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Sample records for adherence drug concentrations

  1. Relationship between self-reported adherence, antiretroviral drug concentration measurement and self-reported symptoms in patients treated for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Cingolani, Antonella; Fanti, Iuri; Colafigli, Manuela; Tamburrini, Enrica; Cauda, Roberto; Navarra, Pierluigi; De Luca, Andrea; Murri, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore relationships between self-reported adherence, antiretroviral drug concentration measurement (TDM) and self-reported symptoms. We systematically administered to human immunodeficiency (HIV)-infected outpatients a questionnaire evaluating measures of self-reported adherence (missing doses during last week, deviations from the prescribed timing of therapy, self-initiated discontinuations for > 24 or 48 h, exhausting drugs and present sense of how patients are taking therapy) and a panel of referred symptoms (a symptom score was built summing self-reported scores for each listed symptom). We selected patients who completed the questionnaire and also had a TDM (mainly reflecting adherence in the past few days or weeks), thus comparing these two tools as measures of adherence. A total of 130 patients (64.6% males, median age 44 years, 76.2% with HIV RNA HIV RNA symptom score was associated with a lower self-reported adherence and with a higher proportion of undetectable drug levels. Self-reported adherence and TDM showed a correlation and seemed to be comparable tools for adherence estimation. Self-reported symptoms were associated with lower adherence and undetectable drug levels.

  2. Measurement of adherence, drug concentrations and the effectiveness of artemether-lumefantrine, chlorproguanil-dapsone or sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Malawi

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    Chimpeni Phillips

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is the only single dose therapy for uncomplicated malaria, but there is widespread resistance. At the time of this study, artemether-lumefantrine (AL and chlorproguanil-dapsone (CPD, both multi-dose regimes, were considered possible alternatives to SP in Malawi. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of poor adherence on the effectiveness of AL and CPD. Methods Children ≥12 months and adults with uncomplicated malaria were randomized to receive AL, CPD or SP. Adherence was measured using a questionnaire and electronic monitoring devices, MEMS™, pill bottles that recorded the date and time of opening. Day-7 plasma dapsone or lumefantrine concentrations were measured to examine their relationship with adherence and clinical response. Results 841 patients were recruited. The day-28 adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR rates, using intention to treat analysis (missing data treated as failure, were AL 85.2%, CPD 63.7% and SP 50%. ACPR rates for AL were higher than CPD or SP on days 28 and 42 (p ≤ 0.002 for all comparisons. CPD was more effective than SP on day-28 (p = 0.01, but not day-42. Very high adherence was reported using the questionnaire, 100% for AL treated patients and 99.2% for the CPD group. Only three CPD participants admitted missing any doses. 164/181 (90.6% of CPD treated patients took all their doses out of the MEMS™ container and they were more likely to have a day-28 ACPR than those who did not take all their medication out of the container, p = 0.024. Only 7/87 (8% AL treated patients did not take all of their doses out of their MEMS™ container and none had treatment failure. Median day-7 dapsone concentrations were higher in CPD treated patients with ACPR than in treatment failures, p = 0.012. There were no differences in day-7 dapsone or lumefantrine concentrations between those who took all their doses from the MEMS™ container and those

  3. Does Prescription Drug Adherence Reduce Hospitalizations and Costs?

    OpenAIRE

    William Encinosa; Didem Bernard; Avi Dor

    2010-01-01

    We estimate the impact of diabetic drug adherence on hospitalizations, ER visits, and hospital costs, using insurance claims from MarketScan® employer data. However, it is often difficult to measure the impact of drug adherence on hospitalizations since both adherence and hospitalizations may be correlated with unobservable patient severity. We control for such unobservables using propensity score methods and instrumental variables for adherence such as drug coinsurance levels and direct-to- ...

  4. Addressing drug adherence using an operations management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunlee, Martin; Bones, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide a model that enables health systems and pharmacy benefit managers to provide medications reliably and test for reliability and validity in the analysis of adherence to drug therapy of chronic disease. SUMMARY The quantifiable model described here can be used in conjunction with behavioral designs of drug adherence assessments. The model identifies variables that can be reproduced and expanded across the management of chronic diseases with drug therapy. By creating a reorder point system for reordering medications, the model uses a methodology commonly seen in operations research. The design includes a safety stock of medication and current supply of medication, which increases the likelihood that patients will have a continuous supply of medications, thereby positively affecting adherence by removing barriers. CONCLUSION This method identifies an adherence model that quantifies variables related to recommendations from health care providers; it can assist health care and service delivery systems in making decisions that influence adherence based on the expected order cycle days and the expected daily quantity of medication administered. This model addresses the possession of medication as a barrier to adherence.

  5. Adherence of paclitaxel drug in magnetite chitosan nanoparticles

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    Escobar Zapata, Edna V.; Martinez Perez, Carlos A.; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Claudia A.; Castro Carmona, Javier S. [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Ave. Del Charro 610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320, Cd. Juarez Chihuahua (Mexico); Quevedo Lopez, Manuel A. [Departamento de Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Garcia-Casillas, Perla E., E-mail: pegarcia@uacj.mx [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Ave. Del Charro 610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320, Cd. Juarez Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitosan silica magnetite adsorbs antineoplastic drug. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica coating improve the drug adherence. - Abstract: Cancer treatment is a big challenge in medicine where chemotherapies and radiotherapies are aggressive and poorly effective having side effects as delirium, fatigue, insomnia, nausea and vomiting which are common problems for cancer patients. For this reason, during the last two decades, many researchers have developed several techniques to improve the current therapies; one of them is the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with an average crystallite size 21.8 nm were covered in a core/shell type; magnetite/silica, magnetite/chitosan, and a double shell magnetite/silica/chitosan were developed for attaching an antineoplastic drug. The mechanism for the functionalization of the nanoparticles with a single and double shell was studied with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adherence of an antineoplastic drug, paclitaxel, onto functionalized nanoparticles was analyzed with a UV-Visible spectroscopy at a wavelength of 253 nm. It was found that the adherence of the drug is improved up to 18% when magnetite nanoparticles are coated with a single chitosan shell, and when the nanoparticles are coated with a silica/chitosan shell the adherence increases up to 29%.

  6. Adherence of paclitaxel drug in magnetite chitosan nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Zapata, Edna V.; Martínez Pérez, Carlos A.; Rodríguez González, Claudia A.; Castro Carmona, Javier S.; Quevedo Lopez, Manuel A.; García-Casillas, Perla E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chitosan silica magnetite adsorbs antineoplastic drug. ► Silica coating improve the drug adherence. - Abstract: Cancer treatment is a big challenge in medicine where chemotherapies and radiotherapies are aggressive and poorly effective having side effects as delirium, fatigue, insomnia, nausea and vomiting which are common problems for cancer patients. For this reason, during the last two decades, many researchers have developed several techniques to improve the current therapies; one of them is the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with an average crystallite size 21.8 nm were covered in a core/shell type; magnetite/silica, magnetite/chitosan, and a double shell magnetite/silica/chitosan were developed for attaching an antineoplastic drug. The mechanism for the functionalization of the nanoparticles with a single and double shell was studied with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adherence of an antineoplastic drug, paclitaxel, onto functionalized nanoparticles was analyzed with a UV–Visible spectroscopy at a wavelength of 253 nm. It was found that the adherence of the drug is improved up to 18% when magnetite nanoparticles are coated with a single chitosan shell, and when the nanoparticles are coated with a silica/chitosan shell the adherence increases up to 29%.

  7. Adherence to hospital drug formularies and cost of drugs in hospitals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plet, H. T.; Hallas, J.; Kjeldsen, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate adherence rates to hospital drug formularies (HDFs) and cost of drugs in hospitals. METHODS: Data on drugs used during 2010 were analyzed for ten hospitals (two hospitals from each of the five regions), constituting 30 % of hospitals and 45 % of hospital beds in Denmark....... Drug use data from individual hospitals were retrieved from the hospital pharmacies. Adherence to the HDFs was analyzed for selected substances characterised by extensive use both in primary and secondary sectors (ATC codes A10, B03, C03, C07, C08, C09, C10, J01, N02, N05 and R03). Within each group......, we also identified the drugs constituting 90 % of the volume (= DU90%) and the adherence to the HDF in this segment (Index of Adherence). RESULTS: Substances used by hospitals varied between 598 and 1,093. The proportion of used substances that were on the HDF varied between 14 % and 44 %. University...

  8. Adherence to drug treatment in association with how the patient perceives care and information on drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfvarson, Johanna; Bardage, Carola; Wredling, Regina A-M; von Bahr, Christer; Adami, Johanna

    2007-01-01

    This study was to explore concordance with drugs prescribed and the patient's self-reported drug consumption, in relation to the older patient's perceived care and information given. Lack of adherence to prescriptions may lead to therapeutic failure with risks for relapse, unnecessary suffering and increased costs. A cross-sectional study with structured interviews of 200 patients who had recently been treated in a medical ward. Patients' medical records were studied to obtain information on their current use of drugs. The data were analyzed by logistic regression, adherence being the dependent response variable. The mean age of the study group was 79 years. The number of drugs reported in the medical chart ranged from one to 17 with a mean of 6.9. The patients reported a drug consumption ranging from 0 to 24 with a mean of 7.3. When comparing the interview results with the information in the medical charts, 30% of the patients showed adherence. An association was found between adherence and self-reported health status. Patients in the non-adherent group reported a higher consumption of drugs. Patients felt that the opportunity to ask questions of either the responsible physicians or of the nurses was influential in decreasing risk. In this study, the patient's total drug consumption was considered. The study showed a large discrepancy between the drugs stated in the medical chart and patient's self-reported drug consumption. The study failed to show that perceived information or educational level had an impact on the results but implicate that the quality of information influences adherence. It is of importance to recognize patients at risk for non-adherence. Decreased health status and many drugs are the main risk factors for patients being non-adherent, and should be recognized as such.

  9. Impact of Active Drug Use on Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Viral Suppression in HIV-infected Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Arnsten, Julia H; Demas, Penelope A; Grant, Richard W; Gourevitch, Marc N; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Howard, Andrea A; Schoenbaum, Ellie E

    2002-01-01

    Despite a burgeoning literature on adherence to HIV therapies, few studies have examined the impact of ongoing drug use on adherence and viral suppression, and none of these have utilized electronic monitors to quantify adherence among drug users. We used 262 electronic monitors to measure adherence with all antiretrovirals in 85 HIV-infected current and former drug users, and found that active cocaine use, female gender, not receiving Social Security benefits, not being married, screening po...

  10. [Adherence of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus to drug treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes-Villas; Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional and quantitative study aimed to evaluate the adherence to drug treatment of the people with diabetes mellitus and its relation to clinical, treatment and metabolic control variables. Sample consisted of 162 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus on follow-up outpatient care. The Measure of Treatment Adherence and consultation to the participants' medical records were used for data collection. A high adherence to drug treatment was obtained. For a p<0.05, it was obtained an inverse correlation with diastolic blood pressure and a direct correlation with the frequency of daily administration of insulin and oral antidiabetic agents. There were no statistically significant correlations between adherence and metabolic control variables. Results diverge from the literature regarding the adherence to drug treatment in chronic diseases, as well as in the correlation between adherence and complexity of drug regimen, which points to the need for more studies on this theme.

  11. Correlation between lamivudine plasma concentrations and patient self-reported adherence to antiretroviral treatment in experienced HIV patients

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    Minzi OM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available OM Minzi1, V Mugoyela2, LL Gustafsson31Unit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; 3Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART is important to achieve treatment success in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. Most HIV clinics apply the patient self-report (PSR method. However, the reliability of this method in experienced HIV patients remains questionable.Purpose: To validate the PSR method for measuring adherence to ART using lamivudine (3TC plasma concentrations in experienced HIV patients.Methods: The study was conducted in Dar Es Salaam and involved 220 patients who were receiving ART services at HIV clinics for more than 12 months. Self-reported adherence information to ART was obtained on the day of HIV clinic visit. The patients were asked to mention the number of doses missed within the past 7 days. In addition, blood samples (2 mL were collected from each patient on the same day. The blood samples were determined for 3TC plasma concentrations. The target 3TC plasma concentration as indicator concentration for adherent patients was determined in 20 patients who took their evening dose of antiretrovirals under supervision. The blood from these patients was drawn 3 hours after drug administration.Results: Complete drug levels of 3TC and self-reported adherence data was obtained in 200 treatment-experienced HIV patients. Lamivudine plasma concentrations obtained in these patients ranged between 0.02–17.36 µg/mL. The mean time from dose administration to blood drawing was 3.1 ± 1.2 hours with coefficient of variation >39%. The mean 3TC plasma concentration obtained in 20 patients who took their antiretroviral dose under supervision was

  12. Validating the Modified Drug Adherence Work-Up (M-DRAW) Tool to Identify and Address Barriers to Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun; Bae, Yuna H; Worley, Marcia; Law, Anandi

    2017-09-08

    Barriers to medication adherence stem from multiple factors. An effective and convenient tool is needed to identify these barriers so that clinicians can provide a tailored, patient-centered consultation with patients. The Modified Drug Adherence Work-up Tool (M-DRAW) was developed as a 13-item checklist questionnaire to identify barriers to medication adherence. The response scale was a 4-point Likert scale of frequency of occurrence (1 = never to 4 = often). The checklist was accompanied by a GUIDE that provided corresponding motivational interview-based intervention strategies for each identified barrier. The current pilot study examined the psychometric properties of the M-DRAW checklist (reliability, responsiveness and discriminant validity) in patients taking one or more prescription medication(s) for chronic conditions. A cross-sectional sample of 26 patients was recruited between December 2015 and March 2016 at an academic medical center pharmacy in Southern California. A priming question that assessed self-reported adherence was used to separate participants into the control group of 17 "adherers" (65.4%), and into the intervention group of nine "unintentional and intentional non-adherers" (34.6%). Comparable baseline characteristics were observed between the two groups. The M-DRAW checklist showed acceptable reliability (13 item; alpha = 0.74) for identifying factors and barriers leading to medication non-adherence. Discriminant validity of the tool and the priming question was established by the four-fold number of barriers to adherence identified within the self-selected intervention group compared to the control group (4.4 versus 1.2 barriers, p tool will include construct validation.

  13. Factors associated with false-positive self-reported adherence to antihypertensive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedla, Y G; Bautista, L E

    2017-05-01

    Self-reported medication adherence is known to overestimate true adherence. However, little is known about patient factors that may contribute to the upward bias in self-reported medication adherence. The objective of this study is to examine whether demographic, behavioral, medication and mood factors are associated with being a false-positive self-reported adherer (FPA) to antihypertensive drug treatment. We studied 175 patients (mean age: 50 years; 57% men) from primary-care clinics starting antihypertensive drug treatment. Self-reported adherence (SRA) was measured with the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and by the number of drug doses missed in the previous week/month, and compared with pill count adherence ratio (PCAR) as gold standard. Data on adherence, demographic, behavioral, medication and mood factors were collected at baseline and every 3 months up to 1 year. FPA was defined as being a non-adherer by PCAR and an adherer by self-report. Mixed effect logistic regression was used for the analysis. Twenty percent of participants were FPA. Anxiety increased (odds ratio (OR): 3.00; P=0.01), whereas smoking (OR: 0.40; P=0.03) and drug side effects (OR: 0.46, P=0.03) decreased the probability for FPA by MARS. Education below high-school completion increased the probability of being an FPA as measured by missing doses in the last month (OR: 1.66; P=0.04) and last week (OR: 1.88; P=0.02). The validity of SRA varies significantly according to drug side effects, behavioral factors and patient's mood. Careful consideration should be given to the use of self-reported measures of adherence among patients likely to be false-positive adherers.

  14. How patients take malaria treatment: a systematic review of the literature on adherence to antimalarial drugs.

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    Katia Bruxvoort

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High levels of patient adherence to antimalarial treatment are important in ensuring drug effectiveness. To achieve this goal, it is important to understand levels of patient adherence, and the range of study designs and methodological challenges involved in measuring adherence and interpreting results. Since antimalarial adherence was reviewed in 2004, there has been a major expansion in the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs in the public sector, as well as initiatives to make them more widely accessible through community health workers and private retailers. These changes and the large number of recent adherence studies raise the need for an updated review on this topic. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting quantitative results on patient adherence to antimalarials obtained for treatment. RESULTS: The 55 studies identified reported extensive variation in patient adherence to antimalarials, with many studies reporting very high adherence (90-100% and others finding adherence of less than 50%. We identified five overarching approaches to assessing adherence based on the definition of adherence and the methods used to measure it. Overall, there was no clear pattern in adherence results by approach. However, adherence tended to be higher among studies where informed consent was collected at the time of obtaining the drug, where patient consultations were directly observed by research staff, and where a diagnostic test was obtained. CONCLUSION: Variations in reported adherence may reflect factors related to patient characteristics and the nature of their consultation with the provider, as well as methodological variations such as interaction between the research team and patients before and during the treatment. Future studies can benefit from an awareness of the impact of study procedures on adherence outcomes, and the identification of improved measurement methods less dependent on self-report.

  15. How patients take malaria treatment: a systematic review of the literature on adherence to antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S Patrick; Schellenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    High levels of patient adherence to antimalarial treatment are important in ensuring drug effectiveness. To achieve this goal, it is important to understand levels of patient adherence, and the range of study designs and methodological challenges involved in measuring adherence and interpreting results. Since antimalarial adherence was reviewed in 2004, there has been a major expansion in the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the public sector, as well as initiatives to make them more widely accessible through community health workers and private retailers. These changes and the large number of recent adherence studies raise the need for an updated review on this topic. We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting quantitative results on patient adherence to antimalarials obtained for treatment. The 55 studies identified reported extensive variation in patient adherence to antimalarials, with many studies reporting very high adherence (90-100%) and others finding adherence of less than 50%. We identified five overarching approaches to assessing adherence based on the definition of adherence and the methods used to measure it. Overall, there was no clear pattern in adherence results by approach. However, adherence tended to be higher among studies where informed consent was collected at the time of obtaining the drug, where patient consultations were directly observed by research staff, and where a diagnostic test was obtained. Variations in reported adherence may reflect factors related to patient characteristics and the nature of their consultation with the provider, as well as methodological variations such as interaction between the research team and patients before and during the treatment. Future studies can benefit from an awareness of the impact of study procedures on adherence outcomes, and the identification of improved measurement methods less dependent on self-report.

  16. Adherence to HIV/AIDS antiretroviral therapy among drug users: A qualitative study in Iran

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    Zahra Hosseini

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The obtained results indicated that adherence to the treatment of HIV is not constant and mono-dimensional, but is a function of different factors. Hence, an individual having feeble adherence in a specific time and under specific circumstances may show desirable adherence under a different circumstance. Thus, treatment of addicts living with HIV/AIDS requires physical, psychological, and social attention along with drug treatments.

  17. Pattern and Determinants of Antiretroviral Drug Adherence among Nigerian Pregnant Women

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    S. O. Ekama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The need for a high level of adherence to antiretroviral drugs has remained a major hurdle to achieving maximal benefit from its use in pregnancy. This study was designed to determine the level of adherence and identify factors that influence adherence during pregnancy. Method. This is a cross-sectional study utilizing a semistructured questionnaire. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression models were used to determine factors independently associated with good drug adherence during pregnancy. Result. 137 (80.6% of the interviewed 170 women achieved adherence level of ≥95% using 3 day recall. The desire to protect the unborn child was the greatest motivation (51.8% for good adherence. Fear of being identified as HIV positive (63.6% was the most common reason for nonadherence. Marital status, disclosure of HIV status, good knowledge of ART, and having a treatment supporter were found to be significantly associated with good adherence at bivariate analysis. However, after controlling for confounders, only HIV status disclosure and having a treatment partner retained their association with good adherence. Conclusion. Disclosure of HIV status and having treatment support are associated with good adherence. Maternal desire to protect the child was the greatest motivator for adherence.

  18. Validating the Modified Drug Adherence Work-Up (M-DRAW Tool to Identify and Address Barriers to Medication Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Barriers to medication adherence stem from multiple factors. An effective and convenient tool is needed to identify these barriers so that clinicians can provide a tailored, patient-centered consultation with patients. The Modified Drug Adherence Work-up Tool (M-DRAW was developed as a 13-item checklist questionnaire to identify barriers to medication adherence. The response scale was a 4-point Likert scale of frequency of occurrence (1 = never to 4 = often. The checklist was accompanied by a GUIDE that provided corresponding motivational interview-based intervention strategies for each identified barrier. The current pilot study examined the psychometric properties of the M-DRAW checklist (reliability, responsiveness and discriminant validity in patients taking one or more prescription medication(s for chronic conditions. A cross-sectional sample of 26 patients was recruited between December 2015 and March 2016 at an academic medical center pharmacy in Southern California. A priming question that assessed self-reported adherence was used to separate participants into the control group of 17 “adherers” (65.4%, and into the intervention group of nine “unintentional and intentional non-adherers” (34.6%. Comparable baseline characteristics were observed between the two groups. The M-DRAW checklist showed acceptable reliability (13 item; alpha = 0.74 for identifying factors and barriers leading to medication non-adherence. Discriminant validity of the tool and the priming question was established by the four-fold number of barriers to adherence identified within the self-selected intervention group compared to the control group (4.4 versus 1.2 barriers, p < 0.05. The current study did not investigate construct validity due to small sample size and challenges on follow-up with patients. Future testing of the tool will include construct validation.

  19. [Adherence with proton pump inhibitor therapy, by continuously taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimanov, S I; Makarenko, E V; Dikareva, E A

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the impact of adherence with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy on the incidence of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastropathy (NSAID gastropathy) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PPI pharmacotherapy adherence was estimated using the Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) in 92 patients with RA, including 32 patients did not take a PPI and 60 used a PPI. The groups were matched for age, disease duration, and used NSAIDs. All those asked underwent video esophagogastroduodenoscopy. According to the data of MAQ survey, low, moderate, and high adherence subgroups could be identified among the patients treated with a PPI. NSAID gastropathy was detected in 43.8% of the patients taking no PPI, in 50% of those with low PPI treatment adherence, in 12.5% with moderate adherence, and in 4.5% with high adherence. In the patients with low adherence to PPI therapy, NSAID gastropathy was recorded 11 times more frequently than in those with high adherence (c2 = 7.77; p = 0.005). This condition occurred in 28.6% of the patients taking NSAID without preventively using a PPI in the absence of risk factors for NSAID gastropathy. Only 36.7% patients who had been recommended to use a PPI for the prevention of NSAID gastropathy strictly observed their doctor's directions. Low PPI pharmacotherapy adherence may serve as an additional risk factor for NSAID gastropathy in patients in whom preventive antisecretory therapy used in combination with NSAID is indicated.

  20. How much elderly people of Isfahan are adherent to their drug therapy regimens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Parvaneh; Jafari, Tayebe Arab; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The need for a correct follow-up for medical advices of health givers is the cornerstone for avoiding drug-related complications in especial period of elderly people life. There isn't any data about drug therapy regimens adherence of elderly people of Isfahan. In this study, we aimed to cover this deficit. In this cross-sectional study which was carried out in Isfahan (Iran) in 2013 senior citizens (aged 65 or more) who were taking at least one medication and had no record of residency in nursing homes were included. We used Morisky medication adherence scale (after validation and reliability assessment for using this questionnaire in Persian language) to evaluate the level of adherence in the study population. A total of 200 elderly participants were fully studied ( n = 200, 61% females), and 52% of them had poor medication adherence. 77.5% of participants were suffered from at least four medical illnesses, and 18.5% of them were taking more than eight medications per day. We have not found any significant statistical relationship between vision or hearing loss disorders and the medication adherence of the participants). There was a significant positive relationship between the level of education and medication adherence ( P = 0.001), ( χ 2 = 0.29). Low Medication adherence is a common and important drug issue in the elderly in Isfahan. This issue can lead to medical complications and huge cost if it is not addressed appropriately.

  1. Assessment of indicators for hospital drug formulary non-adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Lenderink, AW; Egberts, ACG; Brouwers, JRBJ; De Jong-Van DenBerg, LTW

    Background: Translation of rational drug therapy into practice remains an international problem. Although pharmacotherapeutic treatment guidelines (PTGs) as managerial tools are favoured over hospital drug formularies (HDFs), the latter are still applied in most hospitals. HDF enforcement often

  2. Drug Non-Adherence in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Predictors and Associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shams, N.; Ahmed, W.; Kumar, N.; Saleem, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes being a serious health issue faced by developing countries with drug adherence having pivot role for recommended glycaemic target. This study aims to determine drug non-adherence in type 2 diabetics and its predictors and associations. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted after ethical approval at Medicine Dept. Rawal Institute of Health Sciences Islamabad over 10 months duration. Demographic details, duration of diabetes, education, socioeconomic class, glycaemic control, mode of anti-diabetic therapy, number of medications and other modes of therapy documented. Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire applied with outcome as good, acceptable and poor knowledge. Drug adherence was assessed by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (non-adherence at <6 points). Data analysed via SPSS version 17 with significant p-value <0.05. Results: Among 183 diabetics there were 43 (23.5 percent) males and 140 (76.5 percent) females. Mean age was 56.6±10.6 years and mean duration of diabetes 8.4±6.57 years. One hundred and fourteen (62 percent) cases were non-adherent. Diabetes knowledge was poor in 76 (41.5 percent), acceptable in 76 (41.5 percent) and good in 31 (16.9 percent). Un-satisfactory glycaemic control present in 149 (81.4 percent). Non-adherence was found to be associated with poor glycaemic control, poor dietary adherence, poly-pharmacy, illiteracy, practicing other modes of therapy and poor diabetes knowledge (p<0.05). Conclusion: Non-adherence to medication in type 2 diabetics needs to be addressed. Suggested contributory factors are illiteracy, practicing other modes of therapy, poor diabetes knowledge and poly-pharmacy. Public awareness programs, self-monitoring of blood sugars, regular follow-up visits with focus at patient education may improve glycaemic control and diabetes related complications. (author)

  3. Determinants of Adherence with Malaria Chemoprophylactic Drugs Used in a Traveler’s Health Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Shady, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background. The WHO recommends mefloquine, atovaquone/proguanil, and doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Adherence to a drug is determined by many factors. Objective. To detect the determinants of travelers' adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis. Methods. A prospective comparative study was conducted from January 2012 to July 2013 that included travelers (928 travelers) to malaria endemic countries who visited the THC. They were classified into 3 groups: the 1st is the mefloquine group ...

  4. Employment-Based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone Treatment in Unemployed Injection Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Kelly; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence; however suffers from notoriously poor adherence when prescribed for oral self-administration. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could be used to reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a Contingency (n=35) or Prescription (n=32) group fo...

  5. A Systematic Review of Antiretroviral Adherence Interventions for HIV-Infected People Who Use Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    CampBinford, Meredith; Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected persons who use drugs (PWUDs) are particularly vulnerable for suboptimal combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) adherence. A systematic review of interventions to improve cART adherence and virologic outcomes among HIV-infected PWUDs was conducted. Among the 45 eligible studies, randomized controlled trials suggested directly administered antiretroviral therapy, medication-assisted therapy (MAT), contingency management, and multi-component, nurse-delivered interventions provid...

  6. Adherence to oral anti-diabetic drugs among patients attending a Ghanaian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce SP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes mellitus, especially Type-2, continues to increase across the world. Medication adherence is considered an integral component in its management. Poor glycemic controls due to medication nonadherence accelerates the development of long-term complications which consequently leads to increased hospitalization and mortality. Objective: This study examined the level of adherence to oral antidiabetic drugs among patients who visited the teaching hospital and explored the probable contributory factors to non-adherence. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study using systematic sampling to collect quantitative data was undertaken. Questionnaires were administered to out-patients of the medical department of a teaching hospital in Ghana. Logistic regression was performed with statistical significance determined at p<0.05. Results: A total of 200 diabetic patients participated in the study. Using the Morisky Medication Adherence scale, the level of adherence determined was 38.5%. There were significant correlations between level of adherence and educational level [(OR=1.508; (CI 0.805- 2.825, P=0.019, and mode of payment [(OR=1.631; (CI 0.997- 2.669, P=0.05. Conclusion: Adherence in diabetic patients was low among respondents and this can be improved through education, counseling and reinforcement of self-care. There were several possible factors that contributed to the low adherence rate which could benefit from further studies.

  7. Drug adherence behavior among hypertensive out-patients at a tertiary health institution in Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Mukora-Mutseyekwa, Fadzai NN; Chadambuka, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Fadzai NN Mukora-Mutseyekwa, Elizabeth M ChadambukaFaculty of Health Sciences, Africa University, Mutare, ZimbabweObjectives: This study investigated the level of drug adherence among hypertensive outpatients at a tertiary hospital in Zimbabwe. Specific objectives included measurement of blood pressure (BP) control achievement, estimating prevalence of drug adherence behavior, and establishing the association between drug adherence behavior and achievement of BP control.Methods and materials:...

  8. The association between patients? beliefs about medicines and adherence to drug treatment after stroke: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    OpenAIRE

    Sj?lander, Maria; Eriksson, Marie; Glader, Eva-Lotta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Adherence to preventive drug treatment is a clinical problem and we hypothesised that patients' beliefs about medicines and stroke are associated with adherence. The objective was to examine associations between beliefs of patients with stroke about stroke and drug treatment and their adherence to drug treatment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. SETTING: Patients with stroke from 25 Swedish hospitals were included. MEASUREMENTS: Questionnaires were sent to 989 patient...

  9. Proposal to increase the drug adherence in a brazilian health unit

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    Ariane Garrocho de Faria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-0221.2016v13n24p174 The aim of this work was to use a Strategic Planning tool to check for problems and propose strategic activities that increases the drug treatment adherence in a UBS of Minas Gerais. This study was developed from May to October 2015 using Strategic Planning divided in four stages: explanatory, normative, strategic and tactical situational. Resulting actions were defined in order to increase the drug treatment adherence and reduce unnecessary spending. Thus, the importance of the method was perceived, been able to meet the views of participants need and direct discussions to achieve the proposed goals. In conclusion, the method evidenced the awareness of the participants and the shared responsibility for patients as well as the planning official. It is expected following the implementation of the proposed actions, achieving success in relation to the drug treatment adherence.

  10. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

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    Meigs James B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001 to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1 time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2 primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill; (3 time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4 long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7 and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes.

  11. Drug adherence behavior among hypertensive out-patients at a tertiary health institution in Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukora-Mutseyekwa FN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fadzai NN Mukora-Mutseyekwa, Elizabeth M ChadambukaFaculty of Health Sciences, Africa University, Mutare, ZimbabweObjectives: This study investigated the level of drug adherence among hypertensive outpatients at a tertiary hospital in Zimbabwe. Specific objectives included measurement of blood pressure (BP control achievement, estimating prevalence of drug adherence behavior, and establishing the association between drug adherence behavior and achievement of BP control.Methods and materials: An analytic cross sectional design was applied on a convenience sample of 102 participants using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Self-reported adherence was assessed using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale.Findings: The median age of participants was 68.5 years (Q1 61; Q3 76. The majority were female (n = 71; 69.6%. BP control (<140/90 mmHg was achieved in 52% (n = 53. Self-reported drug adherence was 40.2% (n = 42. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, participants with normal BP measurements were more than three times as likely to report maximal adherence to prescribed drug schedules (odds ratio 3.37; 95% confidence interval: 1.38–8.24.Conclusion: Poor drug adherence behavior prevails among hypertensive outpatients. This contributes to poor achievement of BP control. The hospital is recommended to set up a specialized hypertension clinic in the Out-patients' Department where an intensified health education package can be introduced as well as community awareness programs on the importance of medication adherence.Keywords: drug adherence, behavior, hypertension

  12. Influence of subinhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials on hydrophobicity, adherence and ultra-structure of Fusobacterium nucleatum

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    Okamoto Ana C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is considered a bridge organism between earlier and later colonizers in dental biofilms and a putative periodontopathogen. In Dentistry, antimicrobial agents are used for treatment and control of infectious diseases associated with dental plaque. Antiseptics have been used in association with antibiotics to reduce infections after oral surgeries. In this study, the influence of subinhibitory concentrations (SC of chlorhexidine, triclosan, penicillin G and metronidazole, on hydrophobicity, adherence to oral epithelial cells, and ultra-structure of F. nucleatum was examined. All isolates were susceptible to chlorhexidine, triclosan, and metronidazole; however, most of the isolates were susceptible to penicillin G, and all of them were hydrophilic when grown with or without antimicrobials. Adherence was decreased by all antimicrobials. Results suggest that adherence of F. nucleatum was influenced by adhesins because structures such as fimbries or capsule were not observed by transmission electronic microscope.

  13. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    Department of Nursing Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia. ABSTRACT ... it is individually, socially and culturally determined. .... concept that is a semantic representation which .... antiretroviral drugs enhances quality of life and is clearly in keeping with the philosophy of palliative. 19 care .

  14. Spirituality and adherence to antiretroviral drugs among HIV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: It was an observational, longitudinal study in which 215 consenting HIV positive patients aged 18 to 65 years who were on antiretroviral drugs were recruited through systematic random sampling technique. Socio-demographic characteristics, clinical history and physical examination findings were documented for ...

  15. Physician adherence to hypertension treatment guidelines and drug acquisition costs of antihypertensive drugs at the cardiac clinic: a pilot study

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    Abdulameer SA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shaymaa Abdalwahed Abdulameer1, Mohanad Naji Sahib1, Noorizan Abd Aziz1,2, Yahaya Hassan1,2, Hadeer Akram Abdul AlRazzaq1, Omar Ismail31School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM, 42300 Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Hospital Pulau Pinang, 10900, Penang, MalaysiaAbstract: Prescribing pattern surveys are one of the pharmacoepidemiological techniques that provide an unbiased picture of prescribing habits. Prescription surveys permit the identification of suboptimal prescribing patterns for further evaluation. The aims of this study were to determine the prescribing trend, adherence of the prescribers to the guideline, and the impact of drug expenditure on drug utilization at the cardiac clinic of Penang Hospital, Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study. Demographic data of the patients, diagnoses and the drugs prescribed were recorded. The average drug acquisition costs (ADAC were calculated for each antihypertensive drug class on a daily and annual basis. Adherence to the guideline was calculated as a percentage of the total number of patients. A total of 313 individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The average age of the study population was 59.30 ± 10.35 years. The mean number of drugs per prescription in the study was 2.09 ± 0.78. There were no significant differences in the demographic data. Antihypertensive drugs were used in monotherapy and polytherapy in 20.8% and 79.2% of the patients, respectively. Adherence to the guideline regarding prescription occurred in 85.30% of the patients. The lowest priced drug class was diuretics and the highest was angiotensin-receptor blockers. In conclusion, the total adherence to the guideline was good; the adherence percentage only slightly decreased with a co-existing comorbidity (such as diabetes mellitus. The use of thiazide diuretics was encouraged because they are well tolerated and

  16. Non-adherence to anti-TB drugs among TB/HIV co-infected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-adherence to anti-TB drugs among TB/HIV co-infected patients in Mbarara Hospital ... and its associated factors have not been studied in these patients in Uganda. ... Methods: A cross-sectional study with qualitative and quantitative data ...

  17. Mobile phone text messaging improves antihypertensive drug adherence in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varleta, Paola; Acevedo, Mónica; Akel, Carlos; Salinas, Claudia; Navarrete, Carlos; García, Ana; Echegoyen, Carolina; Rodriguez, Daniel; Gramusset, Lissette; Leon, Sandra; Cofré, Pedro; Retamal, Raquel; Romero, Katerine

    2017-12-01

    Antihypertensive drug adherence (ADA) is a mainstay in blood pressure control. Education through mobile phone short message system (SMS) text messaging could improve ADA. The authors conducted a randomized study involving 314 patients with hypertension with Text messaging intervention improved ADA (risk ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.6 [Ptext messaging resulted in an increase in reporting ADA in this hypertensive Latino population. This approach could become an effective tool to overcome poor medication adherence in the community. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Non-adherence to telemedicine interventions for drug users: systematic review

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    Taís de Campos Moreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To estimate rates of non-adherence to telemedicine strategies aimed at treating drug addiction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted of randomized controlled trials investigating different telemedicine treatment methods for drug addiction. The following databases were consulted between May 18, 2012 and June 21, 2012: PubMed, PsycINFO, SciELO, Wiley (The Cochrane Library, Embase, Clinical trials and Google Scholar. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. The criteria evaluated were: appropriate sequence of data generation, allocation concealment, blinding, description of losses and exclusions and analysis by intention to treat. There were 274 studies selected, of which 20 were analyzed. RESULTS Non-adherence rates varied between 15.0% and 70.0%. The interventions evaluated were of at least three months duration and, although they all used telemedicine as support, treatment methods differed. Regarding the quality of the studies, the values also varied from very poor to high quality. High quality studies showed better adherence rates, as did those using more than one technique of intervention and a limited treatment time. Mono-user studies showed better adherence rates than poly-user studies. CONCLUSIONS Rates of non-adherence to treatment involving telemedicine on the part of users of psycho-active substances differed considerably, depending on the country, the intervention method, follow-up time and substances used. Using more than one technique of intervention, short duration of treatment and the type of substance used by patients appear to facilitate adherence.

  19. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

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    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    Full Text Available Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  20. Barriers to physician adherence to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug guidelines: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos, J M; Naik, A D; Woofter, A; Abraham, N S

    2008-09-15

    Despite wide availability of physician guidelines for safer use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and widespread use of these drugs in the US, NSAID prescribing guidelines have been only modestly effective. To identify and describe comprehensively barriers to provider adherence to NSAID prescribing guidelines. We conducted interviews with 25 physicians, seeking to identify the major influences explaining physician non-adherence to guidelines. Interviews were standardized and structured probes were used for clarification and detail. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Three independent investigators analysed the transcripts, using the constant-comparative method of qualitative analysis. Our analysis identified six dominant physician barriers explaining non-adherence to established NSAID prescribing guidelines. These included (i) lack of familiarity with guidelines, (ii) perceived limited validity of guidelines, (iii) limited applicability of guidelines among specific patients, (iv) clinical inertia, (v) influences of prior anecdotal experiences and (vi) medical heuristics. A heterogeneous set of influences are barriers to physician adherence to NSAID prescribing guidelines. Suggested measures for improving guideline-concordant prescribing should focus on measures to improve physician education and confidence in guidelines, implementation of physician/pharmacist co-management strategies and expansion of guideline scope.

  1. Characterization of socioeconomic status of Japanese patients with atopic dermatitis showing poor medical adherence and reasons for drug discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murota, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Sugaya, Makoto; Tanioka, Miki; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito; Saeki, Hidehisa; Imafuku, Shinichi; Abe, Masatoshi; Shintani, Yoichi; Kaneko, Sakae; Masuda, Koji; Hiragun, Takaaki; Inomata, Naoko; Kitami, Yuki; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Abe, Shinya; Kobayashi, Miwa; Morisky, Donald E; Furue, Masutaka; Katoh, Norihito

    2015-09-01

    Patients' high adherence to medication is indispensable for the management of skin diseases including atopic dermatitis. We previously showed poor medication adherence in Japanese dermatological patients. This study was conducted to determine the level of adherence to oral or topical medication in Japanese patients with atopic dermatitis, attempting to characterize the socioeconomic status of those patients with poor adherence. A web questionnaire survey on demographic data as well as adherence level was conducted on patients registered in the monitoring system. Adherence level was assessed with Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 (MMAS-8). Among a total of 3096 respondents with dermatological disorders, data of 1327 subjects with atopic dermatitis were extracted and analyzed. More than 80% of subjects felt that both oral and topical medications were safe and efficacious, while less than 60% of them were satisfied with their treatment. Levels of adherence to oral and topical treatments were evaluated with MMAS-8, giving scores of 4.6 and 4.2, respectively. Demographic factors such as gender, marital status, state of employment, alcohol consumption, frequency of hospital visits, and experience of drug effectiveness had a significant impact on the degree of adherence to treatment. Medication adherence level in Japanese subjects with atopic dermatitis was relatively low compared with that of other chronic diseases. Our survey has characterized patients with poor adherence, who are good targets for interventions to maximize potentially limited healthcare resources. Copyright © 2015 Z. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Adherence to synthetic disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results of the OBSERVAR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Mas, Antonio; Castañeda, Santos; Cantero Santamaría, José I; Baquero, José L; Del Toro Santos, Francisco J

    2017-12-27

    Treatment compliance with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) is essential to achieve the therapeutic goals in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, despite the need for good compliance, there is evidence that patients with RA frequently fail to use DMARD for the control of RA. Thus, the main objective of the OBSERVAR study is to evaluate the reasons for the lack of therapeutic adherence to synthetic DMARD in these patients. A Delphi process involving 18 randomly selected Spanish rheumatologists determined the level of agreement with 66 causes of noncompliance selected from the literature in relation to synthetic DMARD in RA. The reasons for noncompliance were consistent in 75.7%, although 3 reasons (4.5%) were highly consistent: 1) not knowing what to do in the case of an adverse event with DMARD; 2) not having undergone adherence screening by health personnel for early detection of "noncompliant patients"; and 3) not having undergone interventions or strategies that improve adherence. In order to improve adherence to RA treatment with synthetic DMARD, the patient should be adequately informed of each new treatment introduced, the patient's compliance profile should be incorporated into the clinical routine and the patient's motivation for therapeutic compliance be reinforced through the methods available to us. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Determinants of Adherence with Malaria Chemoprophylactic Drugs Used in a Traveler’s Health Clinic

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    Ibrahim Shady

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The WHO recommends mefloquine, atovaquone/proguanil, and doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Adherence to a drug is determined by many factors. Objective. To detect the determinants of travelers’ adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis. Methods. A prospective comparative study was conducted from January 2012 to July 2013 that included travelers (928 travelers to malaria endemic countries who visited the THC. They were classified into 3 groups: the 1st is the mefloquine group (396 travelers, the 2nd is the doxycycline group (370 travelers, and finally those who did not receive any drugs (162 travelers. The participants from the 1st and 2nd groups enrolled in the study. Results. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The predictors for adherence in the mefloquine group were travel to an African destination [OR = 51 (6.8–2385], higher than a secondary school education [OR = 21 (4.1–144.2], organized travel [OR = 4 (2.1–6.5], traveling for leisure [OR = 2.1 (1.1–0.4], and nationality [OR = 2 (1.11–4.00]. In the doxycycline group, the predictors included higher than a secondary education [OR = 20.1 (4.5–125.1], organized travel [OR = 11.4 (5.5–20.9], travel for leisure [OR = 7 (2.3–22.9], travel to an African destination [OR = 6.1 (0.41–417], and nationality [OR = 4.5 (2.3–9.5]. Conclusion. Adherence with malaria chemoprophylaxis could be affected by many factors such as nationality, education, and organized travel.

  4. Determinants of Adherence with Malaria Chemoprophylactic Drugs Used in a Traveler's Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background. The WHO recommends mefloquine, atovaquone/proguanil, and doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Adherence to a drug is determined by many factors. Objective. To detect the determinants of travelers' adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis. Methods. A prospective comparative study was conducted from January 2012 to July 2013 that included travelers (928 travelers) to malaria endemic countries who visited the THC. They were classified into 3 groups: the 1st is the mefloquine group (396 travelers), the 2nd is the doxycycline group (370 travelers), and finally those who did not receive any drugs (162 travelers). The participants from the 1st and 2nd groups enrolled in the study. Results. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The predictors for adherence in the mefloquine group were travel to an African destination [OR = 51 (6.8–2385)], higher than a secondary school education [OR = 21 (4.1–144.2)], organized travel [OR = 4 (2.1–6.5)], traveling for leisure [OR = 2.1 (1.1–0.4)], and nationality [OR = 2 (1.11–4.00)]. In the doxycycline group, the predictors included higher than a secondary education [OR = 20.1 (4.5–125.1)], organized travel [OR = 11.4 (5.5–20.9)], travel for leisure [OR = 7 (2.3–22.9)], travel to an African destination [OR = 6.1 (0.41–417)], and nationality [OR = 4.5 (2.3–9.5)]. Conclusion. Adherence with malaria chemoprophylaxis could be affected by many factors such as nationality, education, and organized travel. PMID:26379712

  5. Strategies for improving adherence to antiepileptic drug treatment in people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aqeel, Sinaa; Gershuni, Olga; Al-Sabhan, Jawza; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2017-02-03

    Poor adherence to antiepileptic medication is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and healthcare costs. In this review, we focus on interventions designed and tested in randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials to assist people with adherence to antiepileptic medication. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in the Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2010. To determine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving adherence to antiepileptic medication in adults and children with epilepsy. For the latest update, on 4 February 2016 we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO), MEDLINE (Ovid 1946 to 4 February 2016), CINAHL Plus (EBSCOhost 1937 to 4 February 2016), PsycINFO (EBSCOhost 1887 to 4 February 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of adherence-enhancing interventions aimed at people with a clinical diagnosis of epilepsy (as defined in individual studies), of any age and treated with antiepileptic drugs in a primary care, outpatient or other community setting. All review authors independently assessed lists of potentially relevant citations and abstracts. At least two review authors independently extracted data and performed quality assessment of each study according to the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias. We graded the level of evidence for each outcome according to the GRADE working group scale.The studies differed widely according to the type of intervention and measures of adherence; therefore combining data was not appropriate. We included 12 studies reporting data on 1642 participants (intervention = 833, control = 809). Eight studies targeted adults with epilepsy, one study included participants

  6. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone treatment in unemployed injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly E; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Oral naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence yet suffers from notoriously poor adherence. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a contingency (n = 35) or prescription (n = 32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared with prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, p workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Multi-dose drug dispensing as a tool to improve medication adherence: A study in patients using vitamin K antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rein, Nienke; de Geus, Kristel S; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Reitsma, Pieter H; van der Meer, Felix J M; Lijfering, Willem M

    2018-01-01

    Multi-dose drug dispensing (MDD) is a dosing aid that provides patients with disposable bags containing all drugs intended for 1 dosing moment. MDD is believed to increase medication adherence, but studies are based on self-reported data, and results may depend on socially desirable answers. Therefore, our purpose was to determine the effect of MDD on medication adherence in non-adherent patients taking vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), and to compare with instructing patients on medication use. We conducted a before-after study in non-adherent patients where MDD was the exposure and change in adherence after MDD initiation was the outcome (within patient comparison). Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was selected as a measure for adherence, as this reflects stability of VKA treatment. To analyze whether MDD improved adherence as compared with standard care (ie, letters or calls from nurses of the anticoagulation clinic), non-adherent patients without MDD were also followed to estimate their TTR change over time (between patient comparison). Eighty-three non-adherent VKA patients started using MDD. The median TTR was 63% before MDD and 73% 6 months after MDD. The within patient TTR increased on average by 13% (95%CI 6% to 21%) within 1 month after starting MDD and remained stable during the next 5 months. The TTR of MDD-patients increased 10% (95%CI 2% to 19%) higher as compared with non-MDD patients within 1 month but was similar after 4 months (TTR difference 3%, 95%CI -2% to 9%). Adherence improved after initiation of MDD. Compared with instructing patients, MDD was associated with better adherence within 1 month but was associated with similar improvement after 4 months. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The association between patients' beliefs about medicines and adherence to drug treatment after stroke: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölander, Maria; Eriksson, Marie; Glader, Eva-Lotta

    2013-09-24

    Adherence to preventive drug treatment is a clinical problem and we hypothesised that patients' beliefs about medicines and stroke are associated with adherence. The objective was to examine associations between beliefs of patients with stroke about stroke and drug treatment and their adherence to drug treatment. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Patients with stroke from 25 Swedish hospitals were included. Questionnaires were sent to 989 patients to assess their perceptions about stroke (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, Brief IPQ), beliefs about medicines (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaires, BMQ) and adherence to treatment (Medication Adherence Report Scale, MARS) 3 months after stroke onset. Only patients living at home were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was self-reported adherence as measured on MARS. MARS scores were dichotomised into adherent/non-adherent. Background and clinical data from the Swedish Stroke register were included. 811 patients were still living at home and 595 answered the questionnaire. Complete MARS data were available for 578 patients and 72 (12.5%) of these were classified as non-adherent. Non-adherent patients scored lower on positive beliefs as measured on BMQ-necessity (OR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.98) and BMQ-benefit (OR=0.77, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87), and higher on negative beliefs as measured on BMQ-concern (OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.21), BMQ-overuse (OR=1.29, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.45), and BMQ-harm (OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.24). The Brief IPQ showed that non-adherent patients believed their current treatment to be less useful (p=0.001). This study showed associations between beliefs of Swedish patients with stroke about medicines and adherence. Positive beliefs were less common and negative more common among non-adherent. To improve adherence, patients' beliefs about medicines should be considered.

  9. Adherence to Disease Modifying Drugs among Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in Germany: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hansen

    Full Text Available Long-term therapies such as disease modifying therapy for Multiple Sclerosis (MS demand high levels of medication adherence in order to reach acceptable outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe adherence to four disease modifying drugs (DMDs among statutorily insured patients within two years following treatment initiation. These drugs were interferon beta-1a i.m. (Avonex, interferon beta-1a s.c. (Rebif, interferon beta-1b s.c. (Betaferon and glatiramer acetate s.c. (Copaxone.This retrospective cohort study used pharmacy claims data from the data warehouse of the German Institute for Drug Use Evaluation (DAPI from 2001 through 2009. New or renewed DMD prescriptions in the years 2002 to 2006 were identified and adherence was estimated during 730 days of follow-up by analyzing the medication possession ratio (MPR as proxy for compliance and persistence defined as number of days from initiation of DMD therapy until discontinuation or interruption.A total of 52,516 medication profiles or therapy cycles (11,891 Avonex, 14,060 Betaferon, 12,353 Copaxone and 14,212 Rebif from 50,057 patients were included into the analysis. Among the 4 cohorts, no clinically relevant differences were found in available covariates. The Medication Possession Ratio (MPR measured overall compliance, which was 39.9% with a threshold MPR≥0.8. There were small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was compliant for the following medications: Avonex (42.8%, Betaferon (40.6%, Rebif (39.2%, and Copaxone (37%. Overall persistence was 32.3% at the end of the 24 months observation period, i.e. during only one third of all included therapy cycles patients did not discontinue or interrupt DMD therapy. There were also small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was persistent as follows: Avonex (34.2%, Betaferon (33.4%, Rebif (31.7% and Copaxone (29.8%.Two years after initiating MS-modifying therapy, only

  10. Measuring and modelling the effects of systematic non-adherence to mass drug administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Dyson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well understood that the success or failure of a mass drug administration campaign critically depends on the level of coverage achieved. To that end coverage levels are often closely scrutinised during campaigns and the response to underperforming campaigns is to attempt to improve coverage. Modelling work has indicated, however, that the quality of the coverage achieved may also have a significant impact on the outcome. If the coverage achieved is likely to miss similar people every round then this can have a serious detrimental effect on the campaign outcome. We begin by reviewing the current modelling descriptions of this effect and introduce a new modelling framework that can be used to simulate a given level of systematic non-adherence. We formalise the likelihood that people may miss several rounds of treatment using the correlation in the attendance of different rounds. Using two very simplified models of the infection of helminths and non-helminths, respectively, we demonstrate that the modelling description used and the correlation included between treatment rounds can have a profound effect on the time to elimination of disease in a population. It is therefore clear that more detailed coverage data is required to accurately predict the time to disease elimination. We review published coverage data in which individuals are asked how many previous rounds they have attended, and show how this information may be used to assess the level of systematic non-adherence. We note that while the coverages in the data found range from 40.5% to 95.5%, still the correlations found lie in a fairly narrow range (between 0.2806 and 0.5351. This indicates that the level of systematic non-adherence may be similar even in data from different years, countries, diseases and administered drugs.

  11. Factors contributing to antiretroviral drug adherence among adults living with HIV or AIDS in a Kenyan rural community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioko, Mary T; Pertet, Anne M

    2017-07-31

    Antiretroviral (ARV) adherence of ≥ 95% is recommended for suppressing HIV. However, studies have shown that the ≥ 95% recommended level is rarely achieved. This cross-sectional community-based study sought to assess factors contributing to ARV drug adherence among adults living with HIV or AIDS. The study was conducted in a rural community in Machakos County, Kenya. The questions used for the study were adapted from the Patient Medicine Adherence Questionnaire (PMAQ), a tool grounded in the Health Belief Model. Adherence to ARV was measured using self-reports and pill counts. The perception social support was measured with a 5-point Likert scale, whereas the type and the number of side effects experienced were recorded using 'yes' and 'no' questions. We used the chi-square test to test associations and binary logistic regression to assess factors explaining dose adherence to ARV. The levels of adherence of 86% using self-reports were significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the pill count of 58.6%. The immediate family was rated high in providing social support (3.7 ± 0.6) followed by social support groups (3.1 ± 0.8). A binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to predict ARV adherence (adherent, non-adherent) using social support, side effects and marital status as explanatory variables. The Wald criterion demonstrated that marital status (p = 0.019) and burden of side effects (p ≤ 0.001) made a significant contribution to the prediction of ARV adherence. The burden of side effects and being a divorcee are primary predictors of ARV adherence.

  12. Do reimbursement recommendation processes used by government drug plans in Canada adhere to good governance principles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawson NS

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nigel SB Rawson,1–3 John Adams4 1Eastlake Research Group, Oakville, ON, 2Canadian Health Policy Institute, Toronto, ON, 3Fraser Institute, Vancouver, BC, 4Canadian PKU and Allied Disorders Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: In democratic societies, good governance is the key to assuring the confidence of stakeholders and other citizens in how governments and organizations interact with and relate to them and how decisions are taken. Although defining good governance can be debatable, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP set of principles is commonly used. The reimbursement recommendation processes of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH, which carries out assessments for all public drug plans outside Quebec, are examined in the light of the UNDP governance principles and compared with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence system in England. The adherence of CADTH's processes to the principles of accountability, transparency, participatory, equity, responsiveness and consensus is poor, especially when compared with the English system, due in part to CADTH's lack of genuine independence. CADTH's overriding responsibility is toward the governments that "own," fund and manage it, while the agency’s status as a not-for-profit corporation under federal law protects it from standard government forms of accountability. The recent integration of CADTH’s reimbursement recommendation processes with the provincial public drug plans’ collective system for price negotiation with pharmaceutical companies reinforces CADTH's role as a nonindependent partner in the pursuit of governments’ cost-containment objectives, which should not be part of its function. Canadians need a national organization for evaluating drugs for reimbursement in the public interest that fully embraces the principles of good governance – one that is publicly accountable, transparent and fair and includes all stakeholders

  13. Characteristics, interactions and coating adherence of heterogeneous polymer/drug coatings for biomedical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManamon, Colm; Silva, Johann P. de; Delaney, Paul; Morris, Michael A.; Cross, Graham L.W.

    2016-01-01

    With this rise in surgical procedures it is important to focus on the mobility and safety of the patient and reduce the infections that are associated with hip replacements. We examine the mechanical properties of gentamicin sulphate as a model antimicrobial layer for titanium-alloy based prosthetic hips to help prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection after surgery. A top layer of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) is added to maintain the properties of the gentamicin sulphate as well as providing a drug delivery system. Through the use of nanoindentation and micro-scratch techniques it is possible to determine the mechanical and adhesive properties of this system. Nanoindentation determined the modulus values for the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and gentamicin sulphate materials to be 8.9 and 5.2 GPa, respectively. Micro-scratch established that the gentamicin sulphate layer is strongly adhered to the Ti alloy and forces of 30 N show no cohesive or adhesive failure. It was determined that the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) is ductile in nature and delaminates from the gentamicin sulphate layer of at 0.5 N. - Highlights: • Biomedical bilayer for prosthetic implant to reduce patient pain and increase patient mobility • The characterisation of the materials shows that the materials are in accordance with FDA regulations. • The mechanical properties of the gentamicin suggest that it is well adhered to the substrate. • The PLGA layer delaminates at lower forces allowing the gentamicin to fight infection.

  14. Characteristics, interactions and coating adherence of heterogeneous polymer/drug coatings for biomedical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManamon, Colm [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Silva, Johann P. de [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Delaney, Paul [Department of Chemistry, Supercritical Fluid Centre and Materials Section, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Morris, Michael A. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Department of Chemistry, Supercritical Fluid Centre and Materials Section, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cross, Graham L.W., E-mail: crossg@tcd.ie [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2016-02-01

    With this rise in surgical procedures it is important to focus on the mobility and safety of the patient and reduce the infections that are associated with hip replacements. We examine the mechanical properties of gentamicin sulphate as a model antimicrobial layer for titanium-alloy based prosthetic hips to help prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection after surgery. A top layer of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) is added to maintain the properties of the gentamicin sulphate as well as providing a drug delivery system. Through the use of nanoindentation and micro-scratch techniques it is possible to determine the mechanical and adhesive properties of this system. Nanoindentation determined the modulus values for the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and gentamicin sulphate materials to be 8.9 and 5.2 GPa, respectively. Micro-scratch established that the gentamicin sulphate layer is strongly adhered to the Ti alloy and forces of 30 N show no cohesive or adhesive failure. It was determined that the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) is ductile in nature and delaminates from the gentamicin sulphate layer of at 0.5 N. - Highlights: • Biomedical bilayer for prosthetic implant to reduce patient pain and increase patient mobility • The characterisation of the materials shows that the materials are in accordance with FDA regulations. • The mechanical properties of the gentamicin suggest that it is well adhered to the substrate. • The PLGA layer delaminates at lower forces allowing the gentamicin to fight infection.

  15. Patient-Centered Tablet Application for Improving Medication Adherence after a Drug-Eluting Stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vicki; Dileep, Anandu; Dickens, Carolyn; Groo, Vicki; Welland, Betty; Field, Jerry; Baumann, Matthew; Flores, Jose D; Shroff, Adhir; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Yao, Yingwei; Wilkie, Diana J; Boyd, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    This study's objective was to evaluate a patient-centered educational electronic tablet application, "My Interventional Drug-Eluting Stent Educational App" (MyIDEA) to see if there was an increase in patient knowledge about dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and medication possession ratio (MPR) compared to treatment as usual. In a pilot project, 24 elderly (≥50 years old) research participants were recruited after a drug-eluting stent. Eleven were randomized to the control arm and 13 to the interventional arm. All the participants completed psychological and knowledge questionnaires. Adherence was assessed through MPR, which was calculated at 3 months for all participants who were scheduled for second and third follow-up visits. Relative to control, the interventional group had a 10% average increase in MPR. As compared to the interventional group, more patients in the control group had poor adherence (<80% MPR). The psychological data revealed a single imbalance in anxiety between the control and interventional groups. On average, interventional participants spent 21 min using MyIDEA. Consumer health informatics has enabled us to engage patients with their health data using novel methods. Consumer health technology needs to focus more on patient knowledge and engagement to improve long-term health. MyIDEA takes a unique approach in targeting DAPT from the onset. MyIDEA leverages patient-centered information with clinical care and the electronic health record highlighting the patients' role as a team member in their own health care. The patients think critically about adverse events and how to solve issues before leaving the hospital.

  16. Patient Centered Tablet Application for improving medication adherence after a Drug Eluting Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Shah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study’s objective was to evaluate a patient-centered educational electronic tablet application, My Interventional Drug-Eluting Stent Educational App (MyIDEA to see if there was an increase in patient knowledge about dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT and medication possession ratio (MPR compared to treatment as usual. Methods: In a pilot project, 24 elderly (≥50 years-old research participants were recruited after a Drug Eluting Stent. 11 were randomized to the control arm and 13 to the interventional arm. All participants completed psychological and knowledge questionnaires. Adherence was assessed through MPR, which was calculated at three months for all participants who were scheduled for a second and third follow-up visit.Results: Relative to control, the interventional group had a 10% average increase in MPR. As compared to the interventional group, more patients in the control group had poor adherence (<80% MPR. The psychological data revealed a single imbalance in anxiety between the control and interventional groups. On average interventional participants spent 21 minutes using MyIDEA. Discussion: Consumer health informatics has enabled us to engage patients with their health data using novel methods. Consumer health technology needs to focus more on patient knowledge and engagement to improve long term health. MyIDEA takes a unique approach in targeting DAPT from the onset.Conclusion: MyIDEA leverages patient centered information with clinical care and the electronic health record highlighting the patients’ role as a team member in their own healthcare. The patients think critically about adverse events and how to solve issues before leaving the hospital.

  17. Live-cell calcium imaging of adherent and non-adherent GL261 cells reveals phenotype-dependent differences in drug responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Averey D; Daniels, Richard L

    2017-08-02

    The tumor-derived GL261 cell line is used as a model for studying glioblastoma and other high-grade gliomas, and can be cultured adherently or as free-floating aggregates known as neurospheres. These different culture conditions give rise to distinct phenotypes, with increased tumorigenicity displayed by neurosphere-cultured cells. An important technique for understanding GL261 pathobiology is live cell fluorescent imaging of intracellular calcium. However, live cell imaging of GL261 neurospheres presents a technical challenge, as experimental manipulations where drugs are added to the extracellular media cause the cells to move during analysis. Here we present a method to immobilize GL261 neurospheres with low melting point agarose for calcium imaging using the fluorescent calcium sensor fura-2. GL261 cells were obtained from the NCI-Frederick Cancer Research Tumor Repository and cultured as adherent cells or induced to form neurospheres by placing freshly trypsinized cells into serum-free media containing fibroblast growth factor 2, epidermal growth factor, and B-27 supplement. Prior to experiments, adherent cells were loaded with fura-2 and cultured on 8-well chamber slides. Non-adherent neurospheres were first loaded with fura-2, placed in droplets onto an 8-well chamber slide, and finally covered with a thin layer of low melting point agarose to immobilize the cells. Ratiometric pseudocolored images were obtained during treatment with ATP, capsaicin, or vehicle control. Cells were marked as responsive if fluorescence levels increased more than 30% above baseline. Differences between treatment groups were tested using Student's t-tests and one-way ANOVA. We found that cellular responses to pharmacological treatments differ based on cellular phenotype. Adherent cells and neurospheres both responded to ATP with a rise in intracellular calcium. Notably, capsaicin treatment led to robust responses in GL261 neurospheres but not adherent cells. We demonstrate the use

  18. Using Potentiometric Free Drug Sensors to Determine the Free Concentration of Ionizable Drugs in Colloidal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thuy; Chakraborty, Anjan; Xi, Xi

    2018-01-01

    The present study investigates the use of free drug sensors (FDS) to measure free ionized drug concentrations in colloidal systems, including micellar solutions, emulsions, and lipid formulations during in vitro lipolysis. Diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DPH) and loperamide hydrochloride (LOP) wer...

  19. Drug adherence in treatment resistant and in controlled hypertension-Results from the Swedish Primary Care Cardiovascular Database (SPCCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Lina; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Kahan, Thomas; Schiöler, Linus; Qvarnström, Miriam; Wettermark, Björn; Hjerpe, Per; Hasselström, Jan; Manhem, Karin

    2018-03-01

    To assess drug adherence in patients treated with ≥3 antihypertensive drug classes, with both controlled and uncontrolled blood pressure and describe associated factors for nonadherence. Patients with hypertension, without cardiovascular comorbidity, aged >30 years treated with ≥3 antihypertensive drug classes were followed for 2 years. Both patients with treatment resistant hypertension (TRH) and patients with controlled hypertension were included. Clinical data were derived from a primary care database. Pharmacy refill data from the Swedish Prescribed drug registry was used to calculate proportion of days covered (PDC). Patients with a PDC level ≥ 80% were included. We found 5846 patients treated ≥3 antihypertensive drug classes, 3508 with TRH (blood pressure ≥ 140/90), and 2338 with controlled blood pressure (drug therapy had similar decline in adherence over time regardless of initial blood pressure control. Diabetes was associated with better adherence, which may imply that the structured caregiving of these patients enhances antihypertensive drug treatment. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Urine Creatinine Concentrations in Drug Monitoring Participants and Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A; Seegmiller, Jesse C; Kloss, Julie; Apple, Fred S

    2016-10-01

    Urine drug testing is commonly performed in both clinical and forensic arenas for screening, monitoring and compliance purposes. We sought to determine if urine creatinine concentrations in monitoring program participants were significantly different from hospital in-patients and out-patients undergoing urine drug testing. We retrospectively reviewed urine creatinine submitted in June through December 2015 for all specimens undergoing urine drug testing. The 20,479 creatinine results were categorized as hospitalized patients (H) and monitoring/compliance groups for pain management (P), legal (L) or recovery (R). Median creatinine concentrations (interquartile range, mg/dL) were significantly different (P creatinine concentrations were significantly lower in the R vs. L group (Pcreatinine concentration and may indicate participants' attempts to tamper with their drug test results through dilution means. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Interventions to increase adherence in patients taking immunosuppressive drugs after kidney transplantation: a systematic review of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Tim; Großpietsch, Kirsten; Neugebauer, Edmund A M; Pieper, Dawid

    2017-11-29

    Immunosuppressive drugs have to be taken through the whole duration of kidney transplant survival to avoid rejection. Low adherence can increase the risk of allograft rejection. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions (AEI) in kidney transplantation recipients taking immunosuppressive drugs. A search was performed in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. The search was performed in May 2016. We included comparative studies on AEI for kidney transplant recipients taking immunosuppressive drugs. The primary outcome was medication adherence. All identified articles were screened according to the predefined inclusion criteria. The risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Study selection and risk of bias assessment were performed by two reviewers independently. Data were extracted in standardized tables. Data extraction was verified by a second reviewer. All discrepancies were resolved through discussion. Data were synthesized in a structured narrative way. There is no registered or published protocol for this systematic review. We identified 12 studies. The number of participants ranged from 24 to 1830. Nine studies included adults, two children, and one adults and children. Risk of bias was high. The main reasons for high risk of bias were inadequate allocation sequence (confounding) and that studies were not blinded. Eleven studies evaluated AEI consisting of educational and/or behavioral components. All these studies showed an effect direction in favor of the intervention. Intervention effect was only moderate. Most adherence measures in studies on educational and behavioral interventions showed statistically significant differences. Studies that combined educational and behavioral intervention components showed larger effects. All studies that were statistically significant were multimodal. Studies that included an individualized component and more intensive interventions showed larger effects. One

  2. The Effect on Treatment Adherence of Administering Drugs as Fixed-Dose Combinations versus as Separate Pills: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, Katy A.; Nellen, Jeannine F.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2014-01-01

    Administering drugs as fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) versus the same active drugs administered as separate pills is assumed to enhance treatment adherence. We synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the effect of FDCs versus separate pills on adherence. We searched

  3. Influence of route of administration/drug formulation and other factors on adherence to treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (pain related) and dyslipidemia (non-pain related).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautrel, Bruno; Balsa, Alejandro; Van Riel, Piet; Casillas, Marta; Capron, Jean-Philippe; Cueille, Carine; de la Torre, Inmaculada

    2017-07-01

    A comprehensive review was performed to investigate the effect of route of administration on medication adherence and persistence in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to compare adherence/persistence with oral medications between RA and a non-painful disease (dyslipidemia). Comprehensive database searches were performed to identify studies investigating medication adherence and/or persistence in adults with RA receiving conventional synthetic or biologic agents. Similar searches were performed for studies of patients with dyslipidemia receiving statins. Studies had to be published after 1998 in English and involve ≥6 months' follow up. Adherence and persistence were compared between the different routes of drug administration in RA, and between the two diseases for oral medications. A total of 35 and 28 papers underwent data extraction for RA and dyslipidemia, respectively. Within the constraints of the analysis, adherence and persistence rates appeared broadly similar for the different routes of drug administration in RA. Adherence to oral medications was also broadly similar across the two diseases, but persistence was lower in dyslipidemia. Poor adherence has clinical consequences in both diseases: greater disease activity and risk of flare in RA, and increased serum cholesterol levels and risk of heart and cerebrovascular disease in dyslipidemia. Over 1-3 years, poor adherence to biologic RA medications led to increased resource use and medical costs but lower total direct costs due to reduced biologic drug costs. Conversely, poor adherence to dyslipidemia medications resulted in increased total direct costs. In both diseases, adherence improved with patient education/support. The route of drug administration and the symptomatic (pain) nature of the disease do not appear to be dominant factors for drug adherence or persistence in RA. The wide range of adherence and persistence values and definitions across studies made comparisons between drug formulations and

  4. The Effect on Treatment Adherence of Administering Drugs as Fixed-Dose Combinations versus as Separate Pills: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Galen, Katy A; Nellen, Jeannine F; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2014-01-01

    Administering drugs as fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) versus the same active drugs administered as separate pills is assumed to enhance treatment adherence. We synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the effect of FDCs versus separate pills on adherence. We searched PubMed for RCTs comparing a FDC with the same active drugs administered as separate pills, including a quantitative estimate of treatment adherence, without restriction to medical condition. The odds ratio (OR) of optimal adherence with FDCs versus separate pills was used as common effect size and aggregated into a pooled effect estimate using a random effect model with inverse variance weights. Out of 1258 articles screened, only six studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Across medical conditions, administering drugs as FDC significantly increased the likelihood of optimal adherence (OR 1.33 (95% CI, 1.03-1.71)). Within subgroups of specific medical conditions, the favourable effect of FDCs on adherence was of borderline statistical significance for HIV infection only (OR 1.46 (95% CI, 1.00-2.13)). We observed a remarkable paucity of RCTs comparing the effect on adherence of administering drugs as FDC versus as separate pills. Administering drugs as FDC improved medication adherence. However, this conclusion is based on a limited number of RCTs only.

  5. Palatability, adherence and prescribing patterns of antiretroviral drugs for children with human immunodeficiency virus infection in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Daren; Seabrook, Jamie A; Matsui, Doreen M; King, Susan M; Rieder, Michael J; Finkelstein, Yaron

    2011-12-01

    To assess the impact of perceived palatability of antiretroviral drugs on adherence to therapy of children infected by human immunodeficiency virus and on prescribing patterns by their caring physicians. Two arms--retrospective chart review and a cross-sectional survey. Tertiary-care pediatric human immunodeficiency virus clinic during a 17-year period. Children with human immunodeficiency virus infection and physicians actively caring for children with human immunodeficiency virus infection in seven provinces in Canada were surveyed regarding their perception of the palatability of 8-liquid and 15 non-liquid antiretroviral medications and its effect on drug selection. Effect of taste preferences of antiretroviral drugs on adherence to treatment by infected children and on drug selection by their caring physicians. Forty of 119 children (34%) refused at least once to an antiretroviral medication. In 5%, treatment was discontinued because of poor palatability. Ritonavir was the least palatable drug (50% of children; p = 0.01). Ritonavir use (OR 4.80 [95%CI 1.34-17.20]) and male gender (OR 7.25 [95%CI 2.30-22.90]) were independent predictors of drug discontinuation because of poor taste. Physicians also perceived liquid ritonavir as the least palatable (p = 0.01) and the most likely to be discontinued (p = 0.01). However, they commonly prescribed it as first-line therapy (p = 0.06). A third of children infected with human immunodeficiency virus fail to adhere to their treatment because of poor drug taste. Physicians are aware of that, but this does not prevent them from selecting the least palatable drugs as first-line therapy. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effect of an Empowerment Intervention on Antiretroviral Drug Adherence in Thai Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihin, Ratchaneekorn; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Chitreechuer, Jittaporn; Grimes, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to determine effects of an empowerment intervention on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among Thai youth living with HIV/AIDS. It compared two groups of 23 young persons (15-24 years) who receive ART from AIDS clinics at two community hospitals. One hospital's patients served as the experimental group, and the other as a control group. The experimental groups attended five sessions that empowered them to take control of their own health. The control group received the standard of care. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square statistics. Before the empowerment, no one from the experimental group or the control group had ART adherence ≥ 95%. After the intervention, the 82.6% of the experimental group had ≥ 95% adherence compared to the control group, which had 21.7% adherence (p < .0001). The empowerment intervention resulted in a significant increase in ART adherence among Thai youth.

  7. Impact of use of alcohol and illicit drugs by AIDS patients on adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Celia; Dourado, Maria De Lourdes; Santos, Marcio P; Brites, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Use of alcohol and illicit drugs is a common finding among HIV-infected individuals, but there are many open questions about its impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy and virological outcomes. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact of the use of alcohol and illicit drugs on the adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among patients starting ART in Salvador, Brazil. We followed up 144 AIDS patients initiating ART for a 6-month period. At baseline, they were interviewed about demographics, behavior, and use of illicit drugs and alcohol. All of them had HIV-1 RNA plasma viral load and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cells count measured before starting therapy. After 60 days of treatment they were asked to answer a new questionnaire on adherence to ART. All patients were monitored during the following months, and new CD4(+) cell count/HIV-1 RNA plasma viral load determinations were performed after 6 months of therapy. Optimal adherence to therapy was defined by self-reported questionnaire, by 95% use of prescribed drug doses, and by using plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load as a biological marker. A total of 61 (42.4%) patients reported alcohol use, 7 (4.9%) used illicit drugs, and 17 (11.8%) used both alcohol and illicit drugs. Being in a steady relationship was protective to nonadherence (95% CI: 0.18-0.84). Missing more than two medical visits was also associated with a 68% higher likelihood of nonadherence (95% CI: 0.10-1.02). After logistic regression we detected a higher risk of nonadherence for patients declaring use of alcohol plus illicit drugs (odds ratio=6.0; 95% CI: 1.78-20.28) or high-intensity use of alcohol (odds ratio=3.29; 95% CI: 1.83-5.92). AIDS patients using alcohol and/or illicit drugs are socially vulnerable, and need specific and flexible programs, combining mental health care, harm reduction strategies, and assisted drug therapy to maximize the chances of successful use of ART.

  8. Employment-based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone in Unemployed Injection Drug Users: 12-month Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Oral naltrexone could be a promising relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for recently detoxified opioid-dependent patients, however interventions are often needed to promote adherence with this treatment approach. We recently conducted a study to evaluate a 26-week employment-based reinforcement intervention of oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users (Dunn et al., 2013). Participants were randomly assigned into a Contingency (n=35) group required to ingest naltrexone under staff obs...

  9. Effects of interactive patient smartphone support app on drug adherence and lifestyle changes in myocardial infarction patients: A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Nina; Bodegard, Johan; Jerström, Susanna; Åkesson, Johanna; Brorsson, Hilja; Alfredsson, Joakim; Albertsson, Per A; Karlsson, Jan-Erik; Varenhorst, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Patients with myocardial infarction (MI) seldom reach recommended targets for secondary prevention. This study evaluated a smartphone application ("app") aimed at improving treatment adherence and cardiovascular lifestyle in MI patients. Multicenter, randomized trial. A total of 174 ticagrelor-treated MI patients were randomized to either an interactive patient support tool (active group) or a simplified tool (control group) in addition to usual post-MI care. Primary end point was a composite nonadherence score measuring patient-registered ticagrelor adherence, defined as a combination of adherence failure events (2 missed doses registered in 7-day cycles) and treatment gaps (4 consecutive missed doses). Secondary end points included change in cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life (European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions), and patient device satisfaction (System Usability Scale). Patient mean age was 58 years, 81% were men, and 21% were current smokers. At 6 months, greater patient-registered drug adherence was achieved in the active vs the control group (nonadherence score: 16.6 vs 22.8 [P = .025]). Numerically, the active group was associated with higher degree of smoking cessation, increased physical activity, and change in quality of life; however, this did not reach statistical significance. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the active vs the control group (system usability score: 87.3 vs 78.1 [P = .001]). In MI patients, use of an interactive patient support tool improved patient self-reported drug adherence and may be associated with a trend toward improved cardiovascular lifestyle changes and quality of life. Use of a disease-specific interactive patient support tool may be an appreciated, simple, and promising complement to standard secondary prevention. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adherence and Depression (CBT-AD) in HIV-Infected Injection Drug Users: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safren, Steven A.; O'Cleirigh, Conall M.; Bullis, Jacqueline R.; Otto, Michael W.; Stein, Michael D.; Pollack, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Depression and substance use, the most common comorbidities with HIV, are both associated with poor treatment adherence. Injection drug users comprise a substantial portion of individuals with HIV in the United States and globally. The present study tested cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) in patients…

  11. Influence of drug concentration on the diffusion parameters of caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, R.Ben; Lafforgue, C.; Fenina, N.; Marty, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In the fields of the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries and in toxicology, the study of the skin penetration of molecules is very interesting. Various studies have considered the impact of different physicochemical drug characteristics, skin thickness, and formulations, on the transition from the surface of the skin to the underlying tissues or to the systemic circulation; however, the influence of drug concentration on the permeation flux of molecules has rarely been raised. Our study aims to discover the influence of caffeine concentration in a formulation on the percutaneous penetration from gels, as a result of different dose applications to polysulfate membrane and human skin. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, three identical base gels were used at 1, 3, and 5% of caffeine, to evaluate the effect of the concentration of caffeine on in vitro release through the synthetic membrane and ex vivo permeation through the human skin, using diffusion FranzTM cells. Results: The diffusion through the epidermal tissue was significantly slower than through the synthetic membrane, which recorded an increase of flux with an increase in the concentration of caffeine. The skin permeation study showed that diffusion depended not only on the concentration, but also on the deposited amount of gel. Nevertheless, for the same amount of caffeine applied, the flux was more significant from the less concentrated gel. Conclusion: Among all the different concentrations of caffeine examined, 1% gel of caffeine applied at 5 mg / cm2 showed the highest absorption characteristics across human skin. PMID:21572649

  12. Impact of health education on drug adherence and self-care in people with epilepsy with low education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Sebastian, Teenu Mary; Aggarwal, Meena; Tripathi, Manjari

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to observe the effect of a structured educational program on drug adherence and self-care management in people with epilepsy in a developing country. A total of 180 consecutive people with epilepsy were enrolled from the epilepsy clinic of a tertiary care hospital in North India. Out of these, 90 were randomized to the epilepsy health education group and received the educational program and 90 were in the control group and received the standard of care but did not receive any structured educational program. The modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) and Epilepsy Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) were administered to assess drug adherence and self-care, respectively, on the day of enrollment. The patients enrolled in the epilepsy health education group received 4 sessions of the structured educational program. The MMAS and ESES questionnaires were again administered to both groups after 6months. Continuous and categorical variables were compared between control and epilepsy health education groups using a chi-square test, with p value less than 0.05 considered significant. A comparison between pretest and posttest MMAS scores and ESES scores was done using a paired t-test. In the epilepsy health education group, the pretest mean MMAS score was 6.58 whereas the posttest mean MMAS score was 7.53; the difference was significant (p=0.001). The mean MMAS scores for the control group's pretest and posttest were 6.46 and 6.58, respectively, which were not significantly different (p=0.224). On comparing the ESES scores at the beginning of the study and after 6months, there was no significant change in both groups. The present study proves the efficacy of a structured educational program in improving drug adherence in a cohort of people with epilepsy with low educational background. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychosocial factors and adherence to drug treatment in patients on chronic haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Vieco, María P; Pérez-García, Rafael; Albalate, Marta; de Sequera, Patricia; Ortega, Mayra; Puerta, Marta; Corchete, Elena; Alcázar, Roberto

    2014-11-17

    The daily pill burden in hemodialysis patients is one of the highest reported to date in any chronic disease. The adherence to prescribed treatment has implications on the quality of life, the survival of patients, and the economic cost of their treatment, this being a priority public health issue. To evaluate the adherence to pharmacological treatment examining, among the possible causes of non-adherence, psychosocial factors such as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment and social support. Transversal-observational study of thirty five patients that suffer from chronic renal disease and who are on manteinance hemodialysis, evaluated by self-reported measures. Non-adherent patients have significant higher depression index than adherent patients. Anxiety, cognitive impairment and social support do not show a significant relation with the degree of adherence or compliance with farmacological treatment. These results suggest that psychological intervention in chronic haemodialysis patients with a severe depression index could increase the degree of fulfillment and general well-being of renal patients.

  14. Radioenzymatic assay for measurement of tissue concentrations of histamine: adaptation to correct for adherence of histamine to mechanical homogenizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.K.; Frey, M.J.; Reed, B.R.; Leff, A.R.; Shields, R.; Gold, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    Because adherence of histamine to glass is well-known, we tested for its adherence to a mechanical homogenizer commonly used in the extraction of histamine from tissue samples. During 60 sec of homogenization, 15% to 17% of the histamine originally present in the samples ''disappeared,'' and the reason for the disappearance was reversible binding of histamine to the homogenizer. Adding trace amounts of [ 14 C]histamine to each sample before homogenization and measuring the disappearance of radioactivity during homogenization permitted correction for binding to the homogenizer. This technique for correction was validated by the measurement of endogenous concentrations of histamine in the tracheal posterior membranes of six dogs (range of mean concentrations: 0.63 to 1.51 ng/mg wet weight) followed by the measurement of known amounts of exogenous histamine added before homogenization to tracheal tissue samples from the same dogs. In the latter samples, 96 +/- 13% (mean +/- SEM) of the histamine added was measured by our technique. We conclude that binding of histamine to mechanical homogenizers may be an important cause of inaccuracy of the enzymatic assay for the measurement of histamine concentrations in tissue but that such binding may but that such binding may be easily corrected for

  15. Determinants of adherence to antiretroviral drugs among people living with HIV/AIDS in the Ife-Ijesa zone of Osun state, Nigeria

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    Muhammed O. Afolabi

    2009-04-01

    Method: 120 subjects who received ARV drugs at a federal government-designated ART site located within the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital complex, (OAUTHC, Ile-Ife, and a community-based non-governmental organisation, Living Hope Care (LIHOC, Ilesa, from February to May 2006 were serially recruited and studied. Relevant data were collected using an interviewer-administered, patient medication adherence questionnaire. Focus group discussions were also held among the subjects to further elicit qualitative information on factors influencing adherence to ART. Results: The age of participants ranged from 21 to 65 years with a mean age of 40.2 + 10.3 years. Participants had been on ARV drugs for a period ranging between three and 60 months. The overall adherence rate in the study population was 44%. 66% of participants who accessed ARV drugs from LIHOC, Ilesa, had good adherence while only 14% of participants who accessed ARV drugs from OAUTHC, Ile-Ife, had good adherence. Participants with good adherence did not pay funds for the preliminary ARV eligibility investigations and they were also offered regular adherence counselling. These facilities were barely available in the group with poor adherence. Demographic factors such as age, gender and marital status did not seem to have any significant association with adherence level (p > 0.05. Conclusion: The level of adherence was high in a cohort of PLWHA accessing ARV drugs in Ilesa while it was low among PLWHA receiving ART in Ife. The most important reasons for this difference were lack of funds for investigations and poor psycho-social counselling.

  16. Adherence to anti-Parkinson drug therapy in the "REASON" sample of Italian patients with Parkinson's disease: the linguistic validation of the Italian version of the "Morisky Medical Adherence Scale-8 items".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbrini, G; Abbruzzese, G; Barone, P; Antonini, A; Tinazzi, M; Castegnaro, G; Rizzoli, S; Morisky, D E; Lessi, P; Ceravolo, R

    2013-11-01

    Information about patients' adherence to therapy represents a primary issue in Parkinson's disease (PD) management. To perform the linguistic validation of the Italian version of the self-rated 8-Item Morisky Medical Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and to describe in a sample of Italian patients affected by PD the adherence to anti-Parkinson drug therapy and the association between adherence and some socio-demographic and clinical features. MMAS-8 was translated into Italian language by two independent Italian mother-tongue translators. The consensus version was then back-translated by an English mother-tongue translator. This translation process was followed by a consensus meeting between the authors of translation and investigators and then by two comprehension tests. The translated version of the MMAS-8 scale was then administered at the baseline visit of the "REASON" study (Italian Study on the Therapy Management in Parkinson's disease: Motor, Non-Motor, Adherence and Quality Of Life Factors) in a large sample of PD patients. The final version of the MMAS-8 was easily understood. Mean ± SD MMAS-8 score was 6.1 ± 1.2. There were no differences in adherence to therapy in relationship to disease severity, gender, educational level or decision to change therapy. The Italian version of MMAS-8, the key tool of the REASON study to assess the adherence to therapy, has shown to be understandable to patients with PD. Patients enrolled in the REASON study showed medium therapy adherence.

  17. The impact of renal protection clinics on prescription of and adherence to cardioprotective drug therapy in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeytre, Fanny; Cardinal, Héloise; Fradette, Lorraine; Verhave, Jacobien; Dorais, Marc; LeLorier, Jacques; Pichette, Vincent; Madore, François

    2017-06-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of follow-up in renal protection clinics on the prescription of and adherence to cardioprotective drugs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: We studied stage 4 and 5 CKD patients who initiated follow-up in three renal protection clinics. The prescription pattern of antihypertensive agents (AHA) and lipid-lowering agents (LLAs) was measured as the percentage of patients who are prescribed the agents of interest at a given time. Adherence to drug therapy was defined as the percentage of days, during a pre-defined observation period, in which patients have an on-hand supply of their prescribed medications. Results: A total of 259 CKD patients were enrolled and followed for up to 1 year after referral to renal protection clinics. There was a significant increase in the prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (34-39%), angiotensin II receptor blockers (11-14%), beta-blockers (40-51%), calcium channel blockers (62-74%), diuretics (66-78%) and LLAs (39-47%) during follow-up in the renal protection clinic compared with baseline (P-values protection clinics. Conclusion: Our results suggest that referral and follow-up in a renal protection clinic may increase the prescription of cardioprotective agents in CKD patients, but does not appear to improve adherence to these medications.

  18. Serum magnesium concentration in drug-addicted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakiewicz, Beata; Kozielec, Tadeusz; Brodowski, Jacek; Chlubek, Dariusz; Noceń, Iwona; Starczewski, Andrzej; Brodowska, Agnieszka; Laszczyńska, Maria

    2007-03-01

    Drug addiction is a complex problem which leads to many somatic, psychic and social diseases. It is accompanied by the disturbed metabolism of various macro and micronutrients. The aim of this study was to assess serum magnesium concentration in drug-addicted patients and analyze whether Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and methadone treatment affect the level of serum magnesium in these patients. The examination was conducted in a group of 83 people - patients of Szczecin-Zdroje Psychiatric Hospital (Poland). They were 21 to 49 years old, and the mean age was 32 +/- 7 years. The control group consisted of 81 healthy individuals. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry method was used to determine the magnesium concentration. The total serum magnesium concentration was calculated for the whole patient group, subgroups of women and men, a subgroup of people infected with HIV, and a subgroup receiving methadone substitution treatment. How magnesium behaves depending on age and addiction period, was checked. The mean concentration of magnesium in blood serum of the patients examined was 0.57 mmol/L, which was significantly lower than in the control group. In the subgroup of men it was 0.57 mmol/L, and in the subgroup of women - 0.55 mmol/L; the differences were not statistically significant. In the patient group nobody had the appropriate magnesium concentration in blood serum. No significant correlation was found between the magnesium concentration, age of the patients and addiction period. In the subgroup of seropositive people the mean concentration of magnesium was 0.55 mmol/L, and in the subgroup of non-infected patients - 0.58 mmol/L; the difference was not statistically significant. The mean concentration of magnesium in the subgroup treated with methadone was 0.59 mmol/L, and in the subgroup not involved in this type of therapy - 0.55 mmol/L; it was not a statistically significant difference.

  19. Particle size distributions, size concentration relationships, and adherence to hands of selected geologic media derived from mining, smelting, and quarrying activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstrom, Carolyn; Shirai, Jeffry; Kissel, John, E-mail: jkissel@uw.edu

    2011-09-15

    Hand-to-mouth activity, especially in children, is a potentially significant pathway of exposure to soil contaminants. Hand-mouthing behavior is of particular concern in areas impacted by mining, smelting, and quarrying activities as these activities may lead to elevated levels of heavy metals in soil. In order to estimate potential exposures to contaminated geologic media attributable to hand-to-mouth contact, it is useful to characterize adherence of those media to skin, as contaminant concentrations in adhered media may differ greatly from unfractionated, whole media concentrations. Such an investigation has been undertaken to aid estimation of exposures to arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc in nine different geologic media collected in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. After establishing the particle size distribution of each medium (fractions < 63 {mu}m, 63-150 {mu}m, 150-250 {mu}m, and 250 {mu}m-2 mm were determined) and target elemental concentrations within each particle size fraction, an active handling protocol involving six volunteers was conducted. Wet media always adhered to a greater extent than dry media and adhered media generally had higher elemental concentrations than bulk media. Regression analyses suggest smaller particle fractions may have higher elemental concentrations. Results of application of a maximum likelihood estimation technique generally indicate that handling of dry media leads to preferential adherence of smaller particle sizes, while handling of wet media does not. Because adhered material can differ greatly in particle size distribution from that found in bulk material, use of bulk concentrations in exposure calculations may lead to poor estimation of actual exposures. Since lead has historically been a metal of particular concern, EPA's Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) Model was used to examine the potential consequences of evaluating ingestion of the selected media assuming concentrations in

  20. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations are critical for fibrin glue adherence in rat high-risk colon anastomoses

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    Eliseo Portilla-de Buen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Fibrin glues have not been consistently successful in preventing the dehiscence of high-risk colonic anastomoses. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in glues determine their ability to function as sealants, healers, and/or adhesives. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin on bursting pressure, leaks, dehiscence, and morphology of high-risk ischemic colonic anastomoses using fibrin glue in rats. METHODS: Colonic anastomoses in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 250-350 g treated with fibrin glue containing different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin were evaluated at post-operative day 5. The interventions were low-risk (normal or high-risk (ischemic end-to-end colonic anastomoses using polypropylene sutures and topical application of fibrinogen at high (120 mg/mL or low (40 mg/mL concentrations and thrombin at high (1000 IU/mL or low (500 IU/mL concentrations. RESULTS: Ischemia alone, anastomosis alone, or both together reduced the bursting pressure. Glues containing a low fibrinogen concentration improved this parameter in all cases. High thrombin in combination with low fibrinogen also improved adherence exclusively in low-risk anastomoses. No differences were detected with respect to macroscopic parameters, histopathology, or hydroxyproline content at 5 days post-anastomosis. CONCLUSIONS: Fibrin glue with a low fibrinogen content normalizes the bursting pressure of high-risk ischemic left-colon anastomoses in rats at day 5 after surgery.

  1. Identification of patients at risk of non-adherence to oral antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis using the Compliance Questionnaire in Rheumatology: an ARCO sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Carlos; Monteagudo, Indalecio; Salvador, Georgina; de Toro, Francisco J; Escudero, Alejandro; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Raya, Enrique; Ortiz, Ana; Carmona, Loreto; Mestre, Yvonne; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Calvo-Alén, Jaime

    2017-07-01

    The ARCO study (Study on Adherence of Rheumatoid Arthritis patients to SubCutaneous and Oral Drugs), a multicenter, non-interventional retrospective study, was primarily designed to assess the percentage of patients [aged ≥18 years with an established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) diagnosis] with non-adherence to prescribed subcutaneous biologicals. This paper reports data for the secondary objective from a subset of patients, namely to evaluate non-adherence to prescribed oral antirheumatic drugs in RA patients in Spain using the validated Compliance Questionnaire Rheumatology (CQR). Patients also completed the Morisky-Green Medication Adherence Questionnaire, Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire, and a questionnaire (developed and validated in Spain) on patient satisfaction with RA treatment and preferences. A total of 271 patients (76.7% females; mean age 55.6 years) were being treated with oral drugs for RA, of which 234 completed the CQR questionnaire. Non-adherence was reported in 49/234 (20.9%) patients. The proportion of non-adherence in younger patients (aged ≤48 years; 37.5%) was double that recorded in patients aged >48 years (p = 0.006). Patients with a perception of lower efficacy also had a higher risk of non-adherence (p = 0.012). Multivariable analysis showed that younger age and male gender were independently associated with risk of non-adherence. There was only slight agreement between the CQR and Morisky-Green assessment tools (kappa coefficient = 0.186), possibly reflecting the fact that both questionnaires measure slightly different aspects of medication adherence. In conclusion, one out of five RA patients was identified as at risk for non-adherence with the CQR, and this was more frequent in younger patients and in males.

  2. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users: 12-month outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Oral naltrexone could be a promising relapse-prevention pharmacotherapy for recently detoxified opioid-dependent patients; however, interventions are often needed to promote adherence with this treatment approach. We recently conducted a study to evaluate a 26-week employment-based reinforcement intervention of oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users (Dunn et al., 2013). Participants were randomly assigned into a contingency (n = 35) group required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain entry into a therapeutic workplace or a prescription (n = 32) group given a take-home supply of oral naltrexone and access to the workplace without observed ingestion. Monthly urine samples were collected and analyzed for evidence for naltrexone adherence, opioid use, and cocaine use. As previously reported, contingency participants provided significantly more naltrexone-positive urine samples than prescription participants during the 26-week intervention period. The goal of this current study is to report the 12-month outcomes, which occurred 6 months after the intervention ended. Results at the 12-month visit showed no between-groups differences in naltrexone-positive, opioid-negative, or cocaine-negative urine samples and no participant self-reported using naltrexone at the follow-up visit. These results show that even after a period of successfully reinforced oral naltrexone adherence, longer-term naltrexone use is unlikely to be maintained after reinforcement contingencies are discontinued. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. To give or not to give: Parental experience and adherence to the Food and Drug Administration warning about over-the-counter cough and cold medicine usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Miron-Shatz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Food and Drug Administration (FDA warned against administering over-the-counter cough and cold medicines to children under 2. This study evaluated whether experienced parents show poorer adherence to the FDA warning, as safe experiences are predicted to reduce the impact of warnings, and how adherence can be improved. Participants included 218 American parents (mean age: 29.98 (SD = 6.16, 82.9% female with children age 2 or less who were aware of the FDA warning. We compared adherence among experienced (N=142; with other children > age 2 and inexperienced parents (N=76; only children 2 or yess. We also evaluated potential moderating variables (amount of warning-related information received, prevalence of side effects, trust in the FDA, frequency of coughs and colds, trust in drug packaging and quantified the impact of amount of information. Logistic regression assessed the ability of experience alone, and experience combined with amount of information, to predict adherence. 53.3% of inexperienced but 28.4\\% of experienced parents were adherent (p = 0.0003. The groups did not differ on potential moderating variables. Adherence was 39.5% among experienced parents receiving ``a lot of information'', but 15.4% for those receiving less (p = 0.002; amount of information did not affect adherence in inexperienced parents (p = 0.22 but uniquely predicted adherence compared to a model with experience alone (p = 0.0005. Experienced parents were also less likely to mistrust drug packaging (p = 0.03. Targeting FDA information to experienced parents, particularly via drug packaging, may improve their adherence.

  4. Self-Reported Adverse Drug Reactions, Medication Adherence, and Clinical Outcomes among Major Depressive Disorder Patients in Ethiopia: A Prospective Hospital Based Study

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    Tadesse Melaku Abegaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is paucity of data on prevalence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs and adherence and clinical outcomes of antidepressants. The present study determined the magnitude of ADRs of antidepressants and their impact on the level of adherence and clinical outcome. Methods. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted among depression patients from September 2016 to January 2017 at Gondar University Hospital psychiatry clinic. The Naranjo ADR probability scale was employed to assess the ADRs. The rate of medication adherence was determined using Morisky Medication Adherence Measurement Scale-Eight. Results. Two hundred seventeen patients participated in the study, more than half of them being males (122; 56.2%. More than one-half of the subjects had low adherence to their medications (124; 57.1% and about 186 (85.7% of the patients encountered ADR. The most common ADR was weight gain (29; 13.2%. More than one-half (125; 57.6% of the respondents showed improved clinical outcome. Optimal level of medication adherence decreased the likelihood of poor clinical outcome by 56.8%. Conclusion. ADRs were more prevalent. However, adherence to medications was very poor in the setup. Long duration of depression negatively affects the rate of adherence. In addition, adherence was found to influence the clinical outcome of depression patients.

  5. Generic substitution of antidiabetic drugs in the elderly does not affect adherence

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    Francesco Trotta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The possibility that variation in packaging and pill appearance may reduce adherence is a reason for concern, especially for chronic diseases. The objectives of the study were to quantify the extent of switches between generic antidiabetics and to verify whether switching between different products of the same substance affects adherence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All elderly residents of the Umbria Region who received at least 2 prescriptions of antidiabetics in 2010 and 2011 were included in the study. Switching was defined as the dispensing of two different products of the same substance in a series of two prescriptions. Single and multiple switchers were identified according to the number of switches during 2011. Switching relevant to the three off-patent substances with generic use ≥ 5% (metformin, gliclazide and repaglinide was quantified. The effect of switching on adherence, defined as the proportion of days in 2011 covered by prescriptions (Medication Possession Ratio, MPR, was estimated. RESULTS: Among the 15 964 patients receiving antidiabetics (14.4% of the elderly population 9211 were prescribed at least one of the generic substances. Of these patients, 23.3% experienced a single switch and 15.7% were multiple switchers (61.0% never switched. The proportion of multiple switchers increased with the number of prescriptions, reaching 26% among patients with ≥ 11 prescriptions. MPR was 62%, 62% and 72%, respectively among non-switchers, single and multiple switchers. CONCLUSIONS: In elderly patients treated with antidiabetics, the substitution between branded and unbranded products (as well as between generics of the same substance, did not negatively affect adherence.

  6. User profiles of a smartphone application to support drug adherence--experiences from the iNephro project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Becker

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: One of the key problems in the drug therapy of patients with chronic conditions is drug adherence. In 2010 the initiative iNephro was launched (www.inephro.de. A software to support regular and correct drug intake was developed for a smartphone platform (iOS. The study investigated whether and how smartphone users deployed such an application. METHODS: Together with cooperating partners the mobile application "Medikamentenplan" ("Medication Plan" was developed. Users are able to keep and alter a list of their regular medication. A memory function supports regular intake. The application can be downloaded free of charge from the App Store™ by Apple™. After individual consent of users from December 2010 to April 2012 2042338 actions were recorded and analysed from the downloaded applications. Demographic data were collected from 2279 users with a questionnaire. RESULTS: Overall the application was used by 11688 smartphone users. 29% (3406/11688 used it at least once a week for at least four weeks. 27% (3209/11688 used the application for at least 84 days. 68% (1554/2279 of users surveyed were male, the stated age of all users was between 6-87 years (mean 44. 74% of individuals (1697 declared to be suffering from cardiovascular disease, 13% (292 had a previous history of transplantation, 9% (205 were suffering from cancer, 7% (168 reported an impaired renal function and 7% (161 suffered from diabetes mellitus. 69% (1568 of users were on <6 different medications, 9% (201 on 6 - 10 and 1% (26 on more than 10. CONCLUSION: A new smartphone application, which supports drug adherence, was used regularly by chronically ill users with a wide range of diseases over a longer period of time. The majority of users so far were middle-aged and male.

  7. Is physician adherence to prescription guidelines a general trait of health care practices or dependent on drug type?--a multilevel logistic regression analysis in South Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Merlo, Juan

    2009-08-01

    Therapeutic traditions at health care practices (HCPs) influence physicians' adherence to prescription guidelines for specific drugs, however, it is not known if such traditions affect all kinds of prescriptions or only specific types of drug. Our goal was to determine whether adherence to prescription guidelines is a common trait of HCPs or dependent on drug type. We fitted separate multi-level logistic regression models to all patients in the Skåne region who received a prescription for a statin drug (ATC: C10AA, n = 6232), an agent acting on the renin-angiotensin system (ATC: C09, n = 7222) or a proton pump inhibitor (ATC: A02BC, n = 11 563) at 198 HCPs from July 2006 to December 2006. There was a high clustering of adherence to prescription guidelines at HCPs for the different drug types (MOR(agents acting on the renin-angiotensin system) = 4.72 [95% CI: 3.90-5.92], MOR(Statins) = 2.71 [95% CI: 2.23-3.39] and MOR(Proton pump inhibitors) = 2.16 [95% CI: 1.95-2.45]). Compared with HCPs with low adherence to guidelines in two drug types, those HCPs with the highest level of adherence for these two drug types also showed a higher probability of adherence for the third drug type. Physicians' decisions to follow prescription guidelines seem to be influenced by therapeutic traditions at the HCP. Moreover, these therapeutic traditions seem to affect all kinds of prescriptions. This information can be used as basis for interventions to support rational and cost-effective medication use. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. An evaluation of adherence in patients with multiple sclerosis newly initiating treatment with a self-injectable or an oral disease-modifying drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munsell M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Munsell,1 Molly Frean,1 Joseph Menzin,1 Amy L Phillips2 1Boston Health Economics, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA; 2Health Economics & Outcomes Research, EMD Serono Inc., Rockland, MA, USA Objective: As the multiple sclerosis (MS disease-modifying drug (DMD treatment options have expanded to include oral therapies, it is important to understand whether route of administration is associated with DMD adherence. The objective of this study was to compare adherence to DMDs in patients with MS newly initiating treatment with a self-injectable versus an oral DMD. Methods: This retrospective database study used IMS Health Real World Data Adjudicated Claims – US data between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2014. Adherence was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR, calculated as the total number of treated days divided by the total number of days from the first treated day until the end of 12-month follow-up. A binary measure representing adherence (MPR ≥0.8 versus nonadherence (MPR <0.8 to therapy was used. Logistic regression evaluated the likelihood of adherence to index DMD type (self-injectable vs oral. Covariates included patient baseline characteristics (ie, age, sex, comorbidities and index DMD type. Results: The analysis included 7,207 self-injectable and 1,175 oral DMD-treated patients with MS. In unadjusted analyses, the proportion of patients adherent to therapy (MPR ≥0.8 did not differ significantly between the self-injectable (54.1% and the oral DMD cohorts (53.0%; P=0.5075. After controlling for covariates, index DMD type was not a significant predictor of adherence (odds ratio [OR] 1.062; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.937–1.202; P=0.3473. Higher likelihood of adherence was associated with male sex (OR 1.20; 95% CI: 1.085–1.335; P=0.0005 and age groups older than 18–34 years (ORs 1.220–1.331; P<0.01. Depression was associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (OR 0.618; 95% CI: 0.511–0.747; P<0.0001. Conclusion: Male

  9. Better adherence to antithyroid drug is associated with decreased risk of stroke in hyperthyroidism patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, M-S; Chuang, P-Y; Huang, C-H; Shih, S-R; Chang, W-T; Chen, N-C; Yu, P-H; Cheng, H-J; Tang, C-H; Chen, W-J

    2015-12-01

    An increased risk for ischaemic stroke has been reported in young hyperthyroidism patients independent of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, whether the use of antithyroid drugs in hyperthyroidism patients can reduce the occurrence of ischaemic stroke remains unclear. A total of 36,510 newly diagnosed hyperthyroidism patients during 2003-2006 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research database. Each patient was individually tracked for 5 years from their index date (beginning the antithyroid drugs) to identify those who suffered from new episode of ischaemic stroke. Medication possession ratio (MPR) was used to represent the antithyroid drug compliance. The association between the MPR and the risk of stroke was examined. The stroke incidence rates for hyperthyroidism patients with age hyperthyroidism patients without AF, good antithyroid drugs compliance also reduced the incidence of stroke significantly (adjusted HR, range: 1.52-1.61; p = 0.02); but not in hyperthyroidism with AF. Hyperthyroidism patients with good antithyroid drug compliance had a lower risk of ischaemic stroke than patients with poor compliance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Assessment of adherence to drug and non-drug treatments and its changes under the influence of an education program in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Orlova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess awareness of drug and non-drug treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA and compliance in patients before and after their participation in an education program, as well as the survival of the knowledge and the need for retraining. Subjects and methods. The study included 43 patients with RA: 23 study group patients were trained according to an education program (Rheumatoid Arthritis Health School, 20 patients formed a control group. The education program consisted of 4 daily 90-min studies. Adherence to drug and non-drug treatments was assessed at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Results. In the study group, the basic therapy remained stably high (about 100% within 6 months. At 3 months after studies, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs could be discontinued in 23.8% (p < 0.05. After 6 months, the proportion of patients using laser therapy increased by 57.1% (p < 0.01 and accounted for 47.8%; the use of electric and ultrasound treatments showed a 55.6% increase (p < 0.01 and was 60.9%. The number of patients who were compliant to the procedures for shaping a correct functional stereotype increased by 14 and 10 times following 3 and 6 months (60.9% and 43.5%, respectively; p < 0.01. After 3 months, there was a rise in the number of patients using hand ortheses by 75.0% (30.4%; p < 0.01; knee ortheses by 50.0% (39.1%; p < 0.01; individual inner soles by 71.4% (52.2%; p < 0.01; and walking sticks and crutches by 60.0% (34.8%; p < 0.01. Following 6 months, the positive changes remained only after the relative use of inner soles (60.9% and support means (34.8%; p < 0.05. The number of patients who regularly did physical activity increased by 5.3 (69.6%; р < 0.01 and 3.7 (47.8%; p < 0.01 times at 3 and 6 months, respectively. The trend in the control group was less pronounced, determining statistically significant differences between the groups in most indicators (р < 0.05. Conclusion. The education program retains high

  11. Adherence to anti-retroviral drugs in pregnant and lactating HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anti-retroviral drugs reduce morbidity and mortality due to HIV and prevent transmission from mother to child. But compliance on anti-retroviral treatment is an essential element for the success of therapeutic goals. Objective: To assess the level of compliance of anti-retroviral treatment in pregnant and lactating ...

  12. Long-term adherence to antimuscarinic drugs when treating overactive bladder in the older: Subjective reason and objective factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Vladimirovich Kosilov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Comparison of subjective reasons for the refusal of antimuscarinic treatment and the state of objective economic, social, psychological and health status markers in the elderly with overactive bladder. Materials and Methods: One thousand seven hundred thirty-six (1,736 patients participated in the experiment: 1,036 or 59.7% of women, and 700 or 40.3% of men aged over 60 years (average age, 68.1 years who took antimuscarinic (AM drugs during the year. The control of objective parameters was carried out by studying patients’ medical records, the use of overactive bladder questionnaire short form and Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Shor-Form Health Survey, voiding diaries, uroflowmetry, as well as income certificates from the Tax Inspectorate, support documentation for expenses on drugs. Results: Fifty-two point six percent (52.6% of patients preserved adherence to treatment during the first 6 months, 30.1% – during the follow-up period. The average time of reaching a 30-day break in the AM drugs administration was 174 days. In 36.5% of cases of the refusal of treatment, patients referred to medical reasons for the refusal, in 31.6% of cases disturbance was established in objective health status markers (differences were significant in 30% of the follow-up time. The percentage of refusals of treatment for social and psychological reasons (13.2% was significantly lower (p≤0.05, than the percentage of individuals with statuses altered objectively (21.9%. Conclusions: A significant share of elderly patients taking AM drugs when treating overactive bladder is inclined to overestimate the importance of health factors influencing their decisions and to underestimate the importance of social and psychological factors, and an urologist should take it into account for the efficacy evaluation.

  13. The 'wise list'- a comprehensive concept to select, communicate and achieve adherence to recommendations of essential drugs in ambulatory care in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lars L; Wettermark, Björn; Godman, Brian; Andersén-Karlsson, Eva; Bergman, Ulf; Hasselström, Jan; Hensjö, Lars-Olof; Hjemdahl, Paul; Jägre, Ingrid; Julander, Margaretha; Ringertz, Bo; Schmidt, Daniel; Sjöberg, Susan; Sjöqvist, Folke; Stiller, Carl-Olav; Törnqvist, Elisabeth; Tryselius, Rolf; Vitols, Sigurd; von Bahr, Christer

    2011-04-01

    The aim was to present and evaluate the impact of a comprehensive strategy over 10 years to select, communicate and achieve adherence to essential drug recommendations (EDR) in ambulatory care in a metropolitan healthcare region. EDRs were issued and launched as a 'Wise List' by the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee in Stockholm. This study presents the concept by: (i) documenting the process for selecting, communicating and monitoring the impact of the 'Wise List'; (ii) analysing the variation in the number of drug substances recommended between 2000 and 2010; (iii) assessing the attitudes to the 'Wise List' among prescribers and the public; (iv) evaluating the adherence to recommendations between 2003 and 2009. The 'Wise List' consistently contained 200 drug substances for treating common diseases. The drugs were selected based on their efficacy, safety, suitability and cost-effectiveness. The 'Wise List' was known among one-third of a surveyed sample of the public in 2002 after initial marketing campaigns. All surveyed prescribers knew about the concept and 81% found the recommendations trustworthy in 2005. Adherence to recommendations increased from 69% in 1999 to 77% in 2009. In primary care, adherence increased from 83% to 87% from 2003 to 2009. The coefficient of variation (CV%) decreased from 6.1% to 3.8% for 156 healthcare centres between these years. The acceptance of the 'Wise List' in terms of trust among physicians and among the public and increased adherence may be explained by clear criteria for drug recommendations, a comprehensive communication strategy, electronic access to recommendations, continuous medical education and involvement of professional networks and patients.

  14. Factors related to high and low levels of drug adherence according to patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, S.D.; Westerman, M.J.; Kok, I.L.; Meeuse, J.C.; de Vries, T.P.G.M.; Hugtenburg, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Adherence to medication in patients with type 2 diabetes varies widely, yet the factors that influence adherence according to patients are not fully known. The aim of this study is to explore both factors related to high and lower levels of adherence that patients with type 2 diabetes

  15. Adherence to drug label recommendations for avoiding drug interactions causing statin-induced myopathy--a nationwide register study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Settergren

    Full Text Available To investigate the extent to which clinicians avoid well-established drug-drug interactions that cause statin-induced myopathy. We hypothesised that clinicians would avoid combining erythromycin or verapamil/diltiazem respectively with atorvastatin or simvastatin. In patients with statin-fibrate combination therapy, we hypothesised that gemfibrozil was avoided to the preference of bezafibrate or fenofibrate. When combined with verapamil/diltiazem or fibrates, we hypothesized that the dispensed doses of atorvastatin/simvastatin would be decreased.Cross-sectional analysis of nationwide dispensing data. Odds ratios of interacting erythromycin, verapamil/diltiazem versus respective prevalence of comparator drugs doxycycline, amlodipine/felodipine in patients co-dispensed interacting statins simvastatin/atorvastatin versus patients unexposed (pravastatin/fluvastatin/rosuvastatin was calculated. For fibrates, OR of gemfibrozil versus fenofibrate/bezafibrate in patients co-dispensed any statin was assessed.OR of interacting erythromycin versus comparator doxycycline did not differ between patients on interacting and comparator statins either in patients dispensed high or low statin doses (adjusted OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.60-1.25 and 0.92; 95% CI 0.69-1.23. Interacting statins were less common among patients dispensed verapamil/diltiazem as compared to patients on amlodipine/felodipine (OR high dose 0.62; CI 0.56-0.68 and low dose 0.63; CI 0.58-0.68. Patients on any statin were to a lesser extent dispensed gemfibrozil compared to patients not dispensed a statin (OR high dose 0.65; CI 0.55-0.76 and low dose 0.70; CI 0.63-0.78. Mean DDD (SD for any statin was substantially higher in patients co-dispensed gemfibrozil 178 (149 compared to patients on statin monotherapy 127 (93, (p<0.001.Prescribers may to some extent avoid co-prescription of statins with calcium blockers and fibrates with an increased risk of myopathy. We found no evidence for avoiding co

  16. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockow, K.; Garvey, L. H.; Aberer, W.; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M.; Barbaud, A.; Bilo, M. B.; Bircher, A.; Blanca, M.; Bonadonna, B.; Campi, P.; Castro, E.; Cernadas, J. R.; Chiriac, A. M.; Demoly, P.; Grosber, M.; Gooi, J.; Lombardo, C.; Mertes, P. M.; Mosbech, H.; Nasser, S.; Pagani, M.; Ring, J.; Romano, A.; Scherer, K.; Schnyder, B.; Testi, S.; Torres, M.; Trautmann, A.; Terreehorst, I.

    2013-01-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable

  17. Effectiveness and content analysis of interventions to enhance oral antidiabetic drug adherence in adults with type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignon Zomahoun, H.T.; de Bruin, M.; Guillaumie, L.; Moisan, J.; Grégoire, J.P.; Pérez, N.; Vézina-Im, L.A.; Guénette, L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the pooled effect size of oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) adherence-enhancing interventions and to explore which of the behavior change techniques (BCTs) applied in the intervention groups modified this pooled intervention effect size. Methods We searched relevant studies

  18. Patterns of prescription antihypertensive drug utilization and adherence to treatment guidelines in the city of Novi Sad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Ana; Tomić, Zdenko; Milijasević, Boris; Ban, Milica; Horvat, Olga; Vukmirović, Sasa; Sabo, Ana

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and more than a half of all health insurance expenditures for reimbursed medicines are allocated to antihypertensive drugs in Serbia. The aim of this study was to identify the antihypertensive drug utilization patterns among hypertensive outpatients in the city of Novi Sad, Serbia, determine the adherence to clinical guidelines and address the economic aspects of current prescribing practices. This retrospective observational study was conducted in Novi Sad over a period of six months. The data on the number of packages, size their, and retail price of antihypertensives issued on prescription in outpatients with the diagnosis of essential arterial hypertension was collected from all state-owned pharmacies in Novi Sad. Drug consumption was analyzed using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)/ defined daily dose (DDD) methodology. Total consumption of antihypertensives issued on prescription over a 6-month period in the city of Novi sad, Serbia was 283.48 DDD per 1,000 inhabitans per day (DID). Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) were most commonly prescribed drugs, and were used 3 times more often than calcium channel blockers and 5 times more than beta-blockers. The consumption of diuretics and angiotensin receptor antagonists was low within all the groups of outpatients. Both national and international guidelines state superiority and effectiveness of diuretics in treatment of hypertension in the elderly, but their consumption was unreasonable low despite the fact that over 70% of all antihypertensive drugs in the city of Novi Sad were dispensed in people aged > 60. The use of more expensive ACEi was observed despite the guidelines deeming all the drugs of this class equally effective in treatment of hypertension. Large differences in utilization of different groups of antihypertensive agents were noted in this study. Underutilization of valuable, efficacious, and

  19. Effects of antiretroviral drug recall on perception of therapy benefits and on adherence to antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannattasio, Antonietta; Barbarino, Alessandro; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Mango, Carmela; Guarino, Alfredo

    2009-09-01

    In June 2007, the European Medicines Agency announced the recall by Roche of nelfinavir from European Union markets because of contamination of tablets with ethyl mesylate. Based on this event, we investigated the effect of switching therapy because of nelfinavir recall or for other reasons on the perception of therapy benefits and adherence to treatment in HIV-infected children and their caregivers. Thirty-eight children (mean age 12.1+/-6.7 years) were enrolled. A 35-item questionnaire was administered to the caregivers of enrolled children. Adherence was evaluated through a 4-day recall adherence instrument. Enrolled children were divided into 3 groups: patients who were shifted because of nelfinavir recall (group A, 8 patients); patients who were shifted for other reasons (group B, 12 patients); patients who were not shifted in the last 6 months (group C, 18 patients). All caregivers considered antiretroviral therapy necessary and effective for their children. However, drug shifting generated anxiety in most of them, irrespective of the reason for shifting. At baseline, 74% patients adhered to therapy. Adherence rate was related to the type of caregivers being higher in children cared for by foster parents than in children cared for by biological parents or second-degree relatives. Adherence rates did not change significantly in groups A and B after switching. Drug-switching raises concern in caregivers of HIV-infected children and induces a negative feeling irrespective of the reason for switching. However, switching, including the shift due to nelfinavir recall, did not affect adherence rates.

  20. Depression longitudinally mediates the association of appearance concerns to ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashill, Aaron J; Gordon, Janna R; Safren, Steven A

    2014-02-01

    Appearance concerns are common among HIV-infected individuals, and previous cross-sectional and longitudinal data indicate that these concerns are associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) non-adherence. However, to date, no known prospective data have explored the mechanism behind this relationship. Thus, the aim of the current study was to test depression severity as a prospective mediator of the relationship between appearance concerns and ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 89 HIV-infected individuals with a history of IDU who participated in a prospective, randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and medication adherence. Clinician-administered measures of depression severity and appearance concerns, along with electronic monitoring of ART non-adherence were included. Data were analyzed using longitudinal linear mixed-level modeling, and mediation was tested via the Monte Carlo Method of Assessing Mediation. Appearance concerns were predictive of depression severity, γ = .31, SE = .076, 95 % CI [.16, .46], t = 4.1, p = .0001, and depression severity was predictive of ART non-adherence, γ = 3.3, SE = 1.3, 95 % CI [.8, 5.8], t = 2.6, p = .01. The effect of appearance concerns on ART non-adherence, however, was significantly mediated by depression severity, γ = 1.02, 95 % CI [.21, 2.1]. Appearance concerns are associated with depression severity, which in turn is associated with ART non-adherence. Integrative interventions addressing appearance concerns, depression and ART adherence are needed, as this is one potential pathway towards worse health outcomes in HIV-infected individuals.

  1. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockow, K; Garvey, L H; Aberer, W

    2013-01-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable...... indicator of true hypersensitivity.To promote and standardize reproducible skin testing with safe and nonirritant drug concentrations in the clinical practice, the European Network and European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Interest Group on Drug Allergy has performed a literature...... search on skin test drug concentration in MEDLINE and EMBASE, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. Where the literature is poor, we have taken into consideration the collective experience of the group...

  2. A Prospective Randomized Trial on the Effect of Using an Electronic Monitoring Drug Dispensing Device to Improve Adherence and Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Jarmo; Tydén, Gunnar; Höijer, Jonas; Wadström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Outcome after renal transplantation depends on patient compliance and adherence for early detection of complications and identification of intervention opportunities. Compliance describes the degree to which patients follow medical advice and take their medications. Adherence has been defined as the extent to which a patients' behavior coincides with clinical prescriptions. Patients were randomized 7 to 14 days after transplantation into groups with (n = 40) and without (n = 40) an electronic medication dispenser (EMD). The EMD, which was used for the 1-year study period, recorded the date and time the patient took their medications and was monitored via a web-based application. Patients were monitored for 1 year regarding outpatient follow-up visits, emergency hospitalizations, renal biopsies, rejection episodes, renal function, and blood concentration of medications. Compliance in the intervention group was 97.8% (the control group was not assessed). Number of missed doses varied significantly by weekday (P = 0.033); patients were most likely to miss doses on Saturdays and Thursdays. Patients missed a total of 11 follow-up visits. During the study, 92 biopsies were performed on 55 patients (intervention group: 32 [17]; control group, 60 [38]). Biopsy-verified rejection was three times more common among controls (13 patients vs. 4; P = 0.054, not significant). Average P-creatinine level was slightly lower in the intervention group than the control group (131 vs. 150 μmol/L, not significant), whereas mean tacrolimus was similar (7.32 vs. 7.22 ng/mL, n.s.). The EMD is associated with high compliance, and there are also indications of a lower rejection rate.

  3. Evaluation Of Prescription Pattern And Medication Adherence Of Antihypertensive Drugs In Stage 1 Essential Hypertensive Patients At Rural Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital Of Central India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan S. Urade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives- To study the prescription pattern of antihypertensive drugs and analyze the medication adherence to antihypertensive drugs at rural tertiary care teaching hospital.Materials and Methods- Prospective, observational, 12 weeks, questionnaire based study, conducted in rural tertiary care teaching hospital of central India. 214 antihypertensive prescriptions were analyzed by Morisky medication adherence scale. Statistical analysis was done by MS Excel and Graph pad prism 6.0.Results- 28.03% patients were not aware about the medicines taken, 29.90% patients were unacquainted about dose and route of administration whereas 32.71% patients were unfamiliar about frequency of administration of medicines. 53.27% patients were unaware about precautions to be taken while consuming medicines.  58.68% & 12.67% patients consumed amlodipine & atenolol respectively. In 16.43% patients, atenolol + amlodipine combination therapy was prescribed.  Amongst 214 patients 12, 58 & 144 showed high, medium & low adherence respectively.  No significant difference was found on gender basis at any level of adherence.Conclusion- In this study, physicians given preference to amlodipine than other antihypertensive drugs. However, thiazide is a first line drug in stage 1 hypertension, recommended by JNC VII guideline. This indicates that there is need of creating awareness about current management of hypertension to clinicians by organizing various workshops. We observed only 5.60% patients showed high adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Therefore educational strategies must be carried out for physicians focusing on causes for nonadherence to antihypertensive medications. Also raising patient trust in their physicians may improve patient motivation to prescribed medication. 

  4. Barriers to drug adherence in the treatment of urea cycle disorders: Assessment of patient, caregiver and provider perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg A. Shchelochkov

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Despite positive views of their effectiveness, respondents found medications, medical foods and dietary supplements difficult to take and viewed adherence as inadequate, thus contributing to hyperammonemic episodes.

  5. Exploring strategies for PrEP adherence and dosing preferences in the context of sexualized recreational drug use among MSM: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closson, Elizabeth F; Mitty, Jennifer A; Malone, Jowanna; Mayer, Kenneth H; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2018-02-01

    The use of recreational drugs while having sex is associated with increased HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM). Taking a daily antiretroviral pill, or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a biomedical intervention to prevent HIV. However, the efficacy of PrEP is closely tied with high levels of adherence. While PrEP has the potential to reduce HIV acquisition, the use of recreational drugs may impede adherence. We explored perceptions of PrEP utilization and regimen preferences among 40 HIV-negative, MSM who reported concurrent recreational drug use and condomless anal sex with a man. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted and the data were analyzed using a qualitative descriptive approach. Participants perceived that it would be challenging to take PrEP while high on crystal meth, crack, powder cocaine, ecstasy and/or GHB. However, men identified strategies for using PrEP when they were not high on these drugs, including taking the pill when they started their day and integrating PrEP into an established routine, such as when taking other medications or preparing for sex. PrEP regimen preferences seemed to be shaped by the frequency in which participants used drugs and their ability to plan for sex. Taking PrEP everyday was appealing for those who regularly engaged in sexualized recreational drug use. Accounts depict these sexual interactions as frequent but unpredictable. A daily regimen would allow them to be prepared for sex without having to plan. An event-driven regimen was acceptable to men who occasionally used recreational drugs in the context of sex. For this group, sex usually occurred was generally prearranged. Patterns of sex and recreational drug use figured largely into participants' framings of how they would use PrEP. These behaviors will likely play a role in the uptake of and adherence to PrEP among this population.

  6. Chinese herbal therapy and Western drug use, belief and adherence for hypertension management in the rural areas of Heilongjiang province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM including Chinese herbal therapy has been widely practiced in China. However, little is known about Chinese herbal therapy use for hypertension management, which is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in China. Thus we described Chinese herbal therapy and western drug users, beliefs, hypertension knowledge, and Chinese herbal and western drug adherence and determinants of Chinese herbal therapy use among patients with hypertension in rural areas of Heilongjiang Province, China.This face-to-face cross sectional survey included 665 hypertensive respondents aged 30 years or older in rural areas of Heilongjiang Province, China. Of 665 respondents, 39.7% were male, 27.4% were aged 65 years or older. At the survey, 14.0% reported using Chinese herbal therapy and 71.3% reported using western drug for hypertension management. A majority of patients had low level of treatment adherence (80.6% for the Chinese herbal therapy users and 81.2% for the western drug users. When respondents felt that their blood pressure was under control, 72.0% of the Chinese herbal therapy users and 69.2% of the western drug users sometimes stopped taking their medicine. Hypertensive patients with high education level or better quality of life are more likely use Chinese herbal therapy.Majority of patients diagnosed with hypertension use western drugs to control blood pressure. Chinese herbal therapy use was associated with education level and quality of life.

  7. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: January 17, 2018 Key ...

  8. Novel Approaches for Visualizing and Analyzing Dose-Timing Data from Electronic Drug Monitors, or "How the 'Broken Window' Theory Pertains to ART Adherence".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Christopher J; DeSilva, Mary Bachman; Hamer, Davidson H; Keyi, Xu; Wilson, Ira B; Sabin, Lora

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral medications is usually expressed in terms of the proportion of doses taken. However, the timing of doses taken may also be an important dimension to overall adherence. Little is known about whether patients who mistime doses are also more likely to skip doses. Using data from the completed Adherence for Life randomized controlled trial, we created visual and statistical models to capture and analyze dose timing data collected longitudinally with electronic drug monitors (EDM). From scatter plots depicting dose time versus calendar date, we identified dominant patterns of dose taking and calculated key features [slope of line over calendar date; residual mean standard error (RMSE)]. Each was assessed for its ability to categorize subjects with 'sub-optimal' (<95 % of doses taken) using area under the receiver operating characteristic (AROC) curve analysis. Sixty eight subjects contributed EDM data, with ~300 to 400 observations/subject. While regression line slopes did not predict 'sub-optimal' adherence (AROC 0.51, 95 % CI 0.26-0.75), the variability in dose timing (RMSE) was strongly predictive (AROC 0.79, 95 % CI 0.62-0.97). Compared with the lowest quartile of RMSE (minimal dose time variability), each successive quartile roughly doubled the odds of 'sub-optimal' adherence (OR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.3-3.4). Patterns of dose timing and mistiming are strongly related to overall adherence behavior. Notably, individuals who skip doses are more likely to mistime doses, with the degree of risk positively correlated with the extent of dose timing variability.

  9. Adherence to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  10. Patient-reported adverse drug reactions and their influence on adherence and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia patients on per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekäle M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meri Kekäle,1 Marikki Peltoniemi,2 Marja Airaksinen1 1Clinical Pharmacy Group, Division of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, 2Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Purpose: To evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs experienced by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients during per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment and correlation of ADR symptoms with medication adherence and perceived quality of life (QoL.Patients and methods: Eighty-six adult, chronic-phase CML patients who had been on TKI treatment (79% on imatinib, 10.5% dasatinib, and 10.5% nilotinib for at least 6 months participated in the study (mean age: 57.8 years, 52% males. The mean time from diagnosis was 5.1 years. All patients were interviewed, and patient-reported ADRs were obtained using a structured list. Adherence was assessed using Morisky’s 8-item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS. The symptoms’ interference with patient’s daily QoL was measured by asking patients about the influence of symptom(s on their mood, general condition, enjoyment of life, walking, relationships, and work.Results: Ninety-seven percent of the patients were suffering from at least one ADR. The mean number of different symptoms was seven (range: 0–15, median 6. The most commonly perceived ADRs were muscle soreness or cramp (69/86, 80%; swelling of hands, legs, feet, or around the eyes (59/86, 69%; and fatigue (43/86, 50%. No correlation was found between adherence and ADRs, because symptoms were equally common in each MMAS adherence class. Half of the patients felt that the ADRs had a negative influence on their daily QoL. A quarter of the patients reported that ADRs affected either their mood, general condition, or enjoyment of life. The incidence of almost all ADRs was much higher among patients reporting negative influence of ADRs on their daily life compared to total study population (P=0.016.Conclusion

  11. “We fear the police, and the police fear us”: Structural and individual barriers and facilitators to HIV medication adherence among injection drug users in Kiev, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Safren, Steven A.; Dvoryak, Sergiy; Reisner, Sari L.; Needle, Richard; Woody, George

    2010-01-01

    Ukraine has one of the most severe HIV/AIDS epidemics in Europe, with an estimated 1.63% of the population living with HIV/AIDS in 2007. Injection drug use (IDU) remains the predominant mode of transmission in Kiev—the capital and largest city. Prior reports suggest that the HIV infection rate among IDUs in Kiev reaches 33%, and many have poor and inequitable access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Among those with access to HAART, little is understood about barriers and facilitators to HAART medication adherence. In 5/2009, two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with HIV-infected IDUs seeking treatment at the City AIDS Center, Kiev. The goal was to use this information to adapt and tailor, to Ukrainian culture, an evidence-based intervention for improving adherence to HAART. All 16 participants attributed HIV infection to IDU. Their average age was 31.6 (SD=7.0), average time with HIV 5.7 years (SD=4.0), average time on HAART 2.5 years (SD=1.7), average time as IDU 14.6 years (SD=6.8), and 88% were on opioid substitution therapy. The most salient themes related to adherence barriers included: (1) harassment and discrimination by police; (2) opioid dependence; (3) complexity of drug regimen; (4) side effects; (5) forgetting; (6) co-occurring mental health problems; and (7) HIV stigma. Facilitators of adherence included: (1) cues for pill taking; (2) support and reminders from family, significant other, and friends; (3) opioid substitution therapy; and (4) wanting improved health. Additional factors explored included: 1) knowledge about HAART; (2) storage of medications; and (3) IDU and sexual risk behaviors. Findings highlighted structural and individual barriers to adherence. At the structural level, police discrimination and harassment was reported to be a major barrier to adherence to opioid substitution therapy and HAART. Privacy and stigma were barriers at the individual level. Recommendations for adherence interventions included

  12. Relationship between hunger, adherence to antiretroviral therapy and plasma HIV RNA suppression among HIV-positive illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, Aranka; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Food insecurity may be a barrier to achieving optimal HIV treatment-related outcomes among illicit drug users. This study therefore, aimed to assess the impact of severe food insecurity, or hunger, on plasma HIV RNA suppression among illicit drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). A cross-sectional Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the potential relationship between hunger and plasma HIV RNA suppression. A sample of n = 406 adults was derived from a community-recruited open prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. A total of 235 (63.7%) reported "being hungry and unable to afford enough food," and 241 (59.4%) had plasma HIV RNA hunger was associated with lower odds of plasma HIV RNA suppression (Odds Ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.90, p = 0.015). In multivariate analyses, this association was no longer significant after controlling for socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, including 95% adherence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.37-1.10, p = 0.105). Multivariate models stratified by 95% adherence found that the direction and magnitude of this association was not significantly altered by the adherence level. Hunger was common among illicit drug users in this setting. Although, there was an association between hunger and lower likelihood of plasma HIV RNA suppression, this did not persist in adjusted analyses. Further research is warranted to understand the social-structural, policy, and physical factors shaping the HIV outcomes of illicit drug users.

  13. Factors for incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapy including drug refill and clinic visits among older adults living with human immunodeficiency virus - cross-sectional study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Abbie; Ford, Nathan; El-Khatib, Ziad

    2018-03-01

    To assess adherence outcomes to antiretroviral therapy (ART) of recipients ≥50 years in Soweto, South Africa. This was a secondary data analysis for a cross-sectional study at two HIV clinics in Soweto. Data on ART adherence and covariates were gathered through structured interviews with HIV 878 persons living with HIV (PLHIV) receiving ART. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations. PLHIV ≥50 years (n = 103) were more likely to miss clinic visits during the last six months than PLHIV aged 25-49 (OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.10-4.18). PLHIV ≥50 years with no or primary-level education were less likely to have missed a clinic visit during the last six months than PLHIV with secondary- or tertiary-level education in the same age category (OR 0.3; 95%CI 0.1-1.1), as were PLHIV who did not disclose their status (OR 0.2; 95%CI 0-1.1). There was no evidence of increased risk for non-adherence to ART pills and drug refill visits among older PLHIV. Missing a clinic visit was more common among older PLHIV who were more financially vulnerable. Further studies are needed to verify these findings and identify new risk factors associated with ART adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Prescribing Pattern of Oral Antihyperglycaemic Drugs, Rationality and Adherence to American Diabetes Association (ADA) Treatment Guidelines among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudhaa; Tandon, Vishal R; Roshi; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-01-01

    Oral antihyperglycaemic prescription trends keep on changing and thus the drug prescription trend study may prove to be powerful exploratory tool for health care providers. To investigate trends in prescriptions of oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OHDs) among postmenopausal women suffering from T2DM in India and evaluate the rationality and adherence to ADA treatment guidelines. An observational, cross-sectional descriptive prescription audit (n=500) was carried. Postmenopausal women were interviewed in their local language using pre-tested pre validated questionnaire after verbal informed consent at a teaching tertiary care hospital of north India. Oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OHDs) drugs were categorized as per the pharmacological classification. Adherence to available clinical practice guidelines/recommendations issued under American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2015 Guidelines as well as rationality of these prescriptions were assessed using WHO Guide to Good Prescribing. Mean age of the study population was 58.14±12.86. Mean duration since menopause was 5.3 years and of T2DM was 9.5 years. A 93.4% of the prescriptions had only OHDs whereas 6.6% of the prescriptions had various insulin preprations + OHDs (pADA treatment guidelines was observed.

  15. Anticancer drugs in Portuguese surface waters - Estimation of concentrations and identification of potentially priority drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mónica S F; Franquet-Griell, Helena; Lacorte, Silvia; Madeira, Luis M; Alves, Arminda

    2017-10-01

    Anticancer drugs, used in chemotherapy, have emerged as new water contaminants due to their increasing consumption trends and poor elimination efficiency in conventional water treatment processes. As a result, anticancer drugs have been reported in surface and even drinking waters, posing the environment and human health at risk. However, the occurrence and distribution of anticancer drugs depend on the area studied and the hydrological dynamics, which determine the risk towards the environment. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the risk of anticancer drugs in Portugal. This work includes an extensive analysis of the consumption trends of 171 anticancer drugs, sold or dispensed in Portugal between 2007 and 2015. The consumption data was processed aiming at the estimation of predicted environmental loads of anticancer drugs and 11 compounds were identified as potentially priority drugs based on an exposure-based approach (PEC b > 10 ng L -1 and/or PEC c > 1 ng L -1 ). In a national perspective, mycophenolic acid and mycophenolate mofetil are suspected to pose high risk to aquatic biota. Moderate and low risk was also associated to cyclophosphamide and bicalutamide exposition, respectively. Although no evidences of risk exist yet for the other anticancer drugs, concerns may be associated with long term effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma vs heart tissue concentration in humans - literature data analysis of drugs distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylutki, Zofia; Polak, Sebastian

    2015-03-12

    Little is known about the uptake of drugs into the human heart, although it is of great importance nowadays, when science desires to predict tissue level behavior rather than to measure it. Although the drug concentration in cardiac tissue seems a better predictor for physiological and electrophysiological changes than its level in plasma, knowledge of this value is very limited. Tissue to plasma partition coefficients (Kp) come to rescue since they characterize the distribution of a drug among tissues as being one of the input parameters in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The article reviews cardiac surgery and forensic medical studies to provide a reference for drug concentrations in human cardiac tissue. Firstly, the focus is on whether a drug penetrates into heart tissue at a therapeutic level; the provided values refer to antibiotics, antifungals and anticancer drugs. Drugs that directly affect cardiomyocyte electrophysiology are another group of interest. Measured levels of amiodarone, digoxin, perhexiline and verapamil in different sites in human cardiac tissue where the compounds might meet ion channels, gives an insight into how these more lipophilic drugs penetrate the heart. Much data are derived from postmortem studies and they provide insight to the cardiac distribution of more than 200 drugs. The analysis depicts potential problems in defining the active concentration location, what may indirectly suggest multiple mechanisms involved in the drug distribution within the heart. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The toxicological significance of post-mortem drug concentrations in bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferner, Robin E; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2018-01-01

    Some authors have proposed that post-mortem drug concentrations in bile are useful in estimating concentrations in blood. Both The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists (TIAFT) and the US Federal Aviation Administration recommend that samples of bile should be obtained in some circumstances. Furthermore, standard toxicological texts compare blood and bile concentrations, implying that concentrations in bile are of forensic value. To review the evidence on simultaneous measurements of blood and bile drug concentrations reported in the medical literature. We made a systematic search of EMBASE 1980-2016 using the search terms ("bile/" OR "exp drug bile level/concentration/") AND "drug blood level/concentration/", PubMed 1975-2017 for ("bile[tw]" OR "biliary[tw]") AND ("concentration[tw]" OR "concentrations[tw]" OR "level[tw]" OR "levels[tw]") AND "post-mortem[tw]" and also MEDLINE 1990-2016 for information on drugs whose biliary concentrations were mentioned in standard textbooks. The search was limited to human studies without language restrictions. We also examined recent reviews, indexes of relevant journals and citations in Web of Science and Google Scholar. We calculated the bile:blood concentration ratio. The searches together yielded 1031 titles with abstracts. We scanned titles and abstracts for relevance and retrieved 230, of which 161 were considered further. We excluded 49 papers because: the paper reported only one case (30 references); the data referred only to a metabolite (1); the work was published before 1980 (3); the information concerned only samples taken during life (10); or the paper referred to a toxin or unusual recreational drug (5). The remaining 112 papers provided data for analysis, with at least two observations for each of 58 drugs. Bile:blood concentration ratios: Median bile:blood concentration ratios varied from 0.18 (range 0.058-0.32) for dextromoramide to 520 (range 0.62-43,000) for buprenorphine. Median bile

  18. Providing patients with information about disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs: Individually or in groups? A pilot randomized controlled trial comparing adherence and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Dawn; Nightingale, Peter; Jobanputra, Paresh

    2009-06-01

    Communicating information about disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) before patients start treatment is a key role for some rheumatology clinical nurse specialists. This is done in our unit to promote understanding of the risks and benefits of drug therapy and encourage timely and reliable use of DMARDs. Information is routinely provided individually but this can lead to delays in starting treatment because of limited nursing resources. In this randomized trial we tested the feasibility of giving patients, who were about to start on a DMARD, information about the drug in groups and compared this with information given individually. Adults with a clinical diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis who were referred to the nursing team for counselling about starting on methotrexate, sulfasalazine or leflunomide were included. Patients who had previously taken a DMARD were not excluded and those consenting were randomized to receive drug information individually or in groups (of three to six patients). We provided all patients with written materials about the relevant drug and discussed the risks and benefits of drug use verbally. Patients allocated to group counselling received this intervention in a teaching room, with a slide presentation. The primary outcome was adherence with medication use, ascertained by pill counts, self-report diaries and prescription dispensation. Secondary outcomes included satisfaction with information about medicines (SIMS) by questionnaire; time taken to provide information; adherence to scheduled hospital appointments and blood monitoring schedules; and DMARD continuation rates at four and twelve months. Of 127 eligible patients referred for counselling about DMARDs, 62 consented to take part: 32 were randomized to receive drug information individually and 30 to receiving it in groups. Patients allocated to the two different interventions were comparable for age and diagnoses at baseline but more patients

  19. Suspended particle and drug ingredient concentrations in hospital dispensaries and implications for pharmacists' working environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Ryoichi; Hioki, Atsushi; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Hiroki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the present status of working environments for pharmacists, including the concentrations of suspended particles and suspended drug ingredients in dispensaries. We conducted a survey on the work processes and working environment in 15 hospital dispensaries, and measured the concentrations of suspended particles and suspended drug ingredients using digital dust counter and high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), respectively. Of 25 types of powdered drugs that were frequently handled in the 15 dispensaries surveyed, 11 could be quantitatively determined. The amounts of suspended particles were relatively high, but below the reference value, in three dispensaries without dust collectors. The sedative-hypnotic drug zopiclone was detected in the suspended particles at one dispensary that was not equipped with dust collectors, and the antipyretic and analgesic drug acetaminophen was detected in two dispensaries equipped with dust collectors. There was no correlation between the daily number of prescriptions containing powdered drugs and the concentration of suspended particles in dispensaries. On the basis of the suspended particle concentrations measured, we concluded that dust collectors were effective in these dispensaries. However, suspended drug ingredients were detected also in dispensaries with dust collectors. These results suggest that the drug dust control systems of individual dispensaries should be properly installed and managed.

  20. Antiretroviral therapy drug adherence in Rwanda: perspectives from patients and healthcare workers using a mixed-methods approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyankandondera, Joseph; Mitchell, Kirstin; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; Boer, Kimberly; Mutwa, Philippe; Balinda, Jean-Paul; van Straten, Masja; Reiss, Peter; van de Wijgert, Janneke

    2013-01-01

    Rwanda has achieved high enrollment into antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs but data on adherence after enrollment are not routinely collected. We used a mixed-methods approach (standardized questionnaires, pill counts, focus group discussions, and in-depth interviews) to determine levels of and

  1. Satisfaction, fulfillment of expectations and adherence to subcutaneous biological drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: ARCO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Vela, Paloma; Bustabad, Sagrario; Maceiras, Francisco; Carmona, Loreto; Cea-Calvo, Luis

    2018-05-15

    In the ARCO study, adherence to subcutaneous biological agents by patients with rheumatoid arthritis improved with monthly administration. We assess whether adherence can be related to fulfillment of expectations and satisfaction with treatment. Adherence was assessed by calculating the Medication Possession Ratio, and satisfaction and fulfillment of expectations using the «EXPRESAR» group questionnaire. In 346 patients, those who were satisfied/very satisfied with efficacy and tolerability were ≥80% and 64.4%, with no differences between weekly, biweekly or monthly administration regimens. Regarding the fulfillment of expectations, 59.9% considered the effect of the treatment greater than expected and 52.6% reported lower/much lower than expected discomfort; the latter percentage was higher in patients with monthly administration (P=.049). The percentages for nonadherence were 15.6% (discomfort greater than expected), 18.5% (expected discomfort) and 11.1% (lower than expected or no discomfort) (P=.189). Satisfaction and fulfillment of expectations were high. Fulfillment of expectations of tolerability was better with monthly administration, which could contribute to better adherence. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Urinary phenylacetylglutamine (U-PAGN concentration as biomarker for adherence in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCD treated with glycerol phenylbutyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mokhtarani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urinary phenylacetylglutamine (U-PAGN concentrations in spot urine samples were analyzed as a dosing biomarker during glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB dosing in 68 healthy adults and 66 adult and pediatric patients with urea cycle disorders who participated in GPB clinical trials. Age- and body surface area (BSA-specific 25th percentile cutoff points for spot U-PAGN concentrations (2 years with BSA ≤1.3 m2, and 2 years of age with BSA >1.3 m2 were determined as an approach to identify patients for whom increased dosing and/or adherence to prescribed dosing should be assessed.

  3. Urinary phenylacetylglutamine (U-PAGN) concentration as biomarker for adherence in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCD) treated with glycerol phenylbutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarani, M; Diaz, G A; Lichter-Konecki, U; Berry, S A; Bartley, J; McCandless, S E; Smith, W; Harding, C; Le Mons, C; Coakley, D F; Lee, B; Scharschmidt, B F

    2015-12-01

    Urinary phenylacetylglutamine (U-PAGN) concentrations in spot urine samples were analyzed as a dosing biomarker during glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB) dosing in 68 healthy adults and 66 adult and pediatric patients with urea cycle disorders who participated in GPB clinical trials. Age- and body surface area (BSA)-specific 25th percentile cutoff points for spot U-PAGN concentrations ( 2 years with BSA ≤ 1.3 m 2 , and  2 years of age with BSA > 1.3 m 2 ) were determined as an approach to identify patients for whom increased dosing and/or adherence to prescribed dosing should be assessed.

  4. The frequency of drugs among Danish drivers before and after the introduction of fixed concentration limits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Anni; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Linnet, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Until July 2007, the driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) legislation in Denmark was based on impairment, evaluated on the basis of a clinical investigation and toxicological analyses, but in 2007 fixed concentration limits were introduced into the Danish traffic legislation. The objective...... for this study was to investigate the prevalence of medication and illicit drugs among Danish drivers before and after 2007.......Until July 2007, the driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) legislation in Denmark was based on impairment, evaluated on the basis of a clinical investigation and toxicological analyses, but in 2007 fixed concentration limits were introduced into the Danish traffic legislation. The objective...

  5. Can fluconazole concentrations in saliva be used for therapeutic drug monitoring?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koks, C. H.; Crommentuyn, K. M.; Hoetelmans, R. M.; Mathôt, R. A.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    The saliva/plasma concentration ratio of fluconazole was investigated in 22 HIV-1-infected individuals with an oropharyngeal Candida infection to determine whether saliva fluconazole concentrations could provide useful information for therapeutic drug monitoring in this population. Steady-state

  6. Clinical significance of 2 h plasma concentrations of first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prahl, Julie B; Johansen, Isik S; Cohen, Arieh S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study 2 h plasma concentrations of the first-line tuberculosis drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide in a cohort of patients with tuberculosis in Denmark and to determine the relationship between the concentrations and the clinical outcome. METHODS: After 6......-207 days of treatment (median 34 days) 2 h blood samples were collected from 32 patients with active tuberculosis and from three patients receiving prophylactic treatment. Plasma concentrations were determined using LC-MS/MS. Normal ranges were obtained from the literature. Clinical charts were reviewed...... failure occurred more frequently when the concentrations of isoniazid and rifampicin were both below the normal ranges (P = 0.013) and even more frequently when they were below the median 2 h drug concentrations obtained in the study (P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: At 2 h, plasma concentrations of isoniazid...

  7. Mathematical Model to Predict Skin Concentration after Topical Application of Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Todo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Skin permeation experiments have been broadly done since 1970s to 1980s as an evaluation method for transdermal drug delivery systems. In topically applied drug and cosmetic formulations, skin concentration of chemical compounds is more important than their skin permeations, because primary target site of the chemical compounds is skin surface or skin tissues. Furthermore, the direct pharmacological reaction of a metabolically stable drug that binds with specific receptors of known expression levels in an organ can be determined by Hill’s equation. Nevertheless, little investigation was carried out on the test method of skin concentration after topically application of chemical compounds. Recently we investigated an estimating method of skin concentration of the chemical compounds from their skin permeation profiles. In the study, we took care of “3Rs” issues for animal experiments. We have proposed an equation which was capable to estimate animal skin concentration from permeation profile through the artificial membrane (silicone membrane and animal skin. This new approach may allow the skin concentration of a drug to be predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion. The silicone membrane was found to be useful as an alternative membrane to animal skin for predicting skin concentration of chemical compounds, because an extremely excellent extrapolation to animal skin concentration was attained by calculation using the silicone membrane permeation data. In this chapter, we aimed to establish an accurate and convenient method for predicting the concentration profiles of drugs in the skin based on the skin permeation parameters of topically active drugs derived from steady-state skin permeation experiments.

  8. An introduction to predictive modelling of drug concentration in anaesthesia monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCou, J; Johnson, K

    2017-01-01

    A significant amount of anaesthetists' work involves the prediction of drug effects and interactions to produce a smooth general anaesthetic that minimises drug side effects and promotes rapid emergence. Successfully managing this process requires a basic understanding of drug effects, experience and inevitably some guesswork, since it is difficult (and in some cases impossible) to anticipate all relevant patient and surgical factors. Although data are generally available to allow calculation of plasma drug and effect site concentrations, this is often difficult to apply in complex clinical contexts, particularly when multiple drug types are used. In recent years, manufacturers have developed and incorporated into anaesthetic workstations technologies that use drug pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data to predict drug effects and interactions. Such systems can predict the duration and effects of drugs during anaesthesia and assist the anaesthetist to understand complex drug interactions. With this information available, different drug types, doses and combinations may be tailored in a scientific way to maximise useful effects whilst minimising overdose and side-effects, particularly in high-risk patients. Examples are used to illustrate how such systems can be used in practice, and how drug effects and interactions can be simulated to "rehearse" an anaesthetic before any drugs are actually administered. At present only a small number of anaesthetic workstations use this technology, and as yet they are not able to manage all drugs used in anaesthetic practice. However, such systems have the potential to help anaesthetists manage the complexity of their work, and to provide information on predicted drug effects in a way that is useful and relevant to both experienced anaesthetists and trainees. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Cure of tuberculosis despite serum concentrations of antituberculosis drugs below published reference ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Monica; Corti, Natascia; Müller, Daniel; Henning, Lars; Gutteck, Ursula; von Braun, Amrei; Weber, Rainer; Fehr, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic target serum concentrations of first-line antituberculosis drugs have not been well defined in clinical studies in tuberculosis (TB) patients. We retrospectively investigated the estimated maximum serum concentrations (eC max) of antituberculosis drugs and clinical outcome of TB patients with therapeutic drug monitoring performed between 2010-2012 at our institution, and follow-up until March 2014. The eC max was defined as the highest serum concentration during a sampling period (2, 4 and 6 hours after drug ingestion). We compared the results with published eC max values, and categorised them as either "within reference range", "low eC max", or "very low eC max".Low/very low eC max-levels were defined as follows: isoniazid 2-3/max levels were classified as "low" or "very low". The eC max was below the relevant reference range in 80% of isoniazid, 95% of rifampicin, 30% of pyrazinamide, and 30% of ethambutol measurements. All but one patient were cured of tuberculosis. Although many antituberculosis drug serum concentrations were below the widely used reference ranges, 16 of 17 patients were cured of tuberculosis. These results challenge the use of the published reference ranges for therapeutic drug monitoring.

  10. Hypnosis control based on the minimum concentration of anesthetic drug for maintaining appropriate hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Eiko; Nishigaki, Yuki; Kanda, Chiaki; Takeda, Toshihiro; Shirakami, Gotaro

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel hypnosis control method using Auditory Evoked Potential Index (aepEX) as a hypnosis index. In order to avoid side effects of an anesthetic drug, it is desirable to reduce the amount of an anesthetic drug during surgery. For this purpose many studies of hypnosis control systems have been done. Most of them use Bispectral Index (BIS), another hypnosis index, but it has problems of dependence on anesthetic drugs and nonsmooth change near some particular values. On the other hand, aepEX has an ability of clear distinction between patient consciousness and unconsciousness and independence of anesthetic drugs. The control method proposed in this paper consists of two elements: estimating the minimum effect-site concentration for maintaining appropriate hypnosis and adjusting infusion rate of an anesthetic drug, propofol, using model predictive control. The minimum effect-site concentration is estimated utilizing the property of aepEX pharmacodynamics. The infusion rate of propofol is adjusted so that effect-site concentration of propofol may be kept near and always above the minimum effect-site concentration. Simulation results of hypnosis control using the proposed method show that the minimum concentration can be estimated appropriately and that the proposed control method can maintain hypnosis adequately and reduce the total infusion amount of propofol.

  11. Measurement complexity of adherence to medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galato D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dayani Galato, Fabiana Schuelter-Trevisol, Anna Paula PiovezanMaster Program in Health Sciences, University of Southern Santa Catarina (Unisul Tubarão, Santa Catarina, BrazilAdherence to pharmacologic therapy is a major challenge for the rational use of medicines, particularly when it comes to antiretroviral drugs that require adherence to at least 95% of prescribed doses.1 Studies in this area are always important and contribute to medication adherence understanding, even though there is no reference test for measuring this. Recently, an article was published in this journal that proposes the determination of lamivudine plasma concentration to validate patient self-reported adherence to antiretroviral treatment.2 In that study, serum levels obtained after 3 hours of ingestion of the last dose of the drug were compared with patient reports that were classified into different levels of adherence, based on their recall of missed doses in the previous 7 days.It was hypothesized by the authors that the use of a biological marker for drug adherence was extremely important, given the relevance of the topic. However, we would like to draw attention to some points that may determine the success of the use of similar methods for this purpose. The formation of groups with similar anthropometric characteristics is relevant since the dose of lamivudine may have to be changed, depending, for example, on sex, weight, and age.3 Even information considered important by the authors of that study was not provided. There is a need for greater clarity on the eligibility criteria, especially with regard to the clinical stage of the disease, CD4 counts and viral load, associated diseases, and comorbidity, as well as the evaluation of kidney function and other medications used that can affect lamivudine pharmacokinetics.3View original paper by Minzi and colleagues

  12. Comparison of adherence to generic multi-tablet regimens vs. brand multi-tablet and brand single-tablet regimens likely to incorporate generic antiretroviral drugs by breaking or not fixed-dose combinations in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwagitinywa, Joseph; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Bourrel, Robert; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Sommet, Agnès

    2018-03-05

    Adherence to antiretroviral (ARV) is crucial to achieve viral load suppression in HIV-infected patients. This study aimed to compare adherence to generic multi-tablet regimens (MTR) vs. brand MTR likely to incorporate ARV drugs without breaking fixed-dose combinations (FDC) and brand single-tablet regimens (STR) likely to incorporate generics by breaking the FDC. Patients aged of 18 years or over exposed to one of the generic or the brand of lamivudine (3TC), zidovudine/lamivudine (AZT/TC), nevirapine (NVP), or efavirenz (EFV), or the brand STR of efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir (EFV/FTC/TDF). Adherence was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR) using both defined daily dose (DDD) and daily number of tablet recommended for adults (DNT). Adherence to generic MTR vs. brand MTR and brand STR was compared using Kruskal-Wallis. The overall median adherence was 0.97 (IQR 0.13) by DNT method and 0.97 (0.14) by DDD method. Adherence in patients exposed to generic MTR (n = 165) vs. brand MTR (n = 481) and brand STR (n = 470) was comparable by DNT and DDD methods. In conclusion, adherence to generic MTR was high and comparable with adherence to brand MTR and to STR. Utilization of DDD instead DNT to measure the MPR led to small but nonsignificant difference that has no clinical impact. © 2018 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  13. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.A. Olowookere

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ure, development of drug resistance and subsequent virological and immunological .... adherence during counseling sessions, although 95% adher- ence is sufficient .... evaluation and adherence measurement by self report.

  14. Adherence to On-Time ART Drug Pick-Up and Its Association with CD4 Changes and Clinical Outcomes Amongst HIV Infected Adults on First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Nigerian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoje, Chukwuemeka; Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oladele, Edward A; Badru, Titilope; Adedokun, Oluwasanmi; Oqua, Dorothy; Khamofu, Hadiza; Adebayo, Olufunso; Torpey, Kwasi; Chabikuli, Otto Nzapfurundi

    2017-02-01

    Medication adherence is a major determinant of antiretroviral treatment (ART) success. Promptness in medication refill pick-ups may give an indication of medication adherence. This study determined medication refill adherence among HIV positive patients on ART and its association with treatment outcomes in HIV treatment centers in Nigeria. This retrospective multi-center cohort study involved a review of ART refill records for 3534 HIV-positive patients aged 18-60 years who initiated first-line ART between January 2008 and December 2009 and were on therapy for ≥18 months after ART initiation. Drug refill records of these patients for 10 consecutive refill visits after ART initiation were analyzed. The first ten consecutive refill appointment-keeping rates after ART initiation ranged from 64.3 % to 76.1 % which decreased with successive visits. Altogether, 743 (21.1 %) patients were deemed adherent, meaning they picked up their drugs within 7 days of the drug refill appointment date on at least nine out of ten refill visits. The adherent group of patients had a mean CD4 cells increase of 206 ± 6.1 cells/dl after 12 months of ART compared to 186 ± 7.1 cells/dl reported among the nonadherent group (p = 0.0145). The proportion of patients in the adherent category who showed no OIs after 12 months on ART (81 %) was significantly higher when compared to the proportion in the non-adherent category (23.5 %), (p = 0.008). The multivariate analysis showed that the odds of being adherent was 2-3 times more in patients who had a baseline CD4 count of less than 200 cells/dl compared to those with a baseline CD4 of >350 cells/dl. (AOR 2.43, 95 % CI 1.62-3.66). In addition, for patients with baseline CD4 cell count of 201-350 cells/dl, the odds of being adherent was found to be 1.9 compared to those with baseline CD4 of greater than 350 cells/dl (AOR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.27-2.94). Pharmacy refill data can serve as an adherence measure. Adherence to on-time drug

  15. [Development of a standardized guide for optimizing drug adherence information to be dispensed during a pharmaceutical counseling with a multiple myeloma patient: Initial validation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier-Archinard, Camille; Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Le Gall, Tanguy; Bourquard, Pascal; Passemard, Nadège; Tora, Sandrine; Rey, Aurélie; Rossi, Marie; Chevallier, Thierry; Cousin, Christelle; Favier, Mireille

    2018-05-01

    The safety of the community treatment with oral anticancer therapies is a strong theme of the cancer plan 2014-2019. The objective of this study was to develop a Pharmaceutical Counseling Guide to improve medication adherence in patients treated for multiple myeloma with oral anticancer therapies. A multidisciplinary professional working group selected a list of relevant medication adherence-related items that served as the framework for the design of the pharmaceutical counseling support materials in patient-accessible language. The readability, understanding and memorization of the information were validated in ten patients treated for myeloma. Twelve items were selected for treatment information (5 items), treatment planning (5 items), and adverse drug effects (2 items). A pharmacist guide, a patient guide, a medication schedule, and three self-questionnaires to evaluate medication knowledge and understanding of patients were developed. The patient test resulted in changes in these documents. This study carried out the initial validation of documents to standardize the pharmaceutical counseling for patients treated for myeloma so that it can be reproduced from one patient to another regardless of the pharmacist, by standardizing the information issued. This study needs to be completed by a final validation in myeloma patients, free from oral anticancer therapies. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Might ART Adherence Estimates Be Improved by Combining Biomarker and Self-Report Data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Rhead

    Full Text Available As we endeavour to examine rates of viral suppression in PLHIV, reliable data on ART adherence are needed to distinguish between the respective contributions of poor adherence and treatment failure on high viral load. Self-reported data are susceptible to response bias and although biomarker data on drug presence and concentration can provide a superior, alternative method of measurement, complications due to drug-drug interactions and genetic variations can cause some inaccuracies. We investigate the feasibility of combining both biomarker and self-report data to produce a potentially more accurate measure of ART adherence.Data were taken from a large general-population survey in the Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, conducted in 2009-2011. HIV-infected adults who had initiated ART (N = 560 provided self-report data on adherence and dried blood spot samples that were analysed for traces of ART medication. A new three-category measure of ART adherence was constructed, based on biomarker data but using self-report data to adjust for cases with abnormally low and high drug concentrations due to possible drug-drug interactions and genetic factors, and was assessed for plausibility using survey data on socio-demographic correlates.94.3% (528/560 and 92.7% (519/560 of the sample reported faithful adherence to their medication and had traces of ART medication, respectively. The combined measure estimated good evidence of ART adherence at 69% and excellent evidence of adherence at 53%. The regression analysis results showed plausible patterns of ART adherence by socio-demographic status with men and younger participants being more likely to adhere poorly to medication, and higher socio-economic status individuals and those living in more urban locations being more likely to adhere well.Biomarker and self-reported measures of adherence can be combined in a meaningful way to produce a potentially more accurate measure of ART adherence. Results indicate that

  17. Might ART Adherence Estimates Be Improved by Combining Biomarker and Self-Report Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhead, Rebecca; Masimirembwa, Collen; Cooke, Graham; Takaruza, Albert; Nyamukapa, Constance; Mutsimhi, Cosmas; Gregson, Simon

    2016-01-01

    As we endeavour to examine rates of viral suppression in PLHIV, reliable data on ART adherence are needed to distinguish between the respective contributions of poor adherence and treatment failure on high viral load. Self-reported data are susceptible to response bias and although biomarker data on drug presence and concentration can provide a superior, alternative method of measurement, complications due to drug-drug interactions and genetic variations can cause some inaccuracies. We investigate the feasibility of combining both biomarker and self-report data to produce a potentially more accurate measure of ART adherence. Data were taken from a large general-population survey in the Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, conducted in 2009-2011. HIV-infected adults who had initiated ART (N = 560) provided self-report data on adherence and dried blood spot samples that were analysed for traces of ART medication. A new three-category measure of ART adherence was constructed, based on biomarker data but using self-report data to adjust for cases with abnormally low and high drug concentrations due to possible drug-drug interactions and genetic factors, and was assessed for plausibility using survey data on socio-demographic correlates. 94.3% (528/560) and 92.7% (519/560) of the sample reported faithful adherence to their medication and had traces of ART medication, respectively. The combined measure estimated good evidence of ART adherence at 69% and excellent evidence of adherence at 53%. The regression analysis results showed plausible patterns of ART adherence by socio-demographic status with men and younger participants being more likely to adhere poorly to medication, and higher socio-economic status individuals and those living in more urban locations being more likely to adhere well. Biomarker and self-reported measures of adherence can be combined in a meaningful way to produce a potentially more accurate measure of ART adherence. Results indicate that ART adherence

  18. Lung Tissue Concentrations of Pyrazinamide among Patients with Drug-Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, M. Tobias; Nikolaishvili, Ketino; Sabulua, Irina; Bablishvili, Nino; Gogishvili, Shota; Avaliani, Zaza; Tukvadze, Nestani; Little, Brent; Bernheim, Adam; Read, Timothy D.; Guarner, Jeannette; Derendorf, Hartmut; Peloquin, Charles A.; Blumberg, Henry M.; Vashakidze, Sergo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Improved knowledge regarding the tissue penetration of antituberculosis drugs may help optimize drug management. Patients with drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis undergoing adjunctive surgery were enrolled. Serial serum samples were collected, and microdialysis was performed using ex vivo lung tissue to measure pyrazinamide concentrations. Among 10 patients, the median pyrazinamide dose was 24.7 mg/kg of body weight. Imaging revealed predominant lung lesions as cavitary (n = 6 patients), mass-like (n = 3 patients), or consolidative (n = 1 patient). On histopathology examination, all tissue samples had necrosis; eight had a pH of ≤5.5. Tissue samples from two patients were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis by culture (pH 5.5 and 7.2). All 10 patients had maximal serum pyrazinamide concentrations within the recommended range of 20 to 60 μg/ml. The median lung tissue free pyrazinamide concentration was 20.96 μg/ml. The median tissue-to-serum pyrazinamide concentration ratio was 0.77 (range, 0.54 to 0.93). There was a significant inverse correlation between tissue pyrazinamide concentrations and the amounts of necrosis (R = −0.66, P = 0.04) and acid-fast bacilli (R = −0.75, P = 0.01) identified by histopathology. We found good penetration of pyrazinamide into lung tissue among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis with a variety of radiological lesion types. Our tissue pH results revealed that most lesions had a pH conducive to pyrazinamide activity. The tissue penetration of pyrazinamide highlights its importance in both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant antituberculosis treatment regimens. PMID:28373198

  19. Lung Tissue Concentrations of Pyrazinamide among Patients with Drug-Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempker, Russell R; Heinrichs, M Tobias; Nikolaishvili, Ketino; Sabulua, Irina; Bablishvili, Nino; Gogishvili, Shota; Avaliani, Zaza; Tukvadze, Nestani; Little, Brent; Bernheim, Adam; Read, Timothy D; Guarner, Jeannette; Derendorf, Hartmut; Peloquin, Charles A; Blumberg, Henry M; Vashakidze, Sergo

    2017-06-01

    Improved knowledge regarding the tissue penetration of antituberculosis drugs may help optimize drug management. Patients with drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis undergoing adjunctive surgery were enrolled. Serial serum samples were collected, and microdialysis was performed using ex vivo lung tissue to measure pyrazinamide concentrations. Among 10 patients, the median pyrazinamide dose was 24.7 mg/kg of body weight. Imaging revealed predominant lung lesions as cavitary ( n = 6 patients), mass-like ( n = 3 patients), or consolidative ( n = 1 patient). On histopathology examination, all tissue samples had necrosis; eight had a pH of ≤5.5. Tissue samples from two patients were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis by culture (pH 5.5 and 7.2). All 10 patients had maximal serum pyrazinamide concentrations within the recommended range of 20 to 60 μg/ml. The median lung tissue free pyrazinamide concentration was 20.96 μg/ml. The median tissue-to-serum pyrazinamide concentration ratio was 0.77 (range, 0.54 to 0.93). There was a significant inverse correlation between tissue pyrazinamide concentrations and the amounts of necrosis ( R = -0.66, P = 0.04) and acid-fast bacilli ( R = -0.75, P = 0.01) identified by histopathology. We found good penetration of pyrazinamide into lung tissue among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis with a variety of radiological lesion types. Our tissue pH results revealed that most lesions had a pH conducive to pyrazinamide activity. The tissue penetration of pyrazinamide highlights its importance in both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant antituberculosis treatment regimens. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. How participation in a Drug Company-Managed Clinical Trial Influenced GPs’ Guideline Adherence and Drug Preference: A Register-Based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Kragstrup, Jakob; Søndergaard, Jens

    2005-01-01

    21 st International Con ference on Pharmacoepidemiology and Therapeytic Risk Management, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, Abstract 187 i Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety 2004;14:494......21 st International Con ference on Pharmacoepidemiology and Therapeytic Risk Management, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, Abstract 187 i Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety 2004;14:494...

  1. CHILDREN'S ADHERENCE TO HAART ADHERENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    han or equal IQ 2 log" and in 64% of children wirh smaller man 2 log,o decrease in viral load. Secondly, i caregivers are not well prepared for adherence issues before starting HAART, or if regimens are too onerous to follow, treatment is likely to fail. Every effort should be made to see the burden of adherence from the.

  2. Flexing the PECs: Predicting environmental concentrations of veterinary drugs in Canadian agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullik, Sigrun A; Belknap, Andrew M

    2017-03-01

    Veterinary drugs administered to food animals primarily enter ecosystems through the application of livestock waste to agricultural land. Although veterinary drugs are essential for protecting animal health, their entry into the environment may pose a risk for nontarget organisms. A means to predict environmental concentrations of new veterinary drug ingredients in soil is required to assess their environmental fate, distribution, and potential effects. The Canadian predicted environmental concentrations in soil (PECsoil) for new veterinary drug ingredients for use in intensively reared animals is based on the approach currently used by the European Medicines Agency for VICH Phase I environmental assessments. The calculation for the European Medicines Agency PECsoil can be adapted to account for regional animal husbandry and land use practices. Canadian agricultural practices for intensively reared cattle, pigs, and poultry differ substantially from those in the European Union. The development of PECsoil default values and livestock categories representative of typical Canadian animal production methods and nutrient management practices culminates several years of research and an extensive survey and analysis of the scientific literature, Canadian agricultural statistics, national and provincial management recommendations, veterinary product databases, and producers. A PECsoil can be used to rapidly identify new veterinary drugs intended for intensive livestock production that should undergo targeted ecotoxicity and fate testing. The Canadian PECsoil model is readily available, transparent, and requires minimal inputs to generate a screening level environmental assessment for veterinary drugs that can be refined if additional data are available. PECsoil values for a hypothetical veterinary drug dosage regimen are presented and discussed in an international context. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:331-341. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada

  3. Phagocytosis and Epithelial Cell Invasion by Crohn’s Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Are Inhibited by the Anti-inflammatory Drug 6-Mercaptopurine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Migliore

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC strains are overrepresented in the dysbiotic microbiota of Crohn’s disease (CD patients, and contribute to the onset of the chronic inflammation typical of the disease. However, the effects of anti-inflammatory drugs used for CD treatment on AIEC virulence have not yet been investigated. In this report, we show that exposure of AIEC LF82 strain to amino-6-mercaptopurine (6-MP riboside, one of the most widely used anti-inflammatory drugs in CD, impairs its ability to adhere to, and consequently to invade, human epithelial cells. Notably, phagocytosis of LF82 treated with 6-MP by human macrophages is also reduced, suggesting that 6-MP affects AIEC cell surface determinants involved both in interaction with epithelial cells and in uptake by macrophages. Since a main target of 6-MP in bacterial cells is the inhibition of the important signal molecule c-di-GMP, we also tested whether perturbations in cAMP, another major signaling pathway in E. coli, might have similar effects on interactions with human cells. To this aim, we grew LF82 in the presence of glucose, which leads to inhibition of cAMP synthesis. Growth in glucose-supplemented medium resulted in a reduction in AIEC adhesion to epithelial cells and uptake by macrophages. Consistent with these results, both 6-MP and glucose can affect expression of cell adhesion-related genes, such as the csg genes, encoding thin aggregative fimbriae (curli. In addition, glucose strongly inhibits expression of the fim operon, encoding type 1 pili, a known AIEC determinant for adhesion to human cells. To further investigate whether 6-MP can indeed inhibit c-di-GMP signaling in AIEC, we performed biofilm and motility assays and determination of extracellular polysaccharides. 6-MP clearly affected biofilm formation and cellulose production, but also, unexpectedly, reduced cell motility, itself an important virulence factor for AIEC. Our results provide strong evidence

  4. The use of real-time cell analyzer technology in drug discovery: defining optimal cell culture conditions and assay reproducibility with different adherent cellular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienzar, Franck A; Tilmant, Karen; Gerets, Helga H; Toussaint, Gaelle; Speeckaert, Sebastien; Hanon, Etienne; Depelchin, Olympe; Dhalluin, Stephane

    2011-07-01

    The use of impedance-based label-free technology applied to drug discovery is nowadays receiving more and more attention. Indeed, such a simple and noninvasive assay that interferes minimally with cell morphology and function allows one to perform kinetic measurements and to obtain information on proliferation, migration, cytotoxicity, and receptor-mediated signaling. The objective of the study was to further assess the usefulness of a real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) platform based on impedance in the context of quality control and data reproducibility. The data indicate that this technology is useful to determine the best coating and cellular density conditions for different adherent cellular models including hepatocytes, cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, and hybrid neuroblastoma/neuronal cells. Based on 31 independent experiments, the reproducibility of cell index data generated from HepG2 cells exposed to DMSO and to Triton X-100 was satisfactory, with a coefficient of variation close to 10%. Cell index data were also well reproduced when cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts were exposed to 21 compounds three times (correlation >0.91, p technology appears to be a powerful and reliable tool in drug discovery because of the reasonable throughput, rapid and efficient performance, technical optimization, and cell quality control.

  5. An inert 3D emulsification device for individual precipitation and concentration of amorphous drug nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, T; Bojko, S; Bunjes, H; Dietzel, A

    2018-02-13

    Nanosizing increases the specific surface of drug particles, leading to faster dissolution inside the organism and improving the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. A novel approach for the preparation of drug nanoparticles in water using chemically inert microfluidic emulsification devices is presented in this paper. A lithographic fabrication sequence was established, allowing fabrication of intersecting and coaxial channels of different depths in glass as is required for 3D flow-focusing. Fenofibrate was used as a model for active pharmaceutical ingredients with very low water solubility in the experiments. It was dissolved in ethyl acetate and emulsified in water, as allowed by the 3D flow-focusing geometry. In the thread formation regime, the drug solution turned into monodisperse droplets of sizes down to below 1 μm. Fast supersaturation occurs individually in each droplet, as the disperse phase solvent progressively diffuses into the surrounding water. Liquid antisolvent precipitation results in highly monodisperse and amorphous nanoparticles of sizes down to 128 nm which can be precisely controlled by the continuous and disperse phase pressure. By comparing optically measured droplet sizes with particle sizes by dynamic light scattering, we could confirm that exactly one particle forms in every droplet. Furthermore, a downstream on-chip concentration allowed withdrawal of major volumes of only the continuous phase fluid which enabled an increase of particle concentration by up to 250 times.

  6. Anti-epileptic drug intake adherence: the value of the blood drug level measurement and the clinical approach Aderência à ingestão de medicamentos antiepilépticos: o valor da avaliação dos níveis sanguíneos e a abordagem clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARLEIDE DA MOTA GOMES

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available It was evaluated the patient antiepileptic drug (AED intake adherence in a pilot cross-sectional study carried out at a neurologic out-patient clinic of a university hospital. Ninety-three AED blood concentration (phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine were analyzed from 24 patients. The variability of the AED blood level was measured (in the steady state period by means of the variation coefficient and compared with the self-reported antiepileptic medication non-adherence, AED blood level according to the range (therapeutic or not, and the seizure control. It was not observed any strong correlation between the higher value of variability and the other three parameters of no adherence. The highest correlation was with the blood drug level (therapeutic or not. The evaluation of blood drug measurement alone, except in cases of extreme low adherence and variability of drug intake, is not enough for the recognition of incorrect drug intake, but the clinical markers and the self-reported adherence have to be also considered for this sort of evaluation.Avaliou-se a aderência à ingesta de drogas antiepilépticas (DAE em estudo piloto transversal conduzido em ambulatório de hospital neurológico universitário. Noventa e três amostras sanguíneas com concentraç��o de DAE (fenobarbital, fenitoína, carbamazepina foram analisadas de 24 pacientes. A variabilidade dos níveis sanguíneos das DAE (em estado estável - steady state period, analizada por meio do coeficiente de variação foi comparada com a auto-referida não aderência à ingesta da DAE, níveis sanguíneos das DAE de acordo com a faixa (terapêutica ou não e o controle das crises epilépticas. Não foi observada correlação forte entre o maior valor da variabilidade e os outros três parâmetros de aderência, apesar da maior correlação com o nível sanguíneo (terapêutico ou não. A avaliação do nível sérico isolado, exceto em caso de extrema baixa aderência e

  7. Adherence to the Australian National Inpatient Medication Chart: the efficacy of a uniform national drug chart on improving prescription error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, Alp

    2013-10-01

    In 2006, the National Inpatient Medication Chart (NIMC) was introduced as a uniform medication chart in Australian public hospitals with the aim of reducing prescription error. The rate of regular medication prescription error in the NIMC was assessed. Data was collected using the NIMC Audit Tool and analyzed with respect to causes of error per medication prescription and per medication chart. The following prescription requirements were assessed: date, generic drug name, route of administration, dose, frequency, administration time, indication, signature, name and contact details. A total of 1877 medication prescriptions were reviewed. 1653 prescriptions (88.07%) had no contact number, 1630 (86.84%) did not have an indication, 1230 and 675 (35.96%) used a drug's trade name. Within 261 medication charts, all had at least one entry, which did not include an indication, 258 (98.85%) had at least one entry, which did not have a contact number and 200 (76.63%) had at least one entry, which used a trade name. The introduction of a uniform national medication chart is a positive step, but more needs to be done to address the root causes of prescription error. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Influence of drugs of abuse and alcohol upon patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards: physician's assessment compared to blood drug concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordal, Jon; Medhus, Sigrid; Holm, Bjørn; Mørland, Jørg; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-06-01

    In acute psychiatric services, rapid and accurate detection of psychoactive substance intake may be required for appropriate diagnosis and intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between (a) drug influence as assessed by physicians and (b) blood drug concentrations among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. We also explored the possible effects of age, sex, and psychotic symptoms on physician's assessment of drug influence. In a cross-sectional study, the sample comprised 271 consecutive admissions from 2 acute psychiatric wards. At admission, the physician on call performed an overall judgment of drug influence. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the positive subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Blood samples were screened for a wide range of psychoactive substances, and quantitative results were used to calculate blood drug concentration scores. Patients were judged as being under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in 28% of the 271 admissions. Psychoactive substances were detected in 56% of the blood samples. Altogether, 15 different substances were found; up to 8 substances were found in samples from 1 patient. Markedly elevated blood drug concentration scores were estimated for 15% of the patients. Physician's assessment was positively related to the blood drug concentration scores (r = 0.52; P < 0.001), to symptoms of excitement, and to the detection of alcohol, cannabis, and amphetamines. The study demonstrates the major impact of alcohol and drugs in acute psychiatric settings and illustrates the challenging nature of the initial clinical assessment.

  9. Considerations for effect site pharmacokinetics to estimate drug exposure: concentrations of antibiotics in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodvold, Keith A; Hope, William W; Boyd, Sara E

    2017-10-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and microdialysis have become the most reliable and relevant methods for measuring lung concentrations of antibiotics, with the majority of BAL studies involving either healthy adult subjects or patients undergoing diagnostic bronchoscopy. Emphasis on the amount of drug that reaches the site of infection is increasingly recognized as necessary to determine whether a dose selection will translate to good clinical outcomes in the treatment of patients with pneumonia. Observed concentrations and/or parameters of exposure (e.g. area-under-the-curve) need to be incorporated with pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic indices so that rational dose selection can be identified for specific pathogens and types of pneumonic infection (community-acquired vs hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia, including ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia). Although having measured plasma or lung concentration-time data from critically ill patients to incorporate into pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models is very unlikely during drug development, it is essential that altered distribution, augmented renal clearance, and renal or hepatic dysfunction should be considered. Notably, the number of published studies involving microdialysis and intrapulmonary penetration of antibiotics has been limited and mainly involve beta-lactam agents, levofloxacin, and fosfomycin. Opportunities to measure in high-resolution effect site spatial pharmacokinetics (e.g. with MALDI-MSI or PET imaging) and in vivo continuous drug concentrations (e.g. with aptamer-based probes) now exist. Going forward these studies could be incorporated into antibiotic development programs for pneumonia in order to further increase the probability of candidate success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adequate plasma drug concentrations suggest that amoxicillin can be administered by continuous infusion using elastomeric pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arensdorff, Lyne; Boillat-Blanco, Noémie; Decosterd, Laurent; Buclin, Thierry; de Vallière, Serge

    2017-09-01

    Elastomeric pumps can be useful for the administration of antibiotics in the outpatient setting. To determine amoxicillin degradation in elastomeric pumps, as well as the effectiveness of amoxicillin treatment administered by elastomeric pumps. Antibiotic degradation was measured in elastomeric pumps filled with 6 g of amoxicillin in 240 mL of NaCl 0.9% by drawing samples at 12 h intervals when stored in the fridge for 48 h and when worn around the waist for 24 h. Subsequently nine patients were treated with continuous infusions of 8 or 12 g of amoxicillin per day. Plasma amoxicillin concentrations were measured on each visit to the outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy unit. Clinical outcome was verified 3 months after the end of treatment. Amoxicillin degradation in elastomeric pumps reached 10% after 48 h in the fridge and an additional 30% when worn around the waist for 24 h. Mean plasma drug concentrations achieved with 12 g of amoxicillin per day were 18.5 mg/L (95% CI 13.5-23.5), which is largely above the MIC of amoxicillin-susceptible bacteria. Nine patients treated for various complicated infections were cured and had no unexpected adverse effects. Adequate plasma drug concentrations and favourable clinical outcomes suggest that amoxicillin can be administered by continuous infusion using elastomeric pumps. This treatment modality does not fulfil formal requirements regarding pharmaceutical stability, but the resulting safety impact in patients is probably limited. Therapeutic drug monitoring and a close clinical follow-up are recommended if this route of administration is chosen. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Drug delivery options to increase patient adherence and satisfaction in the management of rheumatoid arthritis – focus on subcutaneous tocilizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yasuharu Nakashima,1 Masakazu Kondo,2 Hisaaki Miyahara,3 Yukihide Iwamoto11Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Kondo Clinic of Rheumatology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Clinical Research Institute, National Hospital Organization Kyushu Medical Center, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease associated with joint destruction. Tocilizumab (TCZ is a humanized monoclonal anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody that was initially developed for use as an intravenous (IV infusion. Previous studies have shown that TCZ-IV is an important treatment option in patients with moderate-to-severe RA. A subcutaneous (SC formulation of 162 mg TCZ that was recently developed and approved provides an additional treatment option for RA patients. In the present review, we provide an update on the efficacy and safety of TCZ-SC, compared with TCZ-IV. The TCZ-SC doses of 162 mg every 2 weeks (q2w or weekly (qw were selected based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Both TCZ-SC q2w and qw regimens showed equivalent effects to TCZ-IV in most patients; however, the TCZ-SC qw regimen consistently showed a more rapid effect in terms of C-reactive protein normalization. Randomized controlled studies showed that TCZ-SC monotherapy or combined with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs demonstrated comparable efficacy to TCZ-IV in patients who were both biologic-naïve and refractory to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. TCZ-SC at both qw and q2w were generally well-tolerated for up to 24 weeks. There was a low rate of withdrawal due to adverse events, and their incidence was comparable with that seen with TCZ-IV. An injection site reaction was seen in approximately 10% of patients who received the subcutaneous formulation. In conclusion, although clinical results are still limited, the currently available evidence

  12. Citalopram and escitalopram plasma drug and metabolite concentrations: genome-wide associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Schaid, Daniel J; Desta, Zeruesenay; Kubo, Michiaki; Batzler, Anthony J; Snyder, Karen; Mushiroda, Taisei; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Ogburn, Evan; Hall-Flavin, Daniel; Flockhart, David; Nakamura, Yusuke; Mrazek, David A; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2014-08-01

    Citalopram (CT) and escitalopram (S-CT) are among the most widely prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD). We applied a genome-wide association study to identify genetic factors that contribute to variation in plasma concentrations of CT or S-CT and their metabolites in MDD patients treated with CT or S-CT. Our genome-wide association study was performed using samples from 435 MDD patients. Linear mixed models were used to account for within-subject correlations of longitudinal measures of plasma drug/metabolite concentrations (4 and 8 weeks after the initiation of drug therapy), and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were modelled as additive allelic effects. Genome-wide significant associations were observed for S-CT concentration with SNPs in or near the CYP2C19 gene on chromosome 10 (rs1074145, P = 4.1 × 10(-9) ) and with S-didesmethylcitalopram concentration for SNPs near the CYP2D6 locus on chromosome 22 (rs1065852, P = 2.0 × 10(-16) ), supporting the important role of these cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in biotransformation of citalopram. After adjustment for the effect of CYP2C19 functional alleles, the analyses also identified novel loci that will require future replication and functional validation. In vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that the biotransformation of CT to monodesmethylcitalopram and didesmethylcitalopram is mediated by CYP isozymes. The results of our genome-wide association study performed in MDD patients treated with CT or S-CT have confirmed those observations but also identified novel genomic loci that might play a role in variation in plasma levels of CT or its metabolites during the treatment of MDD patients with these selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Drug adherence and multidisciplinary care in patients with multiple sclerosis: Protocol of a prospective, web-based, patient-centred, nation-wide, Dutch cohort study in glatiramer acetate treated patients (CAIR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepman Theodora

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, for which no definitive treatment is available. Most patients start with a relapsing-remitting course (RRMS. Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs reduce relapses and disability progression. First line DMDs include glatiramer acetate (GA, interferon-beta (INFb-1a and INFb-1b, which are all administered via injections. Effectiveness of DMD treatment depends on adequate adherence, meaning year-long continuation of injections with a minimum of missed doses. In real-life practice DMD-treated patients miss 30% of doses. The 6-month discontinuation rate is up to 27% and most patients who discontinue do so in the first 12 months. Treatment adherence is influenced by the socio-economic situation, health care and caregivers, disease, treatment and patient characteristics. Only a few studies have dealt with adherence-related factors in DMD-treated patients. Self-efficacy expectations were found to be related to GA adherence. Patient education and optimal support improve adherence in general. Knowledge of the aspects of care that significantly relate to adherence could lead to adherence-improving measures. Moreover, identification of patients at risk of inadequate adherence could lead to more efficient care. In the near future new drugs will become available for RRMS. Detailed knowledge on factors prognostic of adherence and on care aspects that are associated with adequate adherence will improve the chances of these drugs becoming effective treatments. We investigate in RRMS patients the relationship between drug adherence and multidisciplinary care, as well as factors associated with adherence. Given the differences in the frequency of administration and in the side effects between the DMDs we decided to study patients treated with the same DMD, GA. Methods/design The Correlative analyses of Adherence In Relapsing remitting MS (CAIR study is

  14. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nischal K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has transformed HIV infection into a treatable, chronic condition. However, the need to continue treatment for decades rather than years, calls for a long-term perspective of ART. Adherence to the regimen is essential for successful treatment and sustained viral control. Studies have indicated that at least 95% adherence to ART regimens is optimal. It has been demonstrated that a 10% higher level of adherence results in a 21% reduction in disease progression. The various factors affecting success of ART are social aspects like motivation to begin therapy, ability to adhere to therapy, lifestyle pattern, financial support, family support, pros and cons of starting therapy and pharmacological aspects like tolerability of the regimen, availability of the drugs. Also, the regimen′s pill burden, dosing frequency, food requirements, convenience, toxicity and drug interaction profile compared with other regimens are to be considered before starting ART. The lack of trust between clinician and patient, active drug and alcohol use, active mental illness (e.g. depression, lack of patient education and inability of patients to identify their medications, lack of reliable access to primary medical care or medication are considered to be predictors of inadequate adherence. Interventions at various levels, viz. patient level, medication level, healthcare level and community level, boost adherence and overall outcome of ART.

  15. A Generic Multi-Compartmental CNS Distribution Model Structure for 9 Drugs Allows Prediction of Human Brain Target Site Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; van den Berg, Dirk-Jan; Hartman, Robin; van den Brink, Willem; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Bakshi, Suruchi; Aranzana-Climent, Vincent; Marchand, Sandrine; Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Couet, William; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    Purpose Predicting target site drug concentration in the brain is of key importance for the successful development of drugs acting on the central nervous system. We propose a generic mathematical model to describe the pharmacokinetics in brain compartments, and apply this model to predict human

  16. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease genotyping and drug concentration determination during triple therapy with telaprevir or boceprevir for chronic infection with genotype 1 viruses, southeastern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherfi, Sarah; Solas, Caroline; Motte, Anne; Moreau, Jacques; Borentain, Patrick; Mokhtari, Saadia; Botta-Fridlund, Danielle; Dhiver, Catherine; Portal, Isabelle; Ruiz, Jean-Marie; Ravaux, Isabelle; Bregigeon, Sylvie; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Stein, Andreas; Gérolami, René; Brouqui, Philippe; Tamalet, Catherine; Colson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Telaprevir and boceprevir, the two first hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs), considerably increase rates of sustained virologic response in association with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in chronic HCV genotype 1 infections. The 30 first patients treated by telaprevir or boceprevir including anti-HCV therapies since 2011 in Marseille University hospitals, France, were monitored. HCV loads and plasmatic concentrations of telaprevir and boceprevir were determined on sequential blood samples. HCV NS3 protease gene population sequencing was performed at baseline of treatment and in case of treatment failure. Fifteen patients (including 7 co-infected with HIV) received telaprevir and the other 15 patients (including 4 co-infected with HIV) received boceprevir. At baseline, HCV NS3 protease from six patients harbored amino acid substitutions associated with PI-resistance. Treatment failure occurred at week 12 for 7 patients. Amino acid substitutions associated with PI-resistance were observed in six of these cases. HCV NS3 R155K and T54A/S mutants, all of genotype 1a, were found from four patients. Median (interquartile range) plasma concentrations were 3,092 ng/ml (2,320-3,525) for telaprevir and 486 ng/ml (265-619) for boceprevir. For HIV-HCV co-infected patients, median concentrations were 3,162 ng/ml (2,270-4,232) for telaprevir and 374 ng/ml (229-519) for boceprevir. Plasma drug concentration monitoring revealed undetectable concentrations for two patients at week 4, and probable non-adherence to therapy for another patient. These findings indicate that routine HCV NS3 protease sequencing and plasma PI concentration monitoring might be helpful to characterize cases of therapy failure, at a cost dramatically low compared to that of anti-HCV therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Fixed-Dose Combination Antiretroviral Drugs Adherence among HIV-Positive Pregnant Women on Option B Treatment in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandir Ramlagan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility for all babies to be born and remain HIV-negative for the first year of life is achievable in South Africa. HIV-positive mothers’ adherence to their antiretroviral medication is one of the crucial factors to achieve this target. Cross-sectional data were collected at 12 community health centres, over 12 months (2014–2015, from 673 HIV-positive women, less than 6 months pregnant, attending antenatal care, and on Option B treatment. Adherence measures included the Adults AIDS Clinical Trials Group (AACTG four-day measure, as well as the Visual Analog Scale (VAS seven-day measure. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regressions are presented. 78.8% of respondents were adherent on AACTG, while 68.8% reported VAS adherence. Bivariate analyses for increased adherence show significant associations with older age, less/no alcohol usage, disclosure of HIV status, higher HIV knowledge, no desire to avoid ARV side effects, low stigma, and low depression. AACTG showed a negative association with intimate partner violence. Multivariable logistic regression on AACTG and VAS adherence rates resulted in unique contributions to increased adherence of older age, less/no alcohol usage, higher HIV knowledge, lack of depression, and non-disclosure. Programs targeting closer side effect monitoring, HIV disclosure, pre-natal depression, alcohol intake, and HIV knowledge need consideration.

  18. Measuring and prediction mediction adherence using dispensing data and patient beliefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geers, H.C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838675

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medication adherence can be subdivided into drug initiation, drug taking compliance and (non)persistence. Objective of this thesis was to (1) investigate whether measurement methods and reporting of adherence influenced outcomes, (2) predict poor drug taking compliance and

  19. Plasma Drug Concentrations of Orally Administered Rosuvastatin in Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Papich, Mark G; Brandão, João; Nevarez, Javier; Tully, Thomas N

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerotic diseases are common in pet psittacine birds, in particular Amazon parrots. While hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia have not definitely been associated with increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis in parrots, these are important and well-known risk factors in humans. Therefore statin drugs such as rosuvastatin constitute the mainstay of human treatment of dyslipidemia and the prevention of atherosclerosis. No pharmacologic studies have been performed in psittacine birds despite the high prevalence of atherosclerosis in captivity. Thirteen Hispaniolan Amazon parrots were used to test a single oral dose of 10 mg/kg of rosuvastatin with blood sampling performed according to a balanced incomplete block design over 36 hours. Because low plasma concentrations were produced in the first study, a subsequent pilot study using a dose of 25 mg/kg in 2 Amazon parrots was performed. Most plasma samples for the 10 mg/kg dose and all samples for the 25 mg/kg dose had rosuvastatin concentration below the limits of quantitation. For the 10 mg/kg study, the median peak plasma concentration and time to peak plasma concentration were 0.032 μg/mL and 2 hours, respectively. Our results indicate that rosuvastatin does not appear suitable in Amazon parrots as compounded and used at the dose in this study. Pharmacodynamic studies investigating lipid-lowering effects of statins rather than pharmacokinetic studies may be more practical and cost effective in future studies to screen for a statin with more ideal properties for potential use in psittacine dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic diseases.

  20. Why don't patients take their drugs? The role of communication, context and culture in patient adherence and the work of the pharmacist in HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Claire; Watermeyer, Jennifer; Evans, Melanie

    2011-06-01

    This study examined facilitators and barriers to adherence in four South African antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic sites and explored context and communication factors in relation to the role of the pharmacist. Data were collected from interviews and narratives of patients and health professionals around the issues of adherence and qualitatively analysed using principles of Thematic Content Analysis. Findings confirm the complex interplay between illness, communication, sociocultural, economic, context and systemic issues. Analysis suggests adherence is multifaceted and reinforces the critical role of communication factors in achieving concordance between patient and pharmacist. Successful treatment of HIV/AIDS depends on pharmacists and healthcare teams understanding contextual and interactional factors which play a role in adherence. The findings reinforce the importance of embedding a patient-centred approach in the training and everyday practice of pharmacists. The value of qualitative methods in understanding barriers to adherence and the potential value of the cultural broker in intercultural settings is discussed. Some suggestions are made as to how adherence counselling can be made relevant and effective. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Impact of Serum Drug Concentration on the Efficacy of Imipramine, Pregabalin and their Combination in Painful Polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, Søren Hein; Holbech, Jakob Vormstrup; Bach, Flemming W

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The serum concentration-effect relation was explored for first line drugs in neuropathic pain and aimed to determine if efficacy could be increased. METHODS: Data from a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial on imipramine, pregabalin and their combination in painful...... polyneuropathy were used. Treatment periods were of 4 weeks' duration, outcome was the weekly median of daily pain rated by a 0-10 numeric scale, and drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: In 47 patients pain was reduced -1.0 (95% CI -1.5:-0.6) by imipramine, -0.......178). There was no correlation between drug concentration and pain reduction for imipramine (r= 0.17, P=0.247), whereas there was a marginally, positive correlation for pregabalin (r=0.28, P=0.057). There was no interaction between treatment and concentration classes (imipramine

  2. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesellassie M Bezabhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. RESULTS: Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. CONCLUSIONS: Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved

  3. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R; Peterson, Gregory M; Bimirew, Mekides A; Kassie, Desalew M

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved patient outcomes.

  4. Drug Concentration Thresholds Predictive of Therapy Failure and Death in Children With Tuberculosis: Bread Crumb Trails in Random Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Ramachandran, Geetha; Hemanth Kumar, A K; Srivastava, Shashikant; Deshpande, Devyani; Nuermberger, Eric; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-11-01

     The role of drug concentrations in clinical outcomes in children with tuberculosis is unclear. Target concentrations for dose optimization are unknown.  Plasma drug concentrations measured in Indian children with tuberculosis were modeled using compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses. The children were followed until end of therapy to ascertain therapy failure or death. An ensemble of artificial intelligence algorithms, including random forests, was used to identify predictors of clinical outcome from among 30 clinical, laboratory, and pharmacokinetic variables.  Among the 143 children with known outcomes, there was high between-child variability of isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide concentrations: 110 (77%) completed therapy, 24 (17%) failed therapy, and 9 (6%) died. The main predictors of therapy failure or death were a pyrazinamide peak concentration <38.10 mg/L and rifampin peak concentration <3.01 mg/L. The relative risk of these poor outcomes below these peak concentration thresholds was 3.64 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.28-5.83). Isoniazid had concentration-dependent antagonism with rifampin and pyrazinamide, with an adjusted odds ratio for therapy failure of 3.00 (95% CI, 2.08-4.33) in antagonism concentration range. In regard to death alone as an outcome, the same drug concentrations, plus z scores (indicators of malnutrition), and age <3 years, were highly ranked predictors. In children <3 years old, isoniazid 0- to 24-hour area under the concentration-time curve <11.95 mg/L × hour and/or rifampin peak <3.10 mg/L were the best predictors of therapy failure, with relative risk of 3.43 (95% CI, .99-11.82).  We have identified new antibiotic target concentrations, which are potential biomarkers associated with treatment failure and death in children with tuberculosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  5. Five year results of an international proficiency testing programme for measurement of antifungal drug concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempers, V.J.C.; Alffenaar, J.W.C.; Touw, D.J.; Burger, D.M.; Uges, D.R.A.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Brüggemann, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since 2007 the Dutch Association for Quality Assessment in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (KKGT) has organized an international interlaboratory proficiency testing (PT) programme for measurement of antifungal drugs in plasma. We describe the 5 year results of the laboratories' performance.

  6. Prevalence of alcohol and other drugs and the concentrations in blood of drivers killed in road traffic crashes in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlner, Johan; Holmgren, Anita; Jones, Alan Wayne

    2014-03-01

    Drunk or drug-impaired drivers represent a major public health and societal problem worldwide. Because over 95% of drivers killed on the roads in Sweden are autopsied, reliable information is available about the use of alcohol and/or other drug before the crash. This retrospective 4-year study (2008-2011) used a forensic toxicology database (TOXBASE) to evaluate the concentrations of alcohol and other drugs in blood samples from drivers killed in road-traffic crashes. The mean age of all victims (N = 895) was 48 ± 20 years, and the majority were male (86%). In 504 drivers (56%), the results of toxicological analysis were negative and these victims were older; mean age (± SD) 47 ± 20 years, than alcohol positive cases (35 ± 14 years) and illicit drug users (34 ± 15 years). In 21% of fatalities, blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) was above the statutory limit for driving (0.2 g/L), although the median BAC was appreciably higher (1.72 g/L). Illicit drugs (mainly amphetamine and cannabis) were identified in ~7% of victims, either alone (2.5%), together with alcohol (1.8%) or a prescription drug (2%). The psychoactive prescription drugs identified were mainly benzodiazepines, z-hypnotics and tramadol, which were found in the blood of 7.6% of crash victims. The high median BAC in fatally-injured drivers speaks strongly towards alcohol-induced impairment as being responsible for the crash. Compared with alcohol, the prevalence of illicit and psychoactive prescription drugs was fairly low despite a dramatic increase in the number of drug-impaired drivers arrested by the police after a zero-tolerance law was introduced in 1999.

  7. Adherence to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention in a Clinical Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline C Montgomery

    Full Text Available The HIV epidemic in the United States (US disproportionately affects gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP using co-formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF and emtricitabine (FTC has demonstrated high efficacy in reducing HIV incidence among MSM. However, low adherence was reported in major efficacy trials and may present a substantial barrier to successful PrEP implementation. Rates of adherence to PrEP in "real-world" clinical settings in the US remain largely unknown.We reviewed demographic and clinical data for the first 50 patients to enroll in a clinical PrEP program in Providence, Rhode Island. We analyzed self-reported drug adherence as well as drug concentrations in dried blood spots (DBS from patients who attended either a three- or six-month follow-up appointment. We further assessed drug concentrations and the resistance profile of a single patient who seroconverted while taking PrEP.Of the first 50 patients to be prescribed PrEP, 62% attended a follow-up appointment at three months and 38% at six months. Of those who attended an appointment at either time point (70%, n = 35, 92% and 95% reported taking ±4 doses/week at three and six months, respectively. Drug concentrations were performed on a random sample of 20 of the 35 patients who attended a follow-up appointment. TDF levels consistent with ±4 doses/week were found in 90% of these patients. There was a significant correlation between self-reported adherence and drug concentrations (r = 0.49, p = 0.02. One patient who had been prescribed PrEP seroconverted at his three-month follow-up visit. The patient's drug concentrations were consistent with daily dosing. Population sequencing and ultrasensitive allele-specific PCR detected the M184V mutation, but no other TDF- or FTC-associated mutations, including those present as minor variants.In this clinical PrEP program, adherence was high, and self-reported drug adherence

  8. Adherence to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention in a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Madeline C; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Nunn, Amy S; Mena, Leandro; Anderson, Peter; Liegler, Teri; Mayer, Kenneth H; Patel, Rupa; Almonte, Alexi; Chan, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    The HIV epidemic in the United States (US) disproportionately affects gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using co-formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) has demonstrated high efficacy in reducing HIV incidence among MSM. However, low adherence was reported in major efficacy trials and may present a substantial barrier to successful PrEP implementation. Rates of adherence to PrEP in "real-world" clinical settings in the US remain largely unknown. We reviewed demographic and clinical data for the first 50 patients to enroll in a clinical PrEP program in Providence, Rhode Island. We analyzed self-reported drug adherence as well as drug concentrations in dried blood spots (DBS) from patients who attended either a three- or six-month follow-up appointment. We further assessed drug concentrations and the resistance profile of a single patient who seroconverted while taking PrEP. Of the first 50 patients to be prescribed PrEP, 62% attended a follow-up appointment at three months and 38% at six months. Of those who attended an appointment at either time point (70%, n = 35), 92% and 95% reported taking ±4 doses/week at three and six months, respectively. Drug concentrations were performed on a random sample of 20 of the 35 patients who attended a follow-up appointment. TDF levels consistent with ±4 doses/week were found in 90% of these patients. There was a significant correlation between self-reported adherence and drug concentrations (r = 0.49, p = 0.02). One patient who had been prescribed PrEP seroconverted at his three-month follow-up visit. The patient's drug concentrations were consistent with daily dosing. Population sequencing and ultrasensitive allele-specific PCR detected the M184V mutation, but no other TDF- or FTC-associated mutations, including those present as minor variants. In this clinical PrEP program, adherence was high, and self-reported drug adherence accurately

  9. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens

  10. Adherence to treatment of patients with past ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Je. Azarenko

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main task of the general practitioner is managing patients with the effects of ischemic stroke. The improvement of patients adherence to treatment in a significant way contributes to successful secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. Adherence to treatment can be determined through various questionnaires, including Morissky-Green. Currently, the adherence to a long-term drug therapy remains insufficient.

  11. Primary non-adherence to prescribed medication in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Kristján; Halldórsson, Matthías; Thengilsdóttir, Gudrún

    2013-01-01

    Primary non-adherence refers to the patient not redeeming a prescribed medication at some point during drug therapy. Research has mainly focused on secondary non-adherence. Prior to this study, the overall rate of primary non-adherence in general practice in Iceland was not known....

  12. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Two Coformulated Drugs with Highly Different Concentrations. Application on Vildagliptin and Metformin Hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaazaa, H. E.; Elzanfaly, E. S.; Soudi, A. T.; Salem, M. Y.

    2016-03-01

    A new smart simple validated spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of two drugs one of which is in a very low concentration compared to the other. The method is based on spiking and dilution then simple mathematical manipulation of the absorbance spectra. This method was applied for the determination of a binary mixture of vildagliptin and metformin hydrochloride in the ratio 50:850 in laboratory prepared mixtures containing both drugs in this ratio and in pharmaceutical dosage form with good recoveries. The developed method was validated according to ICH guidelines and can be used for routine quality control testing.

  13. Effects of drugs in subtoxic concentrations on the metabolic fluxes in human hepatoma cell line Hep G2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklas, Jens; Noor, Fozia; Heinzle, Elmar

    2009-01-01

    Commonly used cytotoxicity assays assess the toxicity of a compound by measuring certain parameters which directly or indirectly correlate to the viability of the cells. However, the effects of a given compound at concentrations considerably below EC 50 values are usually not evaluated. These subtoxic effects are difficult to identify but may eventually cause severe and costly long term problems such as idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. We determined the toxicity of three hepatotoxic compounds, namely amiodarone, diclofenac and tacrine on the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 using an online kinetic respiration assay and analysed the effects of subtoxic concentrations of these drugs on the cellular metabolism by using metabolic flux analysis. Several changes in the metabolism could be detected upon exposure to subtoxic concentrations of the test compounds. Upon exposure to diclofenac and tacrine an increase in the TCA-cycle activity was observed which could be a signature of an uncoupling of the oxidative phosphorylation. The results indicate that metabolic flux analysis could serve as an invaluable novel tool for the investigation of the effects of drugs. The described methodology enables tracking the toxicity of compounds dynamically using the respiration assay in a range of concentrations and the metabolic flux analysis permits interesting insights into the changes in the central metabolism of the cell upon exposure to drugs.

  14. Effect of Na2SO3 concentration to drug loading and drug release of ascorbic acid in chitosan edible film as drug delivery system membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kistriyani Lilis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a type of carbohydrate compounds produced from waste marine products, in particular the class of shrimp, crabs and clams. Chitosan is often process into edible films and utilized for food packaging also has potential as a membrane for drug delivery system. Drug loading and drug release can be controlled by improve the characteristics of the membrane by adding crosslinker. The purpose of this research is to study the effect of addition of crosslinker to the rate of loading and release of ascorbic acid in the chitosan edible film. Na2SO3 was used as crosslinker. Two grams of chitosan was dissolved into 100 ml of distilled water. Acetic acid and plasticizer were added in the solution then heated at 50°C. Na2SO3 solution with mass various of Na2SO3 dissolved, 01026 0.3; and 0.5 grams were added about 30 mL to make edible film. The analysis include of drug loading, drug release and tensile strength. The result showed that the loading of edible film with crosslinker 0.15 g; 0.3 g; and 0.5 g respectively were 60.98 ppm; 52.53 ppm; and 40.88 ppm, meanwhile for the release with crosslinker 0.15 g; 0.3 g; and 0.5 g respectively were 3.78 ppm; 5.72 ppm; and 5.97 ppm.

  15. Changes in fibre-adherent and fluid-associated microbial communities and fermentation profiles in the rumen of cattle fed diets differing in hay quality and concentrate amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevenhusen, Fenja; Petri, Renee M; Kleefisch, Maria-Theresia; Khiaosa-Ard, Ratchaneewan; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2017-09-01

    The rumen microbiota enable important metabolic functions to the host cattle. Feeding of starch-rich concentrate feedstuffs to cattle has been demonstrated to increase the risk of metabolic disorders and to significantly alter the rumen microbiome. Thus, alternative feeding strategies like the use of high-quality hay, rich in sugars, as an alternative energy source need to be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in rumen microbial abundances in the liquid and solid-associated fraction of cattle fed two hay qualities differing in sugar content with graded amounts of starchy concentrate feeds using Illumina MiSeq sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Operational taxonomic units clustered separately between the liquid and the solid-associated fraction. Phyla in the liquid fraction were identified as mainly Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, whereas main phyla of the fibre-associated fraction were Bacteroidetes, Fibrobacteres and Firmicutes. Significant alterations in the rumen bacterial communities at all taxonomic levels as a result of changing the hay quality and concentrate proportions were observed. Several intermicrobial correlations were found. Genera Ruminobacter and Fibrobacter were significantly suppressed by feeding sugar-rich hay, whereas others such as Selenomonas and Prevotella proliferated. This study extends the knowledge about diet-induced changes in ruminal microbiome of cattle. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Mass Spectrometry to Determine Intracellular Concentrations of Antiretroviral Drugs: From chemistry to clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAround 1995 – 1996, treatment options for patients infected with the human immunodefiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) 1, 2, improved dramatically. Therapy with a combination of several classes of antiretroviral drugs resulted in a

  17. Impact of concentration and rate of intraluminal drug delivery on absorption and gut wall metabolism of verapamil in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Hartmut; Drescher, Siegfried; Hofmann, Ute; Heinkele, Georg; Somogyi, Andrew A; Eichelbaum, Michel; Fromm, Martin F

    2004-09-01

    In humans gut wall metabolism can be quantitatively as important as hepatic drug metabolism in limiting the systemic exposure to drugs after oral administration. However, it has been proposed that the role of gut wall metabolism might be overemphasized, because high luminal drug concentrations would lead to a saturation of gut wall metabolism. Therefore we investigated the impact of concentration and rate of intraluminal drug delivery on absorption (F(abs)) and gastrointestinal extraction (E(GI)) of a luminally administered cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 substrate (verapamil) using a multilumen perfusion catheter in combination with a stable isotope technique. Two 20-cm-long, adjacent jejunal segments were isolated with the multilumen perfusion catheter in 7 subjects. In this study 80 mg of unlabeled verapamil (d0-verapamil 15 min) was infused into one segment over a 15-minute period, 80 mg of 3-fold deuterated verapamil (d3-verapamil 240 min) was administered over a 240-minute period into the other segment, and simultaneously, 5 mg of 7-fold deuterated verapamil (d7-verapamil) was injected intravenously over a 15-minute period. The rate of intraluminal drug delivery had only a modest effect on bioavailability of the verapamil isotopes (after correction for F abs ) (F/F abs d3-verapamil 240 min versus d0-verapamil 15 min, 0.24 +/- 0.10 versus 0.20 +/- 0.09; P d3-verapamil 240 min was 0.50 +/- 0.18 compared with 0.59 +/- 0.14 for d0 -verapamil 15 min ( P d0-verapamil 15 min ) correlated strongly with E GI (d3-verapamil 240 min ) (r = 0.94, P d0-verapamil 15 min /d3-verapamil 240 min (r = 0.62, P =.03). Substantial gut wall metabolism of verapamil occurs in humans and can be predicted from ex vivo data by use of shed enterocytes. The different intraluminal concentrations and rates of intraluminal drug delivery did not lead to a pronounced saturation of intestinal drug metabolism.

  18. Implementation of a Novel Adherence Monitoring Strategy in a Phase III, Blinded, Placebo-Controlled, HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husnik, Marla J; Brown, Elizabeth R; Marzinke, Mark; Livant, Edward; Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Hendrix, Craig W; Matovu Kiweewa, Flavia; Nair, Gonasagrie; Soto-Torres, Lydia E; Schwartz, Katie; Hillier, Sharon L; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-11-01

    Placebo-controlled HIV-1 prevention trials of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have not generally used concurrent measurement of adherence because of the potential risk of unblinding. However, several pre-exposure prophylaxis trials for HIV-1 prevention among women failed to show effectiveness because of low product adherence. Evaluation of product adherence objectively during a study provides the opportunity for strengthening adherence activities at sites having low adherence. During MTN-020/ASPIRE, a phase III, placebo-controlled trial of the dapivirine intravaginal ring, we implemented an adherence monitoring system. Monitoring began in quarter 1 (Q1) 2013 and continued through the conclusion of the trial. Blood plasma was collected quarterly and tested for dapivirine concentrations while maintaining blinding among study team members involved in participant management. Dapivirine concentrations >95 pg/mL, reflecting >8 hours of continuous use, were assessed as signaling product use. Study leadership monitored results on a monthly basis and provided feedback to site investigators. Experiences were shared across sites to motivate staff and counsel participants to strive toward higher adherence levels. An upward trend in adherence was observed (P dapivirine >95 pg/mL increased from 63% in Q1 2013 to 84% by Q1 2015. Ongoing drug level testing as a marker of adherence in MTN-020/ASPIRE demonstrates the feasibility of real-time adherence monitoring while maintaining study blinding at the level of participants, sites, and study leadership. This approach is novel for large-scale effectiveness studies for HIV-1 prevention.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of routine measuring of serum drug concentrations and anti-drug antibodies in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients with TNF-α blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laine J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Juha Laine,1 T Sakari Jokiranta,2,3 Kari K Eklund,4,5 Merja Väkeväinen,1 Kari Puolakka6 1Pfizer Oy, Helsinki, 2United Medix Laboratories Ltd, Espoo, 3Research Programs Unit, Immunobiology, 4Department of Rheumatology, University of Helsinki, 5Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, 6Department of Medicine, South Karelia, Finland Abstract: Monitoring of anti-drug antibodies (ADAbs or serum concentrations of biologicals in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis could provide an explanation for a loss of efficacy and help in the choice of subsequent medication. Current clinical practices do not generally include such monitoring of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α blockers on a routine basis. The main aims of this study were to estimate the probabilities of optimal and nonoptimal treatment decisions if infliximab or adalimumab drug trough level (DL and ADAbs are tested or not in rheumatoid arthritis, and to model cost-effectiveness of performing such monitoring on a routine basis. Data on DLs and ADAbs concentrations were obtained in Finland from clinically requested monitoring analyses of 486 and 1,137 samples from patients on adalimumab and infliximab, respectively. DL was within the target range in 42% of samples from adalimumab- and 50.4% of infliximab-treated patients. ADAbs were detected in approximately 20% and 13.5% of samples from adalimumab- and infliximab-treated patients, respectively. ADAbs were found in 52.3% and 41.3% of those with low adalimumab or infliximab DLs, respectively. The monitoring data were incorporated into probabilities for making the optimal treatment decision. Economic impact of clinical decision-making was modeled in a short-term (3–6 months scenario with 100 hypothetical patients. In the model, the combined measurement of DLs and ADAbs was cost-saving compared to the nontesting scenario when the monitoring results affected the treatment decision in at least 2–5 of 100 patients, a proportion which is easily

  20. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence.

  1. Concentration and drug prices in the retail market for malaria treatment in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S Patrick; Abdulla, Salim; Bloland, Peter; Mills, Anne

    2009-06-01

    The impact of market concentration has been little studied in markets for ambulatory care in the developing world, where the retail sector often accounts for a high proportion of treatments. This study begins to address this gap through an analysis of the consumer market for malaria treatment in rural areas of three districts in Tanzania. We developed methods for investigating market definition, sales volumes and concentration, and used these to explore the relationship between antimalarial retail prices and competition.The market was strongly geographically segmented and highly concentrated in terms of antimalarial sales. Antimalarial prices were positively associated with market concentration. High antimalarial prices were likely to be an important factor in the low proportion of care-seekers obtaining appropriate treatment.Retail sector distribution of subsidised antimalarials has been proposed to increase the coverage of effective treatment, but this analysis indicates that local market power may prevent such subsidies from being passed on to rural customers. Policymakers should consider the potential to maintain lower retail prices by decreasing concentration among antimalarial providers and recommending retail price levels. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Probe for intracellular concentrations of drugs: delayed fluorescence from acridine orange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardman, P.; Dennis, M.F.; White, J.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop fluorescent probes that will indicate effective concentrations of therapeutic agents, or endogenous protectors, at important cellular sites. Acridine orange associates with nucleic acids and emits a 'delayed' fluorescence signal. This signal is quenched by oxidants such as oxygen, nitroaryl radiosensitizers, adriamycin and mitomycin-c, and reductants such as thiols, ascorbate and other radioprotectors. The quenching of the acridine orange delayed fluorescence reflects the effective concentration of these therapeutically-important oxidants and reductants near DNA. The relative concentration of basic radiosensitizers such as pimonidazole (Ro 03-8799) near the DNA is greater than that of misonidazole. Thiols quench the delayed fluorescence signal according to the degree of ionization of the thiol function; this may model the reactivity of thiols with guanine radical sites in DNA. Ascorbate and aminopyrine do not quench the delayed fluorescence from cells stained with acridine orange as these compounds are taken up by cells very inefficiently

  3. Determination of safety margins for whole blood concentrations of alcohol and nineteen drugs in driving under the influence cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Lena; Strand, Dag Helge; Liane, Veronica Horpestad; Vindenes, Vigdis; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Aldrin, Magne

    2016-02-01

    Legislative limits for driving under the influence of 20 non-alcohol drugs were introduced in Norway in February 2012. Per se limits corresponding to blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of 0.2g/kg were established for 20 psychoactive drugs, and limits for graded sanctions corresponding to BACs of 0.5 and 1.2g/kg were determined for 13 of these drugs. This new legislation made it possible for the courts to make sentences based on the analytical results, similar to the situation for alcohol. To ensure that the reported concentration is as least as high as the true concentration, with a 99% safety level, safety margins had to be calculated for each of the substances. Diazepam, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and alcohol were used as model substances to establish a new model for estimating the safety margins. The model was compared with a previous used model established several years ago, by a similar yet much simpler model, and they were found to be in agreement. The measurement uncertainties depend on the standard batch used, the work list and the measurements' replicate. A Bayesian modelling approach was used to determine the parameters in the model, using a dataset of 4700 diazepam positive specimens and 5400 THC positive specimens. Different safety margins were considered for low and high concentration levels of diazepam (≤2μM (0.6mg/L) and >2μM) and THC (≤0.01μM (0.003mg/L) and >0.01μM). The safety margins were for diazepam 19.5% (≤2μM) and 34% (>2μM), for THC 19.5% (≤0.01μM) and 24.9% (>0.01μM). Concentration dependent safety margins for BAC were based on a dataset of 29500 alcohol positive specimens, and were in the range 10.4% (0.1g/kg) to 4.0% (4.0g/kg) at a 99% safety level. A simplified approach was used to establish safety margins for the compounds amphetamine, MDMA, methamphetamine, alprazolam, phenazepam, flunitrazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, oxazepam, buprenorphine, GHB, methadone, ketamine, cocaine, morphine, zolpidem and zopiclone. The

  4. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Derek M.; Martin, Luke G.; Papich, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  5. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M Foster

    Full Text Available Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL, and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations

  6. Experimental Determination of Drug Diffusion Coefficients in Unstirred Aqueous Environments by Temporally Resolved Concentration Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Cagno, Massimiliano Pio; Clarelli, Fabrizio; Vabenø, Jon

    2018-01-01

    or the need for dedicated instrumentation. In this work, a simple but reliable method based on time resolved concentration measurements by UV-visible spectroscopy in an unstirred aqueous environment was developed. This method is based on spectroscopic measurement of the variation of the local concentration...... characteristics (i.e. ionic strength and presence of complexing agents) on the diffusivity. The method can be employed in any research laboratory equipped with a standard UV-visible spectrophotometer, and could become a useful and straightforward tool in order to characterize diffusion coefficients...

  7. Current Situation of Medication Adherence in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijens, Bernard; Antoniou, Sotiris; Burnier, Michel; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Volpe, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Despite increased awareness, poor adherence to treatments for chronic diseases remains a global problem. Adherence issues are common in patients taking antihypertensive therapy and associated with increased risks of coronary and cerebrovascular events. Whilst there has been a gradual trend toward improved control of hypertension, the number of patients with blood pressure values above goal has remained constant. This has both personal and economic consequences. Medication adherence is a multifaceted issue and consists of three components: initiation, implementation, and persistence. A combination of methods is recommended to measure adherence, with electronic monitoring and drug measurement being the most accurate. Pill burden, resulting from free combinations of blood pressure lowering treatments, makes the daily routine of medication taking complex, which can be a barrier to optimal adherence. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations simplify the habit of medication taking and improve medication adherence. Re-packing of medication is also being utilized as a method of improving adherence. This paper presents the outcomes of discussions by a European group of experts on the current situation of medication adherence in hypertension.

  8. Differential mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+)-limonene as a function of cell physiological state and drug's concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    (+)-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+)-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme), or in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation), thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers) was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) was more sensitive to (+)-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+)-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+)-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+)-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the controversy about

  9. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zor, Kinga; Canepa, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12 500, 35 000, 75 000, and 100 000 cells cm−2) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing timedependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation...... between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 μM doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 μM. By sensing the changes in the cell–substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity...... was observed 5 h earlier than when using a standard colorimetric end-point assay (MTS) which measures changes in the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, with the MTS assay no cytotoxicity was observed after 15 h of incubation with 2.5 μM doxorubicin, whereas the impedance showed at this time point cell...

  10. The reasons for the epilepsy treatment gap in Kilifi, Kenya: using formative research to identify interventions to improve adherence to antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Julie A; Molyneux, Catherine S; Mbuba, Caroline K; Jenkins, Jo; Newton, Charles R J C; Hartley, Sally D

    2012-12-01

    Many people with epilepsy (PWE) in resource-poor countries do not receive appropriate treatment, a phenomenon referred to as the epilepsy treatment gap (ETG). We conducted a qualitative study to explore the reasons for this gap and to identify possible interventions in Kilifi, Kenya. Focus group discussions (FGDs) were carried out of PWE and their caregivers. Individual interviews were conducted of PWE, their caregivers, traditional healers, community health workers and leaders, nurses and doctors. In addition, a series of workshops was conducted, and four factors contributing to the ETG were identified: 1) lack of knowledge about the causes, treatment and prognosis of epilepsy; 2) inaccessibility to antiepileptic drugs; 3) misconceptions about epilepsy derived from superstitions about its origin; 4) and dissatisfaction with the communication skills of health providers. These data indicated possible interventions: 1) education and support for PWE and their caregivers; 2) communication skills training for health providers; 3) and improved drug provision. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasma drug concentrations and clinical effects of a peripheral alpha-2-adrenoceptor antagonist, MK-467, in horses sedated with detomidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainionpää, Mari H; Raekallio, Marja R; Pakkanen, Soile A E; Ranta-Panula, Ville; Rinne, Valtteri M; Scheinin, Mika; Vainio, Outi M

    2013-05-01

    To investigate plasma drug concentrations and the effect of MK-467 (L-659'066) on sedation, heart rate and gut motility in horses sedated with intravenous (IV) detomidine. Experimental randomized blinded crossover study. Six healthy horses. Detomidine (10 μg kg(-1) IV) was administered alone (DET) and in combination with MK-467 (250 μg kg(-1) IV; DET + MK). The level of sedation and intestinal sounds were scored. Heart rate (HR) and central venous pressure (CVP) were measured. Blood was collected to determine plasma drug concentrations. Repeated measures anova was used for HR, CVP and intestinal sounds, and the Student's t-test for pairwise comparisons between treatments for the area under the time-sedation curve (AUCsed ) and pharmacokinetic parameters. Significance was set at p Detomidine-induced intestinal hypomotility was prevented by MK-467. AUCsed was significantly higher with DET than DET + MK, but maximal sedations scores did not differ significantly between treatments. MK-467 lowered the AUC of the plasma concentration of detomidine, and increased its volume of distribution and clearance. MK-467 prevented detomidine induced bradycardia and intestinal hypomotility. MK-467 did not affect the clinical quality of detomidine-induced sedation, but the duration of the effect was reduced, which may have been caused by the effects of MK-467 on the plasma concentration of detomidine. MK-467 may be useful clinically in the prevention of certain peripheral side effects of detomidine in horses. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  12. Green Pharmaceutical Analysis of Drugs Coformulated with Highly Different Concentrations Using Spiking and Manipulation of Their Ratio Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Bassam M

    2017-07-01

    Introducing green analysis to pharmaceutical products is considered a significant approach to preserving the environment. This method can be an environmentally friendly alternative to the existing methods, accompanied by a validated automated procedure for the analysis of a drug with the lowest possible number of samples. Different simple spectrophotometric methods were developed for the simultaneous determination of empagliflozin (EG) and metformin (MT) by manipulating their ratio spectra in their application on a recently approved pharmaceutical combination, Synjardy tablets. A spiking technique was used to increase the concentration of EG in samples prepared from the tablets to allow for the simultaneous determination of EG with MT without prior separation. Validation parameters according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines were acceptable over a concentration range of 2-12 μg/mL for both drugs using derivative ratio and ratio subtraction coupled with extended ratio subtraction. The optimized methods were compared using one-way analysis of variance and proved to be suitable as ecofriendly approaches for industrial QC laboratories.

  13. Therapeutic drug monitoring of atypical antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grundmann Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder often associated with cognitive impairment and affective, mainly depressive, symptoms. Antipsychotic medication is the primary intervention for stabilization of acute psychotic episodes and prevention of recurrences and relapses in patients with schizophrenia. Typical antipsychotics, the older class of antipsychotic agents, are currently used much less frequently than newer atypical antipsychotics. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM of antipsychotic drugs is the specific method of clinical pharmacology, which involves measurement of drug serum concentrations followed by interpretation and good cooperation with the clinician. TDM is a powerful tool that allows tailor-made treatment for the specific needs of individual patients. It can help in monitoring adherence, dose adjustment, minimizing the risk of toxicity and in cost-effectiveness in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The review provides complex knowledge indispensable to clinical pharmacologists, pharmacists and clinicians for interpretation of TDM results.

  14. Demographic and health related data of users of a mobile application to support drug adherence is associated with usage duration and intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Becker

    Full Text Available A wealth of mobile applications are designed to support users in their drug intake. When developing software for patients, it is important to understand the differences between individuals who have, who will or who might never adopt mobile interventions. This study analyzes demographic and health-related factors associated with real-life "longer usage" and the "usage-intensity per day" of the mobile application "Medication Plan".Between 2010-2012, the mobile application "Medication Plan" could be downloaded free of charge from the Apple-App-Store. It was aimed at supporting the regular and correct intake of medication. Demographic and health-related data were collected via an online questionnaire. This study analyzed captured data.App-related activities of 1799 users (1708 complete data sets were recorded. 69% (1183/1708 applied "Medication Plan" for more than a day. 74% were male (872/1183, the median age 45 years. Variance analysis showed a significant effect of the users' age with respect to duration of usage (p = 0.025. While the mean duration of use was only 23.3 days for users younger than 21 years, for older users, there was a substantial increase over all age cohorts up to users of 60 years and above (103.9 days. Sex and educational status had no effect. "Daily usage intensity" was directly associated with an increasing number of prescribed medications and increased from an average of 1.87 uses per day and 1 drug per day to on average 3.71 uses per day for users stating to be taking more than 7 different drugs a day (p<0.001. Demographic predictors (sex, age and educational attainment did not affect usage intensity.Users aged 60+ as well as those with complicated therapeutic drug regimens relied on the service we provided for more than three months on average. Mobile applications may be a promising approach to support the treatment of patients with chronic conditions.

  15. Soybean greatly reduces valproic acid plasma concentrations: A food–drug interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marahatta, Anu; Bhandary, Bidur; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of soy on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of valproic acid (VPA). In a preclinical study, rats were pretreated with two different amounts of soy extract for five days (150 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg), which resulted in decreases of 57% and 65% in the Cmax of VPA, respectively. AUC of VPA decreased to 83% and 70% in the soy pretreatment groups. Interestingly, the excretion rate of VPA glucuronide (VPAG) was higher in the soy-fed groups. Levels of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) UGT1A3, UGT1A6, UGT2B7 and UGT2B15 were elevated in the soy-treated group, and GABA concentrations were elevated in the brain after VPA administration. However, this was less pronounced in soy extract pretreated group than for the untreated group. This is the first study to report the effects of soy pretreatment on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of VPA in rodents. PMID:24618639

  16. Soybean greatly reduces valproic acid plasma concentrations: a food-drug interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marahatta, Anu; Bhandary, Bidur; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2014-03-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of soy on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of valproic acid (VPA). In a preclinical study, rats were pretreated with two different amounts of soy extract for five days (150 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg), which resulted in decreases of 57% and 65% in the Cmax of VPA, respectively. AUC of VPA decreased to 83% and 70% in the soy pretreatment groups. Interestingly, the excretion rate of VPA glucuronide (VPAG) was higher in the soy-fed groups. Levels of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) UGT1A3, UGT1A6, UGT2B7 and UGT2B15 were elevated in the soy-treated group, and GABA concentrations were elevated in the brain after VPA administration. However, this was less pronounced in soy extract pretreated group than for the untreated group. This is the first study to report the effects of soy pretreatment on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of VPA in rodents.

  17. Serum concentrations of psychotropic drugs in neonates as a PROgnOstic Factor for admission to the neonatology ward and withdrawal symptoms: PROOF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparla, Shirley C A; Coppens, Hans; Evers, Inge M; Stramrood, Claire A I; Pasker-de Jong, Pieternel C M; van der Westerlaken, Monique M L; Hogeman, Paul H G; Malingré, Mirte M

    2017-05-01

    The aim is to determine whether serum drug concentrations obtained from the neonate's umbilical cord can be used as a prognostic factor for admission to the neonatology ward and the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms. A retrospective observational monocenter cohort study was carried out among pregnant women using psychotropic drugs and their baby. Binary logistic regression was used for the multivariate analysis. Of the 186 neonates included, 22.6% (n=42) were admitted to the neonatology ward, 6.5% (n=12) because of withdrawal. Among women with therapeutic concentrations of psychotropic medication, 22.0% (n=5) of the neonates had withdrawal symptoms. When comparing neonates with therapeutic versus undetectable drug concentrations, an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.1-8.6) was found for admission to the neonatology ward and an odds ratio of 20.5 (95% confidence interval: 2.2-186.1) for the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms. Therapeutic concentrations of psychotropic drugs in neonates' umbilical cord blood correspond with higher odds for admission to the neonatology ward and the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms compared with neonates with undetectable drug concentrations. The measurement of drug concentrations in the neonate may contribute toward the general clinical assessment of the physician to predict the necessity of admission to the neonatology ward and the risk of withdrawal symptoms.

  18. Correlation between the use of 'over-the-counter' medicines and adherence in elderly patients on multiple medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Charlotte; Harbig, Philipp; Barat, Ishay

    2014-01-01

    (herbal medicines, dietary supplements, or non-prescribed drugs) was elicited during home visit interviews. Prescription drug adherence was determined by pill counts. A patient was categorised as non-adherent if the mean adherence rate for all drugs consumed was ... to be adherent than were non-users (odds ratio 0.41; 95 % confidence interval 0.18–0.91). Sensitivity analyses where adherence was defined different show no relationship between adherence and use of OTC medicine. Furthermore, separate analyses of herbal medicines, dietary supplements, or non-prescribed drugs did...... not correlate with adherence to prescriptions. Conclusion Amongst elderly patients on multiple medications a positive relationship was found between the overall use of OTC medicines and adherence to prescription drugs, in contrast to none when adherence were defined different or herbal medicines, dietary...

  19. Patient Adherence to Biologic Agents in Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Der Yi; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low adherence to therapies in psoriasis decreases treatment outcomes and increases the total health care costs. In spite of the wide use of biologic agents, patients' adherence to these drugs has not been extensively investigated. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to measure adherence...... to the biologic drugs in a population of patients treated for psoriasis vulgaris using the medication possession ratio (MPR) index and to survey patients' attitudes to the treatment. METHODS: This is a single-center study on 247 patients with psoriasis vulgaris treated with adalimumab (n = 113), etanercept (n...... = 39), and ustekinumab (n = 95). MPR calculation was calculated monthly based on the hospital records documenting the dispensing of biologics to the patients. Clinical data [Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), presence of psoriatic arthritis, concomitant...

  20. Determinants of adherence to methylphenidate and the impact of poor adherence on maternal and family measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Susan S F; Shen, Hsin-Yi; Chou, Miao-Churn; Tang, Ching-Shu; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Gau, Churn-Shiouh

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between adherence to immediate-release methylphenidate (IR MPH) and maternal psychological distress, parenting style, parent- child relationship, and perceived family support. The sample consisted of 307 children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (271 boys and 36 girls), 6-17 years of age, who had been treated with IR MPH for the past 6 months. The measures included the Chinese Health Questionnaire, Parental Bonding Instrument, Family APGAR, and Home Behaviors of the Social Adjustment Inventory for Children and Adolescents. Reasons for poor adherence (n = 79; 25.7%) included forgetting medication (72.7%), the medication having no effect (20.0%), and refusing medication (12.7%). Increased age and three-times-daily administration were the major predictors for poor adherence to IR MPH. Poor adherence was associated with increased degree of maternal psychological distress, indifferent parenting, maternal overprotection/control, poor family support, decreased interaction with parents, and increased problems at home. Findings indicate that multiple daily dosing of MPH increases the likelihood of poor adherence, particularly in adolescents, and that poor adherence is associated with impaired maternal/family process. Once-daily administration of MPH is necessary to improve adherence and to decrease the possible exacerbation of tense parent-child relationships caused by poor drug adherence.

  1. Doxorubicin-loaded QuadraSphere microspheres: plasma pharmacokinetics and intratumoral drug concentration in an animal model of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Hun; Liapi, Eleni A; Cornell, Curt; Reb, Philippe; Buijs, Manon; Vossen, Josephina A; Ventura, Veronica Prieto; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro and in vivo, doxorubicin-loaded poly (vinyl alcohol-sodium acrylate) copolymer microspheres [QuadraSphere microspheres (QSMs)] for transcatheter arterial delivery in an animal model of liver cancer. Doxorubicin loading efficiency and release profile were first tested in vitro. In vivo, 15 rabbits, implanted with a Vx-2 tumor in the liver, were divided into three groups of five rabbits each, based on the time of euthanasia. Twenty-five milligrams of QSMs was diluted in 10 ml of a 10 mg/ml doxorubicin solution and 10 ml of nonionic contrast medium for a total volume of 20 ml. One milliliter of a drug-loaded QSM solution containing 5 mg of doxorubicin was injected into the tumor feeding artery. Plasma doxorubicin and doxorubicinol concentrations, and intratumoral and peritumoral doxorubicin tissue concentrations, were measured. Tumor specimens were pathologically evaluated to record tumor necrosis. As a control, one animal was blandly embolized with plain QSMs in each group. In vitro testing of QSM doxorubicin loadability and release over time showed 82-94% doxorubicin loadability within 2 h and 6% release within the first 6 h after loading, followed by a slow release pattern. In vivo, the doxorubicin plasma concentration declined at 40 min. The peak doxorubicin intratumoral concentration was observed at 3 days and remained detectable till the study's end point (7 days). Mean percentage tumor cell death in the doxorubicin QSM group was 90% at 7 days and 60% in the bland QSM embolization group. In conclusion, QSMs can be efficiently loaded with doxorubicin. Initial experiments with doxorubicin-loaded QSMs show a safe pharmacokinetic profile and effective tumor killing in an animal model of liver cancer.

  2. Doxorubicin-Loaded QuadraSphere Microspheres: Plasma Pharmacokinetics and Intratumoral Drug Concentration in an Animal Model of Liver Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Hun; Liapi, Eleni A.; Cornell, Curt; Reb, Philippe; Buijs, Manon; Vossen, Josephina A.; Ventura, Veronica Prieto; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro and in vivo, doxorubicin-loaded poly (vinyl alcohol-sodium acrylate) copolymer microspheres [QuadraSphere microspheres (QSMs)] for transcatheter arterial delivery in an animal model of liver cancer. Doxorubicin loading efficiency and release profile were first tested in vitro. In vivo, 15 rabbits, implanted with a Vx-2 tumor in the liver, were divided into three groups of five rabbits each, based on the time of euthanasia. Twenty-five milligrams of QSMs was diluted in 10 ml of a 10 mg/ml doxorubicin solution and 10 ml of nonionic contrast medium for a total volume of 20 ml. One milliliter of a drug-loaded QSM solution containing 5 mg of doxorubicin was injected into the tumor feeding artery. Plasma doxorubicin and doxorubicinol concentrations, and intratumoral and peritumoral doxorubicin tissue concentrations, were measured. Tumor specimens were pathologically evaluated to record tumor necrosis. As a control, one animal was blandly embolized with plain QSMs in each group. In vitro testing of QSM doxorubicin loadability and release over time showed 82-94% doxorubicin loadability within 2 h and 6% release within the first 6 h after loading, followed by a slow release pattern. In vivo, the doxorubicin plasma concentration declined at 40 min. The peak doxorubicin intratumoral concentration was observed at 3 days and remained detectable till the study's end point (7 days). Mean percentage tumor cell death in the doxorubicin QSM group was 90% at 7 days and 60% in the bland QSM embolization group. In conclusion, QSMs can be efficiently loaded with doxorubicin. Initial experiments with doxorubicin-loaded QSMs show a safe pharmacokinetic profile and effective tumor killing in an animal model of liver cancer.

  3. Evaluation of Flexible Tacrolimus Drug Concentration Monitoring Approach in Patients Receiving Extended-Release Once-Daily Tacrolimus Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philosophe, Benjamin; Leca, Nicolae; West-Thielke, Patricia M; Horwedel, Timothy; Culkin-Gemmell, Christine; Kistler, Kristin; Stevens, Daniel R

    2018-02-20

    The majority of United States kidney transplant patients are treated with tacrolimus, a drug effective in preventing graft rejection, but with a narrow therapeutic range, necessitating close monitoring to avoid increased risks of transplant rejection or toxicity if the tacrolimus concentration is too low or too high, respectively. The trough drug concentration tests are time sensitive; patients treated on a twice-daily basis have blood draws exactly 12 hours after their previous dose. The schedule's rigidity causes problems for both patients and health care providers. Novel once-daily tacrolimus formulations such as LCPT (an extended-release tablet by Veloxis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cary, North Carolina) have allowed for blood draws on a once-daily basis; however, even that schedule can be restrictive. Results from tests taken either before or after that 24-hour target time may be discarded, or worse, may lead to inappropriate dose changes. Data from ASTCOFF, a phase 3B pharmacokinetic clinical trial (NCT02339246), demonstrated that the unique pharmacokinetic curve of LCPT may allow for a therapeutic monitoring window that extends for 3 hours before or after the 24-hour monitoring target. Furthermore, important tools to help clinicians interpret these levels, such as formulas to estimate the 24-hour trough level if an alternative monitoring time is used, were constructed from these data. These study results give treating clinicians access to data that allow them to safely use and monitor LCPT in their patients and expand the body of evidence surrounding differentiation and practical application of the novel LCPT tacrolimus formulation. © 2018, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Radiation sensitivity of microorganisms adhering to the crude drug ''Bezoar Bovis'' and stability of its main components for γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Tokuhiro; Okamoto, Shinichi; Kimura, Syojiro; Taimatsu, Meiko; Endo, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    The sterilization dose (SD) of γ rays required for the microbial-contaminated crude drug ''Bezoar Bovis'' and the residual rates of its characteristic and effective components, bilirubin and some kinds of cholic acid, were studied experimentally. Samples of Bezoar Bovis made in America were used. The contamination level of the samples was 2.2 x 10 8 cells of bacteria and 6.0 x 10 5 spores of fungi per g specimen. The survival rate of these microorganisms showed nearly an exponential dependence on radiation dose. The decimal reduction doses (D 10 ) for the bacteria and fungi were found to be 1.5 kGy and 1.1 kGy respectively. From these values, the dose required for attaining the contamination level provided by the administrative guidance (Bacteria, 3 cells/g; Fungi, 2 spores/g) were estimated to be 7.5 kGy and 4.3 kGy, respectively. The G-values for bilirubin, cholic acid and deoxycholic acid were calculated to be 13, 6 and 8, respectively. If the sterilization treatment is carried out with a dose less than 10 kGy on the specimen in a dry powder state, the reduction of the main components such as bilirubin and cholic acids by γ-ray irradiation is considered to be negligible. (author)

  5. Does good medication adherence really save payers money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Bruce C; Dai, Mingliang; Xu, Jing; Loh, Feng-Hua E; S Dougherty, Julia

    2015-06-01

    Despite a growing consensus that better adherence with evidence-based medications can save payers money, assertions of cost offsets may be incomplete if they fail to consider additional drug costs and/or are biased by healthy adherer behaviors unobserved in typical medical claims-based analyses. The objective of this study was to determine whether controlling for healthy adherer bias (HAB) materially affected estimated medical cost offsets and additional drug spending associated with higher adherence. A total of 1273 Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes enrolled in Part D plans between 2006 and 2009. Using survey and claims data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, we measured medical and drug costs associated with good and poor adherence (proportion of days covered ≥ 80% and <80%, respectively) to oral antidiabetic drugs, ACE inhibitors/ARBs, and statins over 2 years. To test for HAB, we estimated pairs of regression models, one set containing variables typically controlled for in conventional claims analysis and a second set with survey-based variables selected to capture HAB effects. We found consistent evidence that controlling for HAB reduces estimated savings in medical costs from better adherence, and likewise, reduces estimates of additional adherence-related drug spending. For ACE inhibitors/ARBs we estimate that controlling for HAB reduced adherence-related medical cost offsets from $6389 to $4920 per person (P<0.05). Estimates of additional adherence-related drug costs were 26% and 14% lower in HAB-controlled models (P < 0.05). These results buttress the economic case for action by health care payers to improve medication adherence among insured persons with chronic disease. However, given the limitations of our research design, further research on larger samples with other disease states is clearly warranted.

  6. Patient Medication Knowledge Governing Adherence to Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asthma is a chronic disease and often requires complex management. This study was undertaken in four pharmacies–V-Ninat Pharmacy, Videc Chemists, Tomabel Pharmacy and Josbet Chemists, all in Isolo, Lagos, to determine the level of adherence to the anti-asthmatic drugs by asthmatic patients who participated in the ...

  7. the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is better than cure' may therefore be applicable to the problem of non-adherence among patients on ART even more than in the management of chronic non- infectious diseases in which drug resistance is not an issue of concern. We therefore undertook an analysis of results from the adherence monitoring in our HIV care ...

  8. Isoniazid concentrations in hair and plasma area-under-the-curve exposure among children with tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Mave

    Full Text Available We measured hair and plasma concentrations of isoniazid among sixteen children with tuberculosis who underwent personal or video-assisted directly observed therapy and thus had 100% adherence. This study therefore defined typical isoniazid exposure parameters after two months of treatment among fully-adherent patients in both hair and plasma (plasma area under the concentration-time curve, AUC, estimated using pharmacokinetic data collected 0, 2, 4, and 6 hours after drug administration. We found that INH levels in hair among highly-adherent individuals did not correlate well with plasma AUC or trough concentrations, suggesting that each measure may provide incremental and complementary information regarding drug exposure in the context of TB treatment.

  9. Identification of intestinal loss of a drug through physiologically based pharmacokinetic simulation of plasma concentration-time profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie

    2008-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of the role of the gut as a metabolizing organ, recognition of gut wall metabolism and/or other factors contributing to intestinal loss of a compound has been a challenging task due to the lack of well characterized methods to distinguish it from first-pass hepatic extraction. The implications of identifying intestinal loss of a compound in drug discovery and development can be enormous. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) simulations of pharmacokinetic profiles provide a simple, reliable and cost-effective way to understand the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic processes. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of PBPK simulations in bringing to light intestinal loss of orally administered drugs, using two example compounds: verapamil and an in-house compound that is no longer in development (referred to as compound A in this article). A generic PBPK model, built in-house using MATLAB software and incorporating absorption, metabolism, distribution, biliary and renal elimination models, was employed for simulation of concentration-time profiles. Modulation of intrinsic hepatic clearance and tissue distribution parameters in the generic PBPK model was done to achieve a good fit to the observed intravenous pharmacokinetic profiles of the compounds studied. These optimized clearance and distribution parameters are expected to be invariant across different routes of administration, as long as the kinetics are linear, and were therefore employed to simulate the oral profiles of the compounds. For compounds with reasonably good solubility and permeability, an area under the concentration-time curve for the simulated oral profile that far exceeded the observed would indicate some kind of loss in the intestine. PBPK simulations applied to compound A showed substantial loss of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract in humans but not in rats. This accounted for the lower bioavailability of the

  10. Tacrolimus concentration/dose ratio as a therapeutic drug monitoring strategy: The influence of gender and comedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rančić Nemanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A combination of tacrolimus and other drugs such as corticosteroids has been commonly used immunosuppresive regimens. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that male and female may differ in their response to the equal drug treatment. The aim of the study was to estimated the use of tacrolimus concentration/dose (C/D ratio for the assessment of the influence of gender differences and comedication on tacrolimus exposure in renal transplant recipients. Methods. This prospective case series study included 54 patients, in which the unit of monitoring was outpatient examination (1,872 of the renal transplant patients. The patients were monitored in the period 2010-2014, starting one month after the transplantation. Tacrolimus trough concentrations (TTC were measured by chemiluminescence microparticles immunoassay. Results. TTC and the tacrolimus C/D ratio were significantly lower in the females comparing with the males. Contrary to the males, in the females a significant increase of the tacrolimus daily dose (TDD per body weight and TTC, along with the corticosteroid dose increase, was not accompanied by any significant changes in the tacrolimus C/D ratio; in different corticosteroid doses faster elimination of tacrolimus was found with the exception of the doses > 0.25 mg/kg. In the patients treated with proton pump inhibitors, mainly with pantoprazole TDD per body weight and TTC were significantly higher, while the tacrolimus C/D ratio was significantly lower compared to the patients without this treatment. In the patients treated with calcium channel blockers, TDD per body weight was significantly lower (particularly with amlodipine while the tacrolimus C/D ratio was higher compared to the patients who were not treated by them. Conclusion. A lower tacrolimus exposure was detected in females in comparison to males. When gender differences were considered in the context of different corticosteroid doses, faster

  11. [Adherence to pharmacological treatment in adult patients undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgnaolin, Vanessa; Figueiredo, Ana Elizabeth Prado Lima

    2012-06-01

    Adherence to treatment in patients on hemodialysis is not a simple process. Strategies to promote adherence will meet the need for improvements in the process of orientation concerning the disease and its pharmacological treatment. To identify compliance with pharmacological treatment of patients on hemodialysis and the main factors related to it we used the Adherence Scale. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. Interviews were conducted to collect socioeconomic, pharmacological data, as well as those regarding self-reported adherence to drug. Out of the 65 participants, 55.4% showed non-compliance. The mean number of drugs used was 4.1 ± 2.5 (self-report) and 6.2 ± 3.0 (prescription). Statistical analysis showed significant differences concerning compliance at different ages (> 60 years are more adherent). A significant proportion of patients have difficulty to comply with treatment and the main factor was forgetfulness. Regarding age, elderly patients are more adherent to treatment. The low level of knowledge about the used drugs may be one of the reasons for the lack of adherence, and the patient's orientation process by a team of multiprofessionals involved in assisting is a strategy to promote adherence.

  12. Transient improvement of urticaria induces poor adherence as assessed by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Sakae; Masuda, Koji; Hiragun, Takaaki; Inomata, Naoko; Furue, Masutaka; Onozuka, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Sugaya, Makoto; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shintani, Yoichi; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Abe, Shinya; Kobayashi, Miwa; Kitami, Yuki; Tanioka, Miki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Abe, Masatoshi; Hagihara, Akihito; Morisky, Donald E; Katoh, Norito

    2015-11-01

    Poor adherence to medication is a major public health challenge. Here, we aimed to determine the adherence to oral and topical medications and to analyze underlying associated factors using the translated Japanese version of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 regarding urticaria treatment. Web-based questionnaires were performed for 3096 registered dermatological patients, along with a subanalysis of 751 registered urticaria patients in this study. The adherence to oral medication was significantly associated with the frequency of hospital visits. Variables that affected the adherence to topical medication included age and experience of drug effectiveness. The rate of responses that "It felt like the symptoms had improved" varied significantly among the dermatological diseases treated with oral medications. Dermatologists should be aware that adherence to the treatment of urticaria is quite low. Regular visits and active education for patients with urticaria are mandatory in order to achieve a good therapeutic outcome by increasing the adherence. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  13. Suboptimal Antituberculosis Drug Concentrations and Outcomes in Small and HIV-Coinfected Children in India: Recommendations for Dose Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiastrennec, Benjamin; Ramachandran, Geetha; Karlsson, Mats O; Kumar, A K Hemanth; Bhavani, Perumal Kannabiran; Gangadevi, N Poorana; Swaminathan, Soumya; Gupta, Amita; Dooley, Kelly E; Savic, Radojka M

    2017-12-16

    This work aimed to evaluate the once-daily antituberculosis treatment as recommended by the new Indian pediatric guidelines. Isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide concentration-time profiles and treatment outcome were obtained from 161 Indian children with drug-sensitive tuberculosis undergoing thrice-weekly dosing as per previous Indian pediatric guidelines. The exposure-response relationships were established using a population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic approach. Rifampin exposure was identified as the unique predictor of treatment outcome. Consequently, children with low body weight (4-7 kg) and/or HIV infection, who displayed the lowest rifampin exposure, were associated with the highest probability of unfavorable treatment (therapy failure, death) outcome (P unfavorable ). Model-based simulation of optimized (P unfavorable ≤ 5%) rifampin once-daily doses were suggested per treatment weight band and HIV coinfection status (33% and 190% dose increase, respectively, from the new Indian guidelines). The established dose-exposure-response relationship could be pivotal in the development of future pediatric tuberculosis treatment guidelines. © 2017, The Authors Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. Postmortem Blood Concentrations of R- and S-Enantiomers of Methadone and EDDP in Drug Users: Influence of Co-Medication and P-glycoprotein Genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchard, Anders; Linnet, Kristian; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2010-01-01

    We investigated toxicological and pharmacogenetic factors that could influence methadone toxicity using postmortem samples. R- and S-methadone were measured in femoral blood from 90 postmortem cases, mainly drug users. The R-enantiomer concentrations significantly exceeded that of the S-enantiome......We investigated toxicological and pharmacogenetic factors that could influence methadone toxicity using postmortem samples. R- and S-methadone were measured in femoral blood from 90 postmortem cases, mainly drug users. The R-enantiomer concentrations significantly exceeded that of the S...

  15. Usefulness of saliva for measurement of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its metabolites: correlation with plasma drug concentrations and effect of salivary pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, M; Pichini, S; Farré, M; Ortuño, J; Roset, P N; Segura, J; de la Torre, R

    2001-10-01

    Saliva is an alternative biologic matrix for drugs-of-abuse testing that offers the advantages of noninvasive, rapid, and easy sampling. We studied the excretion profile of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its metabolites in both saliva and plasma, as well the effect of the drug on salivary pH. Saliva and plasma samples were obtained from eight healthy MDMA consumers after ingestion of a single 100-mg dose of the drug. Concentrations of MDMA and its main metabolites, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA), in saliva and plasma were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Apparent pharmacokinetic parameters for MDMA in saliva were estimated, and the saliva-to-plasma ratio at each time interval was calculated and correlated with salivary pH. MDMA, MDA, and HMMA were detected in saliva. Salivary concentrations of MDMA were 1728.9-6510.6 microg/L and peaked at 1.5 h after drug intake. This was followed by a progressive decrease, with a mean concentration of 126.2 microg/L at 24 h. The saliva-to-plasma ratio was 32.3-1.2, with a peak of 18.1 at 1.5 h after drug administration. Salivary pH seemed to be affected by MDMA administration; pH values decreased by 0.6 units (mean pH values of 6.9 and 6.8 at 1.5 and 4 h after drug administration vs predose pH of 7.4). Measurement of MDMA in saliva is a valuable alternative to determination of plasma drug concentrations in both clinical and toxicologic studies. On-site testing is also facilitated by noninvasive and rapid collection of salivary specimens.

  16. Parallel monitoring of plasma and intraluminal drug concentrations in man after oral administration of fosamprenavir in the fasted and fed state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of linking the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug with its gastrointestinal behavior by simultaneously monitoring plasma and intraluminal drug concentrations. Fosamprenavir, a phosphate ester prodrug of the poorly water-soluble HIV-inhibitor amprenavir, was selected as model compound. A single tablet of fosamprenavir (Telzir) was administered to 5 volunteers in the fasted and fed state (simulated by intake of a nutritional drink). Gastric and duodenal fluids were aspirated in function of time and characterized with respect to the concentration of (fos)amprenavir, inorganic phosphate and pH. In parallel, blood samples were collected and analyzed for amprenavir. The observed plasma concentration-time profiles suggested a food-induced delay in the absorption of amprenavir: in the fed state, mean tmax increased by more than 150 min compared to the fasted state. A similar delay was seen in the duodenal appearance of fosamprenavir (concentrations in mM-range) and, after dephosphorylation, amprenavir (concentrations below 160 microM). This observation could be related to the behavior of fosamprenavir in the stomach. In the fasted state, gastric dissolution of fosamprenavir started immediately, resulting in a Cmax of 4 +/- 2 mM after 43 +/- 15 min; however, in the fed state, the fosamprenavir concentration remained below 20 microM for the first 90 min after drug intake. The postponed gastric dissolution may be attributed to a food-induced delay in tablet disintegration. For the first time, the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug was monitored in parallel with its gastrointestinal concentrations. The observed food effect in the plasma concentration-time profile of amprenavir after intake of its phosphate ester prodrug could be related to a food-induced delay in gastric dissolution of fosamprenavir.

  17. Nonsmoker Exposure to Secondhand Cannabis Smoke. III. Oral Fluid and Blood Drug Concentrations and Corresponding Subjective Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Edward J; Bigelow, George E; Herrmann, Evan S; Mitchell, John M; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ronald; Vandrey, Ryan

    2015-09-01

    The increasing use of highly potent strains of cannabis prompted this new evaluation of human toxicology and subjective effects following passive exposure to cannabis smoke. The study was designed to produce extreme cannabis smoke exposure conditions tolerable to drug-free nonsmokers. Six experienced cannabis users smoked cannabis cigarettes [5.3% Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in Session 1 and 11.3% THC in Sessions 2 and 3] in a closed chamber. Six nonsmokers were seated alternately with smokers during exposure sessions of 1 h duration. Sessions 1 and 2 were conducted with no ventilation and ventilation was employed in Session 3. Oral fluid, whole blood and subjective effect measures were obtained before and at multiple time points after each session. Oral fluid was analyzed by ELISA (4 ng/mL cutoff concentration) and by LC-MS-MS (limit of quantitation) for THC (1 ng/mL) and total THCCOOH (0.02 ng/mL). Blood was analyzed by LC-MS-MS (0.5 ng/mL) for THC, 11-OH-THC and free THCCOOH. Positive tests for THC in oral fluid and blood were obtained for nonsmokers up to 3 h following exposure. Ratings of subjective effects correlated with the degree of exposure. Subjective effect measures and amounts of THC absorbed by nonsmokers (relative to smokers) indicated that extreme secondhand cannabis smoke exposure mimicked, though to a lesser extent, active cannabis smoking. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Relation between CYP2D6 Genotype, Phenotype and Therapeutic Drug Concentrations among Nortriptyline and Venlafaxine Users in Old Age Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berm, E; Kok, R.; Hak, E; Wilffert, B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine relations between drug concentrations and the cytochrome P450-CYP2D6 genotype or phenotype among elderly patients treated with nortriptyline or venlafaxine. Methods: A post-hoc analysis of a clinical trial was performed. Patients were grouped into phenotypes according to the

  19. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaip Krasniqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB. To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188. Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker’s commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  20. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Neziri, Burim

    2017-01-01

    The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients' adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109-0.188). Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker's commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  1. Predictors of medication non-adherence for vasculitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Susan L.; DeVellis, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to document whether demographic, clinical, regimen-related, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors predict medication non-adherence for vasculitis patients. A secondary purpose is to explore whether adherence varies by medication type and whether patients experienced drug-related side effects. Vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online baseline and 3-month follow-up surveys. Demographic (age, gender, education, race, marital status, and insurance status), clinical (perceived vasculitis severity, disease duration, vasculitis type, and relapse/remission status), regimen-related (experience of side effects), intrapersonal (depressive symptoms), and interpersonal (adherence-related support from family and friends) factors were measured at baseline. Medication non-adherence was assessed at follow-up using the Vasculitis Self-Management Survey medication adherence sub-scale (α=0.89). Variables that significantly correlated (pvasculitis medication types, patients who experienced side effects were less adherent than patients who did not experience side effects. Multiple factors are associated with medication non-adherence for vasculitis patients. Providers should discuss medication adherence and drug-related side effects with vasculitis patients. Providers may want to particularly target younger patients and patients with clinical signs of depression. PMID:23314654

  2. Modelling imperfect adherence to HIV induction therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith? Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction-maintenance therapy is a treatment regime where patients are prescribed an intense course of treatment for a short period of time (the induction phase, followed by a simplified long-term regimen (maintenance. Since induction therapy has a significantly higher chance of pill fatigue than maintenance therapy, patients might take drug holidays during this period. Without guidance, patients who choose to stop therapy will each be making individual decisions, with no scientific basis. Methods We use mathematical modelling to investigate the effect of imperfect adherence during the inductive phase. We address the following research questions: 1. Can we theoretically determine the maximal length of a possible drug holiday and the minimal number of doses that must subsequently be taken while still avoiding resistance? 2. How many drug holidays can be taken during the induction phase? Results For a 180 day therapeutic program, a patient can take several drug holidays, but then has to follow each drug holiday with a strict, but fairly straightforward, drug-taking regimen. Since the results are dependent upon the drug regimen, we calculated the length and number of drug holidays for all fifteen protease-sparing triple-drug cocktails that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Conclusions Induction therapy with partial adherence is tolerable, but the outcome depends on the drug cocktail. Our theoretical predictions are in line with recent results from pilot studies of short-cycle treatment interruption strategies and may be useful in guiding the design of future clinical trials.

  3. Adherence to antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2007-01-01

    Depression is a common disorder with painful symptoms and, frequently, social impairment and decreased quality of life. The disorder has a tendency to be long lasting, often with frequent recurrence of symptoms. The risk of relapse and the severity of the symptoms may be reduced by correct...... of dependence of antidepressant medicine, have a great influence on adherence to treatment....

  4. adherence to antiretroviral regimens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to macro- and microeconomic costs.' What soon became evident, however, was the vital importance of patient adherence with prescribed medication in order to garner the benefits that were so rapidly becoming available. As a result, much attention has recently been paid to this aspect of management. Both clinicians and ...

  5. An integrated approach to care attracts people living with HIV who use illicit drugs in an urban centre with a concentrated HIV epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People living with HIV (PLHIV who are also marginalized by social and structural inequities often face barriers to accessing and adhering to HIV treatment and care. The Dr. Peter Centre (DPC is a non-profit integrated care facility with a supervised injection room that serves PLHIV experiencing multiple barriers to social and health services in Vancouver, Canada. This study examines whether the DPC is successful in drawing in PLHIV with complex health issues, including addiction. Methods Using data collected by the Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary health services (LISA study from July 2007 to January 2010, linked with clinical variables available through the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program, we identified DPC and non-DPC clients with a history of injection drug use. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses compared socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of DPC clients (n = 76 and non-DPC clients (n = 482 with a history of injection drug use. Results Of the 917 LISA participants included within this analysis, 100 (10.9% reported being a DPC client, of which 76 reported a history of injection drug use. Adjusted results found that compared to non-DPC clients with a history of injection drug use, DPC-clients were more likely to be male (AOR: 4.18, 95% CI = 2.09–8.37; use supportive services daily vs. less than daily (AOR: 3.16, 95% CI = 1.79–5.61; to have been diagnosed with a mental health disorder (AOR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.12–3.99; to have a history of interpersonal violence (AOR: 2.76; 95% CI: 1.23–6.19; and to have ever experienced ART interruption longer than 1 year (AOR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.38–4.15. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that the DPC operating care model engages PLHIV with complex care needs, highlighting that integrated care facilities are needed to support the multiple intersecting vulnerabilities faced

  6. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-02

    Sep 2, 2012 ... reported that the number of people newly infected with HIV and the number .... and immunity. Subjects were ... of change in adherence as a response ..... retroviral drugs: Theorising contextual relationships. ... Drug-resistant HIV-1: The virus strikes back. ... persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

  7. [Improving treatment adherence in kidney transplantation: a major challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michèle

    2014-06-01

    The kidney transplant recipient is faced not only with the perspective of taking immunosuppressive drugs lifelong, but also the possibility of other long-term treatments prescribed for preexisting conditions, complications, or side effects. Proper management, and most importantly patient adherence, can become a complex challenge. Here we recall current definitions and describe methods for measuring treatment adherence, followed by a discussion on the prevalence of non-adherence in kidney transplant recipients, its effect on graft survival, and factors predictive of non-adherence. Ways of improving adherence are examined, leading to the conviction that helping patients take their medications regularly would probably have a greater impact on graft survival than marketing a new immunosuppressive agent. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Patients' Adherence in the Maintenance Therapy of Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremeike, K; Juergens, C; Alz, H; Reinhardt, D

    2015-11-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common form of paediatric cancer. Maintenance therapy as last treatment phase includes oral chemotherapy with methotrexate (MTX) and mercaptopurine (6-MP), self- or parent-administered at home, given for about 1 ½ years, and qualified as decisive for an optimum therapy outcome. The aim of our study was to analyze factors influencing the adherence of patients with ALL undergoing maintenance therapy and their families. A multi-method study was undertaken between 11/2011 and 10/2014 with patients surveyed by the Hannover Medical School outpatient clinic, including a questionnaire survey and qualitative interviews with parents as well as blood samples of the patients. 33 questionnaires, 27 interviews and blood samples of 26 patients could be analyzed. Only one third of the blood samples showed concentrations of the 6-MP active metabolite within the therapeutic reference range. Parents named the clinical doctor as their main advisor on medication intake. 36% (12/33) of the participants stated that medication intake has not always occurred the way medication was prescribed. Drug formulation and drug intake information could be identified as determinants of adherence. Parents' problems to obtain information are partly caused by different study results concerning the correct timing of the drug intake and drug interactions with milk products. Parents' information on drug therapy should be more consistent and the pharmaceutical formulations have to be adapted to patients' needs to improve adherence and thereby the chance of long-term remission. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Comparison of direct sampling and brochoalveolar lavage for determining active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid of calves injected with enrofloxacin or tilmicosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, D M; Sylvester, H J; Papich, M G

    2017-12-01

    Antibiotic distribution to interstitial fluid (ISF) and pulmonary epithelial fluid (PELF) was measured and compared to plasma drug concentrations in eight healthy calves. Enrofloxacin (Baytril ® 100) was administered at a dose of 12.5 mg/kg subcutaneously (SC), and tilmicosin (Micotil ® 300) was administered at a dose of 20 mg/kg SC. PELF, sampled by two different methods-bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and direct sampling (DS)-plasma, and ISF were collected from each calf and measured for tilmicosin, enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin by HPLC. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on the concentrations in each fluid, for each drug. The enrofloxacin/ciprofloxacin concentration as measured by AUC in DS samples was 137 ± 72% higher than in plasma, but in BAL samples, this value was 535 ± 403% (p enrofloxacin/ciprofloxacin concentrations collected by DS were significantly different than those collected by BAL, but the tilmicosin concentrations were not significantly different between the two methods. Concentrations of enrofloxacin/ciprofloxacin exceeded the MIC values for bovine respiratory disease pathogens but tilmicosin did not reach MIC levels for these pathogens in any fluids. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of Daily Text Messages to Support Adherence to Preexposure Prophylaxis in Individuals at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus: The TAPIR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David J; Jain, Sonia; Dubé, Michael P; Daar, Eric S; Sun, Xiaoying; Young, Jason; Corado, Katya; Ellorin, Eric; Milam, Joel; Collins, Deborah; Blumenthal, Jill; Best, Brookie M; Anderson, Peter; Haubrich, Richard; Morris, Sheldon R

    2018-05-02

    Adherence is critical for efficacy of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (FTC) as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Between February 2013 and February 2016, 398 men who have sex with men and transgender women were randomized 1:1 to receive individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB) or standard care (SoC) for 48 weeks. The primary endpoint was dried blood spot (DBS) tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) concentrations at both week 12 and the last on-drug visit of >719 fmol/punch (ie, adequate adherence). Secondary outcomes included DBS TFV-DP concentrations of >1246 fmol/punch (ie, near-perfect adherence) and plasma FTC >350 ng/mL (consistent with dosing within the past 24 hours). Concentrations >719 fmol/punch of TFV-DP were found in 88.6% of participants at week 12 and 82.5% at week 48. For the primary endpoint, the study arms did not differ (72.0% in iTAB and 69.2% in SoC; P > .05). For the secondary composite endpoint of >1246 fmol/punch the iTAB arm was superior to SoC (33.5% vs 24.8%; P = .06), reaching statistical significance when adjusting for age (odds ratio, 1.56 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.42]; P .05). Automated text messaging is a low-burden tool that improves durability of near-perfect PrEP adherence. NCT01761643.

  11. Medication Adherence Apps: Review and Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Imran; Ahmad, Niall Safir; Ali, Shahnaz; Ali, Shair; George, Anju; Saleem Danish, Hiba; Uppal, Encarl; Soo, James; Mobasheri, Mohammad H; King, Dominic; Cox, Benita; Darzi, Ara

    2018-03-16

    Medication adherence is an expensive and damaging problem for patients and health care providers. Patients adhere to only 50% of drugs prescribed for chronic diseases in developed nations. Digital health has paved the way for innovative smartphone solutions to tackle this challenge. However, despite numerous apps available claiming to improve adherence, a thorough review of adherence apps has not been carried out to date. The aims of this study were to (1) review medication adherence apps available in app repositories in terms of their evidence base, medical professional involvement in development, and strategies used to facilitate behavior change and improve adherence and (2) provide a system of classification for these apps. In April 2015, relevant medication adherence apps were identified by searching the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store using a combination of relevant search terms. Data extracted included app store source, app price, documentation of health care professional (HCP) involvement during app development, and evidence base for each respective app. Free apps were downloaded to explore the strategies used to promote medication adherence. Testing involved a standardized medication regimen of three reminders over a 4-hour period. Nonadherence features designed to enhance user experience were also documented. The app repository search identified a total of 5881 apps. Of these, 805 fulfilled the inclusion criteria initially and were tested. Furthermore, 681 apps were further analyzed for data extraction. Of these, 420 apps were free for testing, 58 were inaccessible and 203 required payment. Of the 420 free apps, 57 apps were developed with HCP involvement and an evidence base was identified in only 4 apps. Of the paid apps, 9 apps had HCP involvement, 1 app had a documented evidence base, and 1 app had both. In addition, 18 inaccessible apps were produced with HCP involvement, whereas 2 apps had a documented evidence base. The 420 free apps were

  12. Mobile health (mHealth) based medication adherence measurement - a pilot trial using electronic blisters in diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brath, Helmut; Morak, Jürgen; Kästenbauer, Thomas; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Strohner-Kästenbauer, Hermine; Schwarz, Mark; Kort, Willem; Schreier, Günter

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a mobile health (mHealth) based remote medication adherence measurement system (mAMS) in elderly patients with increased cardiovascular risk treated for diabetes, high cholesterol and hypertension. Cardiovascular risk was defined as the presence of at least two out of the three risk factors: type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertension. For treatment of diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertension, four predefined routinely used drugs were selected. Drug adherence was investigated in a controlled randomized doctor blinded study with crossover design. The mAMS was used to measure and improve objectively the adherence by means of closed-loop interactions. The mean age of the 53 patients (30 female) was 69.4 ± 4.8 years. A total of 1654 electronic blisters were handed out. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.04) between the monitoring and the control phase was observed for the diabetes medication only. In a post-study questionnaire twenty-nine patients appreciated that their physician knew if and when they had taken their medications and 13 asked for more or automated communication with their physicians. Only one subject withdrew from the study because of technical complexity. The results indicate that mHealth based adherence management is feasible and well accepted by patients with increased cardiovascular risk. It may help to increase adherence, even in patients with high baseline adherence and, subsequently, lead to improved control of indicators including blood pressure and cholesterol concentrations. Electronic blisters can be used in a multi-medication regimen but need to be carefully designed for day-to-day application. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Can a digital medicine system improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papola, D; Gastaldon, C; Ostuzzi, G

    2018-06-01

    A substantial proportion of people with mental health conditions do not adhere to prescribed pharmacological treatments. Poor adherence is probably one of the most critical elements contributing to relapse in people with schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders. In order to tackle this global issue, in November 2017 the Food and Drug Administration approved a tablet formulation of the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole embedded with a novel digital adherence-assessment device. In this commentary, we critically appraised the potential beneficial and harmful consequences of this new digital formulation of aripiprazole, and we highlighted expected implications for clinical practice.

  14. Medication adherence in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Silveira Adriano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate pharmacological treatment adherence of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, attended in an outpatient pharmacy at a tertiary hospital in northeastern Brazil. Methods: The analysis of adherence was performed along with caregivers, through a structured questionnaire based on Morisky, Green and Levine, which enabled the categorization of adherence in “highest”, “moderate” or “low” grades, and through evaluating medication dispensing registers, which classified the act of getting medications at the pharmacy as “regular” or “irregular”. Drug Related Problems (DRP were identified through the narrative of caregivers and classified according to the Second Granada Consensus. Then, a pharmaceutical orientation chart with information about the therapeutic regimen was applied, in order to function as a guide for issues that influenced adherence. Results: A total of 43 patients was included, with a mean age of 11.12 years, and 65.1% (n = 28 were female. Applying the questionnaire, it was found “highest” adherence in 46.5% (n = 20 patients, “moderate” adherence in 48.8% (n = 21, and “low” adherence in 4.7% (n = 2. Through an analysis of the medication dispensing registers, a lower level of adherence was observed: only 25.6% (n = 11 of the participants received “regularly” the medications. Twenty-six DRP was identified, and 84.6% (n = 22 were classified as real. There were no significant associations between socio-demographic variables and adherence, although some caregivers have reported difficulty in accessing the medicines and in understanding the treatment. Conclusion: Our findings showed problems in the adherence process related to inattention, forgetfulness and irregularity in getting medicines, reinforcing the need for the development of strategies to facilitate a better understanding of treatment and to ensure adherence.

  15. Patient adherence with COPD therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Rand

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there are very few published studies on adherence to treatment regimens in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the evidence that exists suggests that, as with asthma therapy, adherence is poor. Patient beliefs about COPD, as well as their motivation and expectations about the likelihood of success of medical interventions, can influence adherence rates. Other critical factors include the patient's understanding of their illness and therapy, and the complexity of the prescribed treatment regimen. Incorrect inhaler technique is also a common failing. When prescribing in primary or specialist care, healthcare professionals should address adherence as a vital part of the patient consultation. Improved patient education may also increase adherence rates.

  16. Effects of the summer holiday season on UV filter and illicit drug concentrations in the Korean wastewater system and aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Yong; Ekpeghere, Kalu Ibe; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2017-08-01

    Seasonal variations in the concentrations of eight ultraviolet (UV) filters and 22 illicit drugs including their metabolites in the Korean aquatic environment were investigated. Seawater samples from three beaches, water samples from two rivers, and influents and effluents from three wastewater treatment plants were analyzed. The UV filter concentrations in the seawater, river water, and effluent samples were 39.4-296, 35.4-117, and 6.84-51.1 ng L -1 , respectively. The total UV filter concentrations in the seawater samples were 1.9-4.4 times higher at the peak of the holiday season than outside the peak holiday season. An environmental risk assessment showed that ethylhexyl methoxy cinnamate (EHMC) could cause adverse effects on aquatic organisms in the seawater at the three beaches during the holiday period. Seven of the 22 target illicit drugs including their metabolites were detected in the wastewater influent samples, and the total illicit drug concentrations in the influent samples were 0.08-65.4 ng L -1 . The estimated daily consumption rates for cis-tramadol (Cis-TRM), methamphetamine (MTP), meperidine (MEP), and codeine (COD) were 25.7-118.4, 13.8-36.1, 1.36-12.6, and 1.75-8.64 mg d -1 (1000 people) -1 , respectively. In popular vacation area, the illicit drug consumption rates (Cis-TRM, MTP and MEP) were 1.6-2.6 times higher at the peak of the summer holiday season than at the beginning of the summer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dimethadione embryotoxicity in the rat is neither correlated with maternal systemic drug concentrations nor embryonic tissue levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolinš, Terence R.S., E-mail: ozolinst@queensu.ca [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen’s University, Botterell Hall, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Weston, Andrea D. [Currently at Applied Biotechnology/Lead Discovery, Bristol-Myers Squibb, 5 Research Pkwy Wallingford, CT 06492-1996 (United States); Perretta, Anthony [Currently at Pfizer Research and Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Thomson, Jason J. [Currently at Yale Stem Cell Center, Yale School of Medicine, PO Box 208073, New Haven, CT 06520-8073 (United States); Brown, Nigel A. [Division of Basic Medical Sciences, St. George’s University of London, UK SW17 0RE (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Pregnant rats treated with dimethadione (DMO), the N-demethylated metabolite of the anticonvulsant trimethadione, produce offspring having a 74% incidence of congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the incidence of CHD has high inter-litter variability (40–100%) that presents a challenge when studying the initiating events prior to the presentation of an abnormal phenotype. We hypothesized that the variability in CHD incidence was the result of differences in maternal systemic concentrations or embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO. To test this hypothesis, dams were administered 300 mg/kg DMO every 12 h from the evening of gestational day (GD) 8 until the morning of GD 11 (six total doses). Maternal serum levels of DMO were assessed on GD 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 18 and 21. Embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO were assessed on GD 11, 12, 13 and 14. In a separate cohort of GD 12 embryos, DMO concentrations and parameters of growth and development were assessed to determine if tissue levels of DMO were correlated with these endpoints. Embryos were exposed directly to different concentrations of DMO with whole embryo culture (WEC) and their growth and development assessed. Key findings were that neither maternal systemic concentrations nor tissue concentrations of DMO identified embryos that were sensitive or resistant to DMO in vivo. Direct exposure of embryos to DMO via WEC also failed to show correlations between embryonic concentrations of DMO with developmental outcomes in vitro. We conclude that neither maternal serum nor embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO predict embryonic outcome. - Highlights: • Dimethadione (DMO) induces septation defects (VSD) in rat offspring. • Despite high rate of VSD defects inter-litter variability is 40–100%. • Maternal and embryonic concentrations of DMO were assessed. • Neither serum nor tissue levels of DMO were correlated with embryotoxicity.

  18. Dimethadione embryotoxicity in the rat is neither correlated with maternal systemic drug concentrations nor embryonic tissue levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozolinš, Terence R.S.; Weston, Andrea D.; Perretta, Anthony; Thomson, Jason J.; Brown, Nigel A.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant rats treated with dimethadione (DMO), the N-demethylated metabolite of the anticonvulsant trimethadione, produce offspring having a 74% incidence of congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the incidence of CHD has high inter-litter variability (40–100%) that presents a challenge when studying the initiating events prior to the presentation of an abnormal phenotype. We hypothesized that the variability in CHD incidence was the result of differences in maternal systemic concentrations or embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO. To test this hypothesis, dams were administered 300 mg/kg DMO every 12 h from the evening of gestational day (GD) 8 until the morning of GD 11 (six total doses). Maternal serum levels of DMO were assessed on GD 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 18 and 21. Embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO were assessed on GD 11, 12, 13 and 14. In a separate cohort of GD 12 embryos, DMO concentrations and parameters of growth and development were assessed to determine if tissue levels of DMO were correlated with these endpoints. Embryos were exposed directly to different concentrations of DMO with whole embryo culture (WEC) and their growth and development assessed. Key findings were that neither maternal systemic concentrations nor tissue concentrations of DMO identified embryos that were sensitive or resistant to DMO in vivo. Direct exposure of embryos to DMO via WEC also failed to show correlations between embryonic concentrations of DMO with developmental outcomes in vitro. We conclude that neither maternal serum nor embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO predict embryonic outcome. - Highlights: • Dimethadione (DMO) induces septation defects (VSD) in rat offspring. • Despite high rate of VSD defects inter-litter variability is 40–100%. • Maternal and embryonic concentrations of DMO were assessed. • Neither serum nor tissue levels of DMO were correlated with embryotoxicity.

  19. Linezolid Trough Concentrations Correlate with Mitochondrial Toxicity-Related Adverse Events in the Treatment of Chronic Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Jeon, Han-Seung; Park, Yumi; Dodd, Lori E; Dartois, Véronique; Follman, Dean; Wang, Jing; Cai, Ying; Goldfeder, Lisa C; Olivier, Kenneth N; Xie, Yingda; Via, Laura E; Cho, Sang Nae; Barry, Clifton E; Chen, Ray Y

    2015-11-01

    Long-term linezolid use is limited by mitochondrial toxicity-associated adverse events (AEs). Within a prospective, randomized controlled trial of linezolid to treat chronic extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, we serially monitored the translational competence of mitochondria isolated from peripheral blood of participants by determining the cytochrome c oxidase/citrate synthase activity ratio. We compared this ratio with AEs associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Linezolid trough concentrations were determined for 38 participants at both 600 mg and 300 mg doses. Those on 600 mg had a significantly higher risk of AE than those on 300 mg (HR 3·10, 95% CI 1·23-7 · 86). Mean mitochondrial function levels were significantly higher in patients before starting linezolid compared to their concentrations on 300 mg (P = 0·004) or 600 mg (P linezolid trough concentrations were associated with lower mitochondrial function levels (Spearman's ρ = - 0.48; P = 0.005). Mitochondrial toxicity risk increased with increasing linezolid trough concentrations, with all patients with mean linezolid trough > 2 μg/ml developing an AE related to mitochondrial toxicity, whether on 300 mg or 600 mg. Therapeutic drug monitoring may be useful to prevent the development of mitochondrial toxicity associated with long-term linezolid use.

  20. Biodegradable drug-eluting nanofiber-enveloped implants for sustained release of high bactericidal concentrations of vancomycin and ceftazidime: in vitro and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yung-Heng Hsu,1,2 Dave Wei-Chih Chen,1 Chun-Der Tai,3 Ying-Chao Chou,1,2 Shih-Jung Liu,2 Steve Wen-Neng Ueng,1 Err-Cheng Chan4 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Guishan Township, 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Guishan Township, 3Graduate Institute of Medical Mechatronics, Chang Gung University, Guishan Township, 4School of Medical Technology, Chang Gung University, Guishan Township, Taiwan Abstract: We developed biodegradable drug-eluting nanofiber-enveloped implants that provided sustained release of vancomycin and ceftazidime. To prepare the biodegradable nanofibrous membranes, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide and the antibiotics were first dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol. They were electrospun into biodegradable drug-eluting membranes, which were then enveloped on the surface of stainless plates. An elution method and a high-performance liquid chromatography assay were employed to characterize the in vivo and in vitro release rates of the antibiotics from the nanofiber-enveloped plates. The results showed that the biodegradable nanofiber-enveloped plates released high concentrations of vancomycin and ceftazidime (well above the minimum inhibitory concentration for more than 3 and 8 weeks in vitro and in vivo, respectively. A bacterial inhibition test was carried out to determine the relative activity of the released antibiotics. The bioactivity ranged from 25% to 100%. In addition, the serum creatinine level remained within the normal range, suggesting that the high vancomycin concentration did not affect renal function. By adopting the electrospinning technique, we will be able to manufacture biodegradable drug-eluting implants for the long-term drug delivery of different antibiotics. Keywords: biodegradable nanofiber-enveloped plates, electrospinning, antibiotics, release characteristics

  1. Ketamine coadministration attenuates morphine tolerance and leads to increased brain concentrations of both drugs in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilius, T O; Jokinen, V; Neuvonen, M S; Niemi, M; Kalso, E A; Rauhala, P V

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The effects of ketamine in attenuating morphine tolerance have been suggested to result from a pharmacodynamic interaction. We studied whether ketamine might increase brain morphine concentrations in acute coadministration, in morphine tolerance and morphine withdrawal. Experimental Approach Morphine minipumps (6 mg·day–1) induced tolerance during 5 days in Sprague–Dawley rats, after which s.c. ketamine (10 mg·kg–1) was administered. Tail flick, hot plate and rotarod tests were used for behavioural testing. Serum levels and whole tissue brain and liver concentrations of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, ketamine and norketamine were measured using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Key Results In morphine-naïve rats, ketamine caused no antinociception whereas in morphine-tolerant rats there was significant antinociception (57% maximum possible effect in the tail flick test 90 min after administration) lasting up to 150 min. In the brain of morphine-tolerant ketamine-treated rats, the morphine, ketamine and norketamine concentrations were 2.1-, 1.4- and 3.4-fold, respectively, compared with the rats treated with morphine or ketamine only. In the liver of morphine-tolerant ketamine-treated rats, ketamine concentration was sixfold compared with morphine-naïve rats. After a 2 day morphine withdrawal period, smaller but parallel concentration changes were observed. In acute coadministration, ketamine increased the brain morphine concentration by 20%, but no increase in ketamine concentrations or increased antinociception was observed. Conclusions and Implications The ability of ketamine to induce antinociception in rats made tolerant to morphine may also be due to increased brain concentrations of morphine, ketamine and norketamine. The relevance of these findings needs to be assessed in humans. PMID:25297798

  2. Adherence of volatile propofol to various types of plastic tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, F; Lorenz, D J; Pielsticker, G; Volk, T; Sessler, D I; Baumbach, J I; Kreuer, S

    2017-01-23

    Propofol is an intravenous anesthetic. Currently, it is not possible to routinely measure blood concentration of the drug in real time. However, multi-capillary column ion-mobility spectrometry of exhaled gas can estimate blood propofol concentration. Unfortunately, adhesion of volatile propofol on plastic materials complicates measurements. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the extent to which volatile propofol adheres to various plastics used in sampling tubing. Perfluoralkoxy (PFA), polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), polyurethane (PUR), silicone, and Tygon tubing were investigated in an experimental setting using a calibration gas generator (HovaCAL). Propofol gas was measured for one hour at 26 °C, 50 °C, and 90 °C tubing temperature. Test tubing segments were then flushed with N 2 to quantify desorption. PUR and Tygon sample tubing absorbed all volatile propofol. The silicone tubing reached the maximum propofol concentration after 119 min which was 29 min after propofol gas exposure stopped. The use of PFA or PTFE tubing produced comparable and reasonably accurate propofol measurements. The desaturation time for the PFA was 10 min shorter at 26 °C than for PTFE. PFA tubing thus seems most suitable for measurement of volatile propofol, with PTFE as an alternative.

  3. Comparison of concentrations of drugs between blood samples with and without fluoride additive-important findings for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedfeld, Christopher; Krueger, Julia; Skopp, Gisela; Musshoff, Frank

    2018-02-17

    Fluoride is a common stabilizing agent in forensic toxicology to avoid the frequent problem of degradation of drugs in blood samples especially described for cocaine. In cases only samples with addition of fluoride are available, it is a crucial question if also concentrations of common drugs other than cocaine (amphetamines, opiates and cannabinoids) are affected by fluoride. So far, there are only rare literature data available on discrepant results especially for Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In this study, comparative analysis of positive tested paired routine plasma/serum samples (n = 375), collected at the same time point (one device with and one without fluoride), was carried out with special focus on cannabinoids. Samples were measured with validated routine liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (THC-OH), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, morphine, codeine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine, and results were statistically evaluated. Beside the expected stabilization effect on cocaine and the consequently reduced concentration of ecgonine methyl ester in fluoride samples, benzoylecgonine was elevated compared to respective samples without fluoride. Most importantly, new findings were significantly reduced mean concentrations of THC (- 17%), THC-OH (- 17%), and THC-COOH (- 22%) in fluoride samples. Mean amphetamine concentration was significantly higher in samples with the additive (+ 6%). For the other amphetamine type of drugs as well as for morphine and codeine, no significant differences could be seen. Whenever specified thresholds have been set, such as in most European countries, the use of different blood sample systems may result in a motorist being differently charged or prosecuted. The findings will support forensic toxicologists at the

  4. Reduced antituberculosis drug concentrations in HIV-infected patients who are men or have low weight: implications for international dosing guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlleron, Helen; Rustomjee, Roxana; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Mthiyane, Thuli; Denti, Paolo; Connolly, Catherine; Rida, Wasima; Pym, Alexander; Smith, Peter J; Onyebujoh, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    Reduced antituberculosis drug concentrations may contribute to unfavorable treatment outcomes among HIV-infected patients with more advanced immune suppression, and few studies have evaluated pharmacokinetics of the first-line antituberculosis drugs in such patients given fixed-dose combination tablets according to international guidelines using weight bands. In this study, pharmacokinetics were evaluated in 60 patients on 4 occasions during the first month of antituberculosis therapy. Multilevel linear mixed-effects regression analysis was used to examine the effects of age, sex, weight, drug dose/kilogram, CD4(+) lymphocyte count, treatment schedule (5 versus 7 days/week), and concurrent antiretrovirals (efavirenz plus lamivudine plus zidovudine) on the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h (AUC(0-12)) of the respective antituberculosis drugs and to compare AUC(0-12)s at day 8, day 15, and day 29 with the day 1 AUC(0-12). Median (range) age, weight, and CD4(+) lymphocyte count were 32 (18 to 47) years, 55.2 (34.4 to 98.7) kg, and 252 (12 to 500)/μl. For every 10-kg increase in body weight, the predicted day 29 AUC(0-12) increased by 14.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5, 20.8), 14.1% (95% CI, -0.7, 31.1), 6.1% (95% CI, 2.7, 9.6) and 6.0% (95% CI, 0.8, 11.3) for rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, respectively. Males had day 29 AUC(0-12)s 19.3% (95% CI, 3.6, 35.1) and 14.0% (95% CI, 5.6, 22.4) lower than females for rifampin and pyrazinamide, respectively. Level of immune suppression and concomitant antiretrovirals had little effect on the concentrations of the antituberculosis agents. As they had reduced drug concentrations, it is important to review treatment responses in patients in the lower weight bands and males to inform future treatment guidelines, and revision of doses in these patients should be considered.

  5. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  6. AIDS Diarrhea and Antiretroviral Drug Concentrations: A Matched-Pair Cohort Study in Port au Prince, Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillingham, Rebecca; Leger, Paul; Beauharnais, Carole-Anne; Miller, Erica; Kashuba, Angela; Jennings, Steven; Dupnik, Kathryn; Samie, Amidou; Eyma, Etna; Guerrant, Richard; Pape, Jean; Fitzgerald, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhea in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) may cause malabsorption of medications and failure of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We prospectively evaluated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients with and without chronic diarrhea initiating ART in Haiti. We report mean plasma antiretroviral concentrations at 2 and 4 weeks. We measured plasma HIV-1 RNA levels at four points. Fifty-two HIV-1-infected patients (26 matched pairs) were enrolled. No differences in antiretroviral concentrations were detected. At week 24, 18/25 (72%) cases and 16/24 (68%) controls had undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (P = 0.69). Patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels > 50 copies/mL at week 24 had lower early efavirenz concentrations than patients with undetectable HIV-1 RNA (2,621 ng/mL versus 5,278 ng/mL; P = 0.02). Diarrhea at ART initiation does not influence plasma concentrations of the medications evaluated. Virologic outcome at Week 24 does correlate with efavirenz concentrations early in therapy but not with the presence of chronic diarrhea. PMID:21633022

  7. Therapeutic drug monitoring in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Doreen M

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is commonly recommended to optimize drug dosing regimens of various medications. It has been proposed to guide therapy in pregnant women, in whom physiological changes may lead to altered pharmacokinetics resulting in difficulty in predicting the appropriate drug dosage. Ideally, TDM may play a role in enhancing the effectiveness of treatment while minimizing toxicity of both the mother and fetus. Monitoring of drug levels may also be helpful in assessing adherence to prescribed therapy in selected cases. Limitations exist as therapeutic ranges have only been defined for a limited number of drugs and are based on data obtained in nonpregnant patients. TDM has been suggested for anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and antiretroviral drugs, based on pharmacokinetic studies that have shown reduced drug concentrations. However, there is only relatively limited (and sometimes inconsistent) information regarding the clinical impact of these pharmacokinetic changes during pregnancy and the effect of subsequent dose adjustments. Further studies are required to determine whether implementation of TDM during pregnancy improves outcome and is associated with any benefit beyond that achieved by clinical judgment alone. The cost effectiveness of TDM programs during pregnancy also remains to be examined.

  8. Adherence as a language game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolberg, Espen Skarstein

    2017-04-01

    Non-adherence, i.e. medication intake behavior not corresponding with agreed recommendations, is associated with increased morbidity and death, and it has been estimated that as many as 50% of patients in developed countries are not taking their medications as prescribed. But even as efforts in improving medication adherence over the years have increased, results are inconsistent, with only a minority of clinical trials showing any improvement in both adherence and clinical outcome. Since patient education is central to promoting good medication adherence, and language is integral to education, perhaps an exploration of the meaning and use of language, using the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein, is in order.

  9. Andrographis paniculata Extract and Andrographolide Modulate the Hepatic Drug Metabolism System and Plasma Tolbutamide Concentrations in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haw-Wen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide is the most abundant terpenoid of A. paniculata which is used in the treatment of diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effects of A. paniculata extract (APE and andrographolide on the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in rat liver and determined whether modulation of these enzymes changed the pharmacokinetics of tolbutamide. Rats were intragastrically dosed with 2 g/kg/day APE or 50 mg/kg/day andrographolide for 5 days before a dose of 20 mg/kg tolbutamide was given. APE and andrographolide reduced the AUC0–12 h of tolbutamide by 37% and 18%, respectively, compared with that in controls. The protein and mRNA levels and enzyme activities of CYP2C6/11, CYP1A1/2, and CYP3A1/2 were increased by APE and andrographolide. To evaluate whether APE or andrographolide affected the hypoglycemic action of tolbutamide, high-fat diet-induced obese mice were used and treated in the same manner as the rats. APE and andrographolide increased CYP2C6/11 expression and decreased plasma tolbutamide levels. In a glucose tolerance test, however, the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide was not changed by APE or andrographolide. These results suggest that APE and andrographolide accelerate the metabolism rate of tolbutamide through increased expression and activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes. APE and andrographolide, however, do not impair the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide.

  10. Uninformed Clinical Decisions Resulting From Lack of Adherence Assessment in Children with New Onset Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani C.; Wu, Yelena P.; Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Glauser, Tracy A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between non-adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy and clinical decision-making in a cohort of 112 children with newly-diagnosed epilepsy. AED adherence was monitored using electronic monitoring over the first six months of therapy. The primary outcome measure was rate of uninformed clinical decisions as defined by number of participants with AED dosage or drug changes to address continued seizures who demonstrated non-adherence prior to the seizure. Among the 52 (47%) participants who had an AED change for continued seizures, 30 (27% of the overall cohort) had imperfect medication adherence prior to their seizures. A quarter of children with new onset epilepsy had uninformed medication changes because adherence was not rigorously assessed in clinical practice. Results highlight the importance of routinely assessing medication adherence in this population. PMID:23159375

  11. Application of Hill's equation for estimating area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and use of time to AUC 90% for expressing kinetics of drug disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsien C

    2009-01-01

    Half life and its derived pharmacokinetic parameters are calculated on an assumption that the terminal phase of drug disposition follows a constant rate of disposition. In reality, this assumption may not necessarily be the case. A new method is needed for analyzing PK parameters if the disposition does not follow a first order PK kinetic. Cumulative area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) is plotted against time to yield a hyperbolic (or sigmoidal) AUC-time relationship curve which is then analyzed by Hill's equation to yield AUC(inf), time to achieving AUC50% (T(AUC50%)) or AUC90% (T(AUC90%)), and the Hill's slope. From these parameters, an AUC-time relationship curve can be reconstructed. Projected plasma concentration can be calculated for any time point. Time at which cumulative AUC reaches 90% (T(AUC90%)) can be used as an indicator for expressing how fast a drug is cleared. Clearance is calculated in a traditional manner (i.v. dose/AUC(inf)), and the volume of distribution is proposed to be calculated at T(AUC50%) (0.5 i.v. dose/plasma concentration at T(AUC50%)). This method of estimating AUC is applicable for both i.v. and oral data. It is concluded that the Hill's equation can be used as an alternative method for estimating AUC and analysis of PK parameters if the disposition does not follow a first order kinetic. T(AUC90%) is proposed to be used as an indicator for expressing how fast a drug is cleared from the system.

  12. Effect of pH and comedication on gastrointestinal absorption of posaconazole: monitoring of intraluminal and plasma drug concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walravens, Jeroen; Brouwers, Joachim; Spriet, Isabel; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    Posaconazole (Noxafil®) is an extended-spectrum triazole antifungal agent for prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infections. An inadequate dietary intake and abnormal gastric pH levels are common in critically ill patients receiving antifungal treatment with posaconazole, resulting in unpredictable bioavailability and sub-therapeutic plasma concentrations. This study was carried out to elucidate the impact of pH on posaconazole absorption and to explore the underlying mechanisms of enhanced intestinal absorption when coadministering an acidic carbonated beverage. In contrast to previously published studies, in which only plasma concentrations were determined, we also explored the gastric and intestinal behaviour of posaconazole after a single oral dose. A crossover study was performed in five healthy subjects. A single dose (10 mL) of posaconazole suspension (40 mg/mL) was administered orally in four different conditions: with 330 mL of water (condition 1); with 330 mL of a cola beverage [Coca-Cola®] (condition 2); with 330 mL of water following intake of the proton pump inhibitor esomeprazole 40 mg once daily for 3 days (condition 3); or with 330 mL of Coca-Cola® following intake of esomeprazole 40 mg once daily for 3 days (condition 4). After administration, gastrointestinal fluid and plasma samples were collected at regular time points, and posaconazole concentrations were determined. Compared with administration with water, coadministration of Coca-Cola® did not alter the pH of the intraluminal environment but did significantly increase posaconazole gastric concentrations (+102%; p Coca-Cola® and prolonged gastric residence. Coadministration of esomeprazole led to an increased gastric pH, which was accompanied by decreased posaconazole absorption; the mean plasma and gastric area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values decreased by 37% and 84%, respectively. Simultaneous intake of Coca-Cola® could not completely compensate for the

  13. Can Mindfulness Training Improve Medication Adherence? Integrative Review of the Current Evidence and Proposed Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Carey, Michael P

    Medication adherence is a complex, multi-determined behavior that is often influenced by system- (e.g., cost), drug- (e.g., regimen complexity), and patient-related (e.g., depression) factors. System-level approaches (e.g., making medications more affordable) are critically important but do not address patient-level factors that can undermine adherence. In this paper, we identify patient-level determinants of non-adherence and discuss whether mindfulness-training approaches that target these determinants can help to improve adherence to medical treatment. We highlight two chronic medical conditions (viz., heart failure and HIV) where poor adherence is a significant concern, and examine the evidence regarding the use of mindfulness interventions to improve medication adherence in these two conditions. We also discuss the theoretical underpinnings of mindfulness training with respect to medication adherence, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clonogenic assay: adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-03-13

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 1956. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811). Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  15. Intraoperative radiotherapy in combination with misonidazole. In special reference to the drug concentration in tumors and normal tissues and to the initial effect of the treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Masaji; Ono, Kouji; Hamanaka, Daizaburo; Dodo, Yoshihiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1983-03-01

    A hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole, was applied to 28 patients with carcinoma who received intraoperative radiotherapy. A single dose of 2-3g/m/sup 2/ of the drug was given orally to each patient three hours prior to the start of general anesthesia. The levels of misonidazole and its metabolite, desmethylmisonidazole, in blood, tumors and normal tissues taken from excised materials were measured by a high performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that the concentration levels of misonidazole and desmethylmisonidazole in blood correlated neither to oral doses of 2-3g/m/sup 2/ nor to the function of time after drug ingestion until eight hours. The mean value of blood levels was 77.1 +- 10.9..mu..g/ml. A wide range of 10-96% of the blood level was found in tumors. High levels were observed in gastric cancer and brain tumor (glioblastoma) but not in colorectal cancer and osteosarcoma. It was, however, likely that the concentrations in tumors depended on tumor sizes and/or necrotic areas rather than histologic types and/or sites of tumors. It was also noted that the concentration in normal tissues ranged widely from 11 to 87% of the blood level. Higher concentrations showing more than 75% were found in the ulnar nerve, the stomach and the skin. However, 3 of 4 materials for the stomach and 2 of 3 materials for the skin showed low levels of less than 30% and less than 22% respectively. In 27 of 28 cases different doses of 28-50 Gy with different energies of electrons were delivered intraoperatively. It is impossible so far to derive conclusive results of this study, really because of the short period of observation following the treatment.

  16. Antihypertensive Medications Adherence Among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital, Ogbomosho, 2Goshen Heart Clinic, Osogbo, 3Department of Economics, Osun State University, Osogbo, Nigeria ... significant impact of antihypertensive medication adherence.[13]. The level of information provided to patients may also impact ..... Muntner P. New medication adherence scale versus pharmacy.

  17. Spillover adherence effects of fixed-dose combination HIV therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauf TL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Teresa L Kauf1, Keith L Davis2, Stephanie R Earnshaw2, E Anne Davis31Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Independent consultant, Pittsboro, NC, USAAbstract: The impact of fixed-dose combination (FDC products on adherence to other, non-fixed regimen components has not been examined. We compared adherence to a third antiretroviral (ART component among patients receiving a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI backbone consisting of the FDC Epzicom®, GlaxoSmithKline Inc, Research Triangle Park, NC (abacavir sulfate 600 mg + lamivudine 300 mg; FDC group versus NRTI combinations taken as two separate pills (NRTI Combo group using data from a national sample of 30 health plans covering approximately 38 million lives from 1997 to 2005. Adherence was measured as the medication possession ratio (MPR. Multivariate logistic regression compared treatment groups based on the likelihood of achieving ≥95% adherence, with sensitivity analyses using alternative thresholds. MPR was assessed as a continuous variable using multivariate linear regression. Covariates included age, gender, insurance payer type, year of study drug initiation, presence of mental health and substance abuse disorders, and third agent class. The study sample consisted of 650 FDC and 1947 NRTI Combo patients. Unadjusted mean adherence to the third agent was higher in the FDC group than the NRTI Combo group (0.92 vs 0.85; P < 0.0001. In regression analyses, FDC patients were 48% and 39% more likely to achieve 95% and 90% third agent adherence, respectively (P ≤ 0.03. None of the other MPR specifications achieved comparable results. Among managed care patients, use of an FDC appears to substantially improve adherence to a third regimen component and thus the likelihood of achieving the accepted standard for adherence to HIV therapy of 95%.Keywords

  18. Vectorization efforts to increase Gram-negative intracellular drug concentration: a case study on HldE-K inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamanyuk, Dmytro; Faivre, Fabien; Oxoby, Mayalen; Ledoussal, Benoit; Drocourt, Elodie; Moreau, François; Gerusz, Vincent

    2013-03-14

    In this paper, we present different strategies to vectorize HldE kinase inhibitors with the goal to improve their gram-negative intracellular concentration. Syntheses and biological effects of siderophoric, aminoglycosidic, amphoteric, and polycationic vectors are discussed. While siderophoric and amphoteric vectorization efforts proved to be disappointing in this series, aminoglycosidic and polycationic vectors were able for the first time to achieve synergistic effects of our inhibitors with erythromycin. Although these effects proved to be nonspecific, this study provides information about the required stereoelectronic arrangement of the polycationic amines and their basicity requirements to fulfill outer membrane destabilization resulting in better erythromycin synergies.

  19. Grado de adherencia terapéutica a los fármacos del metabolismo óseo-mineral: ¿toman nuestros pacientes la medicación prescrita? Degree of therapeutic adherence to bone mineral metabolism drugs: Do our patients take the prescribed medication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Nieves Cazorla Santana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Los fármacos del metabolismo óseo-mineral tienen gran importancia el tratamiento de los pacientes de hemodiálisis, pero desconocemos las preferencias, y el grado de conocimiento de estos fármacos. Los objetivos del estudio fueron conocer el grado de adherencia terapéutica a los fármacos del metabolismo oseo-mineral, e identificar los factores más relevantes que influyen en la adherencia a este tipo de tratamiento. Pacientes y métodos: Se realizó un estudio transversal en un Centro de hemodiálisis, incluyendo 106 pacientes. Utilizamos el cuestionario simplificado de adherencia a la medicación (SMAQ¹ y un cuestionario específico sobre cumplimiento y preferencias, para conocer el grado de adherencia. Resultados: El 37,7% de los pacientes fue incumplidor según el cuestionario SMAQ. De ellos, el 34% no tomaba la medicación a la misma hora (PBone mineral metabolism drugs are of great importance in treating haemodialysis patients, but we are unaware of their preferences and degree of knowledge of these drugs. The aims of the study were to find out the degree of therapeutic adherence to bone mineral metabolism drugs and to identify the most relevant factors that influence adherence to this type of treatment. Patients and methods: A transversal study was carried out at a haemodialysis centre, including 106 patients. We used the simplified medication adherence questionnaire (SMAQ¹ and a specific questionnaire on compliance and preferences, in order to find out the degree of adherence. Results: 37.7% of the patients were non-compliant, according to the SMAQ. Of these, 34% did not take the medication at the same time (P<0.000, 5.7% did not comply with the treatment at weekends (P<0.010, 13.2% stop taking the medication when they feel unwell (P<0.010; and in the last week, 18% acknowledged that they forgot the treatment 1 day (P= 0.001 and between 2-3 days (12,5%. 52% did not have preferences for any phosphorus chelant and 60.4% knew about

  20. 3D modeling of effects of increased oxygenation and activity concentration in tumors treated with radionuclides and antiangiogenic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerloef, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg, Sweden and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in response to hypoxia is a fundamental event in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. However, abnormalities in tumor neovasculature often induce increased interstitial pressure (IP) and further reduce oxygenation (pO{sub 2}) of tumor cells. In radiotherapy, well-oxygenated tumors favor treatment. Antiangiogenic drugs may lower IP in the tumor, improving perfusion, pO{sub 2} and drug uptake, by reducing the number of malfunctioning vessels in the tissue. This study aims to create a model for quantifying the effects of altered pO{sub 2}-distribution due to antiangiogenic treatment in combination with radionuclide therapy. Methods: Based on experimental data, describing the effects of antiangiogenic agents on oxygenation of GlioblastomaMultiforme (GBM), a single cell based 3D model, including 10{sup 10} tumor cells, was developed, showing how radionuclide therapy response improves as tumor oxygenation approaches normal tissue levels. The nuclides studied were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 211}At. The absorbed dose levels required for a tumor control probability (TCP) of 0.990 are compared for three different log-normal pO{sub 2}-distributions: {mu}{sub 1} = 2.483, {sigma}{sub 1} = 0.711; {mu}{sub 2} = 2.946, {sigma}{sub 2} = 0.689; {mu}{sub 3} = 3.689, and {sigma}{sub 3} = 0.330. The normal tissue absorbed doses will, in turn, depend on this. These distributions were chosen to represent the expected oxygen levels in an untreated hypoxic tumor, a hypoxic tumor treated with an anti-VEGF agent, and in normal, fully-oxygenated tissue, respectively. The former two are fitted to experimental data. The geometric oxygen distributions are simulated using two different patterns: one Monte Carlo based and one radially increasing, while keeping the log-normal volumetric distributions intact. Oxygen and activity are distributed, according to the same pattern. Results: As tumor pO{sub 2

  1. Behavioral measures to reduce non-adherence in renal transplant recipients: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Márcia Fátima Faraldo Martinez; Bravin, Ariane Moyses; Garcia, Paula Dalsoglio; Contti, Mariana Moraes; Nga, Hong Si; Takase, Henrique Mochida; de Andrade, Luis Gustavo Modelli

    2015-11-01

    Solid-organ transplant recipients present a high rate of non-adherence to drug treatment. Few interventional studies have included approaches aimed at increasing adherence. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of an educational and behavioral strategy on treatment adherence of kidney transplant recipients. In a randomized prospective study, incident renal transplant patients (n = 111) were divided into two groups: control group (received usual transplant patient education) and treatment group (usual transplant patient education plus ten additional weekly 30-min education/counseling sessions about immunosuppressive drugs and behavioral changes). Treatment adherence was assessed using ITAS adherence questionnaire after 3 months. Renal function at 3, 6, and 12 months, and the incidence of transplant rejection were evaluated. The non-adherence rates were 46.4 and 14.5 % in the control and treatment groups (p = 0.001), respectively. The relative risk for non-adherence was 2.59 times (CI 1.38-4.88) higher in the control group. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a 5.84 times (CI 1.8-18.8, p = 0.003) higher risk of non-adherence in the control group. There were no differences in renal function and rejection rates between groups. A behavioral and educational strategy addressing the patient's perceptions and knowledge about the anti-rejection drugs significantly improved the short-term adherence to immunosuppressive therapy.

  2. Adherence to oral and topical medication in 445 patients with tinea pedis as assessed by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Abe, Shinya; Kobayashi, Miwa; Kitami, Yuki; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Sugaya, Makoto; Masuda, Koji; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kaneko, Sakae; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shintani, Yoichi; Tanioka, Miki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Abe, Masatoshi; Inomata, Naoko; Morisky, Donald E; Furue, Masutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2015-01-01

    Adherence is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior corresponds with recommendations from health care providers. Adherence to treatment is an important factor for a good therapeutic outcome. This study aimed to examine the adherence of patients with tinea pedis and to clarify the factors related to it. We assessed medication adherence for oral and topical drugs using a translated version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 (MMAS-8) together with other background factors in 445 Japanese patients with tinea pedis, using a questionnaire in a web-based monitoring system. Overall, high, medium and low adherence rates as assessed by MMAS-8 were 8.7%, 31.7% and 59.6% for oral medication, and 8.6%, 17.4% and 74.0% for topical medication, respectively. The adherence level was significantly higher for oral medication than for topical medication. Subgroup analyses showed that the adherence level for topical medication was significantly higher when topical and oral medications were used in combination than when topical medication was used alone. A low adherence level was shown in employed patients, those for whom their oral medication had not been effective and those with topical medication who had visited their hospital less often than once every six months. Patient adherence to therapy can be effectively improved by selecting highly effective medication while considering the prescription of topical and oral antifungal medications concomitantly, by carefully selecting a therapy plan for employed patients and by encouraging patients to visit their doctor regularly.

  3. ADHERENCE TO ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhara Panigrahi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The Million Death Study Collaborators in the British Medical Journal have estimated that the people living with HIV/AIDS population to be between 1.4-1.6 million. Development of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART has been one of the dramatic advances in the history of medicine. Among several factors that can affect the ART outcome, adherence to the ART has been cited as a major factor associated with poor outcomes. For ART to have maximum effect greater than 95%, adherence has been suggested. Additionally, non adherence to ART is a major cause of HIV drug resistance. Especially, in the Indian context, adherence to ART is very important due to the sheer number of HIV/AIDS cases, the socioeconomic status, diversity of the population and regions. That is, the socioeconomic challenges faced by patients contribute to nonadherence to ART in India. With this background, this study was done with the primary objective of assessing the level of adherence to the given regimen of ART as per the NACO guidelines and factors influencing adherence. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective patient record-based study conducted in the Antiretroviral Therapy Centre at MKCG Medical College, Berhampur, from January 2016 to June 2016. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 150 patients’ records from the ART Centre of the medical college. The data was collected in a predesigned case record form from the patient card available at antiretroviral therapy centre. The patients were followed up through the patient card for six months from their recruitment. The adherence to treatment was evaluated using the adherence score adopted by NACO where a score of 1, 2 and 3 implied that 95%, 80-95% and 95% medication taken. Persons with primary education, married individuals and persons without employment had better improvement in adherence score than other groups. Anaemia was the predominant adverse drug reaction encountered. CONCLUSION The findings of this

  4. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in depressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sociodemographic and drug adherence questionnaire was administered. The Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to screen for depressive symptoms while the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) was used to confirm the diagnosis of depressive disorder.

  5. Self-reported adverse effects as barriers to adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: In conclusion, self-reported barriers to optimal adherence included the use of non-prescribed drugs, and the presence of side effects such as insomnia, headaches and abdominal pain; while eating well was a facilitator. These findings emphasise the need for better communication between patients and ...

  6. Adherence to medications by patients after acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Anchal; Kline-Rogers, Eva M; Eagle, Kim A; Fang, Jianming; Armstrong, David F; Rangarajan, Krishna; Otten, Richard F; Stafkey-Mailey, Dana R; Taylor, Stephanie D; Erickson, Steven R

    2005-11-01

    Nonadherence to medication may lead to poor medical outcomes. To describe medication-taking behavior of patients with a history of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) for 4 classes of drugs and determine the relationship between self-reported adherence and patient characteristics. Consenting patients with the diagnosis of ACS were interviewed by telephone approximately 10 months after discharge. The survey elicited data characterizing the patient, current medication regimens, beliefs about drug therapy, reasons for discontinuing medications, and adherence. The survey included the Beliefs About Medicine Questionnaire providing 4 scales: Specific Necessity, Specific Concerns, General Harm, and General Overuse, and the Medication Adherence Scale (MAS). Multivariate regression was used to determine the independent variables with the strongest association to the MAS. A p value or =1 other person, and 42% indicating excellent or very good health. The percentage of patients continuing on medication at the time of the survey category ranged from 87.4% (aspirin) to 66.0% (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors). Reasons for stopping medication included physician discontinuation or adverse effects. Of patients still on drug therapy, the mean MAS was 1.3 +/- 0.4, with 53.8% indicating nonadherence (score >1). The final regression model showed R(2) = 0.132 and included heart-related health status and Specific Necessity as significant predictor variables. After ACS, not all patients continue their drugs or take them exactly as prescribed. Determining beliefs about illness and medication may be helpful in developing interventions aimed at improving adherence.

  7. HIV status disclosure and ARV adherence among patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV status disclosure and ARV adherence among patients attending Jomo Kenyatta University comprehensive care clinic. ... Failure to daily intake of Anti Retrovirals (ARV) not only prevents treatment failure but may also lead to viral development of resistance to the drugs. The fact that HIV is mainly sexually transmitted ...

  8. Psychotropic Medication Adherence among Community-Based Individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D.; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Patel, Isha; Chang, Jongwha; Erickson, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are a common treatment for mental illness in people with developmental disabilities. Medication adherence is a critical determinant of the effectiveness of psychotropic drugs, but psychotropic medication adherence research specific to this population remains limited. This retrospective study analyzed Marketscan®…

  9. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations. 2. The effect of bile salt concentration and drug loading on the performance of type I, II, IIIA, IIIB, and IV formulations during in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Anby, Mette U; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen; Bakala-N'Goma, Jean-Claude; Calderone, Marilyn; Jannin, Vincent; Igonin, Annabel; Partheil, Anette; Marchaud, Delphine; Jule, Eduardo; Vertommen, Jan; Maio, Mario; Blundell, Ross; Benameur, Hassan; Carrière, Frédéric; Müllertz, Anette; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2012-11-05

    The LFCS Consortium was established to develop standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations (LBFs) and to examine the utility of these tests to probe the fundamental mechanisms that underlie LBF performance. In this publication, the impact of bile salt (sodium taurodeoxycholate, NaTDC) concentration and drug loading on the ability of a range of representative LBFs to generate and sustain drug solubilization and supersaturation during in vitro digestion testing has been explored and a common driver of the potential for drug precipitation identified. Danazol was used as a model poorly water-soluble drug throughout. In general, increasing NaTDC concentrations increased the digestion of the most lipophilic LBFs and promoted lipid (and drug) trafficking from poorly dispersed oil phases to the aqueous colloidal phase (AP(DIGEST)). High NaTDC concentrations showed some capacity to reduce drug precipitation, although, at NaTDC concentrations ≥3 mM, NaTDC effects on either digestion or drug solubilization were modest. In contrast, increasing drug load had a marked impact on drug solubilization. For LBFs containing long-chain lipids, drug precipitation was limited even at drug loads approaching saturation in the formulation and concentrations of solubilized drug in AP(DIGEST) increased with increased drug load. For LBFs containing medium-chain lipids, however, significant precipitation was evident, especially at higher drug loads. Across all formulations a remarkably consistent trend emerged such that the likelihood of precipitation was almost entirely dependent on the maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) attained on initiation of digestion. SR(M) defines the supersaturation "pressure" in the system and is calculated from the maximum attainable concentration in the AP(DIGEST) (assuming zero precipitation), divided by the solubility of the drug in the colloidal phases formed post digestion. For LBFs where phase separation of oil phases did not occur, a

  10. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  11. The Female Genital Tract Microbiome Is Associated With Vaginal Antiretroviral Drug Concentrations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue Carlson, Renee; Sheth, Anandi N; Read, Timothy D; Frisch, Michael B; Mehta, C Christina; Martin, Amy; Haaland, Richard E; Patel, Anar S; Pau, Chou-Pong; Kraft, Colleen S; Ofotokun, Igho

    2017-11-15

    The female genital tract (FGT) microbiome may affect vaginal pH and other factors that influence drug movement into the vagina. We examined the relationship between the microbiome and antiretroviral concentrations in the FGT. Over one menstrual cycle, 20 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women virologically suppressed on tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV) underwent serial paired cervicovaginal and plasma sampling for antiretroviral concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of cervicovaginal lavage clustered each participant visit into a unique microbiome community type (mCT). Participants were predominantly African American (95%), with a median age of 38 years. Cervicovaginal lavage sequencing (n = 109) resulted in a low-diversity mCT dominated by Lactobacillus (n = 40), and intermediate-diversity (n = 28) and high-diversity (n = 41) mCTs with abundance of anaerobic taxa. In multivariable models, geometric mean FGT:plasma ratios varied significantly by mCT for all 3 drugs. For both ATV and TFV, FGT:plasma was significantly lower in participant visits with high- and low-diversity mCT groups (all P < .02). For emtricitabine, FGT:plasma was significantly lower in participant visits with low- vs intermediate-diversity mCT groups (P = .002). Certain FGT mCTs are associated with decreased FGT antiretroviral concentrations. These findings are relevant for optimizing antiretrovirals used for biomedical HIV prevention in women. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  13. Clustering based on adherence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwuwa-Muyingo, Sylvia; Oja, Hannu; Walker, Sarah A; Ilmonen, Pauliina; Levin, Jonathan; Todd, Jim

    2011-03-08

    Adherence to a medical treatment means the extent to which a patient follows the instructions or recommendations by health professionals. There are direct and indirect ways to measure adherence which have been used for clinical management and research. Typically adherence measures are monitored over a long follow-up or treatment period, and some measurements may be missing due to death or other reasons. A natural question then is how to describe adherence behavior over the whole period in a simple way. In the literature, measurements over a period are usually combined just by using averages like percentages of compliant days or percentages of doses taken. In the paper we adapt an approach where patient adherence measures are seen as a stochastic process. Repeated measures are then analyzed as a Markov chain with finite number of states rather than as independent and identically distributed observations, and the transition probabilities between the states are assumed to fully describe the behavior of a patient. The patients can then be clustered or classified using their estimated transition probabilities. These natural clusters can be used to describe the adherence of the patients, to find predictors for adherence, and to predict the future events. The new approach is illustrated and shown to be useful with a simple analysis of a data set from the DART (Development of AntiRetroviral Therapy in Africa) trial in Uganda and Zimbabwe.

  14. Factors related to patient adherence to antidiabetic drug therapy Factores relacionados a la adhesión del paciente diabético a la terapéutica medicamentosa Fatores relacionados à adesão do paciente diabético à terapêutica medicamentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Turcatto Gimenes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess patient adherence to antidiabetic drug therapy and its association with factors related to the patient, patient-provider relationship, therapeutic regimen and the disease itself. The study comprised 46 diabetic patients enrolled in a research and extension education center in the State of Sao Paulo, southeastern Brazil, in 2007. Data was collected through interviews using a questionnaire and the Treatment Adherence Measure (TAM. The patient adherence level to antidiabetic drug therapy was 78.3%. In conclusion, since prevalence of adherence is below that recommended in the literature, and in the light of poor blood glucose control and alleged failure of therapeutic regimen, health providers are urged to measure diabetic patient treatment adherence, because it is key to adequate diabetes management with drugs.Este estudio tuvo el objetivo de determinar la adhesión del paciente diabético a la terapéutica medicamentosa y verificar la asociación de la adhesión con factores relacionados al paciente, a la relación profesional-paciente, al esquema terapéutico y a la enfermedad. Participaron 46 diabéticos registrados en un centro de investigación y extensión universitaria en el interior del Estado de San Pablo, en 2007. Los datos fueron obtenidos mediante entrevista, utilizándose un cuestionario y la prueba de Medida de Adhesión al Tratamiento - MAT. Los resultados mostraron que la adhesión del paciente diabético al tratamiento medicamentoso para tratamiento de la diabetes fue de 78,3%. Se concluye que, al considerar que la prevalencia de la adhesión obtenida en el presente estudio estuvo por debajo de la recomendada en la literatura y frente a la vigencia del mal control de la glucemia y de la supuesta falencia en el esquema terapéutico, se urgente que los profesionales de la salud reconozcan la importancia de evaluar la adhesión de los pacientes diabéticos, al tratamiento medicamentoso

  15. Suboptimal treatment adherence in bipolar disorder: impact on clinical outcomes and functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes JM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jose Manuel Montes1, Jorge Maurino2, Consuelo de Dios3, Esteban Medina21Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Universitario del Sureste, 2AstraZeneca Medical Department, 3Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, SpainBackground: The primary aim of this study was to assess drug treatment adherence in patients with bipolar disorder and to identify factors associated with adherence. The secondary aim was to analyze the impact of suboptimal adherence on clinical and functional outcomes.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of outpatients receiving an oral antipsychotic drug. Medication adherence was assessed combining the 10-item Drug Attitude Inventory, the Morisky Green Adherence Questionnaire, and the Compliance Rating Scale. Logistic regression was used to determine significant variables associated with suboptimal adherence to medication.Results: Three hundred and three patients were enrolled into the study. The mean age was 45.9 ± 12.8 years, and 59.7% were females. Sixty-nine percent of patients showed suboptimal adherence. Disease severity and functioning were significantly worse in the suboptimal group than in the adherent group. Multivariate analysis showed depressive polarity of the last acute episode, presence of subsyndromal symptoms, and substance abuse/dependence to be significantly associated with suboptimal treatment adherence (odds ratios 3.41, 2.13, and 1.95, respectively.Conclusion: A high prevalence of nonadherence was found in an outpatient sample with bipolar disorder. Identification of factors related to treatment adherence would give clinicians the opportunity to select more adequately patients who are eligible for potential adherence-focused interventions.Keywords: bipolar disorder, treatment adherence, functioning, polarity, subsyndromal symptoms

  16. The science of being a study participant: FEM-PrEP participants' explanations for overreporting adherence to the study pills and for the whereabouts of unused pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneli, Amy L; McKenna, Kevin; Perry, Brian; Ahmed, Khatija; Agot, Kawango; Malamatsho, Fulufhelo; Skhosana, Joseph; Odhiambo, Jacob; Van Damme, Lut

    2015-04-15

    FEM-PrEP was unable to determine whether once-daily, oral emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate reduces the risk of HIV acquisition among women because of low adherence. Self-reported adherence was high, and pill-count data suggested good adherence. Yet, drug concentrations revealed limited pill use. We conducted a follow-up study with former participants in Bondo, Kenya, and Pretoria, South Africa, to understand factors that had influenced overreporting of adherence and to learn the whereabouts of unused pills. Qualitative, semistructured interviews were conducted with 88 participants, and quantitative, audio computer-assisted self-interviews were conducted with 224 participants. We used thematic analysis and descriptive statistics to analyze the qualitative and quantitative data, respectively. In audio computer-assisted self-interviews, 31% (n = 70) said they had overreported adherence; the main reason was the belief that nonadherence would result in trial termination (69%, n = 48). A considerable percentage (35%, n = 78) acknowledged discarding unused pills. Few acknowledged giving their pills to someone else (4%, n = 10), and even fewer acknowledged giving them to someone with HIV (2%, n = 5). Many participants in the semistructured interviews said other participants had counted and removed pills from their bottles to appear adherent. Despite repeated messages that nonadherence would not upset staff, participants acknowledged several perceived negative consequences of reporting nonadherence, which made it difficult to report accurately. Uneasiness continued in the follow-up study, as many said they had not overreported during the trial. Efforts to improve self-reported measures should include identifying alternative methods for creating supportive environments that allow participants to feel comfortable reporting actual adherence.

  17. Medication adherence and Medicare expenditure among beneficiaries with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopert, Ruth; Shoemaker, J Samantha; Davidoff, Amy; Shaffer, Thomas; Abdulhalim, Abdulla M; Lloyd, Jennifer; Stuart, Bruce

    2012-09-01

    To (1) measure utilization of and adherence to heart failure medications and (2) assess whether better adherence is associated with lower Medicare spending. Pooled cross-sectional design using six 3-year cohorts of Medicare beneficiaries with congestive heart failure (CHF) from 1997 through 2005 (N = 2204). Adherence to treatment was measured using average daily pill counts. Bivariate and multivariate methods were used to examine the relationship between medication adherence and Medicare spending. Multivariate analyses included extensive variables to control for confounding, including healthy adherer bias. Approximately 58% of the cohort were taking an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), 72% a diuretic, 37% a beta-blocker, and 34% a cardiac glycoside. Unadjusted results showed that a 10% increase in average daily pill count for ACE inhibitors or ARBs, beta-blockers, diuretics, or cardiac glycosides was associated with reductions in Medicare spending of $508 (not significant [NS]), $608 (NS), $250 (NS), and $1244 (P <.05), respectively. Estimated adjusted marginal effects of a 10% increase in daily pill counts for beta-blockers and cardiac glycosides were reductions in cumulative 3-year Medicare spending of $510 to $561 and $750 to $923, respectively (P <.05). Higher levels of medication adherence among Medicare beneficiaries with CHF were associated with lower cumulative Medicare spending over 3 years, with savings generally exceeding the costs of the drugs in question.

  18. HYPERTENSION IN THE ELDERLY: AN APPROACH TO MEDICATION ADHERENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Cunha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic arterial hypertension is a chronic disease of high prevalence in Brazil, considered a public health problem. The purpose of this study was to analyze medication adherence by the elderly, for this, a quantitative study was carried out with hypertensive patients enrolled in the Hiperdia program and attended in a Basic Health Unit at Sinop, Mato Grosso. Individual interviews were conducted with the elderly in the Family Health Strategy, at prescheduled time and place according to the patient's availability. The interview script was structured with simple, direct and easy-to-understand questions, involving three aspects: socio-demographic variables (gender, age and income, guided questions about the pathology in question (eating habits, physical exercises, drug therapy and assessment of adherence to antihypertensive treatment. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and the prevalence coefficients were calculated. Fifteen elderly (50% adherents to the drug treatment were identified, of whom 13 were female and only two were male, thus making evident that women seek more the public health service and adhere better to the treatment. Given this, it is necessary to seek strategies that allow greater adherence to treatment and that encourage the male gender to seek health services for constant monitoring and not only in extreme cases.

  19. Relationship of peak serum methotrexate concentration to prognosis and drug tolerance in non-metastatic extremity osteosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Yao, Hao; Xie, Xianbiao; Yin, Junqiang; Zou, Changye; Huang, Gang; Shen, Jingnan

    2018-05-28

    This study aimed to explore whether peak serum methotrexate concentration (C max ) correlated with adverse events, overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) in patients with primary extremity osteosarcoma. Patients with extremity osteosarcoma who were treated at our center between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively studied. All the patients were Enneking stage II and had received standard perioperative chemotherapy composed of high-dose methotrexate, doxorubicin, cisplatin and ifosfamide. C max and treatment-associated toxicities of each cycle were recorded. OS and EFS were estimated and compared by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox regression models were performed for univariate comparisons. In total, 567 patients were followed for an average of 53 months (24-104 months). The estimated 3- and 5-year EFS were 71.7 and 63.1%, and the 3- and 5-year OS were 78.2 and 72.9%, respectively. C max ranged from 527 to 2495 µmol/L with a mean value of 931 ± 106 µmol/L. No significant differences in EFS and OS (p = 0.18 and p = 0.28) were observed among patients with a mean C max  > 1500, > 1000, > 700 and  1500 µmol/L had significantly increased rates of grade 3-5 toxicity. In the univariate analysis, C max was not a prognostic factor for EFS (p = 0.08) or OS (p = 0.16). C max did not correlate significantly with the oncologic prognosis of non-metastatic extremity osteosarcoma patients treated by multi-agent chemotherapy; however, C max correlated closely with toxicities and complications. The persistent inclusion of methotrexate in classical multidisciplinary chemotherapy was questioned and should be examined in future trials.

  20. An alkaline comet assay study on the antimalarial drug atovaquone in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a study based on clinically relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinter, Domagoj; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Atovaquone, a hydroxynaphthoquinone, is an anti-parasite drug, selectively targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of malaria parasite. It is used for both the treatment and prevention of malaria, usually in a fixed combination with proguanil. Although atovaquone has not often been associated with severe adverse reactions in the recommended dosages and has a relatively favorable side effect profile, the present study was undertaken to evaluate its cytogenotoxic potential towards human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Two different concentrations of atovaquone found in plasma when used in fixed-dose combination with proguanile hydrochloride were used with and without S9 metabolic activation: 2950 ng ml(-1) used for prophylactic treatment and 11 800 ng ml(-1) used in treatment of malaria. The results showed that lymphocyte viability was not affected after the treatment, suggesting that atovaquone was not cytotoxic in the given concentrations. With the alkaline comet assay we demonstrated that in human peripheral blood lymphocytes no significant changes in comet parameters occurred after the treatment. There were no differences in tested parameters with the addition of S9 metabolic activation, indicating that atovaquone either has no metabolite or it is not toxic in the given concentrations. Since no effects were observed after the treatment, it is to be concluded that atovaquone is safe from the aspect of genototoxicity in the recommended dosages. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Methods for measuring, enhancing, and accounting for medication adherence in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijens, B; Urquhart, J

    2014-06-01

    Adherence to rationally prescribed medications is essential for effective pharmacotherapy. However, widely variable adherence to protocol-specified dosing regimens is prevalent among participants in ambulatory drug trials, mostly manifested in the form of underdosing. Drug actions are inherently dose and time dependent, and as a result, variable underdosing diminishes the actions of trial medications by various degrees. The ensuing combination of increased variability and decreased magnitude of trial drug actions reduces statistical power to discern between-group differences in drug actions. Variable underdosing has many adverse consequences, some of which can be mitigated by the combination of reliable measurements of ambulatory patients' adherence to trial and nontrial medications, measurement-guided management of adherence, statistically and pharmacometrically sound analyses, and modifications in trial design. Although nonadherence is prevalent across all therapeutic areas in which the patients are responsible for treatment administration, the significance of the adverse consequences depends on the characteristics of both the disease and the medications.

  2. Improving Adherence to Treatment and Reducing Economic Costs of Hypertension: The Role of Olmesartan-Based Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Francesco Vittorio

    2017-09-01

    Poor adherence to antihypertensive treatment is the single most important factor of unsatisfactory blood pressure (BP) control. This review focuses on therapy-related factors affecting adherence and suggests how to improve it with a wise choice of treatment schedule. Complex drug treatment schemes, poor tolerability and drug substitutions are frequent causes of poor adherence which, in turn, causes insufficient BP control, greater incidence of cardiovascular events and, finally, higher global health costs. The effects of prescribing generic drugs and of drug substitutions on adherence is also discussed. In terms of adherence, generic drugs do not seem to be better than branded drugs, unless patients have to bear very high "out of pocket" expenses to buy original drugs, suggesting no advantages in switching drug with the mere goal of reducing the cost of therapy. An important role in improving adherence (and thus cardiovascular events and health expenditure) is also played by the availability of fixed-dose combinations; among antihypertensive drugs, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are those associated with higher levels of adherence and persistence. Among ARBs, olmesartan stands out for a wide choice of effective fixed-dose combinations.

  3. Relationship of race-, sexual orientation-, and HIV-related discrimination with adherence to HIV treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarts, Jessica M; Bogart, Laura M; Tabak, Melanie A; Armelie, Aaron P; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2008-10-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) must be close to perfect in order to maintain suppression of HIV viral load, and to prevent the development of drug resistant strains of HIV. People living with HIV (PLWH) often report low levels of adherence. One variable that has been linked to poor adherence is perceived discrimination; however, research has generally not considered the possible unique effects of different types of discrimination on adherence. The present pilot study aimed to examine the association of three types of discrimination (due to HIV+ status, race, or sexual orientation) with adherence among 57 PLWH. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to demonstrate the relationships between each type of discrimination and self-reported adherence. Racial discrimination significantly predicted lower adherence levels, whereas sexual orientation- and HIV-related discrimination did not. Results underscore the importance of addressing discrimination issues, specifically racial, when designing interventions to improve adherence to HAART.

  4. Predictive patterns of early medication adherence in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Thomas E; Robiner, William N; Thomas, William

    2014-10-27

    Patients' adherence with posttransplant immunosuppression is known to affect renal transplant outcomes. Prospectively, individual medication adherence patterns in 195 kidney transplant recipients were quantified with electronic medication monitors. Monitored drugs were mycophenolate mofetil, sirolimus, or azathioprine. Monitoring began at hospital discharge and continued an average of 15±8 months. Patient follow-up for clinical outcomes averaged 8±3 years. Each month's adherence percentage was calculated as the sum of daily adherence percents, divided by the number of evaluable days. During the first 3 months after transplantation, patients (n=44) with declining medication adherence, defined as dropping by 7% or higher (equal to missing 2 days) between months 1 and 2, later experienced lower mean medication adherence for months 6 to 12, 73% versus 92% respectively (Padherence, they also had more frequent (P=0.034) and earlier (P=0.065) acute rejection episodes. This was additionally associated with more frequent (P=0.017) and earlier (P=0.046) death-censored graft loss.In addition, daily medication adherence, expressed as the percentage of doses taken, decreased as the number of prescribed daily doses increased. During the first 3 months after transplantation, adherence with four doses per day averaged 84%, compared to 91% for patients on twice-daily dosing (P=0.024) and 93.5% for patients on once-daily dosing (P=0.008). Early declining medication nonadherence is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. This pattern is detectable during the first 2 months after transplantation. Early detection of nonadherence provides opportunities to target interventions toward patients at the highest risk for adverse behaviors and events.

  5. Approaches to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Kimberly M

    2014-01-01

    In patients with schizophrenia, nonadherence to prescribed medications increases the risk of patient relapse and hospitalization, key contributors to the costs associated with treatment. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the impact of nonadherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia as it relates to health care professionals, particularly social workers, and to identify effective team approaches to supporting patients based on studies assessing implementation of assertive community treatment teams. A systematic review of the medical literature was conducted by searching the Scopus database to identify articles associated with treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia. Articles included were published from January 1, 2003, through July 15, 2013, were written in English, and reported findings concerning any and all aspects of nonadherence to prescribed treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Of 92 unique articles identified and formally screened, 47 met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. The burden of nonadherence in schizophrenia is significant. Factors with the potential to affect adherence include antipsychotic drug class and formulation, patient-specific factors, and family/social support system. There is inconclusive evidence suggesting superior adherence with an atypical versus typical antipsychotic or with a long-acting injectable versus an oral formulation. Patient-specific factors that contribute to adherence include awareness/denial of illness, cognitive issues, stigma associated with taking medication, substance abuse, access to health care, employment/poverty, and insurance status. Lack of social or family support may adversely affect adherence, necessitating the assistance of health care professionals, such as social workers. Evidence supports the concept that an enhanced team-oriented approach to managing patients with schizophrenia improves adherence and supports corresponding reductions in relapse

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of people infected with HIV, drug misuse can interfere with an individual's likelihood of adhering to the ... HIV/AIDS and the discovery of promising treatment interventions for breaking the harmful links between them, we ...

  7. Caregivers' beliefs associated with medication adherence among children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Patricia Johnson; Alexander, Jeffrey; Ewing, Helen; Gerace, Laina

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between adherence to prescribed antiepileptic medication in a convenience sample of caregivers (n = 100) of children diagnosed with epilepsy, ages 2-14 years, and caregivers' beliefs about the medication. Using the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire and Medication Adherence Report Scale, caregivers were questioned about beliefs of necessity and concerns associated with medication adherence. Using bivariate linear regression, no significant correlation was found between necessity for antiepileptic drug treatment or caregiver's concerns and medication adherence. Nevertheless, although only 28% of the respondents reported complete adherence, the majority of caregivers perceived their child's medication was necessary to maintain good health. Educational aspects and social desirability in this setting may have contributed to the discordance between adherence and caregivers' beliefs.

  8. MEDICATION ADHERENCE IN ELDERLY WITH POLYPHARMACY LIVING AT HOME: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF EXISTING STUDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelko, Erika; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Tusek-Bunc, Ksenija

    2016-04-01

    We wanted to systematically review the available evidence to evaluate the drug adherence in elderly with polypharmacy living at home. We performed a literature search using MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, ProQuest, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Springer Link, Sage Journals and CINAHL. We used the following terms: Medication Adherence, Medication Compliance, Polypharmacy, and Elderly. The search was limited to English-language articles. We included only clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and cross-sectional studies. A total of seven articles were included in this systematic review after applying the search strategy. Six studies dealt with the prevalence of medication adherence and its correlates in patients aged 65 years or more with polypharmacy. Two studies dealt with the effect of various interventions on medication adherence in patients aged 65 years or more with polypharmacy. The available literature on the polypharmacy and drug adherence in elderly living at home is scarce and further studies are needed.

  9. Direct comparison of treatment responses, remission rates, and drug adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab: Results from eight years of surveillance of clinical practice in the nationwide Danish DANBIO registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Tarp, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    response were identified. The odds ratios (ORs) for clinical responses and remission and hazard ratios (HRs) for drug withdrawal were calculated, corrected for age, disease duration, the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), seropositivity, concomitant methotrexate and prednisolone, number...... versus etanercept. Similar predictors and ORs were observed for a good response according to the European League Against Rheumatism criteria, DAS28 remission, and Clinical Disease Activity Index remission. At 48 months, the HRs for drug withdrawal were 1.98 for infliximab versus etanercept (95% 1...

  10. Applications of linking PBPK and PD models to predict the impact of genotypic variability, formulation differences, differences in target binding capacity and target site drug concentrations on drug responses and variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoranjenni eChetty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to demonstrate the added value of integrating prior in vitro data and knowledge-rich physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models with pharmacodynamics (PD models. Four distinct applications that were developed and tested are presented here. PBPK models were developed for metoprolol using different CYP2D6 genotypes based on in vitro data. Application of the models for prediction of phenotypic differences in the pharmacokinetics (PK and PD compared favourably with clinical data, demonstrating that these differences can be predicted prior to the availability of such data from clinical trials. In the second case, PK and PD data for an immediate release formulation of nifedipine together with in vitro dissolution data for a controlled release formulation (CR were used to predict the PK and PD of the CR. This approach can be useful to pharmaceutical scientists during formulation development. The operational model of agonism was used in the third application to describe the hypnotic effects of triazolam, and this was successfully extrapolated to zolpidem by changing only the drug related parameters from in vitro experiments. This PBPK modelling approach can be useful to developmental scientists who which to compare several drug candidates in the same therapeutic class. Finally, differences in QTc prolongation due to quinidine in Caucasian and Korean females were successfully predicted by the model using free heart concentrations as an input to the PD models. This PBPK linked PD model was used to demonstrate a higher sensitivity to free heart concentrations of quinidine in Caucasian females, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding of a clinical observation. In general, permutations of certain conditions which potentially change PK and hence PD may not be amenable to the conduct of clinical studies but linking PBPK with PD provides an alternative method of investigating the potential impact of PK changes on PD.

  11. Applications of linking PBPK and PD models to predict the impact of genotypic variability, formulation differences, differences in target binding capacity and target site drug concentrations on drug responses and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Manoranjenni; Rose, Rachel H; Abduljalil, Khaled; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Lu, Gaohua; Cain, Theresa; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the added value of integrating prior in vitro data and knowledge-rich physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models with pharmacodynamics (PDs) models. Four distinct applications that were developed and tested are presented here. PBPK models were developed for metoprolol using different CYP2D6 genotypes based on in vitro data. Application of the models for prediction of phenotypic differences in the pharmacokinetics (PKs) and PD compared favorably with clinical data, demonstrating that these differences can be predicted prior to the availability of such data from clinical trials. In the second case, PK and PD data for an immediate release formulation of nifedipine together with in vitro dissolution data for a controlled release (CR) formulation were used to predict the PK and PD of the CR. This approach can be useful to pharmaceutical scientists during formulation development. The operational model of agonism was used in the third application to describe the hypnotic effects of triazolam, and this was successfully extrapolated to zolpidem by changing only the drug related parameters from in vitro experiments. This PBPK modeling approach can be useful to developmental scientists who which to compare several drug candidates in the same therapeutic class. Finally, differences in QTc prolongation due to quinidine in Caucasian and Korean females were successfully predicted by the model using free heart concentrations as an input to the PD models. This PBPK linked PD model was used to demonstrate a higher sensitivity to free heart concentrations of quinidine in Caucasian females, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding of a clinical observation. In general, permutations of certain conditions which potentially change PK and hence PD may not be amenable to the conduct of clinical studies but linking PBPK with PD provides an alternative method of investigating the potential impact of PK changes on PD.

  12. Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) does not deplete mitochondrial DNA in human T-cell lines at intracellular concentrations exceeding clinically relevant drug exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stray, Kirsten M; Park, Yeojin; Babusis, Darius; Callebaut, Christian; Cihlar, Tomas; Ray, Adrian S; Perron, Michel

    2017-04-01

    HIV-infected patients treated with certain nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) have experienced adverse effects due to drug-related mitochondrial toxicity. Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) is a novel prodrug of the NRTI tenofovir (TFV) with an improved safety profile compared to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). Prior in vitro studies have demonstrated that the parent nucleotide TFV has no significant effects on mtDNA synthesis. This study investigated whether clinically relevant TAF and TDF exposures affect mtDNA content in human lymphocytes. First, activated or resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as MT-2 and Jurkat T-cell lines, were continuously treated with ddC for 10 days to establish their susceptibility to mtDNA depletion. PBMCs had low sensitivity to NRTI-mediated mtDNA depletion in vitro. In contrast, ddC treatment of rapidly dividing MT-2 and Jurkat cells resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in mtDNA. Therefore, these two T-cell lines were selected for evaluating TAF and TDF treatment effects. MT-2 and Jurkat cells were pulse-treated with TAF or TDF every 24 h for 10 days to mimic pharmacologically relevant drug exposures. Pulse treatment of cells with 3.3 μM TAF or 1.1 μM TDF for 10 days resulted in 2- to 7-fold greater steady-state intracellular TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP) levels than those observed clinically in TAF- or TDF-treated patients. At these concentrations, no significant TAF- (106.7% and 84.1% of control; p = 0.77 and 0.12 for MT-2 and Jurkat, respectively) or TDF- (100.6% and 91.0% of control; p = 0.91 and 0.37, respectively) associated reduction in mtDNA content was observed compared with untreated control cells. This study demonstrates that, despite delivering higher intracellular levels of TFV-DP than TDF, TAF does not inhibit mtDNA synthesis in vitro at concentrations exceeding the clinically relevant intracellular drug exposures. Thus, TAF has a low potential for mitochondrial toxicity in

  13. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli-Hernandez, Carolina; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandez; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ]) and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP]) to evaluate the EP. The "Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral" (CEAT-VIH) was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ) and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self-report (SMAQ) during monthly drug refill, since it allows monitoring adherence through pharmaceutical assistance. Therefore, patient adherence to HAART could be evaluated using self-perception (CEAT-VIH) and the viral load test.

  14. The effects of an individual, multistep intervention on adherence to treatment in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee Vardanjani, Leila; Parvin, Neda; Mahmoodi Shan, Gholamreza

    2015-07-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of individual, multistep intervention on adherence to treatment in hemodialysis patients referred to a hemodialysis center in Shahrekord, Iran. In this interventional study, hemodialysis patients referring the center of the study were randomly assigned into two control and intervention groups (each 33). The control group received routine treatment, recommended dietary and fluid restrictions. The intervention group participated in eight individual interventional sessions accompanied routine treatment. At the beginning and the end of the study, routine laboratory tests and end-stage renal disease-adherence questionnaire were filled out for patients in both groups. The data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. At the end of the study, the two groups showed a significant difference in all domains of adherence except adherence to diet and adherence was better in the intervention group (p adherence to dialysis program (p = 0.04, r = 0.254). After intervention, serum phosphorus decreased significantly in the intervention group (p Adherence to treatment is one of the major problems in hemodialysis patients; however, comprehensive interventions are required in view of individual condition. Implications for Rehabilitation Adherence to treatment means that all patients' behaviors (diet, fluids and drugs intake) should be in line with the recommendations given by healthcare professionals. There is evidence on the association between adherence to treatment and decreased risk of hospitalization in dialysis patients. Individual structured programs are most likely to be successful in encouraging adherence to treatment.

  15. Hybrid dendrimer hydrogel/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle platform: an advanced vehicle for topical delivery of antiglaucoma drugs and a likely solution to improving compliance and adherence in glaucoma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hu; Leffler, Christopher T

    2013-03-01

    Glaucoma therapy typically begins with topical medications, of which there are 4 major classes in common use in the United States: beta-adrenergic antagonists, alpha-agonists, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and prostaglandin analogs. Unfortunately, all 4 classes require at least daily dosing, and 3 of the 4 classes are approved to be administered 2 or 3 times daily. This need for frequent dosing with multiple medications makes compliance difficult. Longer-acting formulations and combinations that require less frequent administration might improve compliance and therefore medication effectiveness. Recently, we developed an ocular drug delivery system, a hybrid dendrimer hydrogel/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle platform for delivering glaucoma therapeutics topically. This platform is designed to deliver glaucoma drugs to the eye efficiently and release the drug in a slow fashion. Furthermore, this delivery platform is designed to be compatible with many of the glaucoma drugs that are currently approved for use. In this article, we review this new delivery system with in-depth discussion of its structural features, properties, and preclinical application in glaucoma treatment. In addition, future directions and translational efforts for marketing this technology are elaborated.

  16. Matrix solid-phase dispersion on column clean-up/pre-concentration as a novel approach for fast isolation of abuse drugs from human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez-Framil, Martha; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Alvarez-Freire, Iván; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María

    2010-10-08

    A simple and fast sample pre-treatment method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) for isolating cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BZE), codeine, morphine and 6-monoacethylmorphine (6-MAM) from human hair has been developed. The MSPD approach consisted of using alumina (1.80 g) as a dispersing agent and 0.6M hydrochloric acid (4 mL) as an extracting solvent. For a fixed hair sample mass of 0.050 g, the alumina mass to sample mass ratio obtained was 36. A previously conditioned Oasis HLB cartridge (2 mL methanol, plus 2 mL ultrapure water, plus 1 mL of 0.2M/0.2M sodium hydroxide/boric acid buffer solution at pH 9.2) was attached to the end of the MSPD syringe for on column clean-up of the hydrochloric acid extract and for transferring the target compounds to a suitable solvent for gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Therefore, the adsorbed analytes were directly eluted from the Oasis HLB cartridges with 2 mL of 2% acetic acid in methanol before concentration by N(2) stream evaporation and dry extract derivatization with N-methyl-tert-butylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and chlorotrimethylsilane (TMCS). The optimization/evaluation of all the factors affecting the MSPD and on column clean-up procedures has led to a fast sample treatment, and analytes extraction and pre-concentration can be finished in approximately 30 min. The developed method has been applied to eight hair samples from poli-drug abusers and measured analyte concentrations have been found to be statistically similar (95% confidence interval) to those obtained after a conventional enzymatic hydrolysis method (Pronase E). Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. [Adherence and fidelity in patients treated with intragastric balloon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazure, R A; Cancer, E; Martínez Olmos, M A; De Castro, M L; Abilés, V; Abilés, J; Bretón, I; Álvarez, V; Peláez, N; Culebras, J M

    2014-01-01

    A correct treatment of obesity needs a program of habits modification regardless of the selected technique, especially if it is minimally invasive as the intragastric balloon (BIG). The adherence of the obese patients with regard to recommended drugs measures to medium- and long-term is less than 50%. Given that the results obtained using the technique of gastric balloon must be seen influenced by adherence to the modification of habits program and its fulfillment, we reviewed series published in attention to the program proposed with the BIG. The series published to date provide few details about the used Therapeutic Programs as well as the adherence of patients to them, and even less concerning the Monitoring Plan and the loyalty of the patient can be seen. We conclude the convenience to agree on a follow-up strategy, at least the 6 months during which the BIG remain in the stomach.

  18. A new application of micellar liquid chromatography in the determination of free ampicillin concentration in the drug-human serum albumin standard solution in comparison with the adsorption method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępnik, Katarzyna E; Malinowska, Irena; Maciejewska, Małgorzata

    2016-06-01

    The determination of free drug concentration is a very important issue in the field of pharmacology because only the unbound drug fraction can achieve a pharmacological effect. Due to the ability to solubilize many different compounds in micellar aggregates, micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) can be used for direct determination of free drug concentration. Proteins are not retained on the stationary phase probably due to the formation of protein - surfactant complexes which are excluded from the pores of stationary phase. The micellar method is simple and fast. It does not require any pre-preparation of the tested samples for analysis. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate a completely new applicability of the analytical use of MLC concerning the determination of free drug concentration in the standard solution of human serum albumin. The well-known adsorption method using RP-HPLC and the spectrophotometric technique was applied as the reference method. The results show that the free drug concentration value obtained in the MLC system (based on the RP-8 stationary phase and CTAB) is similar to that obtained by the adsorption method: both RP-HPLC (95.83μgmL(-1), 79.86% of free form) and spectrophotometry (95.71μgmL(-1), 79.76%). In the MLC the free drug concentration was 93.98μgmL(-1) (78.3%). This indicates that the obtained results are within the analytical range of % of free ampicillin fraction and the MLC with direct sample injection can be treated like a promising method for the determination of free drug concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Social and structural barriers for adherence to methadone maintenance treatment among Vietnamese opioid dependence patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Tran, Tung Thanh; Latkin, Carl A

    2018-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) services may reduce the risk of HIV transmission if patients completely adhere to the treatment. Identifying adherence patterns and potential related factors is vital for the sustainability of MMT program in Vietnam. This study examined social and structural factors associated with adherence to MMT among patients in different service delivery models. A total of 510 patients at three MMT clinics in Hanoi were interviewed. Measures of self-reported adherence included the number of missed doses in the past 7 days and the level of adherence in the past 30 days using a visual analog scale (VAS) scoring from 0 (non-adherence) to 100 (perfect adherence). Multivariate regressions were employed to identify factors associated with non-adherence to MMT. A total of 17.7% of participants reported incomplete MMT adherence in the last 30 days and 8.3% reported missing a dose in the last seven days, respectively. Living with HIV/AIDS, poor self-care and usual activities, and disclosure of health issues to spouses or intimate partners were associated with non-adherence. Those patients with pain or depression were more likely to report better adherence. Disclosing health status to spouse/partner increased the risk of incomplete adherence, while disclosing to friends reduced the number of missed dose in the last seven days. Patients attending clinics with comprehensive services had a lower VAS score of adherence compared to those enrolling in clinics with only MMT and general health care. Sustaining the compliance of patients to MMT is principal in the rapid expansion of this service in Vietnam. It is necessary to address the complexity of health care demands of drug users, their difficulties to be rehabilitated into workforce and society, and the stigmatization to maximize the outcomes of MMT program.

  20. Towards a better prediction of peak concentration, volume of distribution and half-life after oral drug administration in man, using allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Vikash K; Vaarties, Karin; De Buck, Stefan S; Fenu, Luca A; Nijsen, Marjoleen; Gilissen, Ron A H J; Sanderson, Wendy; Van Uytsel, Kelly; Hoeben, Eva; Van Peer, Achiel; Mackie, Claire E; Smit, Johan W

    2011-05-01

    It is imperative that new drugs demonstrate adequate pharmacokinetic properties, allowing an optimal safety margin and convenient dosing regimens in clinical practice, which then lead to better patient compliance. Such pharmacokinetic properties include suitable peak (maximum) plasma drug concentration (C(max)), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and a suitable half-life (t(½)). The C(max) and t(½) following oral drug administration are functions of the oral clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution during the terminal phase by the oral route (V(z)/F), each of which may be predicted and combined to estimate C(max) and t(½). Allometric scaling is a widely used methodology in the pharmaceutical industry to predict human pharmacokinetic parameters such as clearance and volume of distribution. In our previous published work, we have evaluated the use of allometry for prediction of CL/F and AUC. In this paper we describe the evaluation of different allometric scaling approaches for the prediction of C(max), V(z)/F and t(½) after oral drug administration in man. Twenty-nine compounds developed at Janssen Research and Development (a division of Janssen Pharmaceutica NV), covering a wide range of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties, were selected. The C(max) following oral dosing of a compound was predicted using (i) simple allometry alone; (ii) simple allometry along with correction factors such as plasma protein binding (PPB), maximum life-span potential or brain weight (reverse rule of exponents, unbound C(max) approach); and (iii) an indirect approach using allometrically predicted CL/F and V(z)/F and absorption rate constant (k(a)). The k(a) was estimated from (i) in vivo pharmacokinetic experiments in preclinical species; and (ii) predicted effective permeability in man (P(eff)), using a Caco-2 permeability assay. The V(z)/F was predicted using allometric scaling with or without PPB correction. The t(½) was estimated from

  1. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  2. Gamification of Medication Adherence in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Izzat; Thomas, Rhys Huw

    2017-11-01

    Adherence to medication regimens is a crucial factor in seizure-freedom and well-being for people with epilepsy. In contrast, taking medication inconsistently increases the risk of not only seizures and their adverse effects, but drug side-effects and unnecessary modifications to treatment plans. Epilepsy is prevalent across all age groups and we have been slow to utilise both the technologies and psychologies derived from computer gaming. Gaming has broken through to the mainstream and is no longer the preserve of younger males, mirroring the adoption of smart-phones. 'Gamification' motivates users into engaging in an activity with a higher intensity and duration. Introducing gaming elements into a non-gaming context has the potential to transform routine tasks into more enjoyable and motivating experiences. This has been exploited by marketing executives, but also has clear uses in a healthcare setting too. We discuss how previously published frameworks could be employed to help people with epilepsy adhere to medication regimens to create a patient-focussed, modifiable and fun experience. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [The challenge of improving evidence-based therapy adherence in the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease: the next frontier of cardiac rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardi, Sabino; Mazzone, Carmine; Umari, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Non-adherence to prescribed drug regimens is an increasing medical problem affecting physicians and patients and contribute to negative outcomes, such as the increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. Analysis of various patient populations shows that the choice of drug, its tolerability and the duration of treatment influence the non-adherence. Intervention is required toward patients and health-care providers to improve medication adherence. This review deals about the prevalence of non-adherence to therapy after medical and surgical cardiac event, the risk factors affecting non-adherence and the strategies to implement it. Interventions that may successfully improve adherence should include improved physician compliance with guidelines, patient education and patient reminders, frequent visits or telephone calls from staff, simplification of the patient's drug regimen by reducing the number of pills and daily doses. Since single interventions do not appear efficaceous, it is necessary to establish multiple interventions simultaneously addressing a number of barriers to adherence.

  4. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L; Jørgensen, Line A; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2015-06-07

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.

  5. Immune adherence: a quantitative and kinetic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, T [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Research Inst.

    1978-09-01

    Quantitative and kinetic analysis of the immune-adherence reaction (IA) between C3b fragments and IA receptors as an agglutination reaction is difficult. Analysis is possible, however, by use of radio-iodinated bovine serum albumin as antigen at low concentrations (less than 200 ng/ml) and optimal concentration of antibody to avoid precipitation of antigen-antibody complexes with human erythrocytes without participation of complement. Antigen and antibody are reacted at 37/sup 0/C, complement is added, the mixture incubated and human erythrocytes added; after further incubation, ice-cold EDTA containing buffer is added and the erythrocytes centrifuged and assayed for radioactivity. Control cells reacted with heated guinea pig serum retained less than 5% of the added radioactivity. The method facilitates measurement of IA reactivity and permits more detailed analysis of the mechanism underlying the reaction.

  6. Eimeria Oocyst Concentrations and Species Composition in Litter from Commercial Broiler Farms During Anticoccidial Drug or Live Eimeria Oocyst Vaccine Control Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Mark C; Parker, Carolyn; Ritter, Donald

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Eimeria oocyst concentrations and species composition in commercial broiler house litter changed during different cycles of anticoccidial drug (ACD) or live Eimeria oocyst vaccine (VAC) control programs and if there was a correlation between Eimeria oocyst levels and broiler performance. Litter samples were collected from a total of 15 different broiler farms encompassing a total of 45 individual houses during at least one complete grow-out cycle over a 21-mo period. Of these 15 broiler farms, three were followed for the entire 21-mo period spanning three ACD and four VAC cycles. Samples were collected at 2, 4, and 7-8 wk of grow-out corresponding to starter, grower, and withdraw periods of the ACD cycle. On a number of occasions, litter samples were obtained just prior to chick placement. Eimeria oocysts were isolated from all samples, counted by microscopy, and extracted for DNA to identify Eimeria species by ITS1 PCR. In general, Eimeria oocyst concentration in litter reached peak levels at 2-4 wk of grow-out regardless of coccidiosis control measure being used. However, peak oocyst numbers were sometimes delayed until 7-8 wk, indicating some level of Eimeria spp. drug resistance or incomplete vaccine coverage. Eimeria maxima , Eimeria acervulina , Eimeria praecox, and Eimeria tenella were generally present in all samples, and no difference in the species composition was noted between houses on a particular farm. While Eimeria species composition was similar among houses, Eimeria spp. oocyst levels exhibited sporadic peaks in one house of a given location's houses. Of particular interest was the observed correlation between E. maxima oocyst abundance and chick mortality. However, no correlation was observed in E. maxima oocyst levels, and the performance parameters adjusted feed conversion ratio and average daily weight gain. This study showed that understanding the dynamics of Eimeria spp. oocyst levels and species

  7. [Medication adherence of 65 patients in hemodialysis in Togo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabi, K A; Noto-Kadou-Kaza, B; Amekoudi, Y E; Tsevi, M C; Sylla, F; Kossidze, K; Gnionsahe, D A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess adherence in people on hemodialysis and determine the factors of poor adherence. This cross-sectional study took place throughout the month of September, 2012, in the hemodialysis center of the Sylvanus Olympio University Hospital, the only such center in Togo. The study included 65 patients, with a mean age of 49.5 years (range: 22 to 77 years), more often men (sex ratio: 1.82) and married (74 %). More than half (58%) had completed secondary education, while 73% belonged to the least advantaged socioeconomic class; 61 (94%) had health insurance, and 57% had been on dialysis for 1 to 4 years. The compliance rate was 11%. The main factors associated with good adherence were marital status (p = 0.0339) and the patient's general health status (p = 0.001). Treatment fatigue (p = 0.0347), forgetfulness (p = 0.0001), dosage forms and drug characteristics (p = 0.0198) were all factors of noncompliance. Therapeutic non-compliance was proportional to the number of drugs prescribed (p = 0.4263). Adherence in hemodialysis patients in Togo is very poor.

  8. Adherence to treatment for diabetes mellitus: validation of instruments for oral antidiabetics and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes-Villas; Lima, Maria Luisa Soares Almeida Pedroso de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2014-01-01

    to verify the face validity, criterion-related validity and the reliability of two distinct forms of presentation of the instrument Measurement of Adherence to Treatment, one being for ascertaining the adherence to the use of oral antidiabetics and the other for adherence to the use of insulin, as well as to assess differences in adherence between these two modes of drug therapy. a methodological study undertaken with 90 adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The criterion-related validity was verified using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curves; and for the reliability, the researchers calculated the Cronbach alpha coefficient, the item-total correlation, and the Pearson correlation coefficient. the oral antidiabetics and the other showed sensitivity of 0.84, specificity of 0.35 and a Cronbach correlation coefficient of 0.84. For the adherence to the use of insulin, the values found were, respectively, 0.60, 0.21 and 0.68. A statistically significant difference was found between the final scores of the two forms of the instrument, indicating greater adherence to the use of insulin than to oral antidiabetics. it is concluded that the two forms of the Measurement of Adherence to Treatment instrument are reliable and should be used to evaluate adherence to drug treatment among people with diabetes mellitus.

  9. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Morojele, Neo K

    2014-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics in Tshwane, South Africa. We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test), other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument). Additionally, patients' views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted. About half of the male drinkers' and three quarters of the female drinkers' Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour's duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an alcohol-focused adherence counseling program that employs motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy-type approaches. The association between alcohol use and ART nonadherence points to a need for alcohol-focused ART adherence

  10. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and its determinants in AIDS patients: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiabdolbaghi M

    2008-10-01

    known to overestimate adherence. Some determinants are associated with adherence include: age, gender, addiction specially injection drug users, alcohol consumption, depression, social support, level of education, work situation, adverse antiretroviral effects, pregnancy, type of antiretroviral drug regimen, number of pills and daily doses received, severe traumas, social and psychological factors, and relationship between clinician and patient.0 "nKeywords: Adherence, antiretroviral therapy, AIDS, treatment.

  11. Adherence with Preventive Medication in Childhood Asthma

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    Scott Burgess

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal adherence with preventive medication is common and often unrecognised as a cause of poor asthma control. A number of risk factors for nonadherence have emerged from well-conducted studies. Unfortunately, patient report a physician's estimation of adherence and knowledge of these risk factors may not assist in determining whether non-adherence is a significant factor. Electronic monitoring devices are likely to be more frequently used to remind patients to take medication, as a strategy to motivate patients to maintain adherence, and a tool to evaluate adherence in subjects with poor disease control. The aim of this paper is to review non-adherence with preventive medication in childhood asthma, its impact on asthma control, methods of evaluating non-adherence, risk factors for suboptimal adherence, and strategies to enhance adherence.

  12. Cytogenetic and oxidative status of human lymphocytes after exposure to clinically relevant concentrations of antimalarial drugs atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinter, Domagoj; Gajski, Goran; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2015-12-01

    Atovaquone (ATO) and proguanil hydrochloride (PROG) is the fixed combination for the prevention and treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. As safe and effective antimalarial drugs are needed in both the treatment and the prophylaxis of malaria, this study was performed to investigate their possible cyto/genotoxic potential towards human lymphocytes and the possible mechanism responsible for it. Two different concentrations of ATO and PROG were used with and without S9 metabolic activation. The concentrations used were those found in human plasma when a fixed-dose combination of ATO and PROG was used: 2950/130 ng/mL after prophylactic treatment and 11 800/520 ng/mL after treatment of malaria, respectively. Possible cellular and DNA-damaging effects were evaluated by cell viability and alkaline comet assays, while oxidative stress potential was evaluated by formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay, in addition to measuring malondialdehyde and glutathione levels. According to our results, the ATO/PROG combination displayed only weak cyto/genotoxic potential towards human lymphocytes with no impact on oxidative stress parameters, suggesting that oxidative stress is not implicated in their mechanism of action towards human lymphocytes. Given that the key portion of the damaging effects was induced after S9 metabolic activation, it is to presume that the principal metabolite of PROG, cycloguanil, had the greatest impact. The obtained results indicate that the ATO/PROG combination is relatively safe for the consumption from the aspect of cyto/genotoxicity, especially if used for prophylactic treatment. Nevertheless, further cytogenetic research and regular patient monitoring are needed to minimize the risk of adverse events especially among frequent travellers. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  13. [PK/PD breakpoints and clinical/bacteriological effects of cefcapene pivoxil fine granules for children at free drug concentrations in pediatric patients with respiratory infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Iwai, Naoichi; Motohiro, Takashi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Fujii, Ryochi

    2008-06-01

    A post-marketing clinical study was previously conducted in pediatric patients with respiratory infection to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of cefcapene pivoxil (CFPN-PI) fine granules for children. Based on the results from this study, we evaluated PK/PD breakpoints and clinical/bacteriological effects of CFPN-PI at free drug concentrations in pediatric patients with respiratory infection to determine an effective and safe dosage regimen of CFPN-PI. The following results were obtained from 61 pediatric patients evaluated in our research. 1) The response rate of pediatric respiratory infection to CFPN-PI was 100% for laryngopharyngitis, 84.6% for acute bronchitis, 100% for tonsillitis, 100% for pneumonia and 95.8% for all. 2) The bacteriological response (eradication rate of Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, etc.) of pediatric respiratory infection to CFPN-PI was 87.5% for laryngopharyngitis, 66.7% for acute bronchitis, 75.0% for tonsillitis, 63.6% for pneumonia and 73.8% for all. 3) The blood concentration simulation demonstrated that the PK/PD breakpoint exceeding the time above MIC (TAM) of 40% after administration of CFPN-PI 3 mg/kg three times daily was 0.27 microg/mL. 4) The pediatric patients with respiratory infection were stratified by the TAM (%) of CFPN-PI into 40% to 100% (TAM > or = 40% group) and 0% to 40% (TAM or = 40% group, and 88.9% and 62.5% in the TAM or = 40% group than in the TAM < 40% group, although the between-group difference was not statistically significant.

  14. Competing pathways in drug metabolism. I. Effect of input concentration on the conjugation of gentisamide in the once-through in situ perfused rat liver preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.E.; Yuen, V.; Tang, B.K.; Pang, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Sulfation and glucuronidation are two parallel pathways for the metabolism of phenolic substrates. Gentisamide (GAM) was used as a model compound to examine the effects of parallel competing pathways on drug disappearance and metabolite formation in the once-through perfused rat liver preparation. GAM was found to form one glucuronide (GAM-5G) and two sulfate (GAM-2S and GAM-5S) conjugates. These GAM conjugates were biosynthesized in recirculating rat liver preparations, and were isolated by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific incorporation of 35S-sodium sulfate and [14C]glucose into GAM sulfate and glucuronide conjugates revealed corresponding elution patterns as labeled GAM metabolites. Their identities were characterized by enzymatic and acid hydrolyses and by NMR spectroscopy. Gentisamide-5-sulfate (GAM-5S) and gentisamide-5-glucuronide (GAM-5G) are major metabolites, and gentisamide-2-sulfate (GAM-2S) is a minor metabolite. Single-pass rat liver perfusions were used to examine the effect of stepwise increases/decreases of input GAM concentration (CIn) on the extraction ratio (E) of GAM and formation of metabolites. The E of GAM remained constant (about 0.89) at input concentrations from 0.9 to 120 microM and decreased at CIn greater than 120 microM. Metabolite patterns, however, changed with GAM CIn, even when E was constant at CIn up to 120 microM. GAM-5S was present as the major metabolite of GAM at all GAM CInS in most liver preparations but the proportions of GAM-5S and GAM-2S decreased at increasing CIn; the proportion of GAM-5G, a minor metabolite at low CIn, increased with increasing CIn. Biliary excretion rates at steady state accounted for 5.3 +/- 2.7% (mean +/- S.D.) of the input rate: GAM-5G was the predominant metabolite found

  15. Drugs use by adolescents and their perceptions about specialized treatment adherence and dropout Uso de drogas por adolescentes: sus percepciones sobre adhesión y el abandono del tratamiento especializado O uso de drogas por adolescentes e suas percepções sobre adesão e abandono de tratamento especializado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Pereira Vasters

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Drugs use in adolescence is an important issue to be discussed, due to the early damage it causes. This study investigated adolescent drugs use, ranging from the first trial to perceptions about treatment adherence. Based on qualitative research, the researchers aimed to understand the problem from the subjects’ viewpoint. Data were analyzed through thematic categorization. Fourteen teenagers were interviewed: mostly males, 14 to 19 years old and low education. Marijuana was the most used drug upon the first trial. Friends, free time and "parties" favored drugs use. Teenagers also used drugs to escape from conflicts and feelings. Different intrinsic and extrinsic factors were reported as favorable to treatment adherence and dropout. The findings can contribute to establish therapeutic intervention proposals for adolescent drug users.El uso de drogas en la adolescencia es una cuestión importante a ser debatida por los perjuicios ocasionados precozmente. El estudio objetivó conocer el uso de drogas entre adolescentes, partiendo del inicio del uso hasta las percepciones sobre la adhesión al tratamiento. Basándose en la investigación cualitativa, se buscó comprender los aspectos citados desde el punto de vista de los sujetos. Los datos fueron analizados por categorización temática. Catorce adolescentes fueron entrevistados, la mayoría era del sexo masculino, con edad entre 14 a 19 años y baja escolaridad. La marihuana fue la droga más utilizada en la primera experiencia. Amigos, tiempo libre y "fiestas" favorecieron la aproximación con las drogas; estas también fueron utilizadas por los adolescentes como fuga de los conflictos y sentimientos. Diferentes aspectos intrínsecos y extrínsecos fueron referidos como favorables a la adhesión o al abandono del tratamiento. Los hallazgos pueden contribuir en la elaboración de propuestas de intervenciones terapéuticas direccionadas a adolescentes usuarios de drogas.O uso de drogas na

  16. Nanomedicine Drug Delivery across Mucous Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancina, Michael George, III

    Control over the distribution of therapeutic compounds is a complex and somewhat overlooked field of pharmaceutical research. When swallowing a pill or receiving an injection, it is commonly assumed that drug will spread throughout the body in a more or less uniform concentration and find its way to wherever it is needed. In truth, drug biodistribuition is highly non-uniform and dependent on a large number of factors. The development of advanced drug delivery systems to control biodistribution can produce significant advances in clinical treatments without the need to discover new therapeutic compounds. This work focuses on a number of nanostructured materials designed to improve drug delivery by direct and efficient transfer of drugs across one of the body's external mucous membranes. Chapter 1 outlines the central concept that unites these studies: nanomaterials and cationic particles can be used to delivery therapeutic compounds across mucous membranes. Special attention is given to dendritic nanoparticles. In chapter 2, uses for dendrimers in ocular drug delivery are presented. The studies are divided into two main groups: topical and injectable formulations. Chapter 3 does not involve dendrimers but instead another cationic particle used in transmembrane drug delivery, chitosan. Next, a dendrimer based nanofiber mat was used to deliver anti-glaucoma drugs in chapter 4. A three week in vivo efficacy trial showed dendrimer nanofiber mats outperformed traditional eye drops in terms of intra-ocular pressure decrease in a normotensive rat model. Finally, we have developed a new dendrimer based anti-glaucoma drug in chapter 5. Collectively, these studies demonstrate some of the potential applications for nanotechnology to improve transmembrane drug delivery. These particles and fibers are able to readily adhere and penetrate across epithelial cell lays. Utilizing these materials to improve drug absorption through these portals has the potential to improve the

  17. Life cycle synchronization is a viral drug resistance mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia A Neagu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are one of the major causes of death worldwide, with HIV infection alone resulting in over 1.2 million casualties per year. Antiviral drugs are now being administered for a variety of viral infections, including HIV, hepatitis B and C, and influenza. These therapies target a specific phase of the virus's life cycle, yet their ultimate success depends on a variety of factors, such as adherence to a prescribed regimen and the emergence of viral drug resistance. The epidemiology and evolution of drug resistance have been extensively characterized, and it is generally assumed that drug resistance arises from mutations that alter the virus's susceptibility to the direct action of the drug. In this paper, we consider the possibility that a virus population can evolve towards synchronizing its life cycle with the pattern of drug therapy. The periodicity of the drug treatment could then allow for a virus strain whose life cycle length is a multiple of the dosing interval to replicate only when the concentration of the drug is lowest. This process, referred to as "drug tolerance by synchronization", could allow the virus population to maximize its overall fitness without having to alter drug binding or complete its life cycle in the drug's presence. We use mathematical models and stochastic simulations to show that life cycle synchronization can indeed be a mechanism of viral drug tolerance. We show that this effect is more likely to occur when the variability in both viral life cycle and drug dose timing are low. More generally, we find that in the presence of periodic drug levels, time-averaged calculations of viral fitness do not accurately predict drug levels needed to eradicate infection, even if there is no synchronization. We derive an analytical expression for viral fitness that is sufficient to explain the drug-pattern-dependent survival of strains with any life cycle length. We discuss the implications of these findings for

  18. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  19. Approaches to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuler KM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly M Shuler Shuler Counseling and Consulting, Fayetteville, AR, USA Purpose: In patients with schizophrenia, nonadherence to prescribed medications increases the risk of patient relapse and hospitalization, key contributors to the costs associated with treatment. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the impact of nonadherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia as it relates to health care professionals, particularly social workers, and to identify effective team approaches to supporting patients based on studies assessing implementation of assertive community treatment teams. Materials and methods: A systematic review of the medical literature was conducted by searching the Scopus database to identify articles associated with treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia. Articles included were published from January 1, 2003, through July 15, 2013, were written in English, and reported findings concerning any and all aspects of nonadherence to prescribed treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Results: Of 92 unique articles identified and formally screened, 47 met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. The burden of nonadherence in schizophrenia is significant. Factors with the potential to affect adherence include antipsychotic drug class and formulation, patient-specific factors, and family/social support system. There is inconclusive evidence suggesting superior adherence with an atypical versus typical antipsychotic or with a long-acting injectable versus an oral formulation. Patient-specific factors that contribute to adherence include awareness/denial of illness, cognitive issues, stigma associated with taking medication, substance abuse, access to health care, employment/poverty, and insurance status. Lack of social or family support may adversely affect adherence, necessitating the assistance of health care professionals, such as social workers. Evidence supports the concept that an

  20. Poor adherence to medication as assessed by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 and low satisfaction with treatment in 237 psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hidehisa; Imafuku, Shinichi; Abe, Masatoshi; Shintani, Yoichi; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito; Katoh, Norito; Murota, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Sugaya, Makoto; Tanioka, Miki; Kaneko, Sakae; Masuda, Koji; Hiragun, Takaaki; Inomata, Naoko; Kitami, Yuki; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Abe, Shinya; Kobayashi, Miwa; Morisky, Donald E; Furue, Masutaka

    2015-04-01

    Previously we assessed the medication adherence for oral and topical remedies by a translated Japanese version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 (MMAS-8) together with socioeconomic backgrounds in 3096 Japanese dermatological patients, and found the medication adherence, especially to topical drugs, was poor in these patients. In order to elucidate the disease-specific sociomedical factors, we further sub-analyzed the medication adherence in 237 psoriasis patients and compared it with that in other dermatological diseases such as atopic dermatitis, urticaria or tinea. This study was conducted among patients registered in monitoring system and 3096 eligible patients were enrolled. Our web-based questionnaire included the following items such as age, sex, annual income, main health-care institution, experience of effectiveness by oral or topical medication, overall satisfaction with treatment, and MMAS-8 for oral or topical medication. Mean adherence score by MMAS-8 was 5.2 for oral and 4.3 for topical medication. More patients with psoriasis used a university hospital and fewer used a private clinic compared with those with the other skin disease patients. Experience of drug effectiveness by oral medication and overall satisfaction with treatment was lower in psoriasis patients than in other patients. In oral medication, significantly better adherence was observed in those of higher age and with higher annual income. The adherence to medication, especially to topical drugs, was poor in 237 psoriasis patients. We speculated that some severe psoriasis patients were not sufficiently treated systemically and were resistant to topical therapy, leading to poor adherence. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  2. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion

  3. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François

    2013-01-01

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K M 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V max . PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion trapping

  4. Longitudinal Analysis of Adherence to First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy: Evidence of Treatment Sustainability from an Indian HIV Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Anita; Kumarasamy, N; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Shastri, Suresh; Kumar, Dodderi Sunil; Rewari, Bharath B; Arumugam, Karthika; Antony, Jimmy; De Costa, Ayesha; D'Souza, George

    2016-01-01

    Given the chronic nature of HIV infection and the need for life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART), maintaining long-term optimal adherence is an important strategy for maximizing treatment success. In order to understand better the dynamic nature of adherence behaviors in India where complex cultural and logistic features prevail, we assessed the patterns, trajectories and time-dependent predictors of adherence levels in relation to virological failure among individuals initiating first-line ART in India. Between July 2010 and August 2013, eligible ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals newly initiating first-line ART within the national program at three sites in southern India were enrolled and monitored for two years. ART included zidovudine/stavudine/tenofovir plus lamivudine plus nevirapine/efavirenz. Patients were assessed using clinical, laboratory and adherence parameters. Every three months, medication adherence was measured using pill count, and a structured questionnaire on adherence barriers was administered. Optimal adherence was defined as mean adherence ≥95%. Statistical analysis was performed using a bivariate and a multivariate model of all identified covariates. Adherence trends and determinants were modeled as rate ratios using generalized estimating equation analysis in a Poisson distribution. A total of 599 eligible ART-naïve patients participated in the study, and contributed a total of 921 person-years of observation time. Women constituted 43% and mean CD4 count prior to initiating ART was 192 cells/mm3. Overall mean adherence among all patients was 95.4%. The proportion of patients optimally adherent was 75.6%. Predictors of optimal adherence included older age (≥40 years), high school-level education and beyond, lower drug toxicity-related ART interruption, full disclosure, sense of satisfaction with one's own health and patient's perception of having good access to health-care services. Adherence was inversely proportional to virological

  5. Concordance of Adherence Measurement Using Self-Reported Adherence Questionnaires and Medication Monitoring Devices: An Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnette, Alisha; Zhang, Yichen; Shao, Hui; Shi, Lizheng

    2018-01-01

    As medication adherence continues to be a prevalent issue in today's society, the methods used to monitor medication-taking behaviors are constantly being re-evaluated and compared in search of the 'gold standard' measure. Our review aimed to assess the current literature surrounding the correlation between self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) and electronic monitoring devices to determine if these measures produce similar results. We performed a literature search from 2009 to 2017 using PubMed, PubMed In-Process and Non-Indexed, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, and Ovid MEDLINE In-Process. A keyword search using the terms 'patient compliance', 'treatment compliance', 'medication adherence', 'drug monitoring', 'drug therapy', 'electronic', 'digital', 'computer', 'monitor', 'monitoring', 'drug', 'pharmaceutical preparations', 'compliance', and 'medications' was done to capture all articles. We included articles measuring adherence using both monitoring devices and SRQs. Thirty-five articles were included in this review. The average difference in measured adherence rates between the two measures was 9.2% (range -66.3 to 61.5). A majority (62.7%) of articles reported moderate (n = 12; 27.9%), high (n = 5, 11.6%), or significant (n = 10, 23.3%) correlations between SRQs and monitoring devices. Results from our review are consistent with previous studies, as we found that many of our studies produced moderate to high correlation between both SRQs and monitoring devices [Farmer, Clin Ther 21(6):1074-90 (1999), IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. Avoidable costs in US health care (2012), Patel et al., Respirology 18(3):546-52 (2013), Siracusa et al., J Cyst Fibros 14(5):621-6 (2015), Smith et al., Int J Cardiol 145(1):122-3 (2010)]. Our findings demonstrate that self-reported adherence produces comparable results to electronic monitoring devices. As there is not yet a 'gold standard' measure for monitoring patient adherence, SRQs and Medication Event Monitoring Systems

  6. Evaluation of a pilot study to influence medication adherence of patients with diabetes mellitus type-2 by the pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adhien, P.; van Dijk, L.; de Vegter, M.; Westein, M.; Nijpels, G.; Hugtenburg, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Interventions aimed to increase adherence to drug treatment usually are not tailored to the needs of individual patients. A modular pharmacy intervention, named 'Support for Diabetes', was developed to improve adherence to type 2 diabetes treatment. Objective To evaluate the

  7. International Osteoporosis Foundation and European Calcified Tissue Society Working Group. Recommendations for the screening of adherence to oral bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Naylor, K E; Abrahamsen, B

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to oral bisphosphonates is low. A screening strategy is proposed based on the response of biochemical markers of bone turnover after 3 months of therapy. If no change is observed, the clinician should reassess the adherence to the treatment and also other potential issues with the drug....

  8. Determinants of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heestermans, Tessa; Browne, Joyce L; Aitken, Susan C; Vervoort, Sigrid C; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The rapid scale up of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has resulted in an increased focus on patient adherence. Non-adherence can lead to drug-resistant HIV caused by failure to achieve maximal viral suppression. Optimal treatment requires the identification of

  9. Non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungdalh, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives The primary treatment for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders is antipsychotic medication. One of the many public health challenges in mental illness, is to identify contributing factors to non-adherence to pharmacological treatment. The objective...... of this study was to perform an updated systematic review of risk factors for non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in schizophrenia in a European and American context. Methods The study was a systematic literature review of studies that included at least two measurements of pharmacological adherence...... of illness, alcohol or drug abuse and unspecified younger age. Conclusions The findings in this systematic literature review are consistent with previous reviews on non-adherence and schizophrenia. It stresses the methodological challenges in psychiatric adherence research and establishes the need for more...

  10. Antidiabetic medication adherence and associated factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Godfrey Mutashambara Rwegerera

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... tive of the study was to determine current antidiabetic medication adherence in ...... A systematic review of adherence with medications for diabetes. .... Pascal IGU, Ofoedu JN, Uchenna NP, Nkwa AA, Uchamma GUE.

  11. Strong relationship between oral dose and tenofovir hair levels in a randomized trial: hair as a potential adherence measure for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Y Liu

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP trials using tenofovir-based regimens have demonstrated that high levels of adherence are required to evaluate efficacy; the incorporation of objective biomarkers of adherence in trial design has been essential to interpretation, given the inaccuracy of self-report. Antiretroviral measurements in scalp hair have been useful as a marker of long-term exposure in the HIV treatment setting, and hair samples are relatively easy and inexpensive to collect, transport, and store for analysis. To evaluate the relationship between dose and tenofovir concentrations in hair, we examined the dose proportionality of tenofovir in hair in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults.A phase I, crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed in 24 HIV-negative adults receiving directly-observed oral tenofovir tablets administered 2, 4, and 7 doses/week for 6 weeks, with a ≥3-week break between periods. Small samples of hair were collected after each six-week period and analyzed for tenofovir concentrations. Geometric-mean-ratios compared levels between each pair of dosing conditions. Intensive plasma pharmacokinetic studies were performed during the daily-dosing period to calculate areas-under-the-time-concentration curves (AUCs.Over 90% of doses were observed per protocol. Median tenofovir concentrations in hair increased monotonically with dose. A log-linear relationship was seen between dose and hair levels, with an estimated 76% (95% CI 60-93% increase in hair level per 2-fold dose increase. Tenofovir plasma AUCs modestly predicted drug concentrations in hair.This study found a strong linear relationship between frequency of dosing and tenofovir levels in scalp hair. The analysis of quantitative drug levels in hair has the potential to improve adherence measurement in the PrEP field and may be helpful in determining exposure thresholds for protection and explaining failures in PrEP trials. Hair measures for adherence monitoring may also

  12. Influence of intention to adhere, beliefs and satisfaction about medicines on adherence in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugon, Amélie; Roustit, Matthieu; Lehmann, Audrey; Saint-Raymond, Christel; Borrel, Elisabeth; Hilleret, Marie-Noëlle; Malvezzi, Paolo; Bedouch, Pierrick; Pansu, Pascal; Allenet, Benoît

    2014-07-27

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressive (IS) therapy is associated with poor outcomes. Identifying factors predicting poor adherence is therefore essential. The primary objective of this study was to test whether parameters of a model adapted from the theory of planned behavior, and more specifically attitudes that are influenced by beliefs and satisfaction with medication, could predict adherence in solid organ transplant patients. Adherence was assessed with a self-reported medication adherence scale and IS blood trough concentrations over 6 months, in four transplant units. Satisfaction and beliefs were assessed using the Treatment Satisfaction with Medicines Questionnaire (SATMED-Q) and Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), respectively. Theory of planned behavior was assessed with a specific questionnaire exploring intentions, subjective norms, attitudes and perceived behavioral control. Treatment characteristics and socioeconomic data were also collected. One hundred and fifty-three solid organ transplant patients were enrolled, including lung (n=33), heart (n=43), liver (n=42), and kidney (n=44) patients. Satisfaction and positive beliefs about medication were higher in adherent than those in nonadherent patients. Factors independently associated with an increased risk of nonadherence were negative general beliefs about medications (odds ratio [OR]=0.89 [0.83-0.97]), living alone (OR=2.78 [1.09-7.09]), heart transplantation (OR=3.49 [1.34-9.09]), and being on everolimus (OR=5.02 [1.21-20.8]). Negative beliefs toward medications were shown to be an independent risk factor of poor adherence. Therefore, the BMQ could be an effective, easy to implement tool, for use in everyday practice, to identify patients needing interventions to improve adherence to IS.

  13. Adherence of pharmaceutical advertisements in medical journals to FDA guidelines and content for safe prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenstein, Deborah; Keyhani, Salomeh; Mendelson, Ali; Ross, Joseph S

    2011-01-01

    Physician-directed pharmaceutical advertising is regulated in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); adherence to current FDA guidelines is unknown. Our objective was to determine adherence rates of physician-directed print advertisements in biomedical journals to FDA guidelines and describe content important for safe prescribing. Cross-sectional analysis of November 2008 pharmaceutical advertisements within top U.S.-based biomedical journals publishing original research. We excluded advertisements for devices, over the counter medications, and disease awareness. We utilized FDA guideline items identifying unique forms of advertisement bias to categorize advertisements as adherent to FDA guidelines, possibly non-adherent to at least 1 item, or non-adherent to at least 1 item. We also evaluated advertisement content important for safe prescribing, including benefit quantification, risk information and verifiable references. All advertisements were evaluated by 2 or more investigators, with differences resolved by discussion. Twelve journals met inclusion criteria. Nine contained pharmaceutical advertisements, including 192 advertisements for 82 unique products; median 2 per product (range 1-14). Six "teaser" advertisements presented only drug names, leaving 83 full unique advertisements. Fifteen advertisements (18.1%) adhered to all FDA guidelines, 41 (49.4%) were non-adherent with at least one form of FDA-described bias, and 27 (32.5%) were possibly non-adherent due to incomplete information. Content important for safe prescribing was often incomplete; 57.8% of advertisements did not quantify serious risks, 48.2% lacked verifiable references and 28.9% failed to present adequate efficacy quantification. Study limitations included its focus on advertisements from a single month, the subjectivity of FDA guidelines themselves, and the necessary subjectivity of determinations of adherence. Few physician-directed print pharmaceutical advertisements

  14. Adherence of pharmaceutical advertisements in medical journals to FDA guidelines and content for safe prescribing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Korenstein

    Full Text Available Physician-directed pharmaceutical advertising is regulated in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA; adherence to current FDA guidelines is unknown. Our objective was to determine adherence rates of physician-directed print advertisements in biomedical journals to FDA guidelines and describe content important for safe prescribing.Cross-sectional analysis of November 2008 pharmaceutical advertisements within top U.S.-based biomedical journals publishing original research. We excluded advertisements for devices, over the counter medications, and disease awareness. We utilized FDA guideline items identifying unique forms of advertisement bias to categorize advertisements as adherent to FDA guidelines, possibly non-adherent to at least 1 item, or non-adherent to at least 1 item. We also evaluated advertisement content important for safe prescribing, including benefit quantification, risk information and verifiable references. All advertisements were evaluated by 2 or more investigators, with differences resolved by discussion. Twelve journals met inclusion criteria. Nine contained pharmaceutical advertisements, including 192 advertisements for 82 unique products; median 2 per product (range 1-14. Six "teaser" advertisements presented only drug names, leaving 83 full unique advertisements. Fifteen advertisements (18.1% adhered to all FDA guidelines, 41 (49.4% were non-adherent with at least one form of FDA-described bias, and 27 (32.5% were possibly non-adherent due to incomplete information. Content important for safe prescribing was often incomplete; 57.8% of advertisements did not quantify serious risks, 48.2% lacked verifiable references and 28.9% failed to present adequate efficacy quantification. Study limitations included its focus on advertisements from a single month, the subjectivity of FDA guidelines themselves, and the necessary subjectivity of determinations of adherence.Few physician-directed print pharmaceutical

  15. Risk factors for non-adherence to antidepressant treatment in patients with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Peñate, Wenceslao; Sanz, Emilio J

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antidepressant therapy by patients with depressive disorders is essential not only to achieve a positive patient outcome but also to prevent a relapse. The aim of this study was to identify potential modelling factors influencing adherence to antidepressant treatment by patients with mood disorders in the community mental health care setting A total of 160 consecutive psychiatric outpatients attending two Community Mental Health Centres on Tenerife Island between September 2011 and May 2012 were asked to participate in the study; of these, 145 accepted. The Morisky self-report scale was used to assess adherence. The potential predictors examined included socio-demographic, clinical and therapeutic variables. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity and -Improvement scales and the Beck Depression Inventory were used for clinical assessment. Drug treatment side-effects were assessed using the "Self-report Antidepressant Side-Effect Checklist." All participants were also asked to complete the "Drug Attitude Inventory" (DAI), "Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire" (BMQ), and "Leeds Attitude towards concordance Scale". Discriminant analyses were performed to predict non-adherence. There was no clear correlation between adherence and the socio-demographic variables examined, but adherence was related to a positive attitude of the patients towards his/her treatment (DAI) and low scores in the BMQ-Harm and -Concern subscales. Non-adherence was also related to an increasing severity of depression and to the presence and severity of side-effects. Among our study cohort, the profiles of adherent patients to antidepressant treatment were more closely associated with each patient's attitudes and beliefs than to objective socio-demographic variables. The severity of depression played a relevant role in adherence, but whether this role is direct or an interaction with several concurrent factors is not yet clear. Side-effects were also closely related to adherence, as

  16. Effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the production of reactive oxygen species by activated rat neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paino I.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The release of reactive oxygen specie (ROS by activated neutrophil is involved in both the antimicrobial and deleterious effects in chronic inflammation. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs on the production of ROS by stimulated rat neutrophils. Diclofenac (3.6 µM, indomethacin (12 µM, naproxen (160 µM, piroxicam (13 µM, and tenoxicam (30 µM were incubated at 37ºC in PBS (10 mM, pH 7.4, for 30 min with rat neutrophils (1 x 10(6 cells/ml stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (100 nM. The ROS production was measured by luminol and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. Except for naproxen, NSAIDs reduced ROS production: 58 ± 2% diclofenac, 90 ± 2% indomethacin, 33 ± 3% piroxicam, and 45 ± 6% tenoxicam (N = 6. For the lucigenin assay, naproxen, piroxicam and tenoxicam were ineffective. For indomethacin the inhibition was 52 ± 5% and diclofenac showed amplification in the light emission of 181 ± 60% (N = 6. Using the myeloperoxidase (MPO/H2O2/luminol system, the effects of NSAIDs on MPO activity were also screened. We found that NSAIDs inhibited both the peroxidation and chlorinating activity of MPO as follows: diclofenac (36 ± 10, 45 ± 3%, indomethacin (97 ± 2, 100 ± 1%, naproxen (56 ± 8, 76 ± 3%, piroxicam (77 ± 5, 99 ± 1%, and tenoxicam (90 ± 2, 100 ± 1%, respectively (N = 3. These results show that therapeutic levels of NSAIDs are able to suppress the oxygen-dependent antimicrobial or oxidative functions of neutrophils by inhibiting the generation of hypochlorous acid.

  17. Patient Medication Knowledge Governing Adherence to Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samuel Olaleye

    disturbing levels of patients adherence with management recommendations. Asthma education strategies need to be modified to engage ... and quick procedure. ... Participants' medication adherence and skills at using .... In this study 17 of the 67 patients studied .... adherence: changing behaviour to promote better self-.

  18. Preliminary investigation of adherence to antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of HIV with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in declining morbidity and mortality rates from HIV-associated diseases, but concerns regarding access and adherence are growing. To determine the adherence level and the reasons for non-adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among ...

  19. Awareness of memory impairment increases the adherence to immunosuppressants in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C-Y; Lin, B Y-J; Chang, K-H; Shu, K-H; Wu, M-J

    2012-04-01

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressive drugs is a concern among kidney transplantation recipients (KTRs). The adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs can trigger nonadherence and lead to a great impact on the allograft survival. The aim of this prospective controlled study is to determine the major adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs and their correlation with the nonadherence in kidney transplantation recipients. All data were collected from medical and pharmacy records. We use modified Immunosuppressant Therapy Adherence Scale combined with Modified Transplant Symptom Occurrence and Symptom Distress scale to explore the relationship between symptom experience related to side effects of immunosuppressants and adherence. The risk of nonadherence was estimated by stepwise logistic regression while controlling for age, gender, education, and immunosuppressive medications. Multivariable analysis was performed using a single random effect of P adherence increased in patients with awareness of memory impairment (odds ratio 2.320, 95% confidence interval: 1.259-4.274, P = .007). There was no significant difference in the incidence of acute rejection, gender, age, and education between adherent and nonadherent patients. In summary, these results indicate a significant prevalence of nonadherence to immunosuppressive drugs in kidney transplantation recipients. Awareness of memory impairment significantly affected adherence to immunosuppressive drugs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Automated Reminders and Physician Notification to Promote Immunosuppression Adherence Among Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Peter P; Bloom, Roy D; Trofe-Clark, Jennifer; Mussell, Adam; Leidy, Daniel; Levsky, Simona; Zhu, Jingsan; Yang, Lin; Wang, Wenli; Troxel, Andrea; Feldman, Harold I; Volpp, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    Immunosuppression nonadherence increases the risk for kidney transplant loss after transplantation. Wireless-enabled pill bottles have created the opportunity to monitor medication adherence in real time. Reminders may help patients with poor memory or organization. Provision of adherence data to providers may motivate patients to improve adherence and help providers identify adherence barriers. Randomized controlled trial. Kidney transplant recipients (n=120) at a single center. Participants were provided wireless pill bottles to store tacrolimus and record bottle openings. Participants were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to adherence monitoring with customized reminders (including alarms, texts, telephone calls, and/or e-mails), monitoring with customized reminders plus provider notification (every 2 weeks, providers received notification if adherence decreased to adherence during the last 90 days of the 180-day trial. A secondary outcome was tacrolimus whole-blood concentrations at routine clinical visits. Adherence for the primary outcome was assessed via wireless pill bottle openings. Mean participant age was 50 years; 60% were men, and 40% were black. Mean adherence was 78%, 88%, and 55% in the reminders, reminders-plus-notification, and control arms (Padherence, but these strategies require evaluation in trials powered to detect differences in clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Viable adhered Staphylococcus aureus highly reduced on novel antimicrobial sutures using chlorhexidine and octenidine to avoid surgical site infection (SSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jochen; Harrasser, Norbert; Tübel, Jutta; Mühlhofer, Heinrich; Pförringer, Dominik; von Deimling, Constantin; Foehr, Peter; Kiefel, Barbara; Krämer, Christina; Stemberger, Axel; Schieker, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    Background Surgical sutures can promote migration of bacteria and thus start infections. Antiseptic coating of sutures may inhibit proliferation of adhered bacteria and avoid such complications. Objectives This study investigated the inhibition of viable adhering bacteria on novel antimicrobially coated surgical sutures using chlorhexidine or octenidine, a critical factor for proliferation at the onset of local infections. The medical need, a rapid eradication of bacteria in wounds, can be fulfilled by a high antimicrobial efficacy during the first days after wound closure. Methods As a pretesting on antibacterial efficacy against relevant bacterial pathogens a zone of inhibition assay was conducted with middle ranged concentrated suture coatings (22 μg/cm). For further investigation of adhering bacteria in detail the most clinically relevant Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC®49230™) was used. Absorbable braided sutures were coated with chlorhexidine-laurate, chlorhexidine-palmitate, octenidine-laurate, and octenidine-palmitate. Each coating type resulted in 11, 22, or 33 μg/cm drug content on sutures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed once to inspect the coating quality and twice to investigate if bacteria have colonized on sutures. Adhesion experiments were assessed by exposing coated sutures to S. aureus suspensions for 3 h at 37°C. Subsequently, sutures were sonicated and the number of viable bacteria released from the suture surface was determined. Furthermore, the number of viable planktonic bacteria was measured in suspensions containing antimicrobial sutures. Commercially available sutures without drugs (Vicryl®, PGA Resorba®, and Gunze PGA), as well as triclosan-containing Vicryl® Plus were used as control groups. Results Zone of inhibition assay documented a multispecies efficacy of novel coated sutures against tested bacterial strains, comparable to most relevant S. aureus over 48 hours. SEM pictures demonstrated uniform layers on

  2. Differences between patient and physician opinions on adherence to medication for hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Yuji; Murase, Katsuhito; Hamamura, Misako

    2016-09-01

    Non-adherence to prescribed medication presents a barrier to effective treatment. In order to find improved ways of tackling non-adherence, it is important to understand the perspective of both patients and physicians. A web-based survey study was performed to obtain the views and opinions of patients receiving medical treatment for hypertension or diabetes mellitus in Japan, and physicians treating such patients, on adherence to medication. Forty-four percent of both physicians and patients placed great importance on medication adherence, but 11% of patients considered it of low importance. Overall, 85% of patients reported taking their medication correctly. Patients missed a mean of 4.8 or 5.4 daily doses per 30 day prescription based on patient and physician estimates, respectively. Both patients (64%) and physicians (23%) considered the main reason patients forgot to take their medication was that they "inadvertently forgot". Only 1% of physicians said they do not specifically check for residual drugs, but 46% of patients said they do not report missed doses to their doctor. Measures taken by physicians to reduce residual drugs included use of single packs (64%) and reductions in administration frequency (55%); 63% adjusted prescriptions to take account of any remaining drugs. Only 4% of physicians were satisfied with the effectiveness of measures to reduce non-adherence, whereas 59% of patients felt they managed to successfully perform measures to avoid forgetting to take drugs. The study questionnaires were newly developed and did not incorporate validated instruments to assess adherence. Similar proportions of physicians and patients consider medication adherence to be important, but their opinions about measures used to improve adherence differ to some extent. Importantly, almost half of patients do not tell their doctor about missed doses.

  3. Adherence and health care costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuga AO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aurel O Iuga,1,2 Maura J McGuire3,4 1Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Johns Hopkins University, 3Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Medication nonadherence is an important public health consideration, affecting health outcomes and overall health care costs. This review considers the most recent developments in adherence research with a focus on the impact of medication adherence on health care costs in the US health system. We describe the magnitude of the nonadherence problem and related costs, with an extensive discussion of the mechanisms underlying the impact of nonadherence on costs. Specifically, we summarize the impact of nonadherence on health care costs in several chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma. A brief analysis of existing research study designs, along with suggestions for future research focus, is provided. Finally, given the ongoing changes in the US health care system, we also address some of the most relevant and current trends in health care, including pharmacist-led medication therapy management and electronic (e-prescribing. Keywords: patient, medication, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, noncompliance, cost

  4. Perspectives Regarding Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Highly Adherent HIV-Infected Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, John M; Menke, Edna M

    2008-01-01

    Focus group methodology was used to describe the medication adherence experience of 24 HIV-infected gay men who reported being adherent to their medication regimens. A conceptualization of medication adherence as an evolving process consisted of challenges to adherence (learning the diagnosis, starting the medications, struggling with the medications, dealing with side effects, coping with stigma) as well as those factors supportive of adherence (believing in medications, finding motivating factors, using reminders, depending on others, owning the disease). Themes associated with challenges to adherence focused on diagnosis and the physical and emotional adjustments individuals made to incorporate antiretroviral medications into their daily lives and move toward medication adherence. The factors supportive of adherence were related to the ongoing behaviors identified with establishing and maintaining adherence behaviors. What can be taken from the study is that adherence is a complex and dynamic process rather than a static behavior.

  5. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasti, Sharada P; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. A total of 282 (85.5%) respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014); alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035). Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription), followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop appropriate social policy to promote adherence among ART

  6. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada P Wasti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. METHODS: A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. RESULTS: A total of 282 (85.5% respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014; alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035. Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription, followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. CONCLUSION: Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop

  7. Factors Influencing Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in Nepal: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasti, Sharada P.; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V.; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. Results A total of 282 (85.5%) respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p =  0.014); alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035). Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription), followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. Conclusion Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients’ lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop appropriate social

  8. Noninfectious uveitis: strategies to optimize treatment compliance and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolz-Marco R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosa Dolz-Marco,1 Roberto Gallego-Pinazo,1 Manuel Díaz-Llopis,2 Emmett T Cunningham Jr,3–6 J Fernando Arévalo7,8 1Unit of Macula, Department of Ophthalmology, University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, Spain; 3Department of Ophthalmology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, 5The Francis I Proctor Foundation, University of California San Francisco Medical Center, 6West Coast Retina Medical Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 7Vitreoretina Division, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 8Retina Division, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Noninfectious uveitis includes a heterogenous group of sight-threatening ocular and systemic disorders. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of noninfectious uveitis in recent years, particularly with regard to the effective use of corticosteroids and non-corticosteroid immunosuppressive drugs, including biologic agents. All of these therapeutic approaches are limited, however, by any given patient’s ability to comply with and adhere to their prescribed treatment. In fact, compliance and adherence are among the most important patient-related determinants of treatment success. We discuss strategies to optimize compliance and adherence. Keywords: noninfectious uveitis, intraocular inflammation, immunosuppressive treatment, adherence, compliance, therapeutic failure

  9. Ambulatory blood pressure and adherence monitoring: diagnosing pseudoresistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnier, Michel; Wuerzner, Gregoire

    2014-01-01

    A small proportion of the treated hypertensive population consistently has a blood pressure greater than 140/90 mm Hg despite a triple therapy including a diuretic, a calcium channel blocker, and a blocker of the renin-angiotensin system. According to guidelines, these patients have so-called resistant hypertension. The prevalence of this clinical condition is higher in tertiary than primary care centers and often is associated with chronic kidney disease, diabetes, obesity, and sleep apnea syndrome. Exclusion of pseudoresistant hypertension using ambulatory or home blood pressure monitoring is a crucial step in the investigation of patients with resistant hypertension. Thus, among the multiple factors to consider when investigating patients with resistant hypertension, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring should be performed very early. Among other factors to consider, physicians should investigate patient adherence to therapy, assess the adequacy of treatment, exclude interfering factors, and, finally, look for secondary forms of hypertension. Poor adherence to therapy accounts for 30% to 50% of cases of resistance to therapy depending on the methodology used to diagnose adherence problems. This review discusses the clinical factors implicated in the pathogenesis of resistant hypertension with a particular emphasis on pseudoresistance, drug adherence, and the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for the diagnosis and management of resistant hypertension.

  10. Clinical pharmacist interventions to support adherence to thrombopreventive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla

    The three papers in the thesis were based on two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on in-hospital clinical pharmacist interventions for improvement of adherence to thrombopreventive therapy in two different populations: outpatients with hypertension and patients with acute stroke/transient isch......The three papers in the thesis were based on two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on in-hospital clinical pharmacist interventions for improvement of adherence to thrombopreventive therapy in two different populations: outpatients with hypertension and patients with acute stroke...... individualised interventions and team-based care, e.g. integrating a clinical pharmacist with particular focus on patients’ drug-related problems. One approach with growing evidence of improving medication adherence is motivational interviewing (MI). So far, no clinical pharmacist intervention using MI has...... targeted patients with hypertension or stroke in a hospital care setting. Thus, the aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate in-hospital pharmacist interventions including MI to improve adherence to primary and secondary thrombopreventive therapy. The first study was a RCT, which investigated...

  11. Factors relevant to medication non-adherence in kidney transplant: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaiche, Stephanie; Décaudin, Bertrand; Dharancy, Sébastien; Noel, Christian; Odou, Pascal; Hazzan, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Background Medication non-adherence is a major issue after transplant that can lead to misdiagnosis, rejection, poor health affecting quality of life, graft loss or death. Several estimations of adherence and related factors have previously been described but conclusions leave doubt as to the most accurate assessment method. Aim of the review To identify the factors most relevant to medication non-adherence in kidney transplant in current clinical practice. Method This systematic review is registered in the PROSPERO data base and follows the Prisma checklist. Articles in English in three databases from January 2009 to December 2014 were analysed. A synthesis was made to target adherence assessment methods, their prevalence and significance. Results Thirty-seven studies were analysed rates of non-adherence fluctuating from 1.6 to 96%. Assessment methods varied from one study to another, although self-reports were mainly used. It appears that youth (≤50 years old), male, low social support, unemployment, low education, ≥3 months post graft, living donor, ≥6 comorbidities, ≥5 drugs/d, ≥2 intakes/d, negative beliefs, negative behavior, depression and anxiety were the factors significantly related to non-adherence. Conclusion As there are no established guidelines, consideration should be given to more than one approach to identify medication non-adherence although self-reports should remain the cornerstone of adherence assessment.

  12. Adherence to EBM guidelines in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafizianova, R Kh; Burykin, I M

    2015-01-01

    Adequate and rational pharmacotherapy is an important element of rehabilitation of patients with myocardial infarction. Orders of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, domestic and international guidelines, and scientific publications - all contain a complete algorithm for rational pharmacotherapy [1, 2]. These documents are based on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and help practicing physicians to carry out individualized and rational pharmacotherapy. However, clinical studies have shown low adherence of physicians to clinical guidelines. In the Russian Federation the death rate from cardiovascular diseases is higher than in developed countries. Thus, studies of the causes of high cardiovascular mortality are needed. To assess adherence of practicing physicians to principles of evidence-based medicine in treating patients after myocardial infarction at the stage of rehabilitation. A retrospective analysis of 157 cases of patients in rehabilitation after myocardial infarction for the years 2006 and 2009 was undertaken.We analyzed the list of drugs, prescribed to patients during the period of rehabilitation, drug combinations, regimens and pharmacoepidemiological parameters. We used the following rehabilitation criteria: blood pressure control, smoking cessation, and weight control. Recommendations of controlled physical activities have also been studied. Patient care was compared with the guideline recommendations. Statistical analysis was performed using the OLAP system. 65 patients with myocardial infarction received rehabilitation therapy in 2006, and 92 - in 2009. It was found, that in 2006 physicians prescribed an average of 4.5 drugs per patient, and in 2009 - 4.6 drugs per patient. The average number of cardiovascular drugs (category C of ATC classification) per patient was 2.9 in 2006, and 2.6 - in 2009. Polypharmacy was found in half of the patients.In terms of evidence-based medicine, an important element in the rehabilitation

  13. Immunosuppressive medication adherence in kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalić, Jelena; Veličković-Radovanović, Radmila; Mitić, Branka; Paunović, Goran; Cvetković, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    To assess the degree of immunosuppressive medication adherence in kidney transplant patients (KTPs) and to determine if there is a difference in the rate of adherence to tacrolimus (Tac), cyclosporine (CsA) and sirolimus (Sir). From a total of 63 KTPs treated at the Clinic of Nephrology, Clinical Centre Niš, Serbia, 60 participated in the study by responding to questionnaires. They were divided into the adherence group (n = 43) and the nonadherence group (n = 17) according to their degree of adherence which was measured using a validated survey form, the simplified medication adherence questionnaire. The KTP adherence to the different immunosuppressive regimens (Tac, CsA and Sir) was compared. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t test. Adherence was observed in 43 (71.7%) patients, and only 17 (28.3%) did not follow the prescribed therapy. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the nonadherence group (38.52 ± 18.22 ml/min) than in the adherence group (52.43 ± 16.91 ml/min, p adherers and the nonadherers (6.30 ± 2.06 vs. 5.0 ± 1.52 ng/ml, p adherence. Nonadherence was associated with worse graft function and a lower Tac level. Knowledge about the degree of adherence could help the early identification of nonadherent patients and the development of strategies to improve this. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Pharmacist intervention in drug-related problems for patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trop J Pharm Res, October 2016; 15(10): 2275. Tropical Journal of ... medication errors in irrational drug use, while patient adherence ..... Drug-related problems identified from geriatric medication safety ... Ann. Pharmacother. 2005; 39:1423-.

  15. Adherence to treatment, emotional state and quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Llana, Helena; Remor, Eduardo; Selgas, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    A low rate of adherence to treatment is a widespread problem of great clinical relevance among dialysis patients. The objective of the present study is to determine the relationship between adherence, emotional state (depression, anxiety, and perceived stress), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in renal patients undergoing dialysis. Two patient groups (30 in hemodialysis and 31 in peritoneal dialysis) participated in this study. We evaluated aspects of adherence, depression, anxiety, perceived stress, and HRQOL with self-report and standardized instruments. Peritoneal dialysis patients reported significantly higher levels of adherence to treatment and better HRQOL in Physical Function and Bodily Pain domains. Depression level is associated with HRQOL indicators. We did not find any differences regarding specific adherence to antihypertensive and phosphate binder drugs or in psychological variables depending on the modality of dialysis. Patients with adherence to antihypertensive drugs show better physical HRQOL. The predictors of HRQOL in dialysis patients were: work, gender and depression. Our results suggest that the modality of dialysis does not differentially affect the emotional state or specific adherence to drugs, but it is nevertheless related to their overall adherence to treatment and to their HRQOL.

  16. LOW ADHERENCE TO TREATMENT AFTER MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: CAUSES AND WAYS OF ADJUSTMENT CONSIDERING PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL STATE OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuzheleva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the reasons of low adherence to treatment in patients after myocardial infarction as well as methods of its correction considering the mental and emotional state of patients. Material and methods. Patients (n=115 after myocardial infarction registered in "Acute Myocardial Infarction Register» were enrolled into the study. The Moriscos-Green scale was used to determine the degree of adherence to treatment, and psycho-emotional state of patients was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. The special questionnaire was used to study the causes of poor adherence. Results. Only 45% of patients after myocardial infarction have a high commitment to the doctor's recommendations. The main reason for low adherence was forgetfulness (42%. Among other reasons were: fear of side effects (16%; lack of therapeutic effect according to patients' opinion (12%; doubts about the doctor's prescriptions (14%; a large number of prescribed drugs (12%; high cost of drugs (4%. The structure of the causes of poor adherence to treatment varied greatly depending on the psycho-emotional status. Adherence to treatment can be improved by specific physician’s actions (48.5% of patients. At the same time 14% of patients did not want to take drugs for a long time under any circumstances. Conclusion. Adherence to treatment of patients after myocardial infarction deserves attention from doctors. The personalized approach considering patient’s opinion, as well as their specific features, is essential for the development of ways to improve adherence.

  17. Utility of therapeutic drug monitoring in the management of HIV-infected pregnant women in receipt of lopinavir.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Caswell, R J

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs in pregnancy is poorly understood. We reviewed the use of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in clinical settings to document plasma concentrations of lopinavir during pregnancy and investigated how clinicians acted upon TDM results. A retrospective review was carried out of all HIV-infected pregnant women taking boosted lopinavir-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) at five National Health Service (NHS) centres in the UK between May 2004 and March 2007. Seventy-three women in receipt of lopinavir were identified, of whom 89% had plasma lopinavir concentrations above the suggested minimum recommended for wild-type HIV. Initial TDM results prompted dosage change in 10% and assessment of adherence and\\/or pharmacist review in 11%. TDM was repeated in 29%. TDM can play an important role in the clinical management of HIV-positive pregnant women, allowing informed dose modification and an alternative measure of adherence.

  18. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  19. A review on the relation between the brain-serum concentration ratio of drugs and the influence of P-glycoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Thomas Broeng; Morling, Niels; Linnet, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    This overview on the brain-serum relationship for drugs illustrates the importance of the drug transporter P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier. Generally, an inverse relationship exists between the magnitude of the brain-serum ratio and the influence of P-glycoprotein. Concerning the pharma...... the pharmacogenomics of P-glycoprotein, no clear effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been demonstrated in humans....

  20. Retailer adherence to Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, North Carolina, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Shyanika W; Myers, Allison E; D'Angelo, Heather; Ribisl, Kurt M

    2013-04-04

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act regulates the sales and marketing of tobacco products in the United States; poor adherence by tobacco retailers may reduce the effectiveness of the Act's provisions. The objectives of this study were 1) to assess whether and to which provisions retailers were adherent and 2) to examine differences in adherence by county, retailer neighborhood, and retailer characteristics. We conducted multivariate analysis of tobacco retailers' adherence to 12 point-of-sale provisions of the Tobacco Control Act in 3 North Carolina counties. We conducted observational audits of 324 retailers during 3 months in 2011 to assess adherence. We used logistic regression to assess associations between adherence to provisions and characteristics of each county, retailer neighborhood, and retailer. We found 15.7% of retailers did not adhere to at least 1 provision; 84.3% adhered to all provisions. The provisions most frequently violated were the ban on sales of cigarettes with modified-risk labels (eg, "light" cigarettes) (43 [13.3%] retailers nonadherent) and the ban on self-service for cigarettes and smokeless tobacco (6 [1.9%] retailers nonadherent). We found significant differences in rates of nonadherence by county and type of retailer. Pharmacies and drug stores were more than 3 times as likely as grocery stores to be nonadherent. Most tobacco retailers have implemented regulatory changes without enforcement by the US Food and Drug Administration. Monitoring rates of adherence by store type and locale (eg, county) may help retailers comply with point-of-sale provisions.

  1. Renal Transplant Recipients: The Factors Related to Immunosuppressive Medication Adherence Based on the Health Belief Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Pen-Chen; Yeh, Mei Chang; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2017-10-01

    Kidney transplant failures are caused primarily by lack of adherence to immunosuppressive medication regimens by patients after transplantation. A number of studies have indicated that health-related beliefs are an effective predictor of health-related behavior. The aim of this study is to understand the influence of the personal characteristics and health-related beliefs of patients on adherence to treatment with immunosuppressive medication based on the Health Belief Model. This cross-sectional study distributed questionnaires to patients who had been recruited via purposive sampling at one medical center in Taipei. All of the potential participants had undergone kidney transplantation at least 6 months previously. The self-developed questionnaire collected data in three areas: personal characteristics, health-related beliefs regarding transplant rejection, and adherence to the immunosuppressive medication regimen. One hundred twenty-two valid questionnaires were received. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent t test, one-way analysis of variance, Pearson's correlation, and multiple regression. Participants who had received dialysis treatment or had experienced rejection perceived susceptibility to rejection more strongly than those who had not. Participants who had undergone transplantation in Taiwan, had experienced more drug-related symptoms, or had contracted severe to extremely severe infections in the past showed lower rates of adherence to treatment with immunosuppressive medication. Adherence to medication regimens correlated negatively with length of time since transplantation. Length of time since transplantation, drug-related symptoms, perceived susceptibility to rejection, and perceived benefits of treatment were identified as major predictors of adherence to immunosuppressive medication regimens. The results partially conformed to the concepts of the Health Belief Model. Perceived susceptibility to rejection and

  2. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagli-Hernandez C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Dagli-Hernandez,1 Rosa Camila Lucchetta,1 Tales Rubens de Nadai,2 José Carlos Fernandez Galduróz,3 Patricia de Carvalho Mastroianni1 1Department of Drugs and Medications, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, 2Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Americo Brasiliense State Hospital, 3Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Objectives: To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ] and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP] to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results: Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion: A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self

  3. Drug-drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Rao, P S S; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse.

  4. Association between patients' beliefs and oral antidiabetic medication adherence in a Chinese type 2 diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu P

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ping Wu,1 Naifeng Liu2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Basic Medical Sciences and Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, 2Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Southeast University Medical School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The objective of this study was to identify, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB, patients’ beliefs about taking oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs as prescribed, and to measure the correlations between beliefs and medication adherence.Patients and methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of type 2 diabetic patients using structured questionnaires in a Chinese tertiary hospital. A total of 130 patients were enrolled to be interviewed about TPB variables (behavioral, normative, and control beliefs relevant to medication adherence. Medication adherence was assessed using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8. Spearman’s rank correlation was used to assess the association between TPB and MMAS-8. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between different variables and MMAS-8, with statistical significance determined at P<0.05.Results: From 130 eligible Chinese patients with an average age of 60.6 years and a male proportion of 50.8%, a nonsignificant relationship between behavioral, normative, and the most facilitating control beliefs and OAD adherence was found in our study. Having the OADs on hand (P=0.037 was the only facilitating control belief associated with adherence behavior. Being away from home or eating out (P=0.000, not accepting the disease (P=0.000, ignorance of life-long drug adherence (P=0.038, being busy (P=0.001, or poor memory (P=0.008 were control belief barriers found to be correlated with poor adherence. TPB is the only important determinant influencing OAD adherence among all the factors (P=0.011.Conclusion: The results indicate that the TPB model could be used to examine adherence to OADs. One

  5. Selective binding of sucralfate to endoscopic mucosal resection-induced gastric ulcer: evaluation of aluminium adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, T; Kusaka, K; Kawaura, K; Kashimura, K; Yamakawa, J; Takahashi, T; Kanda, T

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of sucralfate in patients with early gastric cancer in endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR)-induced gastric ulcers, and in rats with acetic acid-induced ulcers, by measuring concentrations of aluminium adhering to mucosal lesions. Twenty-two patients who underwent EMR received sucralfate with or without ranitidine and were examined endoscopically after 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks. Gastric juice pH and concentration of aluminium in samples of ulcerated and normal mucosa were measured at various time-points. Good ulcer healing was observed in all patients. Significantly higher concentrations of aluminium were found in ulcerated tissue compared with normal mucosa. This selective binding of sucralfate was even found 12 h after drug administration and was confirmed in acetic acid-induced ulcers in 40 rats. Neutral rather than acid gastric juice was observed up to 12 h after the administration of sucralfate alone. These results suggest that sucralfate with or without ranitidine may contribute to the healing of EMR-induced ulcers by selectively binding to lesions.

  6. Factors affecting adherence to antiretroviral therapy among pregnant women in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent; Ajayi, Anthony Idowu; Ter Goon, Daniel; Owolabi, Eyitayo Omolara; Eboh, Alfred; Lambert, John

    2018-04-13

    Context-specific factors influence adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among pregnant women living with HIV. Gaps exist in the understanding of the reasons for the variable outcomes of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programme at the health facility level in South Africa. This study examined adherence levels and reasons for non-adherence during pregnancy in a cohort of parturient women enrolled in the PMTCT programme in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. This was a mixed-methods study involving 1709 parturient women in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. We conducted a multi-centre retrospective analysis of the mother-infant pair in the PMTCT electronic database in 2016. Semi-structured interviews of purposively selected parturient women with self-reported poor adherence (n = 177) were conducted to gain understanding of the main barriers to adherence. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors of ART non-adherence. A high proportion (69.0%) of women reported perfect adherence. In the logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for confounding factors, marital status, cigarette smoking, alcohol use and non-disclosure to a family member were the independent predictors of non-adherence. Analysis of the qualitative data revealed that drug-related side-effects, being away from home, forgetfulness, non-disclosure, stigma and work-related demand were among the main reasons for non-adherence to ART. Non-adherence to the antiretroviral therapy among pregnant women in this setting is associated with lifestyle behaviours, HIV-related stigma and ART side-effects. In order to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV, clinicians need to screen for these factors at every antenatal clinic visit.

  7. Protocol adherence and the ability to achieve target haemoglobin levels in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Moran, John; Hlatky, Mark; Lafayette, Richard

    2009-06-01

    Anemia management remains complicated in patients with endstage renal disease on hemodialysis. We wished to evaluate the effect of protocol adherence to EPO and intravenous iron dosing on achieving the desired range of hemoglobin levels. A cohort of hemodialysis patients was studied to evaluate the rate of adherence to EPO and iron dosing protocols over a 5 month period. A database was completed to evaluate all known comorbidities, demographic factors, and facility issues that might affect hemoglobin levels. A logistic regression model was employed to evaluate the effect of adherence to the anemia protocols on the probability of achieving a hemoglobin level below, within or above the targeted range of 11-12.5 g/dl. Among 2114 patients, we found that adherence to both the EPO and iron dosing protocol resulted in the greatest probability of achieving the target hemoglobin range (56 +/- 5% in anemia protocol adherent patients versus 42 +/- 7% in non adherent patients). This was predominantly due to a lowered risk of having above target hemoglobin levels rather than below. The use of the anemia protocols was associated with lower rates of hospitalization (9 +/- 0.7 visits/100 months in adherent group vs 15 +/- 2 in non adherent group) and lower utilization of both EPO and intravenous iron. Furthermore, patients in the adherent groups had less variability of their hemoglobin levels month by month, at least as judged by standard deviation. Adherence to anemia protocols, as practiced in the dialysis units included in this cohort, may improve hemodialysis patients' ability to achieve target hemoglobin levels, and by avoiding above target hemoglobin values, lower drug utilization and reduce variability of hemoglobin levels.

  8. Intimate partner violence and HIV-positive women's non-adherence to antiretroviral medication for the purpose of prevention of mother-to-child transmission in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampanda, Karen M

    2016-03-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) depends critically on HIV-positive women's adherence to antiretroviral drugs during and after pregnancy. Adherence among pregnant and breastfeeding women remains a challenge across sub-Saharan Africa. Power dynamics within couples, such as intimate partner violence, has largely been neglected in research regarding PMTCT adherence. This study aims to determine if there is a relationship between intimate partner violence and non-adherence to PMTCT. In 2014, using a verbally administered cross-sectional survey at a large public health clinic in Lusaka, Zambia, 320 HIV-positive postpartum women, who were currently married or living with a man, provided information on their drug adherence during and after pregnancy, as well as relationship dynamics. Adherence was defined as the woman reporting she took or gave to the infant at least 80% of prescribed medication doses. Experiencing intimate partner violence was associated with decreased odds of adherence to PMTCT during and after pregnancy. Different forms of violence affected PMTCT adherence differentially. Physical violence had a less pronounced effect on non-adherence than emotional and sexual violence. A dose-response relationship between intimate partner violence and non-adherence was also observed. Intimate partner violence is associated with non-adherence to PMTCT during and after pregnancy, which deserves increased attention in the effort to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A systematic review of immunosuppressant adherence interventions in transplant recipients: Decoding the streetlight effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, S; Annunziato, R A; Dunphy, C; LaPointe Rudow, D; Shneider, B L; Shemesh, E

    2018-02-01

    Non-adherence to immunosuppressant medications is an important risk factor for graft dysfunction. To evaluate the effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions, we reviewed adherence intervention studies in solid organ transplant recipients (all ages). Using the following databases: PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect, we identified 41 eligible studies. Only three non-randomized trials showed a possible positive effect on objective indicators of transplant outcomes (such as rejection, liver enzyme levels, kidney function). None of the 21 RCTs showed an improvement in transplant outcomes. Three studies showed a higher rate of adverse events in the intervention group as compared with controls, although this may be related to ascertainment bias. Improvement in adherence as measured indirectly (eg, with electronic monitoring devices) was not aligned with effects on transplant outcomes. We conclude that adherence interventions, to date, have largely been ineffective in improving transplant outcomes. To improve this track record, intervention efforts may wish to concentrate on non-adherent patients (rather than use convenience sampling, which excludes many of the patients who need the intervention), use direct measures of adherence to guide the interventions, and employ strategies that are intensive and yet engaging enough to ensure that non-adherent patients are able to participate. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Curing the disobedient patient: medication adherence programs as pharmaceutical marketing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamkin, Matt; Elliott, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies have long focused their marketing strategies on getting doctors to write more prescriptions. But they lose billions in potential sales when patients do not take their prescribed drugs. Getting patients to "adhere" to drug therapies that have unpleasant side effects and questionable efficacy requires more than mere ad campaigns urging patients to talk to their doctors. It requires changing patients' beliefs and attitudes about their medications through repeated contact from people patients trust. Since patients do not trust drug companies, these companies are delivering their marketing messages through nurses, pharmacists, and even other patients--leveraging patients' trust in these intermediaries to persuade them to consume more brand name drugs. Armed with the premise that better adherence improves patients' health, drug companies justify manipulating patients by reframing reasonable decisions to decline therapy as pathological, and promote brand loyalty in the guise of offering medical care. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  11. A Randomized Trial of a Multicomponent Intervention to Promote Medication Adherence: The Teen Adherence in Kidney Transplant Effectiveness of Intervention Trial (TAKE-IT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Bethany J; Pai, Ahna L H; Zelikovsky, Nataliya; Amaral, Sandra; Bell, Lorraine; Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Hebert, Diane; Holly, Crystal; Knauper, Baerbel; Matsell, Douglas; Phan, Veronique; Rogers, Rachel; Smith, Jodi M; Zhao, Huaqing; Furth, Susan L

    2018-03-15

    Poor adherence to immunosuppressive medications is a major cause of premature graft loss among children and young adults. Multicomponent interventions have shown promise but have not been fully evaluated. Unblinded parallel-arm randomized trial to assess the efficacy of a clinic-based adherence-promoting intervention. Prevalent kidney transplant recipients 11 to 24 years of age and 3 or more months posttransplantation at 8 kidney transplantation centers in Canada and the United States (February 2012 to May 2016) were included. Adherence was electronically monitored in all participants during a 3-month run-in, followed by a 12-month intervention. Participants assigned to the TAKE-IT intervention could choose to receive text message, e-mail, and/or visual cue dose reminders and met with a coach at 3-month intervals when adherence data from the prior 3 months were reviewed with the participant. "Action-Focused Problem Solving" was used to address adherence barriers selected as important by the participant. Participants assigned to the control group met with coaches at 3-month intervals but received no feedback about adherence data. The primary outcomes were electronically measured "taking" adherence (the proportion of prescribed doses of immunosuppressive medications taken) and "timing" adherence (the proportion of doses of immunosuppressive medications taken between 1 hour before and 2 hours after the prescribed time of administration) on each day of observation. Secondary outcomes included the standard deviation of tacrolimus trough concentrations, self-reported adherence, acute rejection, and graft failure. 81 patients were assigned to intervention (median age, 15.5 years; 57% male) and 88 to the control group (median age, 15.8 years; 61% male). Electronic adherence data were available for 64 intervention and 74 control participants. Participants in the intervention group had significantly greater odds of taking prescribed medications (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1

  12. Exfoliation in ecstasy: liquid crystal formation and concentration-dependent debundling observed for single-wall nanotubes dispersed in the liquid drug γ-butyrolactone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Shane D.; Nicolosi, Valeria; Giordani, Silvia; de Gromard, Antoine; Carpenter, Leslie; Blau, Werner J.; Coleman, Jonathan N.

    2007-11-01

    Large-scale debundling of single-walled nanotubes has been demonstrated by dilution of nanotube dispersions in the solvent γ-butyrolactone. This liquid, sometimes referred to as 'liquid ecstasy', is well known for its narcotic properties. At high concentrations the dispersions form an anisotropic, liquid crystalline phase which can be removed by mild centrifugation. At lower concentrations an isotropic phase is observed with a biphasic region at intermediate concentrations. By measuring the absorbance before and after centrifugation, as a function of concentration, the relative anisotropic and isotropic nanotube concentrations can be monitored. The upper limit of the pure isotropic phase was CNT~0.004 mg ml-1, suggesting that this can be considered the nanotube dispersion limit in γ-butyrolactone. After centrifugation, the dispersions are stable against sedimentation and further aggregation for a period of 8 weeks at least. Atomic-force-microscopy studies on films deposited from the isotropic phase reveal that the bundle diameter distribution decreases dramatically as concentration is decreased. Detailed data analysis suggests the presence of an equilibrium bundle number density. A population of individual nanotubes is always observed which increases with decreasing concentration until almost 40% of all dispersed objects are individual nanotubes at a concentration of 6 × 10-4 mg ml-1. The number density of individual nanotubes peaks at a concentration of ~6 × 10-3 mg ml-1 where almost 10% of the nanotubes by mass are individualized.

  13. Exfoliation in ecstasy: liquid crystal formation and concentration-dependent debundling observed for single-wall nanotubes dispersed in the liquid drug γ-butyrolactone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergin, Shane D; Nicolosi, Valeria; Giordani, Silvia; Gromard, Antoine de; Carpenter, Leslie; Blau, Werner J; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale debundling of single-walled nanotubes has been demonstrated by dilution of nanotube dispersions in the solvent γ-butyrolactone. This liquid, sometimes referred to as 'liquid ecstasy', is well known for its narcotic properties. At high concentrations the dispersions form an anisotropic, liquid crystalline phase which can be removed by mild centrifugation. At lower concentrations an isotropic phase is observed with a biphasic region at intermediate concentrations. By measuring the absorbance before and after centrifugation, as a function of concentration, the relative anisotropic and isotropic nanotube concentrations can be monitored. The upper limit of the pure isotropic phase was C NT ∼0.004 mg ml -1 , suggesting that this can be considered the nanotube dispersion limit in γ-butyrolactone. After centrifugation, the dispersions are stable against sedimentation and further aggregation for a period of 8 weeks at least. Atomic-force-microscopy studies on films deposited from the isotropic phase reveal that the bundle diameter distribution decreases dramatically as concentration is decreased. Detailed data analysis suggests the presence of an equilibrium bundle number density. A population of individual nanotubes is always observed which increases with decreasing concentration until almost 40% of all dispersed objects are individual nanotubes at a concentration of 6 x 10 -4 mg ml -1 . The number density of individual nanotubes peaks at a concentration of ∼6 x 10 -3 mg ml -1 where almost 10% of the nanotubes by mass are individualized

  14. Population pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of erlotinib and pharmacogenomic analysis of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid drug concentrations in Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudo, Masahide; Ikemi, Yasuaki; Togashi, Yosuke; Masago, Katsuhiro; Kim, Young Hak; Mio, Tadashi; Terada, Tomohiro; Teramukai, Satoshi; Mishima, Michiaki; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Katsura, Toshiya

    2013-07-01

    Erlotinib shows large inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability, but the impact of early drug exposure and genetic variations on the clinical outcomes of erlotinib remains fully investigated. The primary objective of this study was to clarify the population pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of erlotinib in Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The secondary objective was to identify genetic determinant(s) for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) permeability of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420. A total of 88 patients treated with erlotinib (150 mg/day) were enrolled, and CSF samples were available from 23 of these patients with leptomeningeal metastases. Plasma and CSF concentrations of erlotinib and OSI-420 were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with the nonlinear mixed-effects modelling program NONMEM. Germline mutations including ABCB1 (1236C>T, 2677G>T/A, 3435C>T), ABCG2 (421C>A), and CYP3A5 (6986A>G) polymorphisms, as well as somatic EGFR activating mutations if available, were examined. Early exposure to erlotinib and its safety/efficacy relationship were evaluated. The apparent clearance of erlotinib and OSI-420 were significantly decreased by 24 and 35 % in patients with the ABCG2 421A allele, respectively (p OSI-420 (p model showed that erlotinib trough (C0) levels on day 8 were an independent risk factor for the development of grade ≥2 diarrhea (p = 0.037) and skin rash (p = 0.031). Interstitial lung disease (ILD)-like events occurred in 3 patients (3.4 %), and the median value of erlotinib C0 levels adjacent to these events was approximately 3 times higher than that in patients who did not develop ILD (3253 versus 1107 ng/mL; p = 0.014). The objective response rate in the EGFR wild-type group was marginally higher in patients achieving higher erlotinib C0 levels (≥1711 ng/mL) than that in patients having lower erlotinib C0

  15. Predictors of Vitamin Adherence After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Supreet; Santiago, Vincent A; Gougeon, Lorraine; Warwick, Katie; Okrainec, Allan; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-02-01

    Vitamin supplementation in bariatric aftercare is essential to prevent nutrient deficiencies; however, rates of vitamin adherence have been as low as 30 % 6 months post-surgery. Preliminary literature suggests non-adherence to prescribed treatments can be linked to demographic and psychological factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between these factors to vitamin adherence in post-bariatric surgery patients. A total of 92 bariatric patients were assessed 6 months post-surgery. Patients were administered a questionnaire collecting demographic information, psychological scores, and self-reported adherence. Nutrient deficiencies were analyzed through serum vitamin levels measured 3 and 6 months after surgery. Wilcoxon rank-sum and chi-square tests were used for analysis. Non-adherence was associated with male sex and full-time employment (p = 0.027, p = 0.015). There were no differences with respect to living situation, education level, or relationship type. Non-adherent patients did not have significantly higher scores for generalized anxiety, depressive symptoms, or avoidant behaviors. However, non-adherent patients displayed greater attachment anxiety than their adherent counterparts (p = 0.0186). Non-adherence was also associated with lower vitamin B12 levels 6 months post-surgery (p = 0.001). Male gender and full-time work have previously been shown to be associated with non-adherence. This is the first study to demonstrate that attachment anxiety is associated with poor multivitamin adherence in the post-surgical bariatric population. This result is concordant with recent literature that has demonstrated attachment anxiety is associated with poor adherence to dietary recommendations in bariatric patients 6 months postoperatively. Presurgical screening for attachment anxiety could facilitate early interventions to promote better bariatric aftercare in this group.

  16. Non-adherence to standard treatment guidelines in a rural paediatric hospital in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruycker, M; Van den Bergh, R; Dahmane, A; Khogali, M; Schiavetti, B; Nzomukunda, Y; Alders, P; Allaouna, M; Cloquet, C; Enarson, D A; Satyarayanan, S; Magbity, E; Zachariah, R

    2013-06-21

    A rural paediatric hospital in Bo, Sierra Leone. To assess the level of adherence to standard treatment guidelines among clinicians prescribing treatment for children admitted with a diagnosis of malaria and/or lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), and determine the association between (non) adherence and hospital outcomes, given that non-rational use of medicines is a serious global problem. Secondary analysis of routine programme data. Data were collected for 865 children admitted with an entry diagnosis of malaria and 690 children with LRTI during the period January to April 2011; some patients were classified in both categories. Non-adherence to guidelines comprised use of non-standard drug regimens, dosage variations, non-standard frequency of administration and treatment duration. Cumulative non-adherence to guidelines for LRTI cases was 86%. For malaria, this involved 12% of patients. Potentially harmful non-adherence was significantly associated with an unfavourable hospital outcome, both for malaria and for LRTI cases. Overall non-adherence to standard treatment guidelines by clinicians in a routine hospital setting is very high and influences hospital outcomes. This study advocates for the implementation of routine measures to monitor and improve rational drug use and the quality of clinical care in such hospitals.

  17. Differences in Medication Adherence between Living and Deceased Donor Kidney Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhaerynck, K; Schmid-Mohler, G; Kiss, A; Steiger, J; Wüthrich, R P; Bock, A; De Geest, S

    2014-01-01

    Literature review suggests that adherence to immunosuppressive drugs may be lower in recipients of living than of deceased donor kidney grafts, possibly because of profile differences. To compare the level of immunosuppressive adherence levels between patients with deceased and living (-related; -unrelated) donor grafts in Switzerland. Using data from two similar cross-sectional studies at two transplant centers in Switzerland, the level of adherence between the two groups was compared. Medication adherence was assessed by self-report or electronic monitoring. Possible explanatory factors included age, beliefs regarding immunosuppressive drugs, depressive symptomatology, pre-emptive transplantation, and the number of transplants received, were also considered. Data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Unadjusted non-adherence odds were 2 to 3 times higher in living-related than deceased donor transplantation (ORs: 2.09-3.05; padherence in recipients of living-related donor kidneys, possibly owing to differences in patient profile (ie, health beliefs regarding their immunosuppressive needs), knowledge of which may enhance adherence if addressed.

  18. Medication adherence among adult patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmalik M Alkatheri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence was assessed in 89 patients on hemodialysis (HD at the King Abdul Aziz Medical City using an Arabic version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MASS-8. The results of the study revealed that 31.46% and 40.45% of the participants showed low and medium adherence, respectively, while 28.09% showed high medication adherence. Accordingly, 71.91% of the patients visiting the dialysis unit were considered medication non-adherent. While being of older age (P = 0.012, being married (P = 0.012 increased the level of adherence, being of medium level of education (P = 0.024 decreased adherence levels. On the other hand, gender, presence of a care-giver, number of members in the household and employment status seems to have no effect on the level of medication adherence. These results call upon the practitioners in HD units to develop intervention programs that can increase the level of medication adherence.

  19. Medicine non-adherence in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison Fiona; Manias, Elizabeth; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Crawford, Kimberley

    2014-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease, the relative shortage of kidney donors and the economic- and health-related costs of kidney transplant rejection make the prevention of adverse outcomes following transplantation a healthcare imperative. Although strict adherence to immunosuppressant medicine regimens is key to preventing kidney rejection, evidence suggests that adherence is sub-optimal. Strategies need to be developed to help recipients of kidney transplants adhere to their prescribed medicines. This review has found that a number of factors contribute to poor adherence, for example, attitudes towards medicine taking and forgetfulness. Few investigations have been conducted, however, on strategies to enhance medicine adherence in kidney transplant recipients. Strategies that may improve adherence include pharmacist-led interventions (incorporating counselling, medicine reviews and nephrologist liaison) and nurse-led interventions (involving collaboratively working with recipients to understand their routines and offering solutions to improve adherence). Strategies that have shown to have limited effectiveness include supplying medicines free of charge and providing feedback on a participant's medicine adherence without any educational or behavioural interventions. Transplantation is the preferred treatment option for people with end-stage kidney disease. Medicine non-adherence in kidney transplantation increases the risk of rejection, kidney loss and costly treatments. Interventions are needed to help the transplant recipient take all their medicines as prescribed to improve general well-being, medicine safety and reduce healthcare costs. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  20. Efficacy of a brief multifactorial adherence-based intervention on reducing the blood pressure of patients with poor adherence: protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llobera Joan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lowering of blood pressure by antihypertensive drugs reduces the risks of cardiovascular events, stroke, and total mortality. However, poor adherence to antihypertensive medications reduces their effectiveness and increases the risk of adverse events. In terms of relative risk reduction, an improvement in medication adherence could be as effective as the development of a new drug. Methods/Design The proposed randomized controlled trial will include patients with a low adherence to medication and uncontrolled blood pressure. The intervention group will receive a multifactorial intervention during the first, third, and ninth months, to improve adherence. This intervention will include motivational interviews, pill reminders, family support, blood pressure self-recording, and simplification of the dosing regimen. Measurement The primary outcome is systolic blood pressure. The secondary outcomes are diastolic blood pressure, proportion of patients with adequately controlled blood pressure, and total cost. Discussion The trial will evaluate the impact of a multifactorial adherence intervention in routine clinical practice. Ethical approval was given by the Ethical Committee on Human Research of Balearic islands, Spain (approval number IB 969/08 PI. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN21229328

  1. Factors influencing adherence to psychopharmacological medications in psychiatric patients: a structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Las Cuevas, Carlos; de Leon, Jose; Peñate, Wenceslao; Betancort, Moisés

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate pathways through which sociodemographic, clinical, attitudinal, and perceived health control variables impact psychiatric patients' adherence to psychopharmacological medications. A sample of 966 consecutive psychiatric outpatients was studied. The variables were sociodemographic (age, gender, and education), clinical (diagnoses, drug treatment, and treatment duration), attitudinal (attitudes toward psychopharmacological medication and preferences regarding participation in decision-making), perception of control over health (health locus of control, self-efficacy, and psychological reactance), and level of adherence to psychopharmacological medications. Structural equation modeling was applied to examine the nonstraightforward relationships and the interactive effects among the analyzed variables. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that psychiatric patients' treatment adherence was associated: 1) negatively with cognitive psychological reactance (adherence decreased as cognitive psychological reactance increased), 2) positively with patients' trust in their psychiatrists (doctors' subscale), 3) negatively with patients' belief that they are in control of their mental health and that their mental health depends on their own actions (internal subscale), and 4) positively (although weakly) with age. Self-efficacy indirectly influenced treatment adherence through internal health locus of control. This study provides support for the hypothesis that perceived health control variables play a relevant role in psychiatric patients' adherence to psychopharmacological medications. The findings highlight the importance of considering prospective studies of patients' psychological reactance and health locus of control as they may be clinically relevant factors contributing to adherence to psychopharmacological medications.

  2. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs | Mweemba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of antiretroviral treatment in HIV/AIDS is showing inhibition of viral replication and reduction of viral load to a point where viral particles are undetectable in the blood of infected individuals. ... Quality of life is a complex broad ranging multidimensional concept defined in terms of individual's subjective experiences.

  3. Possibility of Predicting Serotonin Transporter Occupancy From the In Vitro Inhibition Constant for Serotonin Transporter, the Clinically Relevant Plasma Concentration of Unbound Drugs, and Their Profiles for Substrates of Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahata, Masahiro; Chiba, Koji; Watanabe, Takao; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Accurate prediction of target occupancy facilitates central nervous system drug development. In this review, we discuss the predictability of serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy in human brain estimated from in vitro K i values for human SERT and plasma concentrations of unbound drug (C u,plasma ), as well as the impact of drug transporters in the blood-brain barrier. First, the geometric means of in vitro K i values were compared with the means of in vivo K i values (K i,u,plasma ) which were calculated as C u,plasma values at 50% occupancy of SERT obtained from previous clinical positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography imaging studies for 6 selective serotonin transporter reuptake inhibitors and 3 serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The in vitro K i values for 7 drugs were comparable to their in vivo K i,u,plasma values within 3-fold difference. SERT occupancy was overestimated for 5 drugs (P-glycoprotein substrates) and underestimated for 2 drugs (presumably uptake transporter substrates, although no evidence exists as yet). In conclusion, prediction of human SERT occupancy from in vitro K i values and C u,plasma was successful for drugs that are not transporter substrates and will become possible in future even for transporter substrates, once the transporter activities will be accurately estimated from in vitro experiments. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Feasibility of mHealth and Near Field Communication technology based medication adherence monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Juergen; Schwarz, Mark; Hayn, Dieter; Schreier, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    Poor patients' adherence to intake of prescribed medication has been identified as a serious problem in the treatment of chronically ill patients. Technical solutions are needed to measure and - if necessary - to increase the patients' adherence. A telemonitoring solution was developed to record a patient's medication intake based on smart blisters and mobile phones with NFC functionality. The components allowed recording of drug type, timestamp, and dosage of pills taken. The system's usability and technical feasibility was evaluated in the course of an application study. Over a period of 13 months 59 patients suffering from diabetes were monitored. 1,760 blisters were handed out to these patients and 14,843 takeout events were recorded and transmitted via mobile phone. Results indicate the feasibility of this concept to monitor adherence. Although the system still needs to be optimized for routine use it shows the potential for targeting the problem of poor patient adherence by NFC enabled devices.

  5. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV: Postpartum adherence to Option B+ until 18 months in Western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Sarah; Rempis, Eva; Schnack, Alexandra; Braun, Vera; Rubaihayo, John; Busingye, Priscilla; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Harms, Gundel; Theuring, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Since 2012, the WHO recommends Option B+ for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. This approach entails the initiation of lifelong antiretroviral therapy in all HIV-positive pregnant women, also implying protection during breastfeeding for 12 months or longer. Research on long-term adherence to Option B+ throughout breastfeeding is scarce to date. Therefore, we conducted a prospective observational cohort study in Fort Portal, Western Uganda, to assess adherence to Option B+ until 18 months postpartum. In 2013, we recruited 67 HIV-positive, Option B+ enrolled women six weeks after giving birth and scheduled them for follow-up study visits after six, twelve and 18 months. Two adherence measures, self-reported drug intake and amount of drug refill visits, were combined to define adherence, and were assessed together with feeding information at all study visits. At six months postpartum, 51% of the enrolled women were considered to be adherent. Until twelve and 18 months postpartum, adherence for the respective follow-up interval decreased to 19% and 20.5% respectively. No woman was completely adherent until 18 months. At the same time, 76.5% of the women breastfed for ≥12 months. Drug adherence was associated with younger age (ptravel costs (p = 0.02), and lower number of previous deliveries (p = 0.04). Long-term adherence to Option B+ seems to be challenging. Considering that in our cohort, prolonged breastfeeding until ≥12 months was widely applied while postpartum adherence until the end of breastfeeding was poor, a potential risk of postpartum vertical transmission needs to be taken seriously into account for Option B+ implementation.

  6. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV: Postpartum adherence to Option B+ until 18 months in Western Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Decker

    Full Text Available Since 2012, the WHO recommends Option B+ for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. This approach entails the initiation of lifelong antiretroviral therapy in all HIV-positive pregnant women, also implying protection during breastfeeding for 12 months or longer. Research on long-term adherence to Option B+ throughout breastfeeding is scarce to date. Therefore, we conducted a prospective observational cohort study in Fort Portal, Western Uganda, to assess adherence to Option B+ until 18 months postpartum. In 2013, we recruited 67 HIV-positive, Option B+ enrolled women six weeks after giving birth and scheduled them for follow-up study visits after six, twelve and 18 months. Two adherence measures, self-reported drug intake and amount of drug refill visits, were combined to define adherence, and were assessed together with feeding information at all study visits. At six months postpartum, 51% of the enrolled women were considered to be adherent. Until twelve and 18 months postpartum, adherence for the respective follow-up interval decreased to 19% and 20.5% respectively. No woman was completely adherent until 18 months. At the same time, 76.5% of the women breastfed for ≥12 months. Drug adherence was associated with younger age (p<0.01, lower travel costs (p = 0.02, and lower number of previous deliveries (p = 0.04. Long-term adherence to Option B+ seems to be challenging. Considering that in our cohort, prolonged breastfeeding until ≥12 months was widely applied while postpartum adherence until the end of breastfeeding was poor, a potential risk of postpartum vertical transmission needs to be taken seriously into account for Option B+ implementation.

  7. Adherence to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the treatment of chronic heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitepu, A.; Hamdani, K.

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure is a tremendous health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment of heart failure should be applied appropriately to improve the successful management of patients. This study aims to evaluate the adherence to European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the treatment of chronic heart failure and to determine factors associated with guideline adherence. This study is an observational study comprising 97 patients with chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. The guideline adherence was assessed the by the use of guideline adherence indicator (GAI), which consider GAI-3 or GAI-5, by calculating the proportion of recommended drugs was prescribed divided by a number of drugs indicated according to the ESC guidelines, in the absence of contraindications. The results showed the use of each indicated drugs were angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (78.4%), beta-blockers (61.9%), mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (61.9%), diuretics (89.7%), and digitalis (26.8%). Furthermore, the predominant categories of GAI-3 and GAI-5 were moderate. This study demonstrates that the adherence to ESC guidelines for the treatment of chronic heart failure still needs to be improved compared to recent studies. Also, age, etiology of heart failure and comorbidity were associated factors that influence the implementation of ESC guidelines.

  8. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Gare

    Full Text Available Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12 of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91, pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84 with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01 and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037 were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033. Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance.

  9. Optimization of a model of red blood cells for the study of anti-oxidant drugs, in terms of concentration of oxidant and phosphate buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, A; Lahet, J-J; Lenfant, F; Bouyer, F; Petitjean, M; Chaillot, B; Freysz, M

    2005-08-01

    The aggression of erythrocytes by an oxidative stress induces hemolysis. This paper aims to valid a model of erythrocytes in terms of composition of the phosphate buffer solution and of concentration of a well-known oxidant, AAPH. Three compositions of phosphate buffer solution are mixed with three concentrations of oxidant. The influence of these two parameters on hemolysis is independently studied by a variance analysis and a Kruskal-Wallis test when ANOVA is not available. The hemolysis rate increases with time at fixed oxidant concentration, but is not influenced by the composition of the buffer solution. The highest hemolysis rate, 90%, was only measured within 2 h with the highest oxidant concentration. If we retain this concentration of oxidant, the lower concentration of the buffer can by eliminated by a significant less hemolysis and the highest concentration of the buffer can by chosen in regard of the better precision for a similar hemolysis compared to the mean buffer. We hope to study the effect of anti-oxidant agent with such a model of erythrocytes.

  10. Exfoliation in ecstasy: liquid crystal formation and concentration-dependent debundling observed for single-wall nanotubes dispersed in the liquid drug {gamma}-butyrolactone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergin, Shane D [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Nicolosi, Valeria [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Giordani, Silvia [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Gromard, Antoine de [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Carpenter, Leslie [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Blau, Werner J [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Coleman, Jonathan N [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2007-11-14

    Large-scale debundling of single-walled nanotubes has been demonstrated by dilution of nanotube dispersions in the solvent {gamma}-butyrolactone. This liquid, sometimes referred to as 'liquid ecstasy', is well known for its narcotic properties. At high concentrations the dispersions form an anisotropic, liquid crystalline phase which can be removed by mild centrifugation. At lower concentrations an isotropic phase is observed with a biphasic region at intermediate concentrations. By measuring the absorbance before and after centrifugation, as a function of concentration, the relative anisotropic and isotropic nanotube concentrations can be monitored. The upper limit of the pure isotropic phase was C{sub NT}{approx}0.004 mg ml{sup -1}, suggesting that this can be considered the nanotube dispersion limit in {gamma}-butyrolactone. After centrifugation, the dispersions are stable against sedimentation and further aggregation for a period of 8 weeks at least. Atomic-force-microscopy studies on films deposited from the isotropic phase reveal that the bundle diameter distribution decreases dramatically as concentration is decreased. Detailed data analysis suggests the presence of an equilibrium bundle number density. A population of individual nanotubes is always observed which increases with decreasing concentration until almost 40% of all dispersed objects are individual nanotubes at a concentration of 6 x 10{sup -4} mg ml{sup -1}. The number density of individual nanotubes peaks at a concentration of {approx}6 x 10{sup -3} mg ml{sup -1} where almost 10% of the nanotubes by mass are individualized.

  11. Determination of the total concentration of highly protein-bound drugs in plasma by on-line dialysis and column liquid chromatography: application to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herraez-Hernandez, R.; van de Merbel, N.C.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    The potential of on-line dialysis as a sample preparation procedure for compounds highly bound to plasma proteins is evaluated, using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as model compounds and column liquid chromatography as the separation technique. Different strategies to reduce the degree of

  12. Determination of the total concentration of highly protein-bound drugs in plasma by on-line dialysis and column liquid chromatography : application to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herráez-Hernández, R; van de Merbel, N C; Brinkman, U A

    1995-01-01

    The potential of on-line dialysis as a sample preparation procedure for compounds highly bound to plasma proteins is evaluated, using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as model compounds and column liquid chromatography as the separation technique. Different strategies to reduce the degree of

  13. Determination of optical properties, drug concentration, and tissue oxygenation in human pleural tissue before and after Photofrin-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Yi Hong; Padawer-Curry, Jonah; Finlay, Jarod C.; Kim, Michele M.; Dimofte, Andreea; Cengel, Keith; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2018-02-01

    PDT efficacy depends on the concentration of photosensitizer, oxygen, and light delivery in patient tissues. In this study, we measure the in-vivo distribution of important dosimetric parameters, namely the tissue optical properties (absorption μa (λ) and scattering μs ' (λ) coefficients), photofrin concentration (cphotofrin), blood oxygen saturation (%StO2), and total hemoglobin concentration (THC), before and after PDT. We characterize the inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity of these quantities and explore how these properties change as a result of PDT treatment. The result suggests the need for real-time dosimetry during PDT to optimize the treatment condition depending on the optical and physiological properties.

  14. SMS messages increase adherence to rapid diagnostic test results among malaria patients: results from a pilot study in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrek, Sepideh; Schatzkin, Eric; De La Cruz, Anna; Isiguzo, Chinwoke; Nwokolo, Ernest; Anyanti, Jennifer; Ujuju, Chinazo; Montagu, Dominic; Liu, Jenny

    2014-02-25

    The World Health Organization now recommends parasitological confirmation for malaria case management. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are an accurate and simple diagnostic to confirm parasite presence in blood. However, where they have been deployed, adherence to RDT results has been poor, especially when the test result is negative. Few studies have examined adherence to RDTs distributed or purchased through the private sector. The Rapid Examination of Malaria and Evaluation of Diagnostic Information (REMEDI) study assessed the acceptability of and adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care from private sector drug retailers in two cities in Oyo State in south-west Nigeria. In total, 465 adult participants were enrolled upon exit from a participating drug shop having purchased anti-malaria drugs for themselves. Participants were given a free RDT and the appropriate treatment advice based on their RDT result. Short Message Service (SMS) text messages reiterating the treatment advice were sent to a randomly selected half of the participants one day after being tested. Participants were contacted via phone four days after the RDT was conducted to assess adherence to the RDT information and treatment advice. Adherence to RDT results was 14.3 percentage points (P-val <0.001) higher in the treatment group who were sent the SMS. The higher adherence in the treatment group was robust to several specification tests and the estimated difference in adherence ranged from 9.7 to 16.1 percentage points. Further, the higher adherence to the treatment advice was specific to the treatment advice for anti-malarial drugs and not other drugs purchased to treat malaria symptoms in the RDT-negative participants who bought both anti-malarial and symptom drugs. There was no difference in adherence for the RDT-positive participants who were sent the SMS. SMS text messages substantially increased adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care for malaria from

  15. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial to Promote Immunosuppressant Adherence in Adult Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; Ver Halen, Nisha; Pencille, Melissa; Tedla, Fasika; Salifu, Moro

    2017-01-01

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressant medication is a prevalent practice among kidney transplant recipients and has been associated with increased risk for graft failure and economic burden. The aim of this pilot study was to test whether a culturally sensitive cognitive-behavioral adherence promotion program could significantly improve medication adherence to tacrolimus prescription as measured by telephone pill counts among kidney transplant recipients. Thirty-three adult transplant recipients were less than 98% adherent to tacrolimus prescription based on 3 telephone pill counts and were randomized either to the 2-session cognitive-behavioral adherence promotion program or to standard care. The curriculum was developed from an iterative process with transplant recipients into a 2-session group program that provided psychoeducation, addressed barriers to adherence, fostered motivation to improve adherence behavior, and discussed cultural messages on adherence behavior. The intervention group displayed significantly higher levels of adherence when compared to the control group (t = 2.2, p = 0.04) and. similarly, when the amount of change was compared between the groups, the intervention group showed more change than the control condition (F (22,1) = 12.005, p = 0.003). Tacrolimus trough concentration levels were used as a secondary measure of adherence and, while there were no significant between-group differences for mean trough concentration levels, the variability in the trough levels did significantly decrease over time indicating more consistent pill-taking behavior in the intervention group. There is preliminary support for the pilot program as a successful intervention in helping patients with their immunosuppressant medication. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    comparison with major infectious diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis ... dietary and fluid adherence is of crucial importance to the quality of life and survival of ... behaviours such as medication adherence among psychiatric ... or nursing sister and introduced to one of the study personnel who .... Children per household. 61.

  17. Self-replenishing low-adherence coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikic, T.; Ming, W.; Benthem, van R.A.T.M.; With, de G.; Schmets, A.J.M.; Zwaag, van der S.

    2007-01-01

    Low-adherence coatings are widely used today since their water/oil repellency makes them easily cleanable (a well-known example is PTFE). The low surface tension is provided by fluorine- or silicon-containing species that are present at the film surface. Low adherence coatings have already been

  18. Medication adherence in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webber Chan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory condition with intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Medications are the cornerstone of treatment of IBD. However, patients often adhere to medication poorly. Adherence to medications is defined as the process by which patients take their medications as prescribed. Treatment non-adherence is a common problem among chronic diseases, averaging 50% in developed countries and is even poorer in developing countries. In this review, we will examine the adherence data in IBD which vary greatly depending on the study population, route of administration, and methods of adherence measurement used. We will also discuss the adverse clinical outcomes related to non-adherence to medical treatment including increased disease activity, flares, loss of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy, and so forth. There are many methods to measure medication adherence namely direct and indirect methods, each with their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we will explore different intervention strategies to improve adherence to medications.

  19. Factors influencing adherence to routine iron supplementation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anemia in pregnancy is a common problem especially in developing countries. and has been linked with feotal and maternal complications. Taking iron supplements could reduce anaemia in pregnancy but some pregnant women do not adhere to this. The study identified some factors associated with non adherence ...

  20. Social Support, Treatment Adherence and Outcome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... Access to family support did not positively influence medication adherence, while access to financial support marginally impacted on outcome among hypertensive and T2D patients. However, un- wavering tendency for therapy affordability significantly influenced adherence and outcome, thus, the need for ...

  1. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  2. An adherence trilogy is essential for long-term HAART success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Garcia

    Full Text Available Adherence is the milestone of a successful therapy. Over the last decade several authors have addressed the importance of adherence for optimal results of antiretroviral (ARV therapy. Many health care systems are investing substantial resources to make available contemporary antiretroviral therapy. Despite the large investment in medications, insufficient investments have been made into an integrated adherence component to maximize the impact of these medications. Adherence, unlike drug therapy, cannot be defined as a single method with a defined prescription or formula. Instead, it is the result of a complex interaction between the patient, a prescribed medication and the health system. Many reports are available analyzing each of these components. We have found that critical elements of adherence include the patient's knowledge about the disease and how medications will help achieve a longer and healthier life, together with the motivation to adapt to a new style of life. A trilogy composed of information, motivation and behavioral skills is essential to achieve the maximum desired level of adherence. We have computerized this trilogy in a software program for self-administration in which each of the three components is provided to the patient as many times as necessary to transmit an understanding of the problem and to help make a rational decision to adhere to the ARV treatment program. In this review we analyze several efforts and techniques to improve adherence to any recommended medication that may interfere with the patient's lifestyle and outline how the adherence trilogy can be best used to optimize the ability of ARV therapy to durably suppress plasma HIV RNA to undetectable levels.

  3. An adherence trilogy is essential for long-term HAART success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Rosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherence is the milestone of a successful therapy. Over the last decade several authors have addressed the importance of adherence for optimal results of antiretroviral (ARV therapy. Many health care systems are investing substantial resources to make available contemporary antiretroviral therapy. Despite the large investment in medications, insufficient investments have been made into an integrated adherence component to maximize the impact of these medications. Adherence, unlike drug therapy, cannot be defined as a single method with a defined prescription or formula. Instead, it is the result of a complex interaction between the patient, a prescribed medication and the health system. Many reports are available analyzing each of these components. We have found that critical elements of adherence include the patient's knowledge about the disease and how medications will help achieve a longer and healthier life, together with the motivation to adapt to a new style of life. A trilogy composed of information, motivation and behavioral skills is essential to achieve the maximum desired level of adherence. We have computerized this trilogy in a software program for self-administration in which each of the three components is provided to the patient as many times as necessary to transmit an understanding of the problem and to help make a rational decision to adhere to the ARV treatment program. In this review we analyze several efforts and techniques to improve adherence to any recommended medication that may interfere with the patient's lifestyle and outline how the adherence trilogy can be best used to optimize the ability of ARV therapy to durably suppress plasma HIV RNA to undetectable levels.

  4. Factors influencing medication knowledge and beliefs on warfarin adherence among patients with atrial fibrillation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shujuan; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Xianpei; Gao, Chuanyu; Qin, Yuhua; Cai, Haixia; Chen, Boya; Cao, Jingjing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Warfarin is often used for ischemic stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), but the factors affecting patient adherence to warfarin therapy have not been fully understood. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in AF patients undergoing warfarin therapy at least 6 months prior to the study. The clinical data collected using questionnaires by phone interviews included the following: 1) self-reported adherence measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8©; 2) beliefs about medicines surveyed by Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ); and 3) drug knowledge as measured by the Warfarin Related Knowledge Test (WRKT). Demographic and clinical factors associated with warfarin adherence were identified using a logistic regression model. Results Two hundred eighty-eight patients completed the survey and 93 (32.3%) of them were classified as nonadherent (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 score <6). Major factors predicting warfarin adherence included age, cardiovascular disorders, WRKT, and BMQ; WRKT and BMQ were independently correlated with adherence to warfarin therapy by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Adherents were more likely to have greater knowledge scores and stronger beliefs in the necessity of their specific medications ([odds ratio {OR} =1.81, 95% confidence interval {CI} =1.51–2.15] and [OR =1.17, 95% CI =1.06–1.29], respectively). Patients with greater concerns about adverse reactions and more negative views of general harm were more likely to be nonadherent ([OR =0.76, 95% CI =0.69–0.84] and [OR =0.82, 95% CI =0.73–0.92], respectively). Conclusion BMK and WRKT are related with patient behavior toward warfarin adherence. BMQ can be applied to identify patients at increased risk of nonadherence. PMID:28223782

  5. Health Information Technology: Meaningful Use and Next Steps to Improving Electronic Facilitation of Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, Hayden B; Zullig, Leah L; Mendys, Phil; Ho, Michael; Trygstad, Troy; Granger, Christopher; Oakes, Megan M; Granger, Bradi B

    2016-03-15

    The use of health information technology (HIT) may improve medication adherence, but challenges for implementation remain. The aim of this paper is to review the current state of HIT as it relates to medication adherence programs, acknowledge the potential barriers in light of current legislation, and provide recommendations to improve ongoing medication adherence strategies through the use of HIT. We describe four potential HIT barriers that may impact interoperability and subsequent medication adherence. Legislation in the United States has incentivized the use of HIT to facilitate and enhance medication adherence. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) was recently adopted and establishes federal standards for the so-called "meaningful use" of certified electronic health record (EHR) technology that can directly impact medication adherence. The four persistent HIT barriers to medication adherence include (1) underdevelopment of data reciprocity across clinical, community, and home settings, limiting the capture of data necessary for clinical care; (2) inconsistent data definitions and lack of harmonization of patient-focused data standards, making existing data difficult to use for patient-centered outcomes research; (3) inability to effectively use the national drug code information from the various electronic health record and claims datasets for adherence purposes; and (4) lack of data capture for medication management interventions, such as medication management therapy (MTM) in the EHR. Potential recommendations to address these issues are discussed. To make meaningful, high quality data accessible, and subsequently improve medication adherence, these challenges will need to be addressed to fully reach the potential of HIT in impacting one of our largest public health issues.

  6. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Jinja, Uganda: a six-year follow-up study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mbonye

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We report on the adherence experience of a group of people living with HIV on ART over six years in Uganda. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2009, we followed up 41 participants who were also part of a clinical trial comparing home and facility based delivery of ART in Jinja, eastern Uganda. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews at enrolment, 3, 6, 18 and 30 months to capture experiences with adherence over time. In 2011 we returned to these participants to find out how they were fairing with long term adherence. We managed to retrace 24 participants and interviewed them about their experience. We thematically analysed the data and compared findings over time. RESULTS: Initially there were few barriers to adherence and many followed the adherence guidance closely. By year six, relaxation of these rules was noticeable although self-reported adherence continued to be high. Alcohol consumption was more common than before. Some relatives of the participants who had died claimed that some deaths were a result of alcohol. While participants reported that ART had allowed them to reclaim independence and return to work the changes in work and social routines created new challenges for adherence. Side effects like lipodystrophy were not only causing some stigma but for some tested their faith in the drugs. Many participants reported resumption of sexual lives but apart from those who selected same status partners, disclosure to new partners was minimal. CONCLUSION: Good adherence practice to ART wanes over the long-term, and people who may have disclosed at initiation find it difficult to do so to new partners once they are healthy. Further adherence interventions and support with disclosure over the course of therapy may need to be considered.

  7. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Kegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug induced liver injury (DILI is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2±0.9×106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay and cell activity (XTT assay. The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production.

  8. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L.; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K.; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production. PMID:26491234

  9. Asthma and Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bårnes, Camilla Boslev; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the cornerstone of maintenance asthma therapy. However, in spite of this, adherence to ICS remains low. The aim of this systematic literature review was to provide an overview of the current knowledge of adherence to ICS, effects of poor adherence, and means...... was found to be between 22 and 63%, with improvement up to and after an exacerbation. Poor adherence was associated with youth, being African-American, having mild asthma, ... prescribed fixed-combination therapy (ICS and long-acting β2 agonists). Good adherence was associated with higher FEV1, a lower percentage of eosinophils in sputum, reduction in hospitalizations, less use of oral corticosteroids, and lower mortality rate. Overall, 24% of exacerbations and 60% of asthma...

  10. Effects of Spray-Drying and Choice of Solid Carriers on Concentrations of Labrasol® and Transcutol® in Solid Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (SMEDDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wai-Kei Lam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS have been used increasingly for improving the bioavailability of hydrophobic drugs. Labrasol® and Transcutol® are used widely as surfactant and solubilizer in the formulation of solid SMEDDS. We investigated the effects of spray-drying and the use of different solid carriers on concentrations of Labrasol® and Transcutol® in solid SMEDDS with scutellarin as the formulated drug. Liquid and gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS and GC-MS methods were developed for measuring low concentrations of Labrasol® and Transcutol®. In the preparation of solid SMEDDS, lactose, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC were used as solid carriers. Judging from the retention ratios of Labrasol® and Transcutol®, the droplet size of solid SMEDDS increased after spray-drying of liquid SMEDDS, and concentrations of these excipients decreased after the solidifying procedure. In such reduction, Lactose and HPMC were found to preserve Labrasol® and Transcutol® better than MCC during spray-drying, and the resultant droplet sizes were smaller than that of MCC. Labrasol® and Transcutol® showed good thermal stability at 60 °C degree for 10 days. It can be concluded that spray-drying could increase the droplet size of solid SMEDDS and decreased the concentration of Labrasol® and Transcutol® therein, while water-soluble solid carriers could preserve Labrasol® and Transcutol® better than insoluble carriers in the solid SMEDDS.

  11. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    ... metabolism and its impact on patient welfare. After underlining the relationship between efficacy, toxicity and drug concentration, the book then considers how metabolizing systems operate and how they impact upon drug concentration...

  12. Adesão de pacientes com AIDS ao tratamento com antiretrovirais: dificuldades relatadas e proposição de medidas atenuantes em um hospital escola Adhesión del paciente con SIDA al tratamiento con antiretrovirales: dificultades relatadas y propuesta de medidas atenuantes en un hospital escuela Adherence of AIDS patients to treatment with antiretroviral drugs in a university hospital: difficulties observed and suggestions of interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosely Moralez de Figueiredo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Com finalidade de propor medidas que facilitem a adesão do paciente com AIDS ao tratamento, este trabalho teve como objetivo caracterizar os erros e as principais dificuldades relatadas por 61 pacientes com AIDS atendidos junto ao Hospital de Clínicas da UNICAMP. Os erros mais freqüentes foram referentes às combinações entre as drogas e falta de jejum; as dificuldades relatadas foram: quantidade de medicamentos e reações adversas. As autoras propuseram, a partir destes dados, a utilização de um roteiro ilustrado para realização de orientações relativas aos medicamentos. Espera-se assim que a orientação individualizada possa contribuir para minimizar as falhas da adesão à terapêutica.Con la finalidad de proponer medidas que faciliten la adhesión del paciente con SIDA al tratamiento, este trabajo tuvo como objetivo caracterizar los errores y las principales dificultades relatadas por 61 pacientes con SIDA atendidos en el Hospital Clínicas de la UNICAMP. Los errores más frecuentes estuvieron relacionados con las combinaciones entre las drogas y la falta de ayuno; las dificultades relatadas fueron: Cantidad de medicamentos y reacciones adversas. Las autoras propusieron, a partir de estos datos, la utilización de una guía ilustrada para dar orientaciones relacionadas con los medicamentos. Se espera que la orientación individualizada pueda contribuir para disminuir las fallas en la adhesión al tratamiento.This study aimed at identifying the incidence of drug intake errors and the main therapy-related difficulties among AIDS patients as well as at proposing measures to increase patients' adherence to treatment. Sixty-one patients with AIDS assisted by the University Hospital of São Paulo State University at Campinas were interviewed. The most frequent errors concerned the combinations of drugs and the length of fasting. The difficulties reported were adverse effects and the variety of drugs. Based on these data, the authors

  13. Administration of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen increases macrophage concentrations but reduces necrosis during modified muscle use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, E. V.; Tidball, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that ibuprofen administration during modified muscle use reduces muscle necrosis and invasion by select myeloid cell populations. METHODS: Rats were subjected to hindlimb unloading for 10 days, after which they experienced muscle reloading by normal weight-bearing to induce muscle inflammation and necrosis. Some animals received ibuprofen by intraperitoneal injection 8 h prior to the onset of muscle reloading, and then again at 8 and 16 h following the onset of reloading. Other animals received buffer injection at 8 h prior to reloading and then ibuprofen at 8 and 16 h following the onset of reloading. Control animals received buffer only at each time point. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis was used to assess the presence of necrotic muscle fibers, total inflammatory infiltrate, neutrophils, ED1+ macrophages and ED2+ macrophages at 24 h following the onset of reloading. RESULT: Administration of ibuprofen beginning 8 h prior to reloading caused significant reduction in the concentration of necrotic fibers, but increased the concentration of inflammatory cells in muscle. The increase in inflammatory cells was attributable to a 2.6-fold increase in the concentration of ED2+ macrophages. Animals treated with ibuprofen 8 h following the onset of reloading showed no decrease in muscle necrosis or increase in ED2+ macrophage concentrations. CONCLUSION: Administration of ibuprofen prior to increased muscle loading reduces muscle damage, but increases the concentration of macrophages that express the ED2 antigen. The increase in ED2+ macrophage concentration and decrease in necrosis may be mechanistically related because ED2+ macrophages have been associated with muscle regeneration and repair.

  14. Insertion/deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene and adherence to ACE inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelleman, H; Klungel, O H; van Duijn, C M; Witteman, J C M; Hofman, A; de Boer, A; Stricker, B H Ch

    AIMS: We investigated whether the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene modified the adherence to ACE inhibitors as measured by the discontinuation of an ACE inhibitor, or addition of another antihypertensive drug. METHODS: This was a cohort study among 239 subjects who started ACE

  15. Insertion/deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene and adherence to ACE inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schelleman (Hedi); O.H. Klungel (Olaf); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert); A.C. de Boer (Anton); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAims: We investigated whether the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene modified the adherence to ACE inhibitors as measured by the discontinuation of an ACE inhibitor, or addition of another antihypertensive drug. Methods: This was a cohort study among 239 subjects who

  16. Comparison of various measures for assessing medication refill adherence using prescription data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, N. M.; Klungel, O. H.; Stolk, R. P.; Denig, P.

    Background Several measures using prescription data have been developed for estimating medication refill adherence. Few Studies have made direct comparisons, and little is known about the accuracy of these measures in patients oil a multiple-drug regimen. Purpose To compare different calculation

  17. Psychological and Educational Intervention to Improve Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence in Ethiopia Based on Health Belief Model: A Cluster Randomized Control Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tola, Habteyes Hailu; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Tol, Azar; Garmaroudi, Gholamreza; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Kebede, Abebaw; Ejeta, Luche Tadesse; Kassa, Desta; Klinkenberg, Eveline

    2016-01-01

    Treatment non-adherence results in treatment failure, prolonged transmission of disease and emergence of drug resistance. Although the problem widely investigated, there remains an information gap on the effectiveness of different methods to improve treatment adherence and the predictors of

  18. Effectiveness of a group-based intervention to change medication beliefs and improve medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwikker, H.E.; Ende, C.H. van den; Lankveld, W.G. van; Broeder, A.A. den; Hoogen, F.H. van den; Mosselaar, B. van de; Dulmen, S. van; Bemt, B.J. van den

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of a group-based intervention on the balance between necessity beliefs and concern beliefs about medication and on medication non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Non-adherent RA patients using disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug ... Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug ...

  20. Influence of drug colour on perceived drug effects and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Da; Wang, Tieyan; Wang, Tieshan; Qu, Xingda

    2018-02-01

    A drug's physical characteristics, such as colour, could be factors influencing its therapeutic effects. It is not well understood whether people's expectations on drug effects and efficacy are affected by colour, especially among Chinese population. This study was conducted to examine people's expectations on drug effects and efficacy on the basis of drug colour, and to reveal possible gender differences in colour-related drug expectations. Participants (n = 224) were asked to classify seven single-coloured and six two-coloured capsules into one of four categories of drug effects, and to indicate the strength of drug efficacy. It is found that all the coloured capsules yielded non-chance distributions in classifications of drug effects, with six single-coloured and four two-coloured capsules associated with specific drug effects. Colour also conveyed differential strengths of drug efficacy in general and in relation to specific drug effects. There were gender differences in drug expectations for some colours and colour combinations. Practitioner Summary: Drug colour was found to have impacts on perceived drug effects and efficacy. The findings from the present study can be used by ergonomics practitioners to design appropriate drug colours in support of drug differentiation, therapeutic effects and medication adherence.

  1. Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adherence to controller therapy in asthma is a major concern during the management of the disease. ... The adherence to asthma treatment was rated using Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A ..... in an outpatient setting.

  2. In vitro killing of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by enrofloxacin in combination with its active metabolite ciprofloxacin using clinically relevant drug concentrations in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeau, J M; Borsos, S; Blondeau, L D; Blondeau, B J

    2012-03-23

    Enrofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent used to treat infections in companion animals. Enrofloxacin's antimicrobial spectrum includes Gram positive and Gram-negative bacteria and demonstrates concentration-dependent bacteriocidal activity. In dogs and cats, enrofloxacin is partially metabolized to ciprofloxacin and both active agents circulate simultaneously in treated animals at ratios of approximately 60-70% enrofloxacin to 30-40% ciprofloxacin. We were interested in determining the killing of companion animal isolates of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin combined using clinically relevant drug concentrations and ratios. For E. coli isolates exposed to 2.1 and 4.1μg/ml of enrofloxacin/ciprofloxacin at 50:50, 60:40 and 70:30 ratios, a 1.7-2.5log(10) reduction (94-99% kill) was seen following 20min of drug exposure; 0.89-1.7log(10) (92-99% kill) of S. pseudintermedius following 180min of drug exposure; 0.85-3.4log(10) (98-99% kill) of P. aeruginosa following 15min of drug exposure. Killing of S. pseudintermedius was enhanced in the presence of enrofloxacin whereas killing of P. aeruginosa was enhanced in the presence of ciprofloxacin. Antagonism was not seen when enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were used in kill assays. The unique feature of partial metabolism of enrofloxacin to ciprofloxacin expands the spectrum of enhanced killing of common companion animal pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Medication Adherence and its Related Factors in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Gholamaliei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Low levels of medication adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes is one of the greatest challenges in the treatment and control of diabetes. This study was designed to determine medication adherence and its related factors in patients with type II diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 300patients with type 2diabetes records in the health centers of Tuyserkan city were randomly selected in 2015. Data collection instrument was a self-made questionnaire, which consisted of factors related to the medication adherence. Questionnaires were completed after confirmation of validity and reliability, by interviews. To analyze the data, descriptive and inferential statistics (T-test, AnOVA, Simple and multiple linear regression were applied, using SPSS software, version 19. Results: Overall, %26.3 of patients were male and %73.7 were female. Also, %65 of patients were illiterate, %24 had some degree of symptoms, and %59.4 had poor medication adherence. There was a significant relationship between age, education, patient care and treatment expenditure, health care team and health system, therapy-related factors and condition-related factors, beliefs about illness, efficacy, and concerns about drugs and medication adherence (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed that medication adherence in patients with diabetes was not suitable and individual, economical and social factors were influential.Therefore, the role of these factors must be considered when designing intervention programs.

  4. Factors influencing medication knowledge and beliefs on warfarin adherence among patients with atrial fibrillation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shujuan; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Xianpei; Gao, Chuanyu; Qin, Yuhua; Cai, Haixia; Chen, Boya; Cao, Jingjing

    2017-01-01

    Warfarin is often used for ischemic stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), but the factors affecting patient adherence to warfarin therapy have not been fully understood. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in AF patients undergoing warfarin therapy at least 6 months prior to the study. The clinical data collected using questionnaires by phone interviews included the following: 1) self-reported adherence measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 © ; 2) beliefs about medicines surveyed by Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ); and 3) drug knowledge as measured by the Warfarin Related Knowledge Test (WRKT). Demographic and clinical factors associated with warfarin adherence were identified using a logistic regression model. Two hundred eighty-eight patients completed the survey and 93 (32.3%) of them were classified as nonadherent (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 score beliefs in the necessity of their specific medications ([odds ratio {OR} =1.81, 95% confidence interval {CI} =1.51-2.15] and [OR =1.17, 95% CI =1.06-1.29], respectively). Patients with greater concerns about adverse reactions and more negative views of general harm were more likely to be nonadherent ([OR =0.76, 95% CI =0.69-0.84] and [OR =0.82, 95% CI =0.73-0.92], respectively). BMK and WRKT are related with patient behavior toward warfarin adherence. BMQ can be applied to identify patients at increased risk of nonadherence.

  5. Communication strategies to improve HIV treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Donna; Ross, Michael W; Looney, Carol; Nepal, Vishnu P; Price, Andrea J; Giordano, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has increased the survival of HIV-positive patients, traditional approaches to improving medication adherence have failed consistently. Acknowledging the role of communication in health behavior, we conducted a qualitative study to learn about patients' HIV treatment adherence experiences and to identify which communication strategies might influence adherence. Findings indicate that five constructs--cultural beliefs/language, stigma, cues to action, self-efficacy, and mood state--are potentially modifiable by improved communication. Results will be used to create a direct marketing campaign targeted to HIV-infected patients. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  6. [Instrument to measure adherence in hypertensive patients: contribution of Item Response Theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Malvina Thaís Pacheco; Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhaes; Vasconcelos, Alexandre Meira de; Andrade, Dalton Francisco de; Silva, Daniele Braz da; Barbetta, Pedro Alberto

    2013-06-01

    To analyze, by means of "Item Response Theory", an instrument to measure adherence to t treatment for hypertension. Analytical study with 406 hypertensive patients with associated complications seen in primary care in Fortaleza, CE, Northeastern Brazil, 2011 using "Item Response Theory". The stages were: dimensionality test, calibrating the items, processing data and creating a scale, analyzed using the gradual response model. A study of the dimensionality of the instrument was conducted by analyzing the polychoric correlation matrix and factor analysis of complete information. Multilog software was used to calibrate items and estimate the scores. Items relating to drug therapy are the most directly related to adherence while those relating to drug-free therapy need to be reworked because they have less psychometric information and low discrimination. The independence of items, the small number of levels in the scale and low explained variance in the adjustment of the models show the main weaknesses of the instrument analyzed. The "Item Response Theory" proved to be a relevant analysis technique because it evaluated respondents for adherence to treatment for hypertension, the level of difficulty of the items and their ability to discriminate between individuals with different levels of adherence, which generates a greater amount of information. The instrument analyzed is limited in measuring adherence to hypertension treatment, by analyzing the "Item Response Theory" of the item, and needs adjustment. The proper formulation of the items is important in order to accurately measure the desired latent trait.

  7. A Study on Adherence to Follow-up, Quality of Life, and Associated Factors Among Renal Transplant Recipients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L; Yan, J; Yang, G-L; Liu, Y

    Adherence to follow-up is vital for the medical surveillance of the postoperative blood concentration, but relatively little research has examined it, and there is less study on relationships between adherence to follow-up and quality of life (QoL). We investigated the status of adherence to follow-up and QoL and associated factors among kidney transplantation recipients in China. A cross-sectional study with the use of a Kidney Transplantation Recipient's Adherence to Follow-Up Questionnaire and a Quality of Life of Kidney Transplantation Recipients Questionnaire was conducted among 250 kidney transplantation recipients in Changsha, China, from January to March in 2015. The mean score for adherence to follow-up was 54.71 ± 6.46. Time after transplantation was the only factor affecting adherence to follow-up scores (β = -0.210; P adherence to follow-up, economic level, job status, donor source, and original disease affected with QoL. Adherence to follow-up decreases with time after transplantation, and better compliance is associated with better QoL in all areas. Improvements in adherence to follow-up, income and reimbursement, psychologic guidance, and social support may increase QoL of kidney transplantat recipients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Patients' perspectives on antiepileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, S. C.; Horne, R.; Chater, A.; Hukins, D.; Smithson, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonadherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can result in suboptimal outcomes for patients. AIM: This study aimed to assess the utility of a theory-based approach to understanding patient perspectives on AEDs and adherence. METHOD: Patients with epilepsy, identified by a GP case note review, were mailed validated questionnaires assessing their perceptions of AEDs and their adherence to them. RESULTS: Most (84.9%) of the 398 AED-treated respondents accepted the necessity of AEDs, bu...

  9. Production of human metabolites by gastrointestinal bacteria as a potential source of post-mortem alteration of antemortem drug/metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Stephanie M; Powers, Robert H; Bell, Suzanne C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bacterial species are capable of transforming complex chemical substances. Several of these species, native to the human gastrointestinal tract, are active in postmortem decomposition. They have potential to cause biotransformations affecting compound-to-metabolite ratios within the human body, especially after death. Investigation of postmortem effects could supply valuable information, especially concerning compound identification and confirmation. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens on diazepam and flunitrazepam in Reinforced Clostridial Medium, and to compare bacterial biotransformation products to those of human metabolism. A decrease in diazepam concentration between pre- and post-incubation was observed for samples inoculated with Escherichia coli (14.7-20.2%) as well as Bacteroides fragilis (13.9-25.7%); however there was no corresponding increase in concentration for the monitored human metabolites. Flunitrazepam demonstrated a greater concentration loss when incubated with individual bacterial species as well as mixed culture (79.2-100.0%). Samples incubated with Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, and mixed culture resulted in nearly complete conversion of flunitrazepam. Increased 7-aminoflunitrazepam concentrations accounted for the majority of the conversion; however discrepancies in the mass balance of the reaction suggested the possibility of a minor metabolite that was not monitored in the current analysis. These experiments served as a pilot study and proof of concept that can be adapted and applied to a realm of possibilities. Ultimately, this methodology would be ideal to study compounds that are too toxic or lethal for animal and human metabolic investigations. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Prevalence and Modifiable Determinants of Non-Adherence in Adult Kidney Transplant Recipients in a German Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Sandra; Morawa, Eva; Stößel, Lisa; Jank, Sabine; Vitinius, Frank; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Erim, Yesim

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence and the modifiable determinants of non-adherence in adult kidney transplant patients in follow-up care. In 74 patients at least six months post-transplant, self-reported adherence (Basel Assessment of Adherence to ImmunosuppressiveMedications Scale, BAASIS©), subjective experience and attitudes after transplantation (Medication Experience Scale for Immunosuppressants, MESI), and depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale,HADSD) were assessed. Non-adherence to any of the four BAASIS© items was 24.3%. For the sub-dimensions: dose taking, drug holidays, timing deviation more than two hours from prescribed time, and dose reduction, the non-adherence levelswere 9.5%, 0%,17.6% and 2.7%, respectively. Marital status, negative beliefs towards immunosuppressants, and prominent anxiety and depression were associated with non-adherence. Screening for adherence and its indicators is of substantial importance in communication with renal transplant recipients. After detecting non-adherence, supportive interventions can be offered to the patients.

  11. Adherence to treatment with denosumab, its efficacy and safety in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Toroptsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to treatment with antiosteoporotic drugs is one of the most important factors contributing to their efficacy during longterm therapy. The adherence is assessed by two main lines: firstly, how long a drug is taken and, secondly, whether its dosage regimen is adhered.Subjects and methods. The paper gives the data of a 12-month prospective follow-up study of 40 women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (OP who initiated treatment with the biological agent denosumab.Results and discussion. After the 12-month follow-up, the significant bone mineral density increase was 4.9% in the lumbar spine, 3.2% in the femoral neck, and 3.0% in the total hip. The previous administration of other antiosteoporotic drugs did not lower the efficiency of denosumab therapy. There were no cases of osteoporotic fractures during 1-year follow-up. 95% of the patients received two denosumab injections (an annual cycle; moreover, 90% of the women were noted to adhere to the dosage regimen. Age, marital status, level of education, time taken to reach the clinic, parental femoral fractures, a history of fractures, duration of OP, and previous therapy had no impact on treatment adherence during 12 months.Conclusion. The one-year prospective follow-up study of the outpatients demonstrated that denosumab was an effective and safe agent for the treatment of patients with postmenopausal OP and its dosage regimen implying its rare subcutaneous administration (twice yearly ensured the high patient adherence to therapy.

  12. Introducing the Adherence Strategy Engineering Framework (ASEF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg; Bertelsen, Olav W.

    2013-01-01

    . Methods: Key concepts related to self-care and adherence were defined, discussed, and implemented as part of the ASEF framework. ASEF was applied to seven self-care case studies, and the perceived usefulness and feasibility of ASEF was evaluated in a questionnaire study by the case study participants...... resulting in reduced data quality and suboptimal treatment. Objectives: The aim of this paper is to introduce the Adherence Strategy Engineering Framework (ASEF) as a method for developing novel technology-based adherence strategies to assess and improve patient adherence levels in the unsupervised setting....... Finally, we reviewed the individual case studies usage of ASEF. Results: A range of central self-care concepts were defined and the ASEF methodological framework was introduced. ASEF was successfully used in seven case studies with a total of 25 participants. Of these, 16 provided answers...

  13. Determinants of Patient's Adherence to Hypertension Medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medications: Application of Health Belief Model .... Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios expressing the ... costs.[15]. Adherence to medication is always a matter of concern, especially in chronic diseases and identification of the ...

  14. Factors Influencing Adherence to Routine Iron Supplementation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fineprint

    2016-06-01

    Jun 1, 2016 ... adherence among pregnant women in three selected health centers in Akinyele. Local Government Area, Ibadan ... socioeconomic status, and illiteracy. [12]. .... 80.74% in India [24 ] Although the reason for this disparity is not ...

  15. Bacterial adherence to vascular grafts after in vitro bacteremia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenman, J.E.; Pearce, W.H.; Kempczinski, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    All currently used arterial prosthetics have a greater susceptibility to infection following bacteremia than does autogenous tissue. This experiment compares quantitative bacterial adherence to various prosthetic materials after bacteremia carried out in a tightly controlled and quantitative fashion. Ten centimeters long, 4 mm i.d. Dacron, umbilical vein (HUV), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts, as well as PTFE grafts with a running suture line at the midportion were tested. Each graft was interposed into a pulsatile perfusion system modified from a Waters MOX 100 TM renal transplant pump. Indium-111-labeled Staphylococcus aureus were added to heparinized canine blood to give a mean concentration of 4.7 X 10(6) bacteria/cc. This infected blood was recirculated through each graft for 30 min at a rate of 125 cc/m, 100 Torr (sys), 60 beats/min. The gamma counts/graft were used to calculate the number of bacteria/cm2 of graft surface. After nine experiments, a mean of 9.63 X 10(5) bacteria/cm2 were adherent to the Dacron, 1.04 X 10(5) bacteria/cm2 to the HUV, and 2.15 X 10(4) bacteria/cm2 to the PTFE. These differences were all significant at the 0.05 level. The addition of a suture line increased bacterial adherence to the PTFE graft by 50%. These results suggest that PTFE is the vascular graft material of choice when a prosthetic graft must be implanted despite a high risk of subsequent clinical bacteremia. An in vitro, pulsatile perfusion model gave accurate and reproducible results, and appears well suited for further studies of bacterial, or platelet adherence to grafts, as well as the biomechanics of vascular conduits

  16. Microbial adherence to cosmetic contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ka Yin; Cho, Pauline; Boost, Maureen

    2014-08-01

    To investigate whether cosmetic contact lenses (CCL) with surface pigments affect microbial adherence. Fifteen brands of