WorldWideScience

Sample records for adherens junction integrity

  1. DHT deficiency perturbs the integrity of the rat seminiferous epithelium by disrupting tight and adherens junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wiszniewska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In rats with a DHT deficiency induced by finasteride, morphological changes in the seminiferous epithelium were observed. The structural alterations were manifested by the premature germ cells sloughing into the lumen of seminiferous tubules. The etiology of this disorder could be connected with intercellular junctions disintegration. We showed in the immunohistochemical study the changes in expression of some proteins building tight and adherens junctions. The depression of N-cadherin, β-catenin and occludin immunoexpressions could be the reason for the release of immature germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. However, the observed increase of the immunohistochemical reaction intensity of vinculin, one of the cadherin/catenin complex regulators, could be insufficient to maintain the proper function of adherens junctions. The hormonal imbalance appears to influence the pattern of expression of junctional proteins in the seminiferous epithelium. It could lead to untimely germ cells sloughing, and ultimately could impair fertility. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 1, 62–71

  2. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  3. Fibroblast growth factor signaling potentiates VE-cadherin stability at adherens junctions by regulating SHP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Hatanaka

    Full Text Available The fibroblast growth factor (FGF system plays a critical role in the maintenance of vascular integrity via enhancing the stability of VE-cadherin at adherens junctions. However, the precise molecular mechanism is not well understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the detailed mechanism of FGF regulation of VE-cadherin function that leads to endothelial junction stabilization.In vitro studies demonstrated that the loss of FGF signaling disrupts the VE-cadherin-catenin complex at adherens junctions by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation levels of VE-cadherin. Among protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs known to be involved in the maintenance of the VE-cadherin complex, suppression of FGF signaling reduces SHP2 expression levels and SHP2/VE-cadherin interaction due to accelerated SHP2 protein degradation. Increased endothelial permeability caused by FGF signaling inhibition was rescued by SHP2 overexpression, indicating the critical role of SHP2 in the maintenance of endothelial junction integrity.These results identify FGF-dependent maintenance of SHP2 as an important new mechanism controlling the extent of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating its presence in adherens junctions and endothelial permeability.

  4. Cigarette smoke disrupts the integrity of airway adherens junctions through the aberrant interaction of p120-catenin with the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Basbaum, Carol; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; McNamara, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) containing epithelial cadherin (E-cad) bound to p120-catenin (p120ctn) and β-catenin (β-ctn) play a crucial role in regulating cell–cell adhesion. Cigarette smoke abrogates cell–cell adhesion between epithelial cells by disrupting E-cad, a hallmark of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), yet the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We used an organotypic culture of primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with smoke-concentrated medium (Smk) to establish an essential role for the interaction between p120ctn and the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 (MUC1-CT) in regulating E-cad disruption. Within the first 4 h of smoke exposure, apical MUC1-CT repositioned to the basolateral membrane of pseudo-stratified HBE cells, where it interacted with p120ctn. A time-dependent increase in MUC1-CT/p120ctn complexes occurred in conjunction with a time-dependent dissociation of p120ctn/E-cad/β-ctn complexes, as well as the coordinated degradation of p120ctn and E-cad. Interestingly, Smk induced a similar interaction between MUC1-CT and β-ctn, but this occurred 44 h after MUC1-CT’s initial interaction with p120ctn, and well after the AJs were destroyed. Blocking MUC1-CT’s interaction with p120ctn using a MUC1-CT dominant-negative peptide, PMIP, successfully abolished Smk’s disruptive effects on AJs and recovered apical-basolateral polarity of HBE cells. The MUC1-CT/p120ctn interaction was highly dependent on EGFR/Src/Jnk-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation (TyrP) of MUC1-CT. Accordingly, EGFR, Src or Jnk inhibitors (AG1478, PP2, SP600125, respectively) abrogated Smk-induced MUC1-CT-TyrP, MUC1-CT/p120ctn interaction, AJ disruption, and loss of cellular polarity. Our work identified MUC1-CT and p120ctn as important regulators of epithelial polarity and cell-cell adhesion during a smoke-induced EMT-like process. Novel therapeutics designed to inhibit MUC1-CT/p120ctn complex formation may prevent EMT in the smoker’s airway. PMID

  5. Adherens junction turnover: regulating adhesion through cadherin endocytosis, degradation, and recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanes, Benjamin A.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Adherens junctions are important mediators of intercellular adhesion, but they are not static structures. They are regularly formed, broken, and rearranged in a variety of situations, requiring changes in the amount of cadherins, the main adhesion molecule in adherens junctions, present at the cell surface. Thus, endocytosis, degradation, and recycling of cadherins are crucial for dynamic regulation of adherens junctions and control of intercellular adhesion. In this chapter, we review the involvement of cadherin endocytosis in development and disease. We discuss the various endocytic pathways available to cadherins, the adaptors involved, and the sorting of internalized cadherin for recycling or lysosomal degradation. In addition, we review the regulatory pathways controlling cadherin endocytosis and degradation, including regulation of cadherin endocytosis by catenins, cadherin ubiquitination, and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. Lastly, we discuss the proteolytic cleavage of cadherins at the plasma membrane. PMID:22674073

  6. Adherens junction proteins are expressed in collagen corneal equivalents produced in vitro with human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Giasson, Claude J.; Deschambeault, Alexandre; Carrier, Patrick; Germain, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test whether adherens junction proteins are present in the epithelium and the endothelium of corneal equivalents. Methods Corneal cell types were harvested from human eyes and grown separately. Stromal equivalents were constructed by seeding fibroblasts into a collagen gel on which epithelial and endothelial cells were added on each side. Alternatively, bovine endothelial cells were used. At maturity, sections of stromal equivalents were processed for Masson's trichrome or indirect...

  7. An Autoinhibited Structure of α-Catenin and Its Implications for Vinculin Recruitment to Adherens Junctions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Noboru; Tanaka, Nobutoshi; Abe, Kentaro; Yang, Yoo Jeong; Abbas, Yazan M.; Umitsu, Masataka; Nagar, Bhushan; Bueler, Stephanie A.; Rubinstein, John L.; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    α-Catenin is an actin- and vinculin-binding protein that regulates cell-cell adhesion by interacting with cadherin adhesion receptors through β-catenin, but the mechanisms by which it anchors the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton at adherens junctions remain unclear. Here we determined crystal structures of αE-catenin in the autoinhibited state and the actin-binding domain of αN-catenin. Together with the small-angle x-ray scattering analysis of full-length αN-catenin, we deduced an elongated multidomain assembly of monomeric α-catenin that structurally and functionally couples the vinculin- and actin-binding mechanisms. Cellular and biochemical studies of αE- and αN-catenins show that αE-catenin recruits vinculin to adherens junctions more effectively than αN-catenin, partly because of its higher affinity for actin filaments. We propose a molecular switch mechanism involving multistate conformational changes of α-catenin. This would be driven by actomyosin-generated tension to dynamically regulate the vinculin-assisted linkage between adherens junctions and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23589308

  8. A contractile actomyosin network linked to adherens junctions by Canoe/afadin helps drive convergent extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Jessica K.; Choi, Wangsun; Jung, Kuo-Chen; He, Li; Harris, Nathan J.; Peifer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Integrating individual cell movements to create tissue-level shape change is essential to building an animal. We explored mechanisms of adherens junction (AJ):cytoskeleton linkage and roles of the linkage regulator Canoe/afadin during Drosophila germband extension (GBE), a convergent-extension process elongating the body axis. We found surprising parallels between GBE and a quite different morphogenetic movement, mesoderm apical constriction. Germband cells have an apical actomyosin network undergoing cyclical contractions. These coincide with a novel cell shape change—cell extension along the anterior–posterior (AP) axis. In Canoe's absence, GBE is disrupted. The apical actomyosin network detaches from AJs at AP cell borders, reducing coordination of actomyosin contractility and cell shape change. Normal GBE requires planar polarization of AJs and the cytoskeleton. Canoe loss subtly enhances AJ planar polarity and dramatically increases planar polarity of the apical polarity proteins Bazooka/Par3 and atypical protein kinase C. Changes in Bazooka localization parallel retraction of the actomyosin network. Globally reducing AJ function does not mimic Canoe loss, but many effects are replicated by global actin disruption. Strong dose-sensitive genetic interactions between canoe and bazooka are consistent with them affecting a common process. We propose a model in which an actomyosin network linked at AP AJs by Canoe and coupled to apical polarity proteins regulates convergent extension. PMID:21613546

  9. Visualization of adherent cell monolayers by cryo-electron microscopy: A snapshot of endothelial adherens junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Olivier; Decossas, Marion; Gontier, Etienne; Gerbod-Giannone, Marie-Christine; Lambert, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) allows the visualization of the cell architecture in its native state. We developed a robust solution to adapt cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS) to a monolayer of adherent cells using a functionalized polyacrylamide hydrogel growing substrate. We applied this method to reconstitute an endothelial cell monolayer to visualize the morphology of adherens junctions (AJs) which regulate permeability and integrity of the vascular barrier. The fine morphology and ultrastructure of AJs from cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were analyzed in their native state by using CEMOVIS. Doxycycline and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are known as efficient regulators of endothelial permeability. Doxycycline and S1P treatments both led to a drastic morphological switch from very uneven to standardized 14-17 nm wide AJs over several microns indicative of a better membrane tethering. Repetitive structures were occasionally noticed within the AJ cleft reflecting a local improved structural organization of VE-cadherin molecules. The ultrastructural stabilization of AJs observed upon treatment likely indicates a better adhesion and thus provides structural clues on the mechanism by which these treatments improve the endothelial barrier function. This method was also successfully extended to a thick epithelial barrier model. We expect our strategy to extend the reliable application of CEMOVIS to virtually any adherent cultured cell systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The extracellular architecture of adherens junctions revealed by crystal structures of type I cadherins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Oliver J; Jin, Xiangshu; Hong, Soonjin; Bahna, Fabiana; Ahlsen, Goran; Brasch, Julia; Wu, Yinghao; Vendome, Jeremie; Felsovalyi, Klara; Hampton, Cheri M; Troyanovsky, Regina B; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Frank, Joachim; Troyanovsky, Sergey M; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry

    2011-02-09

    Adherens junctions, which play a central role in intercellular adhesion, comprise clusters of type I classical cadherins that bind via extracellular domains extended from opposing cell surfaces. We show that a molecular layer seen in crystal structures of E- and N-cadherin ectodomains reported here and in a previous C-cadherin structure corresponds to the extracellular architecture of adherens junctions. In all three ectodomain crystals, cadherins dimerize through a trans adhesive interface and are connected by a second, cis, interface. Assemblies formed by E-cadherin ectodomains coated on liposomes also appear to adopt this structure. Fluorescent imaging of junctions formed from wild-type and mutant E-cadherins in cultured cells confirm conclusions derived from structural evidence. Mutations that interfere with the trans interface ablate adhesion, whereas cis interface mutations disrupt stable junction formation. Our observations are consistent with a model for junction assembly involving strong trans and weak cis interactions localized in the ectodomain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interleukin 2 Activates Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Resulting in Destabilization of Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezinski, Lukasz S; Hawiger, Jacek

    2016-10-28

    The pleiotropic cytokine interleukin 2 (IL2) disrupts the blood-brain barrier and alters brain microcirculation, underlying vascular leak syndrome that complicates cancer immunotherapy with IL2. The microvascular effects of IL2 also play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis and other chronic neurological disorders. The mechanism of IL2-induced disruption of brain microcirculation has not been determined previously. We found that both human and murine brain microvascular endothelial cells express constituents of the IL2 receptor complex. Then we established that signaling through this receptor complex leads to activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor κB, resulting in expression of proinflammatory interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. We also discovered that IL2 induces disruption of adherens junctions, concomitant with cytoskeletal reorganization, ultimately leading to increased endothelial cell permeability. IL2-induced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), a constituent of adherens junctions, leads to dissociation of its stabilizing adaptor partners, p120-catenin and β-catenin. Increased phosphorylation of VE-cadherin was also accompanied by a reduction of Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase 2, known to maintain vascular barrier function. These results unravel the mechanism of deleterious effects induced by IL2 on brain microvascular endothelial cells and may inform the development of new measures to improve IL2 cancer immunotherapy, as well as treatments for autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Adherens junction proteins are expressed in collagen corneal equivalents produced in vitro with human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giasson, Claude J; Deschambeault, Alexandre; Carrier, Patrick; Germain, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    To test whether adherens junction proteins are present in the epithelium and the endothelium of corneal equivalents. Corneal cell types were harvested from human eyes and grown separately. Stromal equivalents were constructed by seeding fibroblasts into a collagen gel on which epithelial and endothelial cells were added on each side. Alternatively, bovine endothelial cells were used. At maturity, sections of stromal equivalents were processed for Masson's trichrome or indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies against pan-, N-, or E-cadherins or α- or β-catenins. Alternatively, stromal equivalents were dissected, to separate the proteins from the epithelium, endothelium, and stroma with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Western blots of the transferred proteins exposed to these primary antibodies were detected with chemiluminescence. Native corneas were processed similarly. Three or four layers of epithelial cells reminiscent of the native cornea (basal cuboidal and superficial flatter cells) lay over a stromal construct containing fibroblastic cells under which an endothelium is present. Western blots and indirect immunofluorescence revealed that, similarly to the native cornea, the epithelium reacted positively to antibodies against catenins (α and β) and E-cadherin. The endothelium of corneal constructs, whether of human or bovine origin, reacted mildly to catenins and N-cadherin. This collagen-based corneal equivalent simulated the native cornea. Cells from the epithelial and endothelial layers expressed adherens junction proteins, indicating the presence of cell-cell contacts and the existence of polarized morphology of these layers over corneal equivalents.

  13. CLASP2 interacts with p120-catenin and governs microtubule dynamics at adherens junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Megias, Diego; Epifano, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Classical cadherins and their connections with microtubules (MTs) are emerging as important determinants of cell adhesion. However, the functional relevance of such interactions and the molecular players that contribute to tissue architecture are still emerging. In this paper, we report that the MT...... plus end-binding protein CLASP2 localizes to adherens junctions (AJs) via direct interaction with p120-catenin (p120) in primary basal mouse keratinocytes. Reductions in the levels of p120 or CLASP2 decreased the localization of the other protein to cell-cell contacts and altered AJ dynamics...... and stability. These features were accompanied by decreased MT density and altered MT dynamics at intercellular junction sites. Interestingly, CLASP2 was enriched at the cortex of basal progenitor keratinocytes, in close localization to p120. Our findings suggest the existence of a new mechanism of MT targeting...

  14. Effects of diabetes and cardiopulmonary bypass on expression of adherens junction proteins in human peripheral tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun; Liu, Yuhong; Singh, Arun K; Ehsan, Afshin; Sellke, Nicholas; Liang, Justin; Sellke, Frank W

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the changes in adherens junction proteins, such as vascular endothelial-cadherin and β-catenin, of skeletal muscle and vessels in patients with or without diabetes in the setting of cardiopulmonary bypass and cardiac operation. Skeletal muscle tissue samples were harvested pre- and post-cardiopulmonary bypass from nondiabetic (hemoglobin A1c: 5.4 ± 0.1), controlled diabetic (hemoglobin A1c: 6.3 ± 0.1), and uncontrolled diabetic patients (hemoglobin A1c: 9.6 ± 0.3) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting operation (n = 8 per group). The expression/phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins vascular endothelial-cadherin and β-catenin were assessed by immunoblotting and immuno-histochemistry. Endothelial function of skeletal muscle arterioles was determined by videomicroscopy in response to the vasodilator substance P. The protein expression of total vascular endothelial-cadherin was not changed at baseline or between pre-and post-cardiopulmonary bypass among groups. The pre-cardiopulmonary bypass level of phospho-vascular endothelial-cadherin was found to be significantly increased in the uncontrolled diabetic patients group compared with the nondiabetic or controlled diabetic groups (P cardiopulmonary bypass levels of phospho-vascular endothelial-cadherin were significantly increased compared with pre-cardiopulmonary bypass in all groups (P cardiopulmonary bypass in all 3 groups (P cardiopulmonary bypass in all 3 groups (P cardiopulmonary bypass. The enhanced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial-cadherin and degradation of β-catenin indicate deterioration of these proteins and damage of the cell-cell endothelial junctions, specifically in the diabetic peripheral vessels. These alterations may contribute to the increases in peripheral vascular permeability and endothelial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajenova, Olga, E-mail: o.bazhenova@spbu.ru [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chaika, Nina [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Gapon, Svetlana [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thomas, Peter [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); O’Brien, Stephen [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  16. The adherens junction-associated LIM domain protein Smallish regulates epithelial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beati, Hamze; Peek, Irina; Hordowska, Paulina; Honemann-Capito, Mona; Glashauser, Jade; Renschler, Fabian A; Kakanj, Parisa; Ramrath, Andreas; Leptin, Maria; Luschnig, Stefan; Wiesner, Silke; Wodarz, Andreas

    2018-01-22

    In epithelia, cells adhere to each other in a dynamic fashion, allowing the cells to change their shape and move along each other during morphogenesis. The regulation of adhesion occurs at the belt-shaped adherens junction, the zonula adherens (ZA). Formation of the ZA depends on components of the Par-atypical PKC (Par-aPKC) complex of polarity regulators. We have identified the Lin11, Isl-1, Mec-3 (LIM) protein Smallish (Smash), the orthologue of vertebrate LMO7, as a binding partner of Bazooka/Par-3 (Baz), a core component of the Par-aPKC complex. Smash also binds to Canoe/Afadin and the tyrosine kinase Src42A and localizes to the ZA in a planar polarized fashion. Animals lacking Smash show loss of planar cell polarity (PCP) in the embryonic epidermis and reduced cell bond tension, leading to severe defects during embryonic morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and organs. Overexpression of Smash causes apical constriction of epithelial cells. We propose that Smash is a key regulator of morphogenesis coordinating PCP and actomyosin contractility at the ZA. © 2018 Beati et al.

  17. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  18. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irna Sufiawati

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD. Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  19. Adherens junction distribution mechanisms during cell-cell contact elongation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Goldenberg

    Full Text Available During Drosophila gastrulation, amnioserosa (AS cells flatten and spread as an epithelial sheet. We used AS morphogenesis as a model to investigate how adherens junctions (AJs distribute along elongating cell-cell contacts in vivo. As the contacts elongated, total AJ protein levels increased along their length. However, genetically blocking this AJ addition indicated that it was not essential for maintaining AJ continuity. Implicating other remodeling mechanisms, AJ photobleaching revealed non-directional lateral mobility of AJs along the elongating contacts, as well as local AJ removal from the membranes. Actin stabilization with jasplakinolide reduced AJ redistribution, and live imaging of myosin II along elongating contacts revealed fragmented, expanding and contracting actomyosin networks, suggesting a mechanism for lateral AJ mobility. Actin stabilization also increased total AJ levels, suggesting an inhibition of AJ removal. Implicating AJ removal by endocytosis, clathrin endocytic machinery accumulated at AJs. However, dynamin disruption had no apparent effect on AJs, suggesting the involvement of redundant or dynamin-independent mechanisms. Overall, we propose that new synthesis, lateral diffusion, and endocytosis play overlapping roles to populate elongating cell-cell contacts with evenly distributed AJs in this in vivo system.

  20. Pivotal Role of MUC1 Glycosylation by Cigarette Smoke in Modulating Disruption of Airway Adherens Junctions In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Chen, Yu Ting Feeling; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; McNamara, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke increases the risk of lung cancer by 20-fold and accounts for 87% of lung cancer deaths. In the normal airway, heavily O-glycosylated mucin-1 (MUC1) and adherens junctions (AJs) establish a structural barrier that protects the airway from infectious, inflammatory and noxious stimuli. Smoke disrupts cell-cell adhesion via its damaging effects on the AJ protein, epithelial cadherin (E-cad). Loss of E-cad is a major hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and has been...

  1. Downregulation of blood-brain barrier phenotype by proinflammatory cytokines involves NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation: consequences for interendothelial adherens and tight junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D Rochfort

    Full Text Available Blood-brain barrier (BBB dysfunction is an integral feature of neurological disorders and involves the action of multiple proinflammatory cytokines on the microvascular endothelial cells lining cerebral capillaries. There is still however, considerable ambiguity throughout the scientific literature regarding the mechanistic role(s of cytokines in this context, thereby warranting a comprehensive in vitro investigation into how different cytokines may cause dysregulation of adherens and tight junctions leading to BBB permeabilization.The present study employs human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMvECs to compare/contrast the effects of TNF-α and IL-6 on BBB characteristics ranging from the expression of interendothelial junction proteins (VE-cadherin, occludin and claudin-5 to endothelial monolayer permeability. The contribution of cytokine-induced NADPH oxidase activation to altered barrier phenotype was also investigated.In response to treatment with either TNF-α or IL-6 (0-100 ng/ml, 0-24 hrs, our studies consistently demonstrated significant dose- and time-dependent decreases in the expression of all interendothelial junction proteins examined, in parallel with dose- and time-dependent increases in ROS generation and HBMvEC permeability. Increased expression and co-association of gp91 and p47, pivotal NADPH oxidase subunits, was also observed in response to either cytokine. Finally, cytokine-dependent effects on junctional protein expression, ROS generation and endothelial permeability could all be attenuated to a comparable extent using a range of antioxidant strategies, which included ROS depleting agents (superoxide dismutase, catalase, N-acetylcysteine, apocynin and targeted NADPH oxidase blockade (gp91 and p47 siRNA, NSC23766.A timely and wide-ranging investigation comparing the permeabilizing actions of TNF-α and IL-6 in HBMvECs is presented, in which we demonstrate how either cytokine can similarly downregulate the

  2. A basolateral sorting signal directs ADAM10 to adherens junctions and is required for its function in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild-Bode, Christine; Fellerer, Katrin; Kugler, Johanna; Haass, Christian; Capell, Anja

    2006-08-18

    ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) initiates regulated intramembrane proteolysis by shedding the ectodomain of a number of different substrates. Shedding is followed by subsequent intramembrane proteolysis leading to the liberation of intracellular domains capable of nuclear signaling. ADAM10 substrates have been found at cell-cell contacts and are apparently involved in cell-cell interaction and cell migration. Here we have investigated the cellular mechanism that guides ADAM10 to substrates at cell-cell contacts. We demonstrate that intracellular trafficking of ADAM10 critically requires a novel sorting signal within its cytoplasmic domain. Sequential deletion of the cytoplasmic domain and site-directed mutagenesis suggest that a potential Src homology 3-binding domain is essential for ADAM10 sorting. In a polarized epithelial cell line this motif not only targets ADAM10 to adherens junctions but is also strictly required for ADAM10 function in E-cadherin processing and cell migration.

  3. Leptospira interrogans causes quantitative and morphological disturbances in adherens junctions and other biological groups of proteins in human endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira transmits from animals to humans, causing the zoonotic life-threatening infection called leptospirosis. This infection is reported worldwide with higher risk in tropical regions. Symptoms of leptospirosis range from mild illness to severe illness such as liver damage, kidney failure, respiratory distress, meningitis, and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Invasive species of Leptospira rapidly disseminate to multiple tissues where this bacterium damages host endothelial cells, increasing vascular permeability. Despite the burden in humans and animals, the pathogenic mechanisms of Leptospira infection remain to be elucidated. The pathogenic leptospires adhere to endothelial cells and permeabilize endothelial barriers in vivo and in vitro. In this study, human endothelial cells were infected with the pathogenic L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni or the saprophyte L. biflexa serovar Patoc to investigate morphological changes and other distinctive phenotypes of host cell proteins by fluorescence microscopy. Among those analyzed, 17 proteins from five biological classes demonstrated distinctive phenotypes in morphology and/or signal intensity upon infection with Leptospira. The affected biological groups include: 1) extracellular matrix, 2) intercellular adhesion molecules and cell surface receptors, 3) intracellular proteins, 4) cell-cell junction proteins, and 5) a cytoskeletal protein. Infection with the pathogenic strain most profoundly disturbed the biological structures of adherens junctions (VE-cadherin and catenins) and actin filaments. Our data illuminate morphological disruptions and reduced signals of cell-cell junction proteins and filamentous actin in L. interrogans-infected endothelial cells. In addition, Leptospira infection, regardless of pathogenic status, influenced other host proteins belonging to multiple biological classes. Our data suggest that this zoonotic agent may damage endothelial cells via multiple cascades or pathways

  4. Leptospira interrogans causes quantitative and morphological disturbances in adherens junctions and other biological groups of proteins in human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Sato

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic Leptospira transmits from animals to humans, causing the zoonotic life-threatening infection called leptospirosis. This infection is reported worldwide with higher risk in tropical regions. Symptoms of leptospirosis range from mild illness to severe illness such as liver damage, kidney failure, respiratory distress, meningitis, and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Invasive species of Leptospira rapidly disseminate to multiple tissues where this bacterium damages host endothelial cells, increasing vascular permeability. Despite the burden in humans and animals, the pathogenic mechanisms of Leptospira infection remain to be elucidated. The pathogenic leptospires adhere to endothelial cells and permeabilize endothelial barriers in vivo and in vitro. In this study, human endothelial cells were infected with the pathogenic L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni or the saprophyte L. biflexa serovar Patoc to investigate morphological changes and other distinctive phenotypes of host cell proteins by fluorescence microscopy. Among those analyzed, 17 proteins from five biological classes demonstrated distinctive phenotypes in morphology and/or signal intensity upon infection with Leptospira. The affected biological groups include: 1 extracellular matrix, 2 intercellular adhesion molecules and cell surface receptors, 3 intracellular proteins, 4 cell-cell junction proteins, and 5 a cytoskeletal protein. Infection with the pathogenic strain most profoundly disturbed the biological structures of adherens junctions (VE-cadherin and catenins and actin filaments. Our data illuminate morphological disruptions and reduced signals of cell-cell junction proteins and filamentous actin in L. interrogans-infected endothelial cells. In addition, Leptospira infection, regardless of pathogenic status, influenced other host proteins belonging to multiple biological classes. Our data suggest that this zoonotic agent may damage endothelial cells via multiple cascades or

  5. Adherens junctions and desmosomes are damaged by Entamoeba histolytica: Participation of EhCPADH complex and EhCP112 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Nava, Elizabeth; Cuellar, Patricia; Nava, Porfirio; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Schnoor, Michael; Orozco, Esther; Betanzos, Abigail

    2017-11-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites adhere to epithelium at the cell-cell contact and perturb tight junctions disturbing the transepithelial electrical resistance. Behind tight junctions are the adherens junctions (AJs) that reinforce them and the desmosomes (DSMs) that maintain the epithelium integrity. The damage produced to AJs and DMSs by this parasite is unknown. Here, we studied the effect of the trophozoites, the EhCPADH complex, and the EhCP112 recombinant enzyme (rEhCP112) on AJ and DSM proteins. We found that trophozoites degraded β-cat, E-cad, Dsp l/ll, and Dsg-2 with the participation of EhCPADH and EhCP112. After contact of epithelial cells with trophozoites, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy assays revealed EhCPADH and rEhCP112 at the intercellular space where they colocalised with β-cat, E-cad, Dsp l/ll, and Dsg-2. Moreover, our results suggested that rEhCP112 could be internalised by caveolae and clathrin-coated vesicles. Immunoprecipitation assays showed the interaction of EhCPADH with β-cat and Dsp l/ll. Besides, in vivo assays demonstrated that rEhCP112 concentrates at the cellular borders of the mouse intestine degrading E-cad and Dsp I/II. Our research gives the first clues on the trophozoite attack to AJs and DSMs and point out the role of the EhCPADH and EhCP112 in the multifactorial event of trophozoites virulence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. SPECC1L deficiency results in increased adherens junction stability and reduced cranial neural crest cell delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan R; Olm-Shipman, Adam J; Acevedo, Diana S; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Hall, Everett G; Kosa, Edina; Stumpff, Kelly M; Smith, Guerin J; Pitstick, Lenore; Liao, Eric C; Bjork, Bryan C; Czirok, Andras; Saadi, Irfan

    2016-01-20

    Cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) delaminate from embryonic neural folds and migrate to pharyngeal arches, which give rise to most mid-facial structures. CNCC dysfunction plays a prominent role in the etiology of orofacial clefts, a frequent birth malformation. Heterozygous mutations in SPECC1L have been identified in patients with atypical and syndromic clefts. Here, we report that in SPECC1L-knockdown cultured cells, staining of canonical adherens junction (AJ) components, β-catenin and E-cadherin, was increased, and electron micrographs revealed an apico-basal diffusion of AJs. To understand the role of SPECC1L in craniofacial morphogenesis, we generated a mouse model of Specc1l deficiency. Homozygous mutants were embryonic lethal and showed impaired neural tube closure and CNCC delamination. Staining of AJ proteins was increased in the mutant neural folds. This AJ defect is consistent with impaired CNCC delamination, which requires AJ dissolution. Further, PI3K-AKT signaling was reduced and apoptosis was increased in Specc1l mutants. In vitro, moderate inhibition of PI3K-AKT signaling in wildtype cells was sufficient to cause AJ alterations. Importantly, AJ changes induced by SPECC1L-knockdown were rescued by activating the PI3K-AKT pathway. Together, these data indicate SPECC1L as a novel modulator of PI3K-AKT signaling and AJ biology, required for neural tube closure and CNCC delamination.

  7. The Drosophila afadin homologue Canoe regulates linkage of the actin cytoskeleton to adherens junctions during apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Jessica K; Harris, Nathan J; Slep, Kevin C; Gaul, Ulrike; Peifer, Mark

    2009-07-13

    Cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs) mediate cell adhesion and regulate cell shape change. The nectin-afadin complex also localizes to AJs and links to the cytoskeleton. Mammalian afadin has been suggested to be essential for adhesion and polarity establishment, but its mechanism of action is unclear. In contrast, Drosophila melanogaster's afadin homologue Canoe (Cno) has suggested roles in signal transduction during morphogenesis. We completely removed Cno from embryos, testing these hypotheses. Surprisingly, Cno is not essential for AJ assembly or for AJ maintenance in many tissues. However, morphogenesis is impaired from the start. Apical constriction of mesodermal cells initiates but is not completed. The actomyosin cytoskeleton disconnects from AJs, uncoupling actomyosin constriction and cell shape change. Cno has multiple direct interactions with AJ proteins, but is not a core part of the cadherin-catenin complex. Instead, Cno localizes to AJs by a Rap1- and actin-dependent mechanism. These data suggest that Cno regulates linkage between AJs and the actin cytoskeleton during morphogenesis.

  8. Cadherin-bound beta-catenin feeds into the Wnt pathway upon adherens junctions dissociation: evidence for an intersection between beta-catenin pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonseok Kam

    Full Text Available Beta-catenin is an essential component of two cellular systems: cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJ and the Wnt signaling pathway. A functional or physical connection between these beta-catenin pools has been suggested in previous studies, but not conclusively demonstrated to date. To further examine this intersection, we treated A431 cell colonies with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, which forces rapid and synchronized dissociation of AJ. A combination of immunostaining, time-lapse microscopy using photoactivatable-GFP-tagged beta-catenin, and image analyses indicate that the cadherin-bound pool of beta-catenin, internalized together with E-cadherin, accumulates at the perinuclear endocytic recycling compartment (ERC upon AJ dissociation, and can be translocated into the cell nucleus upon Wnt pathway activation. These results suggest that the ERC may be a site of residence for beta-catenin destined to enter the nucleus, and that dissociation of AJ may influence beta-catenin levels in the ERC, effectively affecting beta-catenin substrate levels available downstream for the Wnt pathway. This intersection provides a mechanism for integrating cell-cell adhesion with Wnt signaling and could be critical in developmental and cancer processes that rely on beta-catenin-dependent gene expression.

  9. Cadherin-Bound β-Catenin Feeds into the Wnt Pathway upon Adherens Junctions Dissociation: Evidence for an Intersection between β-Catenin Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Yoonseok; Quaranta, Vito

    2009-01-01

    β-catenin is an essential component of two cellular systems: cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJ) and the Wnt signaling pathway. A functional or physical connection between these β-catenin pools has been suggested in previous studies, but not conclusively demonstrated to date. To further examine this intersection, we treated A431 cell colonies with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which forces rapid and synchronized dissociation of AJ. A combination of immunostaining, time-lapse microscopy using photoactivatable-GFP-tagged β-catenin, and image analyses indicate that the cadherin-bound pool of β-catenin, internalized together with E-cadherin, accumulates at the perinuclear endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) upon AJ dissociation, and can be translocated into the cell nucleus upon Wnt pathway activation. These results suggest that the ERC may be a site of residence for β-catenin destined to enter the nucleus, and that dissociation of AJ may influence β-catenin levels in the ERC, effectively affecting β-catenin substrate levels available downstream for the Wnt pathway. This intersection provides a mechanism for integrating cell-cell adhesion with Wnt signaling and could be critical in developmental and cancer processes that rely on β-catenin-dependent gene expression. PMID:19238201

  10. Alpha-catenin-dependent recruitment of the centrosomal protein CAP350 to adherens junctions allows epithelial cells to acquire a columnar shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, Maria P; Arjona, Marina; Zurbano, Angel; Formstecher, Etienne; Martinez-Morales, Juan R; Bornens, Michel; Rios, Rosa M

    2015-03-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. How this complex process is controlled at the molecular level is still largely unknown. Here, we report that the centrosomal microtubule (MT)-binding protein CAP350 localises at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. By two-hybrid screening, we identified a direct interaction of CAP350 with the adhesion protein α-catenin that was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Block of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)-mediated cell-cell adhesion or α-catenin depletion prevented CAP350 localisation at cell-cell junctions. Knocking down junction-located CAP350 inhibited the establishment of an apico-basal array of microtubules and impaired the acquisition of columnar shape in Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells grown as polarised epithelia. Furthermore, MDCKII cystogenesis was also defective in junctional CAP350-depleted cells. CAP350-depleted MDCKII cysts were smaller and contained either multiple lumens or no lumen. Membrane polarity was not affected, but cortical microtubule bundles did not properly form. Our results indicate that CAP350 may act as an adaptor between adherens junctions and microtubules, thus regulating epithelial differentiation and contributing to the definition of cell architecture. We also uncover a central role of α-catenin in global cytoskeleton remodelling, in which it acts not only on actin but also on MT reorganisation during epithelial morphogenesis.

  11. Alpha-catenin-dependent recruitment of the centrosomal protein CAP350 to adherens junctions allows epithelial cells to acquire a columnar shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P Gavilan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial morphogenesis involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. How this complex process is controlled at the molecular level is still largely unknown. Here, we report that the centrosomal microtubule (MT-binding protein CAP350 localises at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. By two-hybrid screening, we identified a direct interaction of CAP350 with the adhesion protein α-catenin that was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Block of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion or α-catenin depletion prevented CAP350 localisation at cell-cell junctions. Knocking down junction-located CAP350 inhibited the establishment of an apico-basal array of microtubules and impaired the acquisition of columnar shape in Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII cells grown as polarised epithelia. Furthermore, MDCKII cystogenesis was also defective in junctional CAP350-depleted cells. CAP350-depleted MDCKII cysts were smaller and contained either multiple lumens or no lumen. Membrane polarity was not affected, but cortical microtubule bundles did not properly form. Our results indicate that CAP350 may act as an adaptor between adherens junctions and microtubules, thus regulating epithelial differentiation and contributing to the definition of cell architecture. We also uncover a central role of α-catenin in global cytoskeleton remodelling, in which it acts not only on actin but also on MT reorganisation during epithelial morphogenesis.

  12. Germline stem cells anchored by adherens junctions in the Drosophila ovary niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Chun-Hong; Doan, Chuong; Xie, Ting

    2002-06-07

    How stem cells are recruited to and maintained in their niches is crucial to understanding their regulation and use in regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that DE-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is required for anchoring germline stem cells (GSCs) in their niches in the Drosophila ovary. Two major components of this adhesion process, DE-cadherin and Armadillo/beta-catenin, accumulate at high levels in the junctions between GSCs and cap cells, one of the niche components. Removal of these proteins from GSCs results in stem cell loss. Furthermore, DE-cadherin is required for recruiting GSCs to their niche. Our study demonstrates that anchorage of GSCs in their niche by DE-cadherin-mediated adhesion is important for stem cell maintenance and function.

  13. Genetic deletion of afadin causes hydrocephalus by destruction of adherens junctions in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Adherens junctions (AJs play a role in mechanically connecting adjacent cells to maintain tissue structure, particularly in epithelial cells. The major cell-cell adhesion molecules at AJs are cadherins and nectins. Afadin binds to both nectins and α-catenin and recruits the cadherin-β-catenin complex to the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion site to form AJs. To explore the role of afadin in radial glial and ependymal cells in the brain, we generated mice carrying a nestin-Cre-mediated conditional knockout (cKO of the afadin gene. Newborn afadin-cKO mice developed hydrocephalus and died neonatally. The afadin-cKO brain displayed enlarged lateral ventricles and cerebral aqueduct, resulting from stenosis of the caudal end of the cerebral aqueduct and obliteration of the ventral part of the third ventricle. Afadin deficiency further caused the loss of ependymal cells from the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces. During development, radial glial cells, which terminally differentiate into ependymal cells, scattered from the ventricular zone and were replaced by neurons that eventually covered the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Moreover, the denuded ependymal cells were only occasionally observed in the third ventricle and the cerebral aqueduct of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Afadin was co-localized with nectin-1 and N-cadherin at AJs of radial glial and ependymal cells in the control midbrain, but these proteins were not concentrated at AJs in the afadin-cKO midbrain. Thus, the defects in the afadin-cKO midbrain most likely resulted from the destruction of AJs, because AJs in the midbrain were already established before afadin was genetically deleted. These results indicate that afadin is essential for the maintenance of AJs in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain and is required for normal morphogenesis of the cerebral aqueduct and ventral third ventricle in the midbrain.

  14. CMTM3 (CKLF-Like Marvel Transmembrane Domain 3) Mediates Angiogenesis by Regulating Cell Surface Availability of VE-Cadherin in Endothelial Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrifi, Ihsan; Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Brandt, Maarten; van Dijk, Christian G M; Burgisser, Petra; Zhu, Changbin; Kros, Johan M; Duncker, Dirk J; Cheng, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Decrease in VE-cadherin adherens junctions reduces vascular stability, whereas disruption of adherens junctions is a requirement for neovessel sprouting during angiogenesis. Endocytosis plays a key role in regulating junctional strength by altering bioavailability of cell surface proteins, including VE-cadherin. Identification of new mediators of endothelial endocytosis could enhance our understanding of angiogenesis. Here, we assessed the function of CMTM3 (CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain 3), which we have previously identified as highly expressed in Flk1+ endothelial progenitor cells during embryonic development. Using a 3-dimensional coculture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and pericytes-RFP (red fluorescent protein), we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated CMTM3 silencing in human umbilical vein endothelial cells impairs angiogenesis. In vivo CMTM3 inhibition by morpholino injection in developing zebrafish larvae confirmed that CMTM3 expression is required for vascular sprouting. CMTM3 knockdown in human umbilical vein endothelial cells does not affect proliferation or migration. Intracellular staining demonstrated that CMTM3 colocalizes with early endosome markers EEA1 (early endosome marker 1) and Clathrin+ vesicles and with cytosolic VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Adenovirus-mediated CMTM3 overexpression enhances endothelial endocytosis, shown by an increase in Clathrin+, EEA1+, Rab11+, Rab5+, and Rab7+ vesicles. CMTM3 overexpression enhances, whereas CMTM3 knockdown decreases internalization of cell surface VE-cadherin in vitro. CMTM3 promotes loss of endothelial barrier function in thrombin-induced responses, shown by transendothelial electric resistance measurements in vitro. In this study, we have identified a new regulatory function for CMTM3 in angiogenesis. CMTM3 is involved in VE-cadherin turnover and is a regulator of the cell surface pool of VE-cadherin. Therefore, CMTM3 mediates

  15. Rho1 interacts with p120ctn and alpha-catenin, and regulates cadherin-based adherens junction components in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magie, Craig R; Pinto-Santini, Delia; Parkhurst, Susan M

    2002-08-01

    Rho GTPases are important regulators of cellular behavior through their effects on processes such as cytoskeletal organization. Here we show interactions between Drosophila Rho1 and the adherens junction components alpha-catenin and p120(ctn). We find that while Rho1 protein is present throughout the cell, it accumulates apically, particularly at sites of cadherin-based adherens junctions. Cadherin and catenin localization is disrupted in Rho1 mutants, implicating Rho1 in their regulation. p120(ctn) has recently been suggested to inhibit Rho activity through an unknown mechanism. We find that Rho1 accumulates in response to lowered p120(ctn) activity. Significantly, we find that Rho1 binds directly to alpha-catenin and p120(ctn) in vitro, and these interactions map to distinct surface-exposed regions of the protein not previously assigned functions. In addition, we find that both alpha-catenin and p120(ctn) co-immunoprecipitate with Rho1-containing complexes from embryo lysates. Our observations suggest that alpha-catenin and p120(ctn) are key players in a mechanism of recruiting Rho1 to its sites of action.

  16. Folliculin, the product of the Birt-Hogg-Dube tumor suppressor gene, interacts with the adherens junction protein p0071 to regulate cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug A Medvetz

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome associated with fibrofolliculomas, cystic lung disease, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. In seeking to elucidate the pathogenesis of BHD, we discovered a physical interaction between folliculin (FLCN, the protein product of the BHD gene, and p0071, an armadillo repeat containing protein that localizes to the cytoplasm and to adherens junctions. Adherens junctions are one of the three cell-cell junctions that are essential to the establishment and maintenance of the cellular architecture of all epithelial tissues. Surprisingly, we found that downregulation of FLCN leads to increased cell-cell adhesion in functional cell-based assays and disruption of cell polarity in a three-dimensional lumen-forming assay, both of which are phenocopied by downregulation of p0071. These data indicate that the FLCN-p0071 protein complex is a negative regulator of cell-cell adhesion. We also found that FLCN positively regulates RhoA activity and Rho-associated kinase activity, consistent with the only known function of p0071. Finally, to examine the role of Flcn loss on cell-cell adhesion in vivo, we utilized keratin-14 cre-recombinase (K14-cre to inactivate Flcn in the mouse epidermis. The K14-Cre-Bhd(flox/flox mice have striking delays in eyelid opening, wavy fur, hair loss, and epidermal hyperplasia with increased levels of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 activity. These data support a model in which dysregulation of the FLCN-p0071 interaction leads to alterations in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and RhoA signaling, with broad implications for the role of cell-cell adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of human disease, including emphysema and renal cell carcinoma.

  17. Rearrangements of the Actin Cytoskeleton and E-Cadherin–Based Adherens Junctions Caused by Neoplasic Transformation Change Cell–Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, Jury M.; Gloushankova, Natalya A.

    2009-01-01

    E-cadherin–mediated cell–cell adhesion, which is essential for the maintenance of the architecture and integrity of epithelial tissues, is often lost during carcinoma progression. To better understand the nature of alterations of cell–cell interactions at the early stages of neoplastic evolution of epithelial cells, we examined the line of nontransformed IAR-2 epithelial cells and their descendants, lines of IAR-6-1 epithelial cells transformed with dimethylnitrosamine and IAR1170 cells transformed with N-RasG12D. IAR-6-1 and IAR1170 cells retained E-cadherin, displayed discoid or polygonal morphology, and formed monolayers similar to IAR-2 monolayer. Fluorescence staining, however, showed that in IAR1170 and IAR-6-1 cells the marginal actin bundle, which is typical of nontransformed IAR-2 cells, disappeared, and the continuous adhesion belt (tangential adherens junctions (AJs)) was replaced by radially oriented E-cadherin–based AJs. Time-lapse imaging of IAR-6-1 cells stably transfected with GFP-E-cadherin revealed that AJs in transformed cells are very dynamic and unstable. The regulation of AJ assembly by Rho family small GTPases was different in nontransformed and in transformed IAR epithelial cells. As our experiments with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 and the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin have shown, the formation and maintenance of radial AJs critically depend on myosin II-mediated contractility. Using the RNAi technique for the depletion of mDia1 and loading cells with N17Rac, we established that mDia1 and Rac are involved in the assembly of tangential AJs in nontransformed epithelial cells but not in radial AJs in transformed cells. Neoplastic transformation changed cell–cell interactions, preventing contact paralysis after the establishment of cell–cell contact and promoting dynamic cell–cell adhesion and motile behavior of cells. It is suggested that the disappearance of the marginal actin bundle and rearrangements of AJs may change the

  18. Rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and E-cadherin-based adherens junctions caused by neoplasic transformation change cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayollo, Dmitry V; Zhitnyak, Irina Y; Vasiliev, Jury M; Gloushankova, Natalya A

    2009-11-30

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, which is essential for the maintenance of the architecture and integrity of epithelial tissues, is often lost during carcinoma progression. To better understand the nature of alterations of cell-cell interactions at the early stages of neoplastic evolution of epithelial cells, we examined the line of nontransformed IAR-2 epithelial cells and their descendants, lines of IAR-6-1 epithelial cells transformed with dimethylnitrosamine and IAR1170 cells transformed with N-RasG12D. IAR-6-1 and IAR1170 cells retained E-cadherin, displayed discoid or polygonal morphology, and formed monolayers similar to IAR-2 monolayer. Fluorescence staining, however, showed that in IAR1170 and IAR-6-1 cells the marginal actin bundle, which is typical of nontransformed IAR-2 cells, disappeared, and the continuous adhesion belt (tangential adherens junctions (AJs)) was replaced by radially oriented E-cadherin-based AJs. Time-lapse imaging of IAR-6-1 cells stably transfected with GFP-E-cadherin revealed that AJs in transformed cells are very dynamic and unstable. The regulation of AJ assembly by Rho family small GTPases was different in nontransformed and in transformed IAR epithelial cells. As our experiments with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 and the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin have shown, the formation and maintenance of radial AJs critically depend on myosin II-mediated contractility. Using the RNAi technique for the depletion of mDia1 and loading cells with N17Rac, we established that mDia1 and Rac are involved in the assembly of tangential AJs in nontransformed epithelial cells but not in radial AJs in transformed cells. Neoplastic transformation changed cell-cell interactions, preventing contact paralysis after the establishment of cell-cell contact and promoting dynamic cell-cell adhesion and motile behavior of cells. It is suggested that the disappearance of the marginal actin bundle and rearrangements of AJs may change the adhesive function

  19. Rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and E-cadherin-based adherens junctions caused by neoplasic transformation change cell-cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V Ayollo

    Full Text Available E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, which is essential for the maintenance of the architecture and integrity of epithelial tissues, is often lost during carcinoma progression. To better understand the nature of alterations of cell-cell interactions at the early stages of neoplastic evolution of epithelial cells, we examined the line of nontransformed IAR-2 epithelial cells and their descendants, lines of IAR-6-1 epithelial cells transformed with dimethylnitrosamine and IAR1170 cells transformed with N-RasG12D. IAR-6-1 and IAR1170 cells retained E-cadherin, displayed discoid or polygonal morphology, and formed monolayers similar to IAR-2 monolayer. Fluorescence staining, however, showed that in IAR1170 and IAR-6-1 cells the marginal actin bundle, which is typical of nontransformed IAR-2 cells, disappeared, and the continuous adhesion belt (tangential adherens junctions (AJs was replaced by radially oriented E-cadherin-based AJs. Time-lapse imaging of IAR-6-1 cells stably transfected with GFP-E-cadherin revealed that AJs in transformed cells are very dynamic and unstable. The regulation of AJ assembly by Rho family small GTPases was different in nontransformed and in transformed IAR epithelial cells. As our experiments with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 and the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin have shown, the formation and maintenance of radial AJs critically depend on myosin II-mediated contractility. Using the RNAi technique for the depletion of mDia1 and loading cells with N17Rac, we established that mDia1 and Rac are involved in the assembly of tangential AJs in nontransformed epithelial cells but not in radial AJs in transformed cells. Neoplastic transformation changed cell-cell interactions, preventing contact paralysis after the establishment of cell-cell contact and promoting dynamic cell-cell adhesion and motile behavior of cells. It is suggested that the disappearance of the marginal actin bundle and rearrangements of AJs may change the

  20. 'Special K' and a Loss of Cell-To-Cell Adhesion in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells: Modulation of the Adherens Junction Complex by Ketamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E.; Jin, Tianrong; Siamantouras, Eleftherios; Liu, Issac K-K; Jefferson, Kieran P.; Squires, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a mild hallucinogenic class C drug, is the fastest growing ‘party drug’ used by 16–24 year olds in the UK. As the recreational use of Ketamine increases we are beginning to see the signs of major renal and bladder complications. To date however, we know nothing of a role for Ketamine in modulating both structure and function of the human renal proximal tubule. In the current study we have used an established model cell line for human epithelial cells of the proximal tubule (HK2) to demonstrate that Ketamine evokes early changes in expression of proteins central to the adherens junction complex. Furthermore we use AFM single-cell force spectroscopy to assess if these changes functionally uncouple cells of the proximal tubule ahead of any overt loss in epithelial cell function. Our data suggests that Ketamine (24–48 hrs) produces gross changes in cell morphology and cytoskeletal architecture towards a fibrotic phenotype. These physical changes matched the concentration-dependent (0.1–1 mg/mL) cytotoxic effect of Ketamine and reflect a loss in expression of the key adherens junction proteins epithelial (E)- and neural (N)-cadherin and β-catenin. Down-regulation of protein expression does not involve the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ, nor is it regulated by the usual increase in expression of Slug or Snail, the transcriptional regulators for E-cadherin. However, the loss in E-cadherin can be partially rescued pharmacologically by blocking p38 MAPK using SB203580. These data provide compelling evidence that Ketamine alters epithelial cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-coupling in the proximal kidney via a non-classical pro-fibrotic mechanism and the data provides the first indication that this illicit substance can have major implications on renal function. Understanding Ketamine-induced renal pathology may identify targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:24009666

  1. 'Special k' and a loss of cell-to-cell adhesion in proximal tubule-derived epithelial cells: modulation of the adherens junction complex by ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E; Jin, Tianrong; Siamantouras, Eleftherios; Liu, Issac K-K; Jefferson, Kieran P; Squires, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a mild hallucinogenic class C drug, is the fastest growing 'party drug' used by 16-24 year olds in the UK. As the recreational use of Ketamine increases we are beginning to see the signs of major renal and bladder complications. To date however, we know nothing of a role for Ketamine in modulating both structure and function of the human renal proximal tubule. In the current study we have used an established model cell line for human epithelial cells of the proximal tubule (HK2) to demonstrate that Ketamine evokes early changes in expression of proteins central to the adherens junction complex. Furthermore we use AFM single-cell force spectroscopy to assess if these changes functionally uncouple cells of the proximal tubule ahead of any overt loss in epithelial cell function. Our data suggests that Ketamine (24-48 hrs) produces gross changes in cell morphology and cytoskeletal architecture towards a fibrotic phenotype. These physical changes matched the concentration-dependent (0.1-1 mg/mL) cytotoxic effect of Ketamine and reflect a loss in expression of the key adherens junction proteins epithelial (E)- and neural (N)-cadherin and β-catenin. Down-regulation of protein expression does not involve the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ, nor is it regulated by the usual increase in expression of Slug or Snail, the transcriptional regulators for E-cadherin. However, the loss in E-cadherin can be partially rescued pharmacologically by blocking p38 MAPK using SB203580. These data provide compelling evidence that Ketamine alters epithelial cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-coupling in the proximal kidney via a non-classical pro-fibrotic mechanism and the data provides the first indication that this illicit substance can have major implications on renal function. Understanding Ketamine-induced renal pathology may identify targets for future therapeutic intervention.

  2. 'Special k' and a loss of cell-to-cell adhesion in proximal tubule-derived epithelial cells: modulation of the adherens junction complex by ketamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Hills

    Full Text Available Ketamine, a mild hallucinogenic class C drug, is the fastest growing 'party drug' used by 16-24 year olds in the UK. As the recreational use of Ketamine increases we are beginning to see the signs of major renal and bladder complications. To date however, we know nothing of a role for Ketamine in modulating both structure and function of the human renal proximal tubule. In the current study we have used an established model cell line for human epithelial cells of the proximal tubule (HK2 to demonstrate that Ketamine evokes early changes in expression of proteins central to the adherens junction complex. Furthermore we use AFM single-cell force spectroscopy to assess if these changes functionally uncouple cells of the proximal tubule ahead of any overt loss in epithelial cell function. Our data suggests that Ketamine (24-48 hrs produces gross changes in cell morphology and cytoskeletal architecture towards a fibrotic phenotype. These physical changes matched the concentration-dependent (0.1-1 mg/mL cytotoxic effect of Ketamine and reflect a loss in expression of the key adherens junction proteins epithelial (E- and neural (N-cadherin and β-catenin. Down-regulation of protein expression does not involve the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ, nor is it regulated by the usual increase in expression of Slug or Snail, the transcriptional regulators for E-cadherin. However, the loss in E-cadherin can be partially rescued pharmacologically by blocking p38 MAPK using SB203580. These data provide compelling evidence that Ketamine alters epithelial cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-coupling in the proximal kidney via a non-classical pro-fibrotic mechanism and the data provides the first indication that this illicit substance can have major implications on renal function. Understanding Ketamine-induced renal pathology may identify targets for future therapeutic intervention.

  3. Targeting Fyn in Ras-transformed cells induces F-actin to promote adherens junction-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Sarah E; Hutchens, Kelli A; Denning, Mitchell F

    2015-10-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases (SFK), is an oncogene in murine epidermis and is associated with cell-cell adhesion turnover and induction of cell migration. Additionally, Fyn upregulation has been reported in multiple tumor types, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Introduction of active H-Ras(G12V) into the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line resulted in upregulation of Fyn mRNA (200-fold) and protein, while expression of other SFKs remained unaltered. Transduction of active Ras or Fyn was sufficient to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HaCaT cells. Inhibition of Fyn activity, using siRNA or the clinical SFK inhibitor Dasatinib, increased cell-cell adhesion and rapidly (5-60 min) increased levels of cortical F-actin. Fyn inhibition with siRNA or Dasatinib also induced F-actin in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have elevated Fyn. F-actin co-localized with adherens junction proteins, and Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion could be blocked by Cytochalasin D, indicating that F-actin polymerization was a key initiator of cell-cell adhesion through the adherens junction. Conversely, inhibiting cell-cell adhesion with low Ca(2+) media did not block Dasatinib-induced F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of the Rho effector kinase ROCK blocked Dasatinib-induced F-actin and cell-cell adhesion, implicating relief of Rho GTPase inhibition as a mechanism of Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion. Finally, topical Dasatinib treatment significantly reduced total tumor burden in the SKH1 mouse model of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Together these results identify the promotion of actin-based cell-cell adhesion as a newly described mechanism of action for Dasatinib and suggest that Fyn inhibition may be an effective therapeutic approach in treating cSCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Vinculin potentiates E-cadherin mechanosensing and is recruited to actin-anchored sites within adherens junctions in a myosin II-dependent manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Duc, Q.; Shi, Q.; Blonk, I.; Sonnenberg, A.; Wang, N.; Leckband, D.; de Rooij, J.

    2010-01-01

    Cell surface receptors integrate chemical and mechanical cues to regulate a wide range of biological processes. Integrin complexes are the mechanotransducers between the extracellular matrix and the actomyosin cytoskeleton. By analogy, cadherin complexes may function as mechanosensors at cell-cell

  5. Rearrangements of the Actin Cytoskeleton and E-Cadherin?Based Adherens Junctions Caused by Neoplasic Transformation Change Cell?Cell Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitry V Ayollo; Irina Y Zhitnyak; Vasiliev, Jury M.; Gloushankova, Natalya A.

    2009-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, which is essential for the maintenance of the architecture and integrity of epithelial tissues, is often lost during carcinoma progression. To better understand the nature of alterations of cell-cell interactions at the early stages of neoplastic evolution of epithelial cells, we examined the line of nontransformed IAR-2 epithelial cells and their descendants, lines of IAR-6-1 epithelial cells transformed with dimethylnitrosamine and IAR1170 cells trans...

  6. Development of tight junctions between odontoblasts in early dentinogenesis as revealed by freeze-fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Arana-Chavez, V.E.; Katchburian, Eduardo

    1997-01-01

    Background: Mature odontoblasts possess junctional structures constituted by adherens, gap, and tight junctions. Although adherens and gap junctions appear early between odontoblasts, there is no information on the appearance and development of tight junctions between odontoblasts. in this study, we have examined freeze-fracture replicas of early dentinogenesis to study the development of tight junctions between odontoblasts and to determine whether these junctions are of zonular or macular t...

  7. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhao [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States); Jin, Zhu-Qiu, E-mail: zhu-qiu.jin@sdstate.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC

  8. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT...... of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling....

  9. MicroRNA-210 Suppresses Junction Proteins and Disrupts Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Neonatal Rat Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyi; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Li, Yong; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Lubo

    2017-06-24

    Cerebral edema, primarily caused by disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), is one of the serious complications associated with brain injury in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Our recent study demonstrated that the hypoxic-ischemic (HI) treatment significantly increased microRNA-210 (miR-210) in the neonatal rat brain and inhibition of miR-210 provided neuroprotection in neonatal HI brain injury. The present study aims to determine the role of miR-210 in the regulation of BBB integrity in the developing brain. miR-210 mimic was administered via intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) into the brain of rat pups. Forty-eight hours after the injection, a modified Rice-Vannucci model was conducted to produce HI brain injury. Post-assays included cerebral edema analysis, western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining for serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) leakage. The results showed that miR-210 mimic exacerbated cerebral edema and IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma. In contrast, inhibition of miR-210 with its complementary locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides (miR-210-LNA) significantly reduced cerebral edema and IgG leakage. These findings suggest that miR-210 negatively regulates BBB integrity i n the neonatal brain. Mechanistically, the seed sequences of miR-210 were identified complementary to the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the mRNA transcripts of tight junction protein occludin and adherens junction protein β-catenin, indicating downstream targets of miR-210. This was further validated by in vivo data showing that miR-210 mimic significantly reduced the expression of these junction proteins in rat pup brains. Of importance, miR-210-LNA preserved the expression of junction proteins occludin and β-catenin from neonatal HI insult. Altogether, the present study reveals a novel mechanism of miR-210 in impairing BBB integrity that contributes to cerebral edema formation after neonatal HI insult, and provides new insights in miR-210-LNA

  10. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  11. Inhibition of Rho and Rac geranylgeranylation by atorvastatin is critical for preservation of endothelial junction integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbing Xiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small GTPases (guanosine triphosphate, GTP are involved in many critical cellular processes, including inflammation, proliferation, and migration. GTP loading and isoprenylation are two important post-translational modifications of small GTPases, and are critical for their normal function. In this study, we investigated the role of post-translational modifications of small GTPases in regulating endothelial cell inflammatory responses and junctional integrity. METHODS AND RESULTS: Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs treated with atorvastatin demonstrated significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated IL-6 and IL-8 generation. The inhibitory effect of atorvastatin (Atorva was attenuated by co-treatment with 100 µM mevalonate (MVA or 10 µM geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP, but not by 10 µM farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP. Atorvastatin treatment of HUVECs produced a time-dependent increase in GTP loading of all Rho GTPases, and induced the translocation of small Rho GTPases from the cellular membrane to the cytosol, which was reversed by 100 µM MVA and 10 µM GGPP, but not by 10 µM FPP. Atorvastatin significantly attenuated thrombin-induced HUVECs permeability, increased VE-cadherin targeting to cell junctions, and preserved junction integrity. These effects were partially reversed by GGPP but not by FPP, indicating that geranylgeranylation of small GTPases plays a major role in regulating endothelial junction integrity. Silencing of small GTPases showed that Rho and Rac, but not Cdc42, play central role in HUVECs junction integrity. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our studies show that post-translational modification of small GTPases plays a vital role in regulating endothelial inflammatory response and endothelial junction integrity. Atorvastatin increased GTP loading and inhibited isoprenylation of small GTPases, accompanied by reduced inflammatory response and preserved cellular junction integrity.

  12. Integration of organic based Schottly junctions into crossbar arrays by standard UV lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsia, E.; Tallarida, G.; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B.

    2008-01-01

    organic based Schottky diodes in a crossbar architecture, by standard UV lithography. The proposed integration route features a limited number of process steps and prevents the exposure of the active materials to UV. This approach was developed using poly(3-hexylthiophene) as a model compound...... and was successfully applied to different organic semiconductors. The electrical characteristics of the as prepared junctions reveal the successful patterning and demonstrate the compatibility of the process sequence steps with the organic materials....

  13. A Novel Role of Human Holliday Junction Resolvase GEN1 in the Maintenance of Centrosome Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, M.; Danielsen, Jannie Michaela Rendtlew; Wei, L.-Z.

    2012-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability requires accurate genome replication, repair of DNA damage, and the precise segregation of chromosomes in mitosis. GEN1 possesses Holliday junction resolvase activity in vitro and presumably functions in homology driven repair of DNA double strand breaks...... but not catalytic activity of GEN1 is required for preventing centrosome hyper-amplification, formation of multiple mitotic spindles, and multi-nucleation. Our findings provide novel insight into the biological functions of GEN1 by uncovering an important role of GEN1 in the regulation of centrosome integrity....

  14. MicroRNA Regulation of Endothelial Junction Proteins and Clinical Consequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugang Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular junctions play a critical role in structural connection and signal communication between cells in various tissues. Although there are structural and functional varieties, cellular junctions include tight junctions, adherens junctions, focal adhesion junctions, and tissue specific junctions such as PECAM-1 junctions in endothelial cells (EC, desmosomes in epithelial cells, and hemidesmosomes in EC. Cellular junction dysfunction and deterioration are indicative of clinical diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNA are ~20 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs that play an important role in posttranscriptional regulation for almost all genes. Unsurprisingly, miRNAs regulate junction protein gene expression and control junction structure integrity. In contrast, abnormal miRNA regulation of junction protein gene expression results in abnormal junction structure, causing related diseases. The major components of tight junctions include zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1, claudin-1, claudin-5, and occludin. The miRNA regulation of ZO-1 has been intensively investigated. ZO-1 and other tight junction proteins such as claudin-5 and occludin were positively regulated by miR-126, miR-107, and miR21 in different models. In contrast, ZO-1, claudin-5, and occludin were negatively regulated by miR-181a, miR-98, and miR150. Abnormal tight junction miRNA regulation accompanies cerebral middle artery ischemia, brain trauma, glioma metastasis, and so forth. The major components of adherens junctions include VE-cadherin, β-catenin, plakoglobin, P120, and vinculin. VE-cadherin and β-catenin were regulated by miR-9, miR-99b, miR-181a, and so forth. These regulations directly affect VE-cadherin-β-catenin complex stability and further affect embryo and tumor angiogenesis, vascular development, and so forth. miR-155 and miR-126 have been shown to regulate PECAM-1 and affect neutrophil rolling and EC junction integrity. In focal adhesion junctions, the major components are integrin β4, paxillin

  15. Interleukin-34 restores blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Jin

    Full Text Available Interleukin-34 (IL-34 is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R, and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood-brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood-brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Zonula occludens-1 and -2 regulate apical cell structure and the zonula adherens cytoskeleton in polarized epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Alan S; Van Itallie, Christina M; Anderson, James M

    2012-02-01

    The structure and function of both adherens (AJ) and tight (TJ) junctions are dependent on the cortical actin cytoskeleton. The zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and -2 proteins have context-dependent interactions with both junction types and bind directly to F-actin and other cytoskeletal proteins, suggesting ZO-1 and -2 might regulate cytoskeletal activity at cell junctions. To address this hypothesis, we generated stable Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines depleted of both ZO-1 and -2. Both paracellular permeability and the localization of TJ proteins are disrupted in ZO-1/-2-depleted cells. In addition, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy revealed a significant expansion of the perijunctional actomyosin ring associated with the AJ. These structural changes are accompanied by a recruitment of 1-phosphomyosin light chain and Rho kinase 1, contraction of the actomyosin ring, and expansion of the apical domain. Despite these changes in the apical cytoskeleton, there are no detectable changes in cell polarity, localization of AJ proteins, or the organization of the basal and lateral actin cytoskeleton. We conclude that ZO proteins are required not only for TJ assembly but also for regulating the organization and functional activity of the apical cytoskeleton, particularly the perijunctional actomyosin ring, and we speculate that these activities are relevant both to cellular organization and epithelial morphogenesis.

  17. Integrated genomics and proteomics of the Torpedo californica electric organ: concordance with the mammalian neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mate Suzanne E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During development, the branchial mesoderm of Torpedo californica transdifferentiates into an electric organ capable of generating high voltage discharges to stun fish. The organ contains a high density of cholinergic synapses and has served as a biochemical model for the membrane specialization of myofibers, the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We studied the genome and proteome of the electric organ to gain insight into its composition, to determine if there is concordance with skeletal muscle and the NMJ, and to identify novel synaptic proteins. Results Of 435 proteins identified, 300 mapped to Torpedo cDNA sequences with ≥2 peptides. We identified 14 uncharacterized proteins in the electric organ that are known to play a role in acetylcholine receptor clustering or signal transduction. In addition, two human open reading frames, C1orf123 and C6orf130, showed high sequence similarity to electric organ proteins. Our profile lists several proteins that are highly expressed in skeletal muscle or are muscle specific. Synaptic proteins such as acetylcholinesterase, acetylcholine receptor subunits, and rapsyn were present in the electric organ proteome but absent in the skeletal muscle proteome. Conclusions Our integrated genomic and proteomic analysis supports research describing a muscle-like profile of the organ. We show that it is a repository of NMJ proteins but we present limitations on its use as a comprehensive model of the NMJ. Finally, we identified several proteins that may become candidates for signaling proteins not previously characterized as components of the NMJ.

  18. Integrated genomics and proteomics of the Torpedo californica electric organ: concordance with the mammalian neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background During development, the branchial mesoderm of Torpedo californica transdifferentiates into an electric organ capable of generating high voltage discharges to stun fish. The organ contains a high density of cholinergic synapses and has served as a biochemical model for the membrane specialization of myofibers, the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We studied the genome and proteome of the electric organ to gain insight into its composition, to determine if there is concordance with skeletal muscle and the NMJ, and to identify novel synaptic proteins. Results Of 435 proteins identified, 300 mapped to Torpedo cDNA sequences with ≥2 peptides. We identified 14 uncharacterized proteins in the electric organ that are known to play a role in acetylcholine receptor clustering or signal transduction. In addition, two human open reading frames, C1orf123 and C6orf130, showed high sequence similarity to electric organ proteins. Our profile lists several proteins that are highly expressed in skeletal muscle or are muscle specific. Synaptic proteins such as acetylcholinesterase, acetylcholine receptor subunits, and rapsyn were present in the electric organ proteome but absent in the skeletal muscle proteome. Conclusions Our integrated genomic and proteomic analysis supports research describing a muscle-like profile of the organ. We show that it is a repository of NMJ proteins but we present limitations on its use as a comprehensive model of the NMJ. Finally, we identified several proteins that may become candidates for signaling proteins not previously characterized as components of the NMJ. PMID:21798097

  19. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Alan J; Malek, Gary A; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping; Wu, Judy Z

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al2O2/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ~1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al2O3 tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  20. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Alan J.; Malek, Gary A.; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping; Wu, Judy Z.

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al2O2/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ˜1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al2O3 tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  1. Integrated SiC Super Junction Transistor-Diode Devices for High-Power Motor Control ModulesOoperating at 500 C Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monolithic Integrated SiC Super Junction Transistor-JBS diode (MIDSJT) devices are used to construct 500

  2. Mutational analysis supports a core role for Drosophila α-catenin in adherens junction function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpal, Ritu; Pellikka, Milena; Patel, Ridhdhi R; Hui, Felix Yan Wai; Godt, Dorothea; Tepass, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    α-catenin associates the cadherin-catenin complex with the actin cytoskeleton. α-catenin binds to β-catenin, which links it to the cadherin cytoplasmic tail, and F-actin, but also to a multitude of actin-associated proteins. These interactions suggest a highly complex cadherin-actin interface. Moreover, mammalian αE-catenin has been implicated in a cadherin-independent cytoplasmic function in Arp2/3-dependent actin regulation, and in cell signaling. The function and regulation of individual molecular interactions of α-catenin, in particular during development, are not well understood. We have generated mutations in Drosophila α-Catenin (α-Cat) to investigate α-Catenin function in this model, and to establish a setup for testing α-Catenin-related constructs in α-Cat-null mutant cells in vivo. Our analysis of α-Cat mutants in embryogenesis, imaginal discs and oogenesis reveals defects consistent with a loss of cadherin function. Compromising components of the Arp2/3 complex or its regulator SCAR ameliorate the α-Cat loss-of-function phenotype in embryos but not in ovaries, suggesting negative regulatory interactions between α-Catenin and the Arp2/3 complex in some tissues. We also show that the α-Cat mutant phenotype can be rescued by the expression of a DE-cadherin::α-Catenin fusion protein, which argues against an essential cytosolic, cadherin-independent role of Drosophila α-Catenin.

  3. Robust integration schemes for junction-based modulators in a 200mm CMOS compatible silicon photonic platform (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelag, Bertrand; Abraham, Alexis; Brision, Stéphane; Gindre, Paul; Blampey, Benjamin; Myko, André; Olivier, Segolene; Kopp, Christophe

    2017-05-01

    Silicon photonic is becoming a reality for next generation communication system addressing the increasing needs of HPC (High Performance Computing) systems and datacenters. CMOS compatible photonic platforms are developed in many foundries integrating passive and active devices. The use of existing and qualified microelectronics process guarantees cost efficient and mature photonic technologies. Meanwhile, photonic devices have their own fabrication constraints, not similar to those of cmos devices, which can affect their performances. In this paper, we are addressing the integration of PN junction Mach Zehnder modulator in a 200mm CMOS compatible photonic platform. Implantation based device characteristics are impacted by many process variations among which screening layer thickness, dopant diffusion, implantation mask overlay. CMOS devices are generally quite robust with respect to these processes thanks to dedicated design rules. For photonic devices, the situation is different since, most of the time, doped areas must be carefully located within waveguides and CMOS solutions like self-alignment to the gate cannot be applied. In this work, we present different robust integration solutions for junction-based modulators. A simulation setup has been built in order to optimize of the process conditions. It consist in a Mathlab interface coupling process and device electro-optic simulators in order to run many iterations. Illustrations of modulator characteristic variations with process parameters are done using this simulation setup. Parameters under study are, for instance, X and Y direction lithography shifts, screening oxide and slab thicknesses. A robust process and design approach leading to a pn junction Mach Zehnder modulator insensitive to lithography misalignment is then proposed. Simulation results are compared with experimental datas. Indeed, various modulators have been fabricated with different process conditions and integration schemes. Extensive

  4. Tricellular junctions: how to build junctions at the TRICkiest points of epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Tomohito; Miller, Ann L.

    2017-01-01

    Tricellular contacts are the places where three cells meet. In vertebrate epithelial cells, specialized structures called tricellular tight junctions (tTJs) and tricellular adherens junctions (tAJs) have been identified. tTJs are important for the maintenance of barrier function, and disruption of tTJ proteins contributes to familial deafness. tAJs have recently been attracting the attention of mechanobiologists because these sites are hot spots of epithelial tension. Although the molecular components, regulation, and function of tTJs and tAJs, as well as of invertebrate tricellular junctions, are beginning to be characterized, many questions remain. Here we broadly cover what is known about tricellular junctions, propose a new model for tension transmission at tAJs, and discuss key open questions. PMID:28705832

  5. Characterization of pure boron depositions integrated in silicon diodes for nanometer-deep junction applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarubbi, F.

    2010-01-01

    Doping technologies for formation of ultrashallow and highly-doped p+ junctions are continuously demanded to face the challenges in front-end processing that have emerged due to the aggressive downscaling of vertical dimensions for future semiconductor devices. As an alternative to implantations,

  6. Development of tight junctions between odontoblasts in early dentinogenesis as revealed by freeze-fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana-Chavez, V E; Katchburian, E

    1997-07-01

    Mature odontoblasts possess junctional structures constituted by adherens, gap, and tight junctions. Although adherens and gap junctions appear early between odontoblasts, there is no information on the appearance and development of tight junctions between odontoblasts. In this study, we have examined freeze-fracture replicas of early dentinogenesis to study the development of tight junctions between odontoblasts and to determine whether these junctions are of zonular or macular type. Upper first molar tooth germs of Wistar rats between 1 and 3 days old were fixed in buffered 4% glutaraldehyde/4% formaldehyde and subsequently cryoprotected with cacodylate-buffered glycerol. Freeze-fracture replicas were obtained in a Balzers 301 apparatus, and early stages of dentinogenesis were examined in a Jeol 100 CX II electron microscope. In the stage of early dentine matrix prior to mineralization, odontoblasts exhibit only gap junctions. With the progression of development, the distal plasma membranes of odontoblasts show numerous short tight junctions formed by fused particles and grooves. In the stage of advanced mineralization, branched and continuous rows of fused particles or grooves constitute tight junctions of the focal or macular type. The present study shows that tight junctions of focal or macular type appear on distal plasma membrane of early odontoblasts during differentiation. Formation of tight junctions indicates the establishment of a distal membrane domain and maturation of odontoblasts. These events occur as mantle dentine formation ceases and circumpulpar dentine formation begins.

  7. Membrane integration of in vitro-translated gap junctional proteins: co- and post-translational mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J T; Chen, M; Foote, C I; Nicholson, B J

    1996-03-01

    Connexins (Cx) are protein components of gap junction channels that permit the passage of small molecules between neighboring cells. cDNAs of a large family of connexins have been isolated and sequenced. A gap junction channel consists of two connexons, one from each cell in contact, composed of six connexin subunits. It has been suggested by Musil and coworkers that the oligomerization of formation of a connexon occurs at the level of the trans-Golgi network. In the present study, we initiated an analysis of the early stages of protein synthesis and membrane insertion of Cx32 and Cx26, two connexins that we have demonstrated are co-expressed in the same junctions in hepatocytes. Using an in vitro transcription and a coupled cell-free translation and translocation system, we observed that both Cx32 and Cx26 could insert into microsome membranes co-translationally, producing a topological structure indistinguishable from that in isolated gap junctions. To our surprise, Cx26 could also insert into membranes post-translationally with a native orientation. This post-translational membrane insertion process is dependent on nucleotides but not their hydrolysis. Cx32, on the other hand, could not insert into membranes post-translationally. These disparate properties of Cx32 and Cx26 are not due to the significant difference in the lengths of their C-terminal domains, but rather to their internal amino acid sequences. These observations raise the possibility that there may be another pathway for Cx26 to insert into membranes in cells and this feature may be important for the regulation of its functions. These findings may also lead us to a new approach to reconstitution without detergent extraction.

  8. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed.

  9. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A.; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed. PMID:26226276

  10. Vasculogenesis, angiogenesis and the molecular organisation of endothelial junctions in the early human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Lopa; Babawale, Michael O; Anderson, Mark; Lammiman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by the capacity of endothelial cells to adhere to each other and form new tubes. The presence and role of junctional adhesion molecules during physiological vasculogenesis is unknown. Using ultrastructural and immunocytochemical approaches, we compared the junctional phenotype of developing vessels of the first-trimester human placenta with vessels in the last trimester; the latter include newly formed terminal capillaries and the quiescent vascular bed. First-trimester placental vessels contained the adherens junctional molecules, vascular endothelial cadherin and alpha- and beta-catenin but lacked plakoglobin, the component of fully differentiated adherens junctions. Furthermore, these vessels did not contain the transmembrane tight junctional molecules occludin and claudin-1 and -2. This profile reflects the phenotype of terminal capillaries but differs from large vessels of the full-term placenta. Electron microscopic studies revealed that endothelial tight junctions are present in the first-trimester placenta. Thus, occludin and claudin-1 appear to play no part in the formation of endothelial tight junctions, but are a later requirement. In the early placenta, the predominant growth factor appears to be vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), whilst at term, angiopoietin-1 was present in large vessels, with intense angiopoietin-2 immunofluorescence (and VEGF) located in terminal villous capillaries. Thus, endothelial junctions in the human placenta possess two distinct molecular phenotypes, i.e. stable or dynamic, dependent on maturity and plasticity. These distinct phenotypes may be influenced by the angiopoietins/VEGF present in the placenta. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA–DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumbale, Percy [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology; Williams, Jessica S. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology; Schellenberg, Matthew J. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology; Kunkel, Thomas A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology and Lab. of Molecular Genetics; Williams, R. Scott [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology and Lab. Molecular Genetics

    2013-12-22

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions used by ATP-dependent DNA ligases. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA lesions. Aprataxin (APTX) reverses DNA adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of APTX to RNase-H2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5' ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNase H2 incision. APTX efficiently repairs adenylated RNA–DNA, and acting in an RNA–DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure–function studies of human APTX–RNA–DNA–AMP–Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA–DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are affected by heritable APTX mutations in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1. Together, these results indicate that accumulation of adenylated RNA–DNA may contribute to neurological disease.

  12. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA-DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumbale, Percy; Williams, Jessica S.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions employed by ATP-dependent DNA ligases1,2. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5′-adenylated (5′-AMP) DNA lesions3–6 (Fig. 1a). Aprataxin (Aptx) reverses DNA-adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of Aptx to RNaseH2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5′-ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNaseH2 incision. Aptx efficiently repairs adenylated RNA-DNA, and acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure-function studies of human Aptx/RNA-DNA/AMP/Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA-DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA-binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are impacted by heritable APTX mutations in Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia 1 (AOA1). Together, these results suggest that accumulation of adenylated RNA-DNA may contribute to neurological disease. PMID:24362567

  13. Myofibroblast keratinocyte growth factor reduces tight junctional integrity and increases claudin-2 levels in polarized Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Il; Poulin, Emily J.; Blask, Elliot; Bukhalid, Raghida; Whitehead, Robert H.; Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The colonic epithelium is composed of a polarized monolayer sheathed by a layer of pericryptal myofibroblasts (PCMFs). We mimicked these cellular compartments in vitro to assess the effects of paracrine-acting PCMF-derived factors on tight junction (TJ) integrity, as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). Co-culture with 18Co PCMFs, or basolateral administration of 18Co conditioned medium (CM), significantly reduced TER of polarized Caco-2 cells. Amongst candidate paracrine factors, only keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) reduced Caco-2 TER; basolateral KGF treatment led to time- and concentration-dependent increases in claudin-2 levels. We also demonstrate amphiregulin (AREG), produced largely by Caco-2 cells, increased claudin-2 levels, leading to epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated TER reduction. We propose that colonic epithelial TJ integrity can be modulated by paracrine KGF and autocrine AREG through increased claudin-2 levels. KGF-regulated claudin-2 induction may have implications for inflammatory bowel disease, where both KGF and claudin-2 are upregulated. PMID:22946653

  14. Dexamethasone suppresses JMJD3 gene activation via a putative negative glucocorticoid response element and maintains integrity of tight junctions in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Wonho; Shin, Jee Y; Lee, Jee Y; Jeong, Sangyun; Kim, Won-Sun; Yune, Tae Y; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2017-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) exhibits a highly selective permeability to support the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). The tight junctions in the BBB microvascular endothelial cells seal the paracellular space to prevent diffusion. Thus, disruption of tight junctions results in harmful effects in CNS diseases and injuries. It has recently been demonstrated that glucocorticoids have beneficial effects on maintaining tight junctions in both in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. In the present study, we found that dexamethasone suppresses the expression of JMJD3, a histone H3K27 demethylase, via the recruitment of glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) and nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) to the negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) in the upstream region of JMJD3 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. The decreased JMJD3 gene expression resulted in the suppression of MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 gene activation. Dexamethasone also activated the expression of the claudin 5 and occludin genes. Collectively, dexamethasone attenuated the disruption of the tight junctions in the brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. Therefore, glucocorticoids may help to preserve the integrity of the tight junctions in the BBB via transcriptional and post-translational regulation following CNS diseases and injuries.

  15. Integrating evolutionary game theory into an agent-based model of ductal carcinoma in situ: Role of gap junctions in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekian, Negin; Habibi, Jafar; Zangooei, Mohammad Hossein; Aghakhani, Hojjat

    2016-11-01

    There are many cells with various phenotypic behaviors in cancer interacting with each other. For example, an apoptotic cell may induce apoptosis in adjacent cells. A living cell can also protect cells from undergoing apoptosis and necrosis. These survival and death signals are propagated through interaction pathways between adjacent cells called gap junctions. The function of these signals depends on the cellular context of the cell receiving them. For instance, a receiver cell experiencing a low level of oxygen may interpret a received survival signal as an apoptosis signal. In this study, we examine the effect of these signals on tumor growth. We make an evolutionary game theory component in order to model the signal propagation through gap junctions. The game payoffs are defined as a function of cellular context. Then, the game theory component is integrated into an agent-based model of tumor growth. After that, the integrated model is applied to ductal carcinoma in situ, a type of early stage breast cancer. Different scenarios are explored to observe the impact of the gap junction communication and parameters of the game theory component on cancer progression. We compare these scenarios by using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test succeeds in proving a significant difference between the tumor growth of the model before and after considering the gap junction communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test also proves that the tumor growth significantly depends on the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis. In this study, the gap junction communication is modeled by using evolutionary game theory to illustrate its role at early stage cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ. This work indicates that the gap junction communication and the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis can notably affect cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic forces enable controlled drug delivery by disrupting endothelial cell-cell junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yongzhi; Tong, Sheng; Zhang, Linlin; Sakurai, Yumiko; Myers, David R.; Hong, Lin; Lam, Wilbur A.; Bao, Gang

    2017-06-01

    The vascular endothelium presents a major transport barrier to drug delivery by only allowing selective extravasation of solutes and small molecules. Therefore, enhancing drug transport across the endothelial barrier has to rely on leaky vessels arising from disease states such as pathological angiogenesis and inflammatory response. Here we show that the permeability of vascular endothelium can be increased using an external magnetic field to temporarily disrupt endothelial adherens junctions through internalized iron oxide nanoparticles, activating the paracellular transport pathway and facilitating the local extravasation of circulating substances. This approach provides a physically controlled drug delivery method harnessing the biology of endothelial adherens junction and opens a new avenue for drug delivery in a broad range of biomedical research and therapeutic applications.

  17. Comparison of CT versus MRI measurements of transverse atlantal ligament integrity in craniovertebral junction injuries. Part 1: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Orribo, Luis; Snyder, Laura A; Kalb, Samuel; Elhadi, Ali M; Hsu, Forrest; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Craniovertebral junction (CVJ) injuries complicated by transverse atlantal ligament (TAL) disruption often require surgical stabilization. Measurements based on the atlantodental interval (ADI), atlas lateral diameter (ALD1), and axis lateral diameter (ALD2) may help clinicians identify TAL disruption. This study used CT scanning to evaluate the reliability of these measurements and other variants in the clinical setting. METHODS Patients with CVJ injuries treated at the authors' institution between 2004 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively for demographics, mechanism and location of CVJ injury, classification of injury, treatment, and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score at the time of injury and follow-up. The integrity of the TAL was evaluated using MRI. The ADI, ALD1, and ALD2 were measured on CT to identify TAL disruption indirectly. RESULTS Among the 125 patients identified, 40 (32%) had atlas fractures, 59 (47.2%) odontoid fractures, 31 (24.8%) axis fractures, and 4 (3.2%) occipital condyle fractures. TAL disruption was documented on MRI in 11 cases (8.8%). The average ADI for TAL injury was 1.8 mm (range 0.9-3.9 mm). Nine (81.8%) of the 11 patients with TAL injury had an ADI of less than 3 mm. In 10 patients (90.9%) with TAL injury, overhang of the C-1 lateral masses on C-2 was less than 7 mm. ADI, ALD1, ALD2, ALD1 - ALD2, and ALD1/ALD2 did not correlate with the integrity of the TAL. CONCLUSIONS No current measurement method using CT, including the ADI, ALD1, and ALD2 or their differences or ratios, consistently indicates the integrity of the TAL. A more reliable CT-based criterion is needed to diagnose TAL disruption when MRI is unavailable.

  18. Nanotube junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  19. A critical role of temporoparietal junction in the integration of top-down and bottom-up attentional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Chang, Chi-Fu; Xi, Sisi; Huang, I-Wen; Liu, Zuxiang; Juan, Chi-Hung; Wu, Yanhong; Fan, Jin

    2015-11-01

    Information processing can be biased toward behaviorally relevant and salient stimuli by top-down (goal-directed) and bottom-up (stimulus-driven) attentional control processes respectively. However, the neural basis underlying the integration of these processes is not well understood. We employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) in humans to examine the brain mechanisms underlying the interaction between these two processes. We manipulated the cognitive load involved in top-down processing and stimulus surprise involved in bottom-up processing in a factorial design by combining a majority function task and an oddball paradigm. We found that high cognitive load and high surprise level were associated with prolonged reaction time compared to low cognitive load and low surprise level, with a synergistic interaction effect, which was accompanied by a greater deactivation of bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ). In addition, the TPJ displayed negative functional connectivity with right middle occipital gyrus, which is involved in bottom-up processing (modulated by the interaction effect), and the right frontal eye field (FEF), which is involved in top-down control. The enhanced negative functional connectivity between the TPJ and right FEF was accompanied by a larger behavioral interaction effect across subjects. Application of cathodal tDCS over the right TPJ eliminated the interaction effect. These results suggest that the TPJ plays a critical role in processing bottom-up information for top-down control of attention. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Inactivation of the Odontogenic ameloblast-associated gene affects the integrity of the junctional epithelium and gingival healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazen, R M; Moffatt, P; Ponce, K J; Kuroda, S; Nishio, C; Nanci, A

    2015-09-28

    Odontogenic ameloblast-associated (ODAM) belongs to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein (SCPP) gene cluster. It is expressed by the epithelial ameloblasts during the accrued mineralisation of enamel and by cells of the junctional epithelium (JE), a specialised portion of the gingiva that plays a critical role in periodontal health. In both cases, ODAM localises at the interface between the cells and the tooth surface. It is also present among the cells of the JE, and is distinctively highly expressed in many epithelial tumours. ODAM has been proposed to be a matricellular protein implicated in the adhesion of epithelial cells to tooth surfaces, and possibly in mediating cell status. To gain further understanding of the role of ODAM, we have created an Odam knockout (KO) mouse by deleting coding exons 2-6. Inactivation of the gene was verified by Southern blot, PCR, real-time qPCR and loss of immunostaining for the protein. Young Odam KO mice showed no readily apparent phenotype. No significant differences were observed in enamel volume and density, rod-interrod organisation, and its attrition. However, in older animals, the JE presented some detachment, an increase in inflammatory infiltrate, and apical down-growth. In addition, its regeneration was delayed following a gingivectomy challenge. Our results indicate that inactivation of Odam expression has no dramatic consequence on enamel but the phenotype in older animals replicates some JE changes seen during human periodontal disease. Altogether, our results suggest that ODAM plays a role in maintaining integrity of the JE.

  1. Ensemble clustering of phosphoproteomic data identifies differences in protein interactions and cell-cell junction integrity of HER2-overexpressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberg, Katherine E; Shirure, Venktesh S; Worley, Elizabeth A; George, Steven C; Naegle, Kristen M

    2017-06-19

    Overexpression of HER2, a receptor tyrosine kinase of the ERBB family, in breast cancer is related to increased cancer progression and aggressiveness. A breast epithelial cell model with the single perturbation of HER2 overexpression is capable of replicating the increased aggressiveness of HER2 overexpressing cancers. In previous work, Wolf-Yadlin and colleagues (Wolf-Yadlin et al., Mol. Syst. Biol., 2006, 2) measured the proximal tyrosine phosphorylation dynamics of the parental and HER2 overexpressing cells (24H) in response to EGF. Here, we apply an ensemble clustering approach to dynamic phosphorylation measurements of the two cell models in order to identify signaling events that explain the increased migratory potential of HER2 overexpressing cells. The use of an ensemble approach for identifying relationships within a dataset and how these relationships change across datasets uncovers relationships that cannot be found by the direct comparison of dynamic responses in the two conditions. Of particular note is a drastic change in the clustering of SHC1 phosphorylation (on site Y349) from an EGFR-MAPK module in parental cells to a module consisting of an E-cadherin junction protein phosphorylation site, catenin delta-1 Y228, in HER2 overexpressing (24H) cells. Given the importance of E-cadherin junctions in healthy epithelial wound healing and migration, we chose to test the computationally-derived identification of altered cell junctions and CTNND1:SHC1 relationships. Our cell and molecular biology experiments demonstrate that SHC and CTNND1 interact in an EGF- and HER2-dependent manner and that the cell junctions are phenotypically affected by HER2, breaking down in response to EGF and yet avoiding apoptosis as a result of cell junction loss. The results suggest a mechanism by which HER2 alters the localization of the SHC-MAPK signaling axis and a phenotypic effect on cell junction integrity.

  2. Axonal domain disorganization in Caspr1 and Caspr2 mutant myelinated axons affects neuromuscular junction integrity, leading to muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifetiarova, Julia; Liu, Xi; Taylor, Anna M; Li, Jie; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2017-07-01

    Bidirectional interactions between neurons and myelinating glial cells result in formation of axonal domains along myelinated fibers. Loss of axonal domains leads to detrimental consequences on nerve structure and function, resulting in reduced conductive properties and the diminished ability to reliably transmit signals to the targets they innervate. Thus, impairment of peripheral myelinated axons that project to the surface of muscle fibers and form neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapses leads to muscle dysfunction. The goal of our studies was to determine how altered electrophysiological properties due to axonal domain disorganization lead to muscle pathology, which is relevant to a variety of peripheral neuropathies, demyelinating diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Using conventional Contactin-Associated Protein 1 (Caspr1) and Caspr2 single or double mutants with disrupted paranodal, juxtaparanodal, or both regions, respectively, in peripheral myelinated axons, we correlated defects in NMJ integrity and muscle pathology. Our data show that loss of axonal domains in Caspr1 and Caspr2 single and double mutants primarily alters distal myelinated fibers together with presynaptic terminals, eventually leading to NMJ denervation and reduction in postsynaptic endplate areas. Moreover, reduction in conductive properties of peripheral myelinated fibers together with NMJ disintegration leads to muscle atrophy in Caspr1 mutants or muscle fiber degeneration accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction in Caspr1/Caspr2 double mutants. Together, our data indicate that proper organization of axonal domains in myelinated fibers is critical for optimal propagation of electrical signals, NMJ integrity, and muscle health, and provide insights into a wide range of pathologies that result in reduced nerve conduction leading to muscle atrophy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Silicon nitride tri-layer vertical Y-junction and 3D couplers with arbitrary splitting ratio for photonic integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Kuanping; Pathak, Shibnath; Liu, Guangyao; Feng, Shaoqi; Li, Siwei; Lai, Weicheng; Yoo, S J B

    2017-05-01

    We designed and demonstrated a tri-layer Si3N4/SiO2 photonic integrated circuit capable of vertical interlayer coupling with arbitrary splitting ratios. Based on this multilayer photonic integrated circuit platform with each layer thicknesses of 150 nm, 50 nm, and 150 nm, we designed and simulated the vertical Y-junctions and 3D couplers with arbitrary power splitting ratios between 1:10 and 10:1 and with negligible(< -50 dB) reflection. Based on the design, we fabricated and demonstrated tri-layer vertical Y-junctions with the splitting ratios of 1:1 and 3:2 with excess optical losses of 0.230 dB. Further, we fabricated and demonstrated the 1 × 3 3D couplers with the splitting ratio of 1:1:4 for symmetric structures and variable splitting ratio for asymmetric structures.

  4. Particulate matter air pollution disrupts endothelial cell barrier via calpain-mediated tight junction protein degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ting

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM is a significant risk factor for increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of PM-mediated pathophysiology remains unknown. However, PM is proinflammatory to the endothelium and increases vascular permeability in vitro and in vivo via ROS generation. Objectives We explored the role of tight junction proteins as targets for PM-induced loss of lung endothelial cell (EC barrier integrity and enhanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Methods Changes in human lung EC monolayer permeability were assessed by Transendothelial Electrical Resistance (TER in response to PM challenge (collected from Ft. McHenry Tunnel, Baltimore, MD, particle size >0.1 μm. Biochemical assessment of ROS generation and Ca2+ mobilization were also measured. Results PM exposure induced tight junction protein Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 relocation from the cell periphery, which was accompanied by significant reductions in ZO-1 protein levels but not in adherens junction proteins (VE-cadherin and β-catenin. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM reduced PM-induced ROS generation in ECs, which further prevented TER decreases and atteneuated ZO-1 degradation. PM also mediated intracellular calcium mobilization via the transient receptor potential cation channel M2 (TRPM2, in a ROS-dependent manner with subsequent activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain. PM-activated calpain is responsible for ZO-1 degradation and EC barrier disruption. Overexpression of ZO-1 attenuated PM-induced endothelial barrier disruption and vascular hyperpermeability in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions These results demonstrate that PM induces marked increases in vascular permeability via ROS-mediated calcium leakage via activated TRPM2, and via ZO-1 degradation by activated calpain. These findings support a novel mechanism for PM-induced lung damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  5. Particulate matter air pollution disrupts endothelial cell barrier via calpain-mediated tight junction protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Wang, Lichun; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Lang, Gabriel D; Siegler, Jessica H; Mathew, Biji; Usatyuk, Peter V; Samet, Jonathan M; Geyh, Alison S; Breysse, Patrick N; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Garcia, Joe G N

    2012-08-29

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is a significant risk factor for increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of PM-mediated pathophysiology remains unknown. However, PM is proinflammatory to the endothelium and increases vascular permeability in vitro and in vivo via ROS generation. We explored the role of tight junction proteins as targets for PM-induced loss of lung endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity and enhanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Changes in human lung EC monolayer permeability were assessed by Transendothelial Electrical Resistance (TER) in response to PM challenge (collected from Ft. McHenry Tunnel, Baltimore, MD, particle size >0.1 μm). Biochemical assessment of ROS generation and Ca2+ mobilization were also measured. PM exposure induced tight junction protein Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) relocation from the cell periphery, which was accompanied by significant reductions in ZO-1 protein levels but not in adherens junction proteins (VE-cadherin and β-catenin). N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM) reduced PM-induced ROS generation in ECs, which further prevented TER decreases and atteneuated ZO-1 degradation. PM also mediated intracellular calcium mobilization via the transient receptor potential cation channel M2 (TRPM2), in a ROS-dependent manner with subsequent activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain. PM-activated calpain is responsible for ZO-1 degradation and EC barrier disruption. Overexpression of ZO-1 attenuated PM-induced endothelial barrier disruption and vascular hyperpermeability in vivo and in vitro. These results demonstrate that PM induces marked increases in vascular permeability via ROS-mediated calcium leakage via activated TRPM2, and via ZO-1 degradation by activated calpain. These findings support a novel mechanism for PM-induced lung damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  6. Shallow Junction Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teyin Mark

    Shallow junction technology is a necessity to maintain the performance of the scaled integrated devices in VLSL. In this work, various approaches to the process design of shallow junctions in implantation/diffusion technology are explored. The high concentration shallow arsenic implant/diffusion profile is described by the Chebyshev polynomial model. Based on the model, the inter-relationships of four design parameters: sheet resistance, junction depth, effective surface concentration, and thermal cycle are analytically derived. A general design graph for shallow arsenic junctions is developed. A similar methodology is applied to describe the high concentration boron shallow junctions design. At very high concentration, arsenic clustering and boron precipitation limit the achievable lower bound of sheet resistance. The sheet resistance is experimentally characterized and modeled. The ultimate limitations on sheet resistance due to these effects are defined. Unintentional channeling in low energy ion-implantation of boron into silicon results in much deeper junctions than predicted by LSS theory, even for wafers tilted well off the channeling directions. The channeling tail imposes an unexpected limitation on the achievable shallow junction depth. This partial channeling effect caused by boron ions being randomly scattered into crystal channels is examined by a calculation of the angular spreading for boron ions in silicon. An empirical formula is found to describe the enhancement of junction depth. To prevent the boron channeling, two methods of dechanneling are explored. Dechanneling by surface oxide layers is found to be ineffective. As-implanted junction depths much deeper than the predictions of LSS theory cannot be avoided. Based on a "lucky" ion model, the as-implanted junction depth with the surface oxide can be predicted. Silicon pre-implantation is found very effective in reducing the junction depth. The amorphization process by the silicon pre

  7. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  8. Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  9. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption.

  10. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. HIV-1 Tat protein alter the tight junction integrity and function of retinal pigment epithelium: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Haotian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How HIV-1 enter into the eyes remains obscure. We postulated that HIV-1 Tat protein can alter the expression of specific tight-junction proteins and disturb the blood retinal barrier, and contributes to HIV trafficking into the eyes. This study is to determine the effects of HIV-1 Tat proteins on the barrier function and tight-junction protein expression of retinal pigment epithelial cell (RPE. Methods A human RPE cell line (D407 cultured on microporous filter-supports was used. After treating with HIV-1 Tat protein, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER of confluent RPE cells was measured by epithelial voltmeter. The permeability of the RPE cells to sodium fluorescein was measured. The expressions of the occludin and claudins were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. Activation of ERK1/2 was detected by Western blot analysis with specific antiphospho protein antibodies. NF-κB DNA binding activity was determined by transcription factor assay. Specific pharmacologic inhibitors directed against the MAPKs were used to analyze the signaling involved in barrier destruction of RPE cells exposed to HIV-1 Tat. Results Treating cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells with 100 nM Tat for 24 hours increased the permeability and decreased the TER of the epithelial monolayer. HIV-1 Tat also disrupted and downregulated the tight-junction proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, and claudin-4 in these cells, whereas claudin-2 was upregulated, and the expression of occludin was unaffected. HIV-1 Tat protein also induced activation of ERK1/2 and NF-κB. HIV-1 Tat protein induced barrier destruction, changes in expression of TJs, and activation of ERK1/2 and NF-κB were abrogated by inhibitor of ERK1/2 and NF-κB. Conclusion HIV-1 Tat protein causes increases in the paracellular permeability of RPE cells in vitro concomitant with changes in expression of certain transmembrane

  12. Effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction integrity: in vitro study in a three dimensional intestinal epithelial cell culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaseen Elamin

    ethanol- and acetaldehyde-induced loss of tight junctions integrity.

  13. Y-junctions based on circular depressed-cladding waveguides fabricated with femtosecond pulses in Nd:YAG crystal: A route to integrate complex photonic circuits in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajates, Javier G.; Romero, Carolina; Castillo, Gabriel R.; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.

    2017-10-01

    We have designed and fabricated photonic structures such as, Y-junctions (one of the basic building blocks for construction any integrated photonic devices) and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, based on circular depressed-cladding waveguides by direct femtosecond laser irradiation in Nd:YAG crystal. The waveguides were optically characterized at 633 nm, showing nearly mono-modal behaviour for the selected waveguide radius (9 μm). The effect of the splitting angle in the Y structures was investigated finding a good preservation of the modal profiles up to more than 2°, with 1 dB of additional losses in comparison with straight waveguides. The dependence with polarization of these splitters keeps in a reasonable low level. Our designs pave the way for the fabrication of arbitrarily complex 3D photonic circuits in crystals with cladding waveguides.

  14. Are additive effects of dietary surfactants on intestinal tight junction integrity an overlooked human health risk? - A mixture study on Caco-2 monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Anders; Igra, Annachiara Malin; Sand, Salomon; Ilbäck, Nils Gunnar; Hellenäs, Karl Erik; Rosén, Johan; Aspenström-Fagerlund, Bitte

    2017-08-01

    Surfactants may cause dysfunction of intestinal tight junctions (TJs), which is a common feature of intestinal autoimmune diseases. Effects of dietary surfactants on TJ integrity, measured as trans-epithelial resistance (TEER), were studied in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Cytotoxicity was assessed as apical LDH leakage. Monolayers were apically exposed for 60 min to the dietary surfactants solanine and chaconine (SC, potato glycoalkaloids, 0-0.25 mM), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS, industrial contaminant, 0-0.8 mM), and sucrose monolaurate (SML, food emulsifier E 473, 0-2.0 mM) separately and as a mixture. Dose-response modelling of TEER EC50 showed that SC were 2.7- and 12-fold more potent than PFOS and SML, respectively. The mixture was composed of 1 molar unit SC, 2.7 units PFOS and 12 units SML ("SC TEER equivalent" proportions 1:1:1). Mixture exposure (0-0.05 mM SC equivalents) dose-response modelling suggested additive action on TJ integrity. Increasing SC and SML concentrations caused increased LDH leakage, but PFOS decreased LDH leakage at intermediate exposure concentrations. In the mixture PFOS appeared to protect from extensive SC- and SML-induced LDH leakage. Complex mixtures of surfactants in food may act additively on intestinal TJ integrity, which should be considered in risk assessment of emulsifier authorisation for use in food production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Involvement of YAP, TAZ and HSP90 in contact guidance and intercellular junction formation in corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Krishna Raghunathan

    Full Text Available The extracellular environment possesses a rich milieu of biophysical and biochemical signaling cues that are simultaneously integrated by cells and influence cellular phenotype. Yes-associated protein (YAP and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (WWTR1; TAZ, two important signaling molecules of the Hippo pathway, have been recently implicated as nuclear relays of cytoskeletal changes mediated by substratum rigidity and topography. These proteins intersect with other important intracellular signaling pathways (e.g. Wnt and TGFβ. In the cornea, epithelial cells adhere to the stroma through a 3-dimensional topography-rich basement membrane, with features in the nano-submicron size-scale that are capable of profoundly modulating a wide range of fundamental cell behaviors. The influences of substratum-topography, YAP/TAZ knockdown, and HSP90 inhibition on cell morphology, YAP/TAZ localization, and the expression of TGFβ2 and CTGF, were investigated. The results demonstrate (a that knockdown of TAZ enhances contact guidance in a YAP dependent manner, (b that CTGF is predominantly regulated by YAP and not TAZ, and (c that TGFβ2 is regulated by both YAP and TAZ in these cells. Additionally, inhibition of HSP90 resulted in nuclear localization and subsequent transcriptional-activation of YAP, formation of cell-cell junctions and co-localization of E-cadherin and β-catenin at adherens junctions. Results presented in this study reflect the complexities underlying the molecular relationships between the cytoskeleton, growth factors, heat shock proteins, and co-activators of transcription that impact mechanotransduction. The data reveal the importance of YAP/TAZ on the cell behaviors, and gene and protein expression.

  16. L-Glutamine Enhances Tight Junction Integrity by Activating CaMK Kinase 2-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Zhenlong; Ji, Yun; Sun, Kaiji; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-03-01

    The tight junctions (TJs) are essential for maintenance of the intestinal mucosal barrier integrity. Results of our recent work show that dietary l-glutamine (Gln) supplementation enhances the protein abundance of TJ proteins in the small intestine of piglets. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that Gln regulates TJ integrity through calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase 2 (CaMKK2)-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling which, in turn, contributes to improved intestinal mucosal barrier function. Jejunal enterocytes isolated from a newborn pig were cultured in the presence of 0-2.0 mmol Gln/L for indicated time points. Cell proliferation, monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), paracellular permeability, expression and distribution of TJ proteins, and phosphorylated AMPK were determined. Compared with 0 mmol Gln/L, 2.0 mmol Gln/L enhanced (P < 0.05) cell growth (by 31.9% at 48 h and 11.1% at 60 h). Cells treated with 2 mmol Gln/L increased TEER by 32.2% at 60 h, and decreased (P < 0.05) TJ permeability by 20.3-40.0% at 36-60 h. In addition, 2.0 mmol Gln/L increased (P < 0.05) the abundance of transmembrane proteins, such as occludin, claudin-4, junction adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, and the plaque proteins zonula occludens (ZO)-1, ZO-2, and ZO-3 by 1.8-6 times. In contrast, 0.5 mmol Gln/L had a moderate effect on TJ protein abundance (20.2-70.5%; P < 0.05) of occludin, claudin-3, claudin-4, JAM-A, and ZO-1. 2.0 mmol Gln/L treatment led to a greater distribution of claudin-1, claudin-4, and ZO-1 at plasma membranes compared with 0 mmol Gln/L. This effect of Gln was mediated by the activation of CaMKK2-AMPK signaling, because either depletion of calcium from the medium or the presence of an inhibitor of CaMKK2 abrogated the effect of Gln on epithelial integrity. Our findings indicate that activation of CaMKK2-AMPK signaling by Gln is associated with improved intestinal mucosal

  17. p120-catenin-dependent junctional recruitment of Shroom3 is required for apical constriction during lens pit morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Richard A; Herman, Ken; Reynolds, Albert B; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D; Plageman, Timothy F

    2014-08-01

    Apical constriction (AC) is a widely utilized mechanism of cell shape change whereby epithelial cells transform from a cylindrical to conical shape, which can facilitate morphogenetic movements during embryonic development. Invertebrate epithelial cells undergoing AC depend on the contraction of apical cortex-spanning actomyosin filaments that generate force on the apical junctions and pull them toward the middle of the cell, effectively reducing the apical circumference. A current challenge is to determine whether these mechanisms are conserved in vertebrates and to identify the molecules responsible for linking apical junctions with the AC machinery. Utilizing the developing mouse eye as a model, we have uncovered evidence that lens placode AC may be partially dependent on apically positioned myosin-containing filaments associated with the zonula adherens. In addition we found that, among several junctional components, p120-catenin genetically interacts with Shroom3, a protein required for AC during embryonic morphogenesis. Further analysis revealed that, similar to Shroom3, p120-catenin is required for AC of lens cells. Finally, we determined that p120-catenin functions by recruiting Shroom3 to adherens junctions. Together, these data identify a novel role for p120-catenin during AC and further define the mechanisms required for vertebrate AC. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Shear-induced reorganization of renal proximal tubule cell actin cytoskeleton and apical junctional complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yi; Gotoh, Nanami; Yan, Qingshang; Du, Zhaopeng; Weinstein, Alan M; Wang, Tong; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2008-08-12

    In this study, we demonstrate that fluid shear stress (FSS)-induced actin cytoskeletal reorganization and junctional formation in renal epithelial cells are nearly completely opposite the corresponding changes in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) [Thi MM et al. (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:16483-16488]. Mouse proximal tubule cells (PTCs) were subjected to 5 h of FSS (1 dyn/cm(2)) to investigate the dynamic responses of the cytoskeletal distribution of filamentous actin (F-actin), ZO-1, E-cadherin, vinculin, and paxillin to FSS. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that FSS caused basal stress fiber disruption, more densely distributed peripheral actin bands (DPABs), and the formation of both tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). A dramatic reinforcement of vinculin staining was found at the cell borders as well as the cell interior. These responses were abrogated by the actin-disrupting drug, cytochalasin D. To interpret these results, we propose a "junctional buttressing" model for PTCs in which FSS enables the DPABs, TJs, and AJs to become more tightly connected. In contrast, in the "bumper-car" model for ECs, all junctional connections were severely disrupted by FSS. This "junctional buttressing" model explains why a FSS of only 1/10 of that used in the EC study can cause a similarly dramatic, cytoskeletal response in these tall, cuboidal epithelial cells; and why junctional buttressing between adjacent cells may benefit renal epithelium in maximizing flow-activated, brush border-dependent, transcellular salt and water reabsorption.

  19. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells disrupt bronchial epithelial barrier integrity by targeting tight junctions through IL-13 in asthmatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Steer, Catherine A; Martinez-Gonzalez, Itziar; Altunbulakli, Can; Morita, Hideaki; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Kubo, Terufumi; Wawrzyniak, Paulina; Rückert, Beate; Sudo, Katsuko; Nakae, Susumu; Matsumoto, Kenji; O'Mahony, Liam; Akdis, Mübeccel; Takei, Fumio; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2018-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial barrier leakiness and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) have been separately linked to asthma pathogenesis; however, the influence of ILC2s on the bronchial epithelial barrier has not been investigated previously. We investigated the role of ILC2s in the regulation of bronchial epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and barrier function both in bronchial epithelial cells of asthmatic patients and healthy subjects and general innate lymphoid cell- and ILC2-deficient mice. Cocultures of human ILC2s and bronchial epithelial cells were used to determine transepithelial electrical resistance, paracellular flux, and TJ mRNA and protein expressions. The effect of ILC2s on TJs was examined by using a murine model of IL-33-induced airway inflammation in wild-type, recombination-activating gene 2 (Rag2) -/- , Rag2 -/- Il2rg -/- , and Rora sg/sg mice undergoing bone marrow transplantation to analyze the in vivo relevance of barrier disruption by ILC2s. ILC2s significantly impaired the epithelial barrier, as demonstrated by reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and increased fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran permeability in air-liquid interface cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells. This was in parallel to decreased mRNAs and disrupted protein expression of TJ proteins and was restored by neutralization of IL-13. Intranasal administration of recombinant IL-33 to wild-type and Rag2 -/- mice lacking T and B cells triggered TJ disruption, whereas Rag2 -/- Il2rg -/- and Rora sg/sg mice undergoing bone marrow transplantation that lack ILC2s did not show any barrier leakiness. Direct nasal administration of IL-13 was sufficient to induce deficiency in the TJ barrier in the bronchial epithelium of mice in vivo. These data highlight an essential mechanism in asthma pathogenesis by demonstrating that ILC2s are responsible for bronchial epithelial TJ barrier leakiness through IL-13. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  20. The phenotype of the human materno-fetal endothelial barrier: molecular occupancy of paracellular junctions dictate permeability and angiogenic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Lopa

    2002-06-01

    In vitro models predict that molecular occupancy of endothelial junctions may regulate both barrier function and angiogenesis. Whether this is true in human vascular beds undergoing physiological angiogenesis has not been shown. This review presents data which demonstrate there are two distinct junctional phenotypes, 'activated' and 'stable', present in the vascular tree of the human placenta taken from two distinct highly angiogenic gestational periods (first and last trimester). Stability is conferred by the presence of occludin in tight junctions and plakoglobin in adherens junctions. Their localization may be influenced by vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietins 1 and 2 that have a similar temporal and site-specific differential expression. The junctional phenotypes are reversible, as shown in studies with endothelial cells isolated from placental microvessels and grown in the presence/absence of cAMP-enhancing agents. Reductions in protein levels and loss of junctional localization of adhesion molecules result in increased permeability to macromolecules, whilst up-regulation and re-targeting of these molecules inhibit cell proliferation and increase transendothelial resistance. These studies suggest junctional adhesion molecules can regulate physiological angiogenesis and vascular re-modelling. Moreover, the activated junctional phenotype of placental microvessels allows them to participate in increased growth and proliferation. This junctional immaturity appears to be at the expense of barrier function resulting in sites of maximal materno-fetal solute exchange.

  1. West Nile virus-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier in mice is characterized by the degradation of the junctional complex proteins and increase in multiple matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelsey; Kumar, Mukesh; Lum, Stephanie; Orillo, Beverly; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Verma, Saguna

    2012-06-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) encephalitis is characterized by neuroinflammation, neuronal loss and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. However, the mechanisms associated with the BBB disruption are unclear. Complex interactions between the tight junction proteins (TJP) and the adherens junction proteins (AJP) of the brain microvascular endothelial cells are responsible for maintaining the BBB integrity. Herein, we characterized the relationship between the BBB disruption and expression kinetics of key TJP, AJP and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the mice brain. A dramatic increase in the BBB permeability and extravasation of IgG was observed at later time points of the central nervous system (CNS) infection and did not precede virus-CNS entry. WNV-infected mice exhibited significant reduction in the protein levels of the TJP ZO-1, claudin-1, occludin and JAM-A, and AJP β-catenin and vascular endothelial cadherin, which correlated with increased levels of MMP-1, -3 and -9 and infiltrated leukocytes in the brain. Further, intracranial inoculation of WNV also demonstrated increased extravasation of IgG in the brain, suggesting the role of virus replication in the CNS in BBB disruption. These data suggest that altered expression of junction proteins is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may explain the molecular basis of BBB disruption. We propose that WNV initially enters CNS without altering the BBB integrity and later virus replication in the brain initiates BBB disruption, allowing enhanced infiltration of immune cells and contribute to virus neuroinvasion via the 'Trojan-horse' route. These data further implicate roles of multiple MMPs in the BBB disruption and strategies to interrupt this process may influence the WNV disease outcome.

  2. Expression of JAM-A, AF-6, PAR-3 and PAR-6 during the assembly and remodeling of RPE tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan; Fukuhara, Masayuki; Weitzman, Matthew; Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2006-09-19

    The tight junctions of the endothelial and epithelial regions of the blood-brain barrier are regulated by interactions with the neighboring tissue. We examined how the neural retina regulates the assembly of tight junctions in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The proteins JAM-A, AF-6, PAR-3 and PAR-6 have been implicated in the assembly of other epithelial tight junctions. Using chick embryos and primary cell culture, we examined gene expression of these proteins during embryonic development, and whether retinal secretions regulate their expression. Three highly conserved RNA splice sites of AF-6 were identified in chick ocular tissues, but only two were expressed in RPE. JAM-A and AF-6 were expressed at relatively high levels early in development when adherens junctions form, but before tight junctions form. Expression of JAM-A and the AF-6 isoforms actually decreased when tight junctions were forming and expanding. The expression of PAR-3 and PAR-6 was constant. Despite the expression of these proteins in vitro (along with claudins, occludin, ZO-1 and ZO-2), the tight junctional networks that form were discontinuous (Rahner, C., Fukuhara, M., Peng, S., Kojima, S., Rizzolo, L.J., 2004. The apical and basal environments of the retinal pigment epithelium regulate the maturation of tight junctions during development. J. Cell Sci. 117, 3307-3318). The expression of these assembly proteins was unaffected by a retinal conditioned medium that induced the completion of tight junction formation. These data indicate that the early expression of the assembly proteins corresponds to the initial establishment of the adherens and tight junctions, but secretory products of the neural retina must induce the expression of additional proteins to complete the maturation process.

  3. Integration of Plasmonic Effects and Schottky Junctions into Metal-Organic Framework Composites: Steering Charge Flow for Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Juan-Ding; Han, Lili; Luo, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong; Jiang, Hai-Long

    2018-01-22

    A wide range of light absorption and rapid electron-hole separation are desired for efficient photocatalysis. Herein, on the basis of a semiconductor-like metal-organic framework (MOF), a Pt@MOF/Au catalyst with two types of metal-MOF interfaces integrates the surface plasmon resonance excitation of Au nanorods with a Pt-MOF Schottky junction, which not only extends the light absorption of the MOF from the UV to the visible region but also greatly accelerates charge transfer. The spatial separation of Pt and Au particles by the MOF further steers the formation of charge flow and expedites the charge migration. As a result, the Pt@MOF/Au presents an exceptionally high photocatalytic H 2 production rate by water splitting under visible light irradiation, far superior to Pt/MOF/Au, MOF/Au and other counterparts with similar Pt or Au contents, highlighting the important role of each component and the Pt location in the catalyst. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Acid fibroblast growth factor preserves blood-brain barrier integrity by activating the PI3K-Akt-Rac1 pathway and inhibiting RhoA following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenzan; Chen, Zaifeng; Tang, Chonghui; Zhang, Jinjing; Cheng, Li; Zuo, Hongxia; Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Daqing; Xiang, Liping; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Xinlong; Wei, Xiaojie

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays important roles in the recovery of traumatic brain injury (TBI) which is a major factor contributing to cerebral edema. Acid fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) contributes to maintain vascular integrity and restores nerve function. However, whether aFGF protects BBB following TBI remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether exogenous aFGF preserves BBB integrity by activating the PI3K-Akt-Rac1 pathway and inhibiting RhoA after TBI. BBB permeability was assessed using evans blue dye and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran fluorescence. Neurofunctional tests, such as the garcia test, were conducted in a blinded fashion, and protein expression was evaluated via western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Our results showed that aFGF improved neurofunctional deficits, preserved BBB integrity, and up-regulated tight junction proteins and adherens junction proteins 24 h after experimental TBI. However, the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 reversed the protective effects of aFGF on neurofunctional deficits and junction protein expression and significantly suppressed p-Akt and GTP-Rac1 activity. Furthermore, aFGF administration significantly decreased GTP-RhoA expression in the treated group compared with the vehicle group, while PI3K/Akt inhibition increased GTP-RhoA expression. Similar results were observed in vitro, as aFGF exerted protective effects on endothelial cell integrity by up-regulating junction proteins and PI3K-Akt-Rac1 pathway and down-regulating RhoA expression under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD) conditions. These data suggest that exogenous aFGF reduces RhoA activity in part by activating the PI3K-Akt-Rac1 signaling pathway, thus improving neurofunctional deficits and preserving BBB integrity after TBI.

  5. Occluding junctions of invertebrate epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonusaite, Sima; Donini, Andrew; Kelly, Scott P

    2016-01-01

    Invertebrate diversity and architecture is immense. This is achieved by the organization and function of four tissue types found in most metazoan phyla-epithelial, connective, muscle and nervous tissue. Epithelial tissue is found in all extant animals (parazoan and metazoan alike). Epithelial cells form cellular sheets that cover internal or external surfaces and regulate the passage of material between separated compartments. The transepithelial movement of biological material between compartments can occur across the transcellular pathway (i.e. across cells) or the paracellular pathway (i.e. between cells) and the latter is regulated by occluding junctions that typically link cells in a subapical domain. In this review, information on occluding junctions of invertebrate epithelia is consolidated and discussed in the context of morphology, ultrastructure and physiology. In addition, an overview of what is currently known about invertebrate occluding junction proteins and their role in maintaining the integrity of invertebrate epithelia and regulating the barrier properties of these tissues is presented.

  6. Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out Circuit of Superconducting-Tunnel-Junction Single-Photon-Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuchi, Kenji; et al.

    2015-07-27

    We proposed a new high-resolution single-photon infrared spectrometer for search for radiative decay of cosmic neutrino background (CνB). The superconducting-tunnel-junctions(STJs) are used as a single-photon counting device. Each STJ consists of Nb/Al/AlxOy/Al/Nb layers, and their thicknesses are optimized for the operation temperature at 370 mK cooled by a 3He sorption refrigerator. Our STJs achieved the leak current 250 pA, and the measured data implies that a smaller area STJ fulfills our requirement. FD-SOI MOSFETs are employed to amplify the STJ signal current in order to increase signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). FD-SOI MOSFETs can be operated at cryogenic temperature of 370 mK, which reduces the noise of the signal amplification system. FD-SOI MOSFET characteristics are measured at cryogenic temperature. The Id-Vgs curve shows a sharper turn on with a higher threshold voltage and the Id-Vds curve shows a nonlinear shape in linear region at cryogenic temperature. Taking into account these effects, FD-SOI MOSFETs are available for read-out circuit of STJ detectors. The bias voltage for STJ detectors is 0.4 mV, and it must be well stabilized to deliver high performance. We proposed an FD-SOI MOSFET-based charge integrated amplifier design as a read-out circuit of STJ detectors. The requirements for an operational amplifier used in the amplifier is estimated using SPICE simulation. The op-amp is required to have a fast response (GBW ≥ 100 MHz), and it must have low power dissipation as compared to the cooling power of refrigerator.

  7. Comparison of CT versus MRI measurements of transverse atlantal ligament integrity in craniovertebral junction injuries. Part 2: A new CT-based alternative for assessing transverse ligament integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Orribo, Luis; Kalb, Samuel; Snyder, Laura A; Hsu, Forrest; Malhotra, Devika; Lefevre, Richard D; Elhadi, Ali M; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Theodore, Nicholas; Crawford, Neil R

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The rule of Spence is inaccurate for assessing integrity of the transverse atlantal ligament (TAL). Because CT is quick and easy to perform at most trauma centers, the authors propose a novel sequence of obtaining 2 CT scans to improve the diagnosis of TAL impairment. The sensitivity of a new CT-based method for diagnosing a TAL injury in a cadaveric model was assessed. METHODS Ten human cadaveric occipitocervical specimens were mounted horizontally in a supine posture with wooden inserts attached to the back of the skull to maintain a neutral or flexed (10°) posture. Specimens were scanned in neutral and flexed postures in a total of 4 conditions (3 conditions in each specimen): 1) intact (n = 10); either 2A) after a simulated Jefferson fracture with an intact TAL (n = 5) or 2B) after a TAL disruption with no Jefferson fracture (n = 5); and 3) after TAL disruption and a simulated Jefferson fracture (n = 10). The atlantodental interval (ADI) and cross-sectional canal area were measured. RESULTS From the neutral to the flexed posture, ADI increased an average of 2.5% in intact spines, 6.25% after a Jefferson fracture without TAL disruption, 34% after a TAL disruption without fracture, and 25% after TAL disruption with fracture. The increase in ADI was significant with both TAL disruption and TAL disruption and fracture (p 0.6). Changes in spinal canal area were not significant (p > 0.70). CONCLUSIONS This novel method was more sensitive than the rule of Spence for evaluating the integrity of the TAL on CT and does not increase the risk of further neurological damage.

  8. Desmosomal Molecules In and Out of Adhering Junctions: Normal and Diseased States of Epidermal, Cardiac and Mesenchymally Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pieperhoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes, anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs, and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs, including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions.

  9. Overexpression of galectin-7 in mouse epidermis leads to loss of cell junctions and defective skin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendronneau, Gaëlle; Sanii, Sadaf; Dang, Tien; Deshayes, Frédérique; Delacour, Delphine; Pichard, Evelyne; Advedissian, Tamara; Sidhu, Sukhvinder S; Viguier, Mireille; Magnaldo, Thierry; Poirier, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    The proteins of the galectin family are implicated in many cellular processes, including cell interactions, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. In human and mouse, galectin-7 is almost exclusively expressed in stratified epithelia, notably in the epidermis. Galectin-7 expression is also altered in several human tumors of epithelial origin. This study aimed at dissecting the consequences of galectin-7 overexpression on epidermis structure and functions in vivo. We established transgenic mice specifically overexpressing galectin-7 in the basal epidermal keratinocytes and analyzed the consequences on untreated skin and after UVB irradiation or mechanical injury. The intercellular cohesion of the epidermis is impaired in transgenic animals, with gaps developing between adjacent keratinocytes, associated with loss of adherens junctions. The epidermal architecture is aberrant with perturbations in the multilayered cellular organisation of the tissue, and structural defects in the basement membrane. These transgenic animals displayed a reduced re-epithelialisation potential following superficial wound, due to a defective collective migration of keratinocytes. Finally, a single mild dose of UVB induced an abnormal apoptotic response in the transgenic epidermis. These results indicate that an excess of galectin-7 leads to a destabilisation of adherens junctions associated with defects in epidermal repair. As this phenotype shares similarities with that of galectin-7 null mutant mice, we conclude that a critical level of this protein is required for maintaining proper epidermal homeostasis. This study brings new insight into the mode of action of galectins in normal and pathological situations.

  10. Overexpression of galectin-7 in mouse epidermis leads to loss of cell junctions and defective skin repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Gendronneau

    Full Text Available The proteins of the galectin family are implicated in many cellular processes, including cell interactions, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. In human and mouse, galectin-7 is almost exclusively expressed in stratified epithelia, notably in the epidermis. Galectin-7 expression is also altered in several human tumors of epithelial origin. This study aimed at dissecting the consequences of galectin-7 overexpression on epidermis structure and functions in vivo.We established transgenic mice specifically overexpressing galectin-7 in the basal epidermal keratinocytes and analyzed the consequences on untreated skin and after UVB irradiation or mechanical injury.The intercellular cohesion of the epidermis is impaired in transgenic animals, with gaps developing between adjacent keratinocytes, associated with loss of adherens junctions. The epidermal architecture is aberrant with perturbations in the multilayered cellular organisation of the tissue, and structural defects in the basement membrane. These transgenic animals displayed a reduced re-epithelialisation potential following superficial wound, due to a defective collective migration of keratinocytes. Finally, a single mild dose of UVB induced an abnormal apoptotic response in the transgenic epidermis.These results indicate that an excess of galectin-7 leads to a destabilisation of adherens junctions associated with defects in epidermal repair. As this phenotype shares similarities with that of galectin-7 null mutant mice, we conclude that a critical level of this protein is required for maintaining proper epidermal homeostasis. This study brings new insight into the mode of action of galectins in normal and pathological situations.

  11. Disruption of tight junctions and induction of proinflammatory cytokine responses in colonic epithelial cells by Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming L; Ge, Zhongming; Fox, James G; Schauer, David B

    2006-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of human enterocolitis and is associated with postinfectious complications, including irritable bowel syndrome and Guillain-Barré syndrome. However, the pathogenesis of C. jejuni infection remains poorly understood. Paracellular pathways in intestinal epithelial cells are gated by intercellular junctions (tight junctions and adherens junctions), providing a functional barrier between luminal microbes and host immune cells in the lamina propria. Here we describe alterations in tight junctions in intestinal epithelial monolayers following C. jejuni infection. Apical infection of polarized T84 monolayers caused a time-dependent decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a redistribution of the tight junctional transmembrane protein occludin from an intercellular to an intracellular location. Subcellular fractionation using equilibrium sucrose density gradients demonstrated decreased hyperphosphorylated occludin in lipid rafts, Triton X-100-soluble fractions, and the Triton X-100-insoluble pellet following apical infection. Apical infection with C. jejuni also caused rapid activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Jun N-terminal protein kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and basolateral secretion of the CXC chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). Basolateral infection with C. jejuni caused a more rapid decrease in TER, comparable redistribution of tight-junction proteins, and secretion of more IL-8 than that seen with apical infection. These results suggest that compromised barrier function and increased chemokine expression contribute to the pathogenesis of C. jejuni-induced enterocolitis.

  12. Rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and E-cadherin-based adherens junctions caused by neoplasic transformation change cell-cell interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayollo, Dmitry V; Zhitnyak, Irina Y; Vasiliev, Jury M; Gloushankova, Natalya A

    2009-01-01

    .... To better understand the nature of alterations of cell-cell interactions at the early stages of neoplastic evolution of epithelial cells, we examined the line of nontransformed IAR-2 epithelial cells...

  13. Reduced expression of adherens and gap junction proteins can have a fundamental role in the development of heart failure following cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniele O; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Fernanda P; Silva, Carlos A; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C; Ramos, Simone G; Prado, Cibele M

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac dysfunction and heart failure (HF). The mechanisms implicated in the transition from compensated to decompensated cardiac hypertrophy are not fully understood. This study was aimed to investigate whether alterations in the expression of intercalated disk proteins could contribute to the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to dilated heart development that culminates in HF. Male rats were submitted to abdominal aortic constriction and at 90 days post surgery (dps), three groups were observed: sham-operated animals (controls), animals with hypertrophic hearts (HH) and animals with hypertrophic + dilated hearts (HD). Blood pressure was evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blot and immunofluorescence were performed to desmoglein-2, desmocollin-2, N-cadherin, plakoglobin, Bcatenin, and connexin-43. Cardiac systolic function was evaluated using the Vevo 2100 ultrasound system. Data were considered significant when p b 0.05. Seventy percent of the animals presented with HH and 30% were HD at 90 dps. The blood pressure increased in both groups. The amount of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 expression was increased in both groups and no difference was observed in either group. The expression of N-cadherin, plakoglobin and B-catenin increased in the HHgroup and decreased in the HDgroup; and connexin-43 decreased only in theHDgroup. Therewas no difference between the ejection fraction and fractional shortening at 30 and 60 dps; however, they were decreased in the HD group at 90 dps. We found that while some proteins have increased expression accompanied by the increase in the cell volume associated with preserved systolic cardiac function in theHHgroup, these same proteins had decreased expression evenwithout significant reduction in the cell volume associated with decreased systolic cardiac function in HD group. The increased expression of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 in both the HH and HD groups could work as a protective compensatory mechanism, helping tomaintain the dilated heart.We can hypothesize that inappropriate intercellular mechanical and electrical coupling associated with necrosis and/or apoptosis are important factors contributing to the transition to HF.

  14. The role of apical cell-cell junctions and associated cytoskeleton in mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluysmans, Sophie; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit; Rouaud, Florian; Citi, Sandra

    2017-04-01

    Tissues of multicellular organisms are characterised by several types of specialised cell-cell junctions. In vertebrate epithelia and endothelia, tight and adherens junctions (AJ) play critical roles in barrier and adhesion functions, and are connected to the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The interaction between junctions and the cytoskeleton is crucial for tissue development and physiology, and is involved in the molecular mechanisms governing cell shape, motility, growth and signalling. The machineries which functionally connect tight and AJ to the cytoskeleton comprise proteins which either bind directly to cytoskeletal filaments, or function as adaptors for regulators of the assembly and function of the cytoskeleton. In the last two decades, specific cytoskeleton-associated junctional molecules have been implicated in mechanotransduction, revealing the existence of multimolecular complexes that can sense mechanical cues and translate them into adaptation to tensile forces and biochemical signals. Here, we summarise the current knowledge about the machineries that link tight and AJ to actin filaments and microtubules, and the molecular basis for mechanotransduction at epithelial and endothelial AJ. © 2017 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  16. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative......, and focuses on mechanism, structure/function relations, regimes and mechanisms of transport, some molecular regularities, and some substantial challenges facing the field. Because there are many regimes and mechanisms in transport junctions, we will discuss time scales, geometries, and inelastic scattering...

  17. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Olga J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  18. Prostate cancer cells specifically reorganize epithelial cell-fibroblast communication through proteoglycan and junction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhovskih, Anastasia V; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Klein, George; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2017-01-02

    Microenvironment and stromal fibroblasts are able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation both through secreted signaling molecules and direct cell-cell interactions but molecular mechanisms of these effects remain unclear. In this study, we investigated a role of cell-cell contact-related molecules (protein ECM components, proteoglycans (PGs) and junction-related molecules) in intercellular communications between the human TERT immortalized fibroblasts (BjTERT fibroblasts) and normal (PNT2) or cancer (LNCaP, PC3, DU145) prostate epithelial cells. It was shown that BjTERT-PNT2 cell coculture resulted in significant decrease of both BjTERT and PNT2 proliferation rates and reorganization of transcriptional activity of cell-cell contact-related genes in both cell types. Immunocytochemical staining revealed redistribution of DCN and LUM in PNT2 cells and significant increase of SDC1 at the intercellular contact zones between BjTERT and PNT2 cells, suggesting active involvement of the PGs in cell-cell contacts and contact inhibition of cell proliferation. Unlike to PNT2 cells, PC3 cells did not respond to BjTERT in terms of PGs expression, moderately increased transcriptional activity of junctions-related genes (especially tight junction) and failed to establish PC3-BjTERT contacts. At the same time, PC3 cells significantly down-regulated junctions-related genes (especially focal adhesions and adherens junctions) in BjTERT fibroblasts resulting in visible preference for homotypic PC3-PC3 over heterotypic PC3-BjTERT contacts and autonomous growth of PC3 clones. Taken together, the results demonstrate that an instructing role of fibroblasts to normal prostate epithelial cells is revoked by cancer cells through deregulation of proteoglycans and junction molecules expression and overall disorganization of fibroblast-cancer cell communication.

  19. The role of Rap1 in cell-cell junction formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, M.R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Both epithelial and endothelial cells form cell-cell junctions at the cell-cell contacts to maintain tissue integrity. Proper regulation of cell-cell junctions is required for the organisation of the tissue and to prevent leakage of blood vessels. In endothelial cells, the cell-cell junctions are

  20. Functional tight junction barrier localizes in the second layer of the stratum granulosum of human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazue; Yokouchi, Mariko; Nagao, Keisuke; Ishii, Ken; Amagai, Masayuki; Kubo, Akiharu

    2013-08-01

    Mammalian epidermis has two diffusion barriers, the stratum corneum (SC) and tight junctions (TJs). We reported previously that a single living cell layer exists between the SC and TJ-forming keratinocytes in mice; however, the exact location of the TJ barrier in human epidermis has not been defined. To investigate the precise distribution of epidermal TJs in relation to various cell-cell junction proteins and the SC and to clarify the barrier function of TJs against macromolecules in human skin. The localization of various junctional proteins was investigated in human skin sections and in the roofs of bullae formed by ex vivo exfoliative toxin (ET) treatment in three dimensions. ET and single-chain variable fragments (scFv) against desmoglein 1 were used as large diffusion probes. Human stratum granulosum (SG) cells have a distinct distribution of TJ, adherens junction, and desmosome proteins in the uppermost three layers (SG1-SG3 from the surface inward). Ex vivo injection of ET or scFv demonstrated that only SG2-SG2 junctions function as a TJ barrier, limiting the inside-out diffusion of these proteins. The roofs of bullae formed by ex vivo ET treatment consisted of SC, SG1 cells, and TJ-forming SG2 cells, probably mimicking bulla formation in bullous impetigo. Human epidermis has three SG cell layers with distinct properties just beneath the SC, of which only SG2 cells have functional TJs. Our results suggest that human epidermal TJs between SG2 cells form a paracellular diffusion barrier against soluble proteins, including immunoglobulins and bacterial toxins. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms.

  2. Integrated strong cation-exchange hybrid monolith coupled with capillary zone electrophoresis and simultaneous dynamic pH junction for large-volume proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Yan, Xiaojing; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-06-01

    A sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange (SCX) monolith was synthesized at the proximal end of a capillary zone electrophoresis column and used for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample preconcentration. Sample was prepared in an acidic buffer and deposited onto the SCX-SPE monolith and eluted using a basic buffer. Electrophoresis was performed in an acidic buffer. This combination of buffers results in formation of a dynamic pH junction, which allows use of relatively large elution buffer volume while maintaining peak efficiency and resolution. All experiments were performed with a 50 µm ID capillary, a 1cm long SCX-SPE monolith, a 60cm long separation capillary, and a electrokinetically pumped nanospray interface. The volume of the capillary is 1.1 µL. By loading 21 µL of a 1×10(-7) M angiotensin II solution, an enrichment factor of 3000 compared to standard electrokinetic injection was achieved on this platform while retaining efficient electrophoretic performance (N=44,000 plates). The loading capacity of the sulfonate SCX hybrid monolith was determined to be ~15 pmol by frontal analysis with 10(-5) M angiotensin II. The system was also applied to the analysis of a 10(-4) mg/mL bovine serum albumin tryptic digest; the protein coverage was 12% and 11 peptides were identified. Finally, by loading 5.5 µL of a 10(-3) mg/mL E. coli digest, 109 proteins and 271 peptides were identified in a 20 min separation; the median separation efficiency generated by these peptides was 25,000 theoretical plates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hong Kao

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa (EB encompasses a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses, characterized by fragility and blistering of the skin, often associated with extracutaneous manifestations. The level of vesiculation within the skin defines 3 major subtypes of EB: EB simplex, junctional EB, and dystrophic EB. We present the case of a male neonate of 36 weeks' gestation, who was born with a few blisters with erosions and who rapidly developed extensive blistering of the skin. Histopathology revealed subepidermal blistering. Electron microscopy confirmed the cleavage of epidermis from dermis within the lamina lucida. Junctional EB was the diagnosis. The patient was discharged after hospitalization for 28 days. The development of new blisters with erosions were gradually improved after AQUACEL® Ag dressing, and the general condition was much better than at admission. The patient likely has a subtype of junctional EB termed generalized atrophic benign EB that clinically improves with age. He has the potential to father children and has a normal life expectancy.

  4. Tunable Nitride Josephson Junctions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Henry, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lewis, Rupert M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolfley, Steven L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brunke, Lyle Brent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolak, Matthaeus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    We have developed an ambient temperature, SiO2/Si wafer - scale process for Josephson junctions based on Nb electrodes and Ta x N barriers with tunable electronic properties. The films are fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The electronic properties of the TaxN barriers are controlled by adjusting the nitrogen flow during sputtering. This technology offers a scalable alternative to the more traditional junctions based on AlOx barriers for low - power, high - performance computing.

  5. Characterization of cytoskeletal and junctional proteins expressed by cells cultured from human arachnoid granulation tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Bhavya C

    2005-10-01

    the in vitro culture of arachnoidal cells grown from human AG tissue. We demonstrated that these cells in vitro continue to express some of the cytoskeletal and junctional proteins characterized previously in human AG tissue, such as proteins involved in the formation of gap junctions, desmosomes, epithelial specific adherens junctions, as well as tight junctions. These junctional proteins in particular may be important in allowing these arachnoidal cells to regulate CSF outflow.

  6. An unusual junctional scotoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, Dan; LeHoang, Phuc

    2002-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with painful unilateral left visual loss, impaired color vision, left afferent pupillary defect, and normal ocular fundus. Although optic neuritis was first suspected, visual fields disclosed a junctional scotoma related to chiasmal demyelination, due to a probable multiple sclerosis.

  7. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  8. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  9. Building a Six-Junction Inverted Metamorphic Concentrator Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Steiner, Myles A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jain, Nikhil [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schulte, Kevin L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); France, Ryan M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McMahon, William E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Perl, Emmett [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Friedman, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-02

    We propose practical six-junction (6J) inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) concentrator solar cell designs with the potential to exceed 50% efficiency using moderately high quality junction materials. We demonstrate the top three junctions and their monolithic integration lattice matched to GaAs using 2.1-eV AlGaInP, 1.7-eV AlGaAs or GaInAsP, and 1.4-eV GaAs with external radiative efficiencies >0.1%. We demonstrate tunnel junctions with peak tunneling current >400 A/cm2 that are transparent to <2.1-eV light. We compare the bottom three GaInAs(p) junctions with bandgaps of 1.2, 1.0, and 0.7 eV grown on InP and transparent metamorphic grades with low dislocation densities. The solution to an integration challenge resulting from Zn diffusion in the GaAs junction is illustrated in a five-junction IMM. Excellent 1-sun performance is demonstrated in a complete 6J IMM device with VOC = 5.15 V, and a promising pathway toward >50% efficiency at high concentrations is presented.

  10. Fluxon propagation and Fiske steps in long Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erné, S. N.; Ferrigno, A.; Parmentier, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    ) model. Resonant propagating configurations corresponding to the first and third Fiske steps are found. The fundamental frequencies and power levels of the radiation emitted from one end when the junction is biased on the first and third Fiske steps and on the first zero-field step are comparable......The dynamical behavior of fluxons propagating in the presence of an applied magnetic field on an overlap-geometry Josephson tunnel junction of length 5λJ having a McCumber βc=5π is studied by numerical integration of the circuit equations of a 50-section lumped RSJ-type (resistive shunted junction...

  11. N p n bipolar-junction-transistor detector with integrated p n p biasing transistor—feasibility study, design and first experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzellesi, Giovanni; Bergamini, Davide; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Piemonte, Claudio; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Bettarini, Stefano; Batignani, Giovanni

    2006-02-01

    We propose a novel n-p-n BJT radiation detector on high-resistivity silicon with integrated p-n-p transistor providing the quiescent base current of the detector. The dc operational limits of the proposed detector are analysed by means of numerical device simulations, pointing out that, by properly distancing the base of the p-n-p transistor from the emitter of the n-p-n detector, the latch-up of the parasitic thyristor embedded within the detector-plus-biasing-transistor structure takes place at relatively high current levels, where detector operation should anyway be avoided in order to prevent the associated current-gain loss. Numerical simulations provides insight about the bias dependence of charge-collection waveforms, indicating that minimization of the collecting time requires the detector quiescent current to be adjusted at the highest value still allowing high-injection effects to be avoided. A small-signal equivalent circuit of the proposed structure is also derived, allowing the impact of p-n-p biasing transistor and load resistance on the charge-collecting time constant to be evaluated. First experimental results show that fabricated structures are immune from the latch-up of the parasitic thyristor throughout their high-current-gain operating region and feature a minimum charge-collecting time constant of 35 µs, as tested by pulsed laser illumination.

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of germanium junctions for multi-junction solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, T.; Faucher, J.; Lee, M. L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth and device characteristics of Ge solar cells. Integrating a Ge bottom cell beneath a lattice-matched triple junction stack grown by MBE could enable ultra-high efficiencies without metamorphic growth or wafer bonding. However, a diffused junction cannot be readily formed in Ge by MBE due to the low sticking coefficient of group-V molecules on Ge surfaces. We therefore realized Ge junctions by growth of homo-epitaxial n-Ge on p-Ge wafers within a standard III-V MBE system. We then fabricated Ge solar cells, finding growth temperature and post-growth annealing to be key factors for achieving high efficiency. Open-circuit voltage and fill factor values of ~0.175 V and ~0.59 without a window layer were obtained, both of which are comparable to diffused Ge junctions formed by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. We also demonstrate growth of high-quality, single-domain GaAs on the Ge junction, as needed for subsequent growth of III-V subcells, and that the surface passivation afforded by the GaAs layer slightly improves the Ge cell performance.

  13. Carbon nanotube Y-junctions for Nanoscale Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaru, Prabhakar; Daraio, Chiara; Jin, Sungho; Rao, Apparao

    2006-03-01

    Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based electronics offer significant potential, as a nanoscale alternative to silicon based devices, for novel molecular electronics technologies. To realize truly nanoelectronic architecture, it is desirable to have a fully integrated nanotube based technology, where both devices and interconnects are based on CNTs. With this aim in mind, we report on the electrical properties of CNT based Y-junctions. The carrier delocalization and the inevitable presence of catalyst particles, introduced during growth, at the junction region induce a net charge and scattering which can be exploited in constructing electronic devices. We have assembled and electrically characterized the DC resistance and the AC impedance of several Y-junction devices^2 with possibilities for switching and transistor related applications. These experiments alert us to the vast potentialities of Y-junction devices in the development of nanoelectronic components including inverters, logic gates, and frequency mixers. An electrical impedance model of a MWNT Y-junction will be presented which will help gain an understanding of the current transport mechanisms in these nanostructures. 1. P. Bandaru et al, ``Novel electrical switching behavior and logic in carbon nanotube Y-junctions'', Nature Materials, vol. 4(9), 663-666, (2005) 2. N. Gothard, et al. ``Controlled growth of Y-junction nanotubes using Ti-doped vapor catalyst'', Nanoletters 4, 213-217 (2004).

  14. Cementoenamel junction: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharidi Laxman Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The location and nature of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ are more than descriptive terms used simply to describe some aspects of tooth morphology; however, CEJ gains a lot of clinical significance due to various measurements dependent on it. It may be necessary to determine the location and pathological changes occurring at CEJ to make a diagnosis and treat diseases pertaining to epithelial attachment and gingival margin. However, the information related to CEJ is not discussed commonly. Hence, the present review paper provides an insight on CEJ in both primary and permanent dentition.

  15. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. Torres-Flores

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells.

  16. Changes of junctions of endothelial cells in coronary sclerosis: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zi Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular diseases, has been a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality in the United States and it has been on the rise globally. Endothelial cell–cell junctions are critical for vascular integrity and maintenance of vascular function. Endothelial cell junctions dysfunction is the onset step of future coronary events and coronary artery disease. Keywords: Coronary atherosclerosis, Junctions, Endothelial cells

  17. Topological Properties of Superconducting Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikulin, D.I.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    Motivated by recent developments in the field of one-dimensional topological superconductors, we investigate the topological properties of s-matrix of generic superconducting junctions where dimension should not play any role. We argue that for a finite junction the s-matrix is always topologically

  18. Mechanics of lithographically defined break junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouwe, SAG; van der Giessen, E; van der Molen, SJ; Dulic, D; Trouwborst, ML; van Wees, BJ

    We investigate the mechanics of lithographically defined mechanically controllable break junctions, both theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the relationship between controlled deflection and junction opening depends on the details of the break junction geometry. As a result the

  19. Mutations with pathogenic potential in proteins located in or at the composite junctions of the intercalated disk connecting mammalian cardiomyocytes: a reference thesaurus for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies and for Naxos and Carvajal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickelt, Steffen; Pieperhoff, Sebastian

    2012-05-01

    In the past decade, an avalanche of findings and reports has correlated arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathies (ARVC) and Naxos and Carvajal diseases with certain mutations in protein constituents of the special junctions connecting the polar regions (intercalated disks) of mature mammalian cardiomyocytes. These molecules, apparently together with some specific cytoskeletal proteins, are components of (or interact with) composite junctions. Composite junctions contain the amalgamated fusion products of the molecules that, in other cell types and tissues, occur in distinct separate junctions, i.e. desmosomes and adherens junctions. As the pertinent literature is still in an expanding phase and is obviously becoming important for various groups of researchers in basic cell and molecular biology, developmental biology, histology, physiology, cardiology, pathology and genetics, the relevant references so far recognized have been collected and are presented here in the following order: desmocollin-2 (Dsc2, DSC2), desmoglein-2 (Dsg2, DSG2), desmoplakin (DP, DSP), plakoglobin (PG, JUP), plakophilin-2 (Pkp2, PKP2) and some non-desmosomal proteins such as transmembrane protein 43 (TMEM43), ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2), desmin, lamins A and C, striatin, titin and transforming growth factor-β3 (TGFβ3), followed by a collection of animal models and of reviews, commentaries, collections and comparative studies.

  20. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated.

  1. A semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction microwave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Maja; Uilhoorn, Willemijn; Kroll, James; de Jong, Damaz; van Woerkom, David; Nygard, Jesper; Krogstrup, Peter; Kouwenhoven, Leo

    We present measurements of microwave lasing from a single Al/InAs/Al nanowire Josephson junction strongly coupled to a high quality factor superconducting cavity. Application of a DC bias voltage to the Josephson junction results in photon emission into the cavity when the bias voltage is equal to a multiple of the cavity frequency. At large voltage biases, the strong non-linearity of the circuit allows for efficient down conversion of high frequency microwave photons down to multiple photons at the fundamental frequency of the cavity. In this regime, the emission linewidth narrows significantly below the bare cavity linewidth to threshold lasing with a power conversion efficiency > 50%. The junction-cavity coupling and laser emission can be tuned rapidly via an external gate, making it suitable to be integrated into a scalable qubit architecture as a versatile source of coherent microwave radiation. This work has been supported by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO/OCW), Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), European Research Council (ERC), and Microsoft Corporation Station Q.

  2. The NF2 tumor suppressor, Merlin, regulates epidermal development through the establishment of a junctional polarity complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Andrew B; Hebert, Alan M; Schneeberger, Eveline E; McClatchey, Andrea I

    2010-11-16

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor suppressor, Merlin, is a FERM (Four point one, Ezrin, Radixin, Moesin) domain-containing protein whose loss results in defective morphogenesis and tumorigenesis in multiple tissues. Like the closely related ERM proteins (Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin), Merlin may organize the plasma membrane by assembling membrane protein complexes and linking them to the cortical actin cytoskeleton. We previously found that Merlin is a critical mediator of contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation and is required for the establishment of stable adherens junctions (AJs) in cultured cells. Here, we delineate the molecular function of Merlin in AJ establishment in epidermal keratinocytes in vitro and confirm that a role in AJ establishment is an essential function of Merlin in vivo. Our studies reveal that Merlin can associate directly with α-catenin and link it to Par3, thereby providing an essential link between the AJ and the Par3 polarity complex during junctional maturation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Entropy Flow Through Near-Critical Quantum Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedan, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    This is the continuation of Friedan (J Stat Phys, 2017. doi: 10.1007/s10955-017-1752-8). Elementary formulas are derived for the flow of entropy through a circuit junction in a near-critical quantum circuit close to equilibrium, based on the structure of the energy-momentum tensor at the junction. The entropic admittance of a near-critical junction in a bulk-critical circuit is expressed in terms of commutators of the chiral entropy currents. The entropic admittance at low frequency, divided by the frequency, gives the change of the junction entropy with temperature—the entropic "capacitance". As an example, and as a check on the formalism, the entropic admittance is calculated explicitly for junctions in bulk-critical quantum Ising circuits (free fermions, massless in the bulk), in terms of the reflection matrix of the junction. The half-bit of information capacity per end of critical Ising wire is re-derived by integrating the entropic "capacitance" with respect to temperature, from T=0 to T=∞.

  4. p120 Catenin is required for normal tubulogenesis but not epithelial integrity in developing mouse pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendley, Audrey M; Provost, Elayne; Bailey, Jennifer M; Wang, Yue J; Cleveland, Megan H; Blake, Danielle; Bittman, Ross W; Roeser, Jeffrey C; Maitra, Anirban; Reynolds, Albert B; Leach, Steven D

    2015-03-01

    The intracellular protein p120 catenin aids in maintenance of cell-cell adhesion by regulating E-cadherin stability in epithelial cells. In an effort to understand the biology of p120 catenin in pancreas development, we ablated p120 catenin in mouse pancreatic progenitor cells, which resulted in deletion of p120 catenin in all epithelial lineages of the developing mouse pancreas: islet, acinar, centroacinar, and ductal. Loss of p120 catenin resulted in formation of dilated epithelial tubules, expansion of ductal epithelia, loss of acinar cells, and the induction of pancreatic inflammation. Aberrant branching morphogenesis and tubulogenesis were also observed. Throughout development, the phenotype became more severe, ultimately resulting in an abnormal pancreas comprised primarily of duct-like epithelium expressing early progenitor markers. In pancreatic tissue lacking p120 catenin, overall epithelial architecture remained intact; however, actin cytoskeleton organization was disrupted, an observation associated with increased cytoplasmic PKCζ. Although we observed reduced expression of adherens junction proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin, p120 catenin family members p0071, ARVCF, and δ-catenin remained present at cell membranes in homozygous p120(f/f) pancreases, potentially providing stability for maintenance of epithelial integrity during development. Adult mice homozygous for deletion of p120 catenin displayed dilated main pancreatic ducts, chronic pancreatitis, acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), and mucinous metaplasia that resembles PanIN1a. Taken together, our data demonstrate an essential role for p120 catenin in pancreas development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoo Kwon

    Full Text Available ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10 is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ, and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR, supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development.

  6. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Junctional Adhesion Molecule, a Novel Member of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily That Distributes at Intercellular Junctions and Modulates Monocyte Transmigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martìn-Padura, Inés; Lostaglio, Susan; Schneemann, Markus; Williams, Lisa; Romano, Maria; Fruscella, Paolo; Panzeri, Carla; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Ruco, Luigi; Villa, Antonello; Simmons, David; Dejana, Elisabetta

    1998-01-01

    Tight junctions are the most apical components of endothelial and epithelial intercellular cleft. In the endothelium these structures play an important role in the control of paracellular permeability to circulating cells and solutes. The only known integral membrane protein localized at sites of membrane–membrane interaction of tight junctions is occludin, which is linked inside the cells to a complex network of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. We report here the identification of a novel protein (junctional adhesion molecule [JAM]) that is selectively concentrated at intercellular junctions of endothelial and epithelial cells of different origins. Confocal and immunoelectron microscopy shows that JAM codistributes with tight junction components at the apical region of the intercellular cleft. A cDNA clone encoding JAM defines a novel immunoglobulin gene superfamily member that consists of two V-type Ig domains. An mAb directed to JAM (BV11) was found to inhibit spontaneous and chemokine-induced monocyte transmigration through an endothelial cell monolayer in vitro. Systemic treatment of mice with BV11 mAb blocked monocyte infiltration upon chemokine administration in subcutaneous air pouches. Thus, JAM is a new component of endothelial and epithelial junctions that play a role in regulating monocyte transmigration. PMID:9660867

  8. NbN/MgO/NbN SIS tunnel junctions for submm wave mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J. A.; Hunt, B. D.; Leduc, H. G.; Judas, A.; Mcgrath, W. R.; Cypher, S. R.; Khanna, S. K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report on the fabrication and testing of all-refractory NbN/MgO/NbN SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) tunnel junctions for use as high-frequency mixers. Progress in the development of techniques for the fabrication of submicron-area tunnel junctions is described. Junction structures which have been investigated include mesa, crossline, and edge geometries. Using reactive sputtering techniques, NbN tunnel junctions with critical currents in excess of 104 A/sq cm have been fabricated with Vm values as high as 65 mV and areas down to 0.1 sq micron. Specific capacitance measurements on NbN/MgO/NbN mesa-type tunnel junctions give values in the range 60-90 fF/sq micron. These SIS tunnel junctions have been integrated with antennas and coupling structures for mixer tests in a waveguide receiver at 207 GHz. Preliminary mixer results are reported.

  9. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwaisayawan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a method of choice for diagnosing cervicothoracic junction trauma, in which the pattern of injuries often suggests possible mechanisms and potential injuries. In this article, the authors describe and illustrate common and uncommon injuries that can occur in the cervicothoracic junction.Keywords: cervicothoracic junction, cervical spine, trauma, imaging, radiology

  10. Intercellular junctions in nerve-free hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, A W; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    Epithelial cells of nerve-free hydra contain septate and gap junctions. In thin sections the gap junctions are characterized by a gap of 3-4 nm. Freeze-fracture demonstrates the presence of septate junctions and two further types of structures: (i) the "E-type" or "inverted" gap junctions...

  11. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  12. Junction formation during desiccation cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, K B; Alaca, B Erdem

    2006-08-01

    In order to provide a sound physical basis for the understanding of the formation of desiccation crack networks, an experimental study is presented addressing junction formation. Focusing on junctions, basic features of the network determining the final pattern, provides an elemental approach and imparts conceptual clarity to the rather complicated problem of the evolution of crack patterns. Using coffee-water mixtures a clear distinction between junction formation during nucleation and propagation is achieved. It is shown that for the same drying suspension, one can switch from the well-known symmetric triple junctions that are unique to the nucleation phase to propagation junctions that are purely dictated by the variations of the stress state. In the latter case, one can even manipulate the path of a propagating crack in a deterministic fashion by changing the stress state within the suspension. Clear microscopic evidence is provided for the formation of propagation junctions, and material inhomogeneity is observed to be reflected by a broad distribution of angles, in stark contrast to shrinkage cracks in homogeneous solid films.

  13. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support.

  14. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  15. Routing Trains Through Railway Junctions: A New Set Packing Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusby, Richard; Larsen, Jesper; Ryan, David

    The problem of routing trains through railway junctions is an integral part of railway operations. Large junctions are highly interconnected networks of track where multiple railway lines meet, intersect, and split. The number of possible routings makes this a very complicated problem. Here we show...... how the problem can be formulated as a set packing model. To exploit the structure of the problem we present a solution procedure which entails solving the dual of this formulation through the dynamic addition of violated cuts (primal variables). A discussion of the variable (train path) generation...

  16. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  17. Integrated High Throughput Analysis Identifies GSK3 as a Crucial Determinant of p53-Mediated Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Chenyang; Sun, Bangyao; Lv, Jiawei; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Shengwang; Li, Hai

    2017-01-01

    p53 dysfunction is frequently observed in lung cancer. Although restoring the tumour suppressor function of p53 is recently approved as a putative strategy for combating cancers, the lack of understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying p53-mediated lung cancer suppression has limited the application of p53-based therapies in lung cancer. Using RNA sequencing, we determined the transcriptional profile of human non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells after treatment with two p53-activating chemical compounds, nutlin and RITA, which could induce A549 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of genome-wide gene expression data showed that distinct transcription profiles were induced by nutlin and RITA and 66 pathways were differentially regulated by these two compounds. However, only two of these pathways, 'Adherens junction' and 'Axon guidance', were found to be synthetic lethal with p53 re-activation, as determined via integrated analysis of genome-wide gene expression profile and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screening. Further functional protein association analysis of significantly regulated genes associated with these two synthetic lethal pathways indicated that GSK3 played a key role in p53-mediated A549 cell apoptosis, and then gene function study was performed, which revealed that GSK3 inhibition promoted p53-mediated A549 cell apoptosis in a p53 post-translational activity-dependent manner. Our findings provide us with new insights regarding the mechanism by which p53 mediates A549 apoptosis and may cast light on the development of more efficient p53-based strategies for treating lung cancer. © 201 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The exon junction complex differentially marks spliced junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulière, Jérôme; Haque, Nazmul; Harms, Scot; Barbosa, Isabelle; Blanchette, Marco; Le Hir, Hervé

    2010-10-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC), which is deposited onto mRNAs as a consequence of splicing, is involved in multiple post-transcriptional events in metazoa. Here, using Drosophila melanogaster cells, we show that only some introns trigger EJC-dependent nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and that EJC association with particular spliced junctions depends on RNA cis-acting sequences. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that EJC deposition is not constitutive but instead is a regulated process.

  19. Structure-function correlation of tight junctional impairment after intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, C; Stieger, B; Landmann, L

    1996-05-01

    Tight junctions, the only barrier between blood and bile, are crucial in bile formation. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in morphology and permeability by comparing structural parameters with marker secretion into normal and cholestatic rat bile. Cholestasis was induced by bile duct ligation of 5 and 21 days of ethinylestradiol administration. Quantitated structural parameters induced junctional length, strand number, junctional depth, and spacing of junctional particles. Junctional permeability was probed with horseradish peroxidase and dextrans of increasing sizes. Junctional length was decreased slightly by ethinylestradiol (-16% after 21 days) but increased by ligation (77%). Mean strand number decreased from 4.6 to 3.7 after 21 days of ethinylestradiol and 3.4 after ligation associated with increased junctional depth. The proportions of morphologically horseradish peroxidase-positive junctions increased from 4% to 15% after 21 days of ethinylestradiol and to 56% after ligation. Horseradish peroxidase secretion was increased twofold by ethinylestradiol and 6.5-fold by ligation, paralleled by an increase of dextran size selectivity from 70,000 to 79,000 daltons after ethinylestradiol and to 266,000 daltons after ligation. Impairment of junctional integrity is paralleled with the degree of cholestasis, whereas correlation of morphological and physiological alterations shows a close structure-function relationship.

  20. [Integrity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  1. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizard, Anna H; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    as "double Holliday junction dissolution." This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called "dissolvasome" comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding......Double Holliday junctions (dHJS) are important intermediates of homologous recombination. The separate junctions can each be cleaved by DNA structure-selective endonucleases known as Holliday junction resolvases. Alternatively, double Holliday junctions can be processed by a reaction known...

  2. Transport properties of molecular junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the physical mechanisms that control electron transport and the characteristics of metal-molecule-metal (MMM) junctions is presented. As far as possible, methods and formalisms presented elsewhere to analyze electron transport through molecules are avoided. This title introduces basic concepts—a description of the electron transport through molecular junctions—and briefly describes relevant experimental methods. Theoretical methods commonly used to analyze the electron transport through molecules are presented. Various effects that manifest in the electron transport through MMMs, as well as the basics of density-functional theory and its applications to electronic structure calculations in molecules are presented. Nanoelectronic applications of molecular junctions and similar systems are discussed as well. Molecular electronics is a diverse and rapidly growing field. Transport Properties of Molecular Junctions presents an up-to-date survey of the field suitable for researchers ...

  3. Method of making semiconductor junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, R. B.

    1990-06-01

    A p-n junction on a silicon substrate doped with boron ions (d-dopant) is made in the following manner. A shallow silicon surface layer including a n-type dopant is first obtained by ion implantation of the substrate with arsenic atoms. The arsenic-doped silicon layer at the surface has a relatively low initial reflectivity. Then, radiation from a pulsed carbon dioxide laser is directed onto the doped surface. A portion of the pulsed radiation causes melting of the thin arsenic-doped layer at the solid surface, giving the shallow melted surface a reflectivity greater than the initial reflectivity of the solid surface. The increased reflectivity of the melted surface prevents an additional portion of the pulsed radiation from causing further melting, thus controlling the depth of melting. The melted surface is then allowed to cool and solidify to form a p-n junction at a thin (less than 200A) junction depth.

  4. Gravitation at the Josephson Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Atanasov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A geometric potential from the kinetic term of a constrained to a curved hyperplane of space-time quantum superconducting condensate is derived. An energy conservation relation involving the geometric field at every material point in the superconductor is demonstrated. At a Josephson junction the energy conservation relation implies the possibility of transforming electric energy into geometric field energy, that is, curvature of space-time. Experimental procedures to verify that the Josephson junction can act as a voltage-to-curvature converter are discussed.

  5. A New Perspective on Intercalated Disc Organization: Implications for Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifen Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherens junctions and desmosomes are intercellular adhesive junctions and essential for the morphogenesis, differentiation, and maintenance of tissues that are subjected to high mechanical stress, including heart and skin. The different junction complexes are organized at the termini of the cardiomyocyte called the intercalated disc. Disruption of adhesive integrity via mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins causes an inherited heart disease, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC. Besides plakoglobin, which is shared by adherens junctions and desmosomes, other desmosomal components, desmoglein-2, desmocollin-2, plakophilin-2, and desmoplakin are also present in ultrastructurally defined fascia adherens junctions of heart muscle, but not other tissues. This mixed-type of junctional structure is termed hybrid adhering junction or area composita. Desmosomal plakophilin-2 directly interacts with adherens junction protein alphaT-catenin, providing a new molecular link between the cadherin-catenin complex and desmosome. The area composita only exists in the cardiac intercalated disc of mammalian species suggesting that it evolved to strengthen mechanical coupling in the heart of higher vertebrates. The cross-talk among different junctions and their implication in the pathogenesis of ARVC are discussed in this review.

  6. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc bias...

  8. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...... dependence on magnetic field are discussed. Experimental results for dc interferometers with 0 and pi high-T-c bi-crystal Josephson junctions are reported and discussed in comparison with numerical simulation....

  9. delta-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Koshelet, V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect...

  10. Modelling and Analysis of Long Josephson Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, T.P.P.

    2002-01-01

    For various reasons people have been interested in Josephson junctions. Ranging from "understanding nature" to building quantum computers. In this thesis we focus on a special type of junction (the long junction) and to a special type of problem fluxon dynamics.

  11. Stability of large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Hylke B.; Kronemeijer, Auke J.; Harkema, Jan; van Hal, Paul A.; Smits, Edsger C. P.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Blom, Paul W. M.

    The stability of molecular junctions is crucial for any application of molecular electronics. Degradation of molecular junctions when exposed to ambient conditions is regularly observed. In this report the stability of large-area molecular junctions under ambient conditions for more than two years

  12. Soliton bunching in annular Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernik, I.V; Lazarides, Nickos; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    By studying soliton (fluxon) motion in long annular Josephson junctions it is possible to avoid the influence of the boundaries and soliton-soliton collisions present in linear junctions. A new experimental design consisting of a niobium coil placed on top of an annular junction has been used to ...

  13. All NbN tunnel junction fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, H. G.; Khanna, S. K.; Stern, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of SIS tunnel junctions based on NbN for mixer applications in the submillimeter range is reported. The unique technological challenges inherent in the development of all refractory-compound superconductor-based tunnel junctions are highlighted. Current deposition and fabrication techniques are discussed, and the current status of all-NbN tunnel junctions is reported.

  14. Tunable Magnetic Proximity Effects in Graphene Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Predrag; Belashchenko, Kirill; Zutic, Igor

    2015-03-01

    The characteristic length of the magnetic proximity effects exceed the thickness of a graphene layer leading to an important, but typically overlooked, modifications of equilibrium and transport properties, as well as the implications for graphene spintronics. Using the first-principles studies that integrate a real space density functional theory (GPAW) with the state-of-the art boundary elements electrostatic code based on the Robin Hood method, we explore tunable electronic structure and magnetic proximity effects in the ferromagnet/insulator/graphene junctions. We show that the inclusion of a finite-size gate electrodes and van der Walls interaction lead to nontrivial effects that could also be important in other two-dimensional materials beyond graphene. Work supported by US ONR, NSF-DMR and Nebraska NSF MRSEC.

  15. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaskólski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF. The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system.

  16. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β.

  17. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  18. Cell-cell junctions: a target of acoustic overstimulation in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guiliang; Hu, Bo Hua

    2012-06-19

    Exposure to intense noise causes the excessive movement of the organ of Corti, stretching the organ and compromising sensory cell functions. We recently revealed changes in the transcriptional expression of multiple adhesion-related genes during the acute phases of cochlear damage, suggesting that the disruption of cell-cell junctions is an early event in the process of cochlear pathogenesis. However, the functional state of cell junctions in the sensory epithelium is not clear. Here, we employed graded dextran-FITC, a macromolecule tracer that is impermeable to the organ of Corti under physiological conditions, to evaluate the barrier function of cell junctions in normal and noise-traumatized cochlear sensory epithelia. Exposure to an impulse noise of 155 dB (peak sound pressure level) caused a site-specific disruption in the intercellular junctions within the sensory epithelium of the chinchilla cochlea. The most vulnerable sites were the junctions among the Hensen cells and between the Hensen and Deiters cells within the outer zone of the sensory epithelium. The junction clefts that formed in the reticular lamina were permeable to 40 and 500 but not 2,000 kDa dextran-FITC macromolecules. Moreover, this study showed that the interruption of junction integrity occurred in the reticular lamina and also in the basilar membrane, a site that had been considered to be resistant to acoustic injury. Finally, our study revealed a general spatial correlation between the site of sensory cell damage and the site of junction disruption. However, the two events lacked a strict one-to-one correlation, suggesting that the disruption of cell-cell junctions is a contributing, but not the sole, factor for initiating acute sensory cell death. Impulse noise causes the functional disruption of intercellular junctions in the sensory epithelium of the chinchilla cochlea. This disruption occurs at an early phase of cochlear damage. Understanding the role of this disruption in

  19. Cavity syncronisation of underdamped Josephson junction arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbara, P.; Filatrella, G.; Lobb, C.

    2003-01-01

    Our recent experiments show that arrays of underdamped Josephson junctions radiate coherently only above a threshold number of junctions switched onto the radiating state. For each junction, the radiating state is a resonant step in the current-voltage characteristics due to the interaction between...... the junctions in the array and an electromagnetic cavity. Here we show that a model of a one-dimensional array of Josephson junctions coupled to a resonator can produce many features of the coherent be havior above threshold, including coherent radiation of power and the shape of the array current......-voltage characteristic. The model also makes quantitative predictions about the degree of coherence of the junctions in the array. However, in this model there is no threshold; the experimental below-threshold region behavior could not be reproduced....

  20. Actomyosin-generated tension on cadherin is similar between dividing and non-dividing epithelial cells in early Xenopus laevis embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbomel, Gaëtan; Hatte, Guillaume; Roul, Julien; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Tassan, Jean-Pierre; Tramier, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Epithelia represent a unique situation where polarized cells must maintain sufficiently strong cell-cell contacts to guarantee the epithelial integrity indispensable for barrier functions. Nevertheless, epithelia must also keep sufficient plasticity which is crucial during development and morphogenesis. Adherens junctions and mechanical forces produced by the actomyosin cytoskeleton are major players for epithelial integrity maintenance and plasticity regulations. To understand how the epithelium is able to meet such a challenge, it is indispensable to determine how cellular junctions and mechanical forces acting at adherens junctions are regulated. Here, we investigate the tensile forces acting on adherens junctions via cadherin during cell division in the Xenopus embryos epithelium. Using the recently developed E-cadherin FRET tension sensor and a fastFLIM prototype microscope, we were able to measure mechanical forces applied on cadherin at cell-cell junctions. We have shown that the Xenopus epithelium is under tension, approximately 3 pN which remains stable, indicating that tensile forces acting on cadherin at the adherens junction are at equilibrium. Unexpectedly, mechanical tension across cadherin was similar between dividing and non-dividing epithelial cells. PMID:28327558

  1. A generic concept to overcome bandgap limitations for designing highly efficient multi-junction photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Li, Ning; Fecher, Frank W; Gasparini, Nicola; Ramirez Quiroz, Cesar Omar; Bronnbauer, Carina; Hou, Yi; Radmilović, Vuk V; Radmilović, Velimir R; Spiecker, Erdmann; Forberich, Karen; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-07-16

    The multi-junction concept is the most relevant approach to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction photovoltaic cells. The record efficiencies of several types of solar technologies are held by series-connected tandem configurations. However, the stringent current-matching criterion presents primarily a material challenge and permanently requires developing and processing novel semiconductors with desired bandgaps and thicknesses. Here we report a generic concept to alleviate this limitation. By integrating series- and parallel-interconnections into a triple-junction configuration, we find significantly relaxed material selection and current-matching constraints. To illustrate the versatile applicability of the proposed triple-junction concept, organic and organic-inorganic hybrid triple-junction solar cells are constructed by printing methods. High fill factors up to 68% without resistive losses are achieved for both organic and hybrid triple-junction devices. Series/parallel triple-junction cells with organic, as well as perovskite-based subcells may become a key technology to further advance the efficiency roadmap of the existing photovoltaic technologies.

  2. Vinculin, cadherin mechanotransduction and homeostasis of cell-cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerberg, Joanne M; Yap, Alpha S

    2013-08-01

    Cell adhesion junctions characteristically arise from the cooperative integration of adhesion receptors, cell signalling pathways and the cytoskeleton. This is exemplified by cell-cell interactions mediated by classical cadherin adhesion receptors. These junctions are sites where cadherin adhesion systems functionally couple to the dynamic actin cytoskeleton, a process that entails physical interactions with many actin regulators and regulation by cell signalling pathways. Such integration implies a potential role for molecules that may stand at the interface between adhesion, signalling and the cytoskeleton. One such candidate is the cortical scaffolding protein, vinculin, which is a component of both cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. While its contribution to integrin-based adhesions has been extensively studied, less is known about how vinculin contributes to cell-cell adhesions. A major recent advance has come with the realisation that cadherin adhesions are active mechanical structures, where cadherin serves as part of a mechanotransduction pathway by which junctions sense and elicit cellular responses to mechanical stimuli. Vinculin has emerged as an important element in cadherin mechanotransduction, a perspective that illuminates its role in cell-cell interactions. We now review its role as a cortical scaffold and its role in cadherin mechanotransduction.

  3. Loss models for long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, O. H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1984-01-01

    A general model for loss mechanisms in long Josephson junctions is presented. An expression for the zero-field step is found for a junction of overlap type by means of a perturbation method. Comparison between analytic solution and perturbation result shows good agreement.......A general model for loss mechanisms in long Josephson junctions is presented. An expression for the zero-field step is found for a junction of overlap type by means of a perturbation method. Comparison between analytic solution and perturbation result shows good agreement....

  4. Superconducting quantum interference devices with graphene junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Prance, Jonathan; Haley, Richard; Pashkin, Yuri; Ben Shalom, Moshe; Fal'Ko, Vladimir; Matthews, Anthony; White, Jeremy; Viznichenko, Roman; Melhem, Ziad

    We present measurements of DC superconducting quantum interference devices based on Nb/graphene/Nb Josephson junctions. The superconducting proximity effect in graphene can be used to build Josephson junctions whose critical current can be controlled by field-effect gates. These junctions combine the tunability of semiconductor Josephson junctions with the high critical currents and low contact resistances of metal SNS junctions. By using local gates, the SQUID junction critical currents can be modified individually and this allows the sensitivity and symmetry of the SQUID to be controlled in-situ. We compare the critical current of the SQUID with simulations that include a non-sinusoidal current phase relation in the junctions, as expected for ballistic graphene junctions. We also investigate the transfer function of the device in both symmetric and asymmetric configurations and find a highest transfer function of 300 μV/Φ0. Graphene Josephson junctions have the potential to add functionality to existing technologies; for example, to make SQUID magnetometers with tunable sensitivity or superconducting qubits with fast electrical control.

  5. Direct Exposure to Ethanol Disrupts Junctional Cell-Cell Contact and Hippo-YAP Signaling in HL-1 Murine Atrial Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Noritake

    Full Text Available Direct exposure of cardiomyocytes to ethanol causes cardiac damage such as cardiac arrythmias and apoptotic cell death. Cardiomyocytes are connected to each other through intercalated disks (ID, which are composed of a gap junction (GJ, adherens junction, and desmosome. Changes in the content as well as the subcellular localization of connexin43 (Cx43, the main component of the cardiac GJ, are reportedly involved in cardiac arrythmias and subsequent damage. Recently, the hippo-YAP signaling pathway, which links cellular physical status to cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, has been implicated in cardiac homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. This study was conducted to explore the possible involvement of junctional intercellular communication, mechanotransduction through cytoskeletal organization, and the hippo-YAP pathway in cardiac damage caused by direct exposure to ethanol. HL-1 murine atrial cardiac cells were used since these cells retain cardiac phenotypes through ID formation and subsequent synchronous contraction. Cells were exposed to 0.5-2% ethanol; significant apoptotic cell death was observed after exposure to 2% ethanol for 48 hours. A decrease in Cx43 levels was already observed after 3 hours exposure to 2% ethanol, suggesting a rapid degradation of this protein. Upon exposure to ethanol, Cx43 translocated into lysosomes. Cellular cytoskeletal organization was also dysregulated by ethanol, as demonstrated by the disruption of myofibrils and intermediate filaments. Coinciding with the loss of cell-cell adherence, decreased phosphorylation of YAP, a hippo pathway effector, was also observed in ethanol-treated cells. Taken together, the results provide evidence that cells exposed directly to ethanol show 1 impaired cell-cell adherence/communication, 2 decreased cellular mechanotransduction by the cytoskeleton, and 3 a suppressed hippo-YAP pathway. Suppression of hippo-YAP pathway

  6. p-n junction theory in view of excess majority carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Wenjie; Liu, Guipeng

    2017-10-01

    The classical p\\text-n junction theory is reconstructed in view of “excess majority carriers”. The effects of excess majority carriers, in addition to the excess minority carriers, are described analytically and integrated into the theory. The quantity and distribution of excess majority carriers are presented, which give rise to an “accompanying electric field” and guarantee the space-charge neutrality of each side of the junction. The accompanying electric field is figured out analytically, and the contributions of majority carriers are clarified quantitatively, which enables the current continuity in either side of the junction. Furthermore, at any position in the quasi-neutral region, the various current components are solved in closed form and the net current is obtained in a straightforward way. The reconstructed theory provides a more thorough understanding of p\\text-n junction operation with physical conciseness.

  7. Keratin 76 is required for tight junction function and maintenance of the skin barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tia DiTommaso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Keratins are cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins that are increasingly being recognised for their diverse cellular functions. Here we report the consequences of germ line inactivation of Keratin 76 (Krt76 in mice. Homozygous disruption of this epidermally expressed gene causes neonatal skin flaking, hyperpigmentation, inflammation, impaired wound healing, and death prior to 12 weeks of age. We show that this phenotype is associated with functionally defective tight junctions that are characterised by mislocalization of the integral protein CLDN1. We further demonstrate that KRT76 interacts with CLDN1 and propose that this interaction is necessary to correctly position CLDN1 in tight junctions. The mislocalization of CLDN1 has been associated in various dermopathies, including the inflammatory disease, psoriasis. These observations establish a previously unknown connection between the intermediate filament cytoskeleton network and tight junctions and showcase Krt76 null mice as a possible model to study aberrant tight junction driven skin diseases.

  8. Keratin 76 is required for tight junction function and maintenance of the skin barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTommaso, Tia; Cottle, Denny L; Pearson, Helen B; Schlüter, Holger; Kaur, Pritinder; Humbert, Patrick O; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins that are increasingly being recognised for their diverse cellular functions. Here we report the consequences of germ line inactivation of Keratin 76 (Krt76) in mice. Homozygous disruption of this epidermally expressed gene causes neonatal skin flaking, hyperpigmentation, inflammation, impaired wound healing, and death prior to 12 weeks of age. We show that this phenotype is associated with functionally defective tight junctions that are characterised by mislocalization of the integral protein CLDN1. We further demonstrate that KRT76 interacts with CLDN1 and propose that this interaction is necessary to correctly position CLDN1 in tight junctions. The mislocalization of CLDN1 has been associated in various dermopathies, including the inflammatory disease, psoriasis. These observations establish a previously unknown connection between the intermediate filament cytoskeleton network and tight junctions and showcase Krt76 null mice as a possible model to study aberrant tight junction driven skin diseases.

  9. Multiplication in Silicon p-n Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moll, John L.

    1965-01-01

    Multiplication values were measured in the collector junctions of silicon p-n-p and n-p-n transistors before and after bombardment by 1016 neutrons/cm2. Within experimental error there was no change either in junction fields, as deduced from capacitance measurements, or in multiplication values...

  10. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the

  11. Some properties of Cosmic String Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouby, Johanna

    2011-07-01

    Cosmic strings are linear concentrations of energy of macroscopic size. Since cosmic superstrings can form junctions, observing them would give some support to string theory. In the following, we study the lensing cosmic string junctions create, the shift in photons' wavelength passing through (leading to the Kaiser-Stebbins effect), and the gravitational radiation they emit.

  12. Atomically Abrupt Topological p-n Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Kho, Byung Woo; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Liu, Feng; Kim, Jun Sung; Yeom, Han Woong

    2017-08-24

    Topological insulators (TI's) are a new class of quantum matter with extraordinary surface electronic states, which bear great potential for spintronics and error-tolerant quantum computing. In order to put a TI into any practical use, these materials need to be fabricated into devices whose basic units are often p-n junctions. Interesting electronic properties of a 'topological' p-n junction were proposed theoretically such as the junction electronic state and the spin rectification. However, the fabrication of a lateral topological p-n junction has been challenging because of materials, process, and fundamental reasons. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach to realize a p-n junction of topological surface states (TSS's) of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) with an atomically abrupt interface. When a ultrathin Sb film is grown on a 3D TI of Bi2Se3 with a typical n-type TSS, the surface develops a strongly p-type TSS through the substantial hybridization between the 2D Sb film and the Bi2Se3 surface. Thus, the Bi2Se3 surface covered partially with Sb films bifurcates into areas of n- and p-type TSS's as separated by atomic step edges with a lateral electronic junction of as short as 2 nm. This approach opens a different avenue toward various electronic and spintronic devices based on well-defined topological p-n junctions with the scalability down to atomic dimensions.

  13. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  14. Fluxon dynamics in three stacked Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorria, Carlos; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2002-01-01

    /sub -/, the coupling between junctions leads to a repulsion of the fluxons with the same polarity. Above this critical velocity a fluxon will induce radiation in the neighboring junctions, leading to a bunching of the fluxons in the stacked junctions. Using the Sakai-Bodin-Pedersen model, three coupled perturbed sine......-Gordon equations are numerically studied for different values of coupling, damping, and bias parameters. In a narrow range of velocities bunching occurs. Outside this interval the fluxons split and new fluxons may be created. I-V characteristics are presented...

  15. Electronic transport in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui

    2006-01-01

    structured molecules could also show NDR. We show that molecular level crossing in a molecular double dot (MDD) system containing cobaltocene and ferrocene leads to NDR and hysteresis. Time-dependent transport properties of molecular junctions under external perturbation of a short time pulse or an alternative bias is studied by solving Green function in the time domain, combined with electronic structure information coming from ab initio density functional calculations. We found that the short time response depends on lead structure, bias voltage and barrier heights both at molecule-lead contacts and within molecules. Under an alternative current (AC) mode, the electron flow either lags (capacitive response) or leads (inductive response) the bias signal. The critical frequency for this transition is characteristic of a junction, depending on factors such as electronic structure of the leads and capacitance of the contacts.

  16. Low specific on-resistance power MOSFET with a surface improved super-junction layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Luo, Xiaorong; Li, Zhaoji

    2014-08-01

    A novel low specific on-resistance (Ron,sp) integrable power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with a surface improved super-junction (SISJ) layer is proposed. A super-junction layer is implemented at the surface of the drift region and the P pillar in super-junction layer is split into two parts with different doping concentrations. Firstly, the super-junction layer causes the multiple-direction depletion effect. The drift region doping concentration of the SISJ LDMOS is therefore increased significantly. Secondly, the super-junction layer provides a surface low on-resistance path. Thirdly, the new electric field peak introduced by the variation in the doping concentration of the P pillar modulates the surface electric field distribution, resulting in an improved breakdown voltage (BV). It reduces the device pitch for a specific BV capacity. All of them decrease Ron,sp sharply. The SISJ LDMOS exhibits a Ron,sp of 10.2 mΩ cm2 for BV = 230 V and decreases Ron,sp by 37% compared with a conventional lateral double-diffused MOSFET (LDMOS) at the same BV. Finally, because of the shallow depth of the SISJ layer, the proposed structure can be compatible with CMOS technology. Consequently, the SISJ LDMOS must be a competitive power device for power integrated circuit applications.

  17. Parity measurement in topological Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, François; Trauzettel, Björn

    2014-02-21

    We study the properties of a topological Josephson junction made of both edges of a two-dimensional topological insulator. We show that, due to fermion parity pumping across the bulk, the global parity of the junction has a clear signature in the periodicity and critical value of the Josephson current. In particular, we find that the periodicity with the flux changes from 4π in a junction with an even number of quasiparticles to 2π in the odd sector. In the case of long junctions, we exhibit a rigorous mathematical connection between the spectrum of Andreev bound states and the fermion parity anomaly, through bosonization. Additionally, we discuss the rather quantitative effects of Coulomb interactions on the Josephson current.

  18. Junction Point Detection Algorithm for SAR Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel junction point detector based on an azimuth consensus for remote sensing images. To eliminate the impact of noise and some noncorrelated edges of SAR image, an azimuth consensus constraint is developed. In addition to detecting the locations of junctions at the subpixel level, this operator recognizes their structures as well. A new formula that includes a minimization criterion for the total weighted distance is proposed to compute the locations of junction points accurately. Compared with other well-known detectors, including Forstner, JUDOCA, and CPDA, the experimental results indicate that our operator outperforms them both in location accuracy of junction points and in angle accuracy of branch edges. Moreover, our method possesses satisfying robustness to the impact of noise and changes of the SAR images. Our operator can be potentially used to solve a number of problems in computer vision, such as SAR image registration, wide-baseline matching, and UAV navigation system.

  19. Congenital right sided ureteropelvic junction obstructionin right ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital right sided ureteropelvic junction obstructionin right crossed fused ectopia with extrarenal calycesmasquerading as massive retroperitoneal urinoma in acase of blunt trauma abdomen: A diagnostic enigma andnovel approach of management.

  20. Junction trees constructions in Bayesian networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smail, Linda

    2017-10-01

    Junction trees are used as graphical structures over which propagation will be carried out through a very important property called the ruining intersection property. This paper examines an alternative method for constructing junction trees that are essential for the efficient computations of probabilities in Bayesian networks. The new proposed method converts a sequence of subsets of a Bayesian network into a junction tree, in other words, into a set of cliques that has the running intersection property. The obtained set of cliques and separators coincide with the junction trees obtained by the moralization and triangulation process, but it has the advantage of adapting to any computational task by adding links to the Bayesian network graph.

  1. New thermoelectric effect in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.D.; Tinkham, M.; Skocpol, W.J.

    1980-11-01

    A new type of thermoelectric current effect is derived for tunneling through oxide barriers between metals at different temperatures, for both superconducting and normal tunnel junctions. This effect was observed in both current and voltage measurements on Al-PbVb tunnel junctions in which one electrode was heated by laser irradiation. The existence of this thermoelectric effect may resolve long-standing discrepencies between experimental results and theoretical predictions for a series of point-contact experiments.

  2. Junction Parameter Extraction for Electronic Device Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Dib, S.; Salame, C.; Toufik, N.; Khoury, A; F. Pélanchon; Mialhe, P.

    2004-01-01

    A new method for the extraction of junction parameters from a description of the current–voltage characteristic is developed. A simulation is performed and a high accuracy is obtained for the determination of the singleexponential model parameters. The method is easy to implement in a control process for device characterization. An application, achieved to observe the degradation of the emitter–base junction of a bipolar transistor during an aging experiment, shows that the evolutions of t...

  3. Modeling of Operating Temperature Performance of Triple Junction Solar Cells Using Silvaco’s ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    TERMS Silvaco , Atlas , Multi-junction Solar Cell, Temperature, Photovoltaic, Simulation 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT... SILVACO INTERNATIONAL ............................................................. 27 1. Working with ATLAS ...Integrated TCAD software [from 24] 1. Working with ATLAS ATLAS is a core tool of the Silvaco VWF framework. It uses description files from

  4. Quasiparticle lifetimes and tunneltimes in SIS junctions for X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, D.J.; Lieshout, H.L.; Michels, F.A.; Valko, P.; Bruijn, M.P.; Kiewiet, F.; Adelerhof, D.J.; Hamster, A.W.; Brons, G.C.S.; Flokstra, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    The quasiparticle lifetimes and tunneltimes in SIS tunnel junctions are essential parameters in the development of these devices for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy. We present a simple analytical model which allows us to calculate both the risetime and the total charge of the integrated tunnel

  5. Subharmonic generation in Josephson junction fluxon oscillators biased on Fiske steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Parmentier, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical integration of the perturbed sine-Gordon equation describing a long overlap-geometry Josephson junction in a magnetic field indicates a branched structure of the first Fiske step. The major portion of the step corresponds to a simply periodic fluxon oscillation whereas the branches are ...... are characterized by subharmonic generation. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  6. Technology Enabling Ultra High Concentration Multi-Junction Cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedair, S. M.; Colter, Peter

    2016-03-30

    The project goal is to enable multijunction cells to operate at greater than 2000× suns intensity with efficiency above forty percent. To achieve this goal the recipients have developed a robust high-bandgap tunnel junction, reduce series resistance, and integrated a practical heat dissipation scheme.

  7. Ferromagnetic Josephson junctions with niobium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Taro; Makise, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Akira; Terai, Hirotaka

    Recently, novel physics and device applications in hybrid structures of superconductor (SC) and ferromagnet (FM), e.g., spin injection into SC, long-range Josephson effect, cryogenic memory, have been studied actively. Among various interesting phenomena in SC/FM structures, a π state (π junction) emerged in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions (SC/FM/SC) is attractive as a superconducting phase shifter for superconducting devices. In the present work, we developed the ferromagnetic Josephson junction in order to realize a quiet superconducting flux qubit with a π junction. Contrary to conventional flux qubits, the qubit with a π junction can be operated without an external magnetic field which is a noise source, and thus good coherence characteristics is expected. As a superconducting material, we adopted niobium nitride (NbN) with high superconducting critical temperature of 16 K, which can be grown epitaxially on a magnesium oxide substrate. Regarding the ferromagnetic material we used copper nickel (CuNi), and fabricated the NbN/CuNi/NbN junctions and then evaluated the dependences of the Josephson critical current on the temperature, thickness and so on. This research was supported by JST, PRESTO.

  8. Cell culture model predicts human disease: Altered expression of junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinases in cervical dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivi Niina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is necessarily caused by human papillomaviruses, which encode three oncogenes manifesting their functions by interfering with a number of cellular proteins and pathways: the E5, E6, and E7 proteins. We have earlier found in our microarray studies that the E5 oncogene crucially affects the expression of cellular genes involved in adhesion and motility of epithelial cells. Methods In order to biologically validate our previous experimental findings we performed immunohistochemical staining of a representative set of tissue samples from different grades of high-risk human papillomavirus associated cervical disease as well as normal squamous and columnar cervical epithelium. Three-dimensional collagen raft cultures established from E5-expressing and control epithelial cells were also examined. The expression of p16, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP -7, MMP-16, cytokeratin (CK 8/18, laminin, E-cadherin and beta-catenin was studied. Results In agreement with our previous microarray studies, we found intense staining for E-cadherin and beta-catenin in adherens junctions even in high-grade cervical lesions. Staining for MMP-16 was increased in severe disease as well. No significant change in staining for MMP-7 and cytokeratin 8/18 along with the grade of cervical squamous epithelial disease was observed. Conclusions Here we have confirmed, using tissue material from human papillomavirus associated lesions, some of the cellular gene expression modifications that we earlier reported in an experimental system studying specifically the E5 oncogene of papillomaviruses. These findings were partially surprising in the context of cervical carcinogenesis and emphasize that the complexity of carcinogenesis is not yet fully understood. Microarray approaches provide a wide overwiev of gene expression in experimental settings, which may yield biologically valid biomarkers for disease diagnostics, prognosis, and follow-up.

  9. Graphene-Insulator-Semiconductor Junction for Hybrid Photodetection Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Stephen W; Ruiz, Isaac; Davids, Paul S; Harrison, Richard K; Smith, Sean W; Goldflam, Michael D; Martin, Jeffrey B; Martinez, Nicholas J; Beechem, Thomas E

    2017-11-07

    A sensitive optical detector is presented based on a deeply depleted graphene-insulator-semiconducting (D(2)GIS) junction, which offers the possibility of simultaneously leveraging the advantages of both charge integration and localized amplification. Direct read-out and built-in amplification are accomplished via photogating of a graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) by carriers generated within a deeply depleted low-doped silicon substrate. Analogous to a depleted metal-oxide-semiconducting junction, photo-generated charge collects in the potential well that forms at the semiconductor/insulator interface and induces charges of opposite polarity within the graphene film modifying its conductivity. This device enables simultaneous photo-induced charge integration with continuous "on detector" readout through use of graphene. The resulting devices exhibit responsivities as high as 2,500 A/W (25,000 S/W) for visible wavelengths and a dynamic range of 30 dB. As both the graphene and device principles are transferrable to arbitrary semiconductor absorbers, D(2)GIS devices offer a high-performance paradigm for imaging across the electromagnetic spectrum.

  10. TRF2 promotes, remodels and protects telomeric Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Anaïs; Buisson, Rémi; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Koelblen, Mélanie; Amiard, Simon; Montel, Fabien; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Bornet, Olivier; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Godet, Thomas; Moukhtar, Julien; Argoul, Françoise; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Lilley, David M J; Ip, Stephen C Y; West, Stephen C; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2009-03-18

    The ability of the telomeric DNA-binding protein, TRF2, to stimulate t-loop formation while preventing t-loop deletion is believed to be crucial to maintain telomere integrity in mammals. However, little is known on the molecular mechanisms behind these properties of TRF2. In this report, we show that TRF2 greatly increases the rate of Holliday junction (HJ) formation and blocks the cleavage by various types of HJ resolving activities, including the newly identified human GEN1 protein. By using potassium permanganate probing and differential scanning calorimetry, we reveal that the basic domain of TRF2 induces structural changes to the junction. We propose that TRF2 contributes to t-loop stabilisation by stimulating HJ formation and by preventing resolvase cleavage. These findings provide novel insights into the interplay between telomere protection and homologous recombination and suggest a general model in which TRF2 maintains telomere integrity by controlling the turnover of HJ at t-loops and at regressed replication forks.

  11. Bathymetry of the Hong and Luoc River Junction, Red River Delta, Vietnam, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Toan, Duong Duc; Thanh, Mung Dinh; Shimizu, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Water Resources University in Hanoi, Vietnam, conducted a bathymetric survey of the junction of the Hong and Luoc Rivers. The survey was done to characterize the channel morphology of this delta distributary network and provide input for hydrodynamic and sediment transport models. The survey was carried out in December 2010 using a boat-mounted multibeam echo sounder integrated with a global positioning system. A bathymetric map of the Hong and Luoc River junction was produced which was referenced to the datum of the Trieu Duong tide gage on the Luoc River.

  12. Josephson tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M.P.

    2006-07-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are well-known physical properties of solid states that have been widely studied and long thought about as antagonistic phenomena due to difference in spin ordering. It turns out that the combination of both superconductor and ferromagnet leads to a very rich and interesting physics. One particular example, the phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameter inside the ferromagnet, will play a major role for the devices discussed in this work. In this thesis, I present Josephson junctions with a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier and a ferromagnetic interlayer, i.e. superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) stacks. The fabrication of junctions was optimized regarding the insulation of electrodes and the homogeneity of the current transport. The junctions were either in the 0 or {pi} coupled ground state, depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer and on temperature. The influence of ferromagnetic layer thickness on the transport properties and the coupling (0, {pi}) of SIFS tunnel junctions was studied. Furthermore, using a stepped ferromagnetic layer with well-chosen thicknesses, I obtained the so-called 0-{pi} Josephson junction. At a certain temperature this 0-{pi} junction can be made perfectly symmetric. In this case the ground state corresponds to a vortex of supercurrent creating a magnetic flux which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}. Such structures allow to study the physics of fractional vortices and to build various electronic circuits based on them. The SIFS junctions presented here have an exponentially vanishing damping at T {yields} 0. The SIFS technology developed within the framework of this work may be used to construct classical and quantum devices such as oscillators, memory cells and qubits. (orig.)

  13. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  14. Magnetic tunnel junctions with monolayer hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquemal-Banci, M.; Galceran, R.; Bouzehouane, K.; Anane, A.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.; Dlubak, B.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Palaiseau 91767 (France); Caneva, S.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Kidambi, P. R.; Robertson, J.; Hofmann, S. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Xavier, S. [Thales Research and Technology, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, Palaiseau 91767 (France)

    2016-03-07

    We report on the integration of atomically thin 2D insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunnel barriers into Co/h-BN/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The h-BN monolayer is directly grown by chemical vapor deposition on Fe. The Conductive Tip Atomic Force Microscopy (CT-AFM) measurements reveal the homogeneity of the tunnel behavior of our h-BN layers. As expected for tunneling, the resistance depends exponentially on the number of h-BN layers. The h-BN monolayer properties are also characterized through integration into complete MTJ devices. A Tunnel Magnetoresistance of up to 6% is observed for a MTJ based on a single atomically thin h-BN layer.

  15. Cell-cell junctions: a target of acoustic overstimulation in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Guiliang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to intense noise causes the excessive movement of the organ of Corti, stretching the organ and compromising sensory cell functions. We recently revealed changes in the transcriptional expression of multiple adhesion-related genes during the acute phases of cochlear damage, suggesting that the disruption of cell-cell junctions is an early event in the process of cochlear pathogenesis. However, the functional state of cell junctions in the sensory epithelium is not clear. Here, we employed graded dextran-FITC, a macromolecule tracer that is impermeable to the organ of Corti under physiological conditions, to evaluate the barrier function of cell junctions in normal and noise-traumatized cochlear sensory epithelia. Results Exposure to an impulse noise of 155 dB (peak sound pressure level caused a site-specific disruption in the intercellular junctions within the sensory epithelium of the chinchilla cochlea. The most vulnerable sites were the junctions among the Hensen cells and between the Hensen and Deiters cells within the outer zone of the sensory epithelium. The junction clefts that formed in the reticular lamina were permeable to 40 and 500 but not 2,000 kDa dextran-FITC macromolecules. Moreover, this study showed that the interruption of junction integrity occurred in the reticular lamina and also in the basilar membrane, a site that had been considered to be resistant to acoustic injury. Finally, our study revealed a general spatial correlation between the site of sensory cell damage and the site of junction disruption. However, the two events lacked a strict one-to-one correlation, suggesting that the disruption of cell-cell junctions is a contributing, but not the sole, factor for initiating acute sensory cell death. Conclusions Impulse noise causes the functional disruption of intercellular junctions in the sensory epithelium of the chinchilla cochlea. This disruption occurs at an early phase of cochlear

  16. Increasing gap junctional coupling: a tool for dissecting the role of gap junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Haugan, Ketil; Stahlhut, Martin

    2007-01-01

    . In a number of cases, gap junctions have been implicated in the initiation and progress of disease, and experimental uncoupling has been used to investigate the exact role of coupling. The inverse approach, i.e., to increase coupling, has become possible in recent years and represents a new way of testing......Much of our current knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological role of gap junctions is based on experiments where coupling has been reduced by either chemical agents or genetic modification. This has brought evidence that gap junctions are important in many physiological processes...... the role of gap junctions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge obtained with agents that selectively increase gap junctional intercellular coupling. Two approaches will be reviewed: increasing coupling by the use of antiarrhythmic peptide and its synthetic analogs...

  17. Plant-derived triterpene celastrol ameliorates oxygen glucose deprivation-induced disruption of endothelial barrier assembly via inducing tight junction proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dan; Zhao, Jia; Rong, Jianhui

    2016-12-01

    The integrity and functions of blood-brain barrier (BBB) are regulated by the expression and organization of tight junction proteins. The present study was designed to explore whether plant-derived triterpenoid celastrol could regulate tight junction integrity in murine brain endothelial bEnd3 cells. We disrupted the tight junctions between endothelial bEnd3 cells by oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). We investigated the effects of celastrol on the permeability of endothelial monolayers by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). To clarify the tight junction composition, we analyzed the expression of tight junction proteins by RT-PCR and Western blotting techniques. We found that celastrol recovered OGD-induced TEER loss in a concentration-dependent manner. Celastrol induced occludin, claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) in endothelial cells. As a result, celastrol effectively maintained tight junction integrity and inhibited macrophage migration through endothelial monolayers against OGD challenge. Further mechanistic studies revealed that celastrol induced the expression of occludin and ZO-1) via activating MAPKs and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We also observed that celastrol regulated claudin-5 expression through different mechanisms. The present study demonstrated that celastrol effectively protected tight junction integrity against OGD-induced damage. Thus, celastrol could be a drug candidate for the treatment of BBB dysfunction in various diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Boudin trafficking reveals the dynamic internalisation of specific septate junction components in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempesta, Camille; Hijazi, Assia; Moussian, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    The maintenance of paracellular barriers in invertebrate epithelia depends on the integrity of specific cell adhesion structures known as septate junctions (SJ). Multiple studies in Drosophila have revealed that these junctions have a stereotyped architecture resulting from the association in the lateral membrane of a large number of components. However, little is known about the dynamic organisation adopted by these multi-protein complexes in living tissues. We have used live imaging techniques to show that the Ly6 protein Boudin is a component of these adhesion junctions and can diffuse systemically to associate with the SJ of distant cells. We also observe that this protein and the claudin Kune-kune are endocytosed in epidermal cells during embryogenesis. Our data reveal that the SJ contain a set of components exhibiting a high membrane turnover, a feature that could contribute in a tissue-specific manner to the morphogenetic plasticity of these adhesion structures. PMID:28977027

  19. Inhomogeneous parallel arrays of Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caputo, J.-G., E-mail: caputo@insa-rouen.f [Laboratoire de Mathematiques, INSA de Rouen, B.P. 8, Avenue de l' Universite, 76801 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Loukitch, L., E-mail: lionel.loukitch@insa-rouen.f [Laboratoire de Mathematiques, INSA de Rouen, B.P. 8, Avenue de l' Universite, 76801 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} New long wave model of an inhomogeneous parallel array of Josephson junctions. {yields} Adapted spectral problem giving resonances in the current-voltage characteristic. {yields} At resonances solution is described by two ordinary differential equations. {yields} Good agreement with the characteristic curve of a real five junction array. - Abstract: We model new inhomogeneous parallel arrays of small Josephson junctions by taking into account the time and space variations of the field in the cavity and the capacity miss-match at the junctions. The model consists in a wave equation with Dirac delta function sine nonlinearities. We introduce an adapted spectral problem whose spectrum gives the resonances in the current-voltage characteristic curve of any array. It is shown that at the resonances the solution is described by two simple ordinary differential equations. The resonances obtained by this approach are in good agreement with the characteristic curve of a real five junction array. This flexible approach is a first step towards building a device tailored for given purposes.

  20. a Structure-Based Approach for Matching Road Junctions with Different Coordinate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luana, X.

    2012-07-01

    Effective matching algorithm of multi-source road networks is of vital importance for integration, updating and maintenance. In traditional matching methods, buffering and geometrical distances are basic strategies for potential matches searching, and the coordinate systems need to be similar. These methods may be invalid if the coordinate systems are unknown. Therefore, a novel approach of comparing the structures of urban road networks based on skeleton extraction is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the similarity measurement between junctions is described by a cluster comparison consisted with its neighbour junctions. And then the hierarchical strokes are recognized as a global structure to match, which eliminates the effect of the different coordinate systems. Finally, graphs converted from hierarchical skeletons of road network in different coordinate systems are compared and the most probable junction correspondences are established with maximum common subgraph algorithm. Based on the corresponding junctions, an affine transformation is able to be established between two unknown coordinate systems, and the remaining junctions matching will be conducted by traditional geometric methods. An experiment of matching road networks is carried out without any other geographic positional information. The result shows that no matter how significant the difference of coordinate systems are, it is still able to find the correct matches, which is impossible by traditional methods.

  1. Estimating Urban Traffic Patterns through Probabilistic Interconnectivity of Road Network Junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Manley

    Full Text Available The emergence of large, fine-grained mobility datasets offers significant opportunities for the development and application of new methodologies for transportation analysis. In this paper, the link between routing behaviour and traffic patterns in urban areas is examined, introducing a method to derive estimates of traffic patterns from a large collection of fine-grained routing data. Using this dataset, the interconnectivity between road network junctions is extracted in the form of a Markov chain. This representation encodes the probability of the successive usage of adjacent road junctions, encoding routes as flows between decision points rather than flows along road segments. This network of functional interactions is then integrated within a modified Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC framework, adapted for the estimation of urban traffic patterns. As part of this approach, the data-derived links between major junctions influence the movement of directed random walks executed across the network to model origin-destination journeys. The simulation process yields estimates of traffic distribution across the road network. The paper presents an implementation of the modified MCMC approach for London, United Kingdom, building an MCMC model based on a dataset of nearly 700000 minicab routes. Validation of the approach clarifies how each element of the MCMC framework contributes to junction prediction performance, and finds promising results in relation to the estimation of junction choice and minicab traffic distribution. The paper concludes by summarising the potential for the development and extension of this approach to the wider urban modelling domain.

  2. Ultrastructure of the embryonic stem cells of the 8-day pig blastocyst before and after in vitro manipulation: development of junctional apparatus and the lethal effects of PBS mediated cell-cell dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, N C; Garrett, W M

    2001-09-01

    Ultrastructural examination of 8-day hatched pig blastocysts (large and small), their cultured inner cell mass (ICM), and cultured epiblast tissue (embryonic stem cells) was undertaken to assess the development of epiblast cell junctions and cytoskeletal elements. In small blastocysts, epiblast cells had no desmosomes or tight junction (TJ) connections and few organized microfilament bundles, whereas in large blastocysts the epiblast cells were connected by TJ and desmosomes with associated microfilaments. ICM isolation by immunodissection damaged the endoderm cells beneath the trophectoderm cells but did not appear to damage the epiblast cells or their associated endoderm cells. Epiblast cells in cultured ICMs were similar in character to those in the intact large blastocyst except that perinuclear microfilaments were observed. Isolated pig epiblasts, cultured for approximately 36 hr on STO feeder layers, formed a monolayer whose cells were connected by TJ, adherens junctions and desmosomes with prominent microfilament bundles running parallel to the apical cytoplasmic membranes. Perinuclear microfilaments were a consistent feature in the approximately 36 hr cultured epiblast cells. A feature characteristic of differentiation into notochordal cells, i.e., a solitary cilium, was also observed in the cultured epiblast. Exposure of the cultured epiblast cells to Ca(++)-Mg(++)-free phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 5-10 min resulted in extensive cell blebbing and lysis. The results may indicate that pig epiblast cells could be more easily dissociated from early blastocysts ( approximately 400 microm in diameter) if immunodissection damage to the ICM can be avoided. It may be difficult, however, to establish them as embryonic stem cell lines because the cultured pig epiblast cells were easily lysed by standard cell-cell dissociation methods. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Stability of DNA nanostructures by junction penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Kim, Hyuncheol

    2013-04-01

    DNA nanostructures have been attracting much attention because of their well-controlled nanoarchitectural features. However, regulating the stability of DNA nanostructures is less well understood because of complexity. In this paper, the stability of DNA nanostructure was studied first in the form of simple building blocks. Since these DNA nanostructures have junctions on the center of the structures, the junctions were mainly investigated as a factor in the instability. In addition, regulation of the stability of complicated nanostructures based on these building blocks was achieved. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods were employed to monitor the conformation change with nano-scale sensitivity. The junction effect on DNA nanostructures was monitored with labeling FRET pairs at various conditions. DNA tile structures was also thoroughly studied by FRET.

  4. Proximity Effects in Superconductor-Graphene Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Fabian A.; Perconte, David; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Dlubak, Bruno; Piquemail, Maelis; Bernard, Rozenn; Trastoy, Juan; Moreau-Luchaire, Constance; Seneor, Pierre; Villegas, Javier E.; Kidambi, Piran; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting proximity effects are of particular interest in graphene: because of its band structure, an unconventional (specular) Andreev reflection is expected. In this context, high-Tc superconductor-graphene junctions are especially attractive. In these, the size of the superconducting energy-gap may exceed the graphene doping inhomogeneities around the Dirac point, which should favor the observation of the specular Andreev reflection. Yet, the fabrication of high-Tc superconductor-graphene junctions is challenging: the usual growth and lithography processes in both materials are incompatible. We report here on a fabrication method that allow us to fabricate planar cuprate superconductor-graphene junctions, which we characterize via conductance spectroscopy. We analyze the features in the conductance spectra as a function of graphene doping, and discuss them in the framework of the Andreev reflection. Work supported by Labex Nanosaclay.

  5. Neuromuscular Junction Dismantling in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cappello

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular junction assembly and plasticity during embryonic, postnatal, and adult life are tightly regulated by the continuous cross-talk among motor nerve endings, muscle fibers, and glial cells. Altered communications among these components is thought to be responsible for the physiological age-related changes at this synapse and possibly for its destruction in pathological states. Neuromuscular junction dismantling plays a crucial role in the onset of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS. ALS is characterized by the degeneration and death of motor neurons leading to skeletal muscle denervation, atrophy and, most often, death of the patient within five years from diagnosis. ALS is a non-cell autonomous disease as, besides motor neuron degeneration, glial cells, and possibly muscle fibers, play a role in its onset and progression. Here, we will review the recent literature regarding the mechanisms leading to neuromuscular junction disassembly and muscle denervation focusing on the role of the three players of this peripheral tripartite synapse.

  6. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic alloy interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Nico

    2015-07-23

    Josephson junctions are used as active devices in superconducting electronics and quantum information technology. Outstanding properties are their distinct non-linear electrical characteristics and a usually sinusoidal relation between the current and the superconducting phase difference across the junction. In general the insertion of ferromagnetic material in the barrier of a Josephson junction is associated with a suppression of superconducting correlations. But also new phenomena can arise which may allow new circuit layouts and enhance the performance of applications. This thesis presents a systematic investigation for two concepts to fabricate Josephson junctions with a rather uncommon negative critical current. Such devices exhibit an intrinsic phase slip of π between the electrodes, so they are also known as π junctions. Both studies go well beyond existing experiments and in one system a π junction is shown for the first time. All the thin film junctions are based on superconducting Nb electrodes. In a first approach, barriers made from Si and Fe were investigated with respect to the realisation of π junctions by spin-flip processes. The distribution of Fe in the Si matrix was varied from pure layers to disperse compounds. The systematic fabrication of alloy barriers was facilitated by the development of a novel timing-based combinatorial sputtering technique for planetary deposition systems. An orthogonal gradient approach allowed to create binary layer libraries with independent variations of thickness and composition. Second, Nb vertical stroke AlO{sub x} vertical stroke Nb vertical stroke Ni{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} vertical stroke Nb (SIsFS) double barrier junctions were experimentally studied for the occurrence of proximity effect induced order parameter oscillations. Detailed dependencies of the critical current density on the thickness of s-layer and F-layer were acquired and show a remarkable agreement to existing theoretical predictions. Especially

  7. Tailoring the vapor-liquid-solid growth toward the self-assembly of GaAs nanowire junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xing; Dayeh, Shadi A; Veeramuthu, Vaithianathan; Larrue, Alexandre; Wang, Jian; Su, Haibin; Soci, Cesare

    2011-11-09

    New insights into understanding and controlling the intriguing phenomena of spontaneous merging (kissing) and the self-assembly of monolithic Y- and T-junctions is demonstrated in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth of GaAs nanowires. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy for determining polar facets was coupled to electrostatic-mechanical modeling and position-controlled synthesis to identify nanowire diameter, length, and pitch, leading to junction formation. When nanowire patterns are designed so that the electrostatic energy resulting from the interaction of polar surfaces exceeds the mechanical energy required to bend the nanowires to the point of contact, their fusion can lead to the self-assembly of monolithic junctions. Understanding and controlling this phenomenon is a great asset for the realization of dense arrays of vertical nanowire devices and opens up new ways toward the large scale integration of nanowire quantum junctions or nanowire intracellular probes.

  8. Structure-Property Relationships in Atomic-Scale Junctions: Histograms and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-15

    are pulled apart has given complementary information such as the stiffness and rupture force of the molecule-metal link bond. Overall, while the BJ technique does not produce a single molecule circuit for practical applications, it has proved remarkably versatile for fundamental studies. Measured data and analysis have been combined with atomic-scale theory and calculations, typically performed for representative junction structures, to provide fundamental physical understanding of structure-function relationships. This Account integrates across an extensive series of our specific nanoscale junction studies which were carried out with the STM- and AFM-BJ techniques and supported by theoretical analysis and density functional theory based calculations, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of the measurement process and the rich data sets that emerge. Several examples illustrate the impact of measured trends based on the most probable values for key characteristics (obtained from ensembles of order 1000-10 000 individual junctions) to build a solid picture of conductance phenomena as well as attributes of the link bond chemistry. The key forward-looking question posed here is the extent to which the full data sets represented by the individual trajectories can be analyzed to address structure-function questions at the level of individual junctions. Initial progress toward physical modeling of conductance of individual junctions indicates trends consistent with physical junction structures. Analysis of junction mechanics reveals a scaling procedure that collapses existing data onto a universal force-extension curve. This research directed to understanding the distribution of structures and physical characteristics addresses fundamental questions concerning the interplay between chemical control and stochastically driven diversity.

  9. Conductance Spectra in Graphene-Superconductor Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The conductance spectra of a graphene ribbon and graphene-superconductor (G-S) junctions are investigated, using the tight-binding model and non-equilibrium Green' function formalism. It is found that the quantized conductance related to graphene' edge-states is robust against perturbations in the model parameters for a graphene monolayer ribbon with the zigzag boundary. With appropriate model parameter of the spin-orbit interaction strength, a new bound state with odd-frequency symmetry is found in the G-S junction. An enhancement in the zero-energy conductance amplitude is followed.

  10. Relationship between Critical Current Fluctuation of Superconducting Bicrystal Junction and Junction Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enpuku, Keiji; Minotani, Tadashi; Shiraishi, Fumio; Kandori, Atushi

    1999-04-01

    Critical current fluctuation of bicrystal junctions is estimated from the 1/f flux noise of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) at T=77 K. The relationships between the current fluctuation and junction parameters, such as critical current Io and resistance R, are obtained. The obtained parameter dependence can be well explained by using the parameter dependence of the resistance fluctuation reported by Marx and Gross [Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 120 (1997)] and the relationship between Io and R obtained for the present junctions. The agreement indicates that the critical current fluctuation is correlated with the resistance fluctuation through the relationship between Io and R.

  11. Josephson junctions loaded by transmission lines: a revisited problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranfagni, Anedio; Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2011-11-01

    The problem of evaluating dissipative effects in Josephson junctions loaded by transmission lines is reexamined, for either the symmetric or the asymmetric case, with particular consideration of the time domain in which the interaction between junction and load system occurs.

  12. Defect formation in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordeeva, Anna; Pankratov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according...

  13. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    We show experimentally as well as theoretically that patterned magnetic tunnel junctions can be characterized using the current-in-plane tunneling (CIPT) method, and the key parameters, the resistance-area product (RA) and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), can be determined. The CIPT method...

  14. Dismembered pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Open dismembered pyeloplasty remains the preferred surgical technique for ureteropelvic junction syndrome (UPJS) in most paediatric urology units. The authors present their experience of 230 patients and describe their form of presentation, treatment and early and long-term results. Materials and Methods: ...

  15. Gap junction diseases of the skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensel, M.A.M. van

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow the passage of water, ions, and small molecules. They are involved in quick, short-range messaging between cells and are found in skin, nervous tissue, heart, and muscle. An increasing number of hereditary skin disorders appear to be caused by

  16. Two-dimensional bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharekhanlou, Behnaz; Khorasani, Sina; Sarvari, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Recent development in fabrication technology of planar two-dimensional (2D) materials has introduced the possibility of numerous novel applications. Our recent analysis has revealed that by definition of p-n junctions through appropriate patterned doping of 2D semiconductors, ideal exponential I-V characteristics may be expected. However, the theory of 2D junctions turns out to be very different to that of standard bulk junctions. Based on this theory of 2D diodes, we construct for the first time a model to describe 2D bipolar junction transistors (2D-BJTs). We derive the small-signal equivalent model, and estimate the performance of a 2D-BJT device based on graphone as the example material. A current gain of about 138 and maximum threshold frequency of 77 GHz, together with a power-delay product of only 4 fJ per 1 μm lateral width is expected at an operating voltage of 5 V. In addition, we derive the necessary formulae and a new approximate solution for the continuity equation in the 2D configuration, which have been verified against numerical solutions.

  17. Craniocervical junction abnormalities with atlantoaxial subluxation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Craniocervical junction abnormalities with atlantoaxial subluxation caused by ventral subluxation of C2 were diagnosed in a 6-month-old female Pomeranian with tetraplegia as a clinical sign. Lateral survey radiography of the neck with flexion revealed atlantoaxial subluxation with ventral subluxation of C2. Computed ...

  18. Intrinsically shunted Josephson junctions for electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Lacquaniti, V.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.

    2017-07-01

    Conventional Josephson metal-insulator-metal devices are inherently underdamped and exhibit hysteretic current-voltage response due to a very high subgap resistance compared to that in the normal state. At the same time, overdamped junctions with single-valued characteristics are needed for most superconducting digital applications. The usual way to overcome the hysteretic behavior is to place an external low-resistance normal-metal shunt in parallel with each junction. Unfortunately, such solution results in a considerable complication of the circuitry design and introduces parasitic inductance through the junction. This paper provides a concise overview of some generic approaches that have been proposed in order to realize internal shunting in Josephson heterostructures with a barrier that itself contains the desired resistive component. The main attention is paid to self-shunted devices with local weak-link transmission probabilities that are so strongly disordered in the interface plane that transmission probabilities are tiny for the main part of the transition region between two super-conducting electrodes, while a small part of the interface is well transparent. We discuss the possibility of realizing a universal bimodal distribution function and emphasize advantages of such junctions that can be considered as a new class of self-shunted Josephson devices promising for practical applications in superconducting electronics operating at 4.2 K.

  19. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  20. Internal dynamics of long Josephson junction oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Lomdahl, P. S.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations on a sine-Gordon model of the Josephson junction fluxon oscillator are compared with experimental measurements. Good agreement is found for the voltage current characteristic, oscillator power output, and range of current bias over which oscillation is observed. Our numerical...

  1. Holographic Josephson junction from massive gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Li, Huai-Fan; Zeng, Hua-Bi; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    We study the holographic superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity. If the boundary theory is independent of spatial directions, i.e., if the chemical potential is homogeneous in spatial directions, we find that the graviton mass

  2. The functional anatomy of the ureterovesical junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomson, A. S.; Dabhoiwala, N. F.; Verbeek, F. J.; Lamers, W. H.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain a new insight into the anti-reflux mechanism of the ureterovesical junction by studying the topographical anatomy of the juxta- and intravesical ureter and its relationship to the surrounding bladder musculature. Fresh pig bladders were fixed, frozen and serially sectioned. Enzyme

  3. Characterization of idiopathic esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeij, F. B.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Esophagogastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction is a manometric diagnosis, characterized by an elevated relaxation pressure (IRP4) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and intact or weak peristalsis. The etiology and preferred treatment remain unknown. We describe a large patient cohort in

  4. Anatomy of the human atrioventricular junctions revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, R. H.; Ho, S. Y.; Becker, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    There have been suggestions made recently that our understanding of the atrioventricular junctions of the heart is less than adequate, with claims for several new findings concerning the arrangement of the ordinary working myocardium and the specialised pathways for atrioventricular conduction. In

  5. Microscopic tunneling theory of long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Hattel, Søren A.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1992-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate...

  6. Structural insights into the exon junction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hir, Hervé; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2008-02-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the exon junction complex is loaded onto spliced mRNAs at a precise position upstream of exon junctions, where it remains during nuclear export and cytoplasmic localisation until it is removed during the first translation round. The exon junction core complex consists of four proteins that form a dynamic binding platform for a variety of peripheral factors involved in mRNA metabolism. In the complex, mRNA binding is mediated by the DEAD-box protein eIF4AIII, and inhibition of its ATPase activity forms the mechanistic basis for the long-term stability of the complex. Recent crystal structures of the exon junction complex and eIF4AIII have provided the structural framework for investigating the function of the eIF4AIII ATPase and for localisation of surface patches involved in binding peripheral factors. Additionally, by comparison with the structure of a second DEAD-box protein also bound to RNA and ATP, general principles for the ATPase and unwinding/mRNP remodelling activities for this important group of enzymes can be proposed on the basis of atomic structures.

  7. Fluxon density waves in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, O. H.; Ustinov, A. V.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the multiple fluxon dynamics stimulated by an external oscillating force applied at a boundary of a long Josephson junction are presented. The calculated IV characteristics agree well with a recent experimental observation of rf-induced satellite flux-flow steps. The volt...... density waves....

  8. Long Josephson Junction Stack Coupled to a Cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Peder; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Groenbech-Jensen, N.

    2007-01-01

    A stack of inductively coupled long Josephson junctions are modeled as a system of coupled sine-Gordon equations. One boundary of the stack is coupled electrically to a resonant cavity. With one fluxon in each Josephson junction, the inter-junction fluxon forces are repulsive. We look at a possible...

  9. Systematic study of shallow junction formation on germanium substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, Geert; Rosseel, Erik; Clarysse, Trudo

    2011-01-01

    Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co-implanti...

  10. Absolute migration and the evolution of the Rodriguez triple junction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rodriguez Triple Junction (RTJ) is a junction connecting three mid-ocean ridges in the Indian Ocean: the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), the Central Indian Ridge (CIR) and the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR). The evolution of the RTJ has been studied extensively for the past 10 Ma and the triple junction is believed to ...

  11. Erectile dysfunction precedes other systemic vascular diseases due to incompetent cavernous endothelial cell-cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji-Kan; Jin, Hai-Rong; Yin, Guo Nan; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Song, Kang-Moon; Choi, Min Ji; Park, Jin-Mi; Das, Nando Dulal; Kwon, Ki-Dong; Batbold, Dulguun; Lee, Tack; Gao, Zhen Li; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Woo Jean; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2013-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction is often a harbinger of cardiovascular disease. We sought to gain mechanistic insight at the cellular and molecular levels into why erectile dysfunction precedes the clinical consequences of cardiovascular disease. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal streptozotocin injection in 8-week-old C57BL/6J mice. At 8 weeks after diabetes induction, we determined the expression of endothelial cell-cell junction proteins and vascular endothelial permeability in the penis, heart and hind limb by systemic injection of various vascular space markers (350 Da to 2,000 kDa) or by immunohistochemical staining with antibody to oxidized low density lipoprotein. We also investigated the effect of recombinant Ang1 protein on cavernous endothelial permeability. Alterations in the integrity of the endothelial cell-cell junction, including a decrease in endothelial cell-cell junction proteins and an increase in vascular permeability to fluorescent tracers or oxidized low density lipoprotein, were prominent in the cavernous tissue of diabetic mice. In contrast, no significant changes in endothelial cell-cell junction proteins or vascular permeability were noted in heart or hind limb tissue according to the diabetic condition. Intracavernous injection of Ang1 protein, an anti-permeability factor, significantly decreased cavernous endothelial permeability to oxidized low density lipoprotein by restoring endothelial cell-cell junction proteins in diabetic mice. The incompetent cavernous endothelial cell-cell junction in the diabetic condition provides an important clue to why erectile dysfunction is highly prevalent and often precedes other systemic vascular diseases. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Coexistence of tunneling magnetoresistance and Josephson effects in SFIFS junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Vávra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an integration of tunneling magnetoresistance and the Josephson effects within one tunneling junction. Several sets of Nb-Fe-Al-Al2O3-Fe-Nb wafers with varying Al and Fe layers thickness were prepared to systematically explore the competition of TMR and Josephson effects. A coexistence of the critical current IC(dFe and the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio T M R(dFe is observed for iron layer dFe thickness range 1.9 and 2.9 nm. Further optimization such as thinner Al2O3 layer leads to an enhancement of the critical current and thus to an extension of the coexistence regime up to dFe≃3.9 nm Fe.

  13. Gonadotropin suppression in men leads to a reduction in claudin-11 at the Sertoli cell tight junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, M J; Tarulli, G A; Laven-Law, G; Matthiesson, K L; Meachem, S J; McLachlan, R I; Dinger, M E; Stanton, P G

    2016-04-01

    Are Sertoli cell tight junctions (TJs) disrupted in men undergoing hormonal contraception? Localization of the key Sertoli cell TJ protein, claudin-11, was markedly disrupted by 8 weeks of gonadotropin suppression, the degree of which was related to the extent of adluminal germ cell suppression. Sertoli cell TJs are vital components of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) that sequester developing adluminal meiotic germ cells and spermatids from the vascular compartment. Claudin-11 knockout mice are infertile; additionally claudin-11 is spatially disrupted in chronically gonadotropin-suppressed rats coincident with a loss of BTB function, and claudin-11 is disorganized in various human testicular disorders. These data support the Sertoli cell TJ as a potential site of hormonal contraceptive action. BTB proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry (n = 16 samples) and mRNA (n = 18 samples) expression levels in available archived testis tissue from a previous study of 22 men who had undergone 8 weeks of gonadotropin suppression and for whom meiotic and post-meiotic germ cell numbers were available. The gonadotropin suppression regimens were (i) testosterone enanthate (TE) plus the GnRH antagonist, acyline (A); (ii) TE + the progestin, levonorgestrel, (LNG); (iii) TE + LNG + A or (iv) TE + LNG + the 5α-reductase inhibitor, dutasteride (D). A control group consisted of seven additional men, with three archived samples available for this study. Immunohistochemical localization of claudin-11 (TJ) and other junctional type markers [ZO-1 (cytoplasmic plaque), β-catenin (adherens junction), connexin-43 (gap junction), vinculin (ectoplasmic specialization) and β-actin (cytoskeleton)] and quantitative PCR was conducted using matched frozen testis tissue. Claudin-11 formed a continuous staining pattern at the BTB in control men. Regardless of gonadotropin suppression treatment, claudin-11 localization was markedly disrupted and was broadly associated with the extent of meiotic

  14. Down-regulation of membrana granulosa cell gap junctions is correlated with irreversible commitment to resume meiosis in golden Syrian hamster oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racowsky, C; Baldwin, K V; Larabell, C A; DeMarais, A A; Kazilek, C J

    1989-08-01

    One of the currently popular hypotheses for the regulation of meiotic resumption in mammalian oocytes proposes that the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone causes down-regulation of follicular gap junctions, which in turn disrupts transfer of a meiotic arrester from the somatic cells into the oocyte. The present study has investigated this hypothesis by examining the integrity of membrana granulosa cell gap junctions during the period of irreversible commitment to maturation of golden Syrian hamster oocytes in vivo. Our results have revealed a significant progressive decrease in the fractional area of cell surface occupied by gap junction membrane with increasing percentage of oocytes irreversibly committed to mature (1.946% and 0.921% fractional gap junction area at 0% and 100% oocytes irreversibly committed to mature, respectively, P less than 0.05). This net loss of membrana granulosa cell gap junctions from the cell surface was accompanied by a significant decrease in density of gap junction particles, whether they were arranged in rectilinear or non-rectilinear packing patterns. Furthermore, the number of gap junction particles per unit area of surface membrane scanned also underwent a significant progressive decrease with increasing percentage of oocytes irreversibly committed to mature. These data with the hamster are consistent with the hypothesis that down-regulation of membrana granulosa cell gap junctions may be of central importance in the regulation of gonadotropic stimulation of meiotic resumption in mammalian oocytes.

  15. Shunted-Josephson-junction model. I. The autonomous case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V. N.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.

    1977-01-01

    The shunted-Josephson-junction model: the parallel combination of a capacitance, a phase-dependent conductance, and an ideal junction element biased by a constant current, is discussed for arbitrary values of the junction parameters. The main objective is to provide a qualitative understanding...... of the junction behavior in different regions of the parameter space. Approximate formulas are given for the parameter-space decomposition into regions of qualitatively different junction behavior corroborated by the associated-phase plane portraits and also approximate expressions for the corresponding dc...

  16. Planar Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monacoa, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    demagnetization effects imposed by the tunnel barrier and electrodes geometry are important. Measurements of the junction critical current versus magnetic field in planar Nb-based high-quality junctions with different geometry, size, and critical current density show that it is advantageous to use a transverse......Traditionally, since the discovery of the Josephson effect in 1962, the magnetic diffraction pattern of planar Josephson tunnel junctions has been recorded with the field applied in the plane of the junction. Here we discuss the static junction properties in a transverse magnetic field where...

  17. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy's Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los

  18. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro [Departamento de Física Teórica I, Ciudad Universitaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego, E-mail: dombriz@fis.ucm.es, E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za, E-mail: diego.saezgomez@uct.ac.za [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  19. Shot noise in YBCO bicrystal Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2003-01-01

    We measured spectral noise density in YBCO symmetric bicrystal Josephson junctions on sapphire substrates at bias voltages up to 100 mV and T 4.2 K. Normal state resistance of the Josephson junctions, R-N = 20-90 Omega and ICRN up to 2.2 mV have been observed in the experimental samples. Noise...... measurements were carried out within frequency bands of 1-2 GHz and 0.3-300 kHz. At bias voltages 10 less than or equal to V less than or equal to 60 mV a linear voltage dependence of noise power has been registered, while at V less than or equal to 5 mV a noticeable noise rise has been observed. The latter...

  20. Kondo Effect in Bare Electromigrated Break Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Andrew; Labaziewicz, Jarek

    2005-03-01

    Electromigrated break junctions are one of only a very few systems currently available that provide sub-nanometer electrode gaps in a gated geometry. They have been used in several experiments over the past few years to measure transport through nanometer-scale objects such as single molecules. Our measurements show that the electromigrated electrode system--even by itself, without added nanoparticles-- is richer than previously thought. This talk will present gate- dependent transport measurements of Kondo impurities in bare gold break junctions, generated with high yield using an electromigration process that is actively controlled. An unexpected behavior of the splitting is observed in the crossover regime, where spin splitting is of the same order as the Kondo temperature. The Kondo resonances observed here may be due to atomic-scale metallic grains formed during electromigration.

  1. Non-Lagrangian theories from brane junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ling [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Mitev, Vladimir [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Mathematik und Inst. fuer Physik; Pomoni, Elli [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Taki, Masato [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan). Mathematical Physics Lab.; Yagi, Futoshi [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this article we use 5-brane junctions to study the 5D T{sub N} SCFTs corresponding to the 5D N=1 uplift of the 4D N=2 strongly coupled gauge theories, which are obtained by compactifying N M5 branes on a sphere with three full punctures. Even though these theories have no Lagrangian description, by using the 5-brane junctions proposed by Benini, Benvenuti and Tachikawa, we are able to derive their Seiberg-Witten curves and Nekrasov partition functions. We cross-check our results with the 5D superconformal index proposed by Kim, Kim and Lee. Through the AGTW correspondence, we discuss the relations between 5D superconformal indices and n-point functions of the q-deformed W{sub N} Toda theories.

  2. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  3. Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Luchini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS is a valuable in situ spectroscopic analysis technique that provides a direct portrait of the electron transport properties of a molecular species. In the past, IETS has been applied to small molecules. Using self-assembled nanoelectronic junctions, IETS was performed for the first time on a large polypeptide protein peptide in the phosphorylated and native form, yielding interpretable spectra. A reproducible 10-fold shift of the I/V characteristics of the peptide was observed upon phosphorylation. Phosphorylation can be utilized as a site-specific modification to alter peptide structure and thereby influence electron transport in peptide molecular junctions. It is envisioned that kinases and phosphatases may be used to create tunable systems for molecular electronics applications, such as biosensors and memory devices.

  4. Josephson spin current in triplet superconductor junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Asano, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    This paper theoretically discusses the spin current in spin-triplet superconductor / insulator / spin-triplet superconductor junctions. At low temperatures, a midgap Andreev resonant state anomalously enhances not only the charge current but also the spin current. The coupling between the Cooper pairs and the electromagnetic fields leads to the Frounhofer pattern in the direct current spin flow in magnetic fields and the alternative spin current under applied bias-voltages.

  5. Decreased Vision and Junctional Scotoma from Pituicytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Huynh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pituicytomas are rare neoplasms of the sellar region. We report a case of vision loss and a junctional scotoma in a 43-year-old woman caused by compression of the optic chiasm by a pituitary tumor. The morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of the tumor were consistent with the diagnosis of pituicytoma. The tumor was debulked surgically, and the patient’s vision improved.

  6. The dentino-enamel junction revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, M; Septier, D; Bourd, K; Hall, R; Jeanny, J C; Jonet, L; Colin, S; Tager, F; Chaussain-Miller, C; Garabédian, M; George, A; Goldberg, H; Menashi, S

    2002-01-01

    The dentino-enamel junction is not an simple inert interface between two mineralized structures. A less simplistic view suggests that the dentino-enamel junctional complex should also include the inner aprismatic enamel and the mantle dentin. At early stages of enamel formation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 is stored in and released from the inner aprismatic enamel, possibly under the control of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3. The concentration peak for MMP-2 and -9 observed in the mantle dentin coincided with a very low labeling for TIMP-1 and -2, favoring the cross-talk between mineralizing epithelial and connective structures, and as a consequence the translocation of enamel proteins toward odontoblasts and pulp cells, and vice versa, the translocation of dentin proteins toward secretory ameloblasts and cells of the enamel organ. Finally, in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, large interglobular spaces in the circumpulpal dentin were the major defect induced by the gene alteration, whereas the mantle dentin was constantly unaffected. Altogether, these data plead for the recognition of the dentino-enamel junctional complex as a specific entity bearing its own biological characteristics.

  7. Junctional ectopic tachycardia after congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, E; Missant, C

    2014-01-01

    In this literature review, we try to give anesthesiologists a better understanding about Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia (JET), a narrow complex tachycardia that frequently occurs during and after surgery for congenital heart disease. Information was found in the databases of Pubmed, Science Direct, Medline and the Cochrane Library, by using the mesh terms "Tachycardia, Ectopic Junctional", combined with "Diagnosis", "Etiology", "Physiopathology", "Complications" and "Therapy". The publication date of the articles ranged from 1990 to 2012. Risk factors for the development JET are surgery near the AV node, a duration of cardiopulmonary bypass longer than 90 minutes, young age, the use of inotropic drugs and hypomagnesaemia. The diagnosis of Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia can be made on a 12-lead ECG, demonstrating a narrow-complex tachycardia with inverted P-waves and VA dissociation. Adenosine administration and an atrial electrocardiogram can help to confirm the diagnosis. If JET has a minimal impact on the hemodynamic status of the patient, risk factors should be avoided and the adrenergic tonus should be reduced. Hemodynamic unstable JET can be treated by amiodarone, hypothermia and pacing. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and radiofrequency or cryoablation are treatment options for life-threatening and resistant JET. JET is the most frequent arrhythmia during and after congenital cardiac surgery. The ECG is the only available method to diagnose JET, demonstrating inverted P-waves and VA-dissociation. Amiodarone seems to be the most effective treatment option, because it can restore sinus rhythm and reduces the JET rate.

  8. [Individual surgical treatment of craniocervical junction malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Rongjun; Li, Zhixiao; Zhang, Jiadong; Chen, Hang; Shi, Xiwen

    2014-08-05

    To explore the individual surgical treatment of various performance types of craniocervical junction malformation. From January 2011 to December 2013, 112 patients with craniocervical junction malformations were treated at our department, including Chiari malformation (n = 65) (syringomyelia, n = 58 and without syringomyelia, n = 7), basilar invagination disease (n = 35) (with cerebellar tonsillar herniation malformation or occipitocervical fusion) and complex craniocervical malformation (n = 22) (atlantoaxial dislocation with occipitocervical fusion or with chiari malformation or cervical insufficiency sub-section). All of them had the symptoms of upper cervical nerve damage. For those with Chiari malformation, we evaluated atlanto-occipital joint stability preoperatively. If atlanto-occipital joint was stable, we performed small occipital bone window decompression, partial removal of cerebellar tonsils, loosening of posterior fossa, upper cervical adhesions, artificial dura appropriate sutured dural repair expanding neck pillow. For patients with basilar invagination, if nerve compression performance was in the rear, posterior decompression was performed. For those with complex craniocervical malformation with atlantoaxial dislocation, neck traction under anesthesia or traction after anterior release, then pillow neck fixation and fusion were performed. During follow-ups, the symptoms improved significantly (n = 98, 87.51%). There were no symptomatic change (n = 10, 8.93%), postoperative neurological deterioration (n = 3, 2.67%) and death (n = 1, 0.89%). According to specific clinical manifestations of craniocervical junction malformation patients, the best treatment is to perform individualized surgeries after thorough preoperative evaluations.

  9. Online Junction Temperature Cycle Recording of an IGBT Power Module in a Hybrid Car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Denk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of the lifetime calculation approach of IGBT power modules used in hybrid-electric powertrains suffers greatly from the inaccurate knowledge of application typical load-profiles. To verify the theoretical load-profiles with data from the field this paper presents a concept to record all junction temperature cycles of an IGBT power module during its operation in a test vehicle. For this purpose the IGBT junction temperature is measured with a modified gate driver that determines the temperature sensitive IGBT internal gate resistor by superimposing the negative gate voltage with a high-frequency identification signal. An integrated control unit manages the TJ measurement during the regular switching operation, the exchange of data with the system controller, and the automatic calibration of the sensor system. To calculate and store temperature cycles on a microcontroller an online Rainflow counting algorithm was developed. The special feature of this algorithm is a very accurate extraction of lifetime relevant information with a significantly reduced calculation and storage effort. Until now the recording concept could be realized and tested within a laboratory voltage source inverter. Currently the IGBT driver with integrated junction temperature measurement and the online cycle recording algorithm is integrated in the voltage source inverter of first test vehicles. Such research will provide representative load-profiles to verify and optimize the theoretical load-profiles used in today’s lifetime calculation.

  10. A unified framework for spiking and gap-junction interactions in distributed neuronal network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, Jan; Helias, Moritz; Kunkel, Susanne; Igarashi, Jun; Bolten, Matthias; Frommer, Andreas; Diesmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary simulators for networks of point and few-compartment model neurons come with a plethora of ready-to-use neuron and synapse models and support complex network topologies. Recent technological advancements have broadened the spectrum of application further to the efficient simulation of brain-scale networks on supercomputers. In distributed network simulations the amount of spike data that accrues per millisecond and process is typically low, such that a common optimization strategy is to communicate spikes at relatively long intervals, where the upper limit is given by the shortest synaptic transmission delay in the network. This approach is well-suited for simulations that employ only chemical synapses but it has so far impeded the incorporation of gap-junction models, which require instantaneous neuronal interactions. Here, we present a numerical algorithm based on a waveform-relaxation technique which allows for network simulations with gap junctions in a way that is compatible with the delayed communication strategy. Using a reference implementation in the NEST simulator, we demonstrate that the algorithm and the required data structures can be smoothly integrated with existing code such that they complement the infrastructure for spiking connections. To show that the unified framework for gap-junction and spiking interactions achieves high performance and delivers high accuracy in the presence of gap junctions, we present benchmarks for workstations, clusters, and supercomputers. Finally, we discuss limitations of the novel technology. PMID:26441628

  11. HfO2 and SiO2 as barriers in magnetic tunneling junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Gokaran; Archer, Thomas; Sanvito, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    SiO2 and HfO2 are both high-k, wide-gap semiconductors, currently used in the microelectronic industry as gate barriers. Here we investigate whether the same materials can be employed to make magnetic tunnel junctions, which in principle can be amenable for integration in conventional Si technology. By using a combination of density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's functions method for quantum transport we have studied the transport properties of Co [0001 ] /SiO2[001 ] /Co [0001 ] and Fe [001 ] /HfO2[001 ] /Fe [001 ] junctions. In both cases we found a quite large magnetoresistance, which is explained through the analysis of the real band structure of the magnets and the complex one of the insulator. We find that there is no symmetry spin filtering for the Co-based junction since the high transmission Δ2' band crosses the Fermi level, EF, for both spin directions. However, the fact that Co is a strong ferromagnet makes the orbital contribution to the two Δ2' spin subbands different, yielding magnetoresistance. In contrast for the Fe-based junction symmetry filtering is active for an energy window spanning between the Fermi level and 1 eV below EF, with Δ1 symmetry contributing to the transmission.

  12. Increased phosphorylation of Cx36 gap junctions in the AII amacrine cells of RD retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Elena; Yee, Christopher W; Sagdullaev, Botir T

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration (RD) encompasses a family of diseases that lead to photoreceptor death and visual impairment. Visual decline due to photoreceptor cell loss is further compromised by emerging spontaneous hyperactivity in inner retinal cells. This aberrant activity acts as a barrier to signals from the remaining photoreceptors, hindering therapeutic strategies to restore light sensitivity in RD. Gap junctions, particularly those expressed in AII amacrine cells, have been shown to be integral to the generation of aberrant activity. It is unclear whether gap junction expression and coupling are altered in RD. To test this, we evaluated the expression and phosphorylation state of connexin36 (Cx36), the gap junction subunit predominantly expressed in AII amacrine cells, in two mouse models of RD, rd10 (slow degeneration) and rd1 (fast degeneration). Using Ser293-P antibody, which recognizes a phosphorylated form of connexin36, we found that phosphorylation of connexin36 in both slow and fast RD models was significantly greater than in wildtype controls. This elevated phosphorylation may underlie the increased gap junction coupling of AII amacrine cells exhibited by RD retina.

  13. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson pi-junctions with insulating ferromagnets and its application to phase qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Kawabata, S.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2007-01-01

    We theoretically investigate macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in a current-biased π junction with a superconductor (S) and an insulating ferromagnet (IF). By using the functional integral method and the instanton approximation, the influence of the quasiparticle dissipation on MQT is found to be

  14. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Wageha A; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2017-02-10

    Maintaining a healthy gut environment is a prerequisite for sustainable animal production. The gut plays a key role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients and constitutes an initial organ exposed to external factors influencing bird's health. The intestinal epithelial barrier serves as the first line of defense between the host and the luminal environment. It consists of a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells connected by intercellular junctional complexes which shrink the space between adjacent cells. Consequently, free passing of solutes and water via the paracellular pathway is prevented. Tight junctions (TJs) are multi-protein complexes which are crucial for the integrity and function of the epithelial barrier as they not only link cells but also form channels allowing permeation between cells, resulting in epithelial surfaces of different tightness. Tight junction's molecular composition, ultrastructure, and function are regulated differently with regard to physiological and pathological stimuli. Both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that reduced tight junction integrity greatly results in a condition commonly known as "leaky gut". A loss of barrier integrity allows the translocation of luminal antigens (microbes, toxins) via the mucosa to access the whole body which are normally excluded and subsequently destroys the gut mucosal homeostasis, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to systemic infection, chronic inflammation and malabsorption. There is considerable evidence that the intestinal barrier dysfunction is an important factor contributing to the pathogenicity of some enteric bacteria. It has been shown that some enteric pathogens can induce permeability defects in gut epithelia by altering tight junction proteins, mediated by their toxins. Resolving the strategies that microorganisms use to hijack the functions of tight junctions is important for our understanding of microbial pathogenesis, because some pathogens can

  15. Anisotropic-Scale Junction Detection and Matching for Indoor Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Nan; Xia, Gui-Song; Bai, Xiang; Zhang, Liangpei; Shen, Weiming

    Junctions play an important role in characterizing local geometrical structures of images, and the detection of which is a longstanding but challenging task. Existing junction detectors usually focus on identifying the location and orientations of junction branches while ignoring their scales, which, however, contain rich geometries of images. This paper presents a novel approach for junction detection and characterization, which especially exploits the locally anisotropic geometries of a junction and estimates its scales by relying on an a-contrario model. The output junctions are with anisotropic scales, saying that a scale parameter is associated with each branch of a junction and are thus named as anisotropic-scale junctions (ASJs). We then apply the new detected ASJs for matching indoor images, where there are dramatic changes of viewpoints and the detected local visual features, e.g., key-points, are usually insufficient and lack distinctive ability. We propose to use the anisotropic geometries of our junctions to improve the matching precision of indoor images. The matching results on sets of indoor images demonstrate that our approach achieves the state-of-the-art performance on indoor image matching.Junctions play an important role in characterizing local geometrical structures of images, and the detection of which is a longstanding but challenging task. Existing junction detectors usually focus on identifying the location and orientations of junction branches while ignoring their scales, which, however, contain rich geometries of images. This paper presents a novel approach for junction detection and characterization, which especially exploits the locally anisotropic geometries of a junction and estimates its scales by relying on an a-contrario model. The output junctions are with anisotropic scales, saying that a scale parameter is associated with each branch of a junction and are thus named as anisotropic-scale junctions (ASJs). We then apply the new

  16. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    electrophysiology and pharmacology. In conclusion, the stimulation of adenosine receptors in hCMEC/D3 cells induces a Ca 2+ influx by opening CNG channels in a cAMP-dependent manner. Ca 2+ in turn induces the formation of new gap junction plaques and a consecutive sustained enhancement of gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a physiological link that integrates gap junction coupling into the adenosine receptor-dependent signalling of endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  17. Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the Long Junction Regimes: Part II- Critical current scaling of the Short and Long Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Chung-Ting; Borzenets, Ivan; Amet, Francois; Draelos, Anne; Wei, Ming-Tso; Seredinski, Andrew; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Bomze, Yuriy; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    The Josephson effect describes the phenomenon of coupling a supercurrent between superconductors through a weak link. Using graphene as this weak link has seen much interest due to its tunable density and related Dirac fermion physics. Previously we have studied the critical current scaling in diffusive graphene samples with different junction lengths. For ballistic junctions, however, knowledge about transport properties remains scarce. With clean encapsulated graphene, studying the supercurrent transport mechanism in ballistic samples has now become feasible. We present measurements of ballistic graphene Josephson junctions from short to long junction limits. From their temperature dependence, we characterize the critical current in both the short and long junction cases by using the characteristic energies Δ and δE, where Δ is the superconducting gap and δE is the level spacing in the long junction case. At low temperatures, as KBT < Δ for short junctions and KBT < δE for long ones, we show that the critical current saturates at a level determined by the product of Δ (or δE) and the number of the junction's transversal modes.

  18. LRP4 is critical for neuromuscular junction maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Bowman, Andrew; Shen, Chengyong; Li, Lei; Xiong, Wen-cheng; Mei, Lin

    2014-10-15

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibers, and is critical for control of muscle contraction. Its formation requires neuronal agrin that acts by binding to LRP4 to stimulate MuSK. Mutations have been identified in agrin, MuSK, and LRP4 in patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome, and patients with myasthenia gravis develop antibodies against agrin, LRP4, and MuSK. However, it remains unclear whether the agrin signaling pathway is critical for NMJ maintenance because null mutation of any of the three genes is perinatal lethal. In this study, we generated imKO mice, a mutant strain whose LRP4 gene can be deleted in muscles by doxycycline (Dox) treatment. Ablation of the LRP4 gene in adult muscle enabled studies of its role in NMJ maintenance. We demonstrate that Dox treatment of P30 mice reduced muscle strength and compound muscle action potentials. AChR clusters became fragmented with diminished junctional folds and synaptic vesicles. The amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials were reduced, indicating impaired neuromuscular transmission and providing cellular mechanisms of adult LRP4 deficiency. We showed that LRP4 ablation led to the loss of synaptic agrin and the 90 kDa fragments, which occurred ahead of other prejunctional and postjunctional components, suggesting that LRP4 may regulate the stability of synaptic agrin. These observations demonstrate that LRP4 is essential for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the NMJ and that loss of muscle LRP4 in adulthood alone is sufficient to cause myasthenic symptoms. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413892-14$15.00/0.

  19. Pulsed-Power Burnout of Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of pulsed-power burnout testing the Fairchild 9046 quad dual-input nand gate and the Amelco 6041 three-input nand gate showed the circuits to...be vulnerable to junction burnout for pulses of less than 100 V and pulse widths on the order of 100 nsec. Calculations based on Wunsch-Bell junction... burnout theory showed good agreement with the experimental results. Sample calculations applying Wunsch-Bell theory to integrated circuits are given.

  20. The role of tight junctions in mammary gland function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelwagen, Kerst; Singh, Kuljeet

    2014-03-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are cellular structures that facilitate cell-cell communication and are important in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of epithelia. It is only during the last two decades that the molecular make-up of TJ is becoming unravelled, with two major transmembrane-spanning structural protein families, called occludin and claudins, being the true constituents of the TJ. These TJ proteins are linked via specific scaffolding proteins to the cell's cytoskeleton. In the mammary gland TJ between adjacent secretory epithelial cells are formed during lactogenesis and are instrumental in establishing and maintaining milk synthesis and secretion, whereas TJ integrity is compromised during mammary involution and also as result of mastitis and periods of mammary inflamation (including mastitis). They prevent the paracellular transport of ions and small molecules between the blood and milk compartments. Formation of intact TJ at the start of lactation is important for the establishment of the lactation. Conversely, loss of TJ integrity has been linked to reduced milk secretion and mammary function and increased paracellular transport of blood components into the milk and vice versa. In addition to acting as a paracellular barrier, the TJ is increasingly linked to playing an active role in intracellular signalling. This review focusses on the role of TJ in mammary function of the normal, non-malignant mammary gland, predominantly in ruminants, the major dairy producing species.

  1. Universality of conductance in mesoscopic junctions and chiral anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxman, Luis E.; Mucciolo, Eduardo R. [Universidadade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2001-03-01

    We show that the electrical conductance of one-dimensional, finite systems with chiral symmetry is not renormalized at low temperatures and depends solely on the characteristics of the electron gas at the leads. This chiral symmetry is related to the invariance under phase transformations that distinguish between left- and right-moving electrons. Alternatively to previous works in the literature, we employ a fermionic path integral formalism which does not rely on bosonization. The fundamental role played by the reservoirs and the finite size of the junctions is put into evidence. [Spanish] En este articulo mostramos que en sistemas unidimensionales finitos con simetria quiral, la conductancia electrica no se renormaliza a bajas temperaturas, y depende solamente de las caracteristicas del gas de electrones en los reservatorios. Esta simetria quiral esta relacionada a la invariancia ante transformadores de fase que distinguen entre modos derechos e izquierdos. Empleamos un formalismo de integral funcional sobre fermiones, el cual constituye una alternativa al metodo de bosonizacion utilizado previamente en la literatura. Tambien ponemos en evidencia el papel fundamental desempenado por los reservatorios y el tamano finito de la muestra.

  2. Recovery by triple junction motion in heavily deformed metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tianbo; Hansen, Niels; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2015-01-01

    is briefly considered, whereas recovery in samples deformed to much higher strains is discussed in more detail. An example is Al, where a new and important recovery mechanism is triple junction motion, which can remove thin lamellae and consequently increase the thickness of neighbouring lamellae...... controlling the rate of recovery by triple junction motion. Operation of triple junction motion in other heavily deformed metals, such as Ni and Cu, is also briefly discussed....

  3. Shottky-barrier formation. Abrupt metal-semiconductor junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guines, F.; Sanchez-Dehesa, J.; Flores, F.

    1983-02-01

    In this paper a realistic self-consistent calculation of an abrupt metal-semiconductor junction is presented by means of a tight-binding approach. A specific Si-Ag junction has been considered, and the charge neutrality level as well as the barrier height have been determined in good agreement with experiments. For a general junction it is shown that the interface properties depend essentially on the characteristics of the first metal layer and its interaction with the semiconductor.

  4. Josephson Effect in Singlet Superconductor-Ferromagnet-Triplet Superconductor Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Chi-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    We study the current-phase relation of a ballistic SIFIT junction, consisting of a spin-singlet superconductor (S), a weak ferromagnetic metal (F), a spin-triplet superconductor (T), and insulating ferromagnetic interfaces (I). We use the generalized quasiclassical formalism developed by A. Millis et al. to compute the current density and the free energy of the junction for arbitrary orientation of the magnetizations of the junction barrier. We investigate in detail the effect of the distribu...

  5. Petri Net-Based Model of Helicobacter pylori Mediated Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins in Stomach Lining during Gastric Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anam Naz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions help prevent the passage of digestive enzymes and microorganisms through the space between adjacent epithelial cells lining. However, Helicobacter pylori encoded virulence factors negatively regulate these tight junctions and contribute to dysfunction of gastric mucosa. Here, we have predicted the regulation of important tight junction proteins, such as Zonula occludens-1, Claudin-2 and Connexin32 in the presence of pathogenic proteins. Molecular events such as post translational modifications and crosstalk between phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, palmitoylation and methylation are explored which may compromise the integrity of these tight junction proteins. Furthermore, the signaling pathways disrupted by dysregulated kinases, proteins and post-translational modifications are reviewed to design an abstracted computational model showing the situation-dependent dynamic behaviors of these biological processes and entities. A qualitative hybrid Petri Net model is therefore constructed showing the altered host pathways in the presence of virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A, leading to the disruption of tight junction proteins. The model is qualitative logic-based, which does not depend on any kinetic parameter and quantitative data and depends on knowledge derived from experiments. The designed model provides insights into the tight junction disruption and disease progression. Model is then verified by the available experimental data, nevertheless formal in vitro experimentation is a promising way to ensure its validation. The major findings propose that H. pylori activated kinases are responsible to trigger specific post translational modifications within tight junction proteins, at specific sites. These modifications may favor alterations in gastric barrier and provide a route to bacterial invasion into host cells.

  6. Flux interactions on stacked Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Alwyn C.; A., Petraglia

    1996-01-01

    Perturbation methods are used to study the dynamics of locked fluxon modes on stacked Josephson junctions and single crystals of certain high-T-c, superconductors. Two limiting cases are considered: (i) The nonlinear diffusion regime in which fluxon dynamics are dominated by energy exchange between...... the bias and loss parameters, and (ii) the propagating regime in which the interplay between magnetic and electric field energies governs the fluxon dynamics. Conditions for stability of locked fluxon modes are shown to be different in these two regimes....

  7. Phonon interference effects in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markussen, Troels

    2013-12-28

    We study coherent phonon transport through organic, π-conjugated molecules. Using first principles calculations and Green's function methods, we find that the phonon transmission function in cross-conjugated molecules, like meta-connected benzene, exhibits destructive quantum interference features very analogous to those observed theoretically and experimentally for electron transport in similar molecules. The destructive interference features observed in four different cross-conjugated molecules significantly reduce the thermal conductance with respect to linear conjugated analogues. Such control of the thermal conductance by chemical modifications could be important for thermoelectric applications of molecular junctions.

  8. Superconducting properties of lithographic lead break junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David; Scheer, Elke

    2018-01-01

    We have fabricated mechanically controlled break junction samples made of lead (Pb) by means of state-of-the-art nanofabrication methods: electron beam lithography and physical vapour deposition. The electrical and magnetic properties were characterized in a {}3{He} cryostat and showed a hard superconducting gap. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of tunnel contacts were compared and quantitatively described by including either thermal broadening of the density of states or pair breaking in the framework of a Skalski model, respectively. We show point contact spectra of few-atom contacts and present tunneling spectra exhibiting a superconducting double-gap structure.

  9. Fluxon Dynamics in Elliptic Annular Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Mygind, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a magnetic flux quantum (current vortex) trapped in a current-biased long planar elliptic annular Josephson tunnel junction. The system is modeled by a perturbed sine-Gordon equation that determines the spatial and temporal behavior of the phase difference across...... the tunnel barrier separating the two superconducting electrodes. In the absence of an external magnetic field, the fluxon dynamics in an elliptic annulus does not differ from that of a circular annulus where the stationary fluxon speed merely is determined by the system losses. The interaction between...

  10. Electron and Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian

    Molecular electronics provide the possibility to investigate electron and phonon transport at the smallest imaginable scale, where quantum effects can be investigated and exploited directly in the design. In this thesis, we study both electron transport and phonon transport in molecular junctions....... The system we are interested in here are π-stacked molecules connected with two semi-infinite leads. π-stacked aromatic rings, connected via π-π electronic coupling, provides a rather soft mechanical bridge while maintaining high electronic conductivity. We investigate electron transport...

  11. Improving transition voltage spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Chen, Jingzhe; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) is a promising spectroscopic tool for molecular junctions. The principles in TVS is to find the minimum on a Fowler-Nordheim plot where ln(I/V2) is plotted against 1/V and relate the voltage at the minimum Vmin to the closest molecular level. Importantly, Vmin...... is approximately half the voltage required to see a peak in the dI/dV curve. Information about the molecular level position can thus be obtained at relatively low voltages. In this work we show that the molecular level position can be determined at even lower voltages, Vmin(α), by finding the minimum of ln...

  12. Reinventing the PN Junction: Dimensionality Effects on Tunneling Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    state tunneling probability is 10-6. 2.3.2 Conclusion This device exploits a unique heterostructure and surface quantum well to create a new...pn junction describes tunneling [9] within a nanowire or carbon nanotube junction as schematically represented in Figure 6.3(a). Tunneling is...6.5 0D-1D JUNCTION A 0d to 1d junction represents tunneling from a quantum dot to a nanowire as shown in Figure 6.6(a). Our main goal in analyzing

  13. Imaging snake orbits at graphene n -p junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasiński, K.; Mreńca-Kolasińska, A.; Szafran, B.

    2017-01-01

    We consider conductance mapping of the snake orbits confined along the n -p junction defined in graphene by the electrostatic doping in the quantum Hall regime. We explain the periodicity of conductance oscillations at the magnetic field and the Fermi energy scales by the properties of the n -p junction as a conducting channel. We evaluate the conductance maps for a floating gate scanning the surface of the device. In the quantum Hall conditions the currents flow near the edges of the sample and along the n -p junction. The conductance mapping resolves only the n -p junction and not the edges. The conductance oscillations along the junction are found in the maps with periodicity related to the cyclotron orbits of the scattering current. Stronger probe potentials provide support to localized resonances at one of the sides of the junction with current loops that interfere with the n -p junction currents. The interference results in a series of narrow lines parallel to the junction with positions that strongly depend on the magnetic field through the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The consequences of a limited transparency of finite-width n -p junctions are also discussed.

  14. Superconducting Tunnel Junction Arrays for UV Photon Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative method is described for the fabrication of superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector arrays offering true "three dimensional" imaging throughout...

  15. ‘Gap Junctions and Cancer: Communicating for 50 Years’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, Trond; Mesnil, Marc; Naus, Christian C.; Lampe, Paul D.; Laird, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    Fifty years ago, tumour cells were found to lack electrical coupling, leading to the hypothesis that loss of direct intercellular communication is commonly associated with cancer onset and progression. Subsequent studies linked this phenomenon to gap junctions composed of connexin proteins. While many studies support the notion that connexins are tumour suppressors, recent evidence suggests that, in some tumour types, they may facilitate specific stages of tumour progression through both junctional and non-junctional signalling pathways. This Timeline article highlights the milestones connecting gap junctions to cancer, and underscores important unanswered questions, controversies and therapeutic opportunities in the field. PMID:27782134

  16. Secretion of alpha-hemolysin by Escherichia coil disrupts tight junctions in ulcerative colitis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Du, Zhengyu; Struve, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    and pathogenic E. coli LF82 were used as controls. RESULTS: E. coli strains from patients with active UC completely disrupted epithelial cell tight junctions shortly after inoculation. These strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are all α-hemolysin positive. In contrast, probiotic E. coli Nissle...... adenocarcinoma) cell tight junctions. However, this phenotype was lost in a mutant with knockout (Δ) of both hly loci (Pjunction integrity in differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. This effect was abolished......, pathogenic E. coli LF82, four E. coli from patients with inactive UC and three E. coli strains from healthy controls did not disrupt tight junctions. E. coli p19A WT as well as cnf1, and single loci of hly mutants from cluster I and II were all able to damage Caco-2 (Heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal...

  17. β-Conglycinin Reduces the Tight Junction Occludin and ZO-1 Expression in IPEC-J2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean allergy presents a health threat to humans and animals. The mechanism by which food/feed allergen β-conglycinin injures the intestinal barrier has not been well understood. In this study, the changes of epithelial permeability, integrity, metabolic activity, the tight junction (TJ distribution and expression induced by β-conglycinin were evaluated using IPEC-J2 model. The results showed a significant decrease of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER (p < 0.001 and metabolic activity (p < 0.001 and a remarkable increase of alkaline phosphatase (AP activity (p < 0.001 in a dose-dependent manner. The expression levels of tight junction occludin and ZO-1 were decreased (p < 0.05. The reduced fluorescence of targets and change of cellular morphology were recorded. The tight junction occludin and ZO-1 mRNA expression linearly declined with increasing β-conglycinin (p < 0.001.

  18. Cdc42 is crucial for the maturation of primordial cell junctions in keratinocytes independent of Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Dan; Pedersen, Esben; Wang, Zhipeng

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts are crucial for the integrity of all tissues. Contrasting reports have been published about the role of Cdc42 in epithelial cell-cell contacts in vitro. In keratinocytes, it was suggested that Rac1 and not Cdc42 is crucial for the formation of mature epithelial junctions, based...... on dominant negative inhibition experiments. Deletion of the Cdc42 gene in keratinocytes in vivo slowly impaired the maintenance of cell-cell contacts by an increased degradation of beta-catenin. Whether Cdc42 is required for the formation of mature junctions was not tested. We show now that Cdc42-deficient...... immortalized and primary keratinocytes form only punctate primordial cell contacts in vitro, which cannot mature into belt-like junctions. This defect was independent of enhanced degradation of beta-catenin, but correlated to an impaired activation and localization of aPKCzeta in the Cdc42-null keratinocytes...

  19. Grades 1-8, Apache Junction Unified School District 43, Apache Junction, Arizona. PLATO Evaluation Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, David W.; Quinn, Nancy W.

    Apache Junction Unified School District, Arizona, has embarked on a 5-year program of instructional improvement using technology. PLATO Elementary reading and mathematics products were installed in the district's elementary and middle schools at the beginning of the 1999-2000 school year. This evaluation studied the use and preliminary student…

  20. Large-area silicon nanowire Schottky junction photodetector with tunable absorption and low junction capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, L. P.; Seyedi, M. A.; Fiorentino, M.; Beausoleil, R. G.

    2017-06-01

    Silicon photodetectors for operation in the near-infrared with a sufficient responsivity and high-speed operation are currently needed as scalable, CMOS compatible components for photonic and communication applications. Photodetectors based on semiconductor nanowire structures with dielectric planarization enable larger active optical areas and higher operating speeds than planar devices due to reduced junction capacitance and enhanced absorption. Here, we report on the fabrication and characterization of a silicon nanowire photodetector with dielectric infilling and a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) Schottky contact. Optical simulations show that the absorbed power can be confined at the top of the nanowire array, enabling efficient operation in the near-infrared. This is despite the relatively low absorption coefficient for silicon in this wavelength range in addition to the design of the nanowire array to have a low fill factor compared to the bulk material in order to minimize the junction capacitance. The responsivity of this device is  >0.3 A W-1 at a reverse bias of 2 V and the junction capacitance is 8  ±  2 nF cm-2, which are respectively comparable and lower than the values expected for a planar silicon Schottky junction photodetector with a similar active area.

  1. Full potential of radial junction Si thin film solar cells with advanced junction materials and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shengyi; Misra, Soumyadeep; Lu, Jiawen; Yu, Zhongwei; Yu, Linwei; Xu, Jun; Wang, Junzhuan; Xu, Ling; Shi, Yi; Chen, Kunji; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2015-07-01

    Combining advanced materials and junction design in nanowire-based thin film solar cells requires a different thinking of the optimization strategy, which is critical to fulfill the potential of nano-structured photovoltaics. Based on a comprehensive knowledge of the junction materials involved in the multilayer stack, we demonstrate here, in both experimental and theoretical manners, the potential of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin film solar cells in a radial junction (RJ) configuration. Resting upon a solid experimental basis, we also assess a more advanced tandem RJ structure with radially stacking a-Si:H/nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si:H) PIN junctions, and show that a balanced photo-current generation with a short circuit current density of Jsc = 14.2 mA/cm2 can be achieved in a tandem RJ cell, while reducing the expensive nc-Si:H absorber thickness from 1-3 μ m (in planar tandem cells) to only 120 nm. These results provide a clearly charted route towards a high performance Si thin film photovoltaics.

  2. A cryogenic scanning laser microscope for investigation of dynamical states in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    The first local oscillators based on moving magnetic flux quanta in long Josephson junctions are being developed for superconducting integrated quasi-optical SIS receivers. In order to further refine these oscillators one has to understand the complex dynamics of these devices. Since the local...... on measurements on different oscillator samples, performed with a novel Cryogenic Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM) having a spatial resolution of less than ±2.5 μm over a 500 μm×50 μm wide scanning area in the temperature range 2 K-300 K. Even though the dynamical states are extremely sensitive to external noise...... this microscope enables us to make stable in-situ measurements on operating Josephson junctions. Recent results are presented and discussed....

  3. Modulation of Tight Junction Structure and Function by Kinases and Phosphatases Targeting Occludin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Johannes Dörfel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs typically represent the most apical contacts in epithelial and endothelial cell layers where they play an essential role in the separation of extracellular or luminal spaces from underlying tissues in the body. Depending on the protein composition, TJs define the barrier characteristics and in addition maintain cell polarity. Two major families of integral membrane proteins form the typical TJ strand network, the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein (TAMP family members occludin, tricellulin, and MarvelD3 as well as a specific set of claudins. Occludin was the first identified member of these tetraspanins and is now widely accepted as a regulator of TJ assembly and function. Therefore, occludin itself has to be tightly regulated. Phosphorylation of occludin appears to be of central importance in this context. Here we want to summarize current knowledge on the kinases and phosphatases directly modifying occludin, and their role in the regulation of TJ structure, function, and dynamics.

  4. Routing trains through railway junctions: A new set-packing approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusby, Richard Martin; Larsen, Jesper; Ryan, David

    2011-01-01

    The problem of routing trains through railway junctions is an integral part of railway operations. Large junctions are highly interconnected networks of track where multiple railway lines merge, intersect, and split. The number of possible routings makes this a very complicated problem. We show how...... the problem can be formulated as a set-packing model with a resource-based constraint system. We prove that this formulation is tighter than the conventional node-packing model, and develop a branch-and-price algorithm that exploits the structure of the set-packing model. A discussion of the variable...... generation phase, as well as a pricing routine in which these variables are represented by tree structures, is also described. Computational experiments on 25 random timetables show this to be an efficient approach. © 2011 INFORMS....

  5. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wageha A. Awad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining a healthy gut environment is a prerequisite for sustainable animal production. The gut plays a key role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients and constitutes an initial organ exposed to external factors influencing bird’s health. The intestinal epithelial barrier serves as the first line of defense between the host and the luminal environment. It consists of a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells connected by intercellular junctional complexes which shrink the space between adjacent cells. Consequently, free passing of solutes and water via the paracellular pathway is prevented. Tight junctions (TJs are multi-protein complexes which are crucial for the integrity and function of the epithelial barrier as they not only link cells but also form channels allowing permeation between cells, resulting in epithelial surfaces of different tightness. Tight junction’s molecular composition, ultrastructure, and function are regulated differently with regard to physiological and pathological stimuli. Both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that reduced tight junction integrity greatly results in a condition commonly known as “leaky gut”. A loss of barrier integrity allows the translocation of luminal antigens (microbes, toxins via the mucosa to access the whole body which are normally excluded and subsequently destroys the gut mucosal homeostasis, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to systemic infection, chronic inflammation and malabsorption. There is considerable evidence that the intestinal barrier dysfunction is an important factor contributing to the pathogenicity of some enteric bacteria. It has been shown that some enteric pathogens can induce permeability defects in gut epithelia by altering tight junction proteins, mediated by their toxins. Resolving the strategies that microorganisms use to hijack the functions of tight junctions is important for our understanding of microbial pathogenesis

  6. Concept and design of super junction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Wentong; Qiao, Ming; Zhan, Zhenya; Li, Zhaoji

    2018-02-01

    The super junction (SJ) has been recognized as the " milestone” of the power MOSFET, which is the most important innovation concept of the voltage-sustaining layer (VSL). The basic structure of the SJ is a typical junction-type VSL (J-VSL) with the periodic N and P regions. However, the conventional VSL is a typical resistance-type VSL (R-VSL) with only an N or P region. It is a qualitative change of the VSL from the R-VSL to the J-VSL, introducing the bulk depletion to increase the doping concentration and optimize the bulk electric field of the SJ. This paper firstly summarizes the development of the SJ, and then the optimization theory of the SJ is discussed for both the vertical and the lateral devices, including the non-full depletion mode, the minimum specific on-resistance optimization method and the equivalent substrate model. The SJ concept breaks the conventional " silicon limit” relationship of R on∝V B 2.5, showing a quasi-linear relationship of R on∝V B 1.03.

  7. Junction like behavior in polycrystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Shivakumar, E-mail: sbhaskar@mail.uh.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cullen College of Engineering, University of Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Charlson, Earl Joe; Litvinov, Dmitri [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cullen College of Engineering, University of Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Makarenko, Boris [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, TX 77004 (United States)

    2012-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result that we obtained are compared with single crystalline diamond devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The barrier height of 4.4 eV matches the ideal pn-junction barrier height of diamond thin film. - Abstract: We have successfully fabricated polycrystalline diamond rectifying junction devices on n-type (1 0 0) silicon substrates by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD) using methane/hydrogen process gas and trimethyl borate and trimethyl phosphite dissolved in acetone as p- and n-type dopants, respectively. Impedance spectroscopy and current-voltage analysis indicates that the conduction is vertical down the grains and facets and not due to surface effects. Electrical characteristics were analyzed with In and Ti/Au top metal contacts with Al as the substrate contact. Current-voltage characteristics as a function of temperature showed barrier potentials of 1.1 eV and 0.77 eV for the In and Ti/Au contacts, respectively. Barrier heights of 4.8 eV (In) and 4.4 eV (Ti/Au) were obtained from capacitance-voltage measurements.

  8. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Cherian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS, congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS. SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability is limited to a few centers. For RNS supramaximal stimulation is essential and so is display of the whole waveform of each muscle response at maximum amplitude. The amplitudes of the negative phase of the first and fourth responses are measured from baseline to negative peak, and the percent change of the fourth response compared with the first represents the decrement or increment. A decrement greater than 10% is accepted as abnormal and smooth progression of response amplitude train and reproducibility form the crux. In suspected LEMS the effect of fast rates of stimulation should be determined after RNS response to slow rates of stimulation. Caution is required to avoid misinterpretation of potentiation and pseudofacilitation.

  9. Molecular Diffusion through Cyanobacterial Septal Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Nieves-Morión

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as filaments in which intercellular molecular exchange takes place. During the differentiation of N2-fixing heterocysts, regulators are transferred between cells. In the diazotrophic filament, vegetative cells that fix CO2 through oxygenic photosynthesis provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with fixed nitrogen. Intercellular molecular transfer has been traced with fluorescent markers, including calcein, 5-carboxyfluorescein, and the sucrose analogue esculin, which are observed to move down their concentration gradient. In this work, we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP assays in the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to measure the temperature dependence of intercellular transfer of fluorescent markers. We find that the transfer rate constants are directly proportional to the absolute temperature. This indicates that the “septal junctions” (formerly known as “microplasmodesmata” linking the cells in the filament allow molecular exchange by simple diffusion, without any activated intermediate state. This constitutes a novel mechanism for molecular transfer across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, in addition to previously characterized mechanisms for active transport and facilitated diffusion. Cyanobacterial septal junctions are functionally analogous to the gap junctions of metazoans.

  10. Single Molecule Nanoelectrochemistry in Electrical Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2016-11-15

    It is now possible to reliably measure single molecule conductance in a wide variety of environments including organic liquids, ultrahigh vacuum, water, ionic liquids, and electrolytes. The most commonly used methods deploy scanning probe microscopes, mechanically formed break junctions, or lithographically formed nanogap contacts. Molecules are generally captured between a pair of facing electrodes, and the junction current response is measured as a function of bias voltage. Gating electrodes can also be added so that the electrostatic potential at the molecular bridge can be independently controlled by this third noncontacting electrode. This can also be achieved in an electrolytic environment using a four-electrode bipotentiostatic configuration, which allows independent electrode potential control of the two contacting electrodes. This is commonly realized using an electrochemical STM and enables single molecule electrical characterization as a function of electrode potential and redox state of the molecular bridge. This has emerged as a powerful tool in modern interfacial electrochemistry and nanoelectrochemistry for studying charge transport across single molecules as a function of electrode potential and the electrolytic environments. Such measurements are possible in electrolytes ranging from aqueous buffers to nonaqueous ionic liquids. In this Account, we illustrate a number of examples of single molecule electrical measurements under electrode potential control use a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and demonstrate how these can help in the understanding of charge transport in single molecule junctions. Examples showing charge transport following phase coherent tunneling to incoherent charge hopping across redox active molecular bridges are shown. In the case of bipyridinium (or viologen) molecular wires, it is shown how electrochemical reduction leads to an increase of the single molecule conductance, which is controlled by the liquid electrochemical

  11. Analysis of T-DNA/Host-Plant DNA Junction Sequences in Single-Copy Transgenic Barley Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne G. Bartlett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing across the junction between an integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA and a host plant genome provides two important pieces of information. The junctions themselves provide information regarding the proportion of T-DNA which has integrated into the host plant genome, whilst the transgene flanking sequences can be used to study the local genetic environment of the integrated transgene. In addition, this information is important in the safety assessment of GM crops and essential for GM traceability. In this study, a detailed analysis was carried out on the right-border T-DNA junction sequences of single-copy independent transgenic barley lines. T-DNA truncations at the right-border were found to be relatively common and affected 33.3% of the lines. In addition, 14.3% of lines had rearranged construct sequence after the right border break-point. An in depth analysis of the host-plant flanking sequences revealed that a significant proportion of the T-DNAs integrated into or close to known repetitive elements. However, this integration into repetitive DNA did not have a negative effect on transgene expression.

  12. Immersed boundary simulation of flow through arterial junctions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dwaipayan Sarkar

    Simulations are further carried out for pulsated flows and effects of blockages near the junctions (due to stenosis or atherosclerosis). Instabilities in the flow structures near the junction and the resulting changes in the downstream pulsation frequency were observed. These changes account for the physiological heart defects ...

  13. Internal resonances in periodically modulated long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Mygind, Jesper; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    1995-01-01

    Fiske modes in the sub-junctions formed between the inhomogeneities. The voltage positions of the resonant steps oscillate as function of the applied magnetic field with a period corresponding to the inclusion of one magnetic flux quantum, Φ0=h/2e, per sub-junction. A qualitative explanation that takes...

  14. Conditions for synchronization in Josephson-junction arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernikov, A.A.; Schmidt, G. [Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An effective perturbation theoretical method has been developed to study the dynamics of Josephson Junction series arrays. It is shown that the inclusion of Junction capacitances, often ignored, has a significant impact on synchronization. Comparison of analytic with computational results over a wide range of parameters shows excellent agreement.

  15. Processing of Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Josephson Edge Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical behavior of epitaxial superconductor-normal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson edge junctions is strongly affected by processing conditions. Ex-situ processes, utilizing photoresist and polyimide/photoresist mask layers, are employed for ion milling edges for junctions with Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxide (YBCO) electrodes and primarily Co-doped YBCO interlayers.

  16. 75 FR 76294 - Radio Broadcasting Services: Pacific Junction, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services: Pacific Junction, IA AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The staff deletes FM Channel 299C2 at Pacific Junction, Iowa...

  17. Magnesium-diboride ramp-type Josephson junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijatovic, D.; Brinkman, Alexander; Oomen, I.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, David H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Josephson junctions have been realized in which two superconducting magnesium-diboride (MgB2) layers are separated by a thin MgO barrier layer, using the ramp-type configuration. Their current–voltage characteristics follow the behavior described by the resistively shunted junction model, with an

  18. Microwave dependence of subharmonic gap structure in superconducting junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffman; Kofoed, Bent; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1974-01-01

    Experiments on both point-contact junctions (Nb-Nb) and on small area thin-film tunnel junctions (Sn-O-Sn) show that applied 4-mm radiation produces satellites associated with "subharmonic" gap structure as well as the familiar microwave-assisted tunneling structure associated with the supercondu...

  19. Externally pumped millimeter-wave Josephson-junction parametric amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, M.T; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, Ole

    1980-01-01

    A unified theory of the singly and doubly degenerate Josephson-junction parametric amplifier is presented. Experiments with single junctions on both amplifier modes at frequencies 10, 35, and 70 GHz are discussed. Low-noise temperature (∼100 K, single sideband (SSB)) and reasonable gain (∼8 d...

  20. Current-Phase Relation of Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Aguilera Servin, J.L.; Rakyta, P.; Kormányos, A.; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Vandersypen, L.M.K.; Goswami, S.

    2017-01-01

    The current-phase relation (CPR) of a Josephson junction (JJ) determines how the supercurrent evolves with the superconducting phase difference across the junction. Knowledge of the CPR is essential in order to understand the response of a JJ to various external parameters. Despite the rising

  1. Seebeck effect in the graphene-superconductor junction

    OpenAIRE

    Wysokiński, Marcin; Spałek, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Thermopower of graphene-superconductor (GS) junction is analyzed within the extended Blonder- Tinkham-Klapwijk formalism. Within this approach we have also calculated the temperature de- pendence of the zero-bias conductance for GS junction. Both quantities reflect quasi-relativistic nature of massless Dirac fermions in graphene. Both, the linear and the non-linear regimes are considered.

  2. Parametric excitation of plasma oscillations in Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm; Særmark, Knud

    1973-01-01

    A theory is presented for parametric excitation of plasma oscillations in a Josephson junction biased in the zero voltage mode. A threshold curve for the onset of the parametric excitation is deduced via the stability properties of a Mathieu differential equation obtained by a self-consistent lin...... junctions, but perhaps less likely in point contacts. ©1973 American Institute of Physics...

  3. Parametric excitation of plasma oscillations in a Josephson tunnel junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl; Kofoed, Bent; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1975-01-01

    Experimental evidence for subharmonic parametric excitation of plasma oscillations in Josephson tunnel junctions is presented. The experiments described are performed by measuring the microwave power necessary to switch a Josephson−tunnel junction biased in the zero−voltage state to a finite−volt......−voltage state. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  4. Phase locked fluxon-antifluxon states in stacked Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carapella, Giovanni; Constabile, Giovanni; Petraglia, Antonio

    1996-01-01

    Measurements were made on a two-stack long Josephson junction with very similar parameters and electrical access to the thin middle electrode. Mutually phase-locked fluxon-antifluxon states were observed. The observed propagation velocity is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. The I-V c...... in the junctions coexist with fluxons. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  5. Differential effects of chronic iron deficiency anaemia on junctional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential effects of chronic iron deficiency anaemia on junctional and labyrinthine zones of placenta in Sprague dawely rat. ... of the labyrinth may be designed to maintain placental diffusion capacity while increased thickness of the junctional zone constitutes a compensatory physical and nutritional adaptation to hypoxia.

  6. Macroscopic quantum dynamics of pi-junction with ferromagnetic insulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawabata, S.; Kawabata, Shiro; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Asano, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Yukio; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the macroscopic quantum dynamics of a π junction with a superconductor (S) and a multiferroic material or a ferromagnetic insulator (FI). By deriving the effective action from a microscopic Hamiltonian, a π-junction qubit (a S-FI-S superconducting quantum interference

  7. Charge Transport Processes in Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Eugene

    Molecular electronics (ME) has evolved into a rich area of exploration that combines the fields of chemistry, materials, electronic engineering and computational modeling to explore the physics behind electronic conduction at the molecular level. Through studying charge transport properties of single molecules and nanoscale molecular materials the field has gained the potential to bring about new avenues for the miniaturization of electrical components where quantum phenomena are utilized to achieve solid state molecular device functionality. Molecular junctions are platforms that enable these studies and consist of a single molecule or a small group of molecules directly connected to electrodes. The work presented in this thesis has built upon the current understanding of the mechanisms of charge transport in ordered junctions using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecular thin films. Donor and acceptor compounds were synthesized and incorporated into SAMs grown on metal substrates then the transport properties were measured with conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). In addition to experimentally measured current-voltage (I-V) curves, the transport properties were addressed computationally and modeled theoretically. The key objectives of this project were to 1) investigate the impact of molecular structure on hole and electron charge transport, 2) understand the nature of the charge carriers and their structure-transport properties through long (electronic coupling from experimental I-V curves. Here, we lay ground work for creating a more complete picture of charge transport in macroscopically ordered molecular junctions of controlled architecture, length and charge carrier. The polaronic nature of hopping transport has been predicted in long, conjugated molecular wires. Using quantum-based calculations, we modeled 'p-type' polaron transport through oligophenylenethiophene (OPTI) wires and assigned transport activation energies to specific modes of

  8. Shunted-Josephson-junction model. II. The nonautonomous case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V. N.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.

    1977-01-01

    The shunted-Josephson-junction model with a monochromatic ac current drive is discussed employing the qualitative methods of the theory of nonlinear oscillations. As in the preceding paper dealing with the autonomous junction, the model includes a phase-dependent conductance and a shunt capacitance...... out. The main objective is to provide a qualitative understanding of the junction behavior, to clarify which kinds of properties may be derived from the shunted-junction model, and to specify the relative arrangement of the important domains in the parameter-space decomposition........ The mathematical discussion makes use of the phase-space representation of the solutions to the differential equation. The behavior of the trajectories in phase space is described for different characteristic regions in parameter space and the associated features of the junction IV curve to be expected are pointed...

  9. Functional Molecular Junctions Derived from Double Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sohyeon; Hwang, Eunhee; Cho, Yunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2017-09-25

    Information processing using molecular junctions is becoming more important as devices are miniaturized to the nanoscale. Herein, we report functional molecular junctions derived from double self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) intercalated between soft graphene electrodes. Newly assembled molecular junctions are fabricated by placing a molecular SAM/(top) electrode on another molecular SAM/(bottom) electrode by using a contact-assembly technique. Double SAMs can provide tunneling conjugation across the van der Waals gap between the terminals of each monolayer and exhibit new electrical functions. Robust contact-assembled molecular junctions can act as platforms for the development of equivalent contact molecular junctions between top and bottom electrodes, which can be applied independently to different kinds of molecules to enhance either the structural complexity or the assembly properties of molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering in Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwane, Madoka; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-08-18

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy that allows Raman spectroscopy on a single molecular scale. Here, we present a review of SERS from molecular junctions, in which a single molecule or molecules are made to have contact from the top to the bottom of metal surfaces. The molecular junctions are nice platforms for SERS as well as transport measurement. Electronic characterization based on the transport measurements of molecular junctions has been extensively studied for the development of miniaturized electronic devices. Simultaneous SERS and transport measurement of the molecular junctions allow both structural (geometrical) and electronic information on the single molecule scale. The improvement of SERS measurement on molecular junctions open the door toward new nanoscience and nanotechnology in molecular electronics.

  11. Identification and characterisation of human Junctional Adhesion Molecule (JAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L A; Martin-Padura, I; Dejana, E; Hogg, N; Simmons, D L

    1999-12-01

    It is widely believed that migrating immune cells utilise the intercellular junctions as routes of passage, and in doing so cause the transient disruption of junctional structures. Thus there is much interest in the molecules that have been identified at cell-cell contact points and their potential involvement in the control of leukocyte diapedesis. In this report we describe the human orthologue to Junctional Adhesion Molecule (JAM), a recently identified member of the immunoglobulin superfamily expressed at intercellular junctions (Martin-Padura et al., 1998). The human protein shares a highly conserved structure and sequence with the murine protein. However it is distinct in that it is constitutively expressed on circulating neutrophils, monocytes, platelets and lymphocyte subsets. This broad expression pattern is similar to another IgSF molecule, CD31, expressed at intercellular junctions, and may indicate further complexities in the control of leukocyte/ endothelial interactions.

  12. [Change in management of ureteropelvic junction obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, P; Ricard, J; Boudailliez, B; Canarelli, J P

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in ureteropelvic junction management, from surgical correction to observation of the hydronephrosis. We checked wether or not it was deleterious for kidney. We retrospectively reviewed 96 charts between 1988 and 1998. Initial ultrasonography, and voiding cystourethrogram were available for all cases. Intravenous urography and diuretic renography were studied when available. Minimal follow-up of patients was one year. Patients were divided into three groups: surgery right away, surgery after observation, and observation only. Later was the diagnosis, more significant were the hydronephrosis and impairment of renal function (p 0.05), and were not predictive of their course. Initial non operative management of hydronephrosis was not dangerous for renal function. It is advisable to detect at the earliest all signs of obstruction, because surgery improves renal drainage but not renal function.

  13. Quantum wells in multiple junction photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbits, Thomas N. D.; Lumb, Matthew P.; Dobbin, Alison

    2011-02-01

    Triple-junction (3J) solar cells are the world's most efficient photovoltaic conversion devices, hero cells operating >41% under concentration between 300 and 500 suns. The typical 3J approach has a bandgap combination that limits the cell efficiency at approximately 49%. Different combinations of bandgaps can increase the theoretical efficiency to closer to 60%, and use of metamorphic materials has attempted to demonstrate still higher efficiencies. Multiple quantum wells (MQW) can also be used to fabricate materials with different effective bandgaps from the host semiconductor, and can do so without the attendant lattice constant change and dislocations associated with metamorphics. We show that sufficiently high absorption in MQWs increases the efficiency of 3J solar cells without incorporating defects during epitaxy, both in simulations and in practice.

  14. Advanced Concepts in Josephson Junction Reflection Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Vesterinen, Visa; Hassel, Juha; Paraoanu, G. S.; Seppä, Heikki; Hakonen, Pertti

    2014-06-01

    Low-noise amplification at microwave frequencies has become increasingly important for the research related to superconducting qubits and nanoelectromechanical systems. The fundamental limit of added noise by a phase-preserving amplifier is the standard quantum limit, often expressed as noise temperature . Towards the goal of the quantum limit, we have developed an amplifier based on intrinsic negative resistance of a selectively damped Josephson junction. Here we present measurement results on previously proposed wide-band microwave amplification and discuss the challenges for improvements on the existing designs. We have also studied flux-pumped metamaterial-based parametric amplifiers, whose operating frequency can be widely tuned by external DC-flux, and demonstrate operation at pumping, in contrast to the typical metamaterial amplifiers pumped via signal lines at.

  15. Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-30

    Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale.

  16. Artificial Photosynthesis with Semiconductor-Liquid Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro, Néstor; Formal, Florian Le; Sivula, Kevin

    2015-02-25

    Given the urgent need to develop a sustainable, carbon neutral energy storage system on a global scale, intense efforts are currently underway to advance the field of artificial photosynthesis: i.e. solar fuel engineering. In this review we give an overview of the field of artificial photosynthesis using a semiconductor-electrolyte interface employed in a photoelectrochemical device or as a heterogeneous photocatalyst. First we present a basic description of the operation principles of a semiconductor-liquid junction based device. The role of nanotechnology in the recent advances in the field is highlighted and common material systems under current study are briefly reviewed. The importance of the material surfaces are further scrutinized by presenting recent advances in interfacial engineering. Technical challenges and an outlook towards industrialization of the technology are given.

  17. Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the Long Junction Regimes: Part I- Governing Energy Scales of the Short and Long Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzenets, Ivan; Amet, Francois; Ke, Chung Ting; Draelos, Anne; Wei, Ming-Tso; Seredinski, Andrew; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Bomze, Yuriy; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    We examine the behavior of the critical current, in ballistic Josephson junctions made of encapsulated graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures. The temperature dependence of the critical current allows us to identify and observe the crossover from the short to the long junction regimes. (The operational regime of a junction is defined by the ratio of the superconducting coherence length ξ to the junction length L). For each regime we extract the governing energy scales, which are found to be consistent with theory. In the short regime, the energy is consistent with the expected superconducting gap Δ. While in the long regime, the governing energy δE is independent of the carrier density and proportional to the level spacing of the ballistic cavity, as determined from Fabry-Perot oscillations of the junction normal resistance. However, in the intermediate regime, we find that junctions behave as if in the long regime, but with δE (which is typically a function of L) rescaled as L ->L + ξ .

  18. Dynamic compact model of thermally assisted switching magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Baraji, M.; Javerliac, V.; Guo, W.; Prenat, G.; Dieny, B.

    2009-12-01

    The general purpose of spin electronics is to take advantage of the electron's spin in addition to its electrical charge to build innovative electronic devices. These devices combine magnetic materials which are used as spin polarizer or analyzer together with semiconductors or insulators, resulting in innovative hybrid CMOS/magnetic (Complementary MOS) architectures. In particular, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) can be used for the design of magnetic random access memories [S. Tehrani, Proc. IEEE 91, 703 (2003)], magnetic field programmable gate arrays [Y. Guillement, International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing, 2008], low-power application specific integrated circuits [S. Matsunaga, Appl. Phys. Express 1, 091301 (2008)], and rf oscillators. The thermally assisted switching (TAS) technology requires heating the MTJ before writing it by means of an external field. It reduces the overall power consumption, solves the data writing selectivity issues, and improves the thermal stability of the written information for high density applications. The design of hybrid architectures requires a MTJ compact model, which can be used in standard electrical simulators of the industry. As a result, complete simulations of CMOS/MTJ hybrid circuits can be performed before experimental realization and testing. This article presents a highly accurate model of the MTJ based on the TAS technology. It is compatible with the Spectre electrical simulator of Cadence design suite.

  19. Effective horizons, junction conditions and large-scale magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannini, Massimo [CERN, Department of Physics, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN, Milan (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    The quantum mechanical generation of hypermagnetic and hyperelectric fields in four-dimensional conformally flat background geometries rests on the simultaneous continuity of the effective horizon and of the extrinsic curvature across the inflationary boundary. The junction conditions for the gauge fields are derived in general terms and corroborated by explicit examples with particular attention to the limit of a sudden (but nonetheless continuous) transition of the effective horizon. After reducing the dynamics to a pair of integral equations related by duality transformations, we compute the power spectra and deduce a novel class of logarithmic corrections which turn out to be, however, numerically insignificant and overwhelmed by the conductivity effects once the gauge modes reenter the effective horizon. In this perspective the magnetogenesis requirements and the role of the postinflationary conductivity are clarified and reappraised. As long as the total duration of the inflationary phase is nearly minimal, quasi-flat hypermagnetic power spectra are comparatively more common than in the case of vacuum initial data. (orig.)

  20. Peripheral nerve and neuromuscular junction pathology in Pompe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Darin J.; Todd, Adrian Gary; Lee, Sooyeon; Soustek, Meghan S.; ElMallah, Mai K.; Fuller, David D.; Notterpek, Lucia; Byrne, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease is a systemic metabolic disorder characterized by lack of acid-alpha glucosidase (GAA) resulting in ubiquitous lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Respiratory and ambulatory dysfunction are prominent features in patients with Pompe yet the mechanism defining the development of muscle weakness is currently unclear. Transgenic animal models of Pompe disease mirroring the patient phenotype have been invaluable in mechanistic and therapeutic study. Here, we demonstrate significant pathological alterations at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of the diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscle as prominent features of disease pathology in Gaa knockout mice. Postsynaptic defects including increased motor endplate area and fragmentation were readily observed in Gaa−/− but not wild-type mice. Presynaptic neuropathic changes were also evident, as demonstrated by significant reduction in the levels of neurofilament proteins, and alterations in axonal fiber diameter and myelin thickness within the sciatic and phrenic nerves. Our data suggest the loss of NMJ integrity is a primary contributor to the decline in respiratory and ambulatory function in Pompe and arises from both pre- and postsynaptic pathology. These observations highlight the importance of systemic phenotype correction, specifically restoration of GAA to skeletal muscle and the nervous system for treatment of Pompe disease. PMID:25217571

  1. Intercellular coupling mediated by potassium accumulation in peg-and-socket junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigmond, Edward J.; Bardakjian, Berj L.; Thuneberg, Lars

    2000-01-01

    Physiology, peg-and-socket junctions, smooth muscle, boundary element method, coupling, morphology......Physiology, peg-and-socket junctions, smooth muscle, boundary element method, coupling, morphology...

  2. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  3. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, Carl Atherton [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 ± 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  4. Direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion via inverted metamorphic multi-junction semiconductor architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James L.; Steiner, Myles A.; Döscher, Henning; France, Ryan M.; Turner, John A.; Deutsch, Todd G.

    2017-03-01

    Solar water splitting via multi-junction semiconductor photoelectrochemical cells provides direct conversion of solar energy to stored chemical energy as hydrogen bonds. Economical hydrogen production demands high conversion efficiency to reduce balance-of-systems costs. For sufficient photovoltage, water-splitting efficiency is proportional to the device photocurrent, which can be tuned by judicious selection and integration of optimal semiconductor bandgaps. Here, we demonstrate highly efficient, immersed water-splitting electrodes enabled by inverted metamorphic epitaxy and a transparent graded buffer that allows the bandgap of each junction to be independently varied. Voltage losses at the electrolyte interface are reduced by 0.55 V over traditional, uniformly p-doped photocathodes by using a buried p-n junction. Advanced on-sun benchmarking, spectrally corrected and validated with incident photon-to-current efficiency, yields over 16% solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with GaInP/GaInAs tandem absorbers, representing a 60% improvement over the classical, high-efficiency tandem III-V device.

  5. Concentrating optical system optimization for 3- and 4-junction solar cells: impact of illumination profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pratibha; Wilkins, Matthew M.; Schriemer, Henry P.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Optical component designs for concentrating photovoltaic systems with three different multijunction solar cells (MJSCs) are optimized to yield maximum system efficiencies under standard test conditions, specifically uniform illumination. Optimization uses an integrated optoelectrical approach with ray tracing of the optical train to generate an irradiance profile for input to the cell's distributed circuit model. These cells, a three-junction lattice-matched (3JLM) solar cell, a three-junction lattice-mismatched inverted metamorphic (3JIMM) solar cell, and a four-junction lattice-matched (4JLM) solar cell, were individually designed for maximum efficiency at 1000×. The optical train introduces losses, modifies the spectrum, and produces a spatially nonuniform profile across the cell. We decouple spectral modification from spatial nonuniformity to separately determine their individual impacts on system efficiencies, finding the optimal set of optical design parameters for each case. Spectral modification yields modest loss penalties (from 1.0% to 1.6%, relative to the MJSC), but the impact of nonuniformity is more significant and cell dependent, with relative loss penalties of 1.1%, 3.8%, and 2.3%, for 3JLM, 3JIMM, and 4JLM, respectively. While spectral modification does not significantly impact design parameters, spatial nonuniformity does, with absolute losses of 1% and 3.4% if 3JIMM and 4JLM cells are used in a 3JLM optimized system, respectively.

  6. Theory of Macroscopic Quantum Tunneling in High-T_c c-Axis Josephson Junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, Takehito; Kato, Takeo; Tanaka, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    We study macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in c-axis twist Josephson junctions made of high-T_c superconductors in order to clarify the influence of the anisotropic order parameter symmetry (OPS) on MQT. The dependence of the MQT rate on the twist angle $\\gamma$ about the c-axis is calculated by using the functional integral and the bounce method. Due to the d-wave OPS, the $\\gamma$ dependence of standard deviation of the switching current distribution and the crossover temperature from thermal activation to MQT are found to be given by $\\cos2\\gamma$ and $\\sqrt{\\cos2\\gamma}$, respectively. We also show that a dissipative effect resulting from the nodal quasiparticle excitation on MQT is negligibly small, which is consistent with recent MQT experiments using Bi${}_2$Sr${}_2$CaCu${}_2$O${}_{8 + \\delta}$ intrinsic junctions. These results indicate that MQT in c-axis twist junctions becomes a useful experimental tool for testing the OPS of high-T_c materials at low temperature, and suggest high potential of suc...

  7. CFD validation in OECD/NEA t-junction benchmark.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obabko, A. V.; Fischer, P. F.; Tautges, T. J.; Karabasov, S.; Goloviznin, V. M.; Zaytsev, M. A.; Chudanov, V. V.; Pervichko, V. A.; Aksenova, A. E. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Cambridge Univ.); (Moscow Institute of Nuclar Energy Safety)

    2011-08-23

    and benchmark data. The numerical scheme has a very small scheme diffusion and is the second and the first order accurate in space and time, correspondingly. We compare and contrast simulation results for three computational fluid dynamics codes CABARET, Conv3D, and Nek5000 for the T-junction thermal striping problem that was the focus of a recent OECD/NEA blind benchmark. The corresponding codes utilize finite-difference implicit large eddy simulation (ILES), finite-volume LES on fully staggered grids, and an LES spectral element method (SEM), respectively. The simulations results are in a good agreement with experimenatl data. We present results from a study of sensitivity to computational mesh and time integration interval, and discuss the next steps in the simulation of this problem.

  8. Derangements in endothelial cell-to-cell junctions involved in the pathogenesis of hypercholesterolemia-induced erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji-Kan; Zhang, Lu Wei; Jin, Hai-Rong; Piao, Shuguang; Choi, Min Ji; Tuvshintur, Buyankhuu; Tumurbaatar, Munkhbayar; Shin, Sun Hwa; Han, Jee-Young; Kim, Woo Jean; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2009-07-01

    Endothelial cell-to-cell junctions are crucial for vascular formation, networking, and remodeling of blood vessels as well as for inducing and integrating intracellular signals. We investigated the differential expression and distribution of endothelial cell-to-cell junction proteins in the penis of mice with hypercholesterolemia-induced erectile dysfunction. Two-month-old C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet containing 4% cholesterol and 1% cholic acid, and age-matched control animals were fed a normal diet, for 3 months. We performed dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO)-based multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (Seegene, Seoul, Korea) to screen the differential gene expression of 21 endothelial cell-to-cell junctions. At 5 months, erectile function was measured by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve, and the penis was harvested and stained with antibody to claudin-5, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 (N = 8 per group). Cavernous specimens from a separate group of animals were used for claudin-5, VE-cadherin, and PECAM-1 reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blot analysis. Erectile function was significantly lower in hypercholesterolemic mice than in controls. DPO-based multiplex PCR revealed a profound decrease in the gene expression of endothelium-specific cell-to-cell junction proteins, including claudin-5, VE-cadherin, and PECAM-1, in hypercholesterolemic mice compared with that in controls. The expression of claudin-5, VE-cadherin, and PECAM-1 protein evaluated by Western blot or immunohistochemistry was significantly lower in hypercholesterolemic mice than in controls. These endothelial cell-to-cell junction proteins were more sparsely distributed in the endothelium of cavernous sinusoids than in the endothelium of cavernous artery and dorsal blood vessels. Down-regulation of the endothelial cell-to-cell junctions and decreased endothelial content in the corpus cavernosum might play a major

  9. Endomicroscopy and electromyography of neuromuscular junctions in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rosalind; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Skehel, Paul A; Ribchester, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electromyography (EMG) is used routinely to diagnose neuromuscular dysfunction in a wide range of peripheral neuropathies, myopathies, and neuromuscular degenerative diseases including motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Definitive neurological diagnosis may also be indicated by the analysis of pathological neuromuscular innervation in motor-point biopsies. Our objective in this study was to preempt motor-point biopsy by combining live imaging with electrophysiological analysis of slow degeneration of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in vivo. Methods We combined conventional needle electromyography with fiber-optic confocal endomicroscopy (CEM), using an integrated hand-held, 1.5-mm-diameter probe. We utilized as a test bed, various axotomized muscles in the hind limbs of anaesthetized, double-homozygous thy1.2YFP16: WldS mice, which coexpress the Wallerian-degeneration Slow (WldS) protein and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in motor neurons. We also tested exogenous vital stains, including Alexa488-α-bungarotoxin; the styryl pyridinium dye 4-Di-2-Asp; and a GFP conjugate of botulinum toxin Type A heavy chain (GFP-HcBoNT/A). Results We show that an integrated EMG/CEM probe is effective in longitudinal evaluation of functional and morphological changes that take place over a 7-day period during axotomy-induced, slow neuromuscular synaptic degeneration. EMG amplitude declined in parallel with overt degeneration of motor nerve terminals. EMG/CEM was safe and effective when nerve terminals and motor endplates were selectively stained with vital dyes. Interpretation Our findings constitute proof-of-concept, based on live imaging in an animal model, that combining EMG/CEM may be useful as a minimally invasive precursor or alternative to motor-point biopsy in neurological diagnosis and for monitoring local administration of potential therapeutics. PMID:25540801

  10. A transistor based on 2D material and silicon junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghoek; Lee, Seunghyun

    2017-07-01

    A new type of graphene-silicon junction transistor based on bipolar charge-carrier injection was designed and investigated. In contrast to many recent studies on graphene field-effect transistor (FET), this device is a new type of bipolar junction transistor (BJT). The transistor fully utilizes the Fermi level tunability of graphene under bias to increase the minority-carrier injection efficiency of the base-emitter junction in the BJT. Single-layer graphene was used to form the emitter and the collector, and a p-type silicon was used as the base. The output of this transistor was compared with a metal-silicon junction transistor ( i.e. surface-barrier transistor) to understand the difference between a graphene-silicon junction and metal-silicon Schottky junction. A significantly higher current gain was observed in the graphene-silicon junction transistor as the base current was increased. The graphene-semiconductor heterojunction transistor offers several unique advantages, such as an extremely thin device profile, a low-temperature (transistor current gain ( β) of 33.7 and a common-emitter amplifier voltage gain of 24.9 were achieved.

  11. Gold plasmonic effects on charge transport through single molecule junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Olgun; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-03-01

    We study the impact of surface plasmon polaritons, the coupling of electromagnetic waves to collective electron oscillations on metal surfaces, on the conductance of single-molecule junctions. We use a scanning-tunneling microscope based break junction setup that is built into an optical microscope to form molecular junctions. Coherent 685nm light is used to illuminate the molecular junctions formed with 4,4'-bipyridine with diffraction limited focusing performance. We employ a lock-in type technique to measure currents induced by light. Furthermore, the thermal expansion due to laser heating is mimicked by mechanically modulating inter-electrode separation. For each junction studied, we measure current, and use AC techniques to determine molecular junction resonance levels and coupling strengths. We use a cross correlations analysis technique to analyze and compare the effect of light to that of the mechanical modulation. Our results show that junction transmission characteristics are not altered under illumination, within the resolution of our instrument. We argue that photo-currents measured with lock-in techniques in these kinds of structures are due to thermal effects. This work was funded by the Center for Re-Defining Photovoltaic Efficiency through Molecule Scale Control, an EFRC funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DESC0001085.

  12. Solar cell junction temperature measurement of PV module

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.

    2011-02-01

    The present study develops a simple non-destructive method to measure the solar cell junction temperature of PV module. The PV module was put in the environmental chamber with precise temperature control to keep the solar PV module as well as the cell junction in thermal equilibrium with the chamber. The open-circuit voltage of PV module Voc is then measured using a short pulse of solar irradiation provided by a solar simulator. Repeating the measurements at different environment temperature (40-80°C) and solar irradiation S (200-1000W/m2), the correlation between the open-circuit voltage Voc, the junction temperature Tj, and solar irradiation S is derived.The fundamental correlation of the PV module is utilized for on-site monitoring of solar cell junction temperature using the measured Voc and S at a short time instant with open circuit. The junction temperature Tj is then determined using the measured S and Voc through the fundamental correlation. The outdoor test results show that the junction temperature measured using the present method, Tjo, is more accurate. The maximum error using the average surface temperature Tave as the junction temperature is 4.8 °C underestimation; while the maximum error using the present method is 1.3 °C underestimation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Ileocolic junction resection in dogs and cats: 18 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Yordan; Seth, Mayank; Murgia, Daniela; Puig, Jordi

    2017-12-01

    There is limited veterinary literature about dogs or cats with ileocolic junction resection and its long-term follow-up. To evaluate the long-term outcome in a cohort of dogs and cats that underwent resection of the ileocolic junction without extensive (≥50%) small or large bowel resection. Medical records of dogs and cats that had the ileocolic junction resected were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained either by telephone interview or e-mail correspondence with the referring veterinary surgeons. Nine dogs and nine cats were included. The most common cause of ileocolic junction resection was intussusception in dogs (5/9) and neoplasia in cats (6/9). Two dogs with ileocolic junction lymphoma died postoperatively. Only 2 of 15 animals, for which long-term follow-up information was available, had soft stools. However, three dogs with suspected chronic enteropathy required long-term treatment with hypoallergenic diets alone or in combination with medical treatment to avoid the development of diarrhoea. Four of 6 cats with ileocolic junction neoplasia were euthanised as a consequence of progressive disease. Dogs and cats undergoing ileocolic junction resection and surviving the perioperative period may have a good long-term outcome with mild or absent clinical signs but long-term medical management may be required.

  14. Tunnel Junction Development Using Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptak, Aaron J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, John D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schulte, Kevin L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jain, Nikhil [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-18

    We demonstrate for the first time III-V tunnel junctions grown using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) with peak tunneling currents >8 A/cm2, sufficient for operation of a multijunction device to several hundred suns of concentration. Multijunction solar cells rely on tunneling interconnects between subcells to enable series connection with minimal voltage loss, but tunnel junctions have never been shown using the HVPE growth method. HVPE has recently reemerged as a low-cost growth method for high-quality III-V materials and devices, including the growth of high-efficiency III-V solar cells. We previously showed single-junction GaAs solar cells with conversion efficiencies of ~24% with a path forward to equal or exceed the practical efficiency limits of crystalline Si. Moving to a multijunction device structure will allow for even higher efficiencies with minimal impact on cost, necessitating the development of tunnel interconnects. Here, we demonstrate the performance of both isolated HVPE-grown tunnel junctions, as well as single-junction GaAs solar cell structures with a tunnel junction incorporated into the contact region. We observe no degradation in device performance compared to a structure without the added junction.

  15. Association of visceral adiposity with oesophageal and junctional adenocarcinomas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Beddy, P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with an increased incidence of oesophageal and oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma, in particular Siewert types I and II. This study compared abdominal fat composition in patients with oesophageal\\/junctional adenocarcinoma with that in patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma, and in controls. METHOD: In total, 194 patients (110 with oesophageal\\/junctional adenocarcinoma, 38 with gastric adenocarcinoma and 46 with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma) and 90 matched control subjects were recruited. The abdominal fat area was assessed using computed tomography (CT), and the total fat area (TFA), visceral fat area (VFA) and subcutaneous fat area (SFA) were calculated. RESULTS: Patients with oesophageal\\/junctional adenocarcinoma had significantly higher TFA and VFA values compared with controls (both P < 0.001), patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (P = 0.013 and P = 0.006 respectively) and patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (both P < 0.001). For junctional tumours, the highest TFA and VFA values were seen in patients with Siewert type I tumours (respectively P = 0.041 and P = 0.033 versus type III; P = 0.332 and P = 0.152 versus type II). CONCLUSION: Patients with oesophageal\\/junctional adenocarcinoma, in particular oesophageal and Siewert type I junctional tumours, have greater CT-defined visceral adiposity than patients with gastric adenocarcinoma or oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, or controls.

  16. Advance of Mechanically Controllable Break Junction for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Xiang, Dong

    2017-06-01

    Molecular electronics stands for the ultimate size of functional elements, keeping up with an unstoppable trend over the past few decades. As a vital component of molecular electronics, single molecular junctions have attracted significant attention from research groups all over the world. Due to its pronounced superiority, the mechanically controllable break junctions (MCBJ) technique has been widely applied to characterize the dynamic performance of single molecular junctions. This review presents a system analysis for single-molecule junctions and offers an overview of four test-beds for single-molecule junctions, thus offering more insight into the mechanisms of electron transport. We mainly focus on the development of state-of-the-art mechanically controlled break junctions. The three-terminal gated MCBJ approaches are introduced to manipulate the electron transport of molecules, and MCBJs are combined with characterization techniques. Additionally, applications of MCBJs and remarkable properties of single molecules are addressed. Finally, the challenges and perspective for the mechanically controllable break junctions technique are provided.

  17. Effect of nonequilibrium quasiparticle flow on SNS Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplunenko, V.K.; Ryazanov, V.V.; Shmidt, V.V.

    1985-10-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the effect of a nonequilibrium flow of quasiparticles on the Josephson properties of a Ta-Cu-Ta SNS junction. A nonequilibrium quasiparticle flow can be set up at the junction because the thickness of the superconducting banks of the SNS sandwich is on the order of the depth to which the longitudinal electric field penetrates into the superconductor, and the sandwich is bracketed by thick plates of a normal metal. During the injection of quasiparticles into one of the superconducting banks of the SNS junction, Josephson generation is excited at the junction; the total current flowing across the junction is zero. The nonequilibrium quasiparticle current which flows across the SNS junction is several times the critical current I/sub c/ and has no direct effect on its Josephson characteristics. The appearance of a difference in the electrochemical potentials of the pairs and of Josephson generation at the junction is due exclusively to the flow of the superconducting current. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of an equivalent circuit proposed for the junction by Kadin, Smith, and Skocpol (J. Low Temp. Phys. 38, 497 (1980)), simplified somewhat for the case at hand. A study of the temperature dependence of the effects shows that at T> or =0.97T/sub c/ the nonequilibrium quasiparticle current in the normal Josephson intermediate layer of the junction does not depend on Andreev reflection processes at the NS interfaces. The scale time for electron-phonon energy relaxation in the tantalum used as the superconductor is estimated to be tau/sub Epsilon/roughly-equal 4.0 x 10/sup -1/ s.

  18. The zinc finger protein Zfr1p is localized specifically to conjugation junction and required for sexual development in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    Full Text Available Conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila involves a developmental program consisting of three prezygotic nuclear divisions, pronuclear exchange and fusion, and postzygotic and exconjugant stages. The conjugation junction structure appears during the initiation of conjugation development, and disappears during the exconjugant stage. Many structural and functional proteins are involved in the establishment and maintenance of the junction structure in T. thermophila. In the present study, a zinc finger protein-encoding gene ZFR1 was found to be expressed specifically during conjugation and to localize specifically to the conjugation junction region. Truncated Zfr1p localized at the plasma membrane in ordered arrays and decorated Golgi apparatus located adjacent to basal body. The N-terminal zinc finger and C-terminal hydrophobic domains of Zfr1p were found to be required for its specific conjugation junction localization. Conjugation development of ZFR1 somatic knockout cells was aborted at the pronuclear exchange and fusion conjugation stages. Furthermore, Zfr1p was found to be important for conjugation junction stability during the prezygotic nuclear division stage. Taken together, our data reveal that Zfr1p is required for the stability and integrity of the conjugation junction structure and essential for the sexual life cycle of the Tetrahymena cell.

  19. Zika Virus Infects Human Sertoli Cells and Modulates the Integrity of theIn VitroBlood-Testis Barrier Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemann, David N; Strange, Daniel P; Maharaj, Payal N; Shi, Pei-Yong; Verma, Saguna

    2017-11-15

    Confirmed reports of Zika virus (ZIKV) in human seminal fluid for months after the clearance of viremia suggest the ability of ZIKV to establish persistent infection in the seminiferous tubules, an immune-privileged site in the testis protected by the blood-testis barrier, also called the Sertoli cell (SC) barrier (SCB). However, cellular targets of ZIKV in human testis and mechanisms by which the virus enters seminiferous tubules remain unclear. We demonstrate that primary human SCs were highly susceptible to ZIKV compared to the closely related dengue virus and induced the expression of alpha interferon (IFN-α), key cytokines, and cell adhesion molecules (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 [VCAM-1] and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]). Furthermore, using an in vitro SCB model, we show that ZIKV was released on the adluminal side of the SCB model with a higher efficiency than in the blood-brain barrier model. ZIKV-infected SCs exhibited enhanced adhesion of leukocytes that correlated with decreases in SCB integrity. ZIKV infection did not affect the expression of tight and adherens junction proteins such as ZO-1, claudin, and JAM-A; however, exposure of SCs to inflammatory mediators derived from ZIKV-infected macrophages led to the degradation of the ZO-1 protein, which correlated with increased SCB permeability. Taken together, our data suggest that infection of SCs may be one of the crucial steps by which ZIKV gains access to the site of spermatozoon development and identify SCs as a therapeutic target to clear testicular infections. The SCB model opens up opportunities to assess interactions of SCs with other testicular cells and to test the ability of anti-ZIKV drugs to cross the barrier. IMPORTANCE Recent outbreaks of ZIKV, a neglected mosquito-borne flavivirus, have identified sexual transmission as a new route of disease spread, which has not been reported for other flaviviruses. To be able to sexually transmit for months after the clearance of

  20. A new spin-functional MOSFET based on magnetic tunnel junction technology: pseudo-spin-MOSFET

    OpenAIRE

    Shuto, Yusuke; Nakane, Ryosho; Wang, Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shuu'ichirou; Tanaka, Masaaki; Inomata, Koichiro; Sugahara, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    We fabricated and characterized a new spin-functional MOSFET referred to as a pseudo-spin-MOSFET (PS-MOSFET). The PS-MOSFET is a circuit using an ordinary MOSFET and magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) for reproducing functions of spin-transistors. Device integration techniques for a bottom gate MOSFET using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate and for an MTJ with a full-Heusler alloy electrode and MgO tunnel barrier were developed. The fabricated PS-MOSFET exhibited high and low transconductanc...

  1. Vortex dynamics in Josephson ladders with II-junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornev, Victor K.; Klenov, N. V.; Oboznov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    current versus applied magnetic field. At temperatures close to the 0-pi transition this dependence shows a doubling of its periodicity frequency that can be explained by 0-pi bistability of the SFS junctions. The change in the array behaviour with number of unit cells has been studied by means......Both experimental and numerical studies of a self-frustrated triangular array of pi-junctions are reported. The array of SFS Josephson junctions shows a transition to the pi-state and self-frustration with a decrease in temperature. This manifests itself in a half-period shift of the bias critical...

  2. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2017-01-01

    that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken......-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations....

  3. How good are one-dimensional Josephson junction models?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomdahl, P. S.; Olsen, O.H.; Eilbeck, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of Josephson junctions of overlap type is presented and shown to reduce to the usual one-dimensional (1D) model in the limit of a very narrow junction. Comparisons between the stability limits for fluxon reflection obtained from the two models suggest that the many results...... obtained from the one-dimensional model can be used for large-area junctions, thus explaining the remarkable agreement between 1D theory and experiments. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  4. Statistical mechanics of strings with Y-junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Rivers, R J

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the Hagedorn transitions of string networks with Y-junctions as may occur, for example, with (p,q) cosmic superstrings. In a simplified model with three different types of string, the partition function reduces to three generalised coupled XY models. We calculate the phase diagram and show that, as the system is heated, the lightest strings first undergo the Hagedorn transition despite the junctions. There is then a second, higher, critical temperature above which infinite strings of all tensions, and junctions, exist. Conversely, on cooling to low temperatures, only the lightest strings remain, but they collapse into small loops.

  5. Superconductive tunnel junctions for X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, P. A. J.; van den Berg, M. L.; Bruijn, M. P.; Frericks, M.; Le Grand, J. B.; Gijsbertsen, J. G.; Houwman, E. P.; Flokstra, J.

    1992-10-01

    Superconductive tunnel junctions are under development as detectors for X-ray astronomy in the 0.5 - 10 keV energy range, because of their potentially high energy resolution in combination with high detection efficiency. Absorber-junction combinations offer the prospect of high energy resolution detectors with a high detection efficiency and a reasonable (about 1/sq cm) size. The proximity effect between the Nb absorber and the Al trapping layer plays a dominant role. A study of the proximity effect in Nb/Al/Al2O3/Al/Nb junctions with different Al-layer, the trapping layer, thicknesses is presented.

  6. The temporo-parietal junction contributes to global gestalt perception – evidence from studies in chess experts

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes eRennig; Merim eBilalic; Elisabeth eHuberle; Hans-Otto eKarnath; Marc eHimmelbach

    2013-01-01

    In a recent neuroimaging study the comparison of intact versus disturbed perception of global gestalt indicated a significant role of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) in the intact perception of global gestalt (Huberle and Karnath, 2012). This location corresponded well with the areas known to be damaged or impaired in patients with simultanagnosia after stroke or due to neurodegenerative diseases. It was concluded that the TPJ plays an important role in the integration of individual item...

  7. The temporo-parietal junction contributes to global gestalt perception-evidence from studies in chess experts

    OpenAIRE

    Rennig J; Bilalic M; Huberle E; Karnath HO; Himmelbach M.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent neuroimaging study the comparison of intact vs. disturbed perception of global gestalt indicated a significant role of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) in the intact perception of global gestalt (Huberle and Karnath, 2012). This location corresponded well with the areas known to be damaged or impaired in patients with simultanagnosia after stroke or due to neurodegenerative diseases. It was concluded that the TPJ plays an important role in the integration of individual items to...

  8. A comprehensive solution for simulating ultra-shallow junctions: From high dose/low energy implant to diffusion annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucard, F. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France)]. E-mail: Frederic.Boucard@silvaco.com; Roger, F. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Chakarov, I. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Zhuk, V. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Temkin, M. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Montagner, X. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Guichard, E. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Mathiot, D. [InESS, CNRS and Universite Louis Pasteur, 23 Rue du Loess, F67037 Strasbourg (France)]. E-mail: Daniel.Mathiot@iness.c-strasbourg.fr

    2005-12-05

    This paper presents a global approach permitting accurate simulation of the process of ultra-shallow junctions. Physically based models of dopant implantation (BCA) and diffusion (including point and extended defects coupling) are integrated within a unique simulation tool. A useful set of the relevant parameters has been obtained through an original calibration methodology. It is shown that this approach provides an efficient tool for process modelling.

  9. Targeting the tight junction protein, zonula occludens-1, with the connexin43 mimetic peptide, αCT1, reduces VEGF-dependent RPE pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Elisabeth; Strauss, Randy; Brandon, Carlene; Grek, Christina; Ghatnekar, Gautam; Gourdie, Robert; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2017-05-01

    A critical target tissue in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which forms the outer blood-retina barrier (BRB). RPE-barrier dysfunction might result from attenuation/disruption of intercellular tight junctions. Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) is a major structural protein of intercellular junctions. A connexin43-based peptide mimetic, αCT1, was developed to competitively block interactions at the PDZ2 domain of ZO-1, thereby inhibiting ligands that selectively bind to this domain. We hypothesized that targeting ZO-1 signaling using αCT1 would maintain BRB integrity and reduce RPE pathophysiology by stabilizing gap- and/or tight-junctions. RPE-cell barrier dysfunction was generated in mice using laser photocoagulation triggering choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or bright light exposure leading to morphological damage. αCT1 was delivered via eye drops. αCT1 treatment reduced CNV development and fluid leakage as determined by optical coherence tomography, and damage was correlated with disruption in cellular integrity of surrounding RPE cells. Light damage significantly disrupted RPE cell morphology as determined by ZO-1 and occludin staining and tiling pattern analysis, which was prevented by αCT1 pre-treatment. In vitro experiments using RPE and MDCK monolayers indicated that αCT1 stabilizes tight junctions, independent of its effects on Cx43. Taken together, stabilization of intercellular junctions by αCT1 was effective in ameliorating RPE dysfunction in models of AMD-like pathology. The connexin43 mimetic αCT1 accumulates in the mouse retinal pigment epithelium following topical delivery via eye drops. αCT1 eye drops prevented RPE-cell barrier dysfunction in two mouse models. αCT1 stabilizes intercellular tight junctions. Stabilization of cellular junctions via αCT1 may serve as a novel therapeutic approach for both wet and dry age-related macular degeneration.

  10. Revisiting the Darmois and Lichnerowicz junction conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Kayll

    2017-10-01

    What have become known as the "Darmois" and "Lichnerowicz" junction conditions are often stated to be equivalent, "essentially" equivalent, in a "sense" equivalent, and so on. One even sees not infrequent reference to the "Darmois-Lichnerowicz" conditions. Whereas the equivalence of these conditions is manifest in Gaussian-normal coordinates, a fact that has been known for close to a century, this equivalence does not extend to a loose definition of "admissible" coordinates (coordinates in which the metric and its first order derivatives are continuous). We show this here by way of a simple, but physically relevant, example. In general, a loose definition of the "Lichnerowicz" conditions gives additional restrictions, some of which simply amount to a convenient choice of gauge, and some of which amount to real physical restrictions, away from strict "admissible" coordinates. The situation was totally confused by a very influential, and now frequently misquoted, paper by Bonnor and Vickers, that erroneously claimed a proof of the equivalence of the "Darmois" and "Lichnerowicz" conditions within this loose definition of "admissible" coordinates. A correct proof, based on a strict definition of "admissible" coordinates, was given years previous by Israel. It is that proof, generally unrecognized, that we must refer to. Attention here is given to a clarification of the subject, and to the history of the subject, which, it turns out, is rather fascinating in itself.

  11. URETERO PELVIC JUNCTION OBSTRUCTION IN THE NEWBORN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kouranloo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Uretero pelvic junction (UPJ obstruction is a common cause of hydronephrosis in infants. The frequent use of fetal ultrasound is allowing early (prenatal diagnosis of numerous uropathies previously delayed until the child either became symptomatic or had a palpable mass. Newborn with severe obstruction often has marked improvement following correction, therefore, early diagnosis and operation are important. From 1993 to 2002, 21 patients were operated on for severe UPJ obstruction who were diagnosed before 6 weeks of age. Only 10 patients (63% had antenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis, the remaining were diagnosed by postnatal ultrasound and IVP or radionuclide scan for palpable renal enlargement or for associated anomalies. Eighteen of them had unilateral and three had bilateral obstruction. Twenty-four pyeloplasties were done; all pyeloplasties were dismembered with tailoring of the dilatated renal pelvis. Postoperative renal function was followed with laboratory blood test, urine test or radionuclide scan or IVP. Postoperative complications included urinary tract infection in three patients and postoperative stenosis in one patient were seen. No mortality occurred on infants in unilateral but one occurred in bilateral obstruction. Also, there was one unrelated late death. We report documented functional improvement with minimal complications in unilateral or bilateral pyeloplasty in newborns with UPJ obstruction. We recommend that if the initial scan shows substantially reduced function in the obstructed kidney, a pyeloplasty (rather than nephrectomy generally should be performed, because the newborn kidney has tremendous capacity for improvement in renal function following decompression.

  12. Seebeck effect in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marvin; Walowski, Jakob; Zbarsky, Vladyslav; Münzenberg, Markus; Schäfers, Markus; Ebke, Daniel; Reiss, Günter; Thomas, Andy; Peretzki, Patrick; Seibt, Michael; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Czerner, Michael; Bachmann, Michael; Heiliger, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Creating temperature gradients in magnetic nanostructures has resulted in a new research direction, that is, the combination of magneto- and thermoelectric effects. Here, we demonstrate the observation of one important effect of this class: the magneto-Seebeck effect. It is observed when a magnetic configuration changes the charge-based Seebeck coefficient. In particular, the Seebeck coefficient changes during the transition from a parallel to an antiparallel magnetic configuration in a tunnel junction. In this respect, it is the analogue to the tunnelling magnetoresistance. The Seebeck coefficients in parallel and antiparallel configurations are of the order of the voltages known from the charge-Seebeck effect. The size and sign of the effect can be controlled by the composition of the electrodes' atomic layers adjacent to the barrier and the temperature. The geometric centre of the electronic density of states relative to the Fermi level determines the size of the Seebeck effect. Experimentally, we realized 8.8% magneto-Seebeck effect, which results from a voltage change of about -8.7 μV K⁻¹ from the antiparallel to the parallel direction close to the predicted value of -12.1 μV K⁻¹. In contrast to the spin-Seebeck effect, it can be measured as a voltage change directly without conversion of a spin current.

  13. Fluxon interaction with external rf radiation in Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivshar, Yuri S.; Olsen, Ole H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1993-01-01

    Interaction of a fluxon with an rf radiation emitted into a long Josephson junction is investigated analytically and numerically. We use a model based on the sine-Gordon equation driven by a periodic force at the boundary with the frequency larger than the plasma frquency of the junction. It is s......Interaction of a fluxon with an rf radiation emitted into a long Josephson junction is investigated analytically and numerically. We use a model based on the sine-Gordon equation driven by a periodic force at the boundary with the frequency larger than the plasma frquency of the junction...... drive is applied, so that the fluxon always moves to the active boundary. We calculate the fluxon parameters and confirm our analytical predictions by direct numerical simulations....

  14. Systematic optimization of quantum junction colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Huan

    2012-01-01

    The recently reported quantum junction architecture represents a promising approach to building a rectifying photovoltaic device that employs colloidal quantum dot layers on each side of the p-n junction. Here, we report an optimized quantum junction solar cell that leverages an improved aluminum zinc oxide electrode for a stable contact to the n-side of the quantum junction and silver doping of the p-layer that greatly enhances the photocurrent by expanding the depletion region in the n-side of the device. These improvements result in greater stability and a power conversion efficiency of 6.1 under AM1.5 simulated solar illumination. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Memory cell operation based on small Josephson junctions arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braiman, Y.; Nair, N.; Rezac, J.; Imam, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a cryogenic memory cell circuit based on a small coupled array of Josephson junctions. All the basic memory operations (e.g., write, read, and reset) are implemented on the same circuit and different junctions in the array can in principle be utilized for these operations. The presented memory operation paradigm is fundamentally different from conventional single quantum flux operation logics (SFQ). As an example, we demonstrate memory operation driven by a SFQ pulse employing an inductively coupled array of three Josephson junctions. We have chosen realistic Josephson junction parameters based on state-of-the-art fabrication capabilities and have calculated access times and access energies for basic memory cell operations. We also implemented an optimization procedure based on the simulated annealing algorithm to calculate the optimized and typical values of access times and access energies.

  16. Low-Cost Multi-Junction Photovoltaic Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed SBIR project will provide a pathway to dramatically reduce the cost of multi-junction solar cells. The project leverages a TRL6 micropackaging process...

  17. Interface Structure and Transport of Complex Oxide Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Chi, M.; Arenholz, E.; Browning, N. D.; Suzuki, Y.

    2008-02-01

    The interface structure and magnetism of hybrid magnetic tunnel junction-spin filter devices have been investigated and correlated with the transport behavior exhibited. Magnetic tunnel junctions made of theoretically predicted half-metallic electrodes (perovskite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and spinel Fe3O4) sandwiching a spinel NiMn2O4 tunnel barrier exhibit very high crystalline quality as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Structurally abrupt interfaces allow for the distinct magnetic switching of the electrodes as well as large junction magnetoresistance. The change in the magnetic anisotropy observed at the spinel-spinel interface supports the presence of limited interdiffusion and the creation of a magnetically soft interfacial layer, whose strong exchange coupling to the Fe3O4 electrode likely accounts for the low background magnetoresistance observed in these junctions, and the successful spin filtering when the barrier layer is ferrimagnetic.

  18. Coherent quantum trasport in ferromagnet-superconductor-ferromagnet graphene junctions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M Salehi; GH Rashedi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the coherent quantum transport in grapheme-based ferromagnet-superconductor-ferromagent junctions within the framework of BCS theory using DBdG quasiparticles equation...

  19. Towards quantum signatures in a swept-bias Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losert, Harald; Vogel, Karl; Schleich, Wolfgang P. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Josephson junctions are one of the best examples for the observation of macroscopic quantum tunneling. The phase difference in a current-biased Josephson junction behaves like the position of a particle in a tilted washboard potential. The escape of this phase-particle corresponds to the voltage switching of the associated junction. Quantum mechanically, the escape from the washboard potential can be explained as tunneling from the ground state, or an excited state. However, it has been shown, that in the case of periodic driving the experimental data for quantum mechanical key features, e.g. Rabi oscillations or energy level quantization, can be reproduced by a completely classical description. Motivated by this discussion, we investigate a swept-bias Josephson junction in the case of a large critical current. In particular, we contrast the switching current distributions resulting from a quantum mechanical and classical description of the time evolution.

  20. Perspective: Theory of quantum transport in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, Michael; Evers, Ferdinand

    2018-01-21

    Molecular junctions, where single molecules are bound to metal or semiconductor electrodes, represent a unique architecture to investigate molecules in a distinct nonequilibrium situation and, in a broader context, to study basic mechanisms of charge and energy transport in a many-body quantum system at the nanoscale. Experimental studies of molecular junctions have revealed a wealth of interesting transport phenomena, the understanding of which necessitates theoretical modeling. The accurate theoretical description of quantum transport in molecular junctions is challenging because it requires methods that are capable to describe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules in a condensed phase environment out of equilibrium, in some cases with strong electron-electron and/or electronic-vibrational interaction. This perspective discusses recent progress in the theory and simulation of quantum transport in molecular junctions. Furthermore, challenges are identified, which appear crucial to achieve a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of transport in these systems.

  1. No junctional communication between epithelial cells in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Laat, S W; Tertoolen, L G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    Diffusion gradients of morphogens have been inferred as a basis for the control of morphogenesis in hydra, and morphogenetic substances have been found which, on the basis of their molecular weight (MW), should be able to pass gap junctions. There have been several reports of the presence of gap...... junctions between epithelial cells of hydra. However, until now, there has been no report published on whether these junctions enable the epithelial cells to exchange molecules of small molecular weight, as has been described in other organisms. Therefore we decided to investigate the communicative...... properties of the junctional membranes by electrophysiological methods and by intracellular-dye iontophoresis. We report here that no electrotonic coupling is detectable between epithelial cells of Hydra attenuata in: (1) intact animals, (2) head-regenerating animals, (3) cell re-aggregates, and (4) hydra...

  2. Sewer service junction point locations at residential sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a point feature dataset with points across the island of Guam. These points represent the junction that the sewer company provides for home owners to connect...

  3. Superconducting switch made of graphene-nanoribbon junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qifeng; Dong, Jinming

    2008-09-03

    The transmission of superconductor-graphene nanoribbon-superconductor junctions (SGS) has been studied by the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the on-site potential U in the center zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) of the SGS junction plays an important role in the magnitude of the supercurrent I(c). As the effective Fermi energy μ(eff) (μ(eff) = μ(F)-U) goes from negative to positive, the SGS junction would suddenly transform from an 'OFF' state to an 'ON' state. And, as μ(eff) increases further, the I(c) will continue to increase. This switching behavior of the SGS junction shares the same origin with the zigzag GNR valley-isospin valve (Rycerz et al 2007 Nat. Phys. 3 172). Besides the valley-isospin, the density of states will also have an effect on the suppression of I(c).

  4. Perspective: Theory of quantum transport in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, Michael; Evers, Ferdinand

    2018-01-01

    Molecular junctions, where single molecules are bound to metal or semiconductor electrodes, represent a unique architecture to investigate molecules in a distinct nonequilibrium situation and, in a broader context, to study basic mechanisms of charge and energy transport in a many-body quantum system at the nanoscale. Experimental studies of molecular junctions have revealed a wealth of interesting transport phenomena, the understanding of which necessitates theoretical modeling. The accurate theoretical description of quantum transport in molecular junctions is challenging because it requires methods that are capable to describe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules in a condensed phase environment out of equilibrium, in some cases with strong electron-electron and/or electronic-vibrational interaction. This perspective discusses recent progress in the theory and simulation of quantum transport in molecular junctions. Furthermore, challenges are identified, which appear crucial to achieve a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of transport in these systems.

  5. High-efficiency thermal switch based on topological Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, Björn; Giazotto, Francesco; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.

    2017-02-01

    We propose theoretically a thermal switch operating by the magnetic-flux controlled diffraction of phase-coherent heat currents in a thermally biased Josephson junction based on a two-dimensional topological insulator. For short junctions, the system shows a sharp switching behavior while for long junctions the switching is smooth. Physically, the switching arises from the Doppler shift of the superconducting condensate due to screening currents induced by a magnetic flux. We suggest a possible experimental realization that exhibits a relative temperature change of 40% between the on and off state for realistic parameters. This is a factor of two larger than in recently realized thermal modulators based on conventional superconducting tunnel junctions.

  6. Radiologic staging of esophageal and gastroesophageal junction carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Overhagen (Hans)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractPretreatment radiologic staging can, theoretically, improve the effectiveness and results of surgical treatment in esophageal and gastroesophageal junction carcinoma. Ideally, on these studies it is possible to select only patients with limited local disease for surgery, whereas those

  7. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Essex Junction Quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG12-3, Gale, M., Kim. J., and Ruksznis, A., 2012, Bedrock Geologic Map of the essex Junction Quadrangle: Vermont Geological Survey Open File...

  8. Status of Four-Junction Cell Development at Fraunhofer ISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lackner D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Four-junction solar cells are being developed for space applications as they promise higher efficiencies compared to the present GaInP/GaInAs/Ge triple-junction industry standard. There are multiple technological routes to achieve four-junction cells with the ideal bandgap combination of 1.9 eV, 1.4 eV 1.05 eV and 0.7 eV. This includes metamorphic growth concepts and direct semiconductor wafer bonded technology. All cell designs have their specific advantages and challenges. Therefore, at Fraunhofer ISE a plurality of different four-junction cell concepts is under investigation. The current status of the development and a discussion of so far achieved characteristics are presented in this work.

  9. Microwave phase locking of Josephson-junction fluxon oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salerno, M.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm; Filatrella, G.

    1990-01-01

    Application of the classic McLaughlin-Scott soliton perturbation theory to a Josephson-junction fluxon subjected to a microwave field that interacts with the fluxon only at the junction boundaries reduces the problem of phase locking of the fluxon oscillation to the study of a two-dimensional fun......Application of the classic McLaughlin-Scott soliton perturbation theory to a Josephson-junction fluxon subjected to a microwave field that interacts with the fluxon only at the junction boundaries reduces the problem of phase locking of the fluxon oscillation to the study of a two...... are qualitatively very similar. The map predicts significantly different behaviors for locking at odd and even subharmonic frequencies and at superharmonic frequencies. It also gives indications regarding hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristic, the existence of zero-crossing steps, and a description...

  10. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2014 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  11. Targeting and alteration of tight junctions by bacteria and their virulence factors such as Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Miriam; Protze, Jonas; Piontek, Anna; Krause, Gerd; Piontek, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The integrity of tight junctions, which regulate paracellular permeability, is challenged by many bacterial pathogens. This is caused by inflammatory responses triggered by pathogens and direct interaction of bacteria or their toxins with host epithelial cells. In some cases, tight junction proteins represent receptors for cell surface proteins or toxins of the pathogen, such as Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). CPE causes diarrhea and cramps-the symptoms of a common foodborne illness, caused by C. perfringens type A. It uses a subgroup of the claudin family of tight junction proteins as receptors and forms pores in the membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. Ca(2+) influx through these pores finally triggers cell damage. In this review, we summarize tight junction targeting and alteration by a multitude of different microorganisms such as C. perfringens, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, protozoan parasites, and their proteins. A focus is drawn towards CPE, the interaction with its receptors, cellular, and pathophysiological consequences for the intestinal epithelium. In addition, we portend to the use of CPE-based claudin modulators for drug delivery as well as diagnosis and therapy of cancer.

  12. A competition-based deformable template for junction extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Cazorla Quevedo, Miguel Ángel; Escolano Ruiz, Francisco; Gallardo López, Domingo; Colomina Pardo, Otto

    1999-01-01

    We propose a deformable template for junction extraction. Our method evolves from the Kona approach. Junction detection is performed in two steps: center detection and wedge extraction. In the first stage, a local filter is used to detect candidates. Then a template deformation method is used to find the optimal number of sections. Comunicación presentada en el VIII Simposium Nacional de Reconocimiento de Formas y Análisis de Imágenes, Bilbao, mayo 1999.

  13. Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction Secondary to Metastatic Relapse of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras H. Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 53-year-old woman with a history of localized breast cancer who presented with flank pain and was found to have new-onset obstruction of the left ureteropelvic junction. Although initially believed to be unrelated to her history of prior malignancy, intraoperative assessment of tissue from the ureteropelvic junction during planned laparoscopic pyeloplasty revealed urothelial infiltration by carcinoma of breast origin.

  14. Nonlinear thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions with vibrational coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, Martin Christian; Wegewijs, M. R.; Flensberg, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the nonlinear thermoelectric properties of a molecular junction, represented by a dissipative Anderson-Holstein model. A single-orbital level with strong Coulomb interaction is coupled to a localized vibrational mode and we account for both electron and phonon...... conditions, which are found to be qualitatively changed by the presence of the vibrational mode. Based on this study of a generic model system, we discuss the desirable properties of molecular junctions for thermoelectric applications....

  15. Effect of surface losses on soliton propagation in Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, A.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Pagano, S.

    1986-01-01

    We have explored numerically the effects on soliton propagation of a third order damping term in the modified sine-Gordon equation. In Josephson tunnel junctions such a term corresponds physically to quasiparticle losses within the metal electrodes of the junction. We find that this loss term plays...... the dominant role in determining the shape and stability of the soliton at high velocity. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  16. Five-Junction Solar Cell Optimization Using Silvaco Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    cell design by Fraunhofer ISE to provide the baseline structure for a simulation model based on published cell characteristics. This structure is...devices, which offer significant improvements over conventional single-junction solar cell designs . This research uses an existing five-junction solar...and maximize efficiency. Optimization of solar cell efficiency is carried out via nearly orthogonal balanced design of experiments methodology. Silvaco

  17. Quantum statistical theory of semiconductor junctions in thermal equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Roos, O.

    1977-01-01

    Free carrier and electric field distributions of one-dimensional semiconductor junctions are evaluated using a quantum mechanical phase-space distribution and its corresponding Boltzmann equation. Attention is given to quantum and exchange corrections in cases of high doping concentrations when carrier densities become degenerate. Quantitative differences between degenerate and classical junction characteristics, e.g., maximum electric field and built-in voltage and carrier concentration within the transition region, are evaluated numerically.

  18. Synchronization of intrinsic Josephson junctions to a cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filatrella, G.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    2004-01-01

    In the utilization of intrinsic Josephson junctions of the highly anisotropic BSCCO type for microwave generation the in-phase motion of fluxons in the different layers is highly desirable but difficult to obtain. We propose to couple each stack junction-which constitutes an underdamped fluxon...... oscillator-to an external high-Q resonator. We have numerically investigated the possibility for in-phase fluxon synchronization using the external cavity....

  19. Electron transport in a ferromagnet-superconductor junction on graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Asano, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Yukio; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2008-01-01

    In a usual ferromagnet connected with a superconductor, the exchange potential suppresses the superconducting pairing correlation. We show that this common knowledge does not hold in a ferromagnetsuperconductor junction on a graphene. When the chemical potential of a graphene is close to the conical point of energy dispersion, the exchange potential rather assists the charge transport through a junction interface. The loose-bottomed electric structure causes this unusual effect

  20. Graphene/silicon nanowire Schottky junction for enhanced light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guifeng; Zhu, Hongwei; Wang, Kunlin; Wei, Jinquan; Li, Xinming; Shu, Qinke; Guo, Ning; Wu, Dehai

    2011-03-01

    Schottky junction solar cells are assembled by directly coating graphene films on n-type silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. The graphene/SiNW junction shows enhanced light trapping and faster carrier transport compared to the graphene/planar Si structure. With chemical doping, the SiNW-based solar cells showed energy conversion efficiencies of up to 2.86% at AM1.5 condition, opening a possibility of using graphene/semiconductor nanostructures in photovoltaic application.

  1. Newly created animal model of human postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moak, Jeffrey P; Mercader, Marco A; He, Dingchao; Kumar, T K Susheel; Trachiotis, Gregory; McCarter, Robert; Jonas, Richard A

    2013-07-01

    Junctional ectopic tachycardia complicates the postoperative recovery from open heart surgery in children. The reported risk factors include younger age, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass times, and administration of inotropic agents. Junctional ectopic tachycardia occurs early after open heart surgery, in the setting of relative postoperative sinus node dysfunction, and exhibits QRS morphology consistent with an origin from the atrioventricular node or proximal conduction system. Our goal was to develop a reproducible animal model for postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia. Eleven pigs, aged 2 to 4 months, underwent open heart surgery after induction of general anesthesia. Electrodes were sewn to the left atrium and right ventricle. Sinus node dysfunction was created using clamp crushing without or with radiofrequency ablation (successful in 1 of 5 pigs) or sinus node removal (successful in 4 of 4). After prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass (>120 minutes) alone and with isoproterenol infusion, no spontaneous junctional ectopic tachycardia developed. Junctional ectopic tachycardia or fascicular tachycardia could be initiated after either slow atrioventricular nodal pathway ablation and/or digoxin administration. Junctional ectopic tachycardia occurred in 8 of 9 pigs (mean ventricular rate, 171 ± 32 bpm), and fascicular tachycardia occurred in 9 of 9 pigs (mean ventricular rate, 187 ± 39 bpm). His and right bundle recordings confirmed the conduction system origin. Experimental junctional ectopic tachycardia or fascicular tachycardia can occur in the intraoperative setting of sinus node dysfunction, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass, and enhanced conduction system automaticity. Conduction system automaticity occurred after either physical injury (ablation or tricuspid valve stretch) or measures to augment the transient inward current of the conduction system (isoproterenol and digoxin). This animal model can serve as the basis to assess new treatments of

  2. Craniovertebral junction stenosis in Lenz-Majewski syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuguchi, Koichi; Ishigro, Akira [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of General Pediatrics and Interdisciplinary Medicine, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Miyazaki, Osamu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Imaging, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    We report a girl with Lenz-Majewski syndrome associated with craniovertebral junction stenosis that led to communicating hydrocephalus and cervical myelopathy. The life-threatening complication was related to progressive craniovertebral hyperostosis that rapidly exacerbated during early childhood. Despite initial success of surgical intervention at 2 years of age, she developed apneic spells and died suddenly at age 5 years. Close monitoring for craniovertebral junction stenosis is essential to reduce morbidity and mortality in children with Lenz-Majewski syndrome. (orig.)

  3. Gap-junctional coupling between neutrophils and endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zahler, Stefan; Hoffmann, Anke; Gloe, Torsten; Pohl, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    Communication between leukocytes and endothelial cells is crucial for inflammatory reactions. Paracrine cross-talk and outside-in signaling (via adhesion molecules) have been characterized as communication pathways to date. As leukocytes and endothelial cells express connexins, we considered intercellular communication via gap junctions an intriguing additional concept. We found that gap-junctional coupling between neutrophils and endothelium occurred in a time-dependent, bidirectional manner...

  4. Prism-coupled light emission from tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushioda, S.; Rutledge, J. E.; Pierce, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Completely p-polarized light emission has been observed from smooth Al-AlO(x)-Au tunnel junctions placed on a prism coupler. The angle and polarization dependence demonstrate unambiguously that the emitted light is radiated by the fast-mode surface plasmon polariton. The emission spectra suggest that the dominant process for the excitation of the fast mode is through conversion of the slow mode to the fast mode mediated by residual roughness on the junction surface.

  5. What happens in Josephson junctions at high critical current densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarotti, D.; Stornaiuolo, D.; Lucignano, P.; Caruso, R.; Galletti, L.; Montemurro, D.; Jouault, B.; Campagnano, G.; Arani, H. F.; Longobardi, L.; Parlato, L.; Pepe, G. P.; Rotoli, G.; Tagliacozzo, A.; Lombardi, F.; Tafuri, F.

    2017-07-01

    The impressive advances in material science and nanotechnology are more and more promoting the use of exotic barriers and/or superconductors, thus paving the way to new families of Josephson junctions. Semiconducting, ferromagnetic, topological insulator and graphene barriers are leading to unconventional and anomalous aspects of the Josephson coupling, which might be useful to respond to some issues on key problems of solid state physics. However, the complexity of the layout and of the competing physical processes occurring in the junctions is posing novel questions on the interpretation of their phenomenology. We classify some significant behaviors of hybrid and unconventional junctions in terms of their first imprinting, i.e., current-voltage curves, and propose a phenomenological approach to describe some features of junctions characterized by relatively high critical current densities Jc. Accurate arguments on the distribution of switching currents will provide quantitative criteria to understand physical processes occurring in high-Jc junctions. These notions are universal and apply to all kinds of junctions.

  6. Strain mapping of a triple junction in nanocrystalline Pd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesner, Harald, E-mail: rosner@uni-muenster.de [Institut fuer Materialphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Kuebel, Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Ivanisenko, Yulia; Kurmanaeva, Lilia [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Divinski, Sergiy V.; Peterlechner, Martin; Wilde, Gerhard [Institut fuer Materialphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy was used to provide structural information on a triple junction in nanocrystalline Pd. This triple junction consists of two intersecting {Sigma}3 twin boundaries with a {Sigma}9 grain boundary and is connected to a quadruple point via the {Sigma}9 grain boundary. A comprehensive strain analysis of this triple junction using geometric phase analysis is presented and compared with a molecular dynamics simulation. The main results are: (i) the strain field of the core of the triple junction shows dislocation character and extends over a distance of about 0.5 nm; (ii) the intersecting boundaries result in a net translation of (a{sub 0})/({radical}(2)) , which corresponds to a Burgers vector of an (a{sub 0})/2 <110> dislocation in the fcc lattice; (iii) a disclination emerging from the triple junction along the {Sigma}9 grain boundary is balanced by a disclination of opposite sign emerging from the quadruple point. Based on the observation that the core of the triple junction can be described by the strain field of a dislocation, its energy was estimated using 1/2 Gb{sup 2} to be about 1.7 x 10{sup -9} J m{sup -1}. The presence of a disclination dipole is thought to be essential for stabilization of the structure observed.

  7. Affordance-based individuation of junctions in Open Street Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Scheider

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an algorithm that can be used to identify automatically the subset of street segments of a road network map that corresponds to a junction. The main idea is to use turn-compliant locomotion affordances, i.e., restricted patterns of supported movement, in order to specify junctions independently of their data representation, and in order to motivate tractable individuation and classification strategies. We argue that common approaches based solely on geometry or topology of the street segment graph are useful but insufficient proxies. They miss certain turn restrictions essential to junctions. From a computational viewpoint, the main challenge of affordance-based individuation of junctions lies in its complex recursive definition. In this paper, we show how Open Street Map data can be interpreted into locomotion affordances, and how the recursive junction definition can be translated into a deterministic algorithm. We evaluate this algorithm by applying it to small map excerpts in order to delineate the contained junctions.

  8. Engineering design of artificial vascular junctions for 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoxiao; Bibb, Richard; Harris, Russell

    2016-06-20

    Vascular vessels, including arteries, veins and capillaries, are being printed using additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing. This paper demonstrates that it is important to follow the vascular design by nature as close as possible when 3D printing artificial vascular branches. In previous work, the authors developed an algorithm of computational geometry for constructing smooth junctions for 3D printing. In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) is used to compare the wall shear stress and blood velocity field for the junctions of different designs. The CFD model can reproduce the expected wall shear stress at locations remote from the junction. For large vessels such as veins, it is shown that ensuring the smoothness of the junction and using smaller joining angles as observed in nature is very important to avoid high wall shear stress and recirculation. The issue is however less significant for capillaries. Large joining angles make no difference to the hemodynamic behavior, which is also consistent with the fact that most capillary junctions have large joining angles. The combination of the CFD analysis and the junction construction method form a complete design method for artificial vascular vessels that can be 3D printed using additive manufacturing technologies.

  9. The string-junction picture of multiquark states: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, G.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Centro Fermi, Museo Storico della Fisica,Piazza del Viminale 1, 00184 Roma (Italy); Veneziano, G. [Collège de France,11 place M. Berthelot, 75005 Paris (France); Theory Division, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma La Sapienza,Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-06-07

    We recall and update, both theoretically and phenomenologically, our (nearly) forty-years-old proposal of a string-junction as a necessary complement to the conventional classification of hadrons based just on their quark-antiquark constituents. In that proposal single (though in general metastable) hadronic states are associated with “irreducible' gauge-invariant operators consisting of Wilson lines (visualized as strings of color flux tubes) that may either end on a quark or an antiquark, or annihilate in triplets at a junction J or an anti-junction J̄. For the junction-free sector (ordinary q q̄ mesons and glueballs) the picture is supported by large-N (number of colors) considerations as well as by a lattice strong-coupling expansion. Both imply the famous OZI rule suppressing quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams. For hadrons with J and/or J̄ constituents the same expansions support our proposal, including its generalization of the OZI rule to the suppression of J−J̄ annihilation diagrams. Such a rule implies that hadrons with junctions are “mesophobic' and thus unusually narrow if they are below threshold for decaying into as many baryons as their total number of junctions (two for a tetraquark, three for a pentaquark). Experimental support for our claim, based on the observation that narrow multiquark states typically lie below (well above) the relevant baryonic (mesonic) thresholds, will be presented.

  10. Myotendinous junction defects and reduced force transmission in mice that lack alpha7 integrin and utrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welser, Jennifer V; Rooney, Jachinta E; Cohen, Nicolette C; Gurpur, Praveen B; Singer, Cherie A; Evans, Rebecca A; Haines, Bryan A; Burkin, Dean J

    2009-10-01

    The alpha7beta1 integrin, dystrophin, and utrophin glycoprotein complexes are the major laminin receptors in skeletal muscle. Loss of dystrophin causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a lethal muscle wasting disease. Duchenne muscular dystrophy-affected muscle exhibits increased expression of alpha7beta1 integrin and utrophin, which suggests that these laminin binding complexes may act as surrogates in the absence of dystrophin. Indeed, mice that lack dystrophin and alpha7 integrin (mdx/alpha7(-/-)), or dystrophin and utrophin (mdx/utr(-/-)), exhibit severe muscle pathology and die prematurely. To explore the contribution of the alpha7beta1 integrin and utrophin to muscle integrity and function, we generated mice lacking both alpha7 integrin and utrophin. Surprisingly, mice that lack both alpha7 integrin and utrophin (alpha7/utr(-/-)) were viable and fertile. However, these mice had partial embryonic lethality and mild muscle pathology, similar to alpha7 integrin-deficient mice. Dystrophin levels were increased 1.4-fold in alpha7/utr(-/-) skeletal muscle and were enriched at neuromuscular junctions. Ultrastructural analysis revealed abnormal myotendinous junctions, and functional tests showed a ninefold reduction in endurance and 1.6-fold decrease in muscle strength in these mice. The alpha7/utr(-/-) mouse, therefore, demonstrates the critical roles of alpha7 integrin and utrophin in maintaining myotendinous junction structure and enabling force transmission during muscle contraction. Together, these results indicate that the alpha7beta1 integrin, dystrophin, and utrophin complexes act in a concerted manner to maintain the structural and functional integrity of skeletal muscle.

  11. Molecular physiology and pathophysiology of tight junctions I. Tight junction structure and function: lessons from mutant animals and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitic, L L; Van Itallie, C M; Anderson, J M

    2000-08-01

    Tight junctions form the major paracellular barrier in epithelial tissues. Barrier-sealing properties are quite variable among cell types in terms of electrical resistance, solute and water flux, and charge selectivity. A molecular explanation for this variability appears closer following identification of the transmembrane proteins occludin and members of the claudin multigene family. For example, the human phenotype of mutations in claudin-16 suggests that it creates a channel that allows magnesium to diffuse through renal tight junctions. Similarly, a mouse knockout of claudin-11 reveals its role in formation of tight junctions in myelin and between Sertoli cells in testis. The study of other claudins is expected to elucidate their contributions to creating junction structure and physiology in all epithelial tissues.

  12. Spatial inhomogeneous barrier heights at graphene/semiconductor Schottky junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Dushyant

    Graphene, a semimetal with linear energy dispersion, forms Schottky junction when interfaced with a semiconductor. This dissertation presents temperature dependent current-voltage and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) measurements performed on graphene Schottky junctions formed with both three and two dimensional semiconductors. To fabricate Schottky junctions, we transfer chemical vapor deposited monolayer graphene onto Si- and C-face SiC, Si, GaAs and MoS2 semiconducting substrates using polymer assisted chemical method. We observe three main type of intrinsic spatial inhomogeneities, graphene ripples, ridges and semiconductor steps in STM imaging that can exist at graphene/semiconductor junctions. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements reveal fluctuations in graphene Dirac point position, which is directly related to the Schottky barrier height. We find a direct correlation of Dirac point variation with the topographic undulations of graphene ripples at the graphene/SiC junction. However, no such correlation is established at graphene/Si and Graphene/GaAs junctions and Dirac point variations are attributed to surface states and trapped charges at the interface. In addition to graphene ripples and ridges, we also observe atomic scale moire patterns at graphene/MoS2 junction due to van der Waals interaction at the interface. Periodic topographic modulations due to moire pattern do not lead to local variation in graphene Dirac point, indicating that moire pattern does not contribute to fluctuations in electronic properties of the heterojunction. We perform temperature dependent current-voltage measurements to investigate the impact of topographic inhomogeneities on electrical properties of the Schottky junctions. We observe temperature dependence in junction parameters, such as Schottky barrier height and ideality factor, for all types of Schottky junctions in forward bias measurements. Standard thermionic emission theory which assumes a perfect

  13. The histopathological comparison on the destruction of the periodontal tissue between normal junctional epithelium and long junctional epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, S; Ukai, T; Kuramoto, A; Yoshinaga, Y; Nakamura, H; Takamori, Y; Yamashita, Y; Hara, Y

    2017-02-01

    The barrier function of long junctional epithelium is thought to be important after periodontal initial therapy and periodontal surgery. Although the difference between long junctional epithelium and normal junctional epithelium regarding their resistance to destruction of periodontal tissue has been investigated, the mechanism still remains unclear. Using our rat experimental periodontitis model in which loss of attachment and resorption of alveolar bone is induced by the formation of immune complexes, we investigated the resistance of periodontal tissue containing long junctional epithelium and normal junctional epithelium to destruction. Rats were divided into four groups. In the immunized long junctional epithelium (I-LJE) group, rats were immunized with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and curettage and root planing procedures were performed on the palatal gingiva of the maxillary first molars to obtain reattachment by long junctional epithelium. In the immunized normal junctional epithelium (I-JE) group, rats were immunized without curettage and root planing procedures. In the nonimmunized long junctional epithelium (nI-LJE) group, rats were not immunized but curettage and root-planing procedures were performed. In the control group, neither immunization nor curettage and root-planing was performed. In all rats, periodontal inflammation was induced by topical application of LPS into the palatal gingival sulcus of maxillary first molars. The rats were killed at baseline and after the third and fifth applications of LPS. Attachment loss and the number of inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in the four groups were compared histopathologically and histometrically. After the third application of LPS in the I-LJE group, attachment loss showed a greater increase than in control and nI-LJE groups, and inflammatory cell infiltration and osteoclasts were increased more than in the other groups. After the fifth application of LPS, attachment loss was greater and there was a

  14. AdS and ds Entropy from String Junctions or the Function of Junction Conjunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Eva

    Flux compactifications of string theory exhibiting the possibility of discretely tuning the cosmological constant to small values have been constructed. The highly tuned vacua in this discretuum have curvature radii which scale as large powers of the flux quantum numbers, exponential in the number of cycles in the compactiflcation. By the arguments of Susskind/Witten (in the AdS case) and Gibbons/Hawking (in the dS case), we expect correspondingly large entropies associated with these vacua. If they are to provide a dual description of these vacua on their Coulomb branch, branes traded for the flux need to account for this entropy at the appropriate energy scale. In this note, we argue that simple string junctions and webs ending on the branes can account for this large entropy, obtaining a rough estimate for junction entropy that agrees with the existing rough estimates for the spacing of the discretuum. In particular, the brane entropy can account for the (A)dS entropy far away from string scale correspondence limits.

  15. Junction-to-Case Thermal Resistance of a Silicon Carbide Bipolar Junction Transistor Measured

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    Junction temperature of a prototype SiC-based bipolar junction transistor (BJT) was estimated by using the base-emitter voltage (V(sub BE)) characteristic for thermometry. The V(sub BE) was measured as a function of the base current (I(sub B)) at selected temperatures (T), all at a fixed collector current (I(sub C)) and under very low duty cycle pulse conditions. Under such conditions, the average temperature of the chip was taken to be the same as that of the temperature-controlled case. At increased duty cycle such as to substantially heat the chip, but same I(sub C) pulse height, the chip temperature was identified by matching the V(sub BE) to the thermometry curves. From the measured average power, the chip-to-case thermal resistance could be estimated, giving a reasonable value. A tentative explanation for an observed bunching with increasing temperature of the calibration curves may relate to an increasing dopant atom ionization. A first-cut analysis, however, does not support this.

  16. Optimal Normal Tissue Sparing in Craniospinal Axis Irradiation Using IMRT With Daily Intrafractionally Modulated Junction(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusters, Johannes M.A.M.; Louwe, Rob J.W.; Kollenburg, Peter G.M. van; Kunze-Busch, Martina C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E.M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssens, Geert O.R.J., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique for craniospinal irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with improved dose homogeneity at the field junction(s), increased target volume conformity, and minimized dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: Five patients with high-risk medulloblastoma underwent CT simulation in supine position. For each patient, an IMRT plan with daily intrafractionally modulated junction(s) was generated, as well as a treatment plan based on conventional three-dimensional planning (3DCRT). A dose of 39.6 Gy in 22 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy was prescribed. Dose-volume parameters for target volumes and OARs were compared for the two techniques. Results: The maximum dose with IMRT was <107% in all patients. V{sub <95} and V{sub >107} were <1 cm{sup 3} for IMRT compared with 3-9 cm{sup 3} for the craniospinal and 26-43 cm{sup 3} for the spinal-spinal junction with 3DCRT. These observations corresponded with a lower homogeneity index and a higher conformity index for the spinal planning target volume with IMRT. IMRT provided considerable sparing of acute and late reacting tissues. V{sub 75} for the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, and intestine was 81%, 81%, and 22% with 3DCRT versus 5%, 0%, and 1% with IMRT, respectively. V{sub 75} for the heart and thyroid was 42% and 32% vs. 0% with IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT with daily intrafractionally modulated junction results in a superior target coverage and junction homogeneity compared with 3DCRT. A significant dose reduction can be obtained for acute as well as late-reacting tissues.

  17. The inferior parietal lobule and temporoparietal junction: A network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igelström, Kajsa M; Graziano, Michael S A

    2017-10-01

    Information processing in specialized, spatially distributed brain networks underlies the diversity and complexity of our cognitive and behavioral repertoire. Networks converge at a small number of hubs - highly connected regions that are central for multimodal integration and higher-order cognition. We review one major network hub of the human brain: the inferior parietal lobule and the overlapping temporoparietal junction (IPL/TPJ). The IPL is greatly expanded in humans compared to other primates and matures late in human development, consistent with its importance in higher-order functions. Evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests that the IPL/TPJ participates in a broad range of behaviors and functions, from bottom-up perception to cognitive capacities that are uniquely human. The organization of the IPL/TPJ is challenging to study due to the complex anatomy and high inter-individual variability of this cortical region. In this review we aimed to synthesize findings from anatomical and functional studies of the IPL/TPJ that used neuroimaging at rest and during a wide range of tasks. The first half of the review describes subdivisions of the IPL/TPJ identified using cytoarchitectonics, resting-state functional connectivity analysis and structural connectivity methods. The second half of the article reviews IPL/TPJ activations and network participation in bottom-up attention, lower-order self-perception, undirected thinking, episodic memory and social cognition. The central theme of this review is to discuss how network nodes within the IPL/TPJ are organized and how they participate in human perception and cognition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Quaternary Evolution of Karliova Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sançar, Taylan; Zabcı, Cengiz; Akyüz, H. Serdar

    2013-04-01

    The arguments to explain Quaternary evolution of Karlıova Triple Junction (KTJ) depends upon two different analogue models. The compressional type of Prandtl Cell Model (PCM) and 60 km wide shear zone with concomitant counter clockwise block rotation used to modelled for west and east of the KTJ respectively. The data for the model of west of the KTJ acquired by extensive field studies, and quantified geomorphic features. Compressional PCM put forward that behavior of slip lines controlled by boundary faults. But the model is not enough to explain slip distribution, age relation of them. At west of the KTJ boundary faults presented by eastern most segments of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) and the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ). Slip lines, however, presented by Bahçeli and Toklular faults. Both field studies and morphometric analyses undisputedly set forth that there are two different fault types between the NAFZ and EAFZ. The most strain loaded fault type, which are positioned near the NAFZ, start as a strike-slip fault and when it turn to SE its sense of motion change to oblique normal due to changing orientation of principal stress axes. The new orientation of stress axes exposed in the field as a special kind of caprock -cuesta-. The younger slip lines formed very close to junction point and accommodate less slip. Even though slip trajectories started from the boundary faults in compressional PCM, at the west of KTJ, right lateral trajectories more clearly formed close the NAFZ and left lateral trajectories, relatively less strain loaded fault type, are poorly formed close the EAFZ . We think that, this differences between KTJ and compressional PCM result from the distinction of velocity of boundary faults. East of the KTJ governed by completely different mechanism. The region controlled two main fault systems. The Varto Fault Zone (VFZ), the eastern branch of the KTJ, and Murat Fault (MF) delimited the region from north and south respectively. The

  19. Syringomyelia and Craniocervical Junction Abnormalities in Chihuahuas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviranta, A-M; Rusbridge, C; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, O; Hielm-Björkman, A; Lappalainen, A K; Knowler, S P; Jokinen, T S

    2017-11-01

    Chiari-like malformation (CM) and syringomyelia (SM) are widely reported in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Griffon Bruxellois dogs. Increasing evidence indicates that CM and SM also occur in other small and toy breed dogs, such as Chihuahuas. To describe the presence of SM and craniocervical junction (CCJ) abnormalities in Chihuahuas and to evaluate the possible association of CCJ abnormalities with SM. To describe CM/SM-related clinical signs and neurologic deficits and to investigate the association of CM/SM-related clinical signs with signalment, SM, or CCJ abnormalities. Fifty-three client-owned Chihuahuas. Prospective study. Questionnaire analyses and physical and neurologic examinations were obtained before magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging. Images were evaluated for the presence of SM, CM, and atlantooccipital overlapping. Additionally, medullary kinking, dorsal spinal cord compression, and their sum indices were calculated. Scratching was the most common CM/SM-related clinical sign and decreased postural reaction the most common neurologic deficit in 73 and 87% of dogs, respectively. Chiari-like malformation and SM were present in 100 and 38% of dogs, respectively. Syringomyelia was associated with the presence of CM/SM-related clinical signs (P = 0.034), and medullary kinking and sum indices were higher in dogs with clinical signs (P = 0.016 and P = 0.007, respectively). Syringomyelia and CCJ abnormalities are prevalent in Chihuahuas. Syringomyelia was an important factor for the presence of CM/SM-related clinical signs, but many dogs suffered from similar clinical signs without being affected by SM, highlighting the clinical importance of CCJ abnormalities in Chihuahuas. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Biosynthesis and structural composition of gap junction intercellular membrane channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, M M

    2000-08-01

    Gap junction channels assemble as dodecameric complexes, in which a hexameric connexon (hemichannel) in one plasma membrane docks end-to-end with a connexon in the membrane of a closely apposed cell to provide direct cell-to-cell communication. Synthesis, assembly, and trafficking of the gap junction channel subunit proteins referred to as connexins, largely appear to follow the general secretory pathway for membrane proteins. The connexin subunits can assemble into homo-, as well as distinct hetero-oligomeric connexons. Assembly appears to be based on specific signals located within the connexin polypeptides. Plaque formation by the clustering of gap junction channels in the plane of the membrane, as well as channel degradation are poorly understood processes that are topics of current research. Recently, we tagged connexins with the autofluorescent reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP), and its cyan (CFP), and yellow (YFP) color variants and combined this reporter technology with single, and dual-color, high resolution deconvolution microscopy, computational volume rendering, and time-lapse microscopy to examine the detailed organization, structural composition, and dynamics of gap junctions in live cells. This technology provided for the first time a realistic, three-dimensional impression of gap junctions as they appear in the plasma membranes of adjoining cells, and revealed an excitingly detailed structural organization of gap junctions never seen before in live cells. Here, I summarize recent progress in areas encompassing the synthesis, assembly and structural composition of gap junctions with a special emphasis on the recent results we obtained using cell-free translation/ membrane-protein translocation, and autofluorescent reporters in combination with live-cell deconvolution microscopy.

  1. Application of Nanostructured Materials and Multi-junction Structure in Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Yangqin

    2015-12-09

    With power conversion efficiency surpassing the 10% milestone for commercialization, photovoltaic technology based on solution-processable polymer solar cells (PSCs) provides a promising route towards a cost-efficient strategy to address the ever-increasing worldwide energy demands. However, to make PSCs successful, challenges such as insufficient light absorption, high maintenance costs, and relatively high production costs must be addressed. As solutions to some of these problems, the unique properties of nanostructured materials and complimentary light absorption in multi-junction device structure could prove to be highly beneficial. As a starting point, integrating nanostructure-based transparent self-cleaning surfaces in PSCs was investigated first. By controlling the length of the hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods and covering their surface with a thin layer of chemical vapor-deposited SiO2, a highly transparent and UV-resistant superhydrophobic surface was constructed. Integrating the transparent superhydrophobic surface in a PSC shows minimal impact on the figure of merit of the PSC. To address the low mechanical durability of the transparent superhydrophobic surface based on SiO2-coated ZnO nanorods, a novel method inspired by the water condensation process was developed. This method involved directly growing hollow silica half-nanospheres on the substrate through the condensation of water in the presence of a silica precursor. Benefit from the decreased back scattering efficiency and increased light transport mean free path arise from the hollow nature, a transparent superhydrophobic surface was realized using submicrometer sized silica half-nanospheres. The decent mechanical property of silica and the “direct-grown” protocol are expected to impart improved mechanical durability to the transparent superhydrophobic surface. Regarding the application of multi-junction device structure in PSCs, homo multi-junction PSCs were constructed from an identical

  2. Resolution of Mismatched Overlap Holliday Junction Intermediates by the Tyrosine Recombinase IntDOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Kenneth; Yoneji, Sumiko; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2017-05-15

    CTnDOT is an integrated conjugative element found in Bacteroides species. CTnDOT contains and transfers antibiotic resistance genes. The element integrates into and excises from the host chromosome via a Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate as part of a site-specific recombination mechanism. The CTnDOT integrase, IntDOT, is a tyrosine recombinase with core-binding, catalytic, and amino-terminal (N) domains. Unlike well-studied tyrosine recombinases, such as lambda integrase (Int), IntDOT is able to resolve Holliday junctions containing heterology (mismatched bases) between the sites of strand exchange. All known natural isolates of CTnDOT contain mismatches in the overlap region between the sites of strand exchange. Previous work showed that IntDOT was unable to resolve synthetic Holliday junctions containing mismatched bases to products in the absence of the arm-type sites and a DNA-bending protein. We constructed synthetic HJs with the arm-type sites and tested them with the Bacteroides host factor (BHFa). We found that the addition of BHFa stimulated resolution of HJ intermediates with mismatched overlap regions to products. In addition, the L1 site is required for directionality of the reaction, particularly when the HJ contains mismatches. BHFa is required for product formation when the overlap region contains mismatches, and it stimulates resolution to products when the overlap region is identical. Without this DNA bending, the N domain of IntDOT is likely unable to bind the L1 arm-type site. These findings suggest that BHFa bends DNA into the necessary conformation for the higher-order complexes, including the L1 site, that are required for product formation.IMPORTANCE CTnDOT is a mobile element that carries antibiotic resistance genes and moves by site-selective recombination and subsequent conjugation. The recombination reaction is catalyzed by an integrase IntDOT that is a member of the tyrosine recombinase family. The reaction proceeds through ordered

  3. Preoperative study of the inner segment/outer segment junction of photoreceptors by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography as a prognostic factor in patients with epiretinal membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobos E

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available E Cobos,1 L Arias,1 JM Ruiz-Moreno,2,3 MJ Rubio,1 P Garcia-Bru,1 JM Caminal,1 J Catala,1 J Arruga11Department of Ophthalmology, Bellvitge University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Castilla La Mancha University, Albacete, Spain; 3Alicante Institute of Ophthalmology, VISSUM, Vitreo-Retinal Unit, Alicante, SpainObjective: To demonstrate whether the preoperative integrity of the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS junction of photoreceptors studied by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT is a prognostic factor in epiretinal membrane surgery.Methods: We retrospectively studied patients with an idiopathic epiretinal membrane who underwent a 23-gauge vitrectomy to remove this membrane. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and SD-OCT scans were examined before and 6 months after the surgery. We studied the retinal microstructure, especially the IS/OS junction of the photoreceptors, and evaluated the intergroup differences between patients with an intact layer and those with an irregular or disrupted layer. We applied both the Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests for statistical analysis.Results: In total, 51 eyes from 51 enrolled patients were examined in this study. The postoperative BCVA was significantly better for eyes that had an intact IS/OS junction than for eyes that had an irregular or disrupted IS/OS junction, as preoperatively observed with SD-OCT scans (P < 0.001. We also observed an important association between disrupted IS/OS junctions and the presence of cystic macular edema (P < 0.01.Conclusion: The presence of an intact IS/OS junction on the preoperative SD-OCT scan was an important predictor of better visual recovery after epiretinal membrane surgery. Keywords: epiretinal membrane, photoreceptors, inner segment/outer segment junction, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

  4. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Guy

    Full Text Available The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of the enamel cap which may go along with the addition of original features. The relative contribution of these two tooth components to morphological variation and their respective response to natural selection is a major issue in paleoanthropology. This study will determine how much enamel morphology relies on the form of the enamel-dentine junction. The outer occlusal enamel surface and the enamel-dentine junction surface of 76 primate second upper molars are represented by polygonal meshes and investigated using tridimensional topometrical analysis. Quantitative criteria (elevation, inclination, orientation, curvature and occlusal patch count are introduced to show that the enamel-dentine junction significantly constrains the topographical properties of the outer enamel surface. Our results show a significant correlation for elevation, orientation, inclination, curvature and occlusal complexity between the outer enamel surface and the enamel dentine junction for all studied primate taxa with the exception of four modern humans for curvature (p<0.05. Moreover, we show that, for all selected topometrical parameters apart from occlusal patch count, the recorded correlations significantly decrease along with enamel thickening in our sample. While preserving tooth integrity by providing resistance to wear and fractures, the variation of enamel thickness may modify the curvature present at the occlusal enamel surface in relation to enamel-dentine junction

  5. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Franck; Lazzari, Vincent; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Thiery, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of the enamel cap which may go along with the addition of original features. The relative contribution of these two tooth components to morphological variation and their respective response to natural selection is a major issue in paleoanthropology. This study will determine how much enamel morphology relies on the form of the enamel-dentine junction. The outer occlusal enamel surface and the enamel-dentine junction surface of 76 primate second upper molars are represented by polygonal meshes and investigated using tridimensional topometrical analysis. Quantitative criteria (elevation, inclination, orientation, curvature and occlusal patch count) are introduced to show that the enamel-dentine junction significantly constrains the topographical properties of the outer enamel surface. Our results show a significant correlation for elevation, orientation, inclination, curvature and occlusal complexity between the outer enamel surface and the enamel dentine junction for all studied primate taxa with the exception of four modern humans for curvature (penamel thickening in our sample. While preserving tooth integrity by providing resistance to wear and fractures, the variation of enamel thickness may modify the curvature present at the occlusal enamel surface in relation to enamel-dentine junction, potentially modifying dental functionalities such as blunt versus sharp dental tools. In terms of natural selection, there is a balance between increasing tooth resistance and maintaining

  6. Transition Fault and the Yakutat-Pacific-North American Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Norton, I. O.; Pavlis, T. L.; Reece, R.; van Avendonk, H.; Worthington, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    elevated by ~1-3 km. The northern arm of the Transition Fault continues to lie at the boundary of the Pacific and Yakutat crust across which depth to the top of the basement changes by 4-6 km suggest that the outer strand of the Transition Fault has likely stepped southward from the primary fault due to increased convergence west of the GASZ and proximal to the triple junction. This additional transpressional deformation likely occurs within the Pacific Plate due to rheology since the Pacific crust is likely the weakest tectonic member at the triple junction. We will investigate this plate boundary deformation at the Gulf of Alaska triple junction further with improved seismic imaging and integration with gravity modeling in an effort to discuss the plate boundary reorganization that can occur during attempted subduction of buoyant crust such as the Yakutat Terrane.

  7. Time Dependent Tunneling in Laser Irradiated Scanning Tunneling Microscope Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sookyung Hur

    A principal motivation for the studies reported in this thesis was to obtain a theoretical explanation for the experimental results obtained by Nguyen et al. (1989) to determine the traversal time of an electron tunneling through a quantum mechanical barrier in a laser irradiated STM junction. The work therefore focused on the calculation of tunneling in a time-dependent oscillating barrier, and more specifically on the inelastic contributions to the tunneling current. To do so the kinetic formalism for tunneling was modified and extended to calculate inelastic processes in an irradiated tunneling junction. Furthermore, there is significant absorption of power from the laser beam in the junction electrodes resulting in thermal effects which can influence the tunneling. Extensive analysis of the spatial and temporal temperature distributions was first done for a realistic model of the diode emitter and anode using the Green function method. Specifically we considered (i) thermal effects due to surface heating of the absorbed laser radiation, (ii) the thermoelectric emf produced in the junction due to differential heating, and (iii) resistive and Thomson heat produced in the junction by laser induced currents. Using first-order time-dependent perturbation theory we also (iv) calculated the inelastic tunneling current due to a time dependent oscillating barrier produced by the antenna geometry of the STM junction. Lastly, we (v) formulated photo-assisted tunneling due to the electron -photon interaction in the junction using the second-quantization formalism. Although quite significant results were obtained for the tunneling current density as a function of frequency, gap distance and other junction parameters which gave insights into important features of the Nguyen et al. experiment (and tunneling characteristics of an irradiated STM in general), no single expression was derived or calculated results obtained which explains or fits all their observed data, or

  8. PKCγ, role in lens differentiation and gap junction coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satyabrata; Wang, Huan; Molina, Samuel A; Martinez-Wittinghan, Francisco J; Jena, Snehalata; Bossmann, Leonie K; Miller, Kendra A; Mathias, Richard T; Takemoto, Dolores J

    2011-07-01

    To determine the role of PKCγ in the regulation of gap junction coupling in the normal lens, we have compared the properties of coupling in lenses from wild type (WT) and PKC-γ knockout (KO) mice. Western blotting, confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoprecipitation, RT-PCR and quantitative real time PCR were used to study gap junction protein and message expression; gap junction coupling conductance and pH gating were measured in intact lenses using impedance studies. There were no gross differences in size, clarity, or expression of full-length Cx46 or Cx50 in lenses from WT and PKCγ KO mice. However, total Cx43 protein expression was ~150% higher in the KO lenses. In WT lenses, Cx43 was found only in epithelial cells whereas in KO lenses, its expression continued into the fiber cells. Gap junction coupling conductance in the differentiating fibers (DF) of PKCγ KO lenses was 34% larger than that of WT. In the mature fiber (MF), the effect was much larger with the KO lenses having an 82% increase in coupling over WT. pH gating of the DF fibers was not altered by the absence of PKCγ. PKCγ has a major role in the regulation of gap junction expression and coupling in the normal lens.

  9. Testosterone Regulates Tight Junction Proteins and Influences Prostatic Autoimmune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Montgomery, Bruce; True, Larry; Nelson, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone and inflammation have been linked to the development of common age-associated diseases affecting the prostate gland including prostate cancer, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. We hypothesized that testosterone regulates components of prostate tight junctions which serve as a barrier to inflammation, thus providing a connection between age- and treatment-associated testosterone declines and prostatic pathology. We examined the expression and distribution of tight junction proteins in prostate biospecimens from mouse models and a clinical study of chemical castration, using transcript profiling, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. We determined that low serum testosterone is associated with reduced transcript and protein levels of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8, resulting in defective tight junction ultrastructure in benign prostate glands. Expression of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8 was negatively correlated with the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate caused by testosterone deprivation. Testosterone suppression also induced an auto-immune humoral response directed toward prostatic proteins. Testosterone supplementation in castrate mice resulted in re-expression of tight junction components in prostate epithelium and significantly reduced prostate inflammatory cell numbers. These data demonstrate that tight junction architecture in the prostate is related to changes in serum testosterone levels, and identify an androgen-regulated mechanism that potentially contributes to the development of prostate inflammation and consequent pathology. PMID:21761342

  10. Graphene based superconducting junctions as spin sources for spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamipour, Hamidreza

    2018-02-01

    We investigate spin-polarized transport in graphene-based ferromagnet-superconductor junctions within the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk formalism by using spin-polarized Dirac-Bogoliubov-de-Gennes equations. We consider superconductor in spin-singlet s-wave pairing state and ferromagnet is modeled by an exchange field with energy of Ex. We have found that graphene-based junctions can be used to produce highly spin-polarized current in different situations. For example, if we design a junction with high Ex and EF compared to order parameter of superconductor, then one can have a large spin-polarized current which is tunable in magnitude and sign by bias voltage and Ex. Therefore graphene-based superconducting junction can be used in spintronic devices in alternative to conventional junctions or half-metallic ferromagnets. Also, we have found that the calculated spin polarization can be used as a tool to distinguish specular Andreev reflection (SAR) from the conventional Andreev reflection (CAR) such that in the case of CAR, spin polarization in sub-gap region is completely negative which means that spin-down current is greater than spin-up current. When the SAR is dominated, the spin polarization is positive at all bias-voltages, which itself shows that spin-up current is greater than spin-down current.

  11. Au nanowire junction breakup through surface atom diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigonski, Simon; Jansson, Ville; Vlassov, Sergei; Polyakov, Boris; Baibuz, Ekaterina; Oras, Sven; Aabloo, Alvo; Djurabekova, Flyura; Zadin, Vahur

    2018-01-01

    Metallic nanowires are known to break into shorter fragments due to the Rayleigh instability mechanism. This process is strongly accelerated at elevated temperatures and can completely hinder the functioning of nanowire-based devices like e.g. transparent conductive and flexible coatings. At the same time, arranged gold nanodots have important applications in electrochemical sensors. In this paper we perform a series of annealing experiments of gold and silver nanowires and nanowire junctions at fixed temperatures 473, 673, 873 and 973 K (200 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C and 700 °C) during a time period of 10 min. We show that nanowires are especially prone to fragmentation around junctions and crossing points even at comparatively low temperatures. The fragmentation process is highly temperature dependent and the junction region breaks up at a lower temperature than a single nanowire. We develop a gold parametrization for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and demonstrate the surface diffusion origin of the nanowire junction fragmentation. We show that nanowire fragmentation starts at the junctions with high reliability and propose that aligning nanowires in a regular grid could be used as a technique for fabricating arrays of nanodots.

  12. Functional Gap Junctions in the Schwann Cell Myelin Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balice-Gordon, Rita J.; Bone, Linda J.; Scherer, Steven S.

    1998-01-01

    The Schwann cell myelin sheath is a multilamellar structure with distinct structural domains in which different proteins are localized. Intracellular dye injection and video microscopy were used to show that functional gap junctions are present within the myelin sheath that allow small molecules to diffuse between the adaxonal and perinuclear Schwann cell cytoplasm. Gap junctions are localized to periodic interruptions in the compact myelin called Schmidt–Lanterman incisures and to paranodes; these regions contain at least one gap junction protein, connexin32 (Cx32). The radial diffusion of low molecular weight dyes across the myelin sheath was not interrupted in myelinating Schwann cells from cx32-null mice, indicating that other connexins participate in forming gap junctions in these cells. Owing to the unique geometry of myelinating Schwann cells, a gap junction-mediated radial pathway may be essential for rapid diffusion between the adaxonal and perinuclear cytoplasm, since this radial pathway is approximately one million times faster than the circumferential pathway. PMID:9722620

  13. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, K. P.; Balogh, Z.; Nyáry, A.; Mészáros, G.; Makk, P.; Solomon, G. C.; Halbritter, A.

    2017-03-01

    We review data analysis techniques that can be used to study temporal correlations among conductance traces in break junction measurements. We show that temporal histograms are a simple but efficient tool to check the temporal homogeneity of the conductance traces, or to follow spontaneous or triggered temporal variations, like structural modifications in trained contacts, or the emergence of single-molecule signatures after molecule dosing. To statistically analyze the presence and the decay time of temporal correlations, we introduce shifted correlation plots. Finally, we demonstrate that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken junctions helps to produce statistically independent conductance traces at room temperature, whereas at low temperature repeating tendencies are observed as long as the contacts are not closed to sufficiently high conductance setpoints. Applying opening-closing correlation analysis on Pt-CO-Pt single-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations.

  14. Magnetoanisotropic Andreev reflection in ferromagnet/superconductor junctions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegl, Petra; Matos-Abiague, Alex; Zutic, Igor; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2016-10-01

    Andreev reflection spectroscopy of ferromagnet/superconductor (F/S) junctions is a sensitive probe of the junction interface as well as the spin polarization. We theoretically investigate spin-polarized transport in F/S junctions in the presence of Rashba and Dresselhaus interfacial spin-orbit fields and show that Andreev reflection can be controlled by changing the magnetization orientation. This suggests a similar control of the superconducting proximity effect and Majorana states. We predict a giant in- and out-of-plane magnetoanisotropy of the junction conductance. If the ferromagnet is highly spin polarized - in the half-metal limit - the magnetoanisotropic Andreev reflection depends universally on the spin-orbit fields only. Our results show that Andreev reflection spectroscopy can be used for sensitive probing of interfacial spin-orbit fields in F/S junction. This work has been supported by DFG SFB 689, the International Doctorate Program Topological Insulators of the Elite Network of Bavaria, DOE-BES Grant DE-SC0004890, and ONR N000141310754. P. Högl, A. Matos-Abiague, Igor Žutić, J. Fabian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 116601 (2015)

  15. Detecting topological superconductivity with φ0 Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrade, Constantin; Hoffman, Silas; Loss, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    The recent experimental discovery of φ0 Josephson junctions by Szombati et al. [Nat. Phys. 12, 568 (2016), 10.1038/nphys3742], characterized by a finite phase offset in the supercurrent, requires the same ingredients as topological superconductors, which suggests a profound connection between these two distinct phenomena. Here, we show that a quantum dot φ0 Josephson junction can serve as a qualitative indicator for topological superconductivity: microscopically, we find that the phase shift in a junction of s -wave superconductors is due to the spin-orbit induced mixing of singly occupied states on the quantum dot, while for a topological superconductor junction it is due to singlet-triplet mixing. Because of this important difference, when the spin-orbit vector of the quantum dot and the external Zeeman field are orthogonal, the s -wave superconductors form a π Josephson junction, while the topological superconductors have a finite offset φ0 by which topological superconductivity can be distinguished from conventional superconductivity. Our prediction can be immediately tested in nanowire systems currently used for Majorana fermion experiments and thus offers a realistic approach for detecting topological bound states.

  16. Proximity Effect at Graphene - High Tc Superconductor Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da; Shih, En-Min; Arefe, Ghidewon; Kim, Youngduck; Edelberg, Drew; Andrade, Erick; Wang, Dennis; Hone, James; Dean, Cory; Pasupathy, Abhay; Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA Collaboration

    The proximity effect is a well-known mesoscopic phenomenon where Cooper pairs from a superconductor (S) enter into a normal metal (N) that is well coupled to it. Since graphene was discovered a decade ago, the proximity effect at superconductor-graphene junctions has been extensively studied and interesting phenomena such as specular Andreev reflection and ballistic transport at graphene Josephson junctions have been observed. However, superconductors used in these experiments to date are of conventional low Tc, such as aluminum(Tc=1.2K), NbSe2(Tc=7K), and MoRe(Tc=8K). Understanding how the proximity effect works between high-Tc superconductors (pnictides and cuprates) and the Dirac Fermions of graphene remains largely unexplored. The chief technical challenge here is to create high-quality junctions between high-Tc superconductors and graphene. In this work, we will introduce a home-made setup that allows us to exfoliate, transfer and encapsulate superconductor-graphene junctions in a well controlled inert atmosphere. Transport measurements of the proximity effect at graphene-iron pnictide(FeSe, FeTeSe) and graphene-cuprate(BSCCO) junctions will be described.

  17. Bile duct epithelial tight junctions and barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R.K.; Samak, G.

    2013-01-01

    Bile ducts play a crucial role in the formation and secretion of bile as well as excretion of circulating xenobiotic substances. In addition to its secretory and excretory functions, bile duct epithelium plays an important role in the formation of a barrier to the diffusion of toxic substances from bile into the hepatic interstitial tissue. Disruption of barrier function and toxic injury to liver cells appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver diseases such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cholangiocarcinoma. Although the investigations into understanding the structure and regulation of tight junctions in gut, renal and endothelial tissues have expanded rapidly, very little is known about the structure and regulation of tight junctions in the bile duct epithelium. In this article we summarize the current understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of bile duct epithelium, the structure and regulation of tight junctions in canaliculi and bile duct epithelia and different mechanisms involved in the regulation of disruption and protection of bile duct epithelial tight junctions. This article will make a case for the need of future investigations toward our understanding of molecular organization and regulation of canalicular and bile duct epithelial tight junctions. PMID:24665411

  18. Do ridge-ridge-fault triple junctions exist on Earth? Evidence from the Aden-Owen-Carlsberg junction in the NW Indian Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Fournier, Marc; Petit, Carole; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Fabbri, Olivier; Huchon, Philippe; Maillot, Bertrand; Lepvrier, Claude

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The triple junctions predicted to be ridge^ridge^fault (RRF) types on the basis of large- scale plate motions are theAzores triple junction between theGloria Fault and theMid-AtlanticRidge, the Juan Fernandez triple junction between the ChileTransform and the East Paci¢c Rise and the Aden^ Owen^Carlsberg (AOC) triple junction between theOwen fracture zone (OFZ) and theCarlsberg and Sheba ridges. In the ¢rst two cases, the expected RRF triple junction does not exist bec...

  19. High-Resolution Silicon-based Particle Sensor with Integrated Amplification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will deliver a breakthrough in particle-detection sensors, by integrating an amplifying junction as part of the detector topology. Focusing...

  20. Enhanced Protein Production in Escherichia coli by Optimization of Cloning Scars at the Vector-Coding Sequence Junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzadeh, Kiavash; Martinez, Virginia; Toddo, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    lie between the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the start codon, they are an integral part of the translation initiation region. To identify the most optimal sequences, we devised a simple and inexpensive PCR-based step that generates sequence variants at the vector-coding sequence junction......Protein production in Escherichia coli is a fundamental activity for a large fraction of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial research laboratories. Maximum production is usually sought, as this reduces costs and facilitates downstream purification steps. Frustratingly, many coding sequences...... are poorly expressed even when they are codon-optimized and expressed from vectors with powerful genetic elements. In this study, we show that poor expression can be caused by certain nucleotide sequences (e.g., cloning scars) at the junction between the vector and the coding sequence. Since these sequences...

  1. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-peng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10, Zusanli (ST36, Pishu (BL20, and Shenshu (BL23 once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  2. Single walled carbon nanotube-based junction biosensor for detection of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Yamada

    Full Text Available Foodborne pathogen detection using biomolecules and nanomaterials may lead to platforms for rapid and simple electronic biosensing. Integration of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and immobilized antibodies into a disposable bio-nano combinatorial junction sensor was fabricated for detection of Escherichia coli K-12. Gold tungsten wires (50 µm diameter coated with polyethylenimine (PEI and SWCNTs were aligned to form a crossbar junction, which was functionalized with streptavidin and biotinylated antibodies to allow for enhanced specificity towards targeted microbes. In this study, changes in electrical current (ΔI after bioaffinity reactions between bacterial cells (E. coli K-12 and antibodies on the SWCNT surface were monitored to evaluate the sensor's performance. The averaged ΔI increased from 33.13 nA to 290.9 nA with the presence of SWCNTs in a 10(8 CFU/mL concentration of E. coli, thus showing an improvement in sensing magnitude. Electrical current measurements demonstrated a linear relationship (R2 = 0.973 between the changes in current and concentrations of bacterial suspension in range of 10(2-10(5 CFU/mL. Current decreased as cell concentrations increased, due to increased bacterial resistance on the bio-nano modified surface. The detection limit of the developed sensor was 10(2 CFU/mL with a detection time of less than 5 min with nanotubes. Therefore, the fabricated disposable junction biosensor with a functionalized SWCNT platform shows potential for high-performance biosensing and application as a detection device for foodborne pathogens.

  3. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis zoospore secretions rapidly disturb intercellular junctions in frog skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutyn, Melanie; D'Herde, Katharina; Dhaenens, Maarten; Van Rooij, Pascale; Verbrugghe, Elin; Hyatt, Alex D; Croubels, Siska; Deforce, Dieter; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Global amphibian declines are in part driven by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, causing superficial dermatomycosis with epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis in infected amphibians. The susceptibility to chytridiomycosis and the severity of epidermal lesions in amphibians with chytridiomycosis are not consistent across species or even among individuals. Severe infections cause death of the animal most likely through disturbance of ion homeostasis. The mechanism by which this superficial skin infection results in epidermal lesions has so far eluded precise definition. It was the aim of this study to unravel how B. dendrobatidis causes alterations that affect skin integrity. Exposure of Xenopus laevis skin to B. dendrobatidis zoospore supernatant using skin explants and Ussing chambers caused rapid disruption of intercellular junctions, demonstrated using histology and transmission electron microscopy. The loss of intercellular junctions led to detachment-induced cell apoptosis, or anoikis. The zoospore supernatant induced neither apoptosis nor necrosis in isolated primary keratinocytes of X. laevis. This supports the idea that the loss of cell contacts triggered apoptosis in the skin explants. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein composition of the supernatant revealed a complex mixture, including several new virulence associated proteins, such as proteases, biofilm-associated proteins and a carotenoid ester lipase. Protease and lipase activity of the supernatant was confirmed with a protease and lipase assay. In conclusion, B. dendrobatidis zoospores produce a complex mixture of proteins that quickly disturbs epidermal intercellular junctions leading to anoikis in the anuran skin. The role of the identified proteins in this process remains to be determined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular optoelectronics: the interaction of molecular conduction junctions with light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2012-07-14

    The interaction of light with molecular conduction junctions is attracting growing interest as a challenging experimental and theoretical problem on one hand, and because of its potential application as a characterization and control tool on the other. It stands at the interface between two important fields, molecular electronics and molecular plasmonics and has attracted attention as a challenging scientific problem with potentially important technological consequences. Here we review the present state of the art of this field, focusing on several key phenomena and applications: using light as a switching device, using light to control junction transport in the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes, light generation in biased junctions and Raman scattering from such systems. This field has seen remarkable progress in the past decade, and the growing availability of scanning tip configurations that can combine optical and electrical probes suggests that further progress towards the goal of realizing molecular optoelectronics on the nanoscale is imminent.

  5. Robust spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed

    2017-04-18

    We theoretically study the current-induced spin torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions, composed of two semi-infinite antiferromagnetic layers separated by a tunnel barrier, in both clean and disordered regimes. We find that the torque enabling electrical manipulation of the Néel antiferromagnetic order parameter is out of plane, ∼n×p, while the torque competing with the antiferromagnetic exchange is in plane, ∼n×(p×n). Here, p and n are the Néel order parameter direction of the reference and free layers, respectively. Their bias dependence shows behavior similar to that in ferromagnetic tunnel junctions, the in-plane torque being mostly linear in bias, while the out-of-plane torque is quadratic. Most importantly, we find that the spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions is much more robust against disorder than that in antiferromagnetic metallic spin valves due to the tunneling nature of spin transport.

  6. Traumatic Tear of the Latissimus Dorsi Myotendinous Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Michael V.; Stensby, J. Derek; Hillen, Travis J.; Demertzis, Jennifer L.; Keener, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    A case of a latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction strain in an avid CrossFit athlete is presented. The patient developed acute onset right axillary burning and swelling and subsequent palpable pop with weakness while performing a “muscle up.” Magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a high-grade tear of the right latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction approximately 9 cm proximal to its intact humeral insertion. There were no other injuries to the adjacent shoulder girdle structures. Isolated strain of the latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction is a very rare injury with a scarcity of information available regarding its imaging appearance and preferred treatment. This patient was treated conservatively and was able to resume active CrossFit training within 3 months. At 6 months postinjury, he had only a mild residual functional deficit compared with his preinjury level. PMID:26502450

  7. Interface Structure and Transport of Complex Oxide Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B.B.; Wong, F.; Chopdekar, R.V.; Chi, M.; Arenholz, E.; Browning, N.D; Suzuki, Y.

    2008-11-05

    The interface structure and magnetism of hybrid magnetic tunnel junction-spin filter devices have been investigated and correlated with their transport properties. Magnetic tunnel junctions made of a spinel NiMn2O4 tunnel barrier sandwiched by theoretically predicted half-metallic electrodes, perovskite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and spinel Fe3O4, exhibit very high crystalline quality as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Structurally abrupt interfaces allow for the distinct magnetic switching of the electrodes as well as large junction magnetoresistance. The change in the magnetic anisotropy observed at the spinel-spinel interface is indicative of a thin interdiffused magnetically soft interfacial layer. The strong exchange coupling at this interface allows for low background magnetoresistance, and a spin-filter effect with when the barrier is ferrimagnetic.

  8. Regulation of cardiovascular connexins by mechanical forces and junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meens, Merlijn J; Pfenniger, Anna; Kwak, Brenda R; Delmar, Mario

    2013-07-15

    Connexins form a family of transmembrane proteins that consists of 20 members in humans and 21 members in mice. Six connexins assemble into a connexon that can function as a hemichannel or connexon that can dock to a connexon expressed by a neighbouring cell, thereby forming a gap junction channel. Such intercellular channels synchronize responses in multicellular organisms through direct exchange of ions, small metabolites, and other second messenger molecules between the cytoplasms of adjacent cells. Multiple connexins are expressed in the cardiovascular system. These connexins not only experience the different biomechanical forces within this system, but may also act as effector proteins in co-ordinating responses within groups of cells towards these forces. This review discusses recent insights regarding regulation of cardiovascular connexins by mechanical forces and junctions. It specifically addresses effects of (i) shear stress on endothelial connexins, (ii) hypertension on vascular connexins, and (iii) changes in afterload and the composition of myocardial mechanical junctions on cardiac connexins.

  9. Josephson radiation and shot noise of a semiconductor nanowire junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Woerkom, David J.; Proutski, Alex; van Gulik, Ruben J. J.; Kriváchy, Tamás; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastian R.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Geresdi, Attila

    2017-09-01

    We measured the Josephson radiation emitted by an InSb semiconductor nanowire junction utilizing photon-assisted quasiparticle tunneling in an ac-coupled superconducting tunnel junction. We quantify the action of the local microwave environment by evaluating the frequency dependence of the inelastic Cooper-pair tunneling of the nanowire junction and find the zero-frequency impedance Z (0 )=492 Ω with a cutoff frequency of f0=33.1 GHz . We extract a circuit coupling efficiency of η ≈0.1 and a detector quantum efficiency approaching unity in the high-frequency limit. In addition to the Josephson radiation, we identify a shot noise contribution with a Fano factor F ≈1 , consistently with the presence of single electron states in the nanowire channel.

  10. Junction Flow Analyses by Two-Dimensional Numerical Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Tae Hoon [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea); Jung, Eui Teak [Korea Water Resources Corporation, Taejeon (Korea); Park, Jong Suk [Kumho Engineering Co., Anyang(Korea)

    1998-10-31

    The flow configurations at open channel junctions are analyzed by 2-D depth averaged mathematical model. The governing factors of the flow at the junction are found to be discharge ratio between tributary flow and the post confluence combined flow, and confluence angle. Analyzed by these two factors are flow patterns and flow depth variation at the confluence, discharge ratio above which the flow upstream from the junction is affected by the tributary flow and the geometries of a recirculation region. Further, the flow contraction in the downstream region and the deflection of the tributary flow in the main channel were investigated. The numerical results are compared with the existing experimental data fairly well. (author). 11 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Shot noise in diffusive SNS and SIN junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefloch, Francois; Hoffmann, Christian; Quirion, David; Sanquer, Marc

    2003-05-01

    We studied shot noise in metallic SNS and doped silicon-based SIN junctions. In SNS structures, the shot noise is very much enhanced due to incoherent multiple Andreev reflections (IMAR) which are truncated, at low voltages, by inelastic electron-electron interaction. These experimental results show good agreement with recent semiclassical theory. In SIN junctions, the zero-voltage conductance is increased by disorder-induced coherent MAR (reflectionless tunneling) and we found that the shot noise is double ( SI=4 eI) below the Thouless energy and equals the full shot noise ( SI=2 eI) above. We also present conductance measurements which show the same zero bias anomaly but in a double-barrier metallic SININ junction.

  12. Gap junction modulation by extracellular signaling molecules: the thymus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are intercellular channels which connect adjacent cells and allow direct exchange of molecules of low molecular weight between them. Such a communication has been described as fundamental in many systems due to its importance in coordination, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, it has been shown that gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC can be modulated by several extracellular soluble factors such as classical hormones, neurotransmitters, interleukins, growth factors and some paracrine substances. Herein, we discuss some aspects of the general modulation of GJIC by extracellular messenger molecules and more particularly the regulation of such communication in the thymus gland. Additionally, we discuss recent data concerning the study of different neuropeptides and hormones in the modulation of GJIC in thymic epithelial cells. We also suggest that the thymus may be viewed as a model to study the modulation of gap junction communication by different extracellular messengers involved in non-classical circuits, since this organ is under bidirectional neuroimmunoendocrine control.

  13. Tunnel junction 850-nm VCSEL for aperture uniformity and reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, P. S.; Yan, J.; Wu, T. C.; Kyi, W.; Pao, J.; Riaziat, M.

    2017-02-01

    We are reporting the first successful fabrication of 850-nm buried tunnel junction (BTJ) VCSELs. Multiple parameters were considered for the design. First, n-type dopants other than silicon had to be considered for an abrupt junction. Second, proper layer thickness had to be chosen. Finally, compatibility with regrowth and processing had to be ensured. In this paper the successful fabrication and performance of 850-nm BTJ VCSELs with tunnel junctions comprised of GaAs and AlGaAs materials is demonstrated. Key achieved parameters include a significant improvement in the slope efficiency from approximately 0.45 W/A in an oxide-aperture VCSEL to over 0.6 W/A.

  14. Rectifying behaviour of spin coated pn hetero-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogamalar, N. Rajeswari; Bose, A. Chandra, E-mail: acbose@nitt.edu [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli – 620 015 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Rectifying pn hetero- junction is fabricated with an acceptor p-type organic semiconductor namely tetra- chloro dihydroxy tetra-iodo fluorescein (Rose Bengal (RB)) followed by an inorganic n-type ZnO semiconductor on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate. The n-type ZnO films are formed by unintentional doping and doping with aluminium (Al) and yttrium (Y) donors. The surface morphology and the distribution of grains are observed from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of the rectifying diode is measured to characterize the junction properties. The I-V plots obtained from the hetero- junction with electric contact shows a diode characteristic different from that of an ideal behavior. The overall efficiency of the diode exhibits a greater dependency on the film crystallinity, carrier concentration, and reverse saturation current.

  15. Symmetry analysis of transport properties in helical superconductor junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiang; Zhang, Yinhan; Zhang, Kunhua; Jin, Biao; Zhang, Changlian

    2017-03-01

    We study the discrete symmetries satisfied by helical p-wave superconductors with the d-vectors [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] and the transformations brought by symmetry operations to ferromagnet and spin-singlet superconductors, which show intimate associations with the transport properties in heterojunctions, including helical superconductors. In particular, the partial symmetries of the Hamiltonian under spin-rotation and gauge-rotation operations are responsible for the novel invariances of the conductance in tunnel junctions and the new selection rules for the lowest current and peculiar phase diagrams in Josephson junctions, which were reported recently. The symmetries of constructed free energies for Josephson junctions are also analyzed, and are consistent with the results from the Hamiltonian.

  16. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Highly strain-sensitive magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Hayes, Patrick; Rott, Karsten; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Meyners, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) junctions with CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB layers are promising for strain sensing applications due to their high TMR effect and magnetostrictive sense layer (CoFeB). TMR junctions available even in submicron dimensions can serve as strain sensors for microelectromechanical systems devices. Upon stress application, the magnetization configuration of such junctions changes due to the inverse magnetostriction effect resulting in strain-sensitive tunnel resistance. Here, strain sensitivity of round-shaped junctions with diameters of 11.3 μm, 19.2 μm, 30.5 μm, and 41.8 μm were investigated on macroscopic cantilevers using a four-point bending apparatus. This investigation mainly focuses on changes in hard-axis TMR loops caused by the stress-induced anisotropy. A macrospin model is proposed, supported by micromagnetic simulations, which describes the complete rotation of the sense layer magnetization within TMR loops of junctions, exposed to high stress. Below 0.2‰ tensile strain, a representative junction with 30.5 μm diameter exhibits a very large gauge factor of 2150. For such high gauge factor a bias field H = - 3.2 kA / m is applied in an angle equal to 3 π / 2 toward the pinned magnetization of the reference layer. The strain sensitivity strongly depends on the bias field. Applying stress along π / 4 against the induced magnetocrystalline anisotropy, both compressive and tensile strain can be identified by a unique sensor. More importantly, a configuration with a gauge factor of 400 at zero bias field is developed which results in a straightforward and compact measuring setup.

  18. Benefits of Damage Engineering for PMOS Junction Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd

    2011-01-01

    As CMOS devices continue to shrink, the formation of ultra shallow junction (USJ) in the source/drain extension remains to be a key challenge requiring high dopant activation, shallow dopant profile and abrupt junctions. The next generations of sub nano-CMOS devices impose a new set of challenges such as elimination of residual defects resulting in higher leakage, difficulty to control lateral diffusion, junction stability post anneal and junction formation in new materials. To address these challenges for advanced technological nodes beyond 32 nm, it is imperative to explore novel species and techniques. Molecular species such as Carborane (C2B10H12), a novel doping species and a promising alternative to monomer Boron is of considerable interest due to the performance boost for 22 nm low power and high performance devices. Also, to reduce residual defects, damage engineering methodologies have generated a lot of attention as it has demonstrated significant benefits in device performance. Varian proprietary techniques to perform implants at cold temperatures (PTC II) have demonstrated lower junction leakage, enhanced activation, reduced dopant diffusion and less dopant deactivation due to the reduction of self-interstitial atoms present at the end-of-range (EOR) with low implant temperatures. In this paper, for the first time, there is a comprehensive study of the effect of implant temperature on defect engineering affecting deactivation/reactivation, and it is well established in this paper that colder the implant temperature the better it is for damage engineering with reduced EOR defects and better amorphization. The effect has been studied over a wide range of implant temperature. To understand any difference in deactivation between molecular and monomer Boron and to provide direct comparison equivalent Boron implants, co-implanted with Carbon were also studied. Implants with wide range of temperatures are implemented using PTC II. This paper will also show how

  19. Roles of gap junctions, connexins and pannexins in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthini eMylvaganam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced gap junctional communication (GJC between neurons is considered a major factor underlying the neuronal synchrony driving seizure activity. In addition, the hippocampal sharp wave ripple complexes, associated with learning and seizures, are diminished by GJC blocking agents. Although gap junctional blocking drugs inhibit experimental seizures, they all have other nonspecific actions. Besides interneuronal GJC between dendrites, inter-axonal and inter-glial GJC is also considered important for seizure generation. Interestingly, in most studies of cerebral tissue from animal seizure models and from human patients with epilepsy, there is up-regulation of glial, but not neuronal gap junctional mRNA and protein. Significant changes in the expression and post-translational modification of the astrocytic connexin Cx43, and Panx1 were observed in an in vitro Co++ seizure model, further supporting a role for glia in seizure-genesis, although the reasons for this remain unclear. Further suggesting an involvement of astrocytic GJC in epilepsy, is the fact that the expression of astrocytic Cx mRNAs (Cxs 30 and 43 is several fold higher than that of neuronal Cx mRNAs (Cxs 36 and 45, and the number of glial cells outnumber neuronal cells in mammalian hippocampal and cortical tissue. Pannexin expression is also increased in both animal and human epileptic tissues. Specific Cx43 mimetic peptides, Gap 27 and SLS, inhibit the docking of astrocytic connexin Cx43 proteins from forming intercellular gap junctions, diminishing spontaneous seizures. Besides GJs, Cx membrane hemichannels in glia and Panx membrane channels in neurons and glia are also inhibited by gap junctional pharmacological blockers. Although there is no doubt that connexin-based gap junctions and hemichannels, and pannexin-based membrane channels are related to epilepsy, the specific details of how they are involved and how we can modulate their function for therapeutic purposes remain to

  20. A gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipperian, T. E.; Dawson, L. R.; Chaffin, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high temperature (350 C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for geothermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p(+)n(-)pp(+) structure was formed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The initial design suffers from a series resistance problem which limits the transistor's usefulness at high temperatures.

  1. Normal-metal-superconductor tunnel junction as a Brownian refrigerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekola, J P; Hekking, F W J

    2007-05-25

    Thermal noise generated by a hot resistor (resistance R) can, under proper conditions, catalyze heat removal from a cold normal metal (N) in contact with a superconductor (S) via a tunnel barrier (I). Such a NIS junction is reminiscent of Maxwell's demon, rectifying the heat flow. Upon reversal of the temperature gradient between the resistor and the junction, the heat fluxes are reversed: this presents a regime which is not accessible in an ordinary voltage-biased NIS structure. We obtain analytical results for the cooling performance in an idealized high impedance environment and perform numerical calculations for general R. We conclude by assessing the experimental feasibility of the proposed effect.

  2. Phase transition in a modified square Josephson-junction array

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J

    1999-01-01

    We study the phase transition in a modified square proximity-coupled Josephson-junction array with small superconducting islands at the center of each plaquette. We find that the modified square array undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless-Berezinskii-like phase transition, but at a lower temperature than the simple square array with the same single-junction critical current. The IV characteristics, as well as the phase transition, resemble qualitatively those of a disordered simple square array. The effects of the presence of the center islands in the modified square array are discussed.

  3. Highly doped layer for tunnel junctions in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, Christopher M.

    2017-08-01

    A highly doped layer for interconnecting tunnel junctions in multijunction solar cells is presented. The highly doped layer is a delta doped layer in one or both layers of a tunnel diode junction used to connect two or more p-on-n or n-on-p solar cells in a multijunction solar cell. A delta doped layer is made by interrupting the epitaxial growth of one of the layers of the tunnel diode, depositing a delta dopant at a concentration substantially greater than the concentration used in growing the layer of the tunnel diode, and then continuing to epitaxially grow the remaining tunnel diode.

  4. Electrical gating and rectification in graphene three-terminal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Händel, B. [FG Nanotechnologie, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); FG Festkörperelektronik, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Technische Universität Ilmenau, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Hähnlein, B. [FG Nanotechnologie, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Göckeritz, R. [FG Nanostrukturierte Materialien, Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Schwierz, F. [FG Festkörperelektronik, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Technische Universität Ilmenau, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Pezoldt, J., E-mail: joerg.pezoldt@tu-ilmenau.de [FG Nanotechnologie, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    Graphene was grown on semiinsulating silicon carbide at 1800 °C and atmospheric argon pressure. The all carbon T- and Y-shape three terminal junction devices were fabricated using electron beam lithography. All devices featured the negative rectification effect. The exact properties of the devices like the curvature of the output voltage response can be tuned by changing the branch width in the T- and Y-shape devices. Beside the rectification a switching behavior is demonstrated with the same three terminal junctions.

  5. Junction leakage measurements with micro four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Rong; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Wang, Fei

    2012-01-01

    We present a new, preparation-free method for measuring the leakage current density on ultra-shallow junctions. The junction leakage is found by making a series of four-point sheet resistance measurements on blanket wafers with variable electrode spacings. The leakage current density is calculated...... using a fit of the measured four-point resistances to an analytical two-sheet model. The validity of the approximation involved in the two-sheet model is verified by a comparison to finite element model calculations....

  6. Stepwise "Dark Photoswitching" of Photochromic Dimers in a Junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stine Tetzschner; Hansen, Thorsten; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2017-01-01

    Molecular photoswitches incorporated in a junction present a way to achieve light-controlled conductance switching by photoisomerization. Yet, the two isomers might also interconvert upon charging of the molecule if this results in a change in their relative energies. This behavior (current......-induced switching) has been termed dark photoswitching and was observed for the dihydroazulene–vinylheptafulvene couple in a junction. In this theoretical study, we expand this concept to dimeric structures containing two dihydroazulene units linked through meta- or para-phenylene bridges and anchored...

  7. Analysis of Waveguide Junction Discontinuities Using Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.

    1997-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine reflection and transmission coefficients of rectangular waveguide junction discontinuities. An H-plane discontinuity, an E-plane ridge discontinuity, and a step discontinuity in a concentric rectangular waveguide junction are analyzed using the FEM procedure. Also, reflection and transmission coefficients due to presence of a gap between two sections of a rectangular waveguide are determined using the FEM. The numerical results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the earlier published results. The numerical results obtained by the FEM are compared with the numerical results obtained using the Mode Matching Method (MMM) and also with the measured data.

  8. Nonlinear electrical properties of Si three-terminal junction devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantao, Meng; Jie, Sun; Graczyk, Mariusz

    2010-01-01

    This letter reports on the realization and characterization of silicon three-terminal junction devices made in a silicon-on-insulator wafer. Room temperature electrical measurements show that the fabricated devices exhibit pronounced nonlinear electrical properties inherent to ballistic electron...... transport in a three-terminal ballistic junction (TBJ) device. The results show that room temperature functional TBJ devices can be realized in a semiconductor material other than high-mobility III-V semiconductor heterostructures and provide a simple design principle for compact silicon devices...

  9. Josephson junction analog and quasiparticle-pair current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1973-01-01

    A close analogy exists between a Josephson junction and a phase-locked loop. A new type of electrical analog based on this principle is presented. It is shown that the inclusion in this analog of a low-pass filter gives rise to a current of the same form as the Josephson quasiparticle-pair curren....... A simple picture of the quasiparticle-pair current, which gives the right dependences, is obtained by assuming a junction cutoff frequency to be at the energy gap. ©1973 American Institute of Physics...

  10. Conductance of Graphene Nanoribbon Junctions and the Tight Binding Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Planar carbon-based electronic devices, including metal/semiconductor junctions, transistors and interconnects, can now be formed from patterned sheets of graphene. Most simulations of charge transport within graphene-based electronic devices assume an energy band structure based on a nearest-neighbour tight binding analysis. In this paper, the energy band structure and conductance of graphene nanoribbons and metal/semiconductor junctions are obtained using a third nearest-neighbour tight binding analysis in conjunction with an efficient nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. We find significant differences in both the energy band structure and conductance obtained with the two approximations.

  11. Quantitatively accurate calculations of conductance and thermopower of molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2013-01-01

    ) connected to gold electrodes using first‐principles calculations. We find excellent agreement with experiments for both molecules when exchange–correlation effects are described by the many‐body GW approximation. In contrast, results from standard density functional theory (DFT) deviate from experiments......‐interaction errors and image charge effects. Finally, we show that the conductance and thermopower of the considered junctions are relatively insensitive to the metal–molecule bonding geometry. Our results demonstrate that electronic and thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions can be predicted from first‐principles...... calculations when exchange–correlation effects are taken properly into account....

  12. On-chip photonic system using suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells device and multiple waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongjin, E-mail: wangyj@njupt.edu.cn; Zhu, Guixia; Gao, Xumin; Yang, Yongchao; Yuan, Jialei; Shi, Zheng; Zhu, Hongbo [Grünberg Research Centre, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210003 (China); Cai, Wei [Grünberg Research Centre, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210003 (China); School of Computer Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing 211167 (China)

    2016-04-18

    We propose, fabricate, and characterize the on-chip integration of suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) device and multiple waveguides on the same GaN-on-silicon platform. The integrated devices are fabricated via a wafer-level process and exhibit selectable functionalities for diverse applications. As the suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs device operates under a light emitting diode (LED) mode, part of the light emission is confined and guided by the suspended waveguides. The in-plane propagation along the suspended waveguides is measured by a micro-transmittance setup. The on-chip data transmission is demonstrated for the proof-of-concept photonic integration. As the suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs device operates under photodiode mode, the light is illuminated on the suspended waveguides with the aid of the micro-transmittance setup and, thus, coupled into the suspended waveguides. The guided light is finally sensed by the photodiode, and the induced photocurrent trace shows a distinct on/off switching performance. These experimental results indicate that the on-chip photonic integration is promising for the development of sophisticated integrated photonic circuits in the visible wavelength region.

  13. Strain-balanced type-II superlattices for efficient multi-junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, A; Utrilla, A D; Reyes, D F; Braza, V; Llorens, J M; Fuertes Marrón, D; Alén, B; Ben, T; González, D; Guzman, A; Hierro, A; Ulloa, J M

    2017-06-21

    Multi-junction solar cells made by assembling semiconductor materials with different bandgap energies have hold the record conversion efficiencies for many years and are currently approaching 50%. Theoretical efficiency limits make use of optimum designs with the right lattice constant-bandgap energy combination, which requires a 1.0-1.15 eV material lattice-matched to GaAs/Ge. Nevertheless, the lack of suitable semiconductor materials is hindering the achievement of the predicted efficiencies, since the only candidates were up to now complex quaternary and quinary alloys with inherent epitaxial growth problems that degrade carrier dynamics. Here we show how the use of strain-balanced GaAsSb/GaAsN superlattices might solve this problem. We demonstrate that the spatial separation of Sb and N atoms avoids the ubiquitous growth problems and improves crystal quality. Moreover, these new structures allow for additional control of the effective bandgap through the period thickness and provide a type-II band alignment with long carrier lifetimes. All this leads to a strong enhancement of the external quantum efficiency under photovoltaic conditions with respect to bulk layers of equivalent thickness. Our results show that GaAsSb/GaAsN superlattices with short periods are the ideal (pseudo)material to be integrated in new GaAs/Ge-based multi-junction solar cells that could approach the theoretical efficiency limit.

  14. FeGa/MgO/Fe/GaAs(001) magnetic tunnel junction: Growth and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobaut, B., E-mail: benoit.gobaut@elettra.eu [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14-km 163.5, Area Science Park, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Ciprian, R.; Salles, B.R.; Krizmancic, D. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14-km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Rossi, G. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14-km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Panaccione, G. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14-km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M. [Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7588, INSP, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Torelli, P. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14-km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Research on spintronics and on multiferroics leads now to the possibility of combining the properties of these materials in order to develop new functional devices. Here we report the integration of a layer of magnetostrictive material into a magnetic tunnel junction. A FeGa/MgO/Fe heterostructure has been grown on a GaAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and studied by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The comparison between magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements and hysteresis performed in total electron yield allowed distinguishing the ferromagnetic hysteresis loop of the FeGa top layer from that of the Fe buried layer, evidencing a different switching field of the two layers. This observation indicates an absence of magnetic coupling between the two ferromagnetic layers despite the thickness of the MgO barrier of only 2.5 nm. The in-plane magnetic anisotropy has also been investigated. Overall results show the good quality of the heterostructure and the general feasibility of such a device using magnetostrictive materials in magnetic tunnel junction.

  15. Antenna-coupled photon emission from hexagonal boron nitride tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzefall, M.; Bharadwaj, P.; Jain, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Novotny, L.

    2015-12-01

    The ultrafast conversion of electrical signals to optical signals at the nanoscale is of fundamental interest for data processing, telecommunication and optical interconnects. However, the modulation bandwidths of semiconductor light-emitting diodes are limited by the spontaneous recombination rate of electron-hole pairs, and the footprint of electrically driven ultrafast lasers is too large for practical on-chip integration. A metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction approaches the ultimate size limit of electronic devices and its operating speed is fundamentally limited only by the tunnelling time. Here, we study the conversion of electrons (localized in vertical gold-hexagonal boron nitride-gold tunnel junctions) to free-space photons, mediated by resonant slot antennas. Optical antennas efficiently bridge the size mismatch between nanoscale volumes and far-field radiation and strongly enhance the electron-photon conversion efficiency. We achieve polarized, directional and resonantly enhanced light emission from inelastic electron tunnelling and establish a novel platform for studying the interaction of electrons with strongly localized electromagnetic fields.

  16. Schottky junctions studied using Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker nonequilibrium Green's function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Hisazumi; Ogura, Masako

    A scheme that combines the non-equilibrium Green's function method with the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) Green's function method is proposed. The method is different from many previous attempts in that it uses the exact Green's function whose spectrum is not bound within a finite energy range, and hence, provides sound basis for quantitative discussions. The scheme is applied to the Schottky junctions composed of an Al/GaN/Al trilayer. Schottky contacts formed in metal/semiconductor junctions play an important role in semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. They have been intensively investigated for several decades not only for possible application to electronic devices but also for gaining a fundamental understanding of the Schottky barrier formation. Our results show that the Schottly barrier is formed between an undoped GaN and Al interface. The transport property of this system under various finite bias voltages is calculated. It is shown that the asymmetric behavior of electron transport against the direction of bias voltage occurs in this system, confirming the feature of rectification. The present study was partly supported by Grant-in-Aid No. 22104012, MEXT, Japan, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, and by the Elements Strategy Initiative Project under the auspice of MEXT, Japan.

  17. SynProt: A Comprehensive Database for Proteins of the Detergent-Resistant Synaptic Junctions Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer ePielot

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical synapses are highly specialized cell-cell contacts for communication between neurons in the CNS characterized by complex and dynamic protein networks at both synaptic membranes. The cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ organizes the apparatus for the regulated release of transmitters from the presynapse. At the postsynaptic side, the postsynaptic density constitutes the machinery for detection, integration and transduction of the transmitter signal. Both pre- and postsynaptic protein networks represent the molecular substrates for synaptic plasticity. Their function can be altered both by regulating their composition and by post-translational modification of their components. For a comprehensive understanding of synaptic networks the entire ensemble of synaptic proteins has to be considered. To support this, we established a comprehensive database for synaptic junction proteins (SynProt database primarily based on proteomics data obtained from biochemical preparations of detergent-resistant synaptic junctions. The database currently contains 2,788 non-redundant entries of rat, mouse and some human proteins, which mainly have been manually extracted from twelve proteomic studies and annotated for synaptic subcellular localization. Each dataset is completed with manually added information including protein classifiers as well as automatically retrieved and updated information from public databases (UniProt and PubMed. We intend that the database will be used to support modeling of synaptic protein networks and rational experimental design.

  18. Silicon on insulator bipolar junction transistors for flexible microwave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavier, John McGoldrick

    Microwave frequency flexible electronic devices require a high quality semiconducting material and a set of fabrication techniques that are compatible with device integration onto flexible polymer substrates. Over the past ten years, monocrystalline silicon nanomembranes (SiNMs) have been studied as a flexible semiconducting material that is compatible with industrial Si processing. Fabricated from commercial silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers, SiNMs can be transferred to flexible substrates using a variety of techniques. Due to their high carrier mobilities, SiNMs are a promising candidate for flexible microwave frequency devices. This dissertation presents fabrication techniques for flexible SiNM devices in general, as well as the progress made towards the development of a microwave frequency SiNM bipolar junction transistor (BJT). In order to overcome previous limitations associated with adhesion, novel methods for transfer printing of metal films and SiNMs are presented. These techniques enable transfer printing of a range of metal films and improve the alignment of small transfer printed SiNM devices. Work towards the development of a microwave frequency BJT on SOI for SiNM devices is also described. Utilizing a self-aligned polysilicon sidewall spacer technique, a BJT with an ultra-narrow base region is fabricated and tested. Two regimes of operation are identified and characterized under DC conditions. At low base currents, devices exhibited forward current gain as high as betaF = 900. At higher base current values, a transconductance of 59 mS was observed. Microwave scattering parameters were obtained for the BJTs under both biasing conditions and compared to unbiased measurements. Microwave frequency gain was not observed. Instead, bias-dependent non-reciprocal behavior was observed and examined. Limitations associated with the microwave impedance-matched electrode configuration are presented. High current densities in the narrow electrodes cause localized

  19. Novel InGaAsN pn Junction for High-Efficiency Multiple-Junction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allerman, A.A.; Chang, P.C.; Gee, J.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Jones, E.D.; Kurtz, S.R.; Reinhardt, K.C.

    1999-03-26

    We report the application of a novel material, InGaAsN, with bandgap energy of 1.05 eV as a junction in an InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsN/Ge 4-junction design. Results of the growth and structural, optical, and electrical properties were demonstrated, showing the promising perspective of this material for ultra high efficiency solar cells. Photovoltaic properties of an as-grown pn diode structure and improvement through post growth annealing were also discussed.

  20. Cardiac Myocyte Diversity and a Fibroblast Network in the Junctional Region of the Zebrafish Heart Revealed by Transmission and Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lafontant, Pascal J.

    2013-08-23

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart. © 2013 Lafontant et al.

  1. Frequency Distribution of Junction Angles of Valley Networks on Mars Consistent with an Early Warm Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cang, X.; Luo, W.

    2017-10-01

    The junction angles on Earth formed under different climatic conditions are different. Here, we investigated the junction angles on Mars. The results are consistent with a “warm” early Mars climate with precipitation.

  2. Theory of the Josephson effect in unconventional superconducting junctions with diffusive barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the Josephson effect in junctions based on unconventional superconductors with diffusive barriers, using the quasiclassical Green's function formalism. Generalized boundary conditions at junction interfaces applicable to unconventional superconductors are derived by

  3. 77 FR 38705 - Draft Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings, Junction Boxes, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Draft Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings... comment on the Draft ``Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings, Junction Boxes, and... recommendations for airport light bases, transformer housings, junction boxes and accessories. The FAA has posted...

  4. Break junction under electrochemical gating: testbed for single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cancan; Rudnev, Alexander V; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-02-21

    Molecular electronics aims to construct functional molecular devices at the single-molecule scale. One of the major challenges is to construct a single-molecule junction and to further manipulate the charge transport through the molecular junction. Break junction techniques, including STM break junctions and mechanically controllable break junctions are considered as testbed to investigate and control the charge transport on a single-molecule scale. Moreover, additional electrochemical gating provides a unique opportunity to manipulate the energy alignment and molecular redox processes for a single-molecule junction. In this review, we start from the technical aspects of the break junction technique, then discuss the molecular structure-conductance correlation derived from break junction studies, and, finally, emphasize electrochemical gating as a promising method for the functional molecular devices.

  5. Experimental Testing and Modeling Analysis of Solute Mixing at Water Distribution Pipe Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. Here we have categorized pipe junctions into five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for describing the solute mixing ...

  6. Morphology of electrophysiologically identified junctions between Purkinje fibers and ventricular muscle in rabbit and pig hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tranum-Jensen, J.; Wilde, A. A.; Vermeulen, J. T.; Janse, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Purkinje fiber-ventricular muscle (PV) junctions were identified by extracellular recording in isolated, superfused preparations from rabbit and pig hearts. Microelectrode recordings from different cell types at the PV junctions were obtained, and the cells recorded from were retrieved

  7. Experimental evaluation of IGBT junction temperature measurement via peak gate current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Temperature sensitive electrical parameters allow junction temperature measurements on power semiconductors without modification to module packaging. The peak gate current has recently been proposed for IGBT junction temperature measurement and relies on the temperature dependent resistance of th...

  8. Multiple frequency generation by bunched solitons in Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomdahl, P. S.; Sørensen, O. H.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1981-01-01

    A detailed numerical study of a long Josephson tunnel junction modeled by a perturbed sine-Gordon equation demonstrates the existence of a variety of bunched soliton configurations. Thus, on the third zero-field step of the V-I characteristic, two simultaneous adjacent frequencies are generated...

  9. Organic tandem and multi-junction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadipour, Afshin; de Boer, Bert; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2008-01-01

    The emerging field of stacked layers (double- and even multi-layers) in organic photovoltaic cells is reviewed. Owing to the limited absorption width of organic molecules and polymers, only a small fraction of the solar flux can be harvested by a single-layer bulk hetero-junction photovoltaic cell.

  10. Junctional ectopic tachycardia following repair of congenital heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) is a rare and transient phenomenon occurring after repair of congenital heart defects. Report on this arrhythmia in the subregion is rare. We set out to determine the incidence of this arrhythmia and review the treatment and outcomes of treatment in our centre.

  11. Graphite/ZnO nanorods junction for ultraviolet photodetectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yatskiv, Roman; Grym, Jan; Verde, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 105, March 2015 (2015), s. 70-73 ISSN 0038-1101 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14111 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : ZnO nanorods * Graphite based junction * UV photodetector Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.345, year: 2015

  12. Low-frequency noise in Josephson junctions for superconducting qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eroms, J.; Van Schaarenburg, L.C.; Driessen, E.F.C.; Plantenberg, J.H.; Huizinga, C.M.; Schouten, R.N.; Verbruggen, A.H.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have studied low-frequency resistance fluctuations in shadow-evaporated Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junctions. Between 300 and 5?K the spectral density follows a 1/f law. Below 5?K, individual defects distort the 1/f shape of the spectrum. The spectral density decreases linearly with temperature

  13. Spin-transfer torque in spin filter tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Ortiz Pauyac, Christian

    2014-12-08

    Spin-transfer torque in a class of magnetic tunnel junctions with noncollinear magnetizations, referred to as spin filter tunnel junctions, is studied within the tight-binding model using the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function technique within Keldysh formalism. These junctions consist of one ferromagnet (FM) adjacent to a magnetic insulator (MI) or two FM separated by a MI. We find that the presence of the magnetic insulator dramatically enhances the magnitude of the spin-torque components compared to conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. The fieldlike torque is driven by the spin-dependent reflection at the MI/FM interface, which results in a small reduction of its amplitude when an insulating spacer (S) is inserted to decouple MI and FM layers. Meanwhile, the dampinglike torque is dominated by the tunneling electrons that experience the lowest barrier height. We propose a device of the form FM/(S)/MI/(S)/FM that takes advantage of these characteristics and allows for tuning the spin-torque magnitudes over a wide range just by rotation of the magnetization of the insulating layer.

  14. Quantum-Tuned Two-Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xihua

    2011-01-01

    We report quantum-size-effect tuned tandem solar cells. Our two-junction photovoltaic devices employ light-absorbing material of a single composition and use two rationally-selected nanoparticle sizes to harvest the sun’s broad spectrum.

  15. [Gap junctions: A new therapeutic target in major depressive disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder is a multifactorial chronic and debilitating mood disease with high lifetime prevalence and is associated with excess mortality, especially from cardiovascular diseases and through suicide. The treatments of this disease with tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are poorly tolerated and those that selectively target serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake are not effective in all patients, showing the need to find new therapeutic targets. Post-mortem studies of brains from patients with major depressive disorders described a reduced expression of the gap junction-forming membrane proteins connexin 30 and connexin 43 in the prefrontal cortex and the locus coeruleus. The use of chronic unpredictable stress, a rodent model of depression, suggests that astrocytic gap junction dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Chronic treatments of rats with fluoxetine and of rat cultured cortical astrocytes with amitriptyline support the hypothesis that the upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between brain astrocytes could be a novel mechanism for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. In conclusion, astrocytic gap junctions are emerging as a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Congenital right sided ureteropelvic junction obstruction in right ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    V. Singh

    Congenital right sided ureteropelvic junction obstruction in right crossed fused ectopia with extrarenal calyces masquerading as massive retroperitoneal urinoma in a case of blunt trauma abdomen: A diagnostic enigma and novel approach of management. V. Singha,∗. , D.K. Guptaa, M. Pandeyb, V. Kumara a Department ...

  17. Estrogen Modulates Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Rat Vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Ahn, Kyuyoun; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to investigate the localization of tight junctions and the modulation of zonula occludens- (ZO-) 1, occludin and claudin-1 expression by estrogen in castrated female rat vagina. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-240 g, n = 45) were divided into three groups and subjected to a sham operation (control group, n = 15), bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx group, n = 15), or bilateral ovariectomy followed by daily subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (50 μg/kg/day, Ovx + Est group, n = 15). The cellular localization and expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Expression of ZO-1 was diffuse in all groups, with the highest intensity in the superficial epithelium in the control group. Occludin was localized in the intermediate and basal epithelium. Claudin-1 was most intense in the superficial layer of the vaginal epithelium in the control group. Expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 was significantly decreased after ovariectomy and was restored to the level of the control after estrogen replacement. Conclusions. Tight junctions are distinctly localized in rat vagina, and estrogen modulates the expression of tight junctions. Further researches are needed to clarify the functional role of tight junctions in vaginal lubrication.

  18. Breathers in Josephson junction ladders: Resonances and electromagnetic wave spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnichenko, A. E.; Flach, S.; Fistul, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the resonant interaction between dynamical localized states (discrete breathers) and linear electromagnetic excitations (EE's) in Josephson junction ladders. By making use of direct numerical simulations we find that such an interaction manifests itself by resonant...

  19. Ureteral switch for bilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a typical case of MRKH type II associated with bilateral pelvic kidneys ectopia, ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction and high inserting ureters. The ureteral switch was performed at the time of pyeloplasty to prevent postoperative obstruction secondary to the angulation. Keywords: Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster- ...

  20. Subtidal flow division at a shallow tidal junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschman, F.A.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Vegt, van der M.; Hoekstra, P.

    2010-01-01

    Tides influence distribution of river discharge at tidally affected channel junctions. At the apex of a channel network in an Indonesian delta, observations of flow division suggest that tidally averaged flow division depends on the tidal range. To understand the mechanisms governing the subtidal