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Sample records for adenylyl transfer catalyzed

  1. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  2. Transfer Methane to Fragrant Hydrocarbon by Direct Catalyzed Dehydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Sponsored by NSFC,a research project -"Transfer methane to fragrant hydrocarbon by direct catalyzed dehydrogenation",directed by Prof.Xin Bao from Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of CAS,honored the 2nd class National Science & Technology Award in 2005.

  3. Nanoparticulate-catalyzed oxygen transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew T.; Breitkopf, Richard C.

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticulates of oxygen transfer materials that are oxides of rare earth metals, combinations of rare earth metals, and combinations of transition metals and rare earth metals are used as catalysts in a variety of processes. Unexpectedly large thermal efficiencies are achieved relative to micron sized particulates. Processes that use these catalysts are exemplified in a multistage reactor. The exemplified reactor cracks C6 to C20 hydrocarbons, desulfurizes the hydrocarbon stream and reforms the hydrocarbons in the stream to produce hydrogen. In a first reactor stage the steam and hydrocarbon are passed through particulate mixed rare earth metal oxide to crack larger hydrocarbon molecules. In a second stage, the steam and hydrocarbon are passed through particulate material that desulfurizes the hydrocarbon. In a third stage, the hydrocarbon and steam are passed through a heated, mixed transition metal/rare earth metal oxide to reform the lower hydrocarbons and thereby produce hydrogen. Stages can be alone or combined. Parallel reactors can provide continuous reactant flow. Each of the processes can be carried out individually.

  4. The Inhibitory Effect of Non-Substrate and Substrate DNA on the Ligation and Self-Adenylylation Reactions Catalyzed by T4 DNA Ligase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Bauer

    Full Text Available DNA ligases are essential both to in vivo replication, repair and recombination processes, and in vitro molecular biology protocols. Prior characterization of DNA ligases through gel shift assays has shown the presence of a nick site to be essential for tight binding between the enzyme and its dsDNA substrate, with no interaction evident on dsDNA lacking a nick. In the current study, we observed a significant substrate inhibition effect, as well as the inhibition of both the self-adenylylation and nick-sealing steps of T4 DNA ligase by non-nicked, non-substrate dsDNA. Inhibition by non-substrate DNA was dependent only on the total DNA concentration rather than the structure; with 1 μg/mL of 40-mers, 75-mers, or circular plasmid DNA all inhibiting ligation equally. A >15-fold reduction in T4 DNA ligase self-adenylylation rate when in the presence of high non-nicked dsDNA concentrations was observed. Finally, EMSAs were utilized to demonstrate that non-substrate dsDNA can compete with nicked dsDNA substrates for enzyme binding. Based upon these data, we hypothesize the inhibition of T4 DNA ligase by non-nicked dsDNA is direct evidence for a two-step nick-binding mechanism, with an initial, nick-independent, transient dsDNA-binding event preceding a transition to a stable binding complex in the presence of a nick site.

  5. The Inhibitory Effect of Non-Substrate and Substrate DNA on the Ligation and Self-Adenylylation Reactions Catalyzed by T4 DNA Ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert J; Evans, Thomas C; Lohman, Gregory J S

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases are essential both to in vivo replication, repair and recombination processes, and in vitro molecular biology protocols. Prior characterization of DNA ligases through gel shift assays has shown the presence of a nick site to be essential for tight binding between the enzyme and its dsDNA substrate, with no interaction evident on dsDNA lacking a nick. In the current study, we observed a significant substrate inhibition effect, as well as the inhibition of both the self-adenylylation and nick-sealing steps of T4 DNA ligase by non-nicked, non-substrate dsDNA. Inhibition by non-substrate DNA was dependent only on the total DNA concentration rather than the structure; with 1 μg/mL of 40-mers, 75-mers, or circular plasmid DNA all inhibiting ligation equally. A >15-fold reduction in T4 DNA ligase self-adenylylation rate when in the presence of high non-nicked dsDNA concentrations was observed. Finally, EMSAs were utilized to demonstrate that non-substrate dsDNA can compete with nicked dsDNA substrates for enzyme binding. Based upon these data, we hypothesize the inhibition of T4 DNA ligase by non-nicked dsDNA is direct evidence for a two-step nick-binding mechanism, with an initial, nick-independent, transient dsDNA-binding event preceding a transition to a stable binding complex in the presence of a nick site.

  6. Construction of cyclic enones via gold-catalyzed oxygen transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald B. Hammond

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, gold-catalyzed reactions have become a tour de force in organic synthesis. Recently, the gold-, Brønsted acid- or Lewis acid-catalyzed oxygen transfer from carbonyl to carbon–carbon triple bond, the so-called alkyne–carbonyl metathesis, has attracted much attention because this atom economical transformation generates α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives which are of great interest in synthetic organic chemistry. This mini-review focuses on the most recent achievements on gold-catalyzed oxygen transfer reactions of tethered alkynones, diynes or alkynyl epoxides to cyclic enones. The corresponding mechanisms for the transformations are also discussed.

  7. Recyclable Polystyrene-Supported Siloxane-Transfer Agent for Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The rational design, synthesis, and validation of a significantly improved insoluble polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent has been achieved that permits efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. The cross-linked polystyrene support facilitates product purification with excellent siloxane recycling. Drawbacks of a previous polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent, relating to reaction efficiency and polymer stability after repeated cycles, have been addressed. PMID:24661113

  8. Pentanidium-catalyzed enantioselective phase-transfer conjugate addition reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Ting

    2011-03-09

    A new chiral entity, pentanidium, has been shown to be an excellent chiral phase-transfer catalyst. The enantioselective Michael addition reactions of tert-butyl glycinate-benzophenone Schiff base with various α,β- unsaturated acceptors provide adducts with high enantioselectivities. A successful gram-scale experiment at a low catalyst loading of 0.05 mol % indicates the potential for practical applications of this methodology. Phosphoglycine ester analogues can also be utilized as the Michael donor, affording enantioenriched α-aminophosphonic acid derivatives and phosphonic analogues of (S)-proline. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of imines catalyzed by a polymer-immobilized chiral catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Naoki; Tsuru, Keiichi; Arakawa, Yukihiro; Itsuno, Shinichi

    2009-01-07

    The asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of imines was performed with the use of a polymer-immobilized chiral catalyst. The chiral catalyst, prepared from crosslinked polystyrene-immobilized chiral 1,2-diamine monosulfonamide, was effective in the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of N-benzyl imines in CH(2)Cl(2) to give a chiral amine in high yield and good enantioselectivity. Furthermore, an amphiphilic polymeric catalyst prepared from crosslinked polystyrene containing sulfonated groups successfully catalyzed the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of cyclic imines in water. Enantioenriched secondary amines with up to 94% ee were obtained by using a polymeric catalyst.

  10. Enantioselective Brønsted acid catalyzed transfer hydrogenation: organocatalytic reduction of imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueping, Magnus; Sugiono, Erli; Azap, Cengiz; Theissmann, Thomas; Bolte, Michael

    2005-08-18

    The first enantioselective Brønsted acid catalyzed reduction of imines has been developed. This new organocatalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketimines with Hantzsch dihydropyridine as the hydrogen source offers a mild method to various chiral amines with high enantioselectivity. The stereochemistry of the chiral amines can be rationalized by a stereochemical model derived from an X-ray crystal structure of a chiral BINOL phosphate catalyst. [reaction: see text

  11. Iron-Catalyzed Regioselective Transfer Hydrogenative Couplings of Unactivated Aldehydes with Simple Alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Long; Liu, Yan-Yao; Wu, Yi-Mei; Wang, Yin-Xia; Lin, Yu-Tong; Ye, Mengchun

    2016-05-17

    An FeBr3 -catalyzed reductive coupling of various aldehydes with alkenes that proceeds through a direct hydride transfer pathway has been developed. With (i) PrOH as the hydrogen donor under mild conditions, previously challenging coupling reactions of unactivated alkyl and aryl aldehydes with simple alkenes, such as styrene derivatives and α-olefins, proceeded smoothly to furnish a diverse range of functionalized alcohols with complete linear regioselectivity.

  12. Peroxidase-catalyzed S-oxygenation: Mechanism of oxygen transfer for lactoperoxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerge, D.R.; Cooray, N.M. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (United States)); Brewster, M.E. (Pharmatec Inc., Alachua, FL (United States))

    1991-09-17

    The mechanism of organosulfur oxygenation by peroxidases (lactoperoxidase (LPX), chloroperoxidase, thyroid peroxidase, and horseradish peroxidase) and hydrogen peroxide was investigated by use of para-substituted thiobenzamides and thioanisoles. The rate constants for thiobenzamide oxygenation by LPX/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were found to correlate with calculated vertical ionization potentials, suggesting rate-limiting single-electron transfer between LPX compound I and the organosulfur substrate. The incorporation of oxygen from {sup 18}O-labeled hydrogen peroxide, water, and molecular oxygen into sulfoxides during peroxidase-catalyzed S-oxygenation reactions was determined by LC- and GC-MS. All peroxidases tested catalyzed essentially quantitative oxygen transfer from {sup 18}O-labeled hydrogen peroxide into thiobenzamide S-oxide, suggesting that oxygen rebound from the oxoferryl heme is tightly coupled with the initial electron transfer in the active site. Experiments using H{sub 2}{sup 18}O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O showed the LPX catalyzed approximately 85,22, and 0% {sup 18}O-incorporation into thioanisole sulfoxide oxygen, respectively. These results are consistent with an active site controlled mechanism in which the protein radical form of LPX compound I is an intermediate in LPX-mediated sulfoxidation reactions.

  13. A role of proton transfer in peroxidase-catalyzed process elucidated by substrates docking calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziemys Arturas

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous kinetic investigations of fungal-peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of N-aryl hydroxamic acids (AHAs and N-aryl-N-hydroxy urethanes (AHUs revealed that the rate of reaction was independent of the formal redox potential of substrates. Moreover, the oxidation rate was 3–5 orders of magnitude less than for oxidation of physiological phenol substrates, though the redox potential was similar. Results To explain the unexpectedly low reactivity of AHAs and AHUs we made ab initio calculations of the molecular structure of the substrates following in silico docking in the active center of the enzyme. Conclusions AHAs and AHUs were docked at the distal side of heme in the sites formed by hydrophobic amino acid residues that retarded a proton transfer and finally the oxidation rate. The analogous phenol substrates were docked at different sites permitting fast proton transfer in the relay of distal His and water that helped fast substrate oxidation.

  14. In situ Regeneration of NADH via Lipoamide Dehydrogenase-catalyzed Electron Transfer Reaction Evidenced by Spectroelectrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Tsz Kin; Chen, Baowei; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    NAD/NADH is a coenzyme found in all living cells, carrying electrons from one reaction to another. We report on characterizations of in situ regeneration of NADH via lipoamide dehydrogenase (LD)-catalyzed electron transfer reaction to regenerate NADH using UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and maximum velocity (Vmax) of NADH regeneration were measured as 0.80 {+-} 0.15 mM and 1.91 {+-} 0.09 {micro}M s-1 in a 1-mm thin-layer spectroelectrochemical cell using gold gauze as the working electrode at the applied potential -0.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The electrocatalytic reduction of the NAD system was further coupled with the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase to examine the coenzymatic activity of the regenerated NADH. Although the reproducible electrocatalytic reduction of NAD into NADH is known to be difficult compared to the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH, our spectroelectrochemical results indicate that the in situ regeneration of NADH via LD-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is fast and sustainable and can be potentially applied to many NAD/NADH-dependent enzyme systems.

  15. Ag-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown on transferable graphite flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob; Kanne, Thomas; Sestoft, Joachim E.; Gejl, Aske; Zeng, Lunjie; Johnson, Erik; Olsson, Eva; Nygård, Jesper; Krogstrup, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Semiconducting nanowires grown by quasi-van-der-Waals epitaxy on graphite flakes are a new class of hybrid materials that hold promise for scalable nanostructured devices within opto-electronics. Here we report on high aspect ratio and stacking fault free Ag-seeded InAs nanowires grown on exfoliated graphite flakes by molecular beam epitaxy. Ag catalyzes the InAs nanowire growth selectively on the graphite flakes and not on the underlying InAs substrates. This allows for easy transfer of the flexible graphite flakes with as-grown nanowire ensembles to arbitrary substrates by a micro-needle manipulator. Besides the possibilities for fabricating novel nanostructure device designs, we show how this method is used to study the parasitic growth and bicrystal match between the graphite flake and the nanowires by transmission electron microscopy.

  16. RecQ Helicase-catalyzed DNA Unwinding Detected by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Dong ZHANG; Shuo-Xing DOU; Ping XIE; Peng-Ye WANG; Xu Guang XI

    2005-01-01

    A fluorometric assay was used to study the DNA unwinding kinetics induced by Escherichia coli RecQ helicase. This assay was based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer and carried out on stopped-flow, in which DNA unwinding was monitored by fluorescence emission enhancement of fluorescein resulting from helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding. By this method, we determined the DNA unwinding rate of RecQ at different enzyme concentrations. We also studied the dependences of DNA unwinding magnitude and rate on magnesium ion concentration. We showed that this method could be used to determine the polarity of DNA unwinding. This assay should greatly facilitate further study of the mechanism for RecQcatalyzed DNA unwinding.

  17. Activity-stability relationships revisited in blue oxidases catalyzing electron transfer at extreme temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulling, Frédéric; Godin, Amandine; Cipolla, Alexandre; Collins, Tony; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Feller, Georges

    2016-09-01

    Cuproxidases are a subset of the blue multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of toxic Cu(I) ions into less harmful Cu(II) in the bacterial periplasm. Cuproxidases from psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic bacteria display the canonical features of temperature adaptation, such as increases in structural stability and apparent optimal temperature for activity with environmental temperature as well as increases in the binding affinity for catalytic and substrate copper ions. In contrast, the oxidative activities at 25 °C for both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are similar, suggesting that the nearly temperature-independent electron transfer rate does not require peculiar adjustments. Furthermore, the structural flexibilities of both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are also similar, indicating that the firm and precise bindings of the four catalytic copper ions are essential for the oxidase function. These results show that the requirements for enzymatic electron transfer, in the absence of the selective pressure of temperature on electron transfer rates, produce a specific adaptive pattern, which is distinct from that observed in enzymes possessing a well-defined active site and relying on conformational changes such as for the induced fit mechanism.

  18. Fluorobenzo[a]pyrenes as probes of the mechanism of cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxygen transfer in aromatic oxygenations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, P.P.J.; Devanesan, P.; Alem, van K.; Lodder, G.; Rogan, E.G.; Cavalieri, E.L.

    2003-01-01

    Fluoro substitution of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) has been very useful in determining the mechanism of cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxygen transfer in the formation of 6-hydroxyBP (6-OHBP) and its resulting BP 1,6-, 3,6-, and 6,12-diones. We report here the metabolism of 1-FBP and 3-FBP, and PM3 calculations

  19. Effect of mass transfer on the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by platinum dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Crooks, Richard M

    2012-07-17

    Here we report on the effect of the mass transfer rate (k(t)) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) comprised of 147 and 55 atoms (Pt(147) and Pt(55)). The experiments were carried out using a dual-electrode microelectrochemical device, which enables the study of the ORR under high k(t) conditions with simultaneous detection of H(2)O(2). At low k(t) (0.02 to 0.12 cm s(-1)) the effective number of electrons involved in ORR, n(eff), is 3.7 for Pt(147) and 3.4 for Pt(55). As k(t) is increased, the mass-transfer-limited current for the ORR becomes significantly lower than the value predicted by the Levich equation for a 4-electron process regardless of catalyst size. However, the percentage of H(2)O(2) detected remains constant, such that n(eff) barely changes over the entire k(t) range explored (0.02 cm s(-1)). This suggests that mass transfer does not affect n(eff), which has implications for the mechanism of the ORR on Pt nanoparticles. Interestingly, there is a significant difference in n(eff) for the two sizes of Pt DENs (n(eff) = 3.7 and 3.5 for Pt(147) and Pt(55), respectively) that cannot be assigned to mass transfer effects and that we therefore attribute to a particle size effect.

  20. Hydride transfer made easy in the oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by choline oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadda, G.; Orville, A.; Pennati, A.; Francis, K.; Quaye, O.; Yuan, H.; Rungsrisuriyachai, K.; Finnegan, S.; Mijatovic, S.; Nguyen, T.

    2008-06-08

    Choline oxidase (E.C. 1.1.3.17) catalyzes the two-step, four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine with betaine aldehyde as enzyme-associated intermediate and molecular oxygen as final electron acceptor (Scheme 1). The gem-diol, hydrated species of the aldehyde intermediate of the reaction acts as substrate for aldehyde oxidation, suggesting that the enzyme may use similar strategies for the oxidation of the alcohol substrate and aldehyde intermediate. The determination of the chemical mechanism for alcohol oxidation has emerged from biochemical, mechanistic, mutagenetic, and structural studies. As illustrated in the mechanism of Scheme 2, the alcohol substrate is initially activated in the active site of the enzyme by removal of the hydroxyl proton. The resulting alkoxide intermediate is then stabilized in the enzyme-substrate complex via electrostatic interactions with active site amino acid residues. Alcohol oxidation then occurs quantum mechanically via the transfer of the hydride ion from the activated substrate to the N(5) flavin locus. An essential requisite for this mechanism of alcohol oxidation is the high degree of preorganization of the activated enzyme-substrate complex, which is achieved through an internal equilibrium of the Michaelis complex occurring prior to, and independently from, the subsequent hydride transfer reaction. The experimental evidence that support the mechanism for alcohol oxidation shown in Scheme 2 is briefly summarized in the Results and Discussion section.

  1. Light-induced ruthenium-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions: a photochemical approach towards N-acyl sulfimides and sulfoximines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizet, Vincent; Buglioni, Laura; Bolm, Carsten

    2014-05-26

    1,4,2-Dioxazol-5-ones are five-membered heterocycles known to decarboxylate under thermal or photochemical conditions, thus yielding N-acyl nitrenes. Described herein is a light-induced ruthenium-catalyzed N-acyl nitrene transfer to sulfides and sulfoxides by decarboxylation of 1,4,2-dioxazol-5-ones at room temperature, thus providing direct access to N-acyl sulfimides and sulfoximines under mild reaction conditions. In addition, a one-pot sulfur imidation/oxidation sequence catalyzed by a single ruthenium complex is reported. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Aminosulf(ox)ides as ligands for Iridium(I)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petra; Kamer; Spek; Schoemaker; van Leeuwen PW

    2000-05-19

    A new class of efficient catalysts was developed for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of unsymmetrical ketones. A series of chiral N,S-chelates (6-22) was synthesized to serve as ligands in the iridium(I)-catalyzed reduction of ketones. Both formic acid and 2-propanol proved to be suitable as hydrogen donors. Sulfoxidation of an (R)-cysteine-based aminosulfide provided a diastereomeric ligand family containing a chiral sulfur atom. The two chiral centers of these ligands showed a clear effect of chiral cooperativity. In addition, aminosulfides containing two asymmetric carbon atoms in the backbone were synthesized. Both the sulfoxide-containing beta-amino alcohols and the aminosulfides derived from 1,2-disubstituted amino alcohols gave rise to high reaction rates and moderate to excellent enantioselectivities in the reduction of various ketones. The enantioselective outcome of the reaction was favorably affected by selecting the most appropriate hydrogen donor. Enantioselectivities of up to 97% were reached in the reduction of aryl-alkyl ketones.

  3. Bicarbonate-Regulated Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuttke MS

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC represents a novel form of mammalian adenylyl cyclase structurally, molecularly, and biochemically distinct from the G protein-regulated, transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs. sAC possesses no transmembrane domains and is insensitive to classic modulators of tmACs, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and P site ligands. Thus, sAC defines an independently regulated cAMP signaling system within mammalian cells. sAC is directly stimulated by bicarbonate ion both in vivo in heterologously expressing cells and in vitro using purified protein. sAC appears to be the predominant form of adenylyl cyclase (AC in mammalian sperm, and its direct activation by bicarbonate provides a mechanism for generating the cAMP required to complete the bicarbonate-induced processes necessary for fertilization, including hyperactivated motility, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction. Immunolocalization studies reveal sAC is also abundantly expressed in other tissues which respond to bicarbonate or carbon dioxide levels suggesting it may function as a general bicarbonate/CO(2 sensor throughout the body.

  4. Influence of ultrasonic condition on phase transfer catalyzed radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate in two phase system - A kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, Elumalai; Murugesan, Vajjiravel

    2017-09-01

    An ultrasonic condition assisted phase transfer catalyzed radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate was investigated in an ethyl acetate/water two phase system at 60±1°C and 25kHz, 300W under inert atmosphere. The influence of monomer, initiator, catalyst and temperature, volume fraction of aqueous phase on the rate of polymerization was examined in detail. The reaction order was found to be unity for monomer, initiator and catalyst. Generally, the reaction rate was relatively fast in two phase system, when a catalytic amount of phase transfer catalyst was used. The combined approach, use of ultrasonic and PTC condition was significantly enhances the rate of polymerization. An ultrasonic and phase transfer catalyzed radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate has shown about three fold enhancements in the rate compared with silent polymerization of MMA using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as PTC. The resultant kinetics was evaluated with silent polymerization and an important feature was discussed. The activation energy and other thermodynamic parameters were computed. Based on the obtained results an appropriate radical mechanism has been derived. TGA showed the polymer was stable up to 150°C. The FT-IR and DSC analysis validates the atactic nature of the obtained polymer. The XRD pattern reveals the amorphous nature of polymer was dominated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Benchmarking Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) Methods on the Thymidylate Synthase-Catalyzed Hydride Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Arafet, Kemel; Kohen, Amnon; Moliner, Vicent

    2017-03-14

    Given the ubiquity of hydride-transfer reactions in enzyme-catalyzed processes, identifying the appropriate computational method for evaluating such biological reactions is crucial to perform theoretical studies of these processes. In this paper, the hydride-transfer step catalyzed by thymidylate synthase (TSase) is studied by examining hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) potentials via multiple semiempirical methods and the M06-2X hybrid density functional. Calculations of protium and tritium transfer in these reactions across a range of temperatures allowed calculation of the temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIE). Dynamics and quantum-tunneling effects are revealed to have little effect on the reaction rate, but are significant in determining the KIEs and their temperature dependence. A good agreement with experiments is found, especially when computed for RM1/MM simulations. The small temperature dependence of quantum tunneling corrections and the quasiclassical contribution term cancel each other, while the recrossing transmission coefficient seems to be temperature-independent over the interval of 5-40 °C.

  6. Selective conversion of polyenes to monoenes by RuCl(3) -catalyzed transfer hydrogenation: the case of cashew nutshell liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdriau, Sébastien; Harder, Sjoerd; Heeres, Hero J; de Vries, Johannes G

    2012-12-01

    Cardanol, a constituent of cashew nutshell liquid (CNSL), was subjected to transfer hydrogenation catalyzed by RuCl(3) using isopropanol as a reductant. The side chain of cardanol, which is a mixture of a triene, a diene, and a monoene, was selectively reduced to the monoene. Surprisingly, it is the C8-C9 double bond that is retained with high selectivity. A similar transfer hydrogenation of linoleic acid derivatives succeeded only if the substrate contained an aromatic ring, such as a benzyl ester. TEM and a negative mercury test showed that the catalyst was homogeneous. By using ESI-MS, ruthenium complexes were identified that contained one, two, or even three molecules of substrate, most likely as allyl complexes. The interaction between ruthenium and the aromatic ring determines selectivity in the hydrogenation reaction.

  7. Selective ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenations of nitriles to amines with 2-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkmeister, Svenja; Bornschein, Christoph; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2013-04-02

    Transfer your hydrogen: Fast and general transfer hydrogenation of nitriles to form primary amines is possible with a homogeneous Ru/1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane (DPPB) catalyst (see scheme). The use of 2-butanol as the hydrogen-transfer reagent is essential for the selective reduction of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and aliphatic nitriles with this system. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effect of association with adenylyl cyclase-associated protein on the interaction of yeast adenylyl cyclase with Ras protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, F; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Tamada, M; Okada, T; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-01

    Posttranslational modification of Ras protein has been shown to be critical for interaction with its effector molecules, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase. However, the mechanism of its action was unknown. In this study, we used a reconstituted system with purified adenylyl cyclase and Ras proteins carrying various degrees of the modification to show that the posttranslational modification, especially the farnesylation step, is responsible for 5- to 10-fold increase in Ras-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase activity even though it has no significant effect on their binding affinity. The stimulatory effect of farnesylation is found to depend on the association of adenylyl cyclase with 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP), which was known to be required for proper in vivo response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras protein, by comparing the levels of Ras-dependent activation of purified adenylyl cyclase with and without bound CAP. The region of CAP required for this effect is mapped to its N-terminal segment of 168 amino acid residues, which coincides with the region required for the in vivo effect. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect is successfully reconstituted by in vitro association of CAP with the purified adenylyl cyclase molecule lacking the bound CAP. These results indicate that the association of adenylyl cyclase with CAP is responsible for the stimulatory effect of posttranslational modification of Ras on its activity and that this may be the mechanism underlying its requirement for the proper in vivo cyclic AMP response.

  9. Microbial activity catalyzes oxygen transfer in membrane-aerated nitritating biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Domingo Felez, Carlos; Lackner, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    of the liquid boundary layer developed at the membrane-liquid interface during clean water tests accounted for two thirds of the total mass transfer resistance, suggesting a strong underestimation of the oxygen transfer rates when it is absent (e.g. after biofilm growth). Reactor operation to attain partial...

  10. Ph(i-PrO)SiH2: An Exceptional Reductant for Metal-Catalyzed Hydrogen Atom Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradors, Carla; Martinez, Ruben M; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2016-04-13

    We report the discovery of an outstanding reductant for metal-catalyzed radical hydrofunctionalization reactions. Observations of unexpected silane solvolysis distributions in the HAT-initiated hydrogenation of alkenes reveal that phenylsilane is not the kinetically preferred reductant in many of these transformations. Instead, isopropoxy(phenyl)silane forms under the reaction conditions, suggesting that alcohols function as important silane ligands to promote the formation of metal hydrides. Study of its reactivity showed that isopropoxy(phenyl)silane is an exceptionally efficient stoichiometric reductant, and it is now possible to significantly decrease catalyst loadings, lower reaction temperatures, broaden functional group tolerance, and use diverse, aprotic solvents in iron- and manganese-catalyzed hydrofunctionalizations. As representative examples, we have improved the yields and rates of alkene reduction, hydration, hydroamination, and conjugate addition. Discovery of this broadly applicable, chemoselective, and solvent-versatile reagent should allow an easier interface with existing radical reactions. Finally, isotope-labeling experiments rule out the alternative hypothesis of hydrogen atom transfer from a redox-active β-diketonate ligand in the HAT step. Instead, initial HAT from a metal hydride to directly generate a carbon-centered radical appears to be the most reasonable hypothesis.

  11. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  12. Rhodium-catalyzed acyl-transfer reaction between benzyl ketones and thioesters: synthesis of unsymmetric ketones by ketone CO-C bond cleavage and intermolecular rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisawa, Mieko; Kuwajima, Manabu; Toriyama, Fumihiko; Li, Guangzhe; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2012-07-20

    In the presence of catalytic amounts of RhH(CO)(PPh3)3 and 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene (dppBz), acyl groups were transferred between benzyl ketones and thioesters/aryl esters. The rhodium complex catalyzed the cleavage of ketone CO-C bonds and intermolecular rearrangement giving unsymmetric ketones. The acyl-transfer reaction also occurred with 1-(p-chlorophenyl)-3-(p-cyanophenyl)propane-2-one giving unsymmetric ketones.

  13. A highly enantioselective phase-transfer catalyzed epoxidation of enones with a mild oxidant, trichloroisocyanuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jinxing; Wang, Yongcan; Liu, Renhua; Zhang, Guofu; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Jiping; Liang, Xinmiao

    2003-11-07

    The enantioselective epoxidation can be carried out using trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) as oxidant in the presence of chiral quaternary ammonium salt as a phase-transfer catalyst; treatment of chalcone derivatives with TCCA under mild conditions afforded the corresponding epoxy ketones in good yields with moderate to excellent enantioselectivities of up to 96%.

  14. Inhibited proton transfer enhances Au-catalyzed CO2-to-fuels selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttig, Anna; Yaguchi, Momo; Motobayashi, Kenta; Osawa, Masatoshi; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    CO2 reduction in aqueous electrolytes suffers efficiency losses because of the simultaneous reduction of water to H2. We combine in situ surface-enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and electrochemical kinetic studies to probe the mechanistic basis for kinetic bifurcation between H2 and CO production on polycrystalline Au electrodes. Under the conditions of CO2 reduction catalysis, electrogenerated CO species are irreversibly bound to Au in a bridging mode at a surface coverage of ∼0.2 and act as kinetically inert spectators. Electrokinetic data are consistent with a mechanism of CO production involving rate-limiting, single-electron transfer to CO2 with concomitant adsorption to surface active sites followed by rapid one-electron, two-proton transfer and CO liberation from the surface. In contrast, the data suggest an H2 evolution mechanism involving rate-limiting, single-electron transfer coupled with proton transfer from bicarbonate, hydronium, and/or carbonic acid to form adsorbed H species followed by rapid one-electron, one-proton, or H recombination reactions. The disparate proton coupling requirements for CO and H2 production establish a mechanistic basis for reaction selectivity in electrocatalytic fuel formation, and the high population of spectator CO species highlights the complex heterogeneity of electrode surfaces under conditions of fuel-forming electrocatalysis. PMID:27450088

  15. Pd0-Catalyzed Methyl Transfer on Nucleosides and Oligonucleotides, Envisaged as a PET Tracer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Fouquet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The methyl transfer reaction from activated monomethyltin, via a modified Stille coupling reaction, was studied under “ligandless” conditions on fully deprotected 5'-modified nucleosides and one dinucleotide. The reaction was optimized to proceed in a few minutes and quantitative yield, even under dilute conditions, thus affording a rapid and efficient new method for oligonucleotide labelling with carbon-11.

  16. Mechanistic Studies of Hafnium-Pyridyl Amido-Catalyzed 1-Octene Polymerization and Chain Transfer Using Quench-Labeling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueny, Eric S; Johnson, Heather C; Anding, Bernie J; Landis, Clark R

    2017-08-30

    Chromophore quench-labeling applied to 1-octene polymerization as catalyzed by hafnium-pyridyl amido precursors enables quantification of the amount of active catalyst and observation of the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of Hf-bound polymers via UV-GPC analysis. Comparison of the UV-detected MWD with the MWD of the "bulk" (all polymers, from RI-GPC analysis) provides important mechanistic information. The time evolution of the dual-detection GPC data, concentration of active catalyst, and monomer consumption suggests optimal activation conditions for the Hf pre-catalyst in the presence of the activator [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4]. The chromophore quench-labeling agents do not react with the chain-transfer agent ZnEt2 under the reaction conditions. Thus, Hf-bound polymeryls are selectively labeled in the presence of zinc-polymeryls. Quench-labeling studies in the presence of ZnEt2 reveal that ZnEt2 does not influence the rate of propagation at the Hf center, and chain transfer of Hf-bound polymers to ZnEt2 is fast and quasi-irreversible. The quench-label techniques represent a means to study commercial polymerization catalysts that operate with high efficiency at low catalyst concentrations without the need for specialized equipment.

  17. Mechanistic insights on N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed annulations: the role of base-assisted proton transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pragya; Patni, Priya A; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2011-07-15

    The density functional theory investigation on the mechanism of NHC-catalyzed cycloannulation reaction of the homoenolate derived from butenal with pentenone is studied. The M06-2X/6-31+G** and B3LYP/6-31+G** levels of theory, including the effect of continuum solvation in dichloromethane and tetrahydrofuran, are employed. Several mechanistic scenarios are examined for each elementary step by identifying the key intermediates and the corresponding transition states interconnecting them on the respective potential energy surfaces. Both assisted and unassisted pathways for important proton transfer steps are considered, respectively, with and without the explicit inclusion of base (DBU) in the corresponding transition states. The barrier for the crucial proton transfer steps involved in the formation of the Breslow intermediate as well as in the subsequent steps is found to be significantly lowered by explicit inclusion of DBU. The energetic comparison between two key pathways, depicted as path A and path B, respectively, leading to cyclopentene and cyclopentanone derivatives, is performed. The major mechanistic bifurcation has been identified as emanating from the site of enolization of the initial zwitterionic intermediate resulting from the addition of a homoenolate equivalent to enone. If the enolization occurs nearer to the NHC moiety, the reaction is likely to proceed through path A, leading to cyclopentene. The enolization away from NHC leads to cyclopentanone product through path B. The computed results are generally in good agreement with the reported experimental results.

  18. Rh-Catalyzed C–C Bond Cleavage by Transfer Hydroformylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Stephen K.; Park, Jung-Woo; Cruz, Faben A.; Dong, Vy M.

    2015-01-01

    The dehydroformylation of aldehydes to generate olefins occurs during the biosynthesis of various sterols, including cholesterol in humans. Here, we implement a synthetic version that features the transfer of a formyl group and hydride from an aldehyde substrate to a strained olefin acceptor. A Rh(Xantphos)(benzoate) catalyst activates aldehyde C–H bonds with high chemoselectivity to trigger C–C bond cleavage and generate olefins at low loadings (0.3 to 2 mol%) and temperatures (22 to 80 °C). This mild protocol can be applied to various natural products and was used to achieve a three step synthesis of (+)-yohimbenone. A study of the mechanism reveals that the benzoate counterion acts as a proton-shuttle to enable transfer hydroformylation. PMID:25554782

  19. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones catalyzed by nickel complex with new PNO-type ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Rong Dong; Yan Yun Li; Shen Luan Yu; Guo Song Sun; Jing Xing Gao

    2012-01-01

    The new polydentate mixed-N,P,O chiral ligands have been synthesized by the condensation of bis(o-formylphenyl)-phenylphosphane and R-phenylglycinol in CHCl3,and fully characterized by IR,NMR and EIMS spectra.These ligands were employed with a simple Ni complex Ni(PPh8)2Cl2 in situ as catalytic systems for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones,and the corresponding optical alcohols were obtained with up to 84% ee under mild conditions.

  20. Phase Transfer Catalyzed Synthesis of Thiosemicarbazide Derivatives of 2-ethoxybenzoic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; TaiBao

    2001-01-01

    A series of 1,4-disubstitued thiosemicarbazides and their related heterocyclic compounds have been found to possess important biological activities[1]. Some thiosemicarbazides have been found to be useful as herbicides, insecticides and plant-growth regulators [1]. In view of these and in continuation of our earlier work on the synthesis and biological activity of thiosemicarbaides derivatives [2], we now report a convenient and efficient method for the preparation of thiosemicarbazides derivatives of 2-ethoxybenzoic acid under the condition of solid-liquid phase transfer catalysis using PEG-400 as the catalyst.  ……

  1. Phase Transfer Catalyzed Synthesis of Thiosemicarbazide Derivatives of 2-ethoxybenzoic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI TaiBao; ZHANG YouMing; WU JiaWei

    2001-01-01

    @@ A series of 1,4-disubstitued thiosemicarbazides and their related heterocyclic compounds have been found to possess important biological activities[1]. Some thiosemicarbazides have been found to be useful as herbicides, insecticides and plant-growth regulators [1]. In view of these and in continuation of our earlier work on the synthesis and biological activity of thiosemicarbaides derivatives [2], we now report a convenient and efficient method for the preparation of thiosemicarbazides derivatives of 2-ethoxybenzoic acid under the condition of solid-liquid phase transfer catalysis using PEG-400 as the catalyst.

  2. DNA strand transfer catalyzed by vaccinia topoisomerase: ligation of DNAs containing a 3' mononucleotide overhang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C; Shuman, S

    2000-05-01

    The specificity of vaccinia topoisomerase for transesterification to DNA at the sequence 5'-CCCTT and its versatility in strand transfer have illuminated the recombinogenic properties of type IB topoisomerases and spawned topoisomerase-based strategies for DNA cloning. Here we characterize a pathway of topoisomerase-mediated DNA ligation in which enzyme bound covalently to a CCCTT end with an unpaired +1T nucleotide rapidly and efficiently joins the CCCTT strand to a duplex DNA containing a 3' A overhang. The joining reaction occurs with high efficiency, albeit slowly, to duplex DNAs containing 3' G, T or C overhangs. Strand transfer can be restricted to the correctly paired 3' A overhang by including 0.5 M NaCl in the ligation reaction mixture. The effects of base mismatches and increased ionic strength on the rates of 3' overhang ligation provide a quantitative picture of the relative contributions of +1 T:A base pairing and electrostatic interactions downstream of the scissile phosphate to the productive binding of an unlinked acceptor DNA to the active site. The results clarify the biochemistry underlying topoisomerase-cloning of PCR products with non-templated 3' overhangs.

  3. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of prochiral ketone catalyzed over Fe-CS/SBA-15 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Ping; WU Tao

    2007-01-01

    A heterogeneous chiral catalyst Fe(Ⅲ)-CS (chitosan)complex/mesoporous molecular sieve SBA-15 (Santa Barbara Amorphous) was prepared.The asymmetric transfer hydrogenations of prochiral acetophenone and 4-methyl-2-pentanone to corresponding chiral alcohols were carried out on Fe-CS/SBA-15 at atmosphere pressure using 2-propanol as hydrogen donor.Effects of Fe content in catalyst,reaction temperature,reaction time and promoter KOH concentration on the conversion of substrates and enantioselectivity were investigated.Fe-CS/SBA-15 with 2.2%mass fraction Fe exhibits considerable enantioselectivity and catalytic activity for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenations of aromatic ketone and aliphatic ketone.Under optimal reaction conditions:KOH concentration 0.03 mol/L,reaction temperature 70℃ and reaction time 4 h,enantiomer excess(ee)of (R)-1-phenylethanol and conversion of acetophenone can reach 87.4%and 27.7%,respectively.Under the above KOH concentration and reaction temperature and reaction time of 8 h,the ee of(R)-4-methyl-2-pentanol and conversion 4-methyl-2-pentanone amounted to 50.2%and 25.5%,respectively.

  4. Propane dehydrogenation catalyzed by ZSM-5 zeolites. A mechanistic study based on the selective energy transfer (SET) theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ragnar

    2015-02-02

    Experimentally determined activation energies of propane dehydrogenation catalyzed by ZSM-5 zeolites have been used to test the SET theory. The basis of this theory is that the catalyst system transfers vibrational energy via a resonance process to a specific vibration mode of the reacting molecule. Being excited up to a certain number of vibrational quanta the molecule is brought to reaction. By analyzing the above-mentioned activation energies we found the wave number of this "specific mode" to be 1065 cm-1. This is very close to the rocking vibration of propane (1053 cm-1). We suggest that the propane molecule reacts when excited so that the CH3 group has been forced towards a flat structure with a carbon atom hybridization that is more sp2 than sp3. Consequently there is no way for three H-atoms to bind to the carbon and one of them must leave. This is the starting point of the reaction. The isokinetic temperature of the system was found as Tiso = 727 ± 4 K. From the SET formula for Tiso when both energy-donating (ω) and energy-accepting (ν) vibrations have the same frequency, viz., Tiso = Nhcν/2R, we obtain ν = ω = 1011 ± 6 cm-1. This agrees rather well with the CH3 rocking mode (1053 cm-1) and also with asymmetric "TO4" stretching vibrations of the zeolite structure (ω).

  5. Propane Dehydrogenation Catalyzed by ZSM-5 Zeolites. A Mechanistic Study Based on the Selective Energy Transfer (SET Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnar Larsson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimentally determined activation energies of propane dehydrogenation catalyzed by ZSM-5 zeolites have been used to test the SET theory. The basis of this theory is that the catalyst system transfers vibrational energy via a resonance process to a specific vibration mode of the reacting molecule. Being excited up to a certain number of vibrational quanta the molecule is brought to reaction. By analyzing the above-mentioned activation energies we found the wave number of this “specific mode” to be 1065 cm−1. This is very close to the rocking vibration of propane (1053 cm−1. We suggest that the propane molecule reacts when excited so that the CH3 group has been forced towards a flat structure with a carbon atom hybridization that is more sp2 than sp3. Consequently there is no way for three H-atoms to bind to the carbon and one of them must leave. This is the starting point of the reaction. The isokinetic temperature of the system was found as Tiso = 727 ± 4 K. From the SET formula for Tiso when both energy-donating (ω and energy-accepting (ν vibrations have the same frequency, viz., Tiso = Nhcν/2R, we obtain ν = ω = 1011 ± 6 cm−1. This agrees rather well with the CH3 rocking mode (1053 cm−1 and also with asymmetric “TO4” stretching vibrations of the zeolite structure (ω.

  6. Shining Light on Copper: Unique Opportunities for Visible-Light-Catalyzed Atom Transfer Radical Addition Reactions and Related Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Oliver

    2016-09-20

    ) the tendency for ligand exchange in Cu(I)L2 assemblies allows the efficient synthesis of heteroleptic Cu(I)LL' complexes to tune the steric and electronic properties and also might coordinate and thus activate substrates in the course of a reaction in addition to electron transfer. Moreover, new photoredox cycles have also been discovered beyond the visible-light-induced Cu(I)* → Cu(II) electron transfer that is arguably best known: examples of the Cu(II)* → Cu(I) and Cu(I)* → Cu(0) transitions have been realized, greatly broadening the potential for copper-based photoredox-catalyzed transformations. Finally, a number of organic transformations that are unique to Cu(I) photoredox catalysts have been discovered.

  7. Asymmetric phase-transfer-catalyzed conjugate addition of glycine imine to exocyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones: construction of polycyclic imines containing three stereocenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing; Hua, Ming-Qing; Xiong, Heng-Ying; Zheng, Yan; Ma, Jun-An

    2012-05-04

    We developed a facile, one-pot, multistep transformation between glycine imine and exocyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones in reactions catalyzed by chiral phase-transfer catalysts (PTC). A series of polycyclic imines containing three adjacent stereocenters were obtained in good to high yields with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Further transformation of the imines could afford N-fused polycyclic compounds with four adjacent stereocenters.

  8. Escherichia coli DNA helicase I catalyzes a sequence-specific cleavage/ligation reaction at the F plasmid origin of transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, J A; Matson, S W

    1994-10-21

    Recent studies have shown that the Escherichia coli F plasmid-encoded traI gene product (TraIp), also known as DNA helicase I, catalyzes the formation of the site- and strand-specific nick that initiates F plasmid DNA transfer. Scission of the phosphodiester bond at the nic site within the origin of transfer (oriT) is accompanied by the covalent attachment of TraIp to the 5'-phosphate of the nicked DNA strand. This mechanism suggests that TraIp may also be capable of catalyzing a DNA ligation reaction using the energy stored in the protein-DNA intermediate. To test this possibility, an in vitro assay was designed that utilized short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides of different lengths derived from the region within oriT that spanned the nic site. Purified TraIp was capable of efficiently cleaving single-stranded DNA that contained a nic site, and upon cleavage, the protein became covalently linked to the 5'-end of the nic site. When TraIp was incubated with two oligonucleotides of different length that contained the nic site, there was formation of novel recombinant products resulting from a TraIp-catalyzed cleavage/ligation reaction. Furthermore, the cleavage and ligation reactions were both sequence-specific. These data suggest that TraIp plays an important role in the initiation and termination of conjugative DNA transfer.

  9. Large Density-Functional and Basis-Set Effects for the DMSO Reductase Catalyzed Oxo-Transfer Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Lai; Mata, Ricardo A; Ryde, Ulf

    2013-03-12

    The oxygen-atom transfer reaction catalyzed by the mononuclear molybdenum enzyme dimethyl sulfoxide reductase (DMSOR) has attracted considerable attention through both experimental and theoretical studies. We show here that this reaction is more sensitive to details of quantum mechanical calculations than what has previously been appreciated. Basis sets of at least triple-ζ quality are needed to obtain qualitatively correct results. Dispersion has an appreciable effect on the reaction, in particular the binding of the substrate or the dissociation of the product (up to 34 kJ/mol). Polar and nonpolar solvation effects are also significant, especially if the enzyme can avoid cavitation effects by using a preformed active-site cavity. Relativistic effects are considerable (up to 22 kJ/mol), but they are reasonably well treated by a relativistic effective core potential. Various density-functional methods give widely different results for the activation and reaction energy (differences of over 100 kJ/mol), mainly reflecting the amount of exact exchange in the functional, owing to the oxidation of Mo from +IV to +VI. By calibration toward local CCSD(T0) calculations, we show that none of eight tested functionals (TPSS, BP86, BLYP, B97-D, TPSSH, B3LYP, PBE0, and BHLYP) give accurate energies for all states in the reaction. Instead, B3LYP gives the best activation barrier, whereas pure functionals give more accurate energies for the other states. Our best results indicate that the enzyme follows a two-step associative reaction mechanism with an overall activation enthalpy of 63 kJ/mol, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Deducing the origin of soluble adenylyl cyclase, a gene lost in multiple lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Jeroen; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The family of eukaryotic adenylyl cyclases consists of a very large group of 12 transmembrane adenylyl cyclases and a very small group of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Orthologs of human sAC are present in rat Diclyostelium and bacteria but absent from the completely sequenced genomes of Drosophil

  11. AKAPs and Adenylyl Cyclase in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic AMP, generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review we discuss how interaction of AKAPs with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology. PMID:21978991

  12. Mechanistic studies of Wacker-type amidocyclization of alkenes catalyzed by (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O): kinetic and stereochemical implications of proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuan; White, Paul B; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-03-01

    The stereochemical course of the amidopalladation of alkenes has important implications for the development of enantioselective Pd-catalyzed "Wacker-type" oxidative amidation of alkenes. We have recently shown that the addition of base (Na2CO3) can alter the stereochemical course of amidopalladation in the (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O)-catalyzed aerobic oxidative amidation of alkene. In this study, the mechanism of (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O)-catalyzed oxidative heterocyclization of (Z)-4-hexenyltosylamide was investigated in the presence and absence of exogenous base Na2CO3. The results reveal two parallel pathways in the absence of base: a cis-amidopalladation pathway with turnover-limiting deprotonation of the sulfonamide nucleophile and a trans-amidopalladation pathway with turnover-limiting nucleophilic attack of sulfonamide on the coordinated alkene. The addition of base (Na2CO3) lowers the energy barrier associated with the proton transfer, leading to an overall faster turnover rate and exclusive cis-amidopalladation of alkene.

  13. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N.; Kataoka, T

    1992-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leuci...

  14. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an

  15. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an importa

  16. Presence or absence of a novel charge-transfer complex in the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-ethylbenzamide or ethyl benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Shinichi; Guan, Wei; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Reaction paths of base-catalyzed hydrolyses of isoelectronic substrates, Ph-C(=O)-X-Et [X = O (ethyl benzoate) and X = NH (N-ethylbenzamide)], were traced by DFT calculations. To simulate bond interchanges accompanied by proton transfers, a cluster model of Ph-C(=O)-X-Et + OH(-)(H(2)O)(16) was employed. For X = O, three elementary processes and for X = NH four ones were obtained. The rate-determining step of X = O is the first TS (TS1, the OH(-) addition step), while that of X = NH is TS2. TS2 of X = NH leads to a novel Mulliken charge-transfer complex, Ph-(OH)(O=)C∙∙∙N(H(2))-Et. The superiority or inferiority between the direct nucleophilic process or the general base-catalyzed process for TS1 was examined with the model Ph-C(=O)-X-Et + OH(-)(H(2)O)(n), n = 3, 5, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 32. The latter process was calculated to be more favorable regardless of the number (n, except n = 3) of water molecules. The counter ion Na(+) works unfavorably on the ester hydrolysis, particularly on TS1. A minimal model of TS1 was proposed and was found to be insensitive to n.

  17. Presence or absence of a novel charge-transfer complex in the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-ethylbenzamide or ethyl benzoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamabe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reaction paths of base-catalyzed hydrolyses of isoelectronic substrates, Ph–C(=O–X–Et [X = O (ethyl benzoate and X = NH (N-ethylbenzamide], were traced by DFT calculations. To simulate bond interchanges accompanied by proton transfers, a cluster model of Ph–C(=O–X–Et + OH−(H2O16 was employed. For X = O, three elementary processes and for X = NH four ones were obtained. The rate-determining step of X = O is the first TS (TS1, the OH− addition step, while that of X = NH is TS2. TS2 of X = NH leads to a novel Mulliken charge-transfer complex, Ph–(OH(O=C∙∙∙N(H2–Et. The superiority or inferiority between the direct nucleophilic process or the general base-catalyzed process for TS1 was examined with the model Ph–C(=O–X–Et + OH−(H2On, n = 3, 5, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 32. The latter process was calculated to be more favorable regardless of the number (n, except n = 3 of water molecules. The counter ion Na+ works unfavorably on the ester hydrolysis, particularly on TS1. A minimal model of TS1 was proposed and was found to be insensitive to n.

  18. A reduced susceptibility to chemoconvulsant stimulation in adenylyl cyclase 8 knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xia; Dong, Guoying; Zheng, Changhong; Wang, Hongbing; Yun, Wenwei; Zhou, Xianju

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) catalyze the synthesis of cAMP from ATP, and cAMP signaling affects a large number of neuronal processes. Ca2+-stimualted adenylyl cyclase 8 (AC8) expressed in the CNS plays a role in synaptic plasticity, drug addiction and ethanol sensitivity, and chronic pain. This study was to aim at examining the contributions of AC8 to epileptogenesis. Methods In this study, we observed the seizure behavior induced by kainic acid (20mg/kg or 30mg/kg) or pilocarpine (350mg/kg) in AC8 KO and wild-type mice. Next we injected kainic acid or pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus (SE), and examined neuronal degeneration (by Fluoro-Jade B staining) and mossy fiber sprouting (by Timm staining) 24 hr and 2 weeks after SE termination in the hippocampus, respectively. Finally, 15min after intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (30mg/kg), we examined phosphor-ERK1/2 in the hippocampus by western blot and immunochemistry staining. Results We first observed that AC8 KO mutants display reduced susceptibility (including seizure latency and episodes) to two chemoconvulsants, kainic acid and pilocarpine. Moreover, we found that degenerative neurons and mossy fiber sprouting induced by chemoconvulsants were significant decreased in the hippocampus. Further, western blot and immunochemistry analysis revealed that the MAPK signaling in the hippocampus was attenuated in kainic acid-injected AC8 KO mice. Conclusion AC8 is involved in epileptogenesis, and may serve as a potential target for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:26656781

  19. Inhibition of adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase isoforms by the antiviral drug foscarnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlacek, O; Mitterauer, T; Nanoff, C; Hohenegger, M; Tang, W J; Freissmuth, M; Kleuss, C

    2001-02-02

    The pyrophosphate (PP(i)) analog foscarnet inhibits viral DNA-polymerases and is used to treat cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency vius infections. Nucleotide cyclases and DNA-polymerases catalyze analogous reactions, i.e. a phosphodiester bond formation, and have similar topologies in their active sites. Inhibition by foscarnet of adenylyl cyclase isoforms was therefore tested with (i) purified catalytic domains C1 and C2 of types I and VII (IC1 and VIIC1) and of type II (IIC2) and (ii) membrane-bound holoenzymes (from mammalian tissues and types I, II, and V heterologously expressed in Sf9 cell membranes). Foscarnet was more potent than PP(i) in suppressing forskolin-stimulated catalysis by both, IC1/IIC2 and VIIC1/IIC2. Stimulation of VIIC1/IIC2 by Galpha(s) relieved the inhibition by foscarnet but not that by PP(i). The IC(50) of foscarnet on membrane-bound adenylyl cyclases also depended on their mode of regulation. These findings predict that receptor-dependent cAMP formation is sensitive to inhibition by foscarnet in some, but not all, cells. This was verified with two cell lines; foscarnet blocked cAMP accumulation after A(2A)-adenosine receptor stimulation in PC12 but not in HEK-A(2A) cells. Foscarnet also inhibited soluble and, to a lesser extent, particulate guanylyl cylase. Thus, foscarnet interferes with the generation of cyclic nucleotides, an effect which may give rise to clinical side effects. The extent of inhibition varies with the enzyme isoform and with the regulatory input.

  20. Protein-protein docking and analysis reveal that two homologous bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins interact with calmodulin differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Jureller, Justin E; Warren, Julia T; Solomaha, Elena; Florián, Jan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2008-08-29

    Calmodulin (CaM), a eukaryotic calcium sensor that regulates diverse biological activities, consists of N- and C-terminal globular domains (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively). CaM serves as the activator of CyaA, a 188-kDa adenylyl cyclase toxin secreted by Bordetella pertussis, which is the etiologic agent for whooping cough. Upon insertion of the N-terminal adenylyl cyclase domain (ACD) of CyaA to its targeted eukaryotic cells, CaM binds to this domain tightly ( approximately 200 pm affinity). This interaction activates the adenylyl cyclase activity of CyaA, leading to a rise in intracellular cAMP levels to disrupt normal cellular signaling. We recently solved the structure of CyaA-ACD in complex with C-CaM to elucidate the mechanism of catalytic activation. However, the structure of the interface between N-CaM and CyaA, the formation of which contributes a 400-fold increase of binding affinity between CyaA and CaM, remains elusive. Here, we used site-directed mutations and molecular dynamic simulations to generate several working models of CaM-bound CyaA-ACD. The validity of these models was evaluated by disulfide bond cross-linking, point mutations, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. Our study reveals that a beta-hairpin region (amino acids 259-273) of CyaA-ACD likely makes contacts with the second calcium binding motif of the extended CaM. This mode of interaction differs from the interaction of N-CaM with anthrax edema factor, which binds N-CaM via its helical domain. Thus, two structurally conserved, bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins have evolved to utilize distinct binding surfaces and modes of activation in their interaction with CaM, a highly conserved eukaryotic signaling protein.

  1. Metalloporphyrin-mediated asymmetric nitrogen-atom transfer to hydrocarbons: aziridination of alkenes and amidation of saturated C-H bonds catalyzed by chiral ruthenium and manganese porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiang-Lin; Huang, Jie-Sheng; Yu, Xiao-Qi; Zhu, Nianyong; Che, Chi-Ming

    2002-04-02

    Chiral metalloporphyrins [Mn(Por*)(OH)(MeOH)] (1) and [Ru(Por*)(CO)(EtOH)] (2) catalyze asymmetric aziridination of aromatic alkenes and asymmetric amidation of benzylic hydrocarbons to give moderate enantiomeric excesses. The mass balance in these nitrogen-atom-transfer processes has been examined. With PhI=NTs as the nitrogen source, the aziridination of styrenes, trans-stilbene, 2-vinylnaphthalene, indene, and 2,2-dimethylchromene catalyzed by complex 1 or 2 resulted in up to 99 % substrate conversions and up to 94 % aziridine selectivities, whereas the amidation of ethylbenzenes, indan, tetralin, 1-, and 2-ethylnaphthalene catalyzed by complex 2 led to substrate conversions of up to 32 % and amide selectivities of up to 91 %. Complex 1 or 2 can also catalyze the asymmetric amidation of 4-methoxyethylbenzene, tetralin, and 2-ethylnaphthalene with "PhI(OAc)(2) + NH(2)SO(2)Me", affording the N-substituted methanesulfonamides in up to 56 % ee with substrate conversions of up to 34 % and amide selectivities of up to 92 %. Extension of the "complex 1 + PhI=NTs" or "complex 1 + PhI(OAc)(2) + NH(2)R (R=Ts, Ns)" amidation protocol to a steroid resulted in diastereoselective amidation of cholesteryl acetate at the allylic C-H bonds at C-7 with substrate conversions of up to 49 % and amide selectivities of up to 90 % (alpha:beta ratio: up to 4.2:1). An aziridination- and amidation-active chiral bis(tosylimido)ruthenium(VI) porphyrin, [Ru(Por*)(NTs)(2)] (3), and a ruthenium porphyrin aziridine adduct, [Ru(Por*)(CO)(TsAz)] (4, TsAz=N-tosyl-2- (4-chlorophenyl)aziridine), have been isolated from the reaction of 2 with PhI=NTs and N-tosyl-2-(4-chlorophenyl)aziridine, respectively. The imidoruthenium porphyrin 3 could be an active species in the aziridination or amidation catalyzed by complex 2 described above. The second-order rate constants for the reactions of 3 with styrenes, 2-vinylnaphthalene, indene, ethylbenzenes, and 2-ethylnaphthalene range from 3.7-42.5x10(-3) dm(3

  2. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Kataoka, T

    1992-11-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leucine-rich repeats of the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase abolished the RAS-dependent activity, which was accompanied by formation of a very high molecular weight complex having the Mn(2+)-dependent activity. Contrary to previous results, disruption of the gene encoding CAP did not alter the extent of RAS protein-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase, while a concomitant decrease in the size of the RAS-responsive complex was observed. These results indicate that CAP is not essential for interaction of the yeast adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins even though it is an inherent component of the RAS-responsive adenylyl cyclase complex.

  3. Novel Oxidative Desulfurization of a Model Fuel with H2O2 Catalyzed by AlPMo12O40 under Phase Transfer Catalyst-Free Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio José da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel process was developed for oxidative desulfurization (ODS in the absence of a phase transfer catalyst (PTC using only Keggin heteropolyacids and their aluminum salts as catalysts. Reactions were performed in biphasic mixtures of isooctane/acetonitrile, with dibenzothiophene (DBT as a model sulfur compound and hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. Remarkably, only the AlPMo12O40-catalyzed reactions resulted in complete oxidation of DBT into DBT sulfone, which was totally extracted by acetonitrile, reducing the sulfur content of isooctane from the 1000 ppm to  H3PMo12O40 > AlPW12O40 > H3PW12O40. The absence of a PTC, acidic organic peroxides, and the use of hydrogen peroxide, an environmentally benign oxidant, make up the positive aspects of AlPMo12O40-catalyzed ODS reactions. In these reactions, high rates of DBT removal (ca. 100% were achieved within a short time (ca. 2 hours and under mild reaction conditions.

  4. Calcium regulation of adenylyl cyclase relevance for endocrine control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, F A

    1997-01-01

    A fundamental process in the hormonal regulation of body functions is the conversion of the intercellular signal into an intracellular signal. The first recognized intracellular messengers mediating the actions of hormones were calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and adenosine 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP), which is synthesized from ATP by adenylyl cyclase. Recent work on the structure of adenylyl cyclases has shown that these enzymes are individually tailored molecular machines controlled by diverse Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. These include allosteric regulation of enzyme activity through the Ca(2+)-receptor protein calmodulin, apparently direct actions of Ca(2+)on the cyclase catalytic moiety and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation by Ca(2+)-regulated protein kinases and protein phosphatases. This article is a brief review of the recent developments in the area of cyclase control that forecast a major revival of the interest in cAMP-Ca(2+)interactions. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:7-14).

  5. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  6. Diene Hydroacylation from the Alcohol or Aldehyde Oxidation Level via Ruthenium Catalyzed C-C Bond Forming Transfer Hydrogenation: Synthesis of β,γ-Unsaturated Ketones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Fumitoshi; Bower, John F.; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Under the conditions of ruthenium catalyzed transfer hydrogenation, isoprene couples to benzylic and aliphatic alcohols 1a–1g to deliver β,γ-unsaturated ketones 3a–3g in good to excellent isolated yields. Under identical conditions, aldehydes 2a–2g couple to isoprene to provide an identical set of β,γ-unsaturated ketones 3a–3g in good to excellent isolated yields. As demonstrated by the coupling of butadiene, myrcene and 1,2-dimethylbutadiene to representative alcohols 1b, 1c and 1e, diverse acyclic dienes participate in transfer hydrogenative coupling to form β,γ-unsaturated ketones. In all cases, complete branch-regioselectivity is observed and, with the exception of adduct 3j, isomerization to the conjugated enone is not detected. Thus, formal intermolecular diene hydroacylation is achieved from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level. In earlier studies employing a related ruthenium catalyst, acyclic dienes were coupled to carbonyl partners from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level to furnish branched homoallylic alcohols. Thus, under transfer hydrogenative coupling conditions, all oxidations levels of substrate (alcohol or aldehyde) and product (homoallyl alcohol or β,γ-unsaturated ketone) are accessible. PMID:18841895

  7. Muon catalyzed fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, K. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nagamine, K. [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Matsuzaki, T. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawamura, N. [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2005-12-15

    The latest progress of muon catalyzed fusion study at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility (and partly at TRIUMF) is reported. The topics covered are magnetic field effect, muon transfer to {sup 3}He in solid D/T and ortho-para effect in dd{mu} formation.

  8. Transfer Hydrogenation of Acetophenone Catalyzed by in situ Generated 2,6-Bis(5-thioxo-4,5-dihydro-1,2,4-triazole- 3-yl)pyridine-ruthenium(Ⅱ) Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CETIN,Ahmet; DAYAN,Osman

    2009-01-01

    2,6-Bis(5-thioxo-4,5-dihydro-1,2,4-triazole-3-yl)pyridines (3, 4) were used for the first time as ligand in ruthe-nium catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone. The in situ prepared three-component system Ru(ll)/tridentate triamine ligands (3a-3d, 4a-4d) and KOH catalysed the transfer hydrogenation reaction of ace-tophenone in good yields under mild conditions.

  9. Searching for the minimum energy path in the sulfuryl transfer reaction catalyzed by human estrogen sulfotransferase: Role of enzyme dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping; Yang, Weitao; Pedersen, Lars C.; Negishi, Masa; Pedersen, Lee G.

    The enzymatic transfer of a sulfuryl group from the ubiquitous biological source of sulfate 3?-phosphoadenosine 5?-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to estrogen is investigated by the pseudo-bond quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method (QM/MM) method. Calculations of the reaction path are performed starting with models based on two crystal structures, which differ in information about the cofactor and substrates. In addition, a subsequent relaxation of the enzyme was performed with the found transition state frozen, followed by redetermination of the path. An activation barrier of 22 kcal/mol is estimated. The reaction mechanism features a proton transfer from the estrogen to a catalytic histidine followed by the rate determining SO3 transfer. The mechanism found is largely dissociative.

  10. In tandem or alone: a remarkably selective transfer hydrogenation of alkenes catalyzed by ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Grzegorz Krzysztof; Samojłowicz, Cezary; Wdowik, Tomasz; Grela, Karol

    2015-03-01

    A system for transfer hydrogenation of alkenes, composed of a ruthenium metathesis catalyst and HCOOH, is presented. This operationally simple system can be formed directly after a metathesis reaction to effect hydrogenation of the metathesis product in a single-pot. These hydrogenation conditions are applicable to a wide range of alkenes and offer remarkable selectivity.

  11. Metallocene-catalyzed ethylene−α-olefin isomeric copolymerization: A perspective from hydrodynamic boundary layer mass transfer and design of MAO anion

    KAUST Repository

    Adamu, Sagir

    2015-11-28

    This study reports a novel conceptual framework that can be easily experimented to evaluate the effects of hydrodynamic boundary layer mass transfer, methylaluminoxane (MAO) anion design, and comonomer steric hindrance on metallocene-catalyzed ethylene polymerization. This approach was illustrated by conducting homo- and isomeric copolymerization of ethylene with 1-hexene and 4-methyl-1-pentene in the presence of bis(n-butylcyclopentadienyl) zirconium dichloride (nBuCp)2ZrCl2, using (i) MAO anion 1 (unsupported [MAOCl2]−) and pseudo-homogeneous reference polymerization, and (ii) MAO anion 2 (supported Si−O−[MAOCl2]−) and in-situ heterogeneous polymerization. The measured polymer morphology, catalyst productivity, molecular weight distribution, and inter-chain composition distribution were related to the locus of polymerization, comonomer effect, in-situ chain transfer process, and micromixing effect, respectively. The peak melting and crystallization temperatures and %crystallinity were mathematically correlated to the parameters of microstructural composition distributions, melt fractionation temperatures, and average lamellar thickness. These relations showed to be insightful. The comonomer-induced enchainment defects and the eventual partial disruption of the crystal lattice were successfully modeled using Flory and Gibbs–Thompson equations. The present methodology can also be applied to study ethylene−α-olefin copolymerization, performed using MAO-activated non-metallocene precatalysts.

  12. Characterization of recombinant human nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase (NMNAT), a nuclear enzyme essential for NAD synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, M; Hennig, K; Lerner, F; Niere, M; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Specht, T; Weise, C; Oei, S L; Ziegler, M

    2001-03-09

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase (NMNAT) is an essential enzyme in all organisms, because it catalyzes a key step of NAD synthesis. However, little is known about the structure and regulation of this enzyme. In this study we established the primary structure of human NMNAT. The human sequence represents the first report of the primary structure of this enzyme for an organism higher than yeast. The enzyme was purified from human placenta and internal peptide sequences determined. Analysis of human DNA sequence data then permitted the cloning of a cDNA encoding this enzyme. Recombinant NMNAT exhibited catalytic properties similar to the originally purified enzyme. Human NMNAT (molecular weight 31932) consists of 279 amino acids and exhibits substantial structural differences to the enzymes from lower organisms. A putative nuclear localization signal was confirmed by immunofluorescence studies. NMNAT strongly inhibited recombinant human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1, however, NMNAT was not modified by poly(ADP-ribose). NMNAT appears to be a substrate of nuclear kinases and contains at least three potential phosphorylation sites. Endogenous and recombinant NMNAT were phosphorylated in nuclear extracts in the presence of [gamma-(32)P]ATP. We propose that NMNAT's activity or interaction with nuclear proteins are likely to be modulated by phosphorylation.

  13. A novel mechanism of sulfur transfer catalyzed by O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase in the methionine-biosynthetic pathway of Wolinella succinogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Timothy H. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 (United States); Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Begley, Tadhg P., E-mail: begley@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77842 (United States); Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: begley@tamu.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    MetY is the first reported structure of an O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase that utilizes a protein thiocarboxylate intermediate as the sulfur source in a novel methionine-biosynthetic pathway instead of catalyzing a direct sulfhydrylation reaction. O-Acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase (OAHS) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent sulfide-utilizing enzyme in the l-cysteine and l-methionine biosynthetic pathways of various enteric bacteria and fungi. OAHS catalyzes the conversion of O-acetylhomoserine to homocysteine using sulfide in a process known as direct sulfhydrylation. However, the source of the sulfur has not been identified and no structures of OAHS have been reported in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of Wolinella succinogenes OAHS (MetY) determined at 2.2 Å resolution is reported. MetY crystallized in space group C2 with two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and crystal packing indicate that the biological unit is a tetramer in solution. This is further supported by the crystal structure, in which a tetramer is formed using a combination of noncrystallographic and crystallographic twofold axes. A search for structurally homologous proteins revealed that MetY has the same fold as cystathionine γ-lyase and methionine γ-lyase. The active sites of these enzymes, which are also PLP-dependent, share a high degree of structural similarity, suggesting that MetY belongs to the γ-elimination subclass of the Cys/Met metabolism PLP-dependent family of enzymes. The structure of MetY, together with biochemical data, provides insight into the mechanism of sulfur transfer to a small molecule via a protein thiocarboxylate intermediate.

  14. A highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptasensor for staphylococcal enterotoxin B detection based on exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Wang, Hongxin; Wang, Zhouping, E-mail: wangzp@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2013-06-11

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An ultrasensitive FRET aptasensor was developed for staphylococcal enterotoxin B determination. •SEB was recognized by SEB aptamer with high affinity and specificity. •The Mn{sup 2+} doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb/Er UCNPs used as donor to quencher dye (BHQ{sub 3}) in new FRET. •The fluorescence intensity was prominently amplified using an exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy. -- Abstract: An ultrasensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) bioassay was developed to detect staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), a low molecular exotoxin, using an aptamer-affinity method coupled with upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs)-sensing, and the fluorescence intensity was prominently enhanced using an exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy. To construct this aptasensor, both fluorescence donor probes (complementary DNA{sub 1}–UCNPs) and fluorescence quencher probes (complementary DNA{sub 2}–Black Hole Quencher{sub 3} (BHQ{sub 3})) were hybridized to an SEB aptamer, and double-strand oligonucleotides were fabricated, which quenched the fluorescence of the UCNPs via FRET. The formation of an aptamer–SEB complex in the presence of the SEB analyte resulted in not only the dissociation of aptamer from the double-strand DNA but also both the disruption of the FRET system and the restoration of the UCNPs fluorescence. In addition, the SEB was liberated from the aptamer–SEB complex using exonuclease I, an exonuclease specific to single-stranded DNA, for analyte recycling by selectively digesting a particular DNA (SEB aptamer). Based on this exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy, an amplified fluorescence intensity could be produced using different SEB concentrations. Using optimized experimental conditions produced an ultrasensitive aptasensor for the detection of SEB, with a wide linear range of 0.001–1 ng mL{sup −1} and a lower detection limit (LOD) of 0.3 pg mL{sup −1} SEB (at 3σ). The fabricated

  15. Transfer Hydrogenation of C= C Double Bonds Catalyzed by Ruthenium Amido-Complexes:Scopes, Limitation and Enantioselectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE,Dong; CHENG,Ying-Chun; CUI,Xin; WANG,Qi-Wei; ZHU,Jin; DENG,Jin-Gen

    2004-01-01

    @@ The reduction of C = C double bonds is one of the most fundamental synthetic transformations and plays a key role in the manufacturing of a wide variety of bulk and fine chemicals. Hydrogenation of olefinic substrates can be achieved readily with molecular hydrogen in many cases, but transfer hydrogenation methods using suitable donor molecules such as formic acid or alcohols are receiving increasing attention as possible synthetic alternatives because it requires no special equipment and avoids the handling of potentially hazardous gaseous hydrogen.

  16. Functional-Group-Tolerant, Silver-Catalyzed N-N Bond Formation by Nitrene Transfer to Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Lourdes; Dorel, Ruth; Pablo, Óscar; Escofet, Imma; Sameera, W M C; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Maseras, Feliu; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Echavarren, Antonio M; Pérez, Pedro J

    2017-02-15

    Silver(I) promotes the highly chemoselective N-amidation of tertiary amines under catalytic conditions to form aminimides by nitrene transfer from PhI═NTs. Remarkably, this transformation proceeds in a selective manner in the presence of olefins and other functional groups without formation of the commonly observed aziridines or C-H insertion products. The methodology can be applied not only to rather simple tertiary amines but also to complex natural molecules such as brucine or quinine, where the products derived from N-N bond formation were exclusively formed. Theoretical mechanistic studies have shown that this selective N-amidation reaction proceeds through triplet silver nitrenes.

  17. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Hassan Biswas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain. In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins.

  18. Versatile In Situ Generated N-Boc-Imines: Application to Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Asymmetric Mannich-Type Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Taichi; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-07-13

    The efficient construction of nitrogen-containing organic compounds is a major challenge in chemical synthesis. Imines are one of the most important classes of electrophiles for this transformation. However, both the available imines and applicable nucleophiles for them are quite limited given the existing preparative methods. Described herein are imine precursors which generate reactive imines with a wide variety of substituents under mild basic conditions. This approach enables the construction of various nitrogen-containing molecules which cannot be accessed by the traditional approach. The utility of the novel imine precursor was demonstrated in the asymmetric Mannich-type reaction under phase-transfer conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Efficient transfer hydrogenation reaction Catalyzed by a dearomatized PN 3P ruthenium pincer complex under base-free Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    He, Lipeng

    2012-03-01

    A dearomatized complex [RuH(PN 3P)(CO)] (PN 3PN, N′-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)-2,6-diaminopyridine) (3) was prepared by reaction of the aromatic complex [RuH(Cl)(PN 3P)(CO)] (2) with t-BuOK in THF. Further treatment of 3 with formic acid led to the formation of a rearomatized complex (4). These new complexes were fully characterized and the molecular structure of complex 4 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallography. In complex 4, a distorted square-pyramidal geometry around the ruthenium center was observed, with the CO ligand trans to the pyridinic nitrogen atom and the hydride located in the apical position. The dearomatized complex 3 displays efficient catalytic activity for hydrogen transfer of ketones in isopropanol. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ibogaine and noribogaine potentiate the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity by opioid and 5-HT receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, R A; Winter, J C

    1996-12-05

    The effects of the putative anti-addictive compound ibogaine and its principal metabolite, noribogaine, on adenylyl cyclase activity were determined in various areas of the rat brain. Neither compound altered either basal or forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities in the frontal cortex, midbrain or striatum. However, in all three brain areas the addition of ibogaine and noribogaine significantly enhanced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity by a maximally effective concentration of morphine. Similarly, both compounds also potentiated the inhibition of hippocampal adenylyl cyclase activity by a maximally effective concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Although ibogaine appears to be more potent than noribogaine in augmenting opioid- and 5-HT-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity, both compounds appear to be of comparable efficacy. Neither compound, however, modified the inhibitory action of the muscarinic acetylcholine agonist, carbachol, on adenylyl cyclase activity. The present data indicate that ibogaine and noribogaine cause a selective increase in receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. This potentiation may be involved in the pharmacological actions of these compounds.

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Validation of an Effective, Reusable Silicon-Based Transfer Agent for Room-Temperature Pd-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions of Aryl and Heteroaryl Chlorides with Readily Available Aryl Lithium Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Solorio, Dionicio; Melillo, Bruno; Sanchez, Luis; Liang, Yong; Lam, Erwin; Houk, K N; Smith, Amos B

    2016-02-17

    A reusable silicon-based transfer agent (1) has been designed, synthesized, and validated for effective room-temperature palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions (CCRs) of aryl and heteroaryl chlorides with readily accessible aryl lithium reagents. The crystalline, bench-stable siloxane transfer agent (1) is easily prepared via a one-step protocol. Importantly, this "green" CCR protocol circumvents prefunctionalization, isolation of organometallic cross-coupling partners, and/or stoichiometric waste aside from LiCl. DFT calculations support a σ-bond metathesis mechanism during transmetalation and lead to insights on the importance of the CF3 groups.

  2. Discovery of LRE1 as a specific and allosteric inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Kleinboelting, Silke; Navarrete, Felipe A; Alvau, Antonio; Visconti, Pablo E; Valsecchi, Federica; Starkov, Anatoly; Manfredi, Giovanni; Buck, Hannes; Adura, Carolina; Zippin, Jonathan H; van den Heuvel, Joop; Glickman, J Fraser; Steegborn, Clemens; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2016-10-01

    The prototypical second messenger cAMP regulates a wide variety of physiological processes. It can simultaneously mediate diverse functions by acting locally in independently regulated microdomains. In mammalian cells, two types of adenylyl cyclase generate cAMP: G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases and bicarbonate-, calcium- and ATP-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Because each type of cyclase regulates distinct microdomains, methods to distinguish between them are needed to understand cAMP signaling. We developed a mass-spectrometry-based adenylyl cyclase assay, which we used to identify a new sAC-specific inhibitor, LRE1. LRE1 bound to the bicarbonate activator binding site and inhibited sAC via a unique allosteric mechanism. LRE1 prevented sAC-dependent processes in cellular and physiological systems, and it will facilitate exploration of the therapeutic potential of sAC inhibition.

  3. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, cap, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamukai, M; Gerst, J; Field, J.; Riggs, M.; Rodgers, L; Wigler, M; Young, D

    1992-01-01

    We have identified, cloned, and studied a gene, cap, encoding a protein that is associated with adenylyl cyclase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This protein shares significant sequence homology with the adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CAP is a bifunctional protein; the N-terminal domain appears to be involved in cellular responsiveness to RAS, whereas loss of the C-terminal portion is associated with morphological and nutritional...

  4. Choreographing the adenylyl cyclase signalosome: sorting out the partners and the steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Bogard, Amy S; Gros, Robert; Feldman, Ross D

    2012-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a ubiquitous family of enzymes and are critical regulators of metabolic and cardiovascular function. Multiple isoforms of the enzyme are expressed in a range of tissues. However, for many processes, the adenylyl cyclase isoforms have been thought of as essentially interchangeable, with their impact more dependent on their common actions to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate content regardless of the isoform involved. It has long been appreciated that each subfamily of isoforms demonstrate a specific pattern of "upstream" regulation, i.e., specific patterns of ion dependence (e.g., calcium-dependence) and specific patterns of regulation by kinases (protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), raf). However, more recent studies have suggested that adenylyl cyclase isoform-selective patterns of signaling are a wide-spread phenomenon. The determinants of these selective signaling patterns relate to a number of factors, including: (1) selective coupling of specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms with specific G protein-coupled receptors, (2) localization of specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in defined structural domains (AKAP complexes, caveolin/lipid rafts), and (3) selective coupling of adenylyl cyclase isoforms with specific downstream signaling cascades important in regulation of cell growth and contractility. The importance of isoform-specific regulation has now been demonstrated both in mouse models as well as in humans. Adenylyl cyclase has not been viewed as a useful target for therapeutic regulation, given the ubiquitous expression of the enzyme and the perceived high risk of off-target effects. Understanding which isoforms of adenylyl cyclase mediate distinct cellular effects would bring new significance to the development of isoform-specific ligands to regulate discrete cellular actions.

  5. Diazepam inhibits forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in human tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, L P; Wang, J

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the benzodiazepine agonist, diazepam, suppresses adenylyl cyclase activity in rat brain, via a G protein-coupled benzodiazepine receptor. Since diazepam binding sites are also present in diverse non-neuronal tissues including tumour cells, its effects on adenylyl cyclase activity were examined in membranes from human MCF-7 (breast cancer) and M-6 (melanoma) cells. Diazepam caused a biphasic and concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in MCF-7 membranes. The first phase of inhibition, at picomolar to nanomolar drug concentrations (EC50=5.7 x 10(-12)M), is similar to the receptor mediated phase observed in the rat brain. At micromolar concentrations of diazepam (EC50= 1.8 x 10(-4)M), the steep decrease in adenylyl cyclase activity may involve a direct action on the enzyme itself, as detected previously in rat brain membranes. Diazepam-induced suppression of adenylyl cyclase activity was also detected in M-6 membranes. However, in contrast to MCF-7 findings, only micromolar concentrations of diazepam (EC50=5.2 x 10(-4)M) inhibited enzyme activity in M-6 membranes. These findings suggest that G protein-coupled benzodiazepine receptors, which mediate inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP pathway in the brain, are also expressed in MCF-7 cells.

  6. Reversible adenylylation of glutamine synthetase is dynamically counterbalanced during steady-state growth of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Hiroyuki; Hwa, Terence; Lenz, Peter; Yan, Dalai

    2010-12-03

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the central enzyme for nitrogen assimilation in Escherichia coli and is subject to reversible adenylylation (inactivation) by a bifunctional GS adenylyltransferase/adenylyl-removing enzyme (ATase). In vitro, both of the opposing activities of ATase are regulated by small effectors, most notably glutamine and 2-oxoglutarate. In vivo, adenylyltransferase (AT) activity is critical for growth adaptation when cells are shifted from nitrogen-limiting to nitrogen-excess conditions and a rapid decrease of GS activity by adenylylation is needed. Here, we show that the adenylyl-removing (AR) activity of ATase is required to counterbalance its AT activity during steady-state growth under both nitrogen-excess and nitrogen-limiting conditions. This conclusion was established by studying AR(-)/AT(+) mutants, which surprisingly displayed steady-state growth defects in nitrogen-excess conditions due to excessive GS adenylylation. Moreover, GS was abnormally adenylylated in the AR(-) mutants even under nitrogen-limiting conditions, whereas there was little GS adenylylation in wild-type strains. Despite the importance of AR activity, we establish that AT activity is significantly regulated in vivo, mainly by the cellular glutamine concentration. There is good general agreement between quantitative estimates of AT regulation in vivo and results derived from previous in vitro studies except at very low AT activities. We propose additional mechanisms for the low AT activities in vivo. The results suggest that dynamic counterbalance by reversible covalent modification may be a general strategy for controlling the activity of enzymes such as GS, whose physiological output allows adaptation to environmental fluctuations.

  7. An extended conformation of calmodulin induces interactions between the structural domains of adenylyl cyclase from Bacillus anthracis to promote catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, C L; Yan, S Z; Sarac, R; Mabuchi, Y; Beckingham, K; Bohm, A; Grabarek, Z; Tang, W J

    2000-11-17

    The edema factor exotoxin produced by Bacillus anthracis is an adenylyl cyclase that is activated by calmodulin (CaM) at resting state calcium concentrations in infected cells. A C-terminal 60-kDa fragment corresponding to the catalytic domain of edema factor (EF3) was cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. The N-terminal 43-kDa domain (EF3-N) of EF3, the sole domain of edema factor homologous to adenylyl cyclases from Bordetella pertussis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is highly resistant to protease digestion. The C-terminal 160-amino acid domain (EF3-C) of EF3 is sensitive to proteolysis in the absence of CaM. The addition of CaM protects EF3-C from being digested by proteases. EF3-N and EF3-C were expressed separately, and both fragments were required to reconstitute full CaM-sensitive enzyme activity. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments using a double-labeled CaM molecule were performed and indicated that CaM adopts an extended conformation upon binding to EF3. This contrasts sharply with the compact conformation adopted by CaM upon binding myosin light chain kinase and CaM-dependent protein kinase type II. Mutations in each of the four calcium binding sites of CaM were examined for their effect on EF3 activation. Sites 3 and 4 were found critical for the activation, and neither the N- nor the C-terminal domain of CaM alone was capable of activating EF3. A genetic screen probing loss-of-function mutations of EF3 and site-directed mutations based on the homology of the edema factor family revealed a conserved pair of aspartate residues and an arginine that are important for catalysis. Similar residues are essential for di-metal-mediated catalysis in mammalian adenylyl cyclases and a family of DNA polymerases and nucleotidyltransferases. This suggests that edema factor may utilize a similar catalytic mechanism.

  8. Effects of 39 Compounds on Calmodulin-Regulated Adenylyl Cyclases AC1 and Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Lübker

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclases (ACs catalyze the conversion of ATP into the second messenger cAMP. Membranous AC1 (AC1 is involved in processes of memory and learning and in muscle pain. The AC toxin edema factor (EF of Bacillus anthracis is involved in the development of anthrax. Both ACs are stimulated by the eukaryotic Ca(2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM. The CaM-AC interaction could constitute a potential target to enhance or impair the AC activity of AC1 and EF to intervene in above (pathophysiological mechanisms. Thus, we analyzed the impact of 39 compounds including typical CaM-inhibitors, an anticonvulsant, an anticholinergic, antidepressants, antipsychotics and Ca(2+-antagonists on CaM-stimulated catalytic activity of AC1 and EF. Compounds were tested at 10 μM, i.e., a concentration that can be reached therapeutically for certain antidepressants and antipsychotics. Calmidazolium chloride decreased CaM-stimulated AC1 activity moderately by about 30%. In contrast, CaM-stimulated EF activity was abrogated by calmidazolium chloride and additionally decreased by chlorpromazine, felodipine, penfluridol and trifluoperazine by about 20-40%. The activity of both ACs was decreased by calmidazolium chloride in the presence and absence of CaM. Thus, CaM-stimulated AC1 activity is more insensitive to inhibition by small molecules than CaM-stimulated EF activity. Inhibition of AC1 and EF by calmidazolium chloride is largely mediated via a CaM-independent allosteric mechanism.

  9. The Importance of Sulfate Adenylyl Transferase in S and O Fractionation by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. A.; Johnston, D. T.; Bradley, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) is critical to the oxidation of organic matter in modern and ancient oceans, and plays an important role in regulating the redox state of the Earth's surface. The sulfur and oxygen isotopic composition of seawater sulfate and of sulfate minerals reflect the biogeochemical processes that cycle sulfur, of which MSR is among the most important. MSR is a multi-enzymatic reaction network that partitions the isotopes of sulfur and oxygen as a consequence of both the flux of sulfate through this biochemical network and the fractionation imposed by each individual enzyme. MSR affects the δ18O of residual, extracellular sulfate mainly by the equilibration of the MSR intermediate sulfite with extracellular water (Antler et al., 2013 GCA, Wankel et al., 2013 Geobiol). A series of oxidative and exchange reactions catalyzed by APS reductase (APSr), sulfate adenylyl transferase (Sat), and sulfate transporters promote the conversion of water-equilibrated intracellular sulfite to extracellular sulfate. The flux of sulfoxy anions via these proteins will be, at least in part, dependent on the activity of these enzymes. To test this, we examined sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation in genetically engineered mutants of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). In these mutants, the activity of Sat has been artificially increased by perturbing the (i) transcriptional repressor Rex and (ii) its binding site upstream of the gene encoding Sat (Christensen et al., 2015 J. Bacteriol). It was predicted that this would minimize the back reaction of Sat, enhance the intracellular pool of APS, and minimize the equilibration between sulfite and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Both mutants, along with the wild type DvH were grown in batch culture made with water enriched in 18O. Samples were collected throughout batch growth, and we report the evolution of the S and O isotopic composition of sulfate, and of the S isotopic

  10. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  11. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  12. Gi proteins regulate adenylyl cyclase activity independent of receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsom, Caroline Bull; Ørstavik, Øivind; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Skomedal, Tor; Levy, Finn Olav; Krobert, Kurt Allen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the view that only β2- as opposed to β1-adrenoceptors (βARs) couple to G(i), some data indicate that the β1AR-evoked inotropic response is also influenced by the inhibition of Gi. Therefore, we wanted to determine if Gi exerts tonic receptor-independent inhibition upon basal adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity in cardiomyocytes. We used the Gs-selective (R,R)- and the Gs- and G(i)-activating (R,S)-fenoterol to selectively activate β2ARs (β1AR blockade present) in combination with Gi inactivation with pertussis toxin (PTX). We also determined the effect of PTX upon basal and forskolin-mediated responses. Contractility was measured ex vivo in left ventricular strips and cAMP accumulation was measured in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult Wistar rats. PTX amplified both the (R,R)- and (R,S)-fenoterol-evoked maximal inotropic response and concentration-dependent increases in cAMP accumulation. The EC50 values of fenoterol matched published binding affinities. The PTX enhancement of the Gs-selective (R,R)-fenoterol-mediated responses suggests that Gi regulates AC activity independent of receptor coupling to Gi protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, forskolin-evoked cAMP accumulation was increased and inotropic responses to forskolin were potentiated by PTX treatment. In non-PTX-treated tissue, phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and 4 inhibition or removal of either constitutive muscarinic receptor activation of Gi with atropine or removal of constitutive adenosine receptor activation with CGS 15943 had no effect upon contractility. However, in PTX-treated tissue, PDE3 and 4 inhibition alone increased basal levels of cAMP and accordingly evoked a large inotropic response. Together, these data indicate that Gi exerts intrinsic receptor-independent inhibitory activity upon AC. We propose that PTX treatment shifts the balance of intrinsic G(i) and Gs activity upon AC towards Gs, enhancing the effect of all cAMP-mediated inotropic agents.

  13. Structure of the adenylylation domain of E. coli glutamine synthetase adenylyl transferase: evidence for gene duplication and evolution of a new active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yibin; Carr, Paul D; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Ollis, David L

    2010-02-26

    The X-ray structure of the C-terminal fragment, containing residues 449-946, of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase adenylyl transferase (ATase) has been determined. ATase is part of the cascade that regulates the enzymatic activity of E. coli glutamine synthetase, a key component of the cell's machinery for the uptake of ammonia. It has two enzymatic activities, adenylyl removase (AR) and adenylyl transferase (AT), which are located in distinct catalytic domains that are separated by a regulatory (R) domain. We previously reported the three-dimensional structure of the AR domain (residues 1-440). The present structure contains both the R and AT domains. AR and AT share 24% sequence identity and also contain the beta-polymerase motif that is characteristic of many nucleotidylyl transferase enzymes. The structures overlap with an rmsd of 2.4 A when the superhelical R domain is omitted. A model for the complete ATase molecule is proposed, along with some refinements of domain boundaries. A rather more speculative model for the complex of ATase with glutamine synthetase and the nitrogen signal transduction protein PII is also presented.

  14. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase signal transduction in mecobalamin-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, S; Watanabe, M; Ikeda, H; Kamada, H; Saito, T; Ohshika, H

    1995-11-30

    This study examined alterations in the beta-adrenoceptor-G5-adenylyl cyclase system in cerebral cortex membranes from vitamin B12-deficient rats fed a diet lacking vitamin B12 (mecobalamin) for 15 weeks. Basal, 5(7)-guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp)-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities were significantly reduced in mecobalamin-deficient rats compared with those in control rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the amount and function of G5- estimated by immunoblotting and guanine nucleotide photoaffinity labeling, respectively, or in the densities and the dissociation constants of beta-adrenoceptors, estimated by [125I] pindolol binding, between control and the deficient rats. These results indicate that vitamin B12 deficiency results in the impairment of the coupling among the beta-adrenoceptor, G5- and the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase, and in dysfunction of the catalytic subunit of the enzyme, suggesting that vitamin B12 participates in the regulation of neuronal adenylyl cyclase signal transduction.

  15. A novel Myb homolog initiates Dictyostelium development by induction of adenylyl cyclase expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otsuka, Hideshi; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Dictyostelium development is induced by starvation. The adenylyl cyclase gene ACA is one of the first genes expressed upon starvation. ACA produces extracellular cAMP that induces chemotaxis, aggregation, and differentiation in neighboring cells. Using insertional mutagenesis we have isolated a muta

  16. Comparison of human CAP and CAP2, homologs of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, G; Swiston, J; Young, D

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported the identification of human CAP, a protein that is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins. The two yeast CAP proteins have similar functions: the N-terminal domains are required for the normal function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains result in morphological and nutritional defects that are unrelated to the cAMP pathways. We have amplified and cloned cDNAs from a human glioblastoma library that encode a second CAP-related protein, CAP2. The human CAP and CAP2 proteins are 64% identical. Expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. cerevisiae cap- strains suppresses phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP, but does not restore hyper-activation of adenylyl cyclase by RAS2val19. Similarly, expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. pombe cap- strains suppresses the morphological and temperature-sensitive phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP in this yeast. In addition, expression of human CAP, but not CAP2, suppresses the propensity to sporulate due to deletion of the N-terminal domain of CAP in S. pombe. This latter observation suggests that human CAP restores normal adenylyl cyclase activity in S. pombe cap- cells. Thus, functional properties of both N-terminal and C-terminal domains are conserved between the human and S. pombe CAP proteins.

  17. A novel Myb homolog initiates Dictyostelium development by induction of adenylyl cyclase expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otsuka, Hideshi; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Dictyostelium development is induced by starvation. The adenylyl cyclase gene ACA is one of the first genes expressed upon starvation. ACA produces extracellular cAMP that induces chemotaxis, aggregation, and differentiation in neighboring cells. Using insertional mutagenesis we have isolated a muta

  18. Adenylyl cyclase AC8 directly controls its micro-environment by recruiting the actin cytoskeleton in a cholesterol-rich milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, Laura J.; Briddon, Stephen J.; Halls, Michelle L.; Hammond, Gerald R. V.; Vaca, Luis; Pacheco, Jonathan; Hill, Stephen J.; Cooper, Dermot M. F.

    2012-01-01

    The central and pervasive influence of cAMP on cellular functions underscores the value of stringent control of the organization of adenylyl cyclases (ACs) in the plasma membrane. Biochemical data suggest that ACs reside in membrane rafts and could compartmentalize intermediary scaffolding proteins and associated regulatory elements. However, little is known about the organization or regulation of the dynamic behaviour of ACs in a cellular context. The present study examines these issues, using confocal image analysis of various AC8 constructs, combined with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These studies reveal that AC8, through its N-terminus, enhances the cortical actin signal at the plasma membrane; an interaction that was confirmed by GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation experiments. AC8 also associates dynamically with lipid rafts; the direct association of AC8 with sterols was confirmed in Förster resonance energy transfer experiments. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and lipid rafts indicates that AC8 tracks along the cytoskeleton in a cholesterol-enriched domain, and the cAMP that it produces contributes to sculpting the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, an adenylyl cyclase is shown not just to act as a scaffold, but also to actively orchestrate its own micro-environment, by associating with the cytoskeleton and controlling the association by producing cAMP, to yield a highly organized signalling hub. PMID:22399809

  19. Thiamine diphosphate adenylyl transferase from E. coli: functional characterization of the enzyme synthesizing adenosine thiamine triphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brans Alain

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently identified a new thiamine derivative, adenosine thiamine triphosphate (AThTP, in E. coli. In intact bacteria, this nucleotide is synthesized only in the absence of a metabolizable carbon source and quickly disappears as soon as the cells receive a carbon source such as glucose. Thus, we hypothesized that AThTP may be a signal produced in response to carbon starvation. Results Here we show that, in bacterial extracts, the biosynthesis of AThTP is carried out from thiamine diphosphate (ThDP and ADP or ATP by a soluble high molecular mass nucleotidyl transferase. We partially purified this enzyme and characterized some of its functional properties. The enzyme activity had an absolute requirement for divalent metal ions, such as Mn2+ or Mg2+, as well as for a heat-stable soluble activator present in bacterial extracts. The enzyme has a pH optimum of 6.5–7.0 and a high Km for ThDP (5 mM, suggesting that, in vivo, the rate of AThTP synthesis is proportional to the free ThDP concentration. When ADP was used as the variable substrate at a fixed ThDP concentration, a sigmoid curve was obtained, with a Hill coefficient of 2.1 and an S0.5 value of 0.08 mM. The specificity of the AThTP synthesizing enzyme with respect to nucleotide substrate is restricted to ATP/ADP, and only ThDP can serve as the second substrate of the reaction. We tentatively named this enzyme ThDP adenylyl transferase (EC 2.7.7.65. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of an enzyme activity transferring a nucleotidyl group on thiamine diphosphate to produce AThTP. The existence of a mechanism for the enzymatic synthesis of this compound is in agreement with the hypothesis of a non-cofactor role for thiamine derivatives in living cells.

  20. Pin-point chemical modification of RNA with diverse molecules through the functionality transfer reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Shibata, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2011-05-07

    The internal modification of RNA has been successfully achieved by the functionality transfer reaction (FTR) and following click chemistry with diverse azide compounds. The benefits of the FTR have been demonstrated by its specificity, rapidity, broad applicability, and procedure simplicity. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  1. Phase Transfer Catalyzed Synthesis of 1, 2-Bis[(3-aryl)-s-triazolo-[3, 4-b]-[1, 3, 4]thiadiazole-6-yl]ethanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De Jiang LI; He Qing FU

    2006-01-01

    A series of new 1, 2-bis[(3-aryl)-s-triazolo[3, 4-b]-[1, 3, 4]thiadiazole-6-yl]ethanes were synthesized in 50-82% yield by cyclization of 3-aryl-4-amino-5-mercapto-1, 2, 4-triazole with butanedioic acid in the presence of POC13 and tetrabutylammonium iodide as phase transfer catalyst.

  2. SOLID-LIQUID PHASE TRANSFER CATALYZED SYNTHESIS OF CINNAMYL ACETATE-KINETICS AND ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE REACTION IN A BATCH REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of solid-liquid phase transfer catalysis has an advantage of carrying out reaction between two immiscible substrates, one in solid phase and the other in liquid phase, with high selectivity and at relatively low temperatures. In this study we investigated the synthesis ci...

  3. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Chemistry Department, Kenyatta University, P. 0. Box 43844 ... harvester (X) [L 2] in a manner consistent with the following Forster equation for long range energy transfer [3-7]. .... sensitive foods, chemical reactors and essences. Recently we ...

  4. [Phase transfer catalyzed bioconversion of penicillin G to 6-APA by immobilized penicillin acylase in recyclable aqueous two-phase systems with light/pH sensitive copolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ke-ming; Cao, Xue-jun; Su, Jin; Ma, Li; Zhuang, Ying-ping; Chu, Ju; Zhang, Si-liang

    2008-03-01

    Immobilized penicillin acylase was used for bioconversion of penicillin PG into 6-APA in aqueous two-phase systems consisting of a light-sensitive polymer PNBC and a pH-sensitive polymer PADB. Partition coefficients of 6-APA was found to be about 5.78 in the presence of 1% NaCl. Enzyme kinetics showed that the reaction reached equilibrium at roughly 7 h. The 6-APA mole yields were 85.3% (pH 7.8, 20 degrees C), with about 20% increment as compared with the reaction of single aqueous phase buffer. The partition coefficient of PG (Na) varied scarcely, while that of the product, 6-APA and phenylacetic acid (PA) significantly varied due to Donnan effect of the phase systems and hydrophobicity of the products. The variation of the partition coefficients of the products also affected the bioconversion yield of the products. In the aqueous two-phase systems, the substrate, PG, the products of 6-APA and PA were biased in the top phase, while immobilized penicillin acylase at completely partitioned at the bottom. The substrate and PG entered the bottom phase, where it was catalyzed into 6-APA and PA and entered the top phase. Inhibition of the substrate and products was removed to result in improvement of the product yield, and the immobilized enzyme showed higher efficiency than the immobilized cells and occupied smaller volume. Compared with the free enzyme, immobilized enzyme had greater stability, longer life-time, and was completely partitioned in the bottom phase and recycle. Bioconversion in two-phase systems using immobilized penicillin acylase showed outstanding advantage. The light-sensitive copolymer forming aqueous two-phase systems could be recovered by laser radiation at 488 nm or filtered 450 nm light, while pH-sensitive polymer PADB could be recovered at the isoelectric point (pH 4.1). The recovery of the two copolymers was between 95% and 99%.

  5. The metabolic/pH sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase is a tumor suppressor protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Diaz, Ana; Nardin, Charlee; Saviola, Anthony J.; Shaw, Fiona; Plitt, Tamar; Yang, Xia; Wolchok, Jedd; Pirog, Edyta C.; Desman, Garrett; Sboner, Andrea; Zhang, Tuo; Xiang, Jenny; Merghoub, Taha; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Zippin, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    cAMP signaling pathways can both stimulate and inhibit the development of cancer; however, the sources of cAMP important for tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a non-canonical, evolutionarily conserved, nutrient- and pH-sensing source of cAMP. sAC has been implicated in the metastatic potential of certain cancers, and it is differentially localized in human cancers as compared to benign tissues. We now show that sAC expression is reduced in many human cancers. Loss of sAC increases cellular transformation in vitro and malignant progression in vivo. These data identify the metabolic/pH sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase as a previously unappreciated tumor suppressor protein. PMID:27323809

  6. Simultaneous stimulation of GABA and beta adrenergic receptors stabilizes isotypes of activated adenylyl cyclase heterocomplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robichon Alain

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated how the synthesis of cAMP, stimulated by isoproterenol acting through β-adrenoreceptors and Gs, is strongly amplified by simultaneous incubation with baclofen. Baclofen is an agonist of δ-aminobutyric acid type B receptors [GABAB], known to inhibit adenylyl cyclase via Gi. Because these agents have opposite effects on cAMP levels, the unexpected increase in cAMP synthesis when they are applied simultaneously has been intensively investigated. From previous reports, it appears that cyclase type II contributes most significantly to this phenomenon. Results We found that simultaneous application of isoproterenol and baclofen specifically influences the association/dissociation of molecules involved in the induction and termination of cyclase activity. Beta/gamma from [GABA]B receptor-coupled Gi has a higher affinity for adenylyl cyclase isoform(s when these isoforms are co-associated with Gs. Our data also suggest that, when beta/gamma and Gαs are associated with adenylyl cyclase isoform(s, beta/gamma from [GABA]B receptor-coupled Gi retards the GTPase activity of Gαs from adrenergic receptor. These reciprocal regulations of subunits of the adenylyl cyclase complex might be responsible for the drastic increase of cAMP synthesis in response to the simultaneous signals. Conclusions Simultaneous signals arriving at a particular synapse converge on molecular detectors of coincidence and trigger specific biochemical events. We hypothesize that this phenomenon comes from the complex molecular architectures involved, including scaffolding proteins that make reciprocal interactions between associated molecules possible. The biochemistry of simultaneous signaling is addressed as a key to synaptic function.

  7. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippin, Jonathan H.; Farrell, Jeanne; Huron, David; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Hess, Kenneth C.; Fischman, Donald A.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation. PMID:14769862

  8. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation.

  9. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

  10. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  11. Genetic reduction of chronic muscle pain in mice lacking calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrovic Michele J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC isoforms AC1 and AC8, couple NMDA receptor activation to cAMP signaling pathways in neurons and are important for development, learning and memory, drug addiction and persistent pain. AC1 and AC8 in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and the spinal cord were previously shown to be important in subcutaneous inflammatory pain. Muscle pain is different from cutaneous pain in its characteristics as well as conducting fibers. Therefore, we conducted the present work to test the role of AC1 and AC8 in both acute persistent and chronic muscle pain. Results Using an acute persistent inflammatory muscle pain model, we found that the behavioral nociceptive responses of both the late phase of acute muscle pain and the chronic muscle inflammatory pain were significantly reduced in AC1 knockout (KO and AC1&8 double knockout (DKO mice. Activation of other adenylyl cyclases in these KO mice by microinjection of forskolin into the ACC or spinal cord, but not into the peripheral tissue, rescued the behavioral nociceptive responses. Additionally, intra-peritoneal injection of an AC1 inhibitor significantly reduced behavioral responses in both acute persistent and chronic muscle pain. Conclusion The results of the present study demonstrate that neuronal Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases in the ACC and spinal cord are important for both late acute persistent and chronic inflammatory muscle pain.

  12. Effects of dopamine on adenylyl cyclase activity and amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, S; Amemiya, N; Takemura, H; Ohshika, H

    1995-06-01

    Several previous studies have shown that dopamine causes amylase secretion from rat parotid tissue. However, the mechanism of this dopamine action is still unclear. The present study was designed to characterize dopamine action in rat parotid gland tissue by examining the effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release. Dopamine significantly enhanced accumulation of cyclic AMP in parotid slices and stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in parotid membrane preparations. It also significantly stimulated amylase release from parotid slices. The stimulatory effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release were effectively blocked with propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, but not by either SCH 23390, a preferential D1 antagonist, or butaclamol, a preferential D2 antagonist. No substantial specific binding sites for D1 receptors were detectable by [3H]SCH 23390 binding in parotid membranes. These results suggest that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue is not mediated through specific D1 dopamine receptors but rather through beta-adrenergic receptors.

  13. Efficient Cu-catalyzed atom transfer radical addition reactions of fluoroalkylsulfonyl chlorides with electron-deficient alkenes induced by visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Jun; Dolbier, William R

    2015-03-27

    Fluoroalkylsulfonyl chlorides, R(f)SO2Cl, in which R(f)=CF3, C4F9, CF2H, CH2F, and CH2CF3, are used as a source of fluorinated radicals to add fluoroalkyl groups to electron-deficient, unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Photochemical conditions, using Cu mediation, are used to produce the respective α-chloro-β-fluoroalkylcarbonyl products in excellent yields through an atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) process. Facile nucleophilic replacement of the α-chloro substituent is shown to lead to further diverse functionalization of the products. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A New Palladium-Catalyzed Phenyl-Alkene Bond Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Roy

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of palladium-catalyzed phenyl-alkene bond formation is reported. This reaction involves transfer of all three phenyl groups from triphenylantimony onto alkenes containing allylic protons.

  15. Orientation towards asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones catalyzed by (pyrazolyl)ethyl)pyridine Fe(II) and Ni(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magubane, Makhosazane N.; Alam, Mohd Gulfam; Ojwach, Stephen O.; Munro, Orde Q.

    2017-05-01

    Compounds 2-[1-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)ethyl]pyridine (L1) and 2-[1-(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)ethyl]pyridine (L2) were obtained in a three-step procedure which involved the reduction of acetylpyridine using NaBH4, chlorination of the alcohol intermediate using SOCl2 and subsequent reaction with appropriate pyrazoles. Reactions of L1 and L2 with Ni(II) and Fe(II) halides produced the respective complexes Ni(L1)Br2 (1), Ni(L1)Cl2 (2), Fe(L1)Cl2 (3) and Ni(L2)Br2 (4) as racemic mixtures in moderate yields. The molecular structures of complexes 1 and 4 are dinuclear and mononuclear respectively. All the complexes (1-4) formed active catalysts for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones (THK) in 2-propanol at 82 °C affording conversions of 58%-84% within 48 h. The influence of catalyst structure, reaction conditions and identity of ketone substrates in the TH reactions have been successfully established.

  16. Studies on the mechanism of electron bifurcation catalyzed by electron transferring flavoprotein (Etf) and butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (Bcd) of Acidaminococcus fermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nilanjan Pal; Mowafy, Amr M; Demmer, Julius K; Upadhyay, Vikrant; Koelzer, Sebastian; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kahnt, Joerg; Hornung, Marco; Demmer, Ulrike; Ermler, Ulrich; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2014-02-21

    Electron bifurcation is a fundamental strategy of energy coupling originally discovered in the Q-cycle of many organisms. Recently a flavin-based electron bifurcation has been detected in anaerobes, first in clostridia and later in acetogens and methanogens. It enables anaerobic bacteria and archaea to reduce the low-potential [4Fe-4S] clusters of ferredoxin, which increases the efficiency of the substrate level and electron transport phosphorylations. Here we characterize the bifurcating electron transferring flavoprotein (EtfAf) and butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (BcdAf) of Acidaminococcus fermentans, which couple the exergonic reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA to the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin both with NADH. EtfAf contains one FAD (α-FAD) in subunit α and a second FAD (β-FAD) in subunit β. The distance between the two isoalloxazine rings is 18 Å. The EtfAf-NAD(+) complex structure revealed β-FAD as acceptor of the hydride of NADH. The formed β-FADH(-) is considered as the bifurcating electron donor. As a result of a domain movement, α-FAD is able to approach β-FADH(-) by about 4 Å and to take up one electron yielding a stable anionic semiquinone, α-FAD, which donates this electron further to Dh-FAD of BcdAf after a second domain movement. The remaining non-stabilized neutral semiquinone, β-FADH(•), immediately reduces ferredoxin. Repetition of this process affords a second reduced ferredoxin and Dh-FADH(-) that converts crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA.

  17. Adenylyl cyclase 3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) complex mediates the anti-migratory effect of forskolin in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Sierra N; Graves, Sarai H; Dains-McGahee, Clayton; Friedman, Emilee M; Hassan, Humma; Witkowski, Piotr; Sabbatini, Maria E

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human malignancies. A better understanding of the intracellular mechanism of migration and invasion is urgently needed to develop treatment that will suppress metastases and improve overall survival. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) is a second messenger that has shown to regulate migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. The rise of cyclic AMP suppressed migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Cyclic AMP is formed from cytosolic ATP by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). There are ten isoforms of ACs; nine are anchored in the plasma membrane and one is soluble. What remains unknown is the extent to which the expression of transmembrane AC isoforms is both modified in pancreatic cancer and mediates the inhibitory effect of forskolin on cell motility. Using real-time PCR analysis, ADCY3 was found to be highly expressed in pancreatic tumor tissues, resulting in a constitutive increase in cyclic AMP levels. On the other hand, ADCY2 was down-regulated. Migration, invasion, and filopodia formation in two different pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, HPAC and PANC-1 deficient in AC1 or AC3, were studied. We found that AC3, upon stimulation with forskolin, enhanced cyclic AMP levels and inhibited cell migration and invasion. Unlikely to be due to a cytotoxic effect, the inhibitory effects of forskolin involved the quick formation of AC3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1)/G-actin complex, which inhibited filopodia formation and cell motility. Using Western blotting analysis, forskolin, through AC3 activation, caused phosphorylation of CREB, but not ERK. The effect of CREB phosphorylation is likely to be associated with long-term signaling changes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. 逆相转移催化合成葵花籽油蔗糖酯%Synthesis of sunflower oil sucrose ester catalyzed by inverse phase - transfer catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊国栋; 康丽; 林振宇

    2012-01-01

    Using water solvent method, sunflower oil sucrose ester was synthesized by inverse phase -transfer catalyst DMAP with sucrose and fatty acid methyl ester prepared by ester - exchange method in the presence of basic catalyst from sunflower oil and methanol. The effects of molar ratio of fatty acids methyl ester to sucrose, catalyst dosage, reaction temperature and reaction time were studied. The results showed that the optimal conditions were as follows; molar ratio of fatty acids methyl ester to sucrose 2.5:1, catalyst dosage 4% , reaction temperature 85 °C and reaction time 7 h. Under the optimal conditions, the conversion rate of sunflower oil fatty acid methyl ester could reach 65. 32%. The final product had good surface activity, the critical micelle concentration(CMC) was 6. 5 g/L, surface tension was 27.41 mN/ m, emulsifying power was 79s, water count was 7. 2 mL, HLB was 10. 1 and iodine value was 126. 9 gI/ 100 g.%先由食用葵花籽油和甲醇在碱性催化剂条件下酯交换反应制得脂肪酸甲酯,然后脂肪酸甲酯与蔗糖通过水溶剂法,以逆相转移催化剂DMAP催化制备蔗糖脂肪酸酯.通过对酯糖摩尔比、催化剂用量、反应温度、反应时间进行考察,确定最佳合成条件为:酯糖摩尔比2.5∶1,催化剂用量4%,反应温度 85℃,反应时间7h.在最佳合成条件下,葵花籽油脂肪酸甲酯的转化率高达65.32%,所得产品具有良好的表面活性,其临界胶束质量浓度(CMC)为6.5 g/L,表面张力为27.41 mN/m,乳化力为79 s,浊点指数为7.2 mL,HLB值为10.1,碘值(Ⅰ)为126.9 g/100 g.

  19. A kinase-anchoring proteins and adenylyl cyclase in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W

    2011-10-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology, including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, AC, protein kinase A, and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review, we discuss how the interaction of A kinase-anchoring proteins with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology.

  20. Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein 1 in the Development of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakurina, G V; Kondakova, I V; Cheremisina, O V; Shishkin, D A; Choinzonov, E L

    2016-03-01

    We compared the content of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) in the blood and tissues of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (with and without regional metastases), patients with chronic inflammatory diseases aggravated by laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, and healthy individuals. The data suggest that serum CAP1 concentration correlated with the depth of primary tumor invasion and the presence of regional metastases. In cancer patients, the serum level of CAP1 was lower than in patients with laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, which can be of importance for differential and timely diagnostics of malignant tumors.

  1. Forskolin photoaffinity labels with specificity for adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, D.I.; Robbins, J.D.; Ruoho, A.E.; Sutkowski, E.M.; Seamon, K.B. (Division of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-07-15

    Two photolabels, N-(3-(4-azido-3-125I-phenyl)-propionamide)-6- aminoethylcarbamylforskolin(125I-6-AIPP-Fsk) and N-(3-(4-azido-3-125I-phenyl)propionamide)-7-aminoethylcarbamyl-7- desacetylforskolin (125I-7-AIPP-Fsk) were synthesized with specific activities of 2200 Ci/mmol and used to label adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter. The affinities of the photolabels for adenylyl cyclase were determined by their inhibition of (3H)forskolin binding to bovine brain membranes. 6-AIPP-Fsk and 7-AIPP-Fsk inhibited (3H)forskolin binding with IC50 values of 15 nM and 200 nM, respectively. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk labeled a 115-kDa protein in control and GTP {gamma} S-preactivated bovine brain membranes. This labeling was inhibited by forskolin but not by 1,9-dideoxyforskolin or cytochalasin B. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk labeling of partially purified adenylyl cyclase was inhibited by forskolin but not by 1,9-dideoxyforskolin. 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk specifically labeled a 45-kDa protein and not a 115-kDa protein in control and GTP {gamma} S-preactivated brain membranes. This labeling was inhibited by forskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, cytochalasin B, and D-glucose but not cytochalasin E or L-glucose. Human erythrocyte membranes were photolyzed with 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk and 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk. 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk, but not 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk, strongly labeled a broad 45-70-kDa band. Forskolin, 7-bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, cytochalasin B, and D-glucose, but not cytochalasin E or L-glucose, inhibited 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk labeling of the 45-70-kDa band. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk and 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk are high affinity photolabels with specificity for adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter, respectively.

  2. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  3. Catalyzing RE Project Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Kate; Elgqvist, Emma; Walker, Andy; Cutler, Dylan; Olis, Dan; DiOrio, Nick; Simpkins, Travis

    2016-09-01

    This poster details how screenings done with REopt - NREL's software modeling platform for energy systems integration and optimization - are helping to catalyze the development of hundreds of megawatts of renewable energy.

  4. G protein β1γ2 subunits purification and their interaction with adenylyl cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Julian; (陈巨莲); NI; Hanxiang; (倪汉祥); SUN; Jingrui; (孙京瑞); WENG; Gezhi

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary study on the interaction of G protein (guanine triphosphate binding pro- tein) β1γ2 subunits and their coupled components in cell signal transduction was conducted in vitro. The insect cell lines, Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda) and H5 (Trichoplusia ni) were used to express the recombinant protein Gβ1γ2. The cell membrane containing Gβ1γ2 was isolated through affinity chromatography column with Ni-NTA agarose by FPLC method, and the highly purified protein was obtained. The adenylyl cyclase 2 (AC2) activity assay showed that the purified Gβ1γ2 could significantly stimulate AC2 activity. The interaction of β1γ2 subunits of G protein with the cytoplasmic tail of various mammalian adenylyl cyclases was monitored by BIAcore technology using NTA sensor chip, which relies on the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The experiments showed the direct binding of Gβ1γ2 to the cytoplasmic tail C2 domain of AC2. The specific binding domain of AC2 with Gβ1γ2 was the same as AC2 activity domain which was stimulated by β1γ2.

  5. Adenylyl cyclase 3 haploinsufficiency confers susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tao; Shen, Ying; Lee, Han-Woong; Yu, Rina; Park, Taesun

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 3 (Adcy3), a member of the mammalian adenylyl cyclase family responsible for generating the second messenger cAMP, has long been known to play an essential role in olfactory signal transduction. Here, we demonstrated that Adcy3 heterozygous null mice displayed increased visceral adiposity in the absence of hyperphagia and developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines on both chow and high-fat diet (HFD). Of note, HFD decreased the Adcy3 expression in white adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. We also report for the first time that Adcy3 haploinsufficiency resulted in reduced expression of genes involved in thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and insulin signaling, with enhanced expression of genes related to adipogenesis in peripheral tissues of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cAMP signals generated by Adcy3 in peripheral tissues may play a pivotal role in modulating obesity and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27678003

  6. Characterization of Plasmodium falciparum adenylyl cyclase-β and its role in erythrocytic stage parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Salazar

    Full Text Available The most severe form of human malaria is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The second messenger cAMP has been shown to be important for the parasite's ability to infect the host's liver, but its role during parasite growth inside erythrocytes, the stage responsible for symptomatic malaria, is less clear. The P. falciparum genome encodes two adenylyl cyclases, the enzymes that synthesize cAMP, PfACα and PfACβ. We now show that one of these, PfACβ, plays an important role during the erythrocytic stage of the P. falciparum life cycle. Biochemical characterization of PfACβ revealed a marked pH dependence, and sensitivity to a number of small molecule inhibitors. These inhibitors kill parasites growing inside red blood cells. One particular inhibitor is selective for PfACβ relative to its human ortholog, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC; thus, PfACβ represents a potential target for development of safe and effective antimalarial therapeutics.

  7. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is an essential sensor for acid/base homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Salazar, Eric; Levin, Lonny R; Goss, Greg G; Buck, Jochen

    2010-01-05

    pH homeostasis is essential for life, yet it remains unclear how animals sense their systemic acid/base (A/B) status. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionary conserved signaling enzyme that produces the second messenger cAMP in response to bicarbonate ions (HCO(3)(-)). We cloned the sAC ortholog from the dogfish, a shark that regulates blood A/B by absorbing and secreting protons (H(+)) and HCO(3)(-) at its gills. Similar to mammalian sAC, dogfish soluble adenylyl cyclase (dfsAC) is activated by HCO(3)(-) and can be inhibited by two structurally and mechanistically distinct small molecule inhibitors. dfsAC is expressed in the gill epithelium, where the subset of base-secreting cells resides. Injection of inhibitors into animals under alkaline stress confirmed that dfsAC is essential for maintaining systemic pH and HCO(3)(-) levels in the whole organism. One of the downstream effects of dfsAC is to promote the insertion of vacuolar proton pumps into the basolateral membrane to absorb H(+) into the blood. sAC orthologs are present throughout metazoans, and mammalian sAC is expressed in A/B regulatory organs, suggesting that systemic A/B sensing via sAC is widespread in the animal kingdom.

  8. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is an acid-base sensor in epithelial base-secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Blood acid-base regulation by specialized epithelia, such as gills and kidney, requires the ability to sense blood acid-base status. Here, we developed primary cultures of ray (Urolophus halleri) gill cells to study mechanisms for acid-base sensing without the interference of whole animal hormonal regulation. Ray gills have abundant base-secreting cells, identified by their noticeable expression of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), and also express the evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Exposure of cultured cells to extracellular alkalosis (pH 8.0, 40 mM HCO3 (-)) triggered VHA translocation to the cell membrane, similar to previous reports in live animals experiencing blood alkalosis. VHA translocation was dependent on sAC, as it was blocked by the sAC-specific inhibitor KH7. Ray gill base-secreting cells also express transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); however, tmAC inhibition by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine did not prevent alkalosis-dependent VHA translocation, and tmAC activation by forskolin reduced the abundance of VHA at the cell membrane. This study demonstrates that sAC is a necessary and sufficient sensor of extracellular alkalosis in ray gill base-secreting cells. In addition, this study indicates that different sources of cAMP differentially modulate cell biology. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Molecular Cloning,Expression,and Characterization of an Adenylyl Cyclase-associated Protein from Gossypium arboreum Fuzzless Mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    CAP,an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein,is predicted to be involved in cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction.Recently,we found that CAP may play an important role in fuzz-like fiber cell initiation in cotton.For the further research,we isolated two CAP homologues from wild type

  10. Isolation of a cotton CAP gene: a homologue of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein highly expressed during fiber elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, M; Aotsuka, S; Uchimiya, H

    1998-12-01

    The cDNA encoding CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) was isolated from a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber cDNA library. The cDNA (GhCAP) contained an open reading frame that encoded 471 amino acid residues. RNA blot analysis showed that the cotton CAP gene was expressed mainly in young fibers.

  11. Coiled-coil interaction of N-terminal 36 residues of cyclase-associated protein with adenylyl cyclase is sufficient for its function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Y; Shima, F; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1998-10-23

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, association with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is required for proper response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras proteins. We show here that a small segment comprising the N-terminal 36 amino acid residues of CAP is sufficient for association with adenylyl cyclase as well as for its function in the Ras-adenylyl cyclase pathway as assayed by the ability to confer RAS2(Val-19)-dependent heat shock sensitivity to yeast cells. The CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase was mapped to a segment of 119 amino acid residues near its C terminus. Both of these regions contained tandem repetitions of a heptad motif alphaXXalphaXXX (where alpha represents a hydrophobic amino acid and X represents any amino acid), suggesting a coiled-coil interaction. When mutants of CAP defective in associating with adenylyl cyclase were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, they were found to carry substitution mutations in one of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats. Furthermore, mutations of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats of adenylyl cyclase also resulted in loss of association with CAP. These results indicate the coiled-coil mechanism as a basis of the CAP-adenylyl cyclase interaction.

  12. The YHS-Domain of an Adenylyl Cyclase from Mycobacterium phlei Is a Probable Copper-Sensor Module.

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    Jürgen Ulrich Linder

    Full Text Available YHS-domains are small protein modules which have been proposed to bind transition-metal ions like the related TRASH-domains. They are found in a variety of enzymes including copper-transporting ATPases and adenylyl cyclases. Here we investigate a class IIIc adenylyl cyclase from Mycobacterium phlei which contains a C-terminal YHS-domain linked to the catalytic domain by a peptide of 8 amino acids. We expressed the isolated catalytic domain and the full-length enzyme in E. coli. The catalytic domain requires millimolar Mn2+ as a cofactor for efficient production of cAMP, is unaffected by low micromolar concentrations of Cu2+ and inhibited by concentrations higher than 10 μM. The full-length enzyme also requires Mn2+ in the absence of an activator. However, 1-10 μM Cu2+ stimulate the M. phlei adenylyl cyclase sixfold when assayed with Mn2+. With Mg2+ as the probable physiological cofactor of the adenylyl cyclase Cu2+ specifically switches the enzyme from an inactive to an active state. Other transition-metal ions do not elicit activity with Mg2+. We favor the view that the YHS-domain of M. phlei adenylyl cyclase acts as a sensor for copper ions and signals elevated levels of the transition-metal via cAMP. By analogy to TRASH-domains binding of Cu2+ probably occurs via one conserved aspartate and three conserved cysteine-residues in the YHS-domain.

  13. Gold-catalyzed naphthalene functionalization

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    Iván Rivilla

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexes IPrMCl (IPr = 1,3-bis(diisopropylphenylimidazol-2-ylidene, M = Cu, 1a; M = Au, 1b, in the presence of one equiv of NaBAr'4 (Ar' = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethylphenyl, catalyze the transfer of carbene groups: C(RCO2Et (R = H, Me from N2C(RCO2Et to afford products that depend on the nature of the metal center. The copper-based catalyst yields exclusively a cycloheptatriene derivative from the Buchner reaction, whereas the gold analog affords a mixture of products derived either from the formal insertion of the carbene unit into the aromatic C–H bond or from its addition to a double bond. In addition, no byproducts derived from carbene coupling were observed.

  14. Regulation of glutamine synthetase activity by adenylylation in the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, S L; Tyler, B

    1981-01-01

    The enzymatic activity of glutamine synthetase [GS; L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2] from the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya is regulated by covalent modification. In whole cells containing high levels of GS the addition of ammonium chloride leads to a rapid decline in GS activity. Crude extracts prepared from such ammonia-shocked cells had very low levels of GS activity as measured by biosynthetic and gamma-glutamyltransferase assays. Incubation of the crude extracts with snake venom phosphodiesterase restored GS activity. In cell extracts, GS was also inactivated by an ATP- and glutamine-dependent reaction. Radioactive labeling studies demonstrated the incorporation of an AmP moiety into GS protein upon modification. Our results suggest a covalent modification of GS in a Gram-positive bacterium. This modification appears to be adenylylation of the GS subunit similar to that found in the Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Adenylylation of Gyrase and Topo IV by FicT Toxins Disrupts Bacterial DNA Topology

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    Alexander Harms

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA modules are ubiquitous molecular switches controlling bacterial growth via the release of toxins that inhibit cell proliferation. Most of these toxins interfere with protein translation, but a growing variety of other mechanisms hints at a diversity that is not yet fully appreciated. Here, we characterize a group of FIC domain proteins as toxins of the conserved and abundant FicTA family of TA modules, and we reveal that they act by suspending control of cellular DNA topology. We show that FicTs are enzymes that adenylylate DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, the essential bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, at their ATP-binding site. This modification inactivates both targets by blocking their ATPase activity, and, consequently, causes reversible growth arrest due to the knotting, catenation, and relaxation of cellular DNA. Our results give insight into the regulation of DNA topology and highlight the remarkable plasticity of FIC domain proteins.

  16. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

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    Lucie Hejnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adenylyl cyclase (AC signaling system plays a crucial role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Here we analyzed the key components of myocardial AC signaling in the developing chick embryo and assessed the impact of selected β-blocking agents on this system. Application of metoprolol and carvedilol, two commonly used β-blockers, at embryonic day (ED 8 significantly downregulated (by about 40% expression levels of AC5, the dominant cardiac AC isoform, and the amount of Gsα protein at ED9. Activity of AC stimulated by forskolin was also significantly reduced under these conditions. Interestingly, when administered at ED4, these drugs did not produce such profound changes in the myocardial AC signaling system, except for markedly increased expression of Giα protein. These data indicate that β-blocking agents can strongly derange AC signaling during the first half of embryonic heart development.

  17. Isoform-specific regulation of adenylyl cyclase: a potential target in future pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) is a target enzyme of multiple G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the past decade, the cloning, structure and biochemical properties of nine AC isoforms were reported, and each isoform of AC shows distinct patterns of tissue distribution and biochemical/pharmacological properties. In addition to the conventional regulators of this enzyme, such as calmodulin (CaM) or PKC, novel regulators, for example, caveolin, have been identified. Most importantly, these regulators work on AC in an isoform dependent manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that certain classic AC inhibitors, i.e., P-site inhibitors, show an isoform-dependent inhibition of AC. The side chain modifications of forskolin, a diterpene extract from Coleus forskolii, markedly enhance its isoform selectivity. When taken together, these findings suggest that it is feasible to develop new pharmacotherapeutic agents that target AC isoforms to regulate various neurohormonal signals in a highly tissue-/organ-specific manner.

  18. Copper-Catalyzed Aerobic C–H Trifluoromethylation of Phenanthrolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng-Liang; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Yuan, Yong-An

    2016-01-01

    Direct C–H trifluoromethylation of heterocycles is a valuable transformation. In particular, nonprecious metal-catalyzed C–H trifluoromethylation processes, which do not proceed through CF3 radical species, have been less developed. In this cluster report, a new copper-catalyzed aerobic C–H trifluoromethylation of phenanthrolines is described. This transformation affords trifluoromethylated phenanthrolines that have not been synthesized and preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that the CF3 group transfer may occur through cooperative activation. PMID:26855477

  19. New structural forms of a mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase Rv1625c

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    Deivanayaga Barathy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rv1625c is one of 16 adenylyl cyclases encoded in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In solution Rv1625c exists predominantly as a monomer, with a small amount of dimer. It has been shown previously that the monomer is active and the dimeric fraction is inactive. Both fractions of wild-type Rv1625c crystallized as head-to-head inactive domain-swapped dimers as opposed to the head-to-tail dimer seen in other functional adenylyl cyclases. About half of the molecule is involved in extensive domain swapping. The strain created by a serine residue located on a hinge loop and the crystallization condition might have led to this unusual domain swapping. The inactivity of the dimeric form of Rv1625c could be explained by the absence of the required catalytic site in the swapped dimer. A single mutant of the enzyme was also generated by changing a phenylalanine predicted to occur at the functional dimer interface to an arginine. This single mutant exists as a dimer in solution but crystallized as a monomer. Analysis of the structure showed that a salt bridge formed between a glutamate residue in the N-terminal segment and the mutated arginine residue hinders dimer formation by pulling the N-terminal region towards the dimer interface. Both structures reported here show a change in the dimerization-arm region which is involved in formation of the functional dimer. It is concluded that the dimerization arm along with other structural elements such as the N-terminal region and certain loops are vital for determining the oligomeric nature of the enzyme, which in turn dictates its activity.

  20. Stimulation of renin secretion by catecholamines is dependent on adenylyl cyclases 5 and 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehni, Fadi; Tang, Tong; Madsen, Kirsten; Plattner, Michael; Schreiber, Andrea; Friis, Ulla G; Hammond, H Kirk; Han, Pyung Lim; Schweda, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The sympathetic nervous system stimulates renin release from juxtaglomerular cells via the β-adrenoreceptor-cAMP pathway. Recent in vitro studies have suggested that the calcium-inhibited adenylyl cyclases (ACs) 5 and 6 possess key roles in the control of renin exocytosis. To investigate the relative contribution of AC5 and AC6 to the regulation of renin release in vivo we performed experiments using AC5 and AC6 knockout mice. Male AC5(-/-) mice exhibited normal plasma renin concentrations, renal renin synthesis (mRNA and renin content), urinary volume, and systolic blood pressure. In male AC6(-/-) mice, plasma renin concentration (AC6(-/-): 732 ± 119; AC6 (+/+): 436 ± 78 ng of angiotensin I per hour*mL(-1); Prenin synthesis were stimulated associated with an increased excretion of dilute urine (1.55-fold; Pplasma renin concentration by a single injection of the β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (10 mg/kg IP) was significantly attenuated in AC5(-/-) (male: -20%; female: -33%) compared with wild-type mice in vivo. The mitigation of the plasma renin concentration response to isoproterenol was even more pronounced in AC6(-/-) (male: -63%; female: -50% versus AC6(+/+)). Similarly, the effects of isoproterenol, prostaglandin E2, and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide on renin release from isolated perfused kidneys were attenuated to a higher extent in AC6(-/-) (-51% to -98% versus AC6(+/+)) than in AC5(-/-) (-31% to 46% versus AC5(+/+)). In conclusion, both AC5 and AC6 are involved in the stimulation of renin secretion in vivo, and AC6 is the dominant isoforms in this process.

  1. In vitro metacyclogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi induced by starvation correlates with a transient adenylyl cyclase stimulation as well as with a constitutive upregulation of adenylyl cyclase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Afsaneh; Botelho, Larisse; Britto, Constança; Fragoso, Stenio Perdigão; Umaki, Adriana Castilhos Souza; Goldenberg, Samuel; Bottu, Guy; Salmon, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi adenylyl cyclase (AC) multigene family encodes different isoforms (around 15) sharing a variable large N-terminal domain, which is extracellular and receptor-like, followed by a transmembrane helix and a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain. It was proposed that these key enzymes in the cAMP signalling pathway allow the parasite to sense its changing extracellular milieu in order to rapidly adapt to its new environment, which is generally achieved through a differentiation process. One of the critical differentiation events the parasitic protozoan T. cruzi undergoes during its life cycle, known as metacyclogenesis, occurs in the digestive tract of the insect and corresponds to the differentiation from noninfective epimastigotes to infective metacyclic trypomastigote forms. By in vitro monitoring the activity of AC during metacyclogenesis, we showed that both the activity of AC and the intracellular cAMP content follow a similar pattern of transient stimulation in a two-step process, with a first activation peak occurring during the first hours of nutritional stress and a second peak between 6 and 48 h, corresponding to the cellular adhesion. During this differentiation process, a general mechanism of upregulation of AC expression of both mRNA and protein is triggered and in particular for a major subclass of these enzymes that are present in various gene copies commonly associated to the THT gene clusters. Although the scattered genome distribution of these gene copies is rather unusual in trypanosomatids and seems to be a recent acquisition in the evolution of the T. cruzi clade, their encoded product redistributed on the flagellum of the parasite upon differentiation could be important to sense the extracellular milieu.

  2. Adenylyl cyclase 2 selectively couples to E prostanoid type 2 receptors, whereas adenylyl cyclase 3 is not receptor-regulated in airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Amy S; Adris, Piyatilake; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2012-08-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists stimulate AC activity and cAMP production. We have previously shown in a number of cell types that AC6 selectively couples to βAR and these proteins are coexpressed in lipid rafts. We overexpressed AC2, AC3, and AC6 in mouse bronchial smooth muscle cells (mBSMCs) and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells by using recombinant adenoviruses and assessed their localization and regulation by various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). AC3 and AC6 were expressed primarily in caveolin-rich fractions, whereas AC2 expression was excluded from these domains. AC6 expression enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol but did not increase responses to butaprost, reflecting the colocalization of AC6 with β(2)AR but not E prostanoid type 2 receptor (EP(2)R) in lipid raft fractions. AC2 expression enhanced butaprost-stimulated cAMP production but had no effect on the β(2)AR-mediated response. AC3 did not couple to any GPCR tested. Forskolin-induced arborization of mBSMCs was assessed as a functional readout of cAMP signaling. Arborization was enhanced by overexpression of AC6 and AC3, but AC2 had no effect. GPCR-stimulated arborization mirrored the selective coupling observed for cAMP production. With the addition of the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram AC2 accelerated forskolin-stimulated arborization. Thus, AC2 selectively couples to EP(2)R, but signals from this complex are limited by PDE4 activity. AC3 does not seem to couple to GPCR in either mBSMCs or HEK-293 cells, so it probably exists in a distinct signaling domain in these cells.

  3. Ectopic expression of cyclase associated protein CAP restores the streaming and aggregation defects of adenylyl cyclase a deficient Dictyostelium discoideum cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana Hameeda; Neelakanta Girish; Rivero Francisco; Blau-Wasser Rosemarie; Schleicher Michael; Noegel Angelika A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cell adhesion, an integral part of D. discoideum development, is important for morphogenesis and regulated gene expression in the multicellular context and is required to trigger cell-differentiation. G-protein linked adenylyl cyclase pathways are crucially involved and a mutant lacking the aggregation specific adenylyl cyclase ACA does not undergo multicellular development. Results Here, we have investigated the role of cyclase-associated protein (CAP), an important regul...

  4. A HCO(3)(-)-dependent mechanism involving soluble adenylyl cyclase for the activation of Ca²⁺ currents in locus coeruleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Ann N; Santin, Joseph M; Graham, Cathy D; Putnam, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    Hypercapnic acidosis activates Ca²⁺ channels and increases intracellular Ca²⁺ levels in neurons of the locus coeruleus, a known chemosensitive region involved in respiratory control. We have also shown that large conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels, in conjunction with this pathway, limits the hypercapnic-induced increase in firing rate in locus coeruleus neurons. Here, we present evidence that the Ca²⁺ current is activated by a HCO(3)(-)-sensitive pathway. The increase in HCO(3)(-) associated with hypercapnia activates HCO(3)(-)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (soluble adenylyl cyclase). This results in an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels and activation of Ca²⁺ channels via cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase A. We also show the presence of soluble adenylyl cyclase in the cytoplasm of locus coeruleus neurons, and that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate analogue db-cyclic adenosine monophosphate increases Ca²⁺i. Disrupting this pathway by decreasing HCO(3)(-) levels during acidification or inhibiting either soluble adenylyl cyclase or protein kinase A, but not transmembrane adenylyl cyclase, can increase the magnitude of the firing rate response to hypercapnia in locus coeruleus neurons from older neonates to the same extent as inhibition of K⁺ channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Somatic 'soluble' adenylyl cyclase isoforms are unaffected in Sacy tm1Lex/Sacy tm1Lex 'knockout' mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Jeanne; Ramos, Lavoisier; Tresguerres, Martin; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2008-09-22

    Mammalian Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, Adcy10, or Sacy) represents a source of the second messenger cAMP distinct from the widely studied, G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases. Genetic deletion of the second through fourth coding exons in Sacy(tm1Lex)/Sacy(tm1Lex) knockout mice results in a male sterile phenotype. The absence of any major somatic phenotype is inconsistent with the variety of somatic functions identified for sAC using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference. We now use immunological and molecular biological methods to demonstrate that somatic tissues express a previously unknown isoform of sAC, which utilizes a unique start site, and which 'escapes' the design of the Sacy(tm1Lex) knockout allele. These studies reveal increased complexity at the sAC locus, and they suggest that the known isoforms of sAC play a unique function in male germ cells.

  6. Temporal and Regional Regulation of Gene Expression by Calcium-Stimulated Adenylyl Cyclase Activity during Fear Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay Wieczorek; James W Maas; Muglia, Lisa M.; Vogt, Sherri K.; Muglia, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (ACs), AC1 and AC8, are key components of long-term memory processing. AC1 and AC8 double knockout mice (Adcy1(-/-)Adcy8(-/-); DKO) display impaired fear memory processing; the mechanism of this impairment is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesize that the Ca2+-stimulated ACs modulate long-lasting transcriptional changes essential for fear memory consolidation and maintenance. Here, we report a genome-wide study of gen...

  7. Extracellular regulation of sperm transmembrane adenylyl cyclase by a forward motility stimulating protein.

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    Souvik Dey

    Full Text Available Forward motility stimulating factor (FMSF, a glycoprotein isolated from buffalo serum, binds to the surface of the mature sperm cells to promote their progressive motility. This article reports the mode of signal transduction of this extracellular factor in goat sperm. The mechanism was investigated by assaying intracellular second messenger level and forward motility in presence of different pharmacological modulators. Mg++-dependent Forskolin responsive form of transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (tmAC of goat spermatozoa was probed for its involvement in FMSF action. Dideoxyadenosine, a selective inhibitor of tmACs, was used to identify the role of this enzyme in the scheme of FMSF-signaling. Involvement of the α-subunit of G-protein in this regard has been inspected using GTPγS. Participation of protein kinase A (PKA and tyrosine kinase was checked using IP20 and genistein, respectively. FMSF promotes tmAC activity in a dose-dependent manner through receptor/G-protein activation to enhance intracellular cAMP and forward motility. Motility boosting effects of this glycoprotein are almost lost in presence of dideoxyadenosine. But, FMSF displayed substantial motility promoting activity when movement of spermatozoa was inhibited with KH7, the specific inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase indicating tmAC to be the primary target of FMSF action. Involvement of cAMP in mediating FMSF action was confirmed by the application of dibutyryl cAMP. Observed motility regulatory effects with IP20 and genistein indicate contribution of PKA and tyrosine kinase in FMSF activity; enhanced phosphorylation of a tyrosine containing ≈50 kDa protein was detected in this regard. FMSF initiates a novel signaling cascade to stimulate tmAC activity that augments intracellular cAMP, which through downstream crosstalk of phosphokinases leads to enhanced forward motility in mature spermatozoa. Thus, this article for the first time describes conventional tm

  8. Analysis of the function of the 70-kilodalton cyclase-associated protein (CAP) by using mutants of yeast adenylyl cyclase defective in CAP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Nishida, Y; Kataoka, T

    1993-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase forms a complex with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP). By in vitro mutagenesis, we assigned a CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase to a small segment near its C terminus and created mutants which lost the ability to bind CAP. CAP binding was assessed first by observing the ability of the overproduced C-terminal 150 residues of adenylyl cyclase to sequester CAP, thereby suppressing the heat shock sensitivity of yeast cells bearing the activated RAS2 gene (RAS2Val-19), and then by immunoprecipitability of adenylyl cyclase activity with anti-CAP antibody and by direct measurement of the amount of CAP bound. Yeast cells whose chromosomal adenylyl cyclase genes were replaced by the CAP-nonbinding mutants possessed adenylyl cyclase activity fully responsive to RAS2 protein in vitro. However, they did not exhibit sensitivity to heat shock in the RAS2Val-19 background. When glucose-induced accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was measured in these mutants carrying RAS2Val-19, a rapid transient rise indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells was observed and a high peak level and following persistent elevation of the cAMP concentration characteristic of RAS2Val-19 were abolished. In contrast, in the wild-type RAS2 background, similar cyclase gene replacement did not affect the glucose-induced cAMP response. These results suggest that the association with CAP, although not involved in the in vivo response to the wild-type RAS2 protein, is somehow required for the exaggerated response of adenylyl cyclase to activated RAS2.

  9. Molecular Cloning, and Characterization of an Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein from Gossypium arboreum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng; ZHAO Guo-hong; JIA Yin-hua; DU Xiong-ming

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clone CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) gene from Gossypium arboreum L. and develop a platform for expressing and purifying CAP protein, which is a base for the construction and function researches of CAP. In this work, a CAP homolog from cotton (DPL971) ovule was identified and cloned. And the cDNA sequence consisted of an open reading frame of 1416 nucleotides encoding a protein of 471 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 50.6 kDa. To gain insight on the CAP role in cotton fiber development, the cloned CAP cDNA was expressed. A significant higher yield pure protein was obtained with the chromatographic method. Further experiments showed that the purified protein can bind with the actin in vitro indicating that the recombinant cotton CAP is functional. The procedure described here produced high yield pure protein through one chromatographic step, suitable for further structure-function studies.

  10. Structure of the Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase Reveals a Novel Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher,D.; Smith, N.; Kim, S.; Heroux, A.; Robinson, H.; Reddy, P.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of the class IV adenylyl cyclase (AC) from Yersinia pestis (Yp) is reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The class IV AC fold is distinct from the previously described folds for class II and class III ACs. The dimeric AC-IV folds into an antiparallel eight-stranded barrel whose connectivity has been seen in only three previous structures: yeast RNA triphosphatase and two proteins of unknown function from Pyrococcus furiosus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Eight highly conserved ionic residues E10, E12, K14, R63, K76, K111, D126, and E136 lie in the barrel core and form the likely binding sites for substrate and divalent cations. A phosphate ion is observed bound to R63, K76, K111, and R113 near the center of the conserved cluster. Unlike the AC-II and AC-III active sites that utilize two-Asp motifs for cation binding, the AC-IV active site is relatively enriched in glutamate and features an ExE motif as its most conserved element. Homologs of Y. pestis AC-IV, including human thiamine triphosphatase, span the three kingdoms of life and delineate an ancient family of phosphonucleotide processing enzymes.

  11. Role of signal transduction crosstalk between adenylyl cyclase and MAP kinase in hippocampus-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2012-08-16

    One of the intriguing questions in neurobiology is how long-term memory (LTM) traces are established and maintained in the brain. Memory can be divided into at least two temporally and mechanistically distinct forms. Short-term memory (STM) lasts no longer than several hours, while LTM persists for days or longer. A crucial step in the generation of LTM is consolidation, a process in which STM is converted to LTM. Hippocampus-dependent LTM depends on activation of Ca(2+), Erk/MAP kinase (MAPK), and cAMP signaling pathways, as well as de novo gene expression and translation. One of the transcriptional pathways strongly implicated in LTM is the CREB/CRE (calcium, cAMP response element) transcriptional pathway. Interestingly, this transcriptional pathway may also contribute to other forms of neuroplasticity including adaptive responses to drugs. Evidence discussed in this review indicates that activation of the Erk1/2 MAP Kinase (MAPK)/CRE transcriptional pathway during the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory depends on calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated adenylyl cyclases.

  12. The Functional State of Hormone-Sensitive Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling System in Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander O. Shpakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM induces a large number of diseases of the nervous, cardiovascular, and some other systems of the organism. One of the main causes of the diseases is the changes in the functional activity of hormonal signaling systems which lead to the alterations and abnormalities of the cellular processes and contribute to triggering and developing many DM complications. The key role in the control of physiological and biochemical processes belongs to the adenylyl cyclase (AC signaling system, sensitive to biogenic amines and polypeptide hormones. The review is devoted to the changes in the GPCR-G protein-AC system in the brain, heart, skeletal muscles, liver, and the adipose tissue in experimental and human DM of the types 1 and 2 and also to the role of the changes in AC signaling in the pathogenesis and etiology of DM and its complications. It is shown that the changes of the functional state of hormone-sensitive AC system are dependent to a large extent on the type and duration of DM and in experimental DM on the model of the disease. The degree of alterations and abnormalities of AC signaling pathways correlates very well with the severity of DM and its complications.

  13. Adenylyl cyclase plays a regulatory role in development, stress resistance and secondary metabolism in Fusarium fujikuroi.

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    Jorge García-Martínez

    Full Text Available The ascomycete fungus Fusarium fujikuroi (Gibberella fujikuroi MP-C produces secondary metabolites of biotechnological interest, such as gibberellins, bikaverin, and carotenoids. Production of these metabolites is regulated by nitrogen availability and, in a specific manner, by other environmental signals, such as light in the case of the carotenoid pathway. A complex regulatory network controlling these processes is recently emerging from the alterations of metabolite production found through the mutation of different regulatory genes. Here we show the effect of the targeted mutation of the acyA gene of F. fujikuroi, coding for adenylyl cyclase. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of the AcyA protein showed different phenotypic alterations, including reduced growth, enhanced production of unidentified red pigments, reduced production of gibberellins and partially derepressed carotenoid biosynthesis in the dark. The phenotype differs in some aspects from that of similar mutants of the close relatives F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides: contrary to what was observed in these species, ΔacyA mutants of F. fujikuroi showed enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress (H(2O(2, but no change in heavy metal resistance or in the ability to colonize tomato tissue, indicating a high versatility in the regulatory roles played by cAMP in this fungal group.

  14. In silico prediction of tyrosinase and adenylyl cyclase inhibitors from natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Pedro; Tong, Henry H Y; Chao, Chi M

    2014-02-01

    Although many herbal medicines are effective in the treatment of hyperpigmentation, the potency of different constituents remains unknown. In this work, more than 20,000 herbal ingredients from 453 herbs were docked into the crystal structures of adenylyl cyclase and a human homology tyrosinase model using Surflex-Dock. These two enzymes are responsible for melanin production and inhibition of them may attain a skin-whitening effect superior to currently available agents. The essential drug properties for topical formulation of the herbal ingredients, including skin permeability, sensitization, irritation, corrosive and carcinogenic properties were predicted by Dermwin, Skin Sensitization Alerts (SSA), Skin Irritation Corrosion Rules Estimation Tool (SICRET) and Benigni/Bossa rulebase module of Toxtree. Moreover, similarity ensemble and pharmacophore mapping approaches were used to forecast other potential targets for these herbal compounds by the software, SEArch and PharmMapper. Overall, this study predicted seven compounds to have advanced drug-like properties over the well-known effective tyrosinase inhibitors, arbutin and kojic acid. These seven compounds have the highest potential for further in vitro and in vivo investigation with the aim of developing safe and high-efficacy skin-whitening agents.

  15. Overexpression of Gs proteins and adenylyl cyclase in normal and diabetic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela-Gomes, Guida M; Abdel-Halim, Samy M

    2002-08-01

    Knowledge about the relation between G proteins and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) is important for the construction of signaling paradigms to increase our understanding of signal transduction in the normal state and its alterations in pathologic states, such as type-2 diabetes. The immunocytochemical expression patterns of the stimulatory Gs proteins (G alpha-s and G alpha-olf) and the in vitro Ca2+-stimulated ACs (AC1, 3, and 8) were studied in normal and spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat pancreatic islets with use of well-characterized antibodies. The expressions of G alpha-11 and AC2, abundant in pancreatic islets, were also studied. G alpha-s and G alpha-olf were mainly expressed in insulin cells, and G alpha-11 in glucagon cells. The immunoreactivity to G alpha-s and G alpha-olf and to AC1 and AC3 was higher in the GK islets than in the controls, whereas AC8 was found only in the diabetic islets. Strong G alpha-11 and AC2 immunoreactivity was seen equally in both animal groups. G alpha-s was colocalized with all ACs, whereas G alpha-olf was mainly colocalized with AC3, and G alpha-11 with AC1. The current findings may help in drawing a more specific signaling paradigm coupling Gs proteins to ACs.

  16. Adenylyl cyclase localization to the uropod of aggregating Dictyostelium cells requires RacC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Jung, D.; Cao, Z.; Chung, C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The localization of adenylyl cyclase A (ACA) to uropod of cells is required for the stream formation during Dictyostelium development. RacC is a Dictyostelium orthologue of Cdc42. We identified a streaming defect of racC− cells as they are clearly less polarized and form smaller and fragmented streams. ACA-YFP is mainly associated with intracellular vesicular structures, but not with the plasma membrane in racC− cells. racC− cells have a slightly higher number of vesicles than Ax3 cells, suggesting that the defect of ACA trafficking is not simply due to the lack of vesicle formation. While the ACA-YFP vesicles traveled with an average velocity of 9.1 µm/min in Ax3 cells, a slow and diffusional movement without direction with an average velocity of 4 µm/min was maintained in racC− cells. Images acquired by using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis revealed that a significantly decreased number of ACA-YFP vesicles appeared near the cell membrane, indicating a defect in ACA-YFP vesicle trafficking. These results suggest an important role of RacC in the rapid and directional movements of ACA vesicles on microtubules to the plasma membrane, especially to the back of polarized cell. PMID:26315268

  17. Adenylyl cyclase 4 does not regulate collecting duct water and sodium handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittikulsuth, Wararat; Stuart, Deborah; Kohan, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Adenylyl cyclase (AC)-stimulated cAMP is a key mediator of collecting duct (CD) Na and water transport. AC isoforms 3, 4, and 6 are expressed in the CD. Our group demonstrated that AC6, but not AC3, is involved in regulating CD Na and water transport. However, the role of AC4 in such regulation remains unknown. Therefore, we generated mice with loxP-flanked critical exons in the Adcy4 gene and bred with mice expressing the aquaporin-2/Cre recombinase transgene to yield CD principal cell-specific knockout of AC4 (CD AC4 KO). Isolated inner medullary CD showed 100% genomic target gene recombination in CD AC4 KO mice, while microdissected cortical CD and renal papillary AC4 mRNA was significantly reduced in CD AC4 KO mice. CD AC4 KO had no effect on vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated cAMP generation in the inner medulla. Water intake, urine volume, and urine osmolality were similar between CD AC4 KO and control mice during normal or restricted water intake. Sodium intake, urinary Na excretion, and blood pressure on a normal-, high-, or low-Na diet were not affected by CD AC4 KO. Moreover, there were no differences in plasma AVP or plasma renin concentration between CD AC4 KO and control mice. In summary, these data suggest that CD AC4 does not play a role in the physiologic regulation of CD Na and water handling.

  18. Metabolic communication between astrocytes and neurons via bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun B; Gordon, Grant R J; Zhou, Ning; Tai, Chao; Rungta, Ravi L; Martinez, Jennifer; Milner, Teresa A; Ryu, Jae K; McLarnon, James G; Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; MacVicar, Brian A

    2012-09-20

    Astrocytes are proposed to participate in brain energy metabolism by supplying substrates to neurons from their glycogen stores and from glycolysis. However, the molecules involved in metabolic sensing and the molecular pathways responsible for metabolic coupling between different cell types in the brain are not fully understood. Here we show that a recently cloned bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) sensor, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC), is highly expressed in astrocytes and becomes activated in response to HCO₃⁻ entry via the electrogenic NaHCO₃ cotransporter (NBC). Activated sAC increases intracellular cAMP levels, causing glycogen breakdown, enhanced glycolysis, and the release of lactate into the extracellular space, which is subsequently taken up by neurons for use as an energy substrate. This process is recruited over a broad physiological range of [K⁺](ext) and also during aglycemic episodes, helping to maintain synaptic function. These data reveal a molecular pathway in astrocytes that is responsible for brain metabolic coupling to neurons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant

  20. Kinetic Resolution of Aryl Alkenylcarbinols Catalyzed by Fc-PIP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡斌; 孟萌; 姜山山; 邓卫平

    2012-01-01

    An effective kinetic resolution of a variety of aryl alkenylcarbinols catalyzed by nonenzymatic acyl transfer catalyst Fe-PIP was developed, affording corresponding unreacted alcohols in good to excellent ee value up to 99% and with selectivity factors up to 24.

  1. Structural studies of a bacterial tRNA(HIS guanylyltransferase (Thg1-like protein, with nucleotide in the activation and nucleotidyl transfer sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Hyde

    Full Text Available All nucleotide polymerases and transferases catalyze nucleotide addition in a 5' to 3' direction. In contrast, tRNA(His guanylyltransferase (Thg1 enzymes catalyze the unusual reverse addition (3' to 5' of nucleotides to polynucleotide substrates. In eukaryotes, Thg1 enzymes use the 3'-5' addition activity to add G-1 to the 5'-end of tRNA(His, a modification required for efficient aminoacylation of the tRNA by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase. Thg1-like proteins (TLPs are found in Archaea, Bacteria, and mitochondria and are biochemically distinct from their eukaryotic Thg1 counterparts TLPs catalyze 5'-end repair of truncated tRNAs and act on a broad range of tRNA substrates instead of exhibiting strict specificity for tRNA(His. Taken together, these data suggest that TLPs function in distinct biological pathways from the tRNA(His maturation pathway, perhaps in tRNA quality control. Here we present the first crystal structure of a TLP, from the gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (BtTLP. The enzyme is a tetramer like human THG1, with which it shares substantial structural similarity. Catalysis of the 3'-5' reaction with 5'-monophosphorylated tRNA necessitates first an activation step, generating a 5'-adenylylated intermediate prior to a second nucleotidyl transfer step, in which a nucleotide is transferred to the tRNA 5'-end. Consistent with earlier characterization of human THG1, we observed distinct binding sites for the nucleotides involved in these two steps of activation and nucleotidyl transfer. A BtTLP complex with GTP reveals new interactions with the GTP nucleotide in the activation site that were not evident from the previously solved structure. Moreover, the BtTLP-ATP structure allows direct observation of ATP in the activation site for the first time. The BtTLP structural data, combined with kinetic analysis of selected variants, provide new insight into the role of key residues in the activation step.

  2. Biological Activity of the Alternative Promoters of the Dictyostelium discoideum Adenylyl Cyclase A Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Centeno, Javier; Sastre, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    Amoebae of the Dictyostelium discoideum species form multicellular fruiting bodies upon starvation. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is used as intercellular signalling molecule in cell-aggregation, cell differentiation and morphogenesis. This molecule is synthesized by three adenylyl cyclases, one of which, ACA, is required for cell aggregation. The gene coding for ACA (acaA) is transcribed from three different promoters that are active at different developmental stages. Promoter 1 is active during cell-aggregation, promoters 2 and 3 are active in prespore and prestalk tip cells at subsequent developmental stages. The biological relevance of acaA expression from each of the promoters has been studied in this article. The acaA gene was expressed in acaA-mutant cells, that do not aggregate, under control of each of the three acaA promoters. acaA expression under promoter 1 control induced cell aggregation although subsequent development was delayed, very small fruiting bodies were formed and cell differentiation genes were expressed at very low levels. Promoter 2-driven acaA expression induced the formation of small aggregates and small fruiting bodies were formed at the same time as in wild-type strains and differentiation genes were also expressed at lower levels. Expression of acaA from promoter 3 induced aggregates and fruiting bodies formation and their size and the expression of differentiation genes were more similar to that of wild-type cells. Expression of acaA from promoters 1 and 2 in AX4 cells also produced smaller structures. In conclusion, the expression of acaA under control of the aggregation-specific Promoter 1 is able to induce cell aggregation in acaA-mutant strains. Expression from promoters 2 and 3 also recovered aggregation and development although promoter 3 induced a more complete recovery of fruiting body formation.

  3. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  4. Altered collecting duct adenylyl cyclase content in collecting duct endothelin-1 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohan Donald E

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1 inhibition of vasopressin (AVP-stimulated water reabsorption by the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD is associated with reduced cAMP accumulation. To determine the effect of ET-1 deficiency, AVP-stimulated cAMP responsiveness was assessed in IMCD from mice with collecting duct-specific deletion of ET-1 (CD ET-1 KO and from control animals. Methods Cyclic AMP production, adenylyl cyclase (AC mRNA, and AC protein were measured in acutely isolated IMCD. Results CD ET-1 KO IMCD had enhanced AVP-stimulated cAMP accumulation. Inhibition of calcium-stimulated AC using BAPTA did not prevent enhanced AVP responsiveness in CD ET-1 KO IMCD. Factors known to be modified by ET-1, including nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase metabolites, and superoxide did not affect the increased AVP responsiveness of CD ET-1 KO IMCD. Differential V2 receptor or G-protein activity was not involved since CD ET-1 KO IMCD had increased cAMP accumulation in response to forskolin and/or cholera toxin. CD ET-1 KO did not affect mRNA or protein levels of AC3, one of the major known collecting duct AC isoforms. However, the other known major collecting duct AC isoform (AC5/6 did have increased protein levels in CD ET-1 KO IMCD, although AC5 (weak signal and 6 mRNA levels were unchanged. Conclusion ET-1 deficiency increases IMCD AC5/6 content, an effect that may synergize with acute ET-1 inhibition of AVP-stimulated cAMP accumulation.

  5. Calcium influx through L-type channels attenuates skeletal muscle contraction via inhibition of adenylyl cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Rodrigues, Francisco Sandro; Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Duarte, Thiago; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2013-11-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by acetylcholine induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although this signaling pathway is independent of extracellular Ca(2+), L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) blockers have inotropic effects on frog skeletal muscles which occur by an unknown mechanism. Taking into account that skeletal muscle fiber expresses Ca(+2)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms and that cAMP is able to increase skeletal muscle contraction force, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) influx on mouse skeletal muscle contraction and the putative crosstalk between extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular cAMP signaling pathways. The effects of Cav blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) and extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA were evaluated on isometric contractility of mouse diaphragm muscle under direct electrical stimulus (supramaximal voltage, 2 ms, 0.1 Hz). Production of cAMP was evaluated by radiometric assay while Ca(2+) transients were assessed by confocal microscopy using L6 cells loaded with fluo-4/AM. Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine had positive inotropic effect, which was mimicked by removal of extracellular Ca(+2) with EGTA or Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. While phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX potentiates verapamil positive inotropic effect, it was abolished by AC inhibitors SQ22536 and NYK80. Finally, the inotropic effect of verapamil was associated with increased intracellular cAMP content and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that positive inotropic effects of Ca(2+) blockers depend on cAMP formation. Together, our results show that extracellular Ca(2+) modulates skeletal muscle contraction, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-sensitive AC. The cross-talk between extracellular calcium and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways appears to regulate the extent of skeletal muscle contraction responses.

  6. Allosteric activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase by calmodulin: molecular dynamics and mutagenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwa, Edithe; Davi, Marilyne; Chenal, Alexandre; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2014-07-25

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin is an essential toxin that allows Bordetella pertussis to invade eukaryotic cells, where it is activated after binding to calmodulin (CaM). Based on the crystal structure of the AC catalytic domain in complex with the C-terminal half of CaM (C-CaM), our previous molecular dynamics simulations (Selwa, E., Laine, E., and Malliavin, T. (2012) Differential role of calmodulin and calcium ions in the stabilization of the catalytic domain of adenyl cyclase CyaA from Bordetella pertussis. Proteins 80, 1028–1040) suggested that three residues (i.e. Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360)) might be important for stabilizing the AC/CaM interaction. These residues belong to a loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC, which is located at the interface between CaM and the AC catalytic loop. In the present study, we conducted the in silico and in vitro characterization of three AC variants, where one (Asn(347); ACm1A), two (Arg(338) and Asp(360); ACm2A), or three residues (Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360); ACm3A) were substituted with Ala. Biochemical studies showed that the affinities of ACm1A and ACm2A for CaM were not affected significantly, whereas that of ACm3A was reduced dramatically. To understand the effects of these modifications, molecular dynamics simulations were performed based on the modified proteins. The molecular dynamics trajectories recorded for the ACm3AC-CaM complex showed that the calcium-binding loops of C-CaM exhibited large fluctuations, which could be related to the weakened interaction between ACm3A and its activator. Overall, our results suggest that the loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC is crucial during CaM binding for stabilizing the AC catalytic loop in an active configuration.

  7. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  8. Regulation of anterior chamber drainage by bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase in the ciliary body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong S; Tresguerres, Martin; Hess, Kenneth; Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2011-12-02

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP). IOP results from the resistance to drainage of aqueous humor (AH) produced by the ciliary body in a process requiring bicarbonate. Once secreted into the anterior chamber, AH drains from the eye via two pathways: uveoscleral and pressure-dependent or conventional outflow (C(t)). Modulation of "inflow" and "outflow" pathways is thought to occur via distinct, local mechanisms. Mice deficient in the bicarbonate channel bestrophin-2 (Best2), however, exhibit a lower IOP despite an increase in AH production. Best2 is expressed uniquely in nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE) cells providing evidence for a bicarbonate-dependent communicative pathway linking inflow and outflow. Here, we show that bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is highly expressed in the ciliary body in NPE cells, but appears to be absent from drainage tissues. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC in mice causes a significant increase in IOP due to a decrease in C(t) with no effect on inflow. In mice deficient in sAC IOP is elevated, and C(t) is decreased relative to wild-type mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC did not alter IOP or C(t) in sAC-deficient mice. Based on these data we propose that the ciliary body can regulate C(t) and that sAC serves as a critical sensor of bicarbonate in the ciliary body regulating the secretion of substances into the AH that govern outflow facility independent of pressure.

  9. Regulation of Anterior Chamber Drainage by Bicarbonate-sensitive Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in the Ciliary Body*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong S.; Tresguerres, Martin; Hess, Kenneth; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Marmorstein, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP). IOP results from the resistance to drainage of aqueous humor (AH) produced by the ciliary body in a process requiring bicarbonate. Once secreted into the anterior chamber, AH drains from the eye via two pathways: uveoscleral and pressure-dependent or conventional outflow (Ct). Modulation of “inflow” and “outflow” pathways is thought to occur via distinct, local mechanisms. Mice deficient in the bicarbonate channel bestrophin-2 (Best2), however, exhibit a lower IOP despite an increase in AH production. Best2 is expressed uniquely in nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE) cells providing evidence for a bicarbonate-dependent communicative pathway linking inflow and outflow. Here, we show that bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is highly expressed in the ciliary body in NPE cells, but appears to be absent from drainage tissues. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC in mice causes a significant increase in IOP due to a decrease in Ct with no effect on inflow. In mice deficient in sAC IOP is elevated, and Ct is decreased relative to wild-type mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC did not alter IOP or Ct in sAC-deficient mice. Based on these data we propose that the ciliary body can regulate Ct and that sAC serves as a critical sensor of bicarbonate in the ciliary body regulating the secretion of substances into the AH that govern outflow facility independent of pressure. PMID:21994938

  10. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Roa, Jinae N

    2014-03-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3(-), and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3(-) sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3(-)-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H(+) absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved.

  11. Relaxin Stimulates cAMP Production in MCF-7 Cells upon Overexpression of Type V Adenylyl Cyclase

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Bao T.; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2005-01-01

    Relaxin stimulates cAMP production and activation of ERK and PI3K in THP-1 cells. Relaxin also stimulates protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) translocation to the plasma membrane in a PI3K-dependent manner in THP-1 and MCF-7 cells. However, relaxin did not increase cAMP production in MCF-7 cells. We overexpressed different adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms in MCF-7 cells to examine coupling of endogenous relaxin receptors to cAMP production. Overexpression of types II and IV AC had no effect on cAMP pr...

  12. Suppression of adenylyl cyclase-mediated cAMP production by plasma membrane associated cytoskeletal protein 4.1G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Toshihiro; Chiba, Ayano; Sukegawa, Jun; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Saito, Masaki; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2013-03-01

    It has been shown lately that activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is regulated by an array of proteins binding to carboxy (C)-terminus of GPCRs. Proteins of 4.1 family are subsets of subcortical cytoskeletal proteins and are known to stabilize cellular structures and proteins at the plasma membrane. One of the 4.1 family proteins, 4.1G has been shown to interact with the C-terminus of GPCRs and regulate intracellular distribution of the receptors, including parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related protein receptor (PTHR). PTHR is coupled to trimeric G proteins G(s) and G(q), which activate the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway and phospholipase C pathway, respectively. During the course of investigation of the role of 4.1G on adenylyl cyclase/cAMP signaling pathway, we found that 4.1G suppressed forskolin-induced cAMP production in cells. The cAMP accumulation induced by forskolin was decreased in HEK293 cells overexpressing 4.1G or increased in 4.1G-knockdown cells. Furthermore, PTH -(1-34)-stimulated cAMP production was also suppressed in the presence of exogenously expressed 4.1G despite its activity to increase the distribution of PTHR to the cell surface. In cells overexpressing FERM domain-deleted 4.1G, a mutant form of the protein deficient in plasma membrane distribution, neither forskolin-induced nor PTH -(1-34)-stimulated cAMP production was not altered. The suppression of the forskolin-induced cAMP production was observed even in membrane preparations of 4.1G-overexpressing cells. In 4.1G-knockdown HEK293 cells, plasma membrane distribution of adenylyl cyclase 6, one of the major subtypes of the enzyme in the cells, showed a slight decrease, in spite of the increased production of cAMP in those cells when stimulated by forskolin. Also, cytochalasin D treatment did not cause any influence on forskolin-induced cAMP production in HEK293 cells. These data indicate that plasma membrane-associated 4.1G regulates GPCR-mediated G(s) signaling

  13. Molecular Cloning,Expression,and Characterization of an Adenylyl Cyclase-associated Protein from Gossypium arboreum Fuzzless Mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng; ZHAO Guo-hong; JIA Yin-hua; DU Xiong-ming

    2008-01-01

    @@ CAP,an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein,is predicted to be involved in cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction.Recently,we found that CAP may play an important role in fuzz-like fiber cell initiation in cotton.For the further research,we isolated two CAP homologues from wild type cotton Gossypium arboreum L.(DPL971) and its natural fuzzless mutant (DPL972).The gene consisted of an open reading frame of 1,416 nucleotides encoding a protein of 471 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 50.6 kDa.

  14. Long-term administration of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol desensitizes CB1-, adenosine A1-, and GABAB-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selley, Dana E; Cassidy, Michael P; Martin, Billy R; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2004-11-01

    Cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the cerebellum mediate the inhibitory effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on motor coordination. Intracellular effects of CB(1) receptors include inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via activation of G(i/o) proteins. There is evidence for the convergence of other neuronal receptors, such as adenosine A(1) and GABA(B), with the cannabinoid system on this signaling pathway to influence motor function. Previous studies have shown that brain CB(1) receptors are desensitized and down-regulated by long-term THC treatment, but few studies have examined the effects of long-term THC treatment on downstream effector activity in brain. Therefore, these studies examined the relationship between CB(1), adenosine A(1), and GABA(B) receptors in cerebella of mice undergoing prolonged treatment with vehicle or THC at the level of G protein activation and adenylyl cyclase inhibition. In control cerebella, CB(1) receptors produced less than additive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase with GABA(B) and A(1) receptors, indicating that these receptors are localized on overlapping populations of cells. Long-term THC treatment produced CB(1) receptor down-regulation and desensitization of both cannabinoid agonist-stimulated G protein activation and inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase. However, G protein activation by GABA(B) or A(1) receptors was unaffected. It is noteworthy that heterologous attenuation of GABA(B) and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was observed, even though absolute levels of basal and forskolin- or G(s)-stimulated activity were unchanged. These results indicate that long-term THC administration produces a disruption of inhibitory receptor control of cerebellar adenylyl cyclase and suggest a potential mechanism of cross-tolerance to the motor incoordinating effects of cannabinoid, GABA(B), and A(1) agonists.

  15. Graphene oxide catalyzed cis-trans isomerization of azobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongha Shin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the fast cis-trans isomerization of an amine-substituted azobenzene catalyzed by graphene oxide (GO, where the amine functionality facilitates the charge transfer from azobenzene to graphene oxide in contrast to non-substituted azobenzene. This catalytic effect was not observed in stilbene analogues, which strongly supports the existence of different isomerization pathways between azobenzene and stilbene. The graphene oxide catalyzed isomerization is expected to be useful as a new photoisomerization based sensing platform complementary to GO-based fluorescence quenching methods.

  16. The mechanism of the NHC catalyzed aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction: insights into a new substrate-catalyzed bimolecular pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pritha; Verma, Pragya; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-04-14

    The first mechanistic study on the NHC-catalyzed aza-MBH reaction between cyclopentenone and N-mesylbenzaldimine using density functional theory reveals that a bimolecular mechanism, involving two molecules of benzaldimine in the proton transfer, is energetically more preferred over the conventional direct proton transfer.

  17. Adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide reduces phosphorylation and toxicity of the polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor in spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Maria Josè; Parodi, Sara; Piol, Diana; Stack, Conor; Chivet, Mathilde; Contestabile, Andrea; Miranda, Helen C; Lievens, Patricia M-J; Espinoza, Stefano; Jochum, Tobias; Rocchi, Anna; Grunseich, Christopher; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Cato, Andrew C B; Lieberman, Andrew P; La Spada, Albert R; Sambataro, Fabio; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Gozes, Illana; Pennuto, Maria

    2016-12-21

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA belongs to the family of polyQ diseases, which are fatal neurodegenerative disorders mainly caused by protein-mediated toxic gain-of-function mechanisms and characterized by deposition of misfolded proteins in the form of aggregates. The neurotoxicity of the polyQ proteins can be modified by phosphorylation at specific sites, thereby providing the rationale for the development of disease-specific treatments. We sought to identify signaling pathways that modulate polyQ-AR phosphorylation for therapy development. We report that cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) phosphorylates polyQ-AR specifically at Ser(96) Phosphorylation of polyQ-AR by CDK2 increased protein stabilization and toxicity and is negatively regulated by the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. To translate these findings into therapy, we developed an analog of pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), a potent activator of the AC/PKA pathway. Chronic intranasal administration of the PACAP analog to knock-in SBMA mice reduced Ser(96) phosphorylation, promoted polyQ-AR degradation, and ameliorated disease outcome. These results provide proof of principle that noninvasive therapy based on the use of PACAP analogs is a therapeutic option for SBMA.

  18. A mitochondrial CO2-adenylyl cyclase-cAMP signalosome controls yeast normoxic cytochrome c oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kenneth C; Liu, Jingjing; Manfredi, Giovanni; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Barrientos, Antoni

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria, the major source of cellular energy in the form of ATP, respond to changes in substrate availability and bioenergetic demands by employing rapid, short-term, metabolic adaptation mechanisms, such as phosphorylation-dependent protein regulation. In mammalian cells, an intramitochondrial CO2-adenylyl cyclase (AC)-cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway regulates aerobic energy production. One target of this pathway involves phosphorylation of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit 4-isoform 1 (COX4i1), which modulates COX allosteric regulation by ATP. However, the role of the CO2-sAC-cAMP-PKA signalosome in regulating COX activity and mitochondrial metabolism and its evolutionary conservation remain to be fully established. We show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, normoxic COX activity measured in the presence of ATP is 55% lower than in the presence of ADP. Moreover, the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 activity is present in mitochondria, and it contributes to the ATP-mediated regulation of COX through the normoxic subunit Cox5a, homologue of human COX4i1, in a bicarbonate-sensitive manner. Furthermore, we have identified 2 phosphorylation targets in Cox5a (T65 and S43) that modulate its allosteric regulation by ATP. These residues are not conserved in the Cox5b-containing hypoxic enzyme, which is not regulated by ATP. We conclude that across evolution, a CO2-sAC-cAMP-PKA axis regulates normoxic COX activity.

  19. Type 5 adenylyl cyclase plays a major role in stabilizing heart rate in response to microgravity induced by parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Satoshi; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Bai, Yunzhe; Jiao, Qibin; Ono, Shinji; Suzuki, Sayaka; Kurotani, Reiko; Sato, Motohiko; Minamisawa, Susumu; Umemura, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that autonomic nervous activity is altered under microgravity, leading to disturbed regulation of cardiac function, such as heart rate. Autonomic regulation of the heart is mostly determined by β-adrenergic receptors/cAMP signal, which is produced by adenylyl cyclase, in cardiac myocytes. To examine a hypothesis that a major cardiac isoform, type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5), plays an important role in regulating heart rate during parabolic flights, we used transgenic mouse models with either disrupted (AC5KO) or overexpressed AC5 in the heart (AC5TG) and analyzed heart rate variability. Heart rate had a tendency to decrease gradually in later phases within one parabola in each genotype group, but the magnitude of decrease was smaller in AC5KO than that in the other groups. The inverse of heart rate, i.e., the R-R interval, was much more variable in AC5KO and less variable in AC5TG than that in wild-type controls. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals, a marker of total autonomic variability, was significantly greater in microgravity phase in each genotype group, but the magnitude of increase was much greater in AC5KO than that in the other groups, suggesting that heart rate regulation became unstable in the absence of AC5. In all, AC5 plays a major role in stabilizing heat rate under microgravity. PMID:18450980

  20. Somatic 'soluble' adenylyl cyclase isoforms are unaffected in Sacy tm1Lex/Sacy tm1Lex 'knockout' mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Farrell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, Adcy10, or Sacy represents a source of the second messenger cAMP distinct from the widely studied, G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases. Genetic deletion of the second through fourth coding exons in Sacy(tm1Lex/Sacy(tm1Lex knockout mice results in a male sterile phenotype. The absence of any major somatic phenotype is inconsistent with the variety of somatic functions identified for sAC using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now use immunological and molecular biological methods to demonstrate that somatic tissues express a previously unknown isoform of sAC, which utilizes a unique start site, and which 'escapes' the design of the Sacy(tm1Lex knockout allele. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies reveal increased complexity at the sAC locus, and they suggest that the known isoforms of sAC play a unique function in male germ cells.

  1. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is present in the cell cytoplasm and nucleus of multiple shark tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is directly stimulated by bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) to produce the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Because sAC and sAC-related enzymes are found throughout phyla from cyanobacteria to mammals and they regulate cell physiology in response to internal and external changes in pH, CO2, and HCO3(-), sAC is deemed an evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor. Previously, sAC has been reported in dogfish shark and round ray gill cells, where they sense and counteract blood alkalosis by regulating the activity of V-type H(+)- ATPase. Here, we report the presence of sAC protein in gill, rectal gland, cornea, intestine, white muscle, and heart of leopard shark Triakis semifasciata Co-expression of sAC with transmembrane adenylyl cyclases supports the presence of cAMP signaling microdomains. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry on tissue sections, and western blots and cAMP-activity assays on nucleus-enriched fractions demonstrate the presence of sAC protein in and around nuclei. These results suggest that sAC modulates multiple physiological processes in shark cells, including nuclear functions. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  2. Hippocampal somatostatin receptors and modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in histamine-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, L; Rodríguez-Martín, E; Arilla, E

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) dose of histamine (0.1, 1.0 or 10.0 micrograms) on the hippocampal somatostatin (SS) receptor/effector system in Wistar rats were investigated. In view of the rapid onset of histamine action, the effects of histamine on the somatostatinergic system were studied 2 h after its administration. Hippocampal SS-like immunoreactivity (SSLI) levels were not modified by any of the histamine doses studied. SS-mediated inhibition of basal and forskolin (FK)-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was markedly increased in hippocampal membranes from rats treated with 10 micrograms of histamine (23% +/- 1% vs. 17% +/- 1% and 37% +/- 2% vs. 23% +/- 1%, respectively). In contrast, neither the basal nor the FK-stimulated enzyme activities were affected by histamine administration. The functional activity of the hippocampal guanine-nucleotide binding inhibitory protein (Gi protein), as assessed by the capacity of the stable GTP analogue 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp[NH]p) to inhibit FK-stimulated AC activity, was not modified by histamine administration. These data suggest that the increased response of the enzyme to SS was not related to an increased functional activity of Gi proteins. In fact, the increased AC response to SS in hippocampal membranes from histamine (10 micrograms)-treated rats was associated with quantitative changes in the SS receptors. Equilibrium binding data obtained with [125I]Tyr11-SS indicate an increase in the number with specific SS receptors (541 +/- 24 vs. 365 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein, P histamine (10 micrograms)-treated rats as compared to control animals. With the aim of determining if these changes were related to histamine binding to its specific receptor sites, the histaminergic H1 and H2 receptor antagonists mepyramine and cimetidine, respectively, were administered 1 h before histamine injection. The pretreatment with mepyramine or cimetidine induced an increase in the

  3. Mice Overexpressing Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase Show Enhanced Spatial Memory Flexibility in the Absence of Intact Synaptic Long-Term Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    There is significant interest in understanding the contribution of intracellular signaling and synaptic substrates to memory flexibility, which involves new learning and suppression of obsolete memory. Here, we report that enhancement of Ca[superscript 2+]-stimulated cAMP signaling by overexpressing type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) facilitated…

  4. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Manganese Catalyzed C-H Halogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C-H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon-halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds to C-Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L-Mn(V)═O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn-F fluorine source, effecting carbon-fluorine bond formation. Indeed, this idea

  6. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones in aqueous solution catalyzed by Rhodium(III) complexes with C2-symmetric fluorene-ligands containing chiral (1R,2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalvo-Gonzalez, Ruben [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Tepic, Nay (Mexico). Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas y Farmaceuticas; Chavez, Daniel; Aguirre, Gerardo; Parra-Hake, Miguel; Somanathan, Ratnasamy, E-mail: somanatha@sundown.sdsu.ed [Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, B.C. (Mexico). Centro de Graduados e Investigacion

    2010-07-01

    Two C{sub 2}-symmetric bis(sulfonamide) ligands containing fluorene-chiral (1R, 2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine were complexed to Rh{sup III}(Cp{sup *}) and used as catalyst to reduce aromatic ketones. The corresponding chiral secondary alcohols were obtained in 87-100% ee and 85-99% yield, under asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) conditions using aqueous sodium formate as the hydride source. With acetophenone, 94% ee and 86-97% yield was achieved with substrate/catalyst (S/C) ratio of 10,000. (author)

  7. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Israel, Lars [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Noegel, Angelika A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Schleicher, Michael [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Holak, Tad A. [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany)

    2004-05-15

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an {alpha}-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by {beta}-strands.

  8. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, Dorota; Brandstetter, Hans; Israel, Lars; Bourenkov, Gleb P; Katchalova, Galina; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Bartunik, Hans D; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2003-09-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are widely distributed and highly conserved proteins that regulate actin remodeling in response to cellular signals. The N termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C termini bind to G-actin and thereby alter the dynamic rearrangements of the microfilament system. We report here the X-ray structure of the core of the N-terminal domain of the CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum, which comprises residues 51-226, determined by a combination of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS). The overall structure of this fragment is an alpha helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices. Results from gel filtration and crosslinking experiments for CAP(1-226), CAP(255-464), and the full-length protein, together with the CAP N-terminal domain structure and the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, provide evidence that the functional structure of CAP is multimeric.

  9. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Israel, Lars; Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an alpha-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by beta-strands.

  10. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barott, K L; Helman, Y; Haramaty, L; Barron, M E; Hess, K C; Buck, J; Levin, L R; Tresguerres, M

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels.

  11. Opioid and GABAB receptors differentially couple to an adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A downstream effector after chronic morphine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Elizabeth Bagley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are intensely addictive, and cessation of their chronic use is associated with a highly aversive withdrawal syndrome. A cellular hallmark of withdrawal is an opioid sensitive protein kinase A-dependent increase in GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1 currents in periaqueductal gray (PAG neurons. Elevated GAT-1 activity directly increases GABAergic neuronal excitability and synaptic GABA release, which will enhance GABAergic inhibition of PAG output neurons. This reduced activity of PAG output neurons to several brain regions, including the hypothalamus and medulla, contributes to many of the PAG-mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces some of the PAG mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. Like the opioid receptors the GABAB receptor is a Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptor. This suggests it could be modulating GAT-1 activity in PAG neurons through its inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway. Opioid modulation of the GAT-1 activity can be detected by changes in the reversal potential of opioid membrane currents. We found that when opioids are reducing the GAT-1 cation conductance and increasing the GIRK conductance the opioid agonist reversal potential is much more negative than Ek. Using this approach for GABAB receptors we show that the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, does not couple to inhibition of GAT-1 currents during opioid withdrawal. It is possible this differential signaling of the two Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptors is due to the strong compartmentalization of the GABAB receptor that does not favor signaling to the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A/GAT-1 pathway. This highlights the importance of studying the effects of G-protein coupled receptors in native tissue with endogenous G-protein coupled receptors and the full complement of relevant proteins and signaling molecules. This study suggests that baclofen reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms through a non-GAT-1

  12. Palladium-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Substitution of Alcohols : Mechanistic Studies and Synthetic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sawadjoon, Supaporn

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the palladium-catalyzed nucleophilic substitution of π-activated alcohols in which the C–O bond of a non-manipulated hydroxyl group is cleaved. The thesis is divided in two chapters describing two different catalytic systems. Chapter 2 describes a heterogeneous palladium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenolysis of primary, secondary, and tertiary benzylic alcohols to generate the corresponding aromatic hydrocarbons using formic acid as the hydrogen donor. A detailed mechanisti...

  13. Exploring possible reaction pathways for the o-atom transfer reactions to unsaturated substrates catalyzed by a [Ni-NO2 ] ↔ [Ni-NO] redox couple using DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipis, Athanassios C

    2017-07-15

    The (nitro)(N-methyldithiocarbamato)(trimethylphospane)nickel(II), [Ni(NO2 )(S2 CNHMe)(PMe3 )] complex catalyses efficiently the O-atom transfer reactions to CO and acetylene. Energetically feasible sequence of elementary steps involved in the catalytic cycle of the air oxidation of CO and acetylene are proposed promoted by the Ni(NO2 )(S2 CNHMe)(PMe3 )] ↔ Ni(NO2 )(S2 CNHMe)(PMe3 ) redox couple using DFT methods both in vacuum and dichloromethane solutions. The catalytic air oxidation of HC≡CH involves formation of a five-member metallacycle intermediate, via a [3 + 2] cyclo-addition reaction of HC≡CH to the Ni-N = O moiety of the Ni(NO2 )(S2 CNHMe)(PMe3 )] complex, followed by a β H-atom migration toward the Cα carbon atom of the coordinated acetylene and release of the oxidation product (ketene). The geometric and energetic reaction profile for the reversible [Ni( κN1-NO2 )(S2 CNHMe)(PMe3 )] ⇌ [Ni( κO,O2-ONO)(S2 CNHMe)(PMe3 )] linkage isomerization has also been modeled by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Study on the synthesis of phenoxyacetic acid with the polyethylene glycol-600 by phase transfer catalyzed method%聚乙二醇-600相转移催化合成苯氧乙酸的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程冬梅; 王学明; 张铁军

    2011-01-01

    研究了用杉甲苯作反应介质,在相转移催化剂聚乙二醇-600的作用下,以苯酚、氯乙酸水溶液和氢氧化钠水溶液为原料合成苯氧乙酸的新工艺,较系统地研究了苯酚/氯乙酸摩尔比、催化剂用量、反应时间等因素对产品收率的影响.实验结果表明,最佳条件为:苯酚、氯乙酸摩尔比为1:1.2,催化剂用量占苯酚和氯乙酸的质量百分比为9.5%,在回流状态下反应2.5h.该工艺具有反应条件温和的优点,收率达到83.5%,含量在90%左右.%The new craft of the synthesis of phenoxyacetic acid, which takes phenol, chloroacetic acid and sodium hydroxide water-soluble fluid as the raw material, polyethylene glycol-600 as the phase transfer catalyst and water/toluene as the reaction medium, is studied in this paper. The effects of the molar ratio of phenol and chloroacetic acid, catalyst dosage and reaction time on the yield were studied systematically. The experiment re- suits showed that the optimal reaction conditions are as follows : the molar ratio of phenol to chloroacetic acid is 1:1.2,the quality percentage of catalyst amount in phenol and chloroacetic acid was 9.5% ,and reflux reac- tion time is 2.5 h. The reaction condition was mild, the yield can reach 83.5%, and the content was about 90%.

  15. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances β-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor β and inhibited by agents that elevate 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. Th...

  16. Gold-Catalyzed Synthesis of Heterocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcadi, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Synthesis of Heterocycles via Gold-Catalyzed Heteroatom Addition to Unsaturated C-C Bonds * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Cyclization of Polyunsaturated Compounds * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Compounds via α-Oxo Gold Carbenoid * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Cycloaddition Reactions * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Activation of Carbonyl Groups and Alcohols * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Compounds through Gold-Mediated C-H Bond Functionalization * Gold-Catalyzed Domino Cyclization/Oxidative Coupling Reactions * Conclusions * References

  17. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for novel object learning and extinction of contextual memory: role of cAMP signaling in primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenshan; Phan, Trongha; Storm, Daniel R

    2011-04-13

    Although primary cilia are found on neurons throughout the brain, their physiological function remains elusive. Human ciliopathies are associated with cognition defects, and transgenic mice lacking proteins expressed in primary cilia exhibit defects in learning and memory. Recently, it was reported that mice lacking the G-protein-coupling receptor somatostatin receptor-3 (SSTR3), a protein expressed predominately in the primary cilia of neurons, have defective memory for novel object recognition and lower cAMP levels in the brain. Since SSTR3 is coupled to regulation of adenylyl cyclase, this suggests that adenylyl cyclase activity in primary cilia of CNS neurons may be critical for some forms of learning and memory. Because the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is expressed in primary cilia of hippocampal neurons, we examined AC3(-/-) mice for several forms of learning and memory. Here, we report that AC3(-/-) mice show no short-term memory for novel objects and fail to exhibit extinction of contextual fear conditioning. They also show impaired learning and memory for temporally dissociative passive avoidance. Since AC3 is exclusively expressed in primary cilia, we conclude that cAMP signals generated within primary cilia contribute to some forms of learning and memory, including extinction of contextual fear conditioning.

  18. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Aca1 regulates virulence and differentiation of Cryptococcus neoformans via the cyclic AMP-protein kinase A cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Hicks, Julie K; Giles, Steven S; Cox, Gary M; Heitman, Joseph

    2004-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway controls cell functions in response to environmental cues in organisms as diverse as yeast and mammals. In the basidiomycetous human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, the cAMP pathway governs virulence and morphological differentiation. Here we identified and characterized adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, Aca1, which functions in parallel with the Galpha subunit Gpa1 to control the adenylyl cyclase (Cac1). Aca1 interacted with the C terminus of Cac1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. By molecular and genetic approaches, Aca1 was shown to play a critical role in mating by regulating cell fusion and filamentous growth in a cAMP-dependent manner. Aca1 also regulates melanin and capsule production via the Cac1-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway. Genetic epistasis studies support models in which Aca1 and Gpa1 are necessary and sufficient components that cooperate to activate adenylyl cyclase. Taken together, these studies further define the cAMP signaling cascade controlling virulence of this ubiquitous human fungal pathogen.

  19. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Benzylic Bromination

    OpenAIRE

    Shibatomi, Kazutaka; Zhang, Yanhua; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2008-01-01

    Lewis acid catalyzed bromination on aromatic side chain was achieved efficiently by using 1,3-dibromo-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DBDMH) as a bromination reagent under mild conditions. Zirconium(IV) chloride showed the highest catalytic activity for the benzylic bromination. It was revealed that the present Lewis acid catalysis proceeds via the radical generation pathway. In contrast to Lewis acid catalysis, Brønsted acid promoted aromatic ring bromination without any benzylic bromination. Monobro...

  20. Gold-catalyzed domino reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Gold-catalyzed reactions have appeared to be highly attractive tools for chemists to promote novel transformations to prepare elaborated structures from simple starting materials. This chapter presents selected and original examples of domino processes in the presence of gold catalysts, highlighting reports implying hydration, hydroxylation, and hydroamination as key starting point for cascade transformations. Domino processes implying 1,n-enynes, asymmetric domino transformations, and applications of all the presented processes in total synthesis are presented.

  1. Mammalian adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) regulates cofilin function, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Ghai, Pooja; Wu, Huhehasi; Wang, Changhui; Field, Jeffrey; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2013-07-19

    CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) was first identified in yeast as a protein that regulates both the actin cytoskeleton and the Ras/cAMP pathway. Although the role in Ras signaling does not extend beyond yeast, evidence supports that CAP regulates the actin cytoskeleton in all eukaryotes including mammals. In vitro actin polymerization assays show that both mammalian and yeast CAP homologues facilitate cofilin-driven actin filament turnover. We generated HeLa cells with stable CAP1 knockdown using RNA interference. Depletion of CAP1 led to larger cell size and remarkably developed lamellipodia as well as accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin). Moreover, we found that CAP1 depletion also led to changes in cofilin phosphorylation and localization as well as activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and enhanced cell spreading. CAP1 forms complexes with the adhesion molecules FAK and Talin, which likely underlie the cell adhesion phenotypes through inside-out activation of integrin signaling. CAP1-depleted HeLa cells also had substantially elevated cell motility as well as invasion through Matrigel. In summary, in addition to generating in vitro and in vivo evidence further establishing the role of mammalian CAP1 in actin dynamics, we identified a novel cellular function for CAP1 in regulating cell adhesion.

  2. Distinct Roles of Soluble and Transmembrane Adenylyl Cyclases in the Regulation of Flagellar Motility in Ciona Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogiku Shiba

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC is a key enzyme that synthesizes cyclic AMP (cAMP at the onset of the signaling pathway to activate sperm motility. Here, we showed that both transmembrane AC (tmAC and soluble AC (sAC are distinctly involved in the regulation of sperm motility in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. A tmAC inhibitor blocked both cAMP synthesis and the activation of sperm motility induced by the egg factor sperm activating and attracting factor (SAAF, as well as those induced by theophylline, an inhibitor of phoshodiesterase. It also significantly inhibited cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of a set of proteins at motility activation. On the other hand, a sAC inhibitor does not affect on SAAF-induced transient increase of cAMP, motility activation or protein phosphorylation, but it reduced swimming velocity to half in theophylline-induced sperm. A sAC inhibitor KH-7 induced circular swimming trajectory with smaller diameter and significantly suppressed chemotaxis of sperm to SAAF. These results suggest that tmAC is involved in the basic mechanism for motility activation through cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation, whereas sAC plays distinct roles in increase of flagellar beat frequency and in the Ca2+-dependent chemotactic movement of sperm.

  3. Genetic Ablation of Type III Adenylyl Cyclase Exerts Region-Specific Effects on Cilia Architecture in the Mouse Nose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary C Challis

    Full Text Available We recently reported that olfactory sensory neurons in the dorsal zone of the mouse olfactory epithelium exhibit drastic location-dependent differences in cilia length. Furthermore, genetic ablation of type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII, a key olfactory signaling protein and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, disrupts the cilia length pattern and results in considerably shorter cilia, independent of odor-induced activity. Given the significant impact of ACIII on cilia length in the dorsal zone, we sought to further investigate the relationship between cilia length and ACIII level in various regions throughout the mouse olfactory epithelium. We employed whole-mount immunohistochemical staining to examine olfactory cilia morphology in phosphodiesterase (PDE 1C-/-;PDE4A-/- (simplified as PDEs-/- hereafter and ACIII-/- mice in which ACIII levels are reduced and ablated, respectively. As expected, PDEs-/- animals exhibit dramatically shorter cilia in the dorsal zone (i.e., where the cilia pattern is found, similar to our previous observation in ACIII-/- mice. Remarkably, in a region not included in our previous study, ACIII-/- animals (but not PDEs-/- mice have dramatically elongated, comet-shaped cilia, as opposed to characteristic star-shaped olfactory cilia. Here, we reveal that genetic ablation of ACIII has drastic, location-dependent effects on cilia architecture in the mouse nose. These results add a new dimension to our current understanding of olfactory cilia structure and regional organization of the olfactory epithelium. Together, these findings have significant implications for both cilia and sensory biology.

  4. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 is a receptor for human resistin and mediates inflammatory actions of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sahmin; Lee, Hyun-Chae; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Youngjin; Kim, Joonoh; Lee, Soobeom; Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Jaewon; Yang, Han-Mo; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Nam, Ky-Youb; Chung, Junho; Lazar, Mitchell A; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-03-04

    Human resistin is a cytokine that induces low-grade inflammation by stimulating monocytes. Resistin-mediated chronic inflammation can lead to obesity, atherosclerosis, and other cardiometabolic diseases. Nevertheless, the receptor for human resistin has not been clarified. Here, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) as a functional receptor for human resistin and clarified its intracellular signaling pathway to modulate inflammatory action of monocytes. We found that human resistin directly binds to CAP1 in monocytes and upregulates cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration, protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and NF-κB-related transcription of inflammatory cytokines. Overexpression of CAP1 in monocytes enhanced the resistin-induced increased activity of the cAMP-dependent signaling. Moreover, CAP1-overexpressed monocytes aggravated adipose tissue inflammation in transgenic mice that express human resistin from their monocytes. In contrast, suppression of CAP1 expression abrogated the resistin-mediated inflammatory activity both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, CAP1 is the bona fide receptor for resistin leading to inflammation in humans.

  5. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1/CAP1 as a biological target substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauwe, Bénédicte; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Proost, Paul; Van Aelst, Ilse; Blockmans, Daniel; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2008-09-10

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically associated with the turnover of secreted structural and functional proteins. Although MMPs have been shown to process also a kaleidoscope of membrane-associated substrates, little is known about the processing of intracellular proteins by MMPs. Physiological and pathological cell apoptosis, necrosis and tumor lysis by chemotherapy, radiotherapy or immunological cytotoxicity, are examples of conditions in which an overload of intracellular proteins becomes accessible to the action of MMPs. We used a model system of dying human myelomonocytic cells to study the processing of intracellular protein substrates by gelatinase B/MMP-9 in vitro. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1 or CAP1 was identified as a novel and most efficient substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9. The presence of CAP1 in the extracellular milieu in vivo was documented by analysis of urine of patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Whereas no active MMP-9 could be detected in urines of healthy controls, all urine samples of patients with clinical parameters of renal failure contained activated MMP-9 and/or MMP-2. In addition, in some of these patients indications of CAP1 cleavage are observed, implying CAP1 degradation in vivo. The high turnover rate of CAP1 by MMP-9, comparable to that of gelatin as the natural extracellular substrate of this enzyme, may be critical to prevent pathological conditions associated with considerable cytolysis.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of a rat homolog of CAP, the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelicof, A; Gatica, J; Gerst, J E

    1993-06-25

    We have isolated a rat cDNA whose expression suppresses the physiological consequences of the chromosomal disruption of CAP, the gene encoding the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast CAP is a bifunctional protein: the NH2 terminus is necessary and sufficient for cellular responsiveness to activated RAS proteins, while the COOH terminus is required for normal cellular morphology and growth control. The rat MCH1 cDNA encodes a protein of 474 amino acids that is 36% identical to S. cerevisiae CAP and is capable of suppressing the loss of the COOH-terminal functions of CAP when expressed in yeast. The MCH1 protein therefore appears to be a structural and functional homolog of the yeast cyclase-associated proteins. Northern analysis of MCH1 gene expression shows it to be constitutively expressed in all cell and tissue types examined. The cloning of a rat homolog of CAP, in addition to the cloning of a human CAP homolog by Matviw et al. (Matviw, H., Yu, G., and Young, D. (1992) Mol. Cell. Biol. 12, 5033-5040), demonstrates that both cyclase-associated proteins and their functions may have evolved with mammalian cells.

  7. Deletion of Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase Perturbs the Postnatal Maturation of Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Olfactory Cilium Ultrastructure in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Mengdi; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Yanfen; Storm, Daniel R.; Wang, Zhenshan

    2017-01-01

    Type 3 adenylyl cyclase (Adcy3) is localized to the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and is an essential component of the olfactory cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathway. Although the role of this enzyme in odor detection and axonal projection in OSNs was previously characterized, researchers will still have to determine its function in the maturation of postnatal OSNs and olfactory cilium ultrastructure. Previous studies on newborns showed that the anatomic structure of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of Adcy3 knockout mice (Adcy3-/-) is indistinguishable from that of their wild-type littermates (Adcy3+/+), whereas the architecture and associated composition of MOE are relatively underdeveloped at this early age. The full effects of sensory deprivation on OSNs may not also be exhibited in such age. In the present study, following a comparison of postnatal OSNs in seven-, 30-, and 90-day-old Adcy3-/- mice and wild-type controls (Adcy3+/+), we observed that the absence of Adcy3 leads to cumulative defects in the maturation of OSNs. Upon aging, Adcy3-/- OSNs exhibited increase in immature cells and reduction in mature cells along with elevated apoptosis levels. The density and ultrastructure of Adcy3-/- cilia were also disrupted in mice upon aging. Collectively, our results reveal an indispensable role of Adcy3 in postnatal maturation of OSNs and maintenance of olfactory cilium ultrastructure in mice through adulthood. PMID:28154525

  8. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  9. Pharmacological stimulation of type 5 adenylyl cyclase stabilizes heart rate under both microgravity and hypergravity induced by parabolic flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yunzhe; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Jiao, Qibin; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Jin, Meihua; Cai, Wenqian; Jin, Hui-Ling; Fujita, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Suita, Kenji; Kurotani, Reiko; Yokoyama, Utako; Sato, Motohiko; Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5) functions in autonomic regulation in the heart. Based on that work, we hypothesized that pharmacological modulation of AC5 activity could regulate the autonomic control of the heart rate under micro- and hypergravity. To test this hypothesis, we selected the approach of activating AC5 activity in mice with a selective AC5 activator (NKH477) or inhibitor (vidarabine) and examining heart rate variability during parabolic flight. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals, a marker of total autonomic variability, was significantly greater under micro- and hypergravity in the vidarabine group, while there were no significant changes in the NKH477 group, suggesting that autonomic regulation was unstable in the vidarabine group. The ratio of low frequency and high frequency (HF) in heart rate variability analysis, a marker of sympathetic activity, became significantly decreased under micro- and hypergravity in the NKH477 group, while there was no such decrease in the vidarabine group. Normalized HF, a marker of parasympathetic activity, became significantly greater under micro- and hypergravity in the NKH477 group. In contrast, there was no such increase in the vidarabine group. This study is the first to indicate that pharmacological modulation of AC5 activity under micro- and hypergravity could be useful to regulate the autonomic control of the heart rate.

  10. Role of the bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase in pH sensing and metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Chin eChang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionarily conserved soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, adcy10 was recently identified as a unique source of cAMP in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Its activity is regulated by bicarbonate and fine-tuned by calcium. As such, and in conjunction with carbonic anhydrase (CA, sAC constitutes an HCO3-/CO¬2/pH sensor. In both alpha-intercalated cells of the collecting duct and the clear cells of the epididymis, sAC is expressed at significant level and involved in pH homeostasis via apical recruitment of vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA in a PKA-dependent manner. In addition to maintenance of pH homeostasis, sAC is also involved in metabolic regulation such as coupling of Krebs cycle to oxidative phosphorylation via bicarbonate/CO2 sensing. Additionally, sAC also regulates CFTR channel and plays an important role in regulation of barrier function and apoptosis. These observations suggest that sAC, via bicarbonate-sensing, plays an important role in maintaining homeostatic status of cells against fluctuations in their microenvironment.

  11. Calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase subtype 1 (AC1 contributes to LTP in the insular cortex of adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Yamanaka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is a key form of cortical plasticity. The insular cortex (IC is known to play important roles in pain perception, aversive memory and mood disorders. LTP has been recently reported in the IC, however, the signaling pathway for IC LTP remains unknown. Here, we investigated the synaptic mechanism of IC LTP. We found that IC LTP induced by the pairing protocol was N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs dependent, and expressed postsynaptically, since paired-pulse ratio (PPR was not affected. Postsynaptic calcium is important for the induction of post-LTP, since the postsynaptic application of BAPTA completely blocked the induction of LTP. Calcium-activated adenylyl cyclase subtype 1 (AC1 is required for potentiation. By contrast, AC8 is not required. Inhibition of Ca2+ permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (CP-AMPARs or protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ reduced the expression of LTP. Our results suggest that calcium-stimulated AC1, but not AC8, can be a trigger of the induction and maintenance of LTP in the IC.

  12. Lactam hydrolysis catalyzed by mononuclear metallo-ß-bactamases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars; Antony, J; Ryde, U

    2003-01-01

    . For most studied systems, the tetrahedral structure is a stable intermediate. Moreover, the C-N bond in the lactam ring is intact in this intermediate, as well as in the following transition state-its cleavage is induced by proton transfer to the nitrogen atom in the lactam ring. However, for the model...... with Asp as a proton shuttle, attack of the zinc-bond hydroxide ion seems to be concerted with the proton transfer. We have also studied the effect of replacing one of the histidine ligands by an asparagine or glutamine residue, giving a zinc site representative of other subclasses of metallo......Two central steps in the hydrolysis of lactam antibiotics catalyzed by mononuclear metallo-beta-lactamases, formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and its breakdown by proton transfer, are studied for model systems using the density functional B3LYP method. Metallo-beta-lactamases have two metal...

  13. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  14. TRANSITION METAL CATALYZED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. COPPER(I)-CATALYZED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATIONS. (R826735)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  16. Oxygen Transfer to Ethylene Catalyzed by the AG(110) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    Baker Laboratory Cornell University Ithaca, New York 14853, USA +Dedicated to our friend Richard Netter on the occasion of his 70th birthday. Accession...Inc. (especially Mr. Richard Netter ) for financial support. Valuable comments by Professor Robert J. Madix and Maija Zonnevylle are also acknovledged

  17. Mechanistic Study of Oxygen Atom Transfer Catalyzed by Rhenium Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaopeng Shan

    2003-08-05

    Two ionic and one neutral methyl(oxo)rhenium(V) compounds were synthesized and structurally characterized. They were compared in reactivity towards the ligands triphenylphosphane, pyridines, pyridine N-oxides. Assistance from Broensted bases was found on ligand displacement of ionic rhenium compounds as well as nucleophile assistance on oxidation of all compounds. From the kinetic data, crystal structures, and an analysis of the intermediates, a structural formula of PicH{sup +}3{sup -} and mechanisms of ligand displacement and oxidation were proposed.

  18. TRANSITION METAL CATALYZED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. COPPER(I)-CATALYZED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATIONS. (R826735)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  1. Surprisingly Mild Enolate-Counterion-Free Pd(0)-Catalyzed Intramolecular Allylic Alkylations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madec, David; Prestat, Guillaume; Martini, Elisabetta;

    2005-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular allylic alkylations of unsaturated EWG-activated amides can take place under phase-transfer conditions or in the presence of a crown ether. These new reaction conditions are milder and higher yielding than those previously reported. A rationalization for such an...

  2. Reduction of nitrobenzene by the catalyzed Fe/Cu process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wenying; LI Ping; FAN Jinhong

    2008-01-01

    The polarization behavior of the couple Fe/Cu in 100 mg/L nitrobenzene aqueous solution was studied using Evans coupling diagrams. The results indicated that the iron corrosion was limited by both anodic and cathodic half-cell reactions under the neutral conditions and cathodically controlled under the alkaline conditions. Batch experiments were performed to study the effect of solution pH, reaction duration, concentration, type of electrolyte and dissolved oxygen (DO) on the reduction of nitrobenzene by the catalyzed Fe/Cu process. This process proved effective in the pH range of 3 to 11. The conversion efficiency of nitrobenzene at pH ≈ 10.1 was almost the same as that under highly acid conditions (pH ≈ 3). The degradation of nitrobenzene fell into two phases: adsorption and surface reduction, and the influence of adsorption and mass transfer became more extensive with solution concentration. The reduction rate decreased in the presence of DO in the solution, indicating that a need for aeration was eliminated in the catalyzed Fe/Cu process. Accordingly, spending on energy consumption would be reduced. Economic analysis indicated that merely 0.05 kg was required for the treatment of a ton of nitrobenzene-containing water with pH from 3 to 11. The catalyzed Fe/Cu process is cost-effective and of practical value.

  3. Temporal and regional regulation of gene expression by calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity during fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Wieczorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (ACs, AC1 and AC8, are key components of long-term memory processing. AC1 and AC8 double knockout mice (Adcy1(-/-Adcy8(-/-; DKO display impaired fear memory processing; the mechanism of this impairment is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesize that the Ca2+-stimulated ACs modulate long-lasting transcriptional changes essential for fear memory consolidation and maintenance. Here, we report a genome-wide study of gene expression changes associated with conditioned fear (CF memory in wild-type and DKO mice to identify AC-dependent gene regulatory changes that occur in the amygdala and hippocampus at baseline and different time points after CF learning. We observed an overall decrease in transcriptional changes in DKO mice across all time points, but most strikingly, at periods when memory consolidation and retention should be occurring. Further, we identified a shared set of transcription factor binding sites in genes upregulated in wild-type mice that were associated with downregulated genes in DKO mice. To prove the temporal and regional importance of AC activity on different stages of memory processing, the tetracycline-off system was used to produce mice with forebrain-specific inducible expression of AC8 on a DKO background. CF behavioral results reveal that adult restoration of AC8 activity in the forebrain is sufficient for intact learning, while cessation of this expression at any time point across learning causes memory deficits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these studies demonstrate that the Ca2+-stimulated ACs contribute to the formation and maintenance of fear memory by a network of long-term transcriptional changes.

  4. Inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in amygdala blocks the effect of audiogenic seizure kindling in genetically epilepsy-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Faingold, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Genetically epilepsy-prone rats of the severe seizure strain (GEPR-9s) exhibit audiogenic seizures (AGS) beginning with wild running and ending with tonic hind limb extension (TE). AGS kindling in GEPR-9s involves periodic repetition of >/=14 seizures over 7-21 days and results in prolonged seizures and an additional phase of generalized post-tonic clonus (PTC) that follows TE. AGS kindling behavior changes are long-lasting and involve expansion of the requisite seizure neuronal network from the brainstem to include the amygdala, mediated by neuroplasticity in lateral amygdala. Recent evidence indicates that focal activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in lateral amygdala leads to precipitous acquisition of AGS-kindled seizure behaviors, suggesting that activation of AC activity is important in development and maintenance of AGS kindling. The present study further examined the role of AC in AGS-kindled seizures in GEPR-9s by focally inhibiting AC in the amygdala. Bilateral microinjection of an AC inhibitor, SQ22,536 (0.25 and 0.50 nmol/side), in AGS-kindled GEPR-9s selectively blocked PTC during AGS at 1 h after microinjection, but the pre-kindled AGS behaviors remained intact. The incidence of PTC during AGS returned to pre-drug levels 12 h after the lower dose of SQ22,536 (0.25 nmol/side). However, after the higher dose of SQ22,536 (0.5 nmol/side), complete return to AGS with PTC was seen in all GEPR-9s at 120 h. These results indicate that maintenance of AGS kindling-mediated PTC in GEPR-9s may involve activation of AC. These data provide further evidence for the involvement of AC in the epileptogenic mechanisms subserving AGS kindling.

  5. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGuadiana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII, somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3, and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344 and Fischer 344 x Brown Norway (F344 x BN rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 x BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in DG. Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young

  6. Adenylyl cyclase 6 enhances NKCC2 expression and mediates vasopressin-induced phosphorylation of NKCC2 and NCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Timo; Tang, Tong; Uchida, Shinichi; Hammond, H Kirk; Fenton, Robert A; Vallon, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) affects kidney function via vasopressin V2 receptors that are linked to activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation. AVP/cyclic adenosine monophosphate enhance the phosphorylation of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) at serine residue 126 (pS126 NKCC2) and of the Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) at threonine 58 (pT58 NCC). The isoform(s) of AC involved in these responses, however, were unknown. Phosphorylation of S126 NKCC2 and T58 NCC, induced by the V2 receptor agonist (1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin) in wild-type mice, is lacking in knockout mice for AC isoform 6 (AC6). With regard to NKCC2 phosphorylation, the stimulatory effect of 1-desamino-8-D-AVP and the defect in AC6(-/-) mice seem to be restricted to the medullary portion of the thick ascending limb. AC6 is also a stimulator of total renal NKCC2 protein abundance in medullary and cortical thick ascending limb. Consequently, mice lacking AC6 have lower NKCC2 expression and a mild Bartter syndrome-like phenotype, including lower plasma concentrations of K+ and H+ and compensatory upregulation of NCC. Increased AC6-independent phosphorylation of NKCC2 at S126 might help to stabilize NKCC2 activity in the absence of AC6. Renal AC6 determines total NKCC2 expression and mediates vasopressin-induced NKCC2/NCC phosphorylation. These regulatory mechanisms, which are defective in AC knockout mice, are likely responsible for the observed mild Bartter syndrome. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human bronchial smooth muscle cells express adenylyl cyclase isoforms 2, 4, and 6 in distinct membrane microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Amy S; Xu, Congfeng; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2011-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (AC) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists stimulate AC activity and increase airway diameter. We assessed expression of AC isoforms in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses detected expression of AC2, AC4, and AC6. Forskolin-stimulated AC activity in membranes from hBSMC displayed Ca(2+)-inhibited and G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity, consistent with expression of AC6, AC2, and AC4. Isoproterenol-stimulated AC activity was inhibited by Ca(2+) but unaltered by G(βγ), whereas butaprost-stimulated AC activity was stimulated by G(βγ) but unaffected by Ca(2+) addition. Using sucrose density centrifugation to isolate lipid raft fractions, we found that only AC6 localized in lipid raft fractions, whereas AC2 and AC4 localized in nonraft fractions. Immunoisolation of caveolae using caveolin-1 antibodies yielded Ca(2+)-inhibited AC activity (consistent with AC6 expression), whereas the nonprecipitated material displayed G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity (consistent with expression of AC2 and/or AC4). Overexpression of AC6 enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol and beraprost but did not increase responses to prostaglandin E(2) or butaprost. β(2)AR, but not prostanoid EP(2) or EP(4) receptors, colocalized with AC5/6 in lipid raft fractions. Thus, particular G protein-coupled receptors couple to discreet AC isoforms based, in part, on their colocalization in membrane microdomains. These different cAMP signaling compartments in airway smooth muscle cells are responsive to different hormones and neurotransmitters and can be regulated by different coincident signals such as Ca(2+) and G(βγ).

  8. Modulation of NaCl absorption by [HCO(3)(-)] in the marine teleost intestine is mediated by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Grosell, Martin

    2010-07-01

    Intestinal HCO(3)(-) secretion and NaCl absorption are essential for counteracting dehydration in marine teleost fish. We investigated how these two processes are coordinated in toadfish. HCO(3)(-) stimulated a luminal positive short-circuit current (I(sc)) in intestine mounted in Ussing chamber, bathed with the same saline solution on the external and internal sides of the epithelium. The I(sc) increased proportionally to the [HCO(3)(-)] in the bath up to 80 mM NaHCO(3), and it did not occur when NaHCO(3) was replaced with Na(+)-gluconate or with NaHCO(3) in Cl(-)-free saline. HCO(3)(-) (20 mM) induced a approximately 2.5-fold stimulation of I(sc), and this [HCO(3)(-)] was used in all subsequent experiments. The HCO(3)(-)-stimulated I(sc) was prevented or abolished by apical application of 10 muM bumetanide (a specific inhibitor of NKCC) and by 30 microM 4-catechol estrogen [CE; an inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC)]. The inhibitory effects of bumetanide and CE were not additive. The HCO(3)(-)-stimulated I(sc) was prevented by apical bafilomycin (1 microM) and etoxolamide (1 mM), indicating involvement of V-H(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrases, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of an NKCC2-like protein in the apical membrane and subapical area of epithelial intestinal cells, of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in basolateral membranes, and of an sAC-like protein in the cytoplasm. We propose that sAC regulates NKCC activity in response to luminal HCO(3)(-), and that V-H(+)-ATPase and intracellular carbonic anhydrase are essential for transducing luminal HCO(3)(-) into the cell by CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) hydration/dehydration. This mechanism putatively coordinates HCO(3)(-) secretion with NaCl and water absorption in toadfish intestine.

  9. A source of ultrasensitivity in the glutamine response of the bicyclic cascade system controlling glutamine synthetase adenylylation state and activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Ninfa, Alexander J

    2011-12-20

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in Escherichia coli is regulated by reversible adenylylation, brought about by a bicyclic system comprised of uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase/UR), its substrate, PII, adenylyltransferase (ATase), and its substrate, GS. The modified and unmodified forms of PII produced by the upstream UTase/UR-PII cycle regulate the downstream ATase-GS cycle. A reconstituted UTase/UR-PII-ATase-GS bicyclic system has been shown to produce a highly ultrasensitive response of GS adenylylation state to the glutamine concentration, but its composite UTase/UR-PII and ATase-GS cycles displayed moderate glutamine sensitivities when examined separately. Glutamine sensitivity of the bicyclic system was significantly reduced when the trimeric PII protein was replaced by a heterotrimeric form of PII that was functionally monomeric, and coupling between the two cycles was different in systems containing wild-type or heterotrimeric PII. Thus, the trimeric nature of PII played a role in the glutamine response of the bicyclic system. We therefore examined regulation of the individual AT (adenylylation) and AR (deadenylylation) activities of ATase by PII preparations with various levels of uridylylation. AR activity was affected in a linear fashion by PII uridylylation, but partially modified wild-type PII activated the AT much less than expected based on the extent of PII modification. Partially modified wild-type PII also bound to ATase less than expected based upon the fraction of modified subunits. Our results suggest that the AT activity is only bound and activated by completely unmodified PII and that this design is largely responsible for ultrasensitivity of the bicyclic system.

  10. miR-181b promotes cell proliferation and reduces apoptosis by repressing the expression of adenylyl cyclase 9 (AC9) in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Yan-Li; Liu, Shang; Zhang, Pei-Pei; Chen, Zheng; Liu, Min; Tang, Hua

    2014-01-03

    MicroRNAs are a class of small, endogenous, non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators. In this study, we found that miR-181b promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. And we validated a new miR-181b target gene, adenylyl cyclase 9 (AC9). miR-181b restricted cAMP production by post-transcriptionally downregulating AC9 expression. Phenotypic experiments indicated that miR-181b and AC9 exerted opposite effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  11. Transition metal-catalyzed functionalization of pyrazines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikishkin, N.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed reactions are generally used for carbon–carbon bond formation on pyrazines and include, but are not limited to, classical palladium-catalyzed reactions like Sonogashira, Heck, Suzuki, and Stille reactions. Also a few examples of carbon–heteroatom bond formation in

  12. Transition metal-catalyzed functionalization of pyrazines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikishkin, Nicolai I.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed reactions are generally used for carbon–carbon bond formation on pyrazines and include, but are not limited to, classical palladium-catalyzed reactions like Sonogashira, Heck, Suzuki, and Stille reactions. Also a few examples of carbon–heteroatom bond formation in pyrazine

  13. Rh-catalyzed linear hydroformylation of styrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boymans, E.; Janssen, Michèle; Müller, Christian; Lutz, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828971; Vogt, D.

    2012-01-01

    Usually the Rh-catalyzed hydroformylation of styrene predominantly yields the branched, chiral aldehyde. An inversion of regioselectivity can be achieved using strong π-acceptor ligands. Binaphthol-based diphosphite and bis(dipyrrolyl-phosphorodiamidite) ligands were applied in the Rh-catalyzed hydr

  14. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen catalyzed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournet, Amandine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)] [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Berge, Mathieu; Roques, Christine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Delia, Marie-Line, E-mail: marieline.delia@ensiacet.f [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has already been shown to catalyze oxidation processes in the anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell. The present study focuses on the reverse capacity of the bacterium, i.e. reduction catalysis. Here we show that P. aeruginosa is able to catalyze the electrochemical reduction of oxygen. The use of cyclic voltammetry showed that, for a given range of potential values, the current generated in the presence of bacteria could reach up to four times the current obtained without bacteria. The adhesion of bacteria to the working electrode was necessary for the catalysis to be observed but was not sufficient. The electron transfer between the working electrode and the bacteria did not involve mediator metabolites like phenazines. The transfer was by direct contact. The catalysis required a certain contact duration between electrodes and live bacteria but after this delay, the metabolic activity of cells was no longer necessary. Membrane-bound proteins, like catalase, may be involved. Various strains of P. aeruginosa, including clinical isolates, were tested and all of them, even catalase-defective mutants, presented the same catalytic property. P. aeruginosa offers a new model for the analysis of reduction catalysis and the protocol designed here may provide a basis for developing an interesting tool in the field of bacterial adhesion.

  15. Metalloporphyrin solubility: a trigger for catalyzing reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Ishai; Schlautman, Mark A

    2004-02-01

    Metalloporphyrins are well known for their electron-transfer roles in many natural redox systems. In addition, several metalloporphyrins and related tetrapyrrole macrocycles complexed with various core metals have been shown to catalyze the reductive dechlorination of certain organic compounds, thus demonstrating the potential for using naturally occurring metalloporphyrins to attenuate toxic and persistent chlorinated organic pollutants in the environment. However, despite the great interest in reductive dechlorination reactions and the wide variety of natural and synthetic porphyrins currently available, only soluble porphyrins, which comprise a small fraction of this particular family of organic macrocycles, have been used as electron-transfer shuttles in these reactions. Results from the present study clearly demonstrate that metalloporphyrin solubility is a key factor in their ability to catalyze the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene and its daughter compounds. Additionally, we show that certain insoluble and nonreactive metalloporphyrins can be activated as catalysts merely by changing solution conditions to bring about their dissolution. Furthermore, once a metalloporphyrin is fully dissolved and activated, tetrachloroethylene transformation proceeds rapidly, giving nonchlorinated and less toxic alkenes as the major reaction products. Results from the present study suggest that if the right environmental conditions exist or can be created, specific metalloporphyrins may provide a solution for cleaning up sites that are contaminated with chlorinated organic pollutants.

  16. Ectopic expression of cyclase associated protein CAP restores the streaming and aggregation defects of adenylyl cyclase a deficient Dictyostelium discoideum cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Hameeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion, an integral part of D. discoideum development, is important for morphogenesis and regulated gene expression in the multicellular context and is required to trigger cell-differentiation. G-protein linked adenylyl cyclase pathways are crucially involved and a mutant lacking the aggregation specific adenylyl cyclase ACA does not undergo multicellular development. Results Here, we have investigated the role of cyclase-associated protein (CAP, an important regulator of cell polarity and F-actin/G-actin ratio in the aca- mutant. We show that ectopic expression of GFP-CAP improves cell polarization, streaming and aggregation in aca- cells, but it fails to completely restore development. Our studies indicate a requirement of CAP in the ACA dependent signal transduction for progression of the development of unicellular amoebae into multicellular structures. The reduced expression of the cell adhesion molecule DdCAD1 together with csA is responsible for the defects in aca- cells to initiate multicellular development. Early development was restored by the expression of GFP-CAP that enhanced the DdCAD1 transcript levels and to a lesser extent the csA mRNA levels. Conclusions Collectively, our data shows a novel role of CAP in regulating cell adhesion mechanisms during development that might be envisioned to unravel the functions of mammalian CAP during animal embryogenesis.

  17. A mechanism of cell death involving an adenylyl cyclase/PKA signaling pathway is induced by the Cry1Ab toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuebin; Candas, Mehmet; Griko, Natalya B.; Taussig, Ronald; Bulla, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Many pathogenic organisms and their toxins target host cell receptors, the consequence of which is altered signaling events that lead to aberrant activity or cell death. A significant body of literature describes various molecular and cellular aspects of toxins associated with bacterial invasion, colonization, and host cell disruption. However, there is little information on the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the insecticidal action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins. Recently, we reported that the Cry1Ab toxin produced by Bt kills insect cells by activating a Mg2+-dependent cytotoxic event upon binding of the toxin to its receptor BT-R1. Here we show that binding of Cry toxin to BT-R1 provokes cell death by activating a previously undescribed signaling pathway involving stimulation of G protein (Gαs) and adenylyl cyclase, increased cAMP levels, and activation of protein kinase A. Induction of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway is manifested by sequential cytological changes that include membrane blebbing, appearance of ghost nuclei, cell swelling, and lysis. The discovery of a toxin-induced cell death pathway specifically linked to BT-R1 in insect cells should provide insights into how insects evolve resistance to Bt and into the development of new, safer insecticides. PMID:16788061

  18. Identification of a human cDNA encoding a protein that is structurally and functionally related to the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matviw, Yu, G.; Young, D. (Univ. of Calgary Health Science Centre, Alberta (Canada))

    1992-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are associated with related proteins named CAP. In S. cerevisiae, CAP is required for cellular responses mediated by the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway. Both yeast CAPs appear to be bifunctional proteins: The N-terminal domains are required for the proper function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains results in morphological and nutritional defects that appear to be unrelated to the cAMP pathways. Expression of either yeast CAP in the heterologous yeast suppresses phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of the endogenous CAP but does not suppress loss of the N-terminal domain. On the basis of the homology between the two yeast CAP proteins, we have designed degenerate oligonucleotides that we used to detect, by the polymerase chain reaction method, a human cDNA fragment encoding a CAP-related peptide. Using the polymerase chain reaction fragment as a probe, we isolated a human cDNA clone encoding a 475-amino-acid protein that is homologous to the yeast CAP proteins. Expressions of the human CAP protein in S. cerevisiae suppresses the phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of CAP but does not suppress phenotypes associated with loss of the N-terminal domain. Thus, CAP proteins have been structurally and, to some extent, functionally conserved in evolution between yeasts and mammals. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is released from capsaicin-sensitive nerve fibres and induces vasodilatation of human cerebral arteries concomitant with activation of adenylyl cyclase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, I; Mortensen, A; Edvinsson, L

    1996-01-01

    strong and potent relaxation of precontracted circular vessel segments. The Imax (maximum relaxant effect) to human calcitonin was low and the pD2 (concentration for half maximum effect) 7.7 was much lower than that of CGRP. The CGRP-1, antagonist human alpha-CGRP8-37 blocked the response to human alpha......-CGRP but not to human beta-CGRP, while the putative antagonist [Tyr]CGRP28-37 did not. Capsaicin (10(-15)-10(-8)M) caused relaxation of the cerebral arteries by 22% of precontraction. Pre-treatment with 10(-6)M human alpha-CGRP8-37 inhibited this relaxation. Human alpha-CGRP increased the cyclic AMP content of human...... cerebral arteries in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase in adenylyl cyclase activity was blocked by human alpha-CGRP8-37. The results suggest that CGRP-1 receptors coupled to adenylyl cyclase are present in human cerebral arteries....

  20. Somatic ‘Soluble’ Adenylyl Cyclase Isoforms Are Unaffected in Sacytm1Lex/Sacytm1Lex ‘Knockout’ Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Background Mammalian Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, Adcy10, or Sacy) represents a source of the second messenger cAMP distinct from the widely studied, G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases. Genetic deletion of the second through fourth coding exons in Sacytm1Lex/Sacytm1Lex knockout mice results in a male sterile phenotype. The absence of any major somatic phenotype is inconsistent with the variety of somatic functions identified for sAC using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference. Principal Findings We now use immunological and molecular biological methods to demonstrate that somatic tissues express a previously unknown isoform of sAC, which utilizes a unique start site, and which ‘escapes’ the design of the Sacytm1Lex knockout allele. Conclusions/Significance These studies reveal increased complexity at the sAC locus, and they suggest that the known isoforms of sAC play a unique function in male germ cells. PMID:18806876

  1. A HCO3−-dependent mechanism involving soluble adenylyl cyclase for the activation of Ca2+ currents in locus coeruleus neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Ann N.; Santin, Joseph M.; Graham, Cathy D.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Hypercapnic acidosis activates Ca2+ channels and increases intracellular Ca2+ levels in neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC), a known chemosensitive region involved in respiratory control. We have also shown that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK), in conjunction with this pathway, limits the hypercapnic-induced increase in firing rate in LC neurons. Here, we present evidence that the Ca2+ current is activated by a HCO3−-sensitive pathway. The increase in HCO3− associated with hypercapnia activates HCO3−-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (sAC). This results in an increase in cAMP levels and activation of Ca2+ channels via cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA). We also show the presence of sAC in the cytoplasm of LC neurons, and that the cAMP analogue db-cAMP increases Ca2+i. Disrupting this pathway by decreasing HCO3− levels during acidification or inhibiting either sAC or PKA, but not transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (tmAC), can increase the magnitude of the firing rate response to hypercapnia in LC neurons from older neonates to the same extent as inhibition of BK channels. PMID:25092170

  2. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide inhibits gli1 gene expression and proliferation in primary medulloblastoma derived tumorsphere cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hongmei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog (HH signaling is critical for the expansion of granule neuron precursors (GNPs within the external granular layer (EGL during cerebellar development. Aberrant HH signaling within GNPs is thought to give rise to medulloblastoma (MB - the most commonly-observed form of malignant pediatric brain tumor. Evidence in both invertebrates and vertebrates indicates that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA antagonizes HH signalling. Receptors specific for the neuropeptide pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP, gene name ADCYAP1 are expressed in GNPs. PACAP has been shown to protect GNPs from apoptosis in vitro, and to interact with HH signaling to regulate GNP proliferation. PACAP/ptch1 double mutant mice exhibit an increased incidence of MB compared to ptch1 mice, indicating that PACAP may regulate HH pathway-mediated MB pathogenesis. Methods Primary MB tumorsphere cultures were prepared from thirteen ptch1+/-/p53+/- double mutant mice and treated with the smoothened (SMO agonist purmorphamine, the SMO antagonist SANT-1, the neuropeptide PACAP, the PKA activator forskolin, and the PKA inhibitor H89. Gene expression of gli1 and [3H]-thymidine incorporation were assessed to determine drug effects on HH pathway activity and proliferation, respectively. PKA activity was determined in cell extracts by Western blotting using a phospho-PKA substrate antibody. Results Primary tumor cells cultured for 1-week under serum-free conditions grew as tumorspheres and were found to express PAC1 receptor transcripts. Gli1 gene expression was significantly reduced by SANT-1, PACAP and forskolin, but was unaffected by purmorphamine. The attenuation of gli1 gene expression by PACAP was reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89, which also blocked PKA activation. Treatment of tumorsphere cultures with PACAP, forskolin, and SANT-1 for 24 or 48 hours reduced proliferation. Conclusions Primary tumorspheres derived from ptch1+/-/p53

  3. [HCO3-]-regulated expression and activity of soluble adenylyl cyclase in corneal endothelial and Calu-3 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Miao

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bicarbonate activated Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase (sAC is a unique cytoplasmic and nuclear signaling mechanism for the generation of cAMP. HCO3- activates sAC in bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCECs, increasing [cAMP] and stimulating PKA, leading to phosphorylation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR and increased apical Cl- permeability. Here, we examined whether HCO3- may also regulate the expression of sAC and thereby affect the production of cAMP upon activation by HCO3- and the stimulation of CFTR in BCECs. Results RT-competitive PCR indicated that sAC mRNA expression in BCECs is dependent on [HCO3-] and incubation time in HCO3-. Immunoblots showed that 10 and 40 mM HCO3- increased sAC protein expression by 45% and 87%, respectively, relative to cells cultured in the absence of HCO3-. Furthermore, 40 mM HCO3- up-regulated sAC protein expression in Calu-3 cells by 93%. On the other hand, sAC expression in BCECs and Calu-3 cells was unaffected by changes in bath pH or osmolarity. Interestingly, BCECs pre-treated with10 μM adenosine or 10 μM forskolin, which increase cAMP levels, showed decreased sAC mRNA expression by 20% and 30%, respectively. Intracellular cAMP production by sAC paralleled the time and [HCO3-]-dependent expression of sAC. Bicarbonate-induced apical Cl- permeability increased by 78% (P 3-. However for cells cultured in the absence of HCO3-, apical Cl- permeability increased by only 10.3% (P > 0.05. Conclusion HCO3- not only directly activates sAC, but also up-regulates the expression of sAC. These results suggest that active cellular uptake of HCO3- can contribute to the basal level of cellular cAMP in tissues that express sAC.

  4. The C1 and C2 domains target human type 6 adenylyl cyclase to lipid rafts and caveolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, Muthusamy; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2009-02-01

    Previous data has shown that adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) is expressed principally in lipid rafts or caveolae of cardiac myocytes and other cell types while certain other isoforms of AC are excluded from these microdomains. The mechanism by which AC6 is localized to lipid rafts or caveolae is unknown. In this study, we show AC6 is localized in lipid rafts of COS-7 cells (expressing caveolin-1) and in HEK-293 cells or cardiac fibroblasts isolated from caveolin-1 knock-out mice (both of which lack prototypical caveolins). To determine the region of AC6 that confers raft localization, we independently expressed each of the major intracellular domains, the N-terminus, C1 and C2 domains, and examined their localization with various approaches. The N-terminus did not associate with lipid rafts or caveolae of either COS-7 or HEK-293 cells nor did it immunoprecipitate with caveolin-1 when expressed in COS-7 cells. By contrast, the C1 and C2 domains each associated with lipid rafts to varying degrees and were present in caveolin-1 immunoprecipitates. There were no differences in the pattern of localization of either the C1 or C2 domains between COS-7 and HEK-293 cells. Further dissection of the C1 domain into four individual proteins indicated that the N-terminal half of this domain is responsible for its raft localization. To probe for a role of a putative palmitoylation motif in the C-terminal portion of the C2 domain, we expressed various truncated forms of AC6 lacking most or all of the C-terminal 41 amino acids. These truncated AC6 proteins were not altered in terms of their localization in lipid rafts or their catalytic activity, implying that this C-terminal region is not required for lipid raft targeting of AC6. We conclude that while the C1 domain may be most important, both the C1 and C2 domains of AC6 play a role in targeting AC6 to lipid rafts.

  5. Advances in lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, Panagiota-Yiolanda; Foukis, Athanasios; Filippou, Michalis; Koukouritaki, Maria; Parapouli, Maria; Theodorou, Leonidas G; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Afendra, Amalia; Pandey, Ashok; Papamichael, Emmanuel M

    2013-12-01

    Lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions are among the most significant chemical and biochemical processes of industrial relevance. Lipases catalyze hydrolysis as well as esterification reactions. Enzyme-catalyzed esterification has acquired increasing attention in many applications, due to the significance of the derived products. More specifically, the lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions attracted research interest during the past decade, due to an increased use of organic esters in biotechnology and the chemical industry. Lipases, as hydrolyzing agents are active in environments, which contain a minimum of two distinct phases, where all reactants are partitioned between these phases, although their distribution is not fixed and changes as the reaction proceeds. The kinetics of the lipase-catalyzed reactions is governed by a number of factors. This article presents a thorough and descriptive evaluation of the applied trends and perspectives concerning the enzymatic esterification, mainly for biofuel production; an emphasis is given on essential factors, which affect the lipase-catalyzed esterification reaction. Moreover, the art of using bacterial and/or fungal strains for whole cell biocatalysis purposes, as well as carrying out catalysis by various forms of purified lipases from bacterial and fungal sources is also reviewed.

  6. Acid-Catalyzed Hydration of anti-Sesquinorbornene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebocka-Tilk, H.; Brown, R. S.

    1996-11-15

    The acid-catalyzed hydration of anti-sesquinorbornene (1) has been studied at 25 degrees C in 20% DME/H(2)O from 0.001 M kinetic isotope effect for hydration of 1 is 2.7, and a plot of the observed second-order rate constant for the hydration in a mixed solvent system of H(2)O/D(2)O against the atom fraction of deuterium (n) is bowed upward. The reaction also shows marked buffer catalysis by formic, chloroacetic, and dichloroacetic acids, the Brønsted alpha being 1 for these three carboxylic acids: H(3)O(+) does not fit on this Brønsted line. A mechanism for the reaction is presented which is consistent with the generally accepted one for acid-catalyzed hydration of an alkene in which the rate-limiting step involves proton transfer from H(3)O(+) to the double bond. Whether attack of a second water on the developing carbocation occurs simultaneously with protonation cannot be ascertained from the data for 1, but if so, the extent of its C-OH(2) bond formation must be small enough that there is little change in the bonding of these O-H bonds.

  7. Tissue-Specific Expression of a Type I Adenylyl Cyclase Rescues the rutabaga Mutant Memory Defect: In Search of the Engram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zars, Troy; Wolf, Reinhard; Davis, Ron; Heisenberg, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Most attempts to localize physical correlates of memory in the central nervous system (CNS) rely on ablation techniques. This approach has the limitation of defining just one of an unknown number of structures necessary for memory formation. We have used the Drosophila rutabaga type I Ca2+/CaM-dependent adenylyl cyclase (AC) gene to determine in which CNS region AC expression is sufficient for memory formation. Using pan-neural and restricted CNS expression with the GAL4 binary transcription activation system, we have rescued the memory defect of the rutabaga mutant in a fast robust spatial learning paradigm. The ventral ganglion, antennal lobes, and median bundle are likely the CNS structures sufficient for rutabaga AC- dependent spatial learning. PMID:10706599

  8. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for the survival and maturation of newly generated granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Chen, Xuanmao; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is localized to olfactory cilia in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and primary cilia in the adult mouse brain. Although AC3 has been strongly implicated in odor perception and olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) targeting, its role in granule cells (GCs), the most abundant interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB), remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the deletion of AC3 leads to a significant reduction in the size of the MOB as well as the level of adult neurogenesis. The cell proliferation and cell cycle in the subventricular zone (SVZ), however, are not suppressed in AC3-/- mice. Furthermore, AC3 deletion elevates the apoptosis of GCs and disrupts the maturation of newly formed GCs. Collectively, our results identify a fundamental role for AC3 in the development of adult-born GCs in the MOB.

  9. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for the survival and maturation of newly generated granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Luo

    Full Text Available The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3 is localized to olfactory cilia in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE and primary cilia in the adult mouse brain. Although AC3 has been strongly implicated in odor perception and olfactory sensory neuron (OSN targeting, its role in granule cells (GCs, the most abundant interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB, remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the deletion of AC3 leads to a significant reduction in the size of the MOB as well as the level of adult neurogenesis. The cell proliferation and cell cycle in the subventricular zone (SVZ, however, are not suppressed in AC3-/- mice. Furthermore, AC3 deletion elevates the apoptosis of GCs and disrupts the maturation of newly formed GCs. Collectively, our results identify a fundamental role for AC3 in the development of adult-born GCs in the MOB.

  10. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances beta-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor beta and inhibited by agents that elevate 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. The present study sought to define the localization of key G protein-coupled receptors with adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) in lipid rafts of rat cardiac fibroblasts and to determine if this colocalization was functionally relevant. We found that cardiac fibroblasts produce cAMP in response to agonists for beta-adrenergic (isoproterenol), prostaglandin EP2 (butaprost), adenosine (adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide, NECA), and prostacyclin (beraprost) receptors. Overexpression of AC6 increased cAMP production stimulated by isoproterenol and beraprost but not by butaprost or NECA. A key function of fibroblasts is the production of collagen. Isoproterenol- and beraprostmediated inhibition of collagen synthesis was also enhanced by AC6 overexpression, while inhibition by butaprost and NECA were unaltered. Lipid raft fractions from cardiac fibroblasts contain the preponderance of beta-adrenergic receptors and AC6 but exclude EP2 receptors. While we could not determine the localization of native prostacyclin receptors, we were able to determine that epitope-tagged prostanoid IP receptors (IPR) expressed in COS7 cells did localize, in part, in lipid raft fractions. These findings indicate that IP receptors are expressed in lipid rafts and can activate raft-localized AC isoforms. AC6 is completely compartmentized in lipid raft domains where it is activated solely by coresident G protein-coupled receptors to regulate cardiac fibroblast function.

  11. Chemo- and Enantioselective Intramolecular Silver-Catalyzed Aziridinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Minsoo; Weatherly, Cale D; Guzei, Ilia A; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2017-08-07

    Asymmetric nitrene-transfer reactions are a powerful tool for the preparation of enantioenriched amine building blocks. Reported herein are chemo- and enantioselective silver-catalyzed aminations which transform di- and trisubstituted homoallylic carbamates into [4.1.0]-carbamate-tethered aziridines in good yields and with ee values of up to 92 %. The effects of the substrate, silver counteranion, ligand, solvent, and temperature on both the chemoselectivity and ee value were explored. Stereochemical models were proposed to rationalize the observed absolute stereochemistry of the aziridines, which undergo nucleophilic ring opening to yield enantioenriched amines with no erosion in stereochemical integrity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Photoredox-Catalyzed Ketyl–Olefin Coupling for the Synthesis of Substituted Chromanols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A visible light photoredox-catalyzed aldehyde olefin cyclization is reported. The method represents a formal hydroacylation of alkenes and alkynes and provides chromanol derivatives in good yields. The protocol takes advantage of the double role played by trialkylamines (NR3) which act as (i) electron donors for reducing the catalyst and (ii) proton donors to activate the substrate via a proton-coupled electron transfer. PMID:27442851

  13. Photoredox-Catalyzed Ketyl–Olefin Coupling for the Synthesis of Substituted Chromanols

    KAUST Repository

    Fava, Eleonora

    2016-07-21

    A visible light photoredox-catalyzed aldehyde olefin cyclization is reported. The method represents a formal hydroacylation of alkenes and alkynes and provides chromanol derivatives in good yields. The protocol takes advantage of the double role played by trialkylamines (NR3) which act as (i) electron donors for reducing the catalyst and (ii) proton donors to activate the substrate via a proton-coupled electron transfer. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  14. On the Brønsted acid-catalyzed homogeneous hydrolysis of furans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbin, Nima; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2013-11-01

    Furan affairs: Electronic structure calculations of the homogeneous Brønsted acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 2,5-dimethylfuran show that proton transfer to the β-position is rate-limiting and provides support that the hydrolysis follows general acid catalysis. By means of projected Fukui indices, we show this to be the case for unsubstituted, 2-, and 2,5-substituted furans with electron-donating groups.

  15. Anode properties of magnesium hydride catalyzed with niobium oxide for an all solid-state lithium-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Suguru; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kawahito, Koji; Hirabayashi, Kazuhiro; Miyaoka, Hiroki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2013-08-18

    The anode properties of pristine MgH2 and MgH2 catalyzed with Nb2O5 have been investigated for an all solid-state lithium-ion battery. The catalytic effect stabilizes the plateau voltage as a result of kinetic improvement of the hydrogen transfer from the Mg phase to the Li phase.

  16. Enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylation of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouy, Mark J; Stanley, Levi M; Hartwig, John F

    2009-08-19

    Highly enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylations of ammonia are reported. These reactions occur with electron-neutral, -rich, and -poor cinnamyl carbonates, alkyl and trityloxy-substituted allylic carbonates, and dienyl carbonates in moderate to good yields and excellent enantioselectivities. This process is enabled by the use of an iridium catalyst that does not require a Lewis acid for activation and that is stable toward a large excess of ammonia. This selective formation of primary allylic amines allows for one-pot syntheses of heterodiallylamines and allylic amides that are not otherwise accessible via iridium-catalyzed allylic amination without the use of blocking groups and protective group manipulations.

  17. Attractor Explosions and Catalyzed Vacuum Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Daniel; Silverstein, Eva; Starr, David

    2006-05-05

    We present a mechanism for catalyzed vacuum bubble production obtained by combining moduli stabilization with a generalized attractor phenomenon in which moduli are sourced by compact objects. This leads straightforwardly to a class of examples in which the Hawking decay process for black holes unveils a bubble of a different vacuum from the ambient one, generalizing the new endpoint for Hawking evaporation discovered recently by Horowitz. Catalyzed vacuum bubble production can occur for both charged and uncharged bodies, including Schwarzschild black holes for which massive particles produced in the Hawking process can trigger vacuum decay. We briefly discuss applications of this process to the population and stability of metastable vacua.

  18. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hu, Jianli; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  19. Rhodium-catalyzed restructuring of carbon frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Metal-catalyzed reactions involving an elementary step which cleaves a carbon-carbon bond provide unique organic transformations. Restructuring reactions recently developed in our laboratory, through which the carbon framework of a starting substance is restructured into a totally different carbon framework, are discussed, with the possibility of applying such methods to the synthesis of natural products.

  20. Zeolite 5A Catalyzed Etherification of Diphenylmethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.; Lightbody, Owen C.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for the synthetic undergraduate laboratory is described in which zeolite 5A catalyzes the room temperature dehydration of diphenylmethanol, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOH, producing 1,1,1',1'-tetraphenyldimethyl ether, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOCH(C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]. The…

  1. Lysophosphatidylcholine synthesis by lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guolong; Yang, Ruoxi; Hu, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is amphiphilic substance, and possesses excellent physiological functions. In this study, LPC was prepared through ethanolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in n-hexane or solvent free media catalyzed by Novozym 435 (from Candida antarctica), Lipozyme TLIM (from Thermomcyces lanuginosus) and Lipozyme RMIM (from Rhizomucor miehei). The results showed that three immobilized lipases from Candida Antarctica, Thermomcyces lanuginosus and Rhizomucor miehei could catalyze ethanolysis of PC efficiently. In n-hexane, the LPC conversions of ethanolysis of PC catalyzed by Novozyme 435, Lipozyme TLIM and Lipozyme RMIM could reach to 98.5 ± 1.6%, 94.6 ± 1.4% and 93.7 ± 1.8%, respectively. In solvent free media, the highest LPC conversions of ethanolysis of PC catalyzed by Novozyme 435, Lipozyme TL IM and Lipozyme RM IM were 97.7 ± 1.7%, 93.5 ± 1.2% and 93.8 ± 1.9%, respectively. The catalytic efficiencies of the three lipases were in the order of Novozyme 435 > Lipozyme TLIM > Lipozyme RMIM. Furthermore, their catalytic efficiencies in n-hexane were better than those in solvent free media.

  2. Mechanochemical ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Jean-Louis; Mottillo, Cristina; Tan, Davin; Štrukil, Vjekoslav; Friščić, Tomislav

    2015-02-25

    We describe the development of a mechanochemical approach for Ru-catalyzed olefin metathesis, including cross-metathesis and ring-closing metathesis. The method uses commercially available catalysts to achieve high-yielding, rapid, room-temperature metathesis of solid or liquid olefins on a multigram scale using either no or only a catalytic amount of a liquid.

  3. Pinacol Coupling Reactions Catalyzed by Active Zinc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui ZHAO; Wei DENG; Qing Xiang GUO

    2005-01-01

    Pinacol coupling reactions catalyzed by active zinc revealed high activity and extensive suitability. The efficiency of the reaction was improved apparently owing to decreasing reductive potential of zinc. In addition, the results indicated that the zinc activity has a direct relation to the coupling reactivity compared to untreated zinc or other general active zinc.

  4. Catalyzing curriculum evolution in graduate science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutlerner, Johanna L; Van Vactor, David

    2013-05-09

    Strategies in life science graduate education must evolve in order to train a modern workforce capable of integrative solutions to challenging problems. Our institution has catalyzed such evolution through building a postdoctoral Curriculum Fellows Program that provides a collaborative and scholarly education laboratory for innovation in graduate training.

  5. Biodiesel production by enzyme-catalyzed transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Olivera S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The principles and kinetics of biodiesel production from vegetable oils using lipase-catalyzed transesterification are reviewed. The most important operating factors affecting the reaction and the yield of alkyl esters, such as: the type and form of lipase, the type of alcohol, the presence of organic solvents, the content of water in the oil, temperature and the presence of glycerol are discussed. In order to estimate the prospects of lipase-catalyzed transesterification for industrial application, the factors which influence the kinetics of chemically-catalysed transesterification are also considered. The advantages of lipase-catalyzed transesterification compared to the chemically-catalysed reaction, are pointed out. The cost of down-processing and ecological problems are significantly reduced by applying lipases. It was also emphasized that lipase-catalysed transesterification should be greatly improved in order to make it commercially applicable. The further optimization of lipase-catalyzed transesterification should include studies on the development of new reactor systems with immobilized biocatalysts and the addition of alcohol in several portions, and the use of extra cellular lipases tolerant to organic solvents, intracellular lipases (i.e. whole microbial cells and genetically-modified microorganisms ("intelligent" yeasts.

  6. Palladium-Catalyzed Intramolecular Aminofluorination of Styrenes%Palladium-Catalyzed Intramolecular Aminofluorination of Styrenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐涛; 邱水发; 刘国生

    2011-01-01

    A novel palladium-catalyzed intramolecular oxidative aminofluorination of styrenes has been developed by using NFSI as fluorinating reagent. This reaction represented an efficient method for the synthesis of 2-aryl-3-fluoropyrrolidine derivatives.

  7. Kinetics of aggregation growth with competition between catalyzed birth and catalyzed death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hai-Feng; Lin Zhen-Quan; Gao Yan

    2008-01-01

    An aggregation growth model of three species A, B and C with the competition between catalyzed birth and catalyzed death is proposed. Irreversible aggregation occurs between any two aggregates of the like species with the constant rate kernels In(n = 1, 2, 3). Meanwhile, a monomer birth of an A species aggregate of size k occurs under the catalysis of a B species aggregate of size j with the catalyzed birth rate kernel K(k,j) = Kkjv, and a monomer death of an A species aggregate of size k occurs under the catalysis of a C species aggregate of size j with the catalyzed death rate kernel L(k, j) = Lkjv, where v is a parameter reflecting the dependence of the catalysis reaction rates of birth and death on the size of catalyst aggregate. The kinetic evolution behaviours of the three species are investigated by the rate equation approach based on the mean-field theory. The form of the aggregate size distribution of A species ak(t) is found to be dependent crucially on the competition between the catalyzed birth and death of A species, as well as the irreversible aggregation processes of the three species: (1) In the v < 0 case, the irreversible aggregation dominates the process, and ak(t) satisfies the conventional scaling form; (2) In the v ≥ 0 case, the competition between the catalyzed birth and death dominates the process. When the catalyzed birth controls the process, ak(t) takes the conventional or generalized scaling form. While the catalyzed death controls the process, the scaling description of the aggregate size distribution breaks down completely.

  8. Alloying Au surface with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Kun

    2016-03-30

    © 2016. Various Au-Pd/SiO2 catalysts with a fixed Au loading but different Au:Pd molar ratios were prepared via deposition-precipitation method followed by H2 reduction. The structures were characterized and the catalytic activities in CO oxidation were evaluated. The formation of Au-Pd alloy particles was identified. The Au-Pd alloy particles exhibit enhanced dispersions on SiO2 than Au particles. Charge transfer from Pd to Au within Au-Pd alloy particles. Isolated Pd atoms dominate the surface of Au-Pd alloy particles with large Au:Pd molar ratios while contiguous Pd atoms dominate the surface of Au-Pd alloy particles with small Au:Pd molar ratios. Few synergetic effect of Au-Pd alloy occurs on catalyzing CO oxidation under employed reaction conditions. Alloying Au with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation, and contiguous Pd atoms on the Au-Pd alloy particles are capable of catalyzing CO oxidation while isolated Pd atoms are not. These results advance the fundamental understandings of Au-Pd alloy surfaces in catalyzing CO oxidation.

  9. [A change of hormonal regulation of adenylyl cyclase in the epididymal adipose tissue of rats with experimental models of diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, K V; Chistyakova, O V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the key causes of diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications are hormonal disturbances in functioning of hormonal signaling systems, including the adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS). The goal of this work was to study the functional state and hormonal sensitivity of ACSS in the epididymal adipose tissue of male rats in the 7-month model of mild type 1 DM (DM1), in the 18-month neonatal model of type 2 DM (DM2), and in the taken for comparison model of the 30-day acute DM1. It is shown for the first time that in adipocytes from the epididymal fat of rats with the studied DM models the basal AC activity and its stimulation by forskolin were decreased, which indicates a weakening of the catalytic function of the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). Stimulation of AC by guanine nucleotides in DM changed to the lesser extent, which speaks in favor of preservation of functions of heterotrimeric G(s)-proteins in the epididymal fat. In rats with DM1 the sensitivity of AC of adipocytes to agonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR), activators of lipolysis, remained practically unchanged, while in animals with DM2 the AC stimulating effects of β-AR-agonists were reduced or completely blocked, like in the case of β3-AR-agonist BRL-37344 and CL-316243. In adipocytes of rats with DM1 the AC inhibitory effect of N6-cyclopentyladenosine, agonist of type 1 adenosine receptors (Aden1R), an inhibitor of lipolysis, was attenuated, whe- reas in DM2 this effect was completely preserved. Thus, in the epididymal adipose tissue of rats with DM1 the antilipolytic AC cascades including Aden1R were decreased and the stimulation of AC by β-AR-agonists was preserved, whereas in rats with DM2 the β-AR-mediated AC cascades activating lipolysis were reduced, but Aden1R-mediated AC cascades inhibiting lipolysis did not change. The changes of hormonal regulation of ACSS in adipocytes from the epididymal fat lead to disturbances of the metabolic status of animal with DM1 and DM2 and

  10. Enantioselective epoxidation and carbon-carbon bond cleavage catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and myeloperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuynman, A; Spelberg, J L; Kooter, I M; Schoemaker, H E; Wever, R

    2000-02-01

    We demonstrate that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) catalyze the enantioselective epoxidation of styrene and a number of substituted derivatives with a reasonable enantiomeric excess (up to 80%) and in a moderate yield. Three major differences with respect to the chloroperoxidase from Caldariomyces fumago (CPO) are observed in the reactivity of MPO and CiP toward styrene derivatives. First, in contrast to CPO, MPO and CiP produced the (S)-isomers of the epoxides in enantiomeric excess. Second, for MPO and CiP the H(2)O(2) had to be added very slowly (10 eq in 16 h) to prevent accumulation of catalytically inactive enzyme intermediates. Under these conditions, CPO hardly showed any epoxidizing activity; only with a high influx of H(2)O(2) (300 eq in 1.6 h) was epoxidation observed. Third, both MPO and CiP formed significant amounts of (substituted) benzaldehydes as side products as a consequence of C-alpha-C-beta bond cleavage of the styrene derivatives, whereas for CPO and cytochrome c peroxidase this activity is not observed. C-alpha-C-beta cleavage was the most prominent reaction catalyzed by CiP, whereas with MPO the relative amount of epoxide formed was higher. This is the first report of peroxidases catalyzing both epoxidation reactions and carbon-carbon bond cleavage. The results are discussed in terms of mechanisms involving ferryl oxygen transfer and electron transfer, respectively.

  11. Radionuclide transfer. Radionuklid Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG)

  12. Stop-Catalyzed Baryogenesis Beyond the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Andrey; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J; Winslow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Non-minimal supersymmetric models that predict a tree-level Higgs mass above the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) bound are well motivated by naturalness considerations. Indirect constraints on the stop sector parameters of such models are significantly relaxed compared to the MSSM; in particular, both stops can have weak-scale masses. We revisit the stop-catalyzed electroweak baryogenesis (EWB) scenario in this context. We find that the LHC measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates already rule out the possibility of stop-catalyzed EWB. We also introduce a gauge-invariant analysis framework that may generalize to other scenarios in which interactions outside the gauge sector drive the electroweak phase transition.

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchand, Basuli; Satyanarayana, Gedu

    2016-08-05

    Recent trends in research have gained an orientation toward developing efficient strategies using innocuous reagents. The earlier reported transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylations involved either toxic carbon monoxide (CO) gas as carbonylating agent or functional-group-assisted ortho sp(2) C-H activation (i.e., ortho acylation) or carbonylation by activation of the carbonyl group (i.e., via the formation of enamines). Contradicting these methods, here we describe an environmentally benign process, [Pd]-catalyzed direct carbonylation starting from simple and commercially available iodo arenes and aldehydes, for the synthesis of a wide variety of ketones. Moreover, this method comprises direct coupling of iodoarenes with aldehydes without activation of the carbonyl and also without directing group assistance. Significantly, the strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis n-butylphthalide and pitofenone.

  14. Identification of a CAP (adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein) homologous gene in Lentinus edodes and its functional complementation of yeast CAP mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G L; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, T; Tanaka, K; Shishido, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    1998-04-01

    The adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was originally identified in yeasts as a protein that functions in both signal transduction and cytoskeletal organization. This paper reports the identification of a cDNA and genomic DNA that encodes a CAP homologue from the mushroom Lentinus edodes. The L. edodes cap gene contains eight introns and an ORF encoding a 518 amino acid protein. The L. edodes CAP is 35.5% and 40.9% identical at the amino acid level with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAP and Schizosaccharomyces pombe CAP, respectively. The C-terminal domain shows greater homology (39-46% identity) with yeast CAPs than does the N-terminal domain (27-35% identity). Southern blotting and Northern blotting results suggest that L. edodes cap is a single-copy gene and uniformly expressed. Expression of the L. edodes CAP in both Schiz. pombe and Sacch. cerevisiae complemented defects associated with the loss of the C-terminal domain function of the endogenous CAP. By using a yeast two-hybrid assay, an interaction was demonstrated between the L. edodes CAP and Schiz. pombe actin. This result and the functional complementation test indicate that CAP from L. edodes has a conserved C-terminal domain function.

  15. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 in metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakurina, G. V.; Kolegova, E. S.; Cheremisina, O. V.; Zavyalov, A. A.; Shishkin, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    Progression of tumors and metastasis in particular is one of the main reasons of the high mortality rate among cancer patients. The primary role in developing metastases plays cell locomotion which requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Form, dynamics, localization and mechanical properties of the actin cytoskeleton are regulated by a variety of actin-binding proteins, which include the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). The study is devoted to the investigation of CAP1 level depending on the presence or absence of metastases in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results show the contribution of CAP1 to SCCHN and NSCLC progression. We detected the connection between the tissue protein CAP1 level and the stage of NSCLC and SCCHN disease. Also the levels of the CAP1 protein in tissues of primary tumors and metastases in lung cancer were different. Our data showed that CAP is important in the development of metastases, which suggests further perspectives in the study of this protein for projecting metastasis of NSCLC and SCCHN.

  16. Association of elongation factor 1 alpha and ribosomal protein L3 with the proline-rich region of yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein CAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, C; Shinkai, M; Kariya, K; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Hu, C D; Masuda, T; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-17

    CAP is a multifunctional protein; the N-terminal region binds adenylyl cyclase and controls its response to Ras while the C-terminal region is involved in cytoskeletal regulation. In between the two regions, CAP possesses two proline-rich segments, P1 and P2, resembling a consensus sequence for binding SH3 domains. We have identified two yeast proteins with molecular sizes of 48 and 46 kDa associated specifically with P2. Determination of partial protein sequences demonstrated that the 48-kDa and 46-kDa proteins correspond to EF1 alpha and rL3, respectively, neither of which contains any SH3-domain-like sequence. Deletion of P2 from CAP resulted in loss of the activity to bind the two proteins either in vivo or in vitro. Yeast cells whose chromosomal CAP was replaced by the P2-deletion mutant displayed an abnormal phenotype represented by dissociated localizations of CAP and F-actin, which were colocalized in wild-type cells. These results suggest that these associations may have functional significance.

  17. Ocean acidification stimulates alkali signal pathway: A bicarbonate sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase from oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates physiological changes induced by CO2 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudan; Wang, Mengqiang; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) has been demonstrated to have severe effects on marine organisms, especially marine calcifiers. However, the impacts of OA on the physiology of marine calcifiers and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an acid-base sensor in response to [HCO3(-)] and an intracellular source of cyclic AMP (cAMP). In the present study, an ortholog of sAC was identified from pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated as CgsAC) and the catalytic region of CgsAC was cloned and expressed. Similar to the native CgsAC from gill tissues, the recombinant CgsAC protein (rCgsAC) exhibited [HCO3(-)] mediated cAMP-forming activity, which could be inhibited by a small molecule KH7. After 16days of CO2 exposure (pH=7.50), the mRNA transcripts of CgsAC increased in muscle, mantle, hepatopancreas, gill, male gonad and haemocytes, and two truncated CgsAC forms of 45kD and 20kD were produced. Cytosolic CgsAC could be translocated from the cytoplasm and nuclei to the membrane in response to CO2 exposure. Besides, CO2 exposure could increase the production of cAMP and intracellular pH of haemocytes, which was regulated by CgsAC (pocean acidification on marine calcifiers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Similarly potent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by P-site inhibitors in hearts from wild type and AC5 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg H Braeunig

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5 was described as major cardiac AC isoform. The knockout of AC5 (AC5KO exerted cardioprotective effects in heart failure. Our study explored the impact of AC5KO on mouse heart AC activities and evaluated putative AC5-selective inhibitors. In cardiac membranes from AC5KO mice, basal AC activity was decreased, while AC stimulation was intact. The putative AC5-selective P-site inhibitors SQ22,536 [9-(tetra-hydro-2-furanyl-9H-purin-6-amine], vidarabine (9-β-D-arabinosyladenine and NKY80 [2-amino-7-(2-furanyl-7,8-dihydro-5(6H-quinazolinone] inhibited recombinant AC5 more potently than AC2 and AC1, but selectivity was only modest (∼4-40-fold. These compounds inhibited cardiac AC from WT and AC5KO mice with similar potencies. In conclusion, AC regulation in AC5KO hearts was unimpaired, questioning the supposed dominant role of AC5 in the heart. Moreover, the AC inhibitors SQ22,536, NKY80 and vidarabine lack adequate selectivity for AC5 and, therefore, do not present suitable tools to study AC5-specific functions.

  19. Role of rut adenylyl cyclase in the ensemble regulation of presynaptic terminal excitability: reduced synaptic strength and precision in a Drosophila memory mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Although modulation of presynaptic terminal excitability can profoundly affect transmission efficacy, how excitability along axonal terminal branches is regulated requires further investigations. We performed focal patch recording in Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) to monitor the activity of individual synaptic boutons along the presynaptic terminal. Analysis of the learning mutant rutabaga (rut) suggests a tight regulation of presynaptic terminal excitability by rut adenylyl cyclase (AC) that is responsible for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cAMP synthesis. Focal excitatory junctional currents (ejcs) demonstrated that disrupted cAMP metabolism in rut mutant boutons leads to decreased transmitter release, coupled with temporal dispersion and amplitude fluctuation of ejcs during repetitive activity. Strikingly, rut motor terminals displayed greatly increased variability among corresponding terminal branches of identified NMJs in different preparations. However, boutons throughout single terminal branches were relatively uniform in either WT or rut mutant larvae. The use of electrotonic depolarization to directly evoke transmitter release from axonal terminals revealed that variability in neurotransmission originated from varying degrees of weakened excitability in rut terminals. Pharmacological treatments and axonal action potential recordings raised the possibility that defective rut AC resulted in reduced Ca2+ currents in the nerve terminal. Thus, our data indicate that rut AC not only affects transmitter release machinery, but also plays a previously unsuspected role in local excitability control, both contributing to transmission level and precision along the entire axonal terminal.

  20. Adenylyl cyclase A expression is tip-specific in Dictyostelium slugs and directs StatA nuclear translocation and CudA gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerke-van Wijk, I; Fukuzawa, M; Devreotes, P N; Schaap, P

    2001-06-01

    cAMP oscillations, generated by adenylyl cyclase A (ACA), coordinate cell aggregation in Dictyostelium and have also been implicated in organizer function during multicellular development. We used a gene fusion of the ACA promoter with a labile lacZ derivative to study the expression pattern of ACA. During aggregation, most cells expressed ACA, but thereafter expression was lost in all cells except those of the anterior tip. Before aggregation, ACA transcription was strongly upregulated by nanomolar cAMP pulses. Postaggregative transcription was sustained by nanomolar cAMP pulses, but downregulated by a continuous micromolar cAMP stimulus and by the stalk-cell-inducing factor DIF. Earlier work showed that the transcription factor StatA displays tip-specific nuclear translocation and directs tip-specific expression of the nuclear protein CudA, which is essential for culmination. Both StatA and CudA were present in nuclei throughout the entire slug in an aca null mutant that expresses ACA from the constitutive actin15 promoter. This suggests that the tip-specific expression of ACA directs tip-specific nuclear translocation of StatA and tip-specific expression of CudA.

  1. Adenosine diphosphate ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase and adenylylation of glutamine synthetase control ammonia excretion in ethylenediamine-resistant mutants of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A; Tripathi, A K

    2006-10-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a nitrogen-fixing, root-colonizing bacterium that brings about plant-growth-promoting effects mainly because of its ability to produce phytohormones. Ethylenediamine (EDA)-resistant mutants of A. brasilense were isolated and screened for their higher ability to decrease acetylene and release ammonia in the medium. One of the mutants showed considerably higher levels of acetylene decrease and ammonia excretion. Nitrogenase activity of this mutant was relatively resistant to inhibition by NH(4)Cl. Adenosine triphosphate ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in the mutant did not increase even in presence of 10 mM NH(4)Cl. Although the mutant showed decreased glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, neither the levels of GS synthesized by the mutant nor the NH (4) (+) -binding site in the GS differed from those of the parent. The main reason for the release of ammonia by the mutant seems to be the fixation of higher levels of nitrogen than its GS can assimilate, as well as higher levels of adenylylation of GS, which may decrease ammonia assimilation.

  2. Three enzymatic activities catalyze the oxidation of sulfide to thiosulfate in mammalian and invertebrate mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Grieshaber, Manfred K

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a potent toxin of aerobic respiration, but also has physiological functions as a signalling molecule and as a substrate for ATP production. A mitochondrial pathway catalyzing sulfide oxidation to thiosulfate in three consecutive reactions has been identified in rat liver as well as in the body-wall tissue of the lugworm, Arenicola marina. A membrane-bound sulfide : quinone oxidoreductase converts sulfide to persulfides and transfers the electrons to the ubiquinone pool. Subsequently, a putative sulfur dioxygenase in the mitochondrial matrix oxidizes one persulfide molecule to sulfite, consuming molecular oxygen. The final reaction is catalyzed by a sulfur transferase, which adds a second persulfide from the sulfide : quinone oxidoreductase to sulfite, resulting in the final product thiosulfate. This role in sulfide oxidation is an additional physiological function of the mitochondrial sulfur transferase, rhodanese.

  3. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  4. Pragmatic Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Attempting to clarify the concept of pragmatic transfer, this article proposes as a basic distinction Leech/Thomas' dichotomy of sociopragmatics versus pragmalinguistics, presenting evidence for transfer at both levels. Issues discussed include pragmatic universals in speech act realization, conditions for pragmatic transfer, communicative…

  5. Lactam hydrolysis catalyzed by mononuclear metallo-beta-lactamases: A density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Olsen, L.; Antony, J.

    2003-01-01

    . For most studied systems, the tetrahedral structure is a stable intermediate. Moreover, the C-N bond in the lactam ring is intact in this intermediate, as well as in the following transition state-its cleavage is induced by proton transfer to the nitrogen atom in the lactam ring. However, for the model...... with Asp as a proton shuttle, attack of the zinc-bond hydroxide ion seems to be concerted with the proton transfer. We have also studied the effect of replacing one of the histidine ligands by an asparagine or glutamine residue, giving a zinc site representative of other subclasses of metallo......Two central steps in the hydrolysis of lactam antibiotics catalyzed by mononuclear metallo-beta-lactamases, formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and its breakdown by proton transfer, are studied for model systems using the density functional B3LYP method. Metallo-beta-lactamases have two metal...

  6. [Fragment reaction catalyzed by E. coli ribosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotusov, V V; Kukhanova, M K; Sal'nikova, N E; Nikolaeva, L V; Kraevskiĭ, A A

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown that 50S subunits of E. coli MRE-600 ribosomes catalyze the reaction of N-(formyl)-methionyl ester of adenosine 5'-phosphate acting as peptide donor, with Phe-tRNA or CACCA-Phe serving as a peptide acceptor. The reaction is stimulated by cytidine 5'phosphate and inhibited by lincomycin, puromycin and chloramphenicol. The obtained results show that the structure of the donor site of peptidyltransferase is completely assembled on the 50S subunit and 30S subunit is not required for its formation.

  7. Chiral Diamine-catalyzed Asymmetric Aldol Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; XU Da-zhen; WU Lu-lu; WANG Yong-mei

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient catalytic system composed of a simple and commercially available chiral primary diamine (1R,2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine(6) and trifluoroacetic acid(TFA) was employed for asymmetric Aldol reaction in i-PrOH at room temperature.A loading of 10%(molar fraction) catalyst 6 with TFA as a cocatalyst could catalyze the Aldol reactions of various ketones or aldehydes with a series of aromatic aldehydes,furnishing Aldol products in moderate to high yields(up to >99%) with enantioselectivities of up to >99% and diastereoselectivities of up to 99:1.

  8. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  9. Enzymatically catalyzed HES conjugation using microbial transglutaminase: Proof of feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besheer, Ahmed; Hertel, Thomas C; Kressler, Jörg; Mäder, Karsten; Pietzsch, Markus

    2009-11-01

    Polymer-drug and polymer-protein conjugates are promising candidates for the delivery of therapeutic agents. PEGylation, using poly(ethylene glycol) for the conjugation, is now the gold standard in this field, and some PEGylated proteins have successfully reached the market. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is a water-soluble, biodegradable derivative of starch that is currently being investigated as a substitute for PEG. So far, only chemical methods have been suggested for HES conjugation; however, these may have detrimental effects on proteins. Here, we report an enzymatic method for HES conjugation using a recombinant microbial transglutaminase (rMTG). The latter catalyzes the acyl transfer between the gamma-carboxamide group of a glutaminyl residue (acyl donors) and a variety of primary amines (acyl acceptors), including the amino group of lysine. HES was modified with N-carbobenzyloxy glutaminyl glycine (Z-QG) and hexamethylene diamine (HMDA) to act as acyl donor and acyl acceptor, respectively. Using (1)H NMR, the degree of modification with Z-QG and HMDA was found to be 4.6 and 3.9 mol%, respectively. Using SDS-PAGE, it was possible to show that the modified HES successfully coupled to test compounds, proving that it is accepted as a substrate by rMTG. Finally, the process described in this study is a simple, mild approach to produce fully biodegradable polymer-drug and polymer-protein conjugates. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  10. Evidence for physical and functional interactions among two Saccharomyces cerevisiae SH3 domain proteins, an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein and the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lila, T; Drubin, D G

    1997-02-01

    In a variety of organisms, a number of proteins associated with the cortical actin cytoskeleton contain SH3 domains, suggesting that these domains may provide the physical basis for functional interactions among structural and regulatory proteins in the actin cytoskeleton. We present evidence that SH3 domains mediate at least two independent functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp1p in vivo. Abp1p contains a single SH3 domain that has recently been shown to bind in vitro to the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Srv2p. Immunofluorescence analysis of Srv2p subcellular localization in strains carrying mutations in either ABP1 or SRV2 reveals that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the normal association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. We also show that a site in Abp1p itself is specifically bound by the SH3 domain of the actin-associated protein Rvs167p. Genetic analysis provides evidence that Abp1p and Rvs167p have functions that are closely interrelated. Abp1 null mutations, like rvs167 mutations, result in defects in sporulation and reduced viability under certain suboptimal growth conditions. In addition, mutations in ABP1 and RVS167 yield similar profiles of genetic "synthetic lethal" interactions when combined with mutations in genes encoding other cytoskeletal components. Mutations which specifically disrupt the SH3 domain-mediated interaction between Abp1p and Srv2p, however, show none of the shared phenotypes of abp1 and rvs167 mutations. We conclude that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that Abp1p performs a distinct function that is likely to involve binding by the Rvs167p SH3 domain. Overall, work presented here illustrates how SH3 domains can integrate the activities of multiple actin cytoskeleton proteins in response to varying environmental conditions.

  11. Water absorption and bicarbonate secretion in the intestine of the sea bream are regulated by transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M; Fuentes, Juan

    2012-12-01

    In the marine fish intestine luminal, HCO₃⁻ can remove divalent ions (calcium and magnesium) by precipitation in the form of carbonate aggregates. The process of epithelial HCO₃⁻ secretion is under endocrine control, therefore, in this study we aimed to characterize the involvement of transmembrane (tmACs) and soluble (sACs) adenylyl cyclases on the regulation of bicarbonate secretion (BCS) and water absorption in the intestine of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). We observed that all sections of sea bream intestine are able to secrete bicarbonate as measured by pH-Stat in Ussing chambers. In addition, gut sac preparations reveal net water absorption in all segments of the intestine, with significantly higher absorption rates in the anterior intestine that in the rectum. BCS and water absorption are positively correlated in all regions of the sea bream intestinal tract. Furthermore, stimulation of tmACs (10 μM FK + 500 μM IBMX) causes a significant decrease in BCS, bulk water absorption and short circuit current (Isc) in a region dependent manner. In turn, stimulation of sACs with elevated HCO₃⁻ results in a significant increase in BCS, and bulk water absorption in the anterior intestine, an action completely reversed by the sAC inhibitor KH7 (200 μM). Overall, the results reveal a functional relationship between BCS and water absorption in marine fish intestine and modulation by tmACs and sAC. In light of the present observations, it is hypothesized that the endocrine effects on intestinal BCS and water absorption mediated by tmACs are locally and reciprocally modulated by the action of sACs in the fish enterocyte, thus fine-tuning the process of carbonate aggregate production in the intestinal lumen.

  12. Identification of a 14-3-3 protein from Lentinus edodes that interacts with CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein), and conservation of this interaction in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G L; Yamamoto, T; Ozoe, F; Yano, D; Tanaka, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    2000-01-01

    We previously identified a gene encoding a CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) homologue from the edible Basidiomycete Lentinus edodes. To further discover the cellular functions of the CAP protein, we searched for CAP-interacting proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system. Among the candidates thus obtained, many clones encoded the C-terminal half of an L. edodes 14-3-3 homologue (designated cip3). Southern blot analysis indicated that L. edodes contains only one 14-3-3 gene. Overexpression of the L. edodes 14-3-3 protein in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad24 null cells complemented the loss of endogenous 14-3-3 protein functions in cell morphology and UV sensitivity, suggesting functional conservation of 14-3-3 proteins between L. edodes and S. pombe. The interaction between L. edodes CAP and 14-3-3 protein was restricted to the N-terminal domain of CAP and was confirmed by in vitro co-precipitation. Results from both the two-hybrid system and in vivo co-precipitation experiments showed the conservation of this interaction in S. pombe. The observation that a 14-3-3 protein interacts with the N-terminal portion of CAP but not with full-length CAP in L. edodes and S. pombe suggests that the C-terminal region of CAP may have a negative effect on the interaction between CAP and 14-3-3 proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins may play a role in regulation of CAP function.

  13. Association of yeast adenylyl cyclase with cyclase-associated protein CAP forms a second Ras-binding site which mediates its Ras-dependent activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, F; Okada, T; Kido, M; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Tamada, M; Hu, C D; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    2000-01-01

    Posttranslational modification, in particular farnesylation, of Ras is crucial for activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase (CYR1). Based on the previous observation that association of CYR1 with cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is essential for its activation by posttranslationally modified Ras, we postulated that the associated CAP might contribute to the formation of a Ras-binding site of CYR1, which mediates CYR1 activation, other than the primary Ras-binding site, the leucine-rich repeat domain. Here, we observed a posttranslational modification-dependent association of Ras with a complex between CAP and CYR1 C-terminal region. When CAP mutants defective in Ras signaling but retaining the CYR1-binding activity were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, CYR1 complexed with two of the obtained three mutants failed to be activated efficiently by modified Ras and exhibited a severely impaired ability to bind Ras, providing a genetic evidence for the importance of the physical association with Ras at the second Ras-binding site. On the other hand, CYR1, complexed with the other CAP mutant, failed to be activated by Ras but exhibited a greatly enhanced binding to Ras. Conversely, a Ras mutant E31K, which exhibits a greatly enhanced binding to the CYR1-CAP complex, failed to activate CYR1 efficiently. Thus, the strength of interaction at the second Ras-binding site appears to be a critical determinant of CYR1 regulation by Ras: too-weak and too-strong interactions are both detrimental to CYR1 activation. These results, taken together with those obtained with mammalian Raf, suggest the importance of the second Ras-binding site in effector regulation.

  14. Effect of Interleukin-1β on the Variation of Adenylyl Cyclase Expression in Rats with Seizures Induced by L-Glutamate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王珍; 刘庆莹; 朱长庚

    2004-01-01

    To explore the mechanism of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the onset of seizure and the effect of IL-1β on the expression of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in rats with seizure induced by L-glutamate. Experimental rats were first injected with IL-1β and then L-glutamate (a dose under the threshold) was injected into the right lateral ventricle. The rats were sacrificed 4 h after the onset of epileptic activity and examined for changes in behavior, immunohistochemistry and compared with those with seizure induced by L-glutamate alone. It was found that the expression of AC in hippocampal and neocortex of rats with seizure induced by IL-1β and L-glutamate were stronger than that of control group (P<0.05), without significant difference found between the L-glutamate group and IL-1β plus L-glutamate group in the expression of AC, the latent period and the severity of seizure. When IL-ra were given (i. c. v. ) first, there was no epileptic activity and the expression of AC did not increase. There were no differences in the expression of AC of rats with IL-1ra and that of control rats. But when 2-methyl-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (MCCG) was given (i. c.v. ) first, the strongest expression of AC, the shortest latent period and the the most serious seizure activities were observed. The results indicated that IL-1β could facilitate the onset of epilepsy induced by L-glutamate through IL-1R, metabotropic glutamate receptors might work with IL-1R and the increased expression of AC might be involved in the process.

  15. Stability of prostacyclin analogues: an unusual lack of reactivity in acid-catalyzed alkene hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, A; O'Yang, C; Powell, M F

    1988-04-01

    Prostacyclin analogue 5 undergoes specific acid-catalyzed hydration (kH+ = 1.9 x 10(-7)M-1 sec-1 at 25 degrees C) and a pH-independent oxidation reaction (k0 = 1.2 x 10(-10) sec-1 at 25 degrees C) above pH approximately 5. The hydration reaction for 5 is much slower than for other structurally similar exocyclic alkenes, even though the rate-determining step is proton transfer. This slowness of reaction and an analysis of the pH-rate profile show that 5 does not exhibit significant intramolecular general acid catalysis, as does prostacyclin.

  16. N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed asymmetric intermolecular Stetter reaction: origin of enantioselectivity and role of counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyil, Rositha; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2013-10-04

    The mechanism and the role of KOtBu in an enantioselective NHC-catalyzed Stetter reaction between p-chlorobenzaldehyde and N-acylamido acrylate is established using DFT(M06-2X) methods. The Gibbs free energies are found to be significantly lower for transition states with explicit bound KOtBu as compared to the conventional pathways without the counterions. An intermolecular proton transfer from HOtBu to the prochiral carbon is identified as the stereocontrolling step. The computed enantioselectivities are in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  17. How the Proximal Pocket May Influence the Enantiospecificities of Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Epoxidations of Olefins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexander N.; Chatfield, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase-catalyzed enantiospecific epoxidations of olefins are of significant biotechnological interest. Typical enantiomeric excesses are in the range of 66%–97% and translate into free energy differences on the order of 1 kcal/mol. These differences are generally attributed to the effect of the distal pocket. In this paper, we show that the influence of the proximal pocket on the electron transfer mechanism in the rate-limiting event may be just as significant for a quantitatively accurate account of the experimentally-measured enantiospecificities. PMID:27517911

  18. Selenium-catalyzed Oxidative Carbonylation of Benzylamines to 1,3-Dibenzylureas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaopeng; LI Zhengwei; WANG Ping; FAN Xuesen; ZHANG Guisheng

    2017-01-01

    A facile,efficient and cost-effective approach to 1,3-dibenzylurea was reported.With cheap and recyclable nonmetal selenium as catalyst,carbon monoxide instead of phosgene derivatives as carbonylation agent and oxygen as oxidant,the selenium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reaction of benzylamines can proceed efficiently in one-pot manner in the presence of triethylamine to afford the desired 1,3-dibenzylureas mostly in moderate to excellent yields.Selenium catalyst can be easily recovered due to its phase-transfer catalytic function and recycled.

  19. Chronic treatment with escitalopram but not R-citalopram translocates Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains and potentiates adenylyl cyclase: a 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-independent action of this antidepressant compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanqiu; Rasenick, Mark M

    2010-03-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Galpha(s) from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Galpha(s) in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Galpha(s) in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Galpha(s) content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Galpha(s) localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Galpha(s) and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Galpha(s) from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs.

  20. Biginelli Reaction Catalyzed by Copper Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Manika; Kumar, Ajeet; Saxena, Amit; De, Arnab; Mozumdar, Subho

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported a novel synthesis of copper nanoparticles from copper sulphate utilizing the charge-compensatory effect of ionic liquid [bmim]BF4 and ethylene glycol. The nanoparticles were characterized and found to be stable for one year. Here we hypothesize that the stabilized nanoparticles should be able to catalyze one-pot multicomponent organic reactions. We show that the nanoparticles catalyzed Biginelli reaction at room temperature to give the product 3,4-dihydopyrimidinone (>90% yield in ∼15 minutes) from aldehydes, β-diketoester (ethylacetoacetate) and urea (or thiourea). ). Remarkably, such high yields and rapid kinetics was found to be independent of the electronic density on the reactant aryl-aldehyde. This was probably because even the surface-active particles reacted faster in the presence of ionic liquid as compared to conventional methods. The heterocyclic dihydropyrimidinones (DHPMs) and their derivatives are widely used in natural and synthetic organic chemistry due to their wide spectrum of biological and therapeutic properties (resulting from their antibacterial, antiviral, antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities. Our method has an easy work-up procedure and the nanoparticles could be recycled with minimal loss of efficiency. PMID:22912792

  1. Palladium-Catalyzed Arylation of Fluoroalkylamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusoe, Andrew T.; Hartwig, John F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis of fluorinated anilines by palladium-catalyzed coupling of fluoroalkylamines with aryl bromides and aryl chlorides. The products of these reactions are valuable because anilines typically require the presence of an electron-withdrawing substituent on nitrogen to suppress aerobic or metabolic oxidation, and the fluoroalkyl groups have steric properties and polarity distinct from those of more common electron-withdrawing amide and sulfonamide units. The fluoroalkylaniline products are unstable under typical conditions for C–N coupling reactions (heat and strong base). However, the reactions conducted with the weaker base KOPh, which has rarely been used in cross-coupling to form C–N bonds, occurred in high yield in the presence of a catalyst derived from commercially available AdBippyPhos and [Pd(allyl)Cl]2. Under these conditions, the reactions occur with low catalyst loadings (<0.50 mol % for most substrates) and tolerate the presence of various functional groups that react with the strong bases that are typically used in Pd-catalyzed C–N cross-coupling reactions of aryl halides. The resting state of the catalyst is the phenoxide complex, (BippyPhosPd(Ar)OPh); due to the electron-withdrawing property of the fluoroalkyl substituent, the turnover-limiting step of the reaction is reductive elimination to form the C–N bond. PMID:26065341

  2. Biginelli reaction catalyzed by copper nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manika Dewan

    Full Text Available We recently reported a novel synthesis of copper nanoparticles from copper sulphate utilizing the charge-compensatory effect of ionic liquid [bmim]BF(4 and ethylene glycol. The nanoparticles were characterized and found to be stable for one year. Here we hypothesize that the stabilized nanoparticles should be able to catalyze one-pot multicomponent organic reactions. We show that the nanoparticles catalyzed Biginelli reaction at room temperature to give the product 3,4-dihydopyrimidinone (>90% yield in ~15 minutes from aldehydes, β-diketoester (ethylacetoacetate and urea (or thiourea. . Remarkably, such high yields and rapid kinetics was found to be independent of the electronic density on the reactant aryl-aldehyde. This was probably because even the surface-active particles reacted faster in the presence of ionic liquid as compared to conventional methods. The heterocyclic dihydropyrimidinones (DHPMs and their derivatives are widely used in natural and synthetic organic chemistry due to their wide spectrum of biological and therapeutic properties (resulting from their antibacterial, antiviral, antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities. Our method has an easy work-up procedure and the nanoparticles could be recycled with minimal loss of efficiency.

  3. Inhibition of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation by imidazole-based thiones and selones: a mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Gouriprasanna; Jayaram, P N; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2013-08-01

    Herein, we describe the synthesis and biomimetic activity of a series of N,N-disubstituted thiones and selones that contain an imidazole pharmacophore. The N,N-disubstituted thiones do not show any inhibitory activity towards LPO-catalyzed oxidation reactions, but their corresponding N,N-disubstituted selones exhibit inhibitory activity towards LPO-catalyzed oxidation reactions. Substituents on the N atom of the imidazole ring appear to have a significant effect on the inhibition of LPO-catalyzed oxidation and iodination reactions. Selones 16, 17, and 19, which contain methyl, ethyl, and benzyl substituents, exhibit similar inhibition activities towards LPO-catalyzed oxidation reactions with IC50 values of 24.4, 22.5, and 22.5 μM, respectively. However, their activities are almost three-fold lower than that of the commonly used anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMI). In contrast, selone 21, which contains a N-CH2CH2OH substituent, exhibits high inhibitory activity, with an IC50 value of 7.2 μM, which is similar to that of MMI. The inhibitory activity of these selones towards LPO-catalyzed oxidation/iodination reactions is due to their ability to decrease the concentrations of the co-substrates (H2O2 and I2), either by catalytically reducing H2O2 (anti-oxidant activity) or by forming stable charge-transfer complexes with oxidized iodide species. The inhibition of LPO-catalyzed oxidation/iodination reactions by N,N-disubstituted selones can be reversed by increasing the concentration of H2O2. Interestingly, all of the N,N-disubstituted selones exhibit high anti-oxidant activities and their glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like activity is 4-12-fold higher than that of the well-known GPx-mimic ebselen. These experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the selones exist as zwitterions, in which the imidazole ring contains a positive charge and the selenium atom carries a large negative charge. Therefore, the selenium moieties of these selones possess highly

  4. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...

  5. Oxazolidinone Synthesis through Halohydrin Dehalogenase-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikleusevic, Ana; Hamersak, Zdenko; Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Tang, Lixia; Janssen, Dick B.; Elenkov, Maja Majeric

    2015-01-01

    An efficient dynamic kinetic resolution protocol using a single enzyme is described. Both the kinetic resolution and substrate racemization are catalyzed by halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 (HheC). The HheC-catalyzed reaction of epibromohydrin and

  6. Synthetic applications of gold-catalyzed ring expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nevado

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of new methodologies catalyzed by late transition metals involving cycloisomerizations of strained rings can open new venues for the synthesis of structurally complex molecules with interesting biological activities. Herein we summarize, from both a synthetic as well as a mechanistic point of view, the most recent developments in gold-catalyzed ring expansions.

  7. Recent advances in osmium-catalyzed hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelucci, Giorgio; Baldino, Salvatore; Baratta, Walter

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: A current issue in metal-catalyzed reactions is the search for highly efficient transition-metal complexes affording high productivity and selectivity in a variety of processes. Moreover, there is also a great interest in multitasking catalysts that are able to efficiently promote different organic transformations by careful switching of the reaction parameters, such as temperature, solvent, and cocatalyst. In this context, osmium complexes have shown the ability to catalyze efficiently different types of reactions involving hydrogen, proving at the same time high thermal stability and simple synthesis. In the catalytic reduction of C═X (X = O, N) bonds by both hydrogenation (HY) and transfer hydrogenation (TH) reactions, the most interest has been focused on homogeneous systems based on rhodium, iridium, and in particular ruthenium catalysts, which have proved to catalyze chemo- and stereoselective hydrogenations with remarkable efficiency. By contrast, osmium catalysts have received much less attention because they are considered less active on account of their slower ligand exchange kinetics. Thus, this area remained almost neglected until recent studies refuted these prejudices. The aim of this Account is to highlight the impressive developments achieved over the past few years by our and other groups on the design of new classes of osmium complexes and their applications in homogeneous catalytic reactions involving the hydrogenation of carbon-oxygen and carbon-nitrogen bonds by both HY and TH reactions as well as in alcohol deydrogenation (DHY) reactions. The work described in this Account demonstrates that osmium complexes are emerging as powerful catalysts for asymmetric and non-asymmetric syntheses, showing a remarkably high catalytic activity in HY and TH reactions of ketones, aldehydes, imines, and esters as well in DHY reactions of alcohols. Thus, for instance, the introduction of ligands with an NH function, possibly in combination with a

  8. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    increase was shown to quickly saturate with cell mass attached on the electrode. Based on recent modelling data that suggested that the electrode currents might be limited by the poor electrical conductivity of the anode, the power density versus electrical conductivity of a yeast-immobilized anode was investigated. Introduction of high aspect ratio carbon fiber filaments to the immobilization matrix increased the electrical conductivity of the anode. Although a higher electrical conductivity clearly led to an increase in power densities, it was shown that the principal limitation to power density increase was coming from proton transfer limitations in the immobilized anode. Partial overcoming of the gradients lead a power density of ca. 250 microW cm-2, which is the highest reported for yeast powered MFCs. A yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cell was investigated as a power source for low power sensors using raw tree sap. It was shown that yeast can efficiently utilize the sucrose present in the raw tree sap to produce electricity when excess salt is added to the medium. Therefore the salinity of a potential energy source is an important consideration when MFCs are being considered for energy harvesting from natural sources.

  9. Lipase-catalyzed production of lysophospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mnasri Taha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysophospholipids, such as lysophosphatidic acid or lysophosphatidylcholine, are important bioactive lipids, involved in various normal and pathological cellular processes. They also have industrial and pharmaceutical uses such as emulsifiers or components of drug delivery systems. Lipases, which natural substrates are long chain triacylglycerols, are important biocatalysts for organic synthesis mainly due to their broad substrate specificity and their ability to display high catalytic activity in organic media. This paper describes the various lipase-catalyzed reactions implemented for the production of lysophospholipids. They include hydrolysis or alcoholysis of phospholipids and acylation of the glycerophosphoryl moiety. Special emphasis is made on our work dealing with the production of lysophospholipids rich in dososahexaenoic acid, an important dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid via the hydrolysis of phospholipids extracted from the microalga Isochrysis galbana.

  10. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Oxidation Reactions Using Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef

    Heterogeneously catalyzed selective oxidation reactions have attracted a lot of attention in recent time. The first part of the present thesis provides an overview over heterogeneous copper and silver catalysts for selective oxidations in the liquid phase and compared the performance and catalytic...... that both copper and silver can function as complementary catalyst materials to gold showing different catalytic properties and being more suitable for hydrocarbon oxidation reactions. Potential opportunities for future research were outlined. In an experimental study, the potential of silver as a catalyst...... revealed that all catalysts were more active in combination with ceria nanoparticles and that under the tested reaction conditions silver was equally or even more efficient than the gold catalysts. Calcination at 900 °C of silver on silica prepared by impregnation afforded a catalyst which was used...

  11. Rhodium-Catalyzed Alkene Difunctionalization with Nitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Jennifer; Dequirez, Geoffroy; Retailleau, Pascal; Gandon, Vincent; Dauban, Philippe

    2016-06-27

    The Rh(II) -catalyzed oxyamination and diamination of alkenes generate 1,2-amino alcohols and 1,2-diamines, respectively, in good to excellent yields and with complete regiocontrol. In the case of diamination, the intramolecular reaction provides an efficient method for the preparation of pyrrolidines, and the intermolecular reaction produces vicinal amines with orthogonal protecting groups. These alkene difunctionalizations proceed by aziridination followed by nucleophilic ring opening induced by an Rh-bound nitrene generated in situ, details of which were uncovered by both experimental and theoretical studies. In particular, DFT calculations show that the nitrogen atom of the putative [Rh]2 =NR metallanitrene intermediate is electrophilic and support an aziridine activation pathway by N⋅⋅⋅N=[Rh]2 bond formation, in addition to the N⋅⋅⋅[Rh]2 =NR coordination mode. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Enzyme-catalyzed degradation of carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene, the nanoscale sp 2 allotropes of carbon, have garnered widespread attention as a result of their remarkable electrical, mechanical, and optical properties and the promise of new technologies that harness these properties. Consequently, these carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been employed for diverse applications such as electronics, sensors, composite materials, energy conversion devices, and nanomedicine. The manufacture and eventual disposal of these products may result in the release of CNMs into the environment and subsequent exposure to humans, animals, and vegetation. Given the possible pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of CNMs, much attention has been focused on the distribution, toxicity, and persistence of CNMs both in living systems and the environment. This dissertation will guide the reader though recent studies aimed at elucidating fundamental insight into the persistence of CNMs such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide). In particular, in-testtube oxidation/degradation of CNMs catalyzed by peroxidase enzymes will be examined, and the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying these processes will be discussed. Finally, an outlook of the current field including in vitro and in vivo biodegradation experiments, which have benefits in terms of human health and environmental safety, and future directions that could have implications for nanomedical applications such as imaging and drug delivery will be presented. Armed with an understanding of how and why CNMs undergo enzyme-catalyzed oxidation/biodegradation, researchers can tailor the structure of CNMs to either promote or inhibit these processes. For example, in nanomedical applications such as drug delivery, the incorporation of carboxylate functional groups could facilitate biodegradation of the nanomaterial after delivery of the cargo. Also, the incorporation of CNMs with defect sites in consumer

  13. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  14. Triosephosphate isomerase: energetics of the reaction catalyzed by the yeast enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickbarg, E.B.; Knowles, J.R.

    1988-08-09

    Triosephosphate isomerase from bakers' yeast, expressed in Escherichia coli strain DF502(p12), has been purified to homogeneity. The kinetics of the reaction in each direction have been determined at pH 7.5 and 30 degrees C. Deuterium substitution at the C-2 position of substrate (R)-glyceraldehyde phosphate and at the 1-pro-R position of substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate results in kinetic isotope effects on kcat of 1.6 and 3.4, respectively. The extent of transfer of tritium from (1(R)-TH)dihydroxyacetone phosphate to product (R)-glyceraldehyde phosphate during the catalyzed reaction is only 3% after 66% conversion to product, indicating that the enzymic base that mediates proton transfer is in rapid exchange with solvent protons. When the isomerase-catalyzed reaction is run in tritiated water in each direction, radioactivity is incorporated both into the remaining substrate and into the product. In the exchange-conversion experiment with dihydroxyacetone phosphate as substrate, the specific radioactivity of remaining dihydroxyacetone phosphate rises as a function of the extent of reaction with a slope of about 0.3, while the specific radioactivity of the products is 54% that of the solvent. In the reverse direction with (R)-glyceraldehyde phosphate as substrate, the specific radioactivity of the product formed is only 11% that of the solvent, while the radioactivity incorporated into the remaining substrate (R)-glyceraldehyde phosphate also rises as a function of the extent of reaction with a slope of 0.3. These results have been analyzed according to the protocol described earlier to yield the free energy profile of the reaction catalyzed by the yeast isomerase.

  15. Copper-vapor-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Tianru; Wang, Haomin; Zhang, Xuefu; Shi, Zhiyuan; Xie, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Direct synthesis of high-quality graphene on dielectric substrates is important for its application in electronics. In this work, we report the process of copper-vapor-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition of high-quality and large graphene domains on various dielectric substrates. The copper vapor plays a vital role on the growth of transfer-free graphene. Both single-crystal domains that are much larger than previous reports and high-coverage graphene films can be obtained by adjusting the growth duration. The quality of the obtained graphene was verified to be comparable with that of graphene grown on Cu foil. The progress reported in this work will aid the development of the application of transfer-free graphene in the future.

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bulk Polymerization of Styrene Catalyzed by Rare Earth Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴林波; 李伯耿; 李宝芳; 曹堃

    2001-01-01

    The bulk polymerization of styrene catalyzed by Nd(P204)3/MgBu2/HMPA (hexamethyl phospho-ramide) was carried out in capped glass tubes. The effects of reaction conditions on polymerization conversion and molecular weight in the range of high conversion were investigated. The molecular weight of the resultant polymers is dramatically high and its distribution is relatively narrow. The polymerization process demonstrates the feature of living polymerization and auto-acceleration phenomenon. The auto-acceleration phenomenon is attributed to the non-instantaneous formation of the active species. The experimental data suggest that chain transfer to MgBu2 is one of the factors governing the molecular weight development. A mechanism of polymerization is presented with the chain transfer process incorporated.

  17. Density functional study on enantioselective reduction of keto oxime ether with borane catalyzed by oxazaborolidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Ming; ZHENG; Wenxu

    2006-01-01

    The enantioselective reduction of keto oxime ether with borane catalyzed by oxazaborolidine is discussed by the density functional theory (DFT) method. The main intermediates and transition states for this reaction are optimized completely at the B3LYP/6-31g(d) level, and the transition states are verified by vibrational modes. As shown, the chirality-controlled steps for this reaction are the hydride transfer from borane to carbonyl carbon and oxime carbon of keto oxime ether, and the chirality for the reduced products is determined in these two reaction steps. In all examined reaction paths, the first hydride is transferred via a six-membered ring and the second hydride via a five-membered ring or a four-membered ring.

  18. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide and nerve growth factor use the proteasome to rescue nerve growth factor-deprived sympathetic neurons cultured from chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przywara, D A; Kulkarni, J S; Wakade, T D; Leontiev, D V; Wakade, A R

    1998-11-01

    Removal of nerve growth factor (NGF) from sympathetic neurons initiates a neuronal death program and apoptosis. We show that pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) prevents apoptosis in NGF-deprived sympathetic neurons. PACAP (100 nM) added to culture medium at the time of plating failed to support neuronal survival. However, in neurons grown for 2 days with NGF and then deprived of NGF, PACAP prevented cell death for the next 24-48 h. Uptake of [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) was used as an index of survival and decreased >50% in NGF-deprived cultures within 24 h. PACAP (1-100 nM) restored [3H]NE uptake to 92 +/- 8% of that of NGF-supported controls. Depolarization-induced [3H]NE release in neurons rescued by PACAP was the same as that in NGF-supported neurons. PACAP rescue was not mimicked by forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP and was not blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate. Mobilization of phosphatidylinositol by muscarine failed to support NGF-deprived neurons. Thus, PACAP may use novel signaling to promote survival of sympathetic neurons. The apoptosis-associated caspase CPP32 activity increased approximately fourfold during 6 h of NGF withdrawal (145 +/- 40 versus 38 +/- 17 nmol of substrate cleaved/min/mg of protein) and returned to even below the control level in NGF-deprived, PACAP-rescued cultures (14 +/- 7 nmol/min/mg of protein). Readdition of NGF or PACAP to NGF-deprived cultures reversed CPP32 activation, and this was blocked by lactacystin, a potent and specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that NGF and PACAP target CPP32 for destruction by the proteasome. As PACAP is a preganglionic neurotransmitter in autonomic ganglia, we propose a novel function for this transmitter as an apoptotic rescuer of sympathetic neurons when the supply of NGF is compromised.

  19. Dysregulation of TrkB phosphorylation and proBDNF protein in adenylyl cyclase 1 and 8 knockout mice in a model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susick, Laura L; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Hool, Steven M; Conti, Alana C

    2016-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates neuron growth and is regulated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs). Mice lacking AC1/8 (DKO) have a basal reduction in the dendritic complexity of medium spiny neurons in the caudate putamen and demonstrate increased neurotoxicity in the striatum following acute neonatal ethanol exposure compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting a compromise in BDNF regulation under varying conditions. Although neonatal ethanol exposure can negatively impact BDNF expression, little is known about the effect on BDNF receptor activation and its downstream signaling, including Akt activation, an established neuroprotective pathway. Therefore, here we determined the effects of AC1/8 deletion and neonatal ethanol administration on BDNF and proBDNF protein expression, and activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), Akt, ERK1/2, and PLCγ. WT and DKO mice were treated with a single dose of 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline at postnatal days 5-7 to model late-gestational alcohol exposure. Striatal and cortical tissues were analyzed using a BDNF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoblotting for proBDNF, phosphorylated and total TrkB, Akt, ERK1/2, and PLCɣ1. Neither postnatal ethanol exposure nor AC1/8 deletion affected total BDNF protein expression at any time point in either region examined. Neonatal ethanol increased the expression of proBDNF protein in the striatum of WT mice 6, 24, and 48 h after exposure, with DKO mice demonstrating a reduction in proBDNF expression 6 h after exposure. Six and 24 h after ethanol administration, phosphorylation of full-length TrkB in the striatum was significantly reduced in WT mice, but was significantly increased in DKO mice only at 24 h. Interestingly, 48 h after ethanol, both WT and DKO mice demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated full-length TrkB. In addition, Akt and PLCɣ1 phosphorylation was also decreased in ethanol-treated DKO mice 48 h after injection. These data demonstrate

  20. Adenylyl cyclase-5 in the dorsal striatum function as a molecular switch for the generation of behavioral preferences for cue-directed food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hannah; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Yunjin; Kang, Minkyung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2014-11-07

    Behavioral choices in habits and innate behaviors occur automatically in the absence of conscious selection. These behaviors are not easily modified by learning. Similar types of behaviors also occur in various mental illnesses including drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and autism. However, underlying mechanisms are not clearly understood. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating unconditioned preferred behaviors in food-choices. Mice lacking adenylyl cyclase-5 (AC5 KO mice), which is preferentially expressed in the dorsal striatum, consumed food pellets nearly one after another in cages. AC5 KO mice showed aversive behaviors to bitter tasting quinine, but they compulsively chose quinine-containing AC5 KO-pellets over fresh pellets. The unusual food-choice behaviors in AC5 KO mice were due to the gain of behavioral preferences for food pellets containing an olfactory cue, which wild-type mice normally ignored. Such food-choice behaviors in AC5 KO mice disappeared when whiskers were trimmed. Conversely, whisker trimming in wildtype mice induced behavioral preferences for AC5 KO food pellets, indicating that preferred food-choices were not learned through prior experience. Both AC5 KO mice and wildtype mice with trimmed whiskers had increased glutamatergic input from the barrel cortex into the dorsal striatum, resulting in an increase in the mGluR1-dependent signaling cascade. The siRNA-mediated inhibition of mGluR1 in the dorsal striatum in AC5 KO mice and wildtype mice with trimmed whiskers abolished preferred choices for AC5 KO food pellets, whereas siRNA-mediated inhibition of mGluR3 glutamate receptors in the dorsal striatum in wildtype mice induced behavioral preferences for AC5 KO food pellets, thus mimicking AC5 KO phenotypes. Our results show that the gain and loss of behavioral preferences for a specific cue-directed option were regulated by specific cellular factors in the dorsal striatum, such

  1. Carbon nanotube substrates and catalyzed hot stamp for polishing and patterning the substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhuang [Evanston, IL; Hauge, Robert H [Houston, TX; Schmidt, Howard K [Houston, TX; Kim, Myung Jong [Houston, TX; Kittrell, W Carter [Houston, TX

    2009-09-08

    The present invention is generally directed to catalyzed hot stamp methods for polishing and/or patterning carbon nanotube-containing substrates. In some embodiments, the substrate, as a carbon nanotube fiber end, is brought into contact with a hot stamp (typically at 200-800.degree. C.), and is kept in contact with the hot stamp until the morphology/patterns on the hot stamp have been transferred to the substrate. In some embodiments, the hot stamp is made of material comprising one or more transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Pt, Ag, Au, etc.), which can catalyze the etching reaction of carbon with H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O, and/or O.sub.2. Such methods can (1) polish the carbon nanotube-containing substrate with a microscopically smooth finish, and/or (2) transfer pre-defined patterns from the hot stamp to the substrate. Such polished or patterned carbon nanotube substrates can find application as carbon nanotube electrodes, field emitters, and field emitter arrays for displays and electron sources.

  2. Oxygenase-catalyzed ribosome hydroxylation occurs in prokaryotes and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei; Wolf, Alexander; Feng, Tianshu; Ho, Chia-Hua; Sekirnik, Rok; Zayer, Adam; Granatino, Nicolas; Cockman, Matthew E; Loenarz, Christoph; Loik, Nikita D; Hardy, Adam P; Claridge, Timothy D W; Hamed, Refaat B; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Gong, Lingzhi; Robinson, Carol V; Trudgian, David C; Jiang, Miao; Mackeen, Mukram M; Mccullagh, James S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Thalhammer, Armin; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yang, Ming; Liu-Yi, Phebee; Zhang, Zhihong; Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion; Kessler, Benedikt M; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Preston, Gail M; Coleman, Mathew L; Schofield, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    The finding that oxygenase-catalyzed protein hydroxylation regulates animal transcription raises questions as to whether the translation machinery and prokaryotic proteins are analogously modified. Escherichia coli ycfD is a growth-regulating 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase catalyzing arginyl hydroxylation of the ribosomal protein Rpl16. Human ycfD homologs, Myc-induced nuclear antigen (MINA53) and NO66, are also linked to growth and catalyze histidyl hydroxylation of Rpl27a and Rpl8, respectively. This work reveals new therapeutic possibilities via oxygenase inhibition and by targeting modified over unmodified ribosomes.

  3. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  4. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohgi Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA, which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism.

  5. Oxidative catalysis using the stoichiometric oxidant as a reagent: an efficient strategy for single-electron-transfer-induced tandem anion-radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, František; Holan, Martin; Hidasová, Denisa; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative single-electron transfer-catalyzed tandem reactions consisting of a conjugate addition and a radical cyclization are reported, which incorporate the mandatory terminal oxidant as a functionality into the product.

  6. Cu催化的单电子转移活性自由基聚合制备石墨烯/聚N,N-二甲基丙烯酰胺复合体系%Preparation of Graphene/Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) Nanocomposite via Cu-Catalyzed Single-Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凇旸; 郭冠南; 杨东; 胡建华

    2014-01-01

    Exfoliated graphene oxide (GO) sheets were prepared from natural graphite by a modified Hummer’s method, which included oxidative hydrolysis under strong acidic conditions and ultrasonic dispersing. GO was firstly reduced by hy-drazine and then followed by a diazonium addition reaction to give graphene containing hydroxyls (G-OH), which was con-verted to graphene with singel eclectron transfer-living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) initiating groups via esterification with 2-chloropropionyl chloride. Finally, poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMAA) chains were grown from the surface of graphene via in situ SET-LRP to obtain graphene/PDMAA (G-PDMAA) nanocomposite. G-PDMAA nanocomposite showed good dispersity in common organic solvents and aqueous solution.%以天然石墨为起始原料,采用改进的 Hummer 方法,通过强酸氧化水解和超声分散制备了氧化石墨烯,然后通过肼还原和重氮化反应得到含有羟基的石墨烯(G-OH),再通过酯化反应在石墨烯表面上引入了α-氯代羰基,从而得到了含有单电子转移活性自由基聚合(SET-LRP)引发基团的石墨烯(G-Cl)。最后,在石墨烯表面原位引发N,N-二甲基丙烯酰胺(DMAA)单体的SET-LRP聚合,得到了G-PDMAA复合材料, G-PDMAA在常规的有机溶剂和水中具有良好的分散性。

  7. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardal, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using {sup 14}C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  8. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  9. Cyclopalladated Ferrocenylimine Catalyzed Chlorination of 2-Arylbenzoxazoles%Cyclopalladated Ferrocenylimine Catalyzed Chlorination of 2-Arylbenzoxazoles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷瑜婷; 杨帆; 吴养洁; 李克

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and facile protocol for palladacycle-catalyzed chlorination of 2-arylbenzoxazoles was developed. The results represent the first examples involving the palladacycle as the catalyst for such chlorination. This chlori- nation was not a ligand-directed ortho-C--H activation, but an electrophilic substitution process at the para-position of the nitrogen atom in the benzo ring of benzoxazole moiety, the regiochemistry of which had been confirmed by HMBC spectral analysis. The catalytic system could tolerate various halogen atoms, such as F, Cl and Br, affording the corresponding products in moderate to excellent yields.

  10. Platinum-Catalyzed Selective Tin-Carbon Bond Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoonen, Sander Hendrikus Lambertus

    2003-01-01

    In conclusion, two improved methods for the selective synthesis of monoorganotin trihalides were developed. The platinum-catalyzed Kocheshkov redistribution reaction of dialkyltin dichlorides with tin tetrachloride is the most interesting. Contrary to the other two methods described (the direct

  11. Functioned Calix[4]arenes as Artificial Enzymes Catalyze Aldol Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Aldolase models derived from calix[4]arene were designed and synthesized. The aldol condensation of p-nitrobenzaldehyde with acetone was catalyzed by the synthetic enzymes proceeded under mild conditions to offer chiefly aldol-type product in good yield.

  12. Diastereoselective Pt catalyzed cycloisomerization of polyenes to polycycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Michael J; Gagné, Michel R

    2014-02-26

    Application of a tridentate NHC containing pincer ligand to Pt catalyzed cascade cyclization reactions has allowed for the catalytic, diastereoselective cycloisomerization of biogenic alkene terminated substrates to the their polycyclic counterparts.

  13. Lipase catalyzed synthesis of epoxy-fatty acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN, Qian; LI, Zu-Yi

    2000-01-01

    Lipase catalyzed synthesis of epoxy-fatty acidas from unsaturated carboxylic acids was investigated.Under mild conditions unsaturated arboxylic acids were convcveed to peroxide,then the unsaturated peroxycarboxylic acids epoxidised the C=C bond of themselves

  14. Homocoupling of Aryl Bromides Catalyzed by Nickel Chloride in Pyridine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO, Xiao-Chun; ZHOU, Wei; ZHANG, Yue-Ping; DAI, Chun-ya; SHEN, Dong; HUANG, Mei

    2006-01-01

    Pyridine was used as a solvent for homocoupling of aryl bromides catalyzed by nickel chloride/triarylphosphine in the presence of zinc and recycled easily. Triphenylphosphine was the best ligand for nickel in this coupling reaction.

  15. Gold-Catalyzed Regioselective Dimerization of Aliphatic Terminal Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sheng; Kroll, Julien; Luo, Yingdong; Zhang, Liming

    2012-01-01

    A gold-catalyzed regioselective homodimerization of aliphatic terminal alkynes is described. Bulky and less Lewis acidic tBuXPhosAuNTf(2) is the preferred catalyst, and the additive, anhydrous NaOAc, substantially facilitates the reaction.

  16. Blastocyst Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    ### Method: Blastocyst transfer is usually performed 24 hours after aggregation when the morulae have become expanded blastocysts and on the same day as injection. A little time is given between injection and transfer to allow blastocysts to re-expand. **The Recipient** Careful selection of the recipient is most important as the pups are the end result of a lot of hard work. Two strains of mice are used:RB Swiss and (CBA*C57BL6/J)f1. RB Swiss are quiet and make excellent mothers ...

  17. Heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, J P

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most popular heat transfer texts, Jack Holman's "Heat Transfer" is noted for its clarity, accessible approach, and inclusion of many examples and problem sets. The new tenth edition retains the straight-forward, to-the-point writing style while covering both analytical and empirical approaches to the subject. Throughout the book, emphasis is placed on physical understanding while, at the same time, relying on meaningful experimental data in those situations that do not permit a simple analytical solution. New examples and templates provide students with updated resources for computer-numerical solutions.

  18. Stereoselective synthesis of tricyclic compounds by intramolecular palladium-catalyzed addition of aryl iodides to carbonyl groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Jakub; Bentz, Christoph; Redies, Kai; Lentz, Dieter; Zimmer, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    Summary Starting from γ-ketoesters with an o-iodobenzyl group we studied a palladium-catalyzed cyclization process that stereoselectively led to bi- and tricyclic compounds in moderate to excellent yields. Four X-ray crystal structure analyses unequivocally defined the structure of crucial cyclization products. The relative configuration of the precursor compounds is essentially transferred to that of the products and the formed hydroxy group in the newly generated cyclohexane ring is consistently in trans-arrangement with respect to the methoxycarbonyl group. A transition-state model is proposed to explain the observed stereochemical outcome. This palladium-catalyzed Barbier-type reaction requires a reduction of palladium(II) back to palladium(0) which is apparently achieved by the present triethylamine. PMID:27559374

  19. Heck reaction catalyzed by Pd/C, in a triphasic-organic/Aliquat 336/aqueous-solvent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perosa, Alvise; Tundo, Pietro; Selva, Maurizio; Zinovyev, Sergei; Testa, Alberto

    2004-08-07

    The rate of the Pd/C catalyzed Heck coupling of Ar-I with CH(2)=CH-R is accelerated tenfold by the presence of Aliquat 336 (A336), a well known phase transfer catalyst, and an ionic liquid. Both when conducted in A336 as solvent, and in an isooctane/A336/aqueous triphasic mixture, the Heck reaction of aryl iodides with electron deficient olefins, catalyzed by Pd/C, proceeds with high yields and selectivity. When KOH is used instead of Et(3)N, selective formation of the biphenyl rather than the Heck product, is observed. Aryl bromides react more sluggishly, and only the more activated ones undergo the Heck reaction. In the absence of the olefin, aryl halides possessing an electron withdrawing group are reduced to the corresponding Ar-H.

  20. Stereoselective synthesis of tricyclic compounds by intramolecular palladium-catalyzed addition of aryl iodides to carbonyl groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Saadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from γ-ketoesters with an o-iodobenzyl group we studied a palladium-catalyzed cyclization process that stereoselectively led to bi- and tricyclic compounds in moderate to excellent yields. Four X-ray crystal structure analyses unequivocally defined the structure of crucial cyclization products. The relative configuration of the precursor compounds is essentially transferred to that of the products and the formed hydroxy group in the newly generated cyclohexane ring is consistently in trans-arrangement with respect to the methoxycarbonyl group. A transition-state model is proposed to explain the observed stereochemical outcome. This palladium-catalyzed Barbier-type reaction requires a reduction of palladium(II back to palladium(0 which is apparently achieved by the present triethylamine.

  1. LIPASE-CATALYZED TRANSESTERIFICATION OF PALM KERNEL OIL WITH DIALKYLCARBONATES

    OpenAIRE

    Tjahjono Herawan; M. Rüsch Gen. Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed transesterifications-especially in a solvent-free medium-are important for industrial applications because such systems would have an enormous advantage by avoiding the problem of separation, toxicity and flammability of organic solvents. However, the organic solvent-free alcoholysis, especially methanolysis, does not give high conversions. The same problem also occurs when ethyl or methyl acetate are used as acyl acceptors. The main problems of lipase-catalyzed organic solve...

  2. Development and industrial application of catalyzer for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis of Claus tail gas

    OpenAIRE

    Honggang Chang; Ronghai Zhu; Zongshe Liu; Jinlong He; Chongrong Wen; Sujuan Zhang; Yang Li

    2015-01-01

    With the implementation of more strict national environmental protection laws, energy conservation, emission reduction and clean production will present higher requirements for sulfur recovery tail gas processing techniques and catalyzers. As for Claus tail gas, conventional hydrogenation catalyzers are gradually being replaced by low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers. This paper concentrates on the development of technologies for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis catalyzers, prepar...

  3. Diazo transfer for azido-functional surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Russo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of azido-functionalized polymers is gaining increasing attention. We wish to report an innovative, novel strategy for azido functionalization of polymeric materials, coupling plasma technology and solution processed diazo transfer reactions. This novel approach allows the azido group to be introduced downstream of the material preparation, thus preserving its physicochemical and mechanical characteristics, which can be tailored a priori according to the desired application. The whole process involves the surface plasma functionalization of a material with primary amino groups, followed by a diazo transfer reaction, which converts the amino functionalities into azido groups that can be exploited for further chemoselective reactions. The diazo transfer reaction is performed in a heterogeneous phase, where the azido group donor is in solution. Chemical reactivity of the azido functionalities was verified by subsequent copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

  4. Quantum chemical study on the mechanism of enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones catalyzed by oxazaborolidines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The ab initio molecular orbital study on the mechanism of enantioselective reduction of 3,3-dimethyl butanone-2 with borane catalyzed by chiral oxazaborolidine is performed. As illus trated, this enantioselective reduction is exothermic and goes mainly through the formations of the catalyst-borane adduct, the catalyst-borane-3,3-dimethyl butanone-2 adduct, and the cata lyst-alkoxyborane adduct with a B-O-B-N 4-member ring and through the decomposition of the catalyst-alkoxyborane adduct with the regeneration of the catalyst. During the hydride transfer in the catalyst-borane-3,3-dimethyl butanone-2 adduct to form the catalyst-alkoxyborane adduct, the hydride transfer and the formation of the B-O-B-N 4-member ring in the catalyst-alkoxyborane ad duct happen simultaneously. The controlling step for the reduction is the transfer of hydride from the borane moiety to the carbonyl carbon of 3,3-dimethyl butanone-2. The transition state for the hydride transfer is a twisted chair structure and the reduction leads to R-chiral alcohols.

  5. Non-natural olefin cyclopropanation catalyzed by diverse cytochrome P450s and other hemoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heel, Thomas; McIntosh, John A; Dodani, Sheel C; Meyerowitz, Joseph T; Arnold, Frances H

    2014-11-24

    Recent work has shown that engineered variants of cytochrome P450BM3 (CYP102A1) efficiently catalyze non-natural reactions, including carbene and nitrene transfer reactions. Given the broad substrate range of natural P450 enzymes, we set out to explore if this diversity could be leveraged to generate a broad panel of new catalysts for olefin cyclopropanation (i.e., carbene transfer). Here, we took a step towards this goal by characterizing the carbene transfer activities of four new wild-type P450s that have different native substrates. All four were active and exhibited a range of product selectivities in the model reaction: cyclopropanation of styrene by using ethyl diazoacetate (EDA). Previous work on P450BM3 demonstrated that mutation of the axial coordinating cysteine, universally conserved among P450 enzymes, to a serine residue, increased activity for this non-natural reaction. The equivalent mutation in the selected P450s was found to activate carbene transfer chemistry both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, serum albumins complexed with hemin were also found to be efficient in vitro cyclopropanation catalysts.

  6. Effect of osmolytes on protein dynamics in the lactate dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhadin, Nickolay; Callender, Robert

    2011-03-15

    Laser-induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy was used to probe the effect of osmolytes on the microscopic rate constants of the lactate dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction. NADH fluorescence and absorption relaxation kinetics were measured for the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction system in the presence of varying amounts of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a protein-stabilizing osmolyte, or urea, a protein-destabilizing osmolyte. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) at a concentration of 1 M strongly increases the rate of hydride transfer, nearly nullifies its activation energy, and also slightly increases the enthalpy of hydride transfer. In 1 M urea, the hydride transfer enthalpy is almost nullified, but the activation energy of the step is not affected significantly. TMAO increases the preference of the closed conformation of the active site loop in the LDH·NAD(+)·lactate complex; urea decreases it. The loop opening rate in the LDH·NADH·pyruvate complex changes its temperature dependence to inverse Arrhenius with TMAO. In this complex, urea accelerates the loop motion, without changing the loop opening enthalpy. A strong, non-Arrhenius decrease in the pyruvate binding rate in the presence of TMAO offers a decrease in the fraction of the open loop, pyruvate binding competent form at higher temperatures. The pyruvate off rate is not affected by urea but decreases with TMAO. Thus, the osmolytes strongly affect the rates and thermodynamics of specific events along the LDH-catalyzed reaction: binding of substrates, loop closure, and the chemical event. Qualitatively, these results can be understood as an osmolyte-induced change in the energy landscape of the protein complexes, shifting the conformational nature of functional substates within the protein ensemble.

  7. Transfer Timing

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    sim present Simulation Presentation Interactive Media Element This IME is used in the Computer Communications and Networks class offered in the Graduate School of Operations and Information Sciences. This introductory computer networking course provides the theory and principles of networking and communications protocols. This IME is used to help students understand data transfer options. CS3502 Computer Communications and Networks

  8. Sophisticated transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhart, T.

    2006-01-01

    On the eve of the Iraq war, fears were expressed in different circles that under the cover of war, Israel may attempt a transfer of Palestinians in the “seam line” area of the northern West Bank (Kalkilya, Tulkarem). Last week, the army produced a scene from this scenario. On April 2 at 3 AM, a larg

  9. Copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Abeer Ahmed

    The click reaction concept, introduced in 2001, has since spurred the rapid development and reexamination of efficient, high yield reactions which proceed rapidly under mild conditions. Prior to the discovery of facile copper catalysis in 2002, the thermally activated azide-alkyne or Huisgen cycloaddition reaction was largely ignored following its discovery in large part due to its slow kinetics, requirement for elevated temperature and limited selectivity. Now, arguably, the most prolific and capable of the click reactions, the copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is extremely efficient and affords exquisite control of the reaction. The orthogonally and chemoselectivity of this reaction enable its wide utility across varied scientific fields. Despite numerous inherent advantages and widespread use for small molecule synthesis and solution-based polymer chemistry, it has only recently and rarely been utilized to form polymer networks. This work focuses on the synthesis, mechanisms, and unique attributes of the CuAAC reaction for the fabrication of functional polymer networks. The photo-reduction of a series of copper(II)/amine complexes via ligand metal charge transfer was examined to determine their relative efficiency and selectivity in catalyzing the CuAAC reaction. The aliphatic amine ligands were used as an electron transfer species to reduce Cu(II) upon irradiation with 365 nm light while also functioning as an accelerating agent and as protecting ligands for the Cu(I) that was formed. Among the aliphatic amines studied, tertiary amines such as triethylamine (TEA), tetramethyldiamine (TMDA), N,N,N',N",N"-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDTA), and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTETA) were found to be the most effective. The reaction kinetics were accelerated by increasing the PMDETA : Cu(II) ratio with a ratio of ligand to Cu(II) of 4:1 yielding the maximum conversion in the shortest time. The sequential and orthogonal nature of the photo

  10. Conservation Kickstart- Catalyzing Conservation Initiatives Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinish, G.

    2014-12-01

    Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) is a nonprofit organization that collects environmental data to catalyze conservation initiatives worldwide. Adventure athletes have the skills and motivation to reach the most remote corners of the world. ASC utilizes those skills to provide the scientific community with data while providing the outdoor community with purpose beyond the personal high of reaching a summit or rowing across an ocean. We carefully select projects, choosing partnerships that will maximize the impact of ASC volunteers. Each project must have a clear path to a tangible conservation outcome and demonstrate a clear need for our brand of volunteers. We partner with government agencies, universities, and independant reseachers to kickstart data collection efforts around the world. Last year, through a partnership with the Olympic National Forest, 20 volunteers from the Seattle area set up and monitored camera traps in an effort to survey for costal Pacific marten. Our work led to the species' listing as "critically imperiled" with NatureServe. A partnership with the inaugural Great Pacific Race, engaging trans-Pacific rowing teams, searched for microplastics in the Pacific Ocean as part of our ongoing microplastics campaign. In a multi-year partnership with the American Prairie Reserve (APR), ASC volunteer crews live and work on the Reserve collecting wildlife data year round. The data we obtain directly informs the Reserve's wildlife management decisions. On this project, our crews have safely and effectively navigated temperature extremes from -30 degrees to 100+ degrees while traveling in a remote location. We are currently scouting projects in the Okavango Delta of Botswana and the rainforest of Suriname where we will be able to cover large amounts of area in a short periord of time. ASC is at the crossroads of the adventure and coservation science communities. Our approach of answering specific questions by using highly skilled and

  11. Mechanistic Insight into the Intramolecular Benzylic C-H Nitrene Insertion Catalyzed by Bimetallic Paddlewheel Complexes: Influence of the Metal Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuepeng; Xu, Huiying; Liu, Xueping; Phillips, David Lee; Zhao, Cunyuan

    2016-05-17

    The intramolecular benzylic C-H amination catalyzed by bimetallic paddlewheel complexes was investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The metal-metal bonding characters were investigated and the structures featuring either a small HOMO-LUMO gap or a compact SOMO energy scope were estimated to facilitate an easier one-electron oxidation of the bimetallic center. The hydrogen-abstraction step was found to occur through three manners, that is, hydride transfer, hydrogen migration, and proton transfer. The imido N species are more preferred in the Ru-Ru and Pd-Mn cases whereas coexisting N species, namely, singlet/triplet nitrene and imido, were observed in the Rh-Rh and Pd-Co cases. On the other hand, the triplet nitrene N species were found to be predominant in the Pd-Ni and Pd-Zn systems. A concerted asynchronous mechanism was found to be modestly favorable in the Rh-Rh-catalyzed reactions whereas the Pd-Co-catalyzed reactions demonstrated a slight preference for a stepwise pathway. Favored stepwise pathways were seen in each Ru-Ru- and Pd-Mn-catalyzed reactions and in the triplet nitrene involved Pd-Ni and Pd-Zn reactions. The calculations suggest the feasibility of the Pd-Mn, Pd-Co, and Pd-Ni paddlewheel complexes as being economical alternatives for the expensive dirhodium/diruthenium complexes in C-H amination catalysis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The vasorelaxant effect of 8(17),12E,14-labdatrien-18-oic acid involves stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP/PKA pathway: Evidences by pharmacological and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Luciano A A; Alencar Filho, Edilson B; Coelho, Maisa C; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2015-10-05

    The relaxant effect of 8(17),12E,14-labdatrien-18-oic acid (LBD) was investigated on isolated aortic rings and compared with forskolin (FSK), a standard and potent activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC) with relaxing effect. The presence of potassium channel blockers, such as glibenclamide (ATP-blocker), apamin (SKCa-blocker), charybdotoxin (BKCa-blocker) did not significantly affect either the LBD or FSK concentration-response curves. However, in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (KV-blocker), the relaxant effect for both diterpenes was significantly attenuated, with reduction of its relative potencies. Moreover, the relaxation induced by 8-Br-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, was also significantly attenuated in the same conditions, i.e., in the presence of 4-aminopyridine. The presence of aminophylline, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, caused a significant increasing in the potency for both LBD and FSK. On the other hand, the presence of Rp-cAMPS, a selective PKA-inhibitor, significantly attenuated the relaxant effect of LBD. In this work, in the same experimental conditions, both labdane-type diterpenes presented remarkably similar results; FSK, however, presented a higher potency (100-fold) than LBD. Thus, the hypothesis that LBD could be a novel AC-activator emerged. To assess that hypothesis, computational molecular docking studies were performed. Crystallographic structure of adenylyl cyclase/forskolin complex (1AB8) was obtained from RSCB Protein Data Bank and used to compare the modes of interaction of the native ligand and LBD. The computational data shows many similarities between LBD and FSK concerning the interaction with the regulatory site of AC. Taken together, the results presented here pointed to LBD as a novel AC-activator.

  13. Transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taback, I.

    1979-01-01

    The vulnerability of electronic equipment to carbon fibers is studied. The effectiveness of interfaces, such as filters, doors, window screens, and cabinets, which affect the concentration, exposure, or deposition of carbon fibers on both (internal and external) sides of the interface is examined. The transfer function of multilayer aluminum mesh, wet and dry, polyurethane foam, and window screen are determined as a function of air velocity. FIlters installed in typical traffic control boxes and air conditioners are also considered.

  14. Mechanism of horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed heme oxidation and polymerization (beta-hematin formation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Vishal; Chand, Prem; Maulik, Prakas R; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2005-05-25

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes the polymerization of free heme (beta-hematin formation) through its oxidation. Heme when added to HRP compound II (FeIV=O) causes spectral shift from 417 nm (Compound II) to 402 nm (native, FeIII) indicating that heme may be oxidized via one-electron transfer. Direct evidence for one-electron oxidation of heme by HRP intermediates is provided by the appearance of an E.s.r signal of a 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (spin trap)-heme radical adduct (a1H=14.75 G, a2H=4.0 G) in E.s.r studies. Heme-polymerization by HRP is inhibited by spin trap indicating that one-electron oxidation product of heme ultimately leads to the formation of heme-polymer. HRP, when incubated with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC), a histidine specific reagent, shows concentration dependent loss of heme-polymerization indicating the role of histidine residues in the process. We suggest that HRP catalyzes the formation of heme-polymer through one-electron oxidation of free heme.

  15. Inhibitory effect of water on the oxygen reduction catalyzed by cobalt(II) tetraphenylporphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojánek, Antonín; Langmaier, Jan; Kvapilová, Hana; Záliš, Stanislav; Samec, Zdeněk

    2014-03-20

    Stopped-flow kinetic measurements, UV-vis spectroscopy, rotating disk voltammetry, and quantum chemical calculations are used to clarify the role of water in the homogeneous two-electron reduction of O2 to H2O2 in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) using ferrocene (Fc) as an electron donor, tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)boric acid (HTB) as a proton donor, and [5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine]cobalt(II) (Co(II)TTP) as a catalyst. Kinetic analysis suggests that the reaction is controlled by the intramolecular proton coupled electron transfer to the O2 molecule coordinated to the metal center producing the O2H(•) radical. This rate-determining step is common to both the O2 reduction by Fc catalyzed by Co(II)TPP and the O2 reduction by Co(II)TPP itself. Experimental data point to the competitive coordination of water to the metal center leading to a strong inhibition of the catalytic reaction. In agreement with this finding, quantum chemical calculations indicate that water is bound to the metal center much more strongly than triplet O2. A similar effect is demonstrated also for the O2 reduction catalyzed by the porphyrin free base (H2TPP), though its rate is lower by 2 orders of magnitude.

  16. Remote C−H Activation of Quinolines through Copper-Catalyzed Radical Cross-Coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jun

    2016-01-12

    Achieving site selectivity in carbon-hydrogen (C-H) functionalization reactions is a formidable challenge in organic chemistry. Herein, we report a novel approach to activating remote C-H bonds at the C5 position of 8-aminoquinoline through copper-catalyzed sulfonylation under mild conditions. Our strategy shows high conversion efficiency, a broad substrate scope, and good toleration with different functional groups. Furthermore, our mechanistic investigations suggest that a single-electron-transfer process plays a vital role in generating sulfonyl radicals and subsequently initiating C-S cross-coupling. Importantly, our copper-catalyzed remote functionalization protocol can be expanded for the construction of a variety of chemical bonds, including C-O, C-Br, C-N, C-C, and C-I. These findings provide a fundamental insight into the activation of remote C-H bonds, while offering new possibilities for rational design of drug molecules and optoelectronic materials requiring specific modification of functional groups. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Synthesis of Unsymmetric Ureas by Selenium-Catalyzed Oxidative-Reductive Carbonylation with CO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Jian-Ting; LU Shi-Wei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Unsymmetric, substituted ureas that contain the peptide bond (NHCONH), many of which possess biological activities, are widely used as herbicides, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals. [1,2] A series of unsymmetric ureascontaining substituted groups have been synthesized via selenium-catalyzed selective oxidative-reductive carbonylation of amines and nitro compounds with CO instead of phosgene in one-pot reaction. [3,4] These catalytic reactions are important from both synthetic and industrial points of view, because not only the reactions can be proceeded with high selectivity of higher than 99% towards desired unsymmetric ureas, but also there exists a phase-transfer process of the selenium catalyst in thereaction, so that the after-treatment of the catalysts and products from the reaction systems can be easily separated by simple phase separation.

  18. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Häring

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent.

  19. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häring, Marleen; Pettignano, Asja; Quignard, Françoise; Tanchoux, Nathalie; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-08-25

    Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry) reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein) were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry) reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent.

  20. Analyzing site selectivity in Rh2(esp)2-catalyzed intermolecular C-H amination reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Elizabeth N; DeLuca, Ryan J; Tindall, Daniel J; Oderinde, Martins S; Roizen, Jennifer L; Du Bois, J; Sigman, Matthew S

    2014-04-16

    Predicting site selectivity in C-H bond oxidation reactions involving heteroatom transfer is challenged by the small energetic differences between disparate bond types and the subtle interplay of steric and electronic effects that influence reactivity. Herein, the factors governing selective Rh2(esp)2-catalyzed C-H amination of isoamylbenzene derivatives are investigated, where modification to both the nitrogen source, a sulfamate ester, and substrate are shown to impact isomeric product ratios. Linear regression mathematical modeling is used to define a relationship that equates both IR stretching parameters and Hammett σ(+) values to the differential free energy of benzylic versus tertiary C-H amination. This model has informed the development of a novel sulfamate ester, which affords the highest benzylic-to-tertiary site selectivity (9.5:1) observed for this system.

  1. Empirical modeling the ultrasound-assisted base-catalyzed sunflower oil methanolysis kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Jelena M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasound-assisted sunflower oil methanolysis catalyzed by KOH was studied to define a simple empirical kinetic model useful for reactor design without complex computation. It was assumed that the neutralization of free fatty acids and the saponification reaction were negligible. The methanolysis process rate was observed to be controlled by the mass transfer limitation in the initial heterogeneous regime and by the chemical reaction in the later pseudo-homogeneous regime. The model involving the irreversible second-order kinetics was established and used for simulation of the triacylglycerol conversion and the fatty acid methyl esters formation in the latter regime. A good agreement between the proposed model and the experimental data in the chemically controlled regime was found.

  2. Origin of stereoselectivity in a chiral N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed desymmetrization of substituted cyclohexyl 1,3-diketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Yernaidu; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-06-01

    The mechanism and stereoselectivity in a chiral N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed desymmetrization of a 1,3-diketone is established by using density functional theory computations. The Breslow intermediate formation is identified to involve Hunig's base-assisted proton transfer. The relative energies of stereoselectivity-determining intramolecular aldol cyclization transition states reveal that in the most preferred mode the re-face of enolate adds to the si-face of carbonyl leading to a tricyclic lactone with a configuration (2aS,4aS,8'S) in excellent agreement with previous experimental reports.

  3. Heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Jorge, Kubie; Thomas, Grassie

    2012-01-01

    A core task of engineers is to analyse energy related problems. The analytical treatment is usually based on principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, but is increasingly being handled computationally.This unique resource presents a practical textbook, written for both undergraduates and professionals, with a series of over 60 computer workbooks on an accompanying CD.The book emphasizes how complex problems can be deconstructed into a series of simple steps. All thermophysical property computations are illustrated using diagrams within text and on the compani

  4. moisture transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Kulasiri

    2005-01-01

    model drying porous materials. Coupled partial differential equations governing the moisture and heat transfer can be solved using numerical techniques, and in this paper we solve them analytically in a setting suitable for industrial drying situations. We discuss the nature of the solutions using the physical properties of Pinus radiata. It is shown that the temperature gradients play a significant role in deciding the moisture profiles within the material when thickness is large and that models based only on moisture potential gradients may not be sufficient to explain the drying phenomena in moist porous materials.

  5. Copper-Catalyzed Redox-Triggered Remote C-H Functionalization: Highly Selective Formation of C-CF3 and C-O Bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taotao Li; Peng Yu; Jin-Shun Lin; Yonggang Zhi; Xin-Yuan Liu

    2016-01-01

    A Cu-catalyzed remote sp3 C-H/unactivated alkenes functionalization reaction for the concomitant construction ofC-CF3 and C-O bonds was described.An 1,5-H radical transfer involving an sp3 C-H bond adjacent to a nitrogen atom and an α-CF3-alkyl radical intermediate derived from unactivated alkenes was observed and demonstrated to proceed via the radical process.

  6. Role of keto–enol tautomerization in a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric thiocarboxylysis of meso-epoxide: a DFT study

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John

    2015-09-15

    The mechanism of a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed thiocarboxylysis of meso-epoxide was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations (M06-2X). The nucleophilic ring opening of epoxide by thiobenzoic acid was found to proceed via a concerted termolecular transition state with a simultaneous dual proton transfer to yield the β-hydroxy thioester product. Electrostatic interactions together with the steric environment inside the chiral catalyst play an important role in determining the enantioselectivity of the reaction.

  7. Nickel-Catalyzed Cross Couplings of Benzylic Ammonium Salts and Boronic Acids: Stereospecific Formation of Diarylethanes via C–N Bond Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Prantik; Shacklady-McAtee, Danielle M.; Yap, Glenn P. A.; Sirianni, Eric R.; Watson, Mary P.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a nickel-catalyzed cross coupling of benzylic ammonium triflates with aryl boronic acids to afford diarylmethanes and diarylethanes. This reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions and with exceptional functional group tolerance. Further, it transforms branched benzylic ammonium salts to diarylethanes with excellent chirality transfer, offering a new strategy for the synthesis of highly enantioenriched diarylethanes from readily available chiral benzylic amines. PMID:23268734

  8. The Structural Basis of Ribozyme-Catalyzed RNA Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, M.P.; Scott, W.G.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Life originated, according to the RNA World hypothesis, from self-replicating ribozymes that catalyzed ligation of RNA fragments. We have solved the 2.6 angstrom crystal structure of a ligase ribozyme that catalyzes regiospecific formation of a 5' to 3' phosphodiester bond between the 5'-triphosphate and the 3'-hydroxyl termini of two RNA fragments. Invariant residues form tertiary contacts that stabilize a flexible stem of the ribozyme at the ligation site, where an essential magnesium ion coordinates three phosphates. The structure of the active site permits us to suggest how transition-state stabilization and a general base may catalyze the ligation reaction required for prebiotic RNA assembly.

  9. Palladium-Catalyzed Modification of Unprotected Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin H. Shaughnessy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  10. Highly efficient palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of ethyl ethynyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Ian P; Kwon, Ohyun

    2008-12-08

    The palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of acetylenes is widely exploited in organic synthesis as a means of forming vinyl stannanes for use in palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. Application of this methodology to ethyl ethynyl ether results in an enol ether that is challenging to isolate from the crude reaction mixture because of incompatibility with typical silica gel chromatography. Reported here is a highly efficient procedure for the palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of ethyl ethynyl ether using 0.1% palladium(0) catalyst and 1.0 equiv of tributyltin hydride. The product obtained is a mixture of regioisomers that can be carried forward with exclusive reaction of the beta-isomer. This method is highly reproducible; relative to previously reported procedures, it is more economical and involves a more facile purification procedure.

  11. Asymmetric cyclopropanation of chalcones using chiral phase-transfer catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The first phase-transfer catalyzed cyclopropanation reaction of chalcones using bromomalonates as the nucleophiles in a Michael Initiated Ring Closing reaction (MIRC) was developed. Key to success was the use of a free OH-containing cinchona alkaloid ammonium salt catalyst and carefully optimized liquid/liquid reaction conditions. The reaction performed well for electron neutral and electron deficient chalcones giving the products in yields up to 98% and with enantiomeric ratios up to 91:9.

  12. Microbial-Catalyzed Biotransformation of Multifunctional Triterpenoids Derived from Phytonutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Adnan Ali Shah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial-catalyzed biotransformations have considerable potential for the generation of an enormous variety of structurally diversified organic compounds, especially natural products with complex structures like triterpenoids. They offer efficient and economical ways to produce semi-synthetic analogues and novel lead molecules. Microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi could catalyze chemo-, regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations of diverse triterpenoid substrates that are extremely difficult to produce by chemical routes. During recent years, considerable research has been performed on the microbial transformation of bioactive triterpenoids, in order to obtain biologically active molecules with diverse structures features. This article reviews the microbial modifications of tetranortriterpenoids, tetracyclic triterpenoids and pentacyclic triterpenoids.

  13. New Palladium-Catalyzed Approaches to Heterocycles and Carbocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinhua [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-12-19

    The tert-butylimines of o-(1-alkynyl)benzaldehydes and analogous pyridinecarbaldehydes have been cyclized under very mild reaction conditions in the presence of I2, ICl, PhSeCl, PhSCl and p-O2NC6H4SCl to give the corresponding halogen-, selenium- and sulfur-containing disubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines, respectively. Monosubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines have been synthesized by the metal-catalyzed ring closure of these same iminoalkynes. This methodology accommodates a variety of iminoalkynes and affords the anticipated heterocycles in moderate to excellent yields. The Pd(II)-catalyzed cyclization of 2-(1-alkynyl)arylaldimines in the presence of various alkenes provides an efficient way to synthesize a variety of 4-(1-alkenyl)-3-arylisoquinolines in moderate to excellent yields. The introduction of an ortho-methoxy group on the arylaldimine promotes the Pd-catalyzed cyclization and stabilizes the resulting Pd(II) intermediate, improving the yields of the isoquinoline products. Highly substituted naphthalenes have been synthesized by the palladium-catalyzed annulation of a variety of internal alkynes, in which two new carbon-carbon bonds are formed in a single step under relatively mild reaction conditions. This method has also been used to synthesize carbazoles, although a higher reaction temperature is necessary. The process involves arylpalladation of the alkyne, followed by intramolecular Heck olefination and double bond isomerization. This method accommodates a variety of functional groups and affords the anticipated highly substituted naphthalenes and carbazoles in good to excellent yields. Novel palladium migratiodarylation methodology for the synthesis of complex fused polycycles has been developed, in which one or more sequential Pd-catalyzed intramolecular migration processes involving C-H activation are employed. The chemistry works best with electron-rich aromatics, which is in agreement

  14. New Palladium-Catalyzed Approaches to Heterocycles and Carbocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qinhua Huang

    2004-12-19

    The tert-butylimines of o-(1-alkynyl)benzaldehydes and analogous pyridinecarbaldehydes have been cyclized under very mild reaction conditions in the presence of I{sub 2}, ICl, PhSeCl, PhSCl and p-O{sub 2}NC{sub 6}H{sub 4}SCl to give the corresponding halogen-, selenium- and sulfur-containing disubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines, respectively. Monosubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines have been synthesized by the metal-catalyzed ring closure of these same iminoalkynes. This methodology accommodates a variety of iminoalkynes and affords the anticipated heterocycles in moderate to excellent yields. The Pd(II)-catalyzed cyclization of 2-(1-alkynyl)arylaldimines in the presence of various alkenes provides an efficient way to synthesize a variety of 4-(1-alkenyl)-3-arylisoquinolines in moderate to excellent yields. The introduction of an ortho-methoxy group on the arylaldimine promotes the Pd-catalyzed cyclization and stabilizes the resulting Pd(II) intermediate, improving the yields of the isoquinoline products. Highly substituted naphthalenes have been synthesized by the palladium-catalyzed annulation of a variety of internal alkynes, in which two new carbon-carbon bonds are formed in a single step under relatively mild reaction conditions. This method has also been used to synthesize carbazoles, although a higher reaction temperature is necessary. The process involves arylpalladation of the alkyne, followed by intramolecular Heck olefination and double bond isomerization. This method accommodates a variety of functional groups and affords the anticipated highly substituted naphthalenes and carbazoles in good to excellent yields. Novel palladium migratiodarylation methodology for the synthesis of complex fused polycycles has been developed, in which one or more sequential Pd-catalyzed intramolecular migration processes involving C-H activation are employed. The chemistry works best with electron-rich aromatics, which is in agreement with the idea that

  15. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengtao Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Copper-catalyzed (or -mediated asymmetric coupling reactions have received significant attention over the past few years. Especially the coupling reactions of aryl or alkyl halides with nucleophiles became a very powerful tool for the formation of C–C, C–N, C–O and other carbon–heteroatom bonds as well as for the construction of heteroatom-containing ring systems. This review summarizes the recent progress in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions for the formation of C–C and carbon–heteroatom bonds.

  16. The mechanism of Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation of phenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    竹湘锋; 徐新华

    2004-01-01

    Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation yielded better degradation rate and extent of COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) or oxalic acid as compared with oxidation by ozone alone. Two parameters with strong effects on the efficiency of ozonation are pH of the solution and the catalyst (Fe3+) dosage. The existence of a critical pH value determining the catalysis of Fe (Ⅲ) in acid conditions was observed in phenol and oxalic acid systems. The best efficiency of catalysis was obtained at a moderate concentration of the catalyst. A reasonable mechanism of Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation of phenol was obtained based on the results and literature.

  17. Esterification of phenolic acids catalyzed by lipases immobilized in organogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoumpanioti, M; Merianou, E; Karandreas, T; Stamatis, H; Xenakis, A

    2010-10-01

    Lipases from Rhizomucor miehei and Candida antarctica B were immobilized in hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose organogels based on surfactant-free microemulsions consisting of n-hexane, 1-propanol and water. Both lipases kept their catalytic activity, catalyzing the esterification reactions of various phenolic acids including cinnamic acid derivatives. High reaction rates and yields (up to 94%) were obtained when lipase from C. antarctica was used. Kinetic studies have been performed and apparent kinetic constants were determined showing that ester synthesis catalyzed by immobilized lipases occurs via the Michaelis-Menten mechanism.

  18. Cyclodextrin-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Cai Bai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins are well-known macrocyclic oligosaccharides that consist of α-(1,4 linked glucose units and have been widely used as artificial enzymes, chiral separators, chemical sensors, and drug excipients, owing to their hydrophobic and chiral interiors. Due to their remarkable inclusion capabilities with small organic molecules, more recent interests focus on organic reactions catalyzed by cyclodextrins. This contribution outlines the current progress in cyclodextrin-catalyzed organic reactions. Particular emphases are given to the organic reaction mechanisms and their applications. In the end, the future directions of research in this field are proposed.

  19. A Phase Transfer Catalyzed Permanganate Oxidation: Preparation of Vanillin from Isoeugenol Acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampman, Gary M.; Sharpe, Steven D.

    1983-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and results are provided for the preparation of vanillin from isoeugenol acetate. Reaction scheme used to prepare the vanillin and a table indicating the different oxidation experiments carried out on isoeugenol or isoeugenol acetate are also provided. (JN)

  20. ELECTRON TRANSFER CATALYZED [2+2] CYCLOREVERSION OF BENZENE DIMERS. (R826113)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. Transfer hydrogenation reactions catalyzed by chiral half-sandwich Ruthenium complexes derived from Proline

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARUN KUMAR PANDIA KUMAR; ASHOKA G SAMUELSON

    2016-09-01

    Chiral ruthenium half-sandwich complexes were prepared using a chelating diamine made from proline with a phenyl, ethyl, or benzyl group, instead of hydrogen on one of the coordinating arms. Three of these complexes were obtained as single diastereoisomers and their configuration identified by X-ray crystallography. The complexes are recyclable catalysts for the reduction of ketones to chiral alcohols in water. A ruthenium hydride species is identified as the active species by NMR spectroscopy and isotopic labelling experiments.Maximum enantio-selectivity was attained when a phenyl group was directly attached to the primary amine on the diamine ligand derived from proline.

  2. Ag-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown on transferable graphite flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob; Kanne, Thomas; Sestoft, Joachim E.;

    2016-01-01

    Semiconducting nanowires grown by quasi-van-der-Waals epitaxy on graphite flakes are a new class of hybrid materials that hold promise for scalable nanostructured devices within opto-electronics. Here we report on high aspect ratio and stacking fault free Ag-seeded InAs nanowires grown......-needle manipulator. Besides the possibilities for fabricating novel nanostructure device designs, we show how this method is used to study the parasitic growth and bicrystal match between the graphite flake and the nanowires by transmission electron microscopy....

  3. Lipase-Catalyzed Aza-Michael Reaction on Acrylate Derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunenberg, P.; Sijm, M.; Zuilhof, H.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Scott, E.L.; Franssen, M.C.R.

    2013-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for an efficient and selective lipase-catalyzed aza-Michael reaction of various amines (primary and secondary) with a series of acrylates and alkylacrylates. Reaction parameters were tuned, and under the optimal conditions it was found that Pseudomonas stutzeri lipas

  4. Rh-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of 1,2-Dicyanoalkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meina; Kong, Duanyang; Zi, Guofu; Hou, Guohua

    2017-01-06

    A highly efficient enantioselective hydrogenation of 1,2-dicyanoalkenes catalyzed by the complex of rhodium and f-spiroPhos has been developed. A series of 1,2-dicyanoalkenes were successfully hydrogenated to the corresponding chiral 1,2-dicyanoalkanes under mild conditions with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 98% ee). This methodology provides efficient access to the asymmetric synthesis of chiral diamines.

  5. Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Titanium Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG XiaoMing

    2001-01-01

    @@ Chiral titanium complexes is very importance catalyst to asymmetric catalytic reactions. A series of catalytic systems based on titanium-chiral ligands complexes has been reported. This presentation will discuss some of our recent progress on asymmetric catalytic reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes.

  6. Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Titanium Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; XiaoMing

    2001-01-01

    Chiral titanium complexes is very importance catalyst to asymmetric catalytic reactions. A series of catalytic systems based on titanium-chiral ligands complexes has been reported. This presentation will discuss some of our recent progress on asymmetric catalytic reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes.  ……

  7. Recent developments in gold-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando López

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last years there have been extraordinary advances in the development of gold-catalyzed cycloaddition processes. In this review we will summarize some of the most remarkable examples, and present the mechanistic rational underlying the transformations.

  8. Palladium-Catalyzed alpha-Arylation of Tetramic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Morten; Dorwald, F. Z.; Peschke, B.;

    2009-01-01

    A mild, racemization-free, palladium-Catalyzed alpha-arylation of tetramic acids (2,4-pyrrolidinediones) has been developed. Various amino acid-derived tetramic acids were cleanly arylated by treatment with 2 mol % of Pd(OAc)(2), 4 mol % of a sterically demanding biaryl phosphine, 2.3 equiv of K2CO...

  9. DNA strand exchange catalyzed by molecular crowding in PEG solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Bobo

    2010-01-01

    DNA strand exchange is catalyzed by molecular crowding and hydrophobic interactions in concentrated aqueous solutions of polyethylene glycol, a discovery of relevance for understanding the function of recombination enzymes and with potential applications to DNA nanotechnology. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. ASYMMETRIC HYDROSILYLATION CATALYZED BY POLYMER—SUPPORTED THIAZOLIDINE RHODIUM CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEIYanohui; LIHong; 等

    1999-01-01

    Asymmetric hydrisilylation catalyzed by polymeric thiazolidine rhodium catalysts was conducted.Almost the same optical yields have been obtained when comb-shaped polymeric ligands and their corresponding monomer complexed rhodium cataltysts were used to asymmetric hydrosilylation of acetophenone.Optical yield of chiral 1-methylbenzyl alcohol reaches as high as 71.5%.Temperature dependence of enantioselective hydrosilylation of acetophenone was discussed.

  11. Palladium-catalyzed silylation of aryl chlorides with hexamethyldisilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Eric; Barder, Timothy E; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2007-09-13

    A method for the palladium-catalyzed silylation of aryl chlorides has been developed. The method affords desired product in good yield, is tolerant of a variety of functional groups, and provides access to a wide variety of aryltrimethylsilanes from commercially available aryl chlorides. Additionally, a one-pot procedure that converts aryl chlorides into aryl iodides has been developed.

  12. Solvent-free lipase-catalyzed preparation of diacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nikolaus; Mukherjee, Kumar D

    2004-08-25

    Various methods have been applied for the enzymatic preparation of diacylglycerols that are used as dietary oils for weight reduction in obesity and related disorders. Interesterification of rapeseed oil triacylglycerols with commercial preparations of monoacylglycerols, such as Monomuls 90-O18, Mulgaprime 90, and Nutrisoft 55, catalyzed by immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme RM IM) in vacuo at 60 degrees C led to extensive (from 60 to 75%) formation of diacylglycerols. Esterification of rapeseed oil fatty acids with Nutrisoft, catalyzed by Lipozyme RM in vacuo at 60 degrees C, also led to extensive (from 60 to 70%) formation of diacylglycerols. Esterification of rapeseed oil fatty acids with glycerol in vacuo at 60 degrees C, catalyzed by Lipozyme RM and lipases from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM) and Candida antarctica (lipase B, Novozym 435), also provided diacylglycerols, however, to a lower extent (40-45%). Glycerolysis of rapeseed oil triacylglycerols with glycerol in vacuo at 60 degrees C, catalyzed by Lipozyme TL and Novozym 435, led to diacylglycerols to the extent of

  13. N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed direct carbonylation of dimethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaonian; Liu, Kun; Xu, Xiaoliang; Ma, Lei; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Dahao; Zhang, Qunfeng; Lu, Chunshan

    2011-07-21

    N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalyzed direct carbonylation of dimethylamine leading to the formation of DMF was successfully accomplished under metal-free conditions. The catalytic efficiency was investigated and the turnover numbers can reach as high as >300. The possible mechanism was also proposed.

  14. Iron-Catalyzed Synthesis of Sulfur-Containing Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosset, Cyril; Lefebvre, Gauthier; Angibaud, Patrick; Stansfield, Ian; Meerpoel, Lieven; Berthelot, Didier; Guérinot, Amandine; Cossy, Janine

    2016-10-13

    An iron-catalyzed synthesis of sulfur- and sulfone-containing heterocycles is reported. The method is based on the cyclization of readily available substrates and proceeded with high efficiency and diastereoselectivity. A variety of sulfur-containing heterocycles bearing moieties suitable for subsequent functionalization are prepared. Illustrative examples of such postcyclization modifications are also presented.

  15. Lipase-Catalyzed Modification of Canola Oil with Caprylic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yingyao; Luan, Xia; Xu, Xuebing

    Lipase-catalyzed acidolysis of canola oil with caprylic acid was performed to produce structured lipids. Six commercial lipases from different sources were screened for their ability to incorporate the caprylic acid into the canola oil. The positional distribution of FA on the glycerol backbone o...

  16. Gal3 Catalyzed Tetrahydropyranylation of Alcohols and Phenols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN, Pei-Pei(孙培培); HU, Zhi-Xin(胡志新)

    2004-01-01

    In dichloromethane, the nucleophilic addition of alcohols or phenols to 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran (DHP) was catalyzed effectively by gallium triiodide which was generated in situ by the reaction of gallium metal and iodine to give the corresponding tetrahydropyranyl acetals in good to excellent yields.

  17. Catalyzing new product adoption at the base of the pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinakis, Y.D.; Walsh, S.T.; Harms, R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the more perplexing of the entrepreneurial issues at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) is how to catalyze new product adoption by BoP consumers. Because S-shaped adoption dynamics are the result of cultural transmission bias, the question can be rephrased as, how can an entrepreneur overcome conf

  18. Rh-Catalyzed arylation of fluorinated ketones with arylboronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Luca S; Pattison, Graham

    2016-09-25

    The Rh-catalyzed arylation of fluorinated ketones with boronic acids is reported. This efficient process allows access to fluorinated alcohols in high yields under mild conditions. Competition experiments suggest that difluoromethyl ketones are more reactive than trifluoromethyl ketones in this process, despite their decreased electronic activation, an effect we postulate to be steric in origin.

  19. Rhodium catalyzed arylation of diazo compounds with aryl boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorai, Jayanta; Anbarasan, Pazhamalai

    2015-04-03

    A general and efficient synthesis of diarylacetate, a diarylmethine derivative, was accomplished through rhodium catalyzed direct arylation of diazo compounds with arylboronic acids. The reaction tolerates various boronic acid derivatives and functional groups. Notably, chemoselective arylation of diazo compounds over other electrophiles were demonstrated. The efficacy of the developed methodology is shown by the expeditious synthesis of the core structure of diclofensine.

  20. Palladium-catalyzed enantioselective conjugate addition of arylboronic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gini, F; Hessen, B; Minnaard, AJ

    2005-01-01

    The first asymmetric palladium-catalyzed conjugate addition of arylboronic acids to alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, ketones, and esters is described. For cyclic substrates, excellent chemo-, regio-, and enantioselectivities are achieved when a Pd(O2CCF3)(2)/DuPHOS catalyst is applied.

  1. Amylase catalyzed synthesis of glycosyl acrylates and their polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Wouter M.J.; Jovanovic, Danijela; Brouwer, Sander; Loos, Katja

    2014-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of novel (di)saccharide acrylates from starch and 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate (2-HEA, 2-HEMA and 4-HBA) catalyzed by various commercially available amylase preparations is demonstrated. Both liquefaction and saccharificatio

  2. Enantioselective N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed synthesis of trifluoromethyldihydropyridinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Ling; Liang, Zhi-Qin; Chen, Kun-Quan; Sun, De-Qun; Ye, Song

    2015-06-05

    The enantioselective N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed [4 + 2] cyclocondensation of α-chloroaldehydes and trifluoromethyl N-Boc azadienes was developed, giving the corresponding 3,4-disubstituted-6-trifluoromethyldihydropyridin-2(1H)-ones in good yields with exclusive cis-selectivities and excellent enantioselectivities.

  3. ReBr(CO)5-Catalyzed Knoevenagel Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Wei-xiong; HUA Rui-mao; SUN Hong-bin

    2004-01-01

    Knoevenagel condensations are especially important reactions for the synthesis of alkene compounds having electron-withdrawing groups such as COR,CN,COOR,NO2 etc. Recently,transition metal hydride ruthenium1, hydride and polyhydride rhenium2, and polyhydride iridium complexes have been found to be the efficient catalysts for Knoevenagle condensation. However the mentioned-above transition metal hydride complexes are not easily prepared. In addition, all of them are oxygen and H2O-sensitive, unstable compands. Therefor the catalytic reactions are required to be carried out under an inert atmosphere, and using the prepurified reagent.In the paper, We wish to report the development of Knoevenagel condensation catalyzed by ReBr(CO)5 under an air atmosphere in the absence of solvent.All the experiments were carried out under 1atm, without solvent.The resuIts of the representative Knoevenagel condensations are summarized in Table 1.The Knoevenagel reaction with diethyl malonate can be catalyzed by ReBr(CO)5, while the present Knoevenagel reactions catalyzed by transition metal have at least one cyano group in active methylene compouds.A propose mechanism for present catalytic coupling dehydration reactions is also illustrated in the paper.Briefly, this paper reports the ReBr(CO)5-catalyzed Knoevenagel reaction. The reaction is a new method for the Konevenagel condensation.

  4. Phosphine-catalyzed [3+2] annulation of cyanoallenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinderman, S.S.; van Maarseveen, J.H.; Hiemstra, H.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanoallenes were successfully used in organophosphine-catalyzed [3+2]-type annulation to give cyano-substituted dihydropyrroles in good yield. Chiral phosphines were also screened, leading to some initial results in the asymmetric version of cyano­allene-based annulations.

  5. Platinum-catalyzed hydroformylation of terminal and internal octenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duren, R.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Vogt, D.

    2007-01-01

    A brief historic overview of Pt/Sn-catalyzed hydroformylation as well as recent advances in the hydroformylation of internal alkenes is provided. This serves as background for the results obtained with the [Pt(Sixantphos)Cl2] system, for which the molecular structure and the spectroscopic data are

  6. Synthesis of lactams using enzyme-catalyzed aminolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavila, E.; Loos, K.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of e-caprolactam from 6-aminocaproic acid catalyzed by CALB (N435) is reported. Different lactam ring sizes can be prepared starting from 4-aminobutanoic acid, 5-aminovaleric acid, and 8-aminooctanoic acid. Experiments with mixtures of aminocarboxylic acids have shown that CALB prefers

  7. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  8. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...

  9. [The influence of two-month treatment with bromocryptine on activity of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system in the myocardium and testes of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, K V; Bondareva, V M; Moyseyuk, I V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are cardiovascular diseases and dysfunctions of the reproductive system, indicating the urgency of developing new approaches to their correction. Last years for the treatment of DM2 began to use bromocryptine (BC), the agonist of type 2 dopamine receptors, which not only restores the energy metabolism, but also prevents the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms and targets of BC action are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BC treatment on functional activity of adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the myocardium and testes of male rats with DM2, which is caused by high-fat diet and treatment with streptozotocin (25 mg/kg). The treatment with BC (60 days, orally at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg once every two days) was started 90 days after the beginning of high-fat diet. Diabetic rats had an increased body weight, elevated triglycerides level, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. The treatment with BC resulted in the restoration of glycometabolic indicators and in the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp), relaxin, and agonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β3-AR)--isoproterenol and norepinephrine were decreased in the miocardium of the diabetic rats. The corresponding effects of the β-agonists BRL-37344 and CL-316243 was preserved. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on forskolin-stimulated AC activity was attenuated, while the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline mediated through α2-AR increased. The treatment with BC resulted in the normalization of the adrenergic signaling in the myocardium and partially restoration of AC effects of relaxin and somatostatin. In the testes of diabetic rats, the basal and stimulated by GppNHp, forskolin, human chorionic gonadotropin and pituitary AC-activating polypeptide AC activity were decreased, and the

  10. Application of Grote-Hynes theory to the reaction catalyzed by thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Natalia; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent

    2010-10-28

    A theoretical study of dynamic effects on the rate-limiting step of the thymidylate synthase catalyzed reaction has been carried out by means of Grote-Hynes theory, successfully predicting the values of the recrossing effects for a chemical reaction that involves the transfer of a classical light particle. The transmission coefficients, obtained at 278, 293, 303, and 313 K, are almost invariant and in all cases far from unity, revealing a significant coupling of the environment motions and the reaction coordinate. Nevertheless, their energetic contribution to the activation free energy represents less than 0.50 kcal/mol for each of the four tested temperatures. Calculation of the transmission coefficient for the isotopically labeled hydride transfer has rendered almost the same values, in agreement with the experimentally observed temperature-independent KIEs. Fourier transform of the time-dependent friction kernel at these four temperatures has allowed obtaining the transition-state friction spectra, which present very small dependence with temperature. Their analysis has led to the identification of some key vibrational modes governing the coupling between the reaction coordinate and the protein environment, thus identifying the relevant motions in the active site and obtaining a full picture of the role of each amino acid.

  11. Simple and Efficient Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidation of Primary Alcohols with Molecular Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ritwika; Chandra, Shubhadeep; Maiti, Debabrata; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative transformations utilizing molecular oxygen (O2 ) as the stoichiometric oxidant are of paramount importance in organic synthesis from ecological and economical perspectives. Alcohol oxidation reactions that employ O2 are scarce in homogeneous catalysis and the efficacy of such systems has been constrained by limited substrate scope (most involve secondary alcohol oxidation) or practical factors, such as the need for an excess of base or an additive. Catalytic systems employing O2 as the "primary" oxidant, in the absence of any additive, are rare. A solution to this longstanding issue is offered by the development of an efficient ruthenium-catalyzed oxidation protocol, which enables smooth oxidation of a wide variety of primary, as well as secondary benzylic, allylic, heterocyclic, and aliphatic, alcohols with molecular oxygen as the primary oxidant and without any base or hydrogen- or electron-transfer agents. Most importantly, a high degree of selectivity during alcohol oxidation has been predicted for complex settings. Preliminary mechanistic studies including (18) O labeling established the in situ formation of an oxo-ruthenium intermediate as the active catalytic species in the cycle and involvement of a two-electron hydride transfer in the rate-limiting step.

  12. Alkyne-azide click reaction catalyzed by metallic copper under ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintas, Pedro; Barge, Alessandro; Tagliapietra, Silvia; Boffa, Luisa; Cravotto, Giancarlo

    2010-03-01

    This protocol is for the ultrasound (US)-assisted 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes using metallic copper (Cu) as the catalyst. The azido group is a willing participant in this kind of organic reaction and its coupling with alkynes is substantially improved in the presence of Cu(I). This protocol does not require additional ligands and proceeds with excellent yields. The Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is generally recognized as the most striking example of 'click chemistry'. Reactions involving metals represent the favorite domain of sonochemistry because US favors mechanical depassivation and enhances both mass transfer and electron transfer from the metal to the organic acceptor. The reaction rate increases still further when simultaneous US and microwave irradiation are applied. The US-assisted click synthesis has been applied for the preparation of a wide range of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole derivatives starting both from small molecules and oligomers such as cyclodextrins (CDs). Using this efficient and greener protocol, all the adducts can be synthesized in 2-4 h (including work-up and excluding characterization). Click chemistry has been shown to be able to directly link chemistry to biology, thus becoming a true interdisciplinary reaction with extremely wide applicability.

  13. Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Etheric C–O Bond Cleavage Catalyzed by Lanthanide Triflates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Atesin, Abdurrahman C.; Li, Zhi; Curtiss, Larry A.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-09-06

    Efficient and selective cleavage of etheric C-O bonds is crucial for converting biomass into platform chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. In this contribution, computational methods at the DFT B3LYP level of theory are employed to understand the efficacy of lanthanide triflate catalysts (Ln(OTf)3, Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Yb, and Lu) in cleaving etheric C-O bonds. In agreement with experiment, the calculations indicate that the reaction pathway for C-O cleavage occurs via a C-H → O-H proton transfer in concert with weakening of the C-O bond of the coordinated ether substrate to ultimately yield a coordinated alkenol. The activation energy for this process falls as the lanthanide ionic radius decreases, reflecting enhanced metal ion electrophilicity. Details of the reaction mechanism for Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed ring opening are explored in depth, and for 1-methyl-d3-butyl phenyl ether, the computed primary kinetic isotope effect of 2.4 is in excellent agreement with experiment (2.7), confirming that etheric ring-opening pathway involves proton transfer from the methyl group alpha to the etheric oxygen atom, which is activated by the electrophilic lanthanide ion. Calculations of the catalytic pathway using eight different ether substrates indicate that the more rapid cleavage of acyclic versus cyclic ethers is largely due to entropic effects, with the former C-O bond scission processes increasing the degrees of freedom/particles as the transition state is approached.

  14. An Alternative Mechanism for the Methylation of Phosphoethanolamine Catalyzed by Plasmodium falciparum Phosphoethanolamine Methyltransferase*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saen-oon, Suwipa; Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M.; Guallar, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The phosphobase methylation pathway catalyzed by the phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase in Plasmodium falciparum (PfPMT), the malaria parasite, offers an attractive target for anti-parasitic drug development. PfPMT methylates phosphoethanolamine (pEA) to phosphocholine for use in membrane biogenesis. Quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations tested the proposed reaction mechanism for methylation of pEA involving the previously identified Tyr-19–His-132 dyad, which indicated an energetically unfavorable mechanism. Instead, the QM/MM calculations suggested an alternative mechanism involving Asp-128. The reaction coordinate involves the stepwise transfer of a proton to Asp-128 via a bridging water molecule followed by a typical Sn2-type methyl transfer from S-adenosylmethionine to pEA. Functional analysis of the D128A, D128E, D128Q, and D128N PfPMT mutants shows a loss of activity with pEA but not with the final substrate of the methylation pathway. X-ray crystal structures of the PfPMT-D128A mutant in complex with S-adenosylhomocysteine and either pEA or phosphocholine reveal how mutation of Asp-128 disrupts a hydrogen bond network in the active site. The combined QM/MM, biochemical, and structural studies identify a key role for Asp-128 in the initial step of the phosphobase methylation pathway in Plasmodium and provide molecular insight on the evolution of multiple activities in the active site of the PMT. PMID:25288796

  15. Kinetics of Horseradish Peroxidase-Catalyzed Nitration of Phenol in a Biphasic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Mingming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Qida; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2017-02-28

    The use of peroxidase in the nitration of phenols is gaining interest as compared with traditional chemical reactions. We investigated the kinetic characteristics of phenol nitration catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in an aqueous-organic biphasic system using n-butanol as the organic solvent and NO2(-) and H2O2 as substrates. The reaction rate was mainly controlled by the reaction kinetics in the aqueous phase when appropriate agitation was used to enhance mass transfer in the biphasic system. The initial velocity of the reaction increased with increasing HRP concentration. Additionally, an increase in the substrate concentrations of phenol (0-2 mM in organic phase) or H2O2 (0-0.1 mM in aqueous phase) enhanced the nitration efficiency catalyzed by HRP. In contrast, high concentrations of organic solvent decreased the kinetic parameter Vmax/Km. No inhibition of enzyme activity was observed when the concentrations of phenol and H2O2 were at or below 10 mM and 0.1 mM, respectively. On the basis of the peroxidase catalytic mechanism, a double-substrate ping-pong kinetic model was established. The kinetic parameters were Km(H2O2)= 1.09 mM, Km(PhOH) = 9.45 mM, and Vmax = 0.196 mM/min. The proposed model was well fit to the data obtained from additional independent experiments under the suggested optimal synthesis conditions. The kinetic model developed in this paper lays a foundation for further comprehensive study of enzymatic nitration kinetics.

  16. Transition state for the NSD2-catalyzed methylation of histone H3 lysine 36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Myles B; Schneck, Jessica L; Matico, Rosalie E; McDevitt, Patrick J; Huddleston, Michael J; Hou, Wangfang; Johnson, Neil W; Thrall, Sara H; Meek, Thomas D; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-02-02

    Nuclear receptor SET domain containing protein 2 (NSD2) catalyzes the methylation of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36). It is a determinant in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and is overexpressed in human multiple myeloma. Despite the relevance of NSD2 to cancer, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of this enzyme reported. Here, a combination of kinetic isotope effect measurements and quantum chemical modeling was used to provide subangstrom details of the transition state structure for NSD2 enzymatic activity. Kinetic isotope effects were measured for the methylation of isolated HeLa cell nucleosomes by NSD2. NSD2 preferentially catalyzes the dimethylation of H3K36 along with a reduced preference for H3K36 monomethylation. Primary Me-(14)C and (36)S and secondary Me-(3)H3, Me-(2)H3, 5'-(14)C, and 5'-(3)H2 kinetic isotope effects were measured for the methylation of H3K36 using specifically labeled S-adenosyl-l-methionine. The intrinsic kinetic isotope effects were used as boundary constraints for quantum mechanical calculations for the NSD2 transition state. The experimental and calculated kinetic isotope effects are consistent with an SN2 chemical mechanism with methyl transfer as the first irreversible chemical step in the reaction mechanism. The transition state is a late, asymmetric nucleophilic displacement with bond separation from the leaving group at (2.53 Å) and bond making to the attacking nucleophile (2.10 Å) advanced at the transition state. The transition state structure can be represented in a molecular electrostatic potential map to guide the design of inhibitors that mimic the transition state geometry and charge.

  17. Identification and characterization of sulfonyltransferases catalyzing ethyl sulfate formation and their inhibition by polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, Nicole; Skopp, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl sulfate (EtS) is a minor metabolite of ethanol, usually being present along with ethyl glucuronide in both blood and urine. At present, there have been few studies on sulfotransferases (SULTs) catalyzing EtS formation. Moreover, inhibition by nutritional components on EtS formation, e.g., polyphenols that are extensively sulfonated, has not been addressed at all. Firstly, the incubation procedure was optimized with regard to buffer, substrate concentration, and incubation time. Recombinant SULT enzymes including SULT1A1, 1A3, 1B1, 1E1, and 2A1 were screened for their activity towards ethanol; subsequently, respective kinetics was investigated. The inhibitory potential of resveratrol, quercetin, and kaempferol being abundant in beer and wine was studied thereafter. Analysis was performed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using deuterated EtS as the internal standard. All enzymes are involved in the sulfonation of ethanol; respective kinetics followed the Michaelis-Menten model. Among the five SULTs under investigation, SULT1A1 displayed the highest activity towards ethanol followed by SULT2A1. Polyphenols significantly reduced the formation of EtS. Results revealed multiple SULT isoforms being capable of catalyzing the transfer of a sulfo group to ethanol; nevertheless, the relevance of SULTs' polymorphism on the sulfonation of ethanol needs further appraisal. Nutritional components such as polyphenols effectively inhibit formation of EtS; this observation may partly serve as an explanation of the highly inter-individual variability of EtS findings in both blood and urine.

  18. ErbB3/HER3 intracellular domain is competent to bind ATP and catalyze autophosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Fumin; Telesco, Shannon E.; Liu, Yingting; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN); (UPENN-MED)

    2010-06-21

    ErbB3/HER3 is one of four members of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER) or ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family. ErbB3 binds neuregulins via its extracellular region and signals primarily by heterodimerizing with ErbB2/HER2/Neu. A recently appreciated role for ErbB3 in resistance of tumor cells to EGFR/ErbB2-targeted therapeutics has made it a focus of attention. However, efforts to inactivate ErbB3 therapeutically in parallel with other ErbB receptors are challenging because its intracellular kinase domain is thought to be an inactive pseudokinase that lacks several key conserved (and catalytically important) residues - including the catalytic base aspartate. We report here that, despite these sequence alterations, ErbB3 retains sufficient kinase activity to robustly trans-autophosphorylate its intracellular region - although it is substantially less active than EGFR and does not phosphorylate exogenous peptides. The ErbB3 kinase domain binds ATP with a K{sub d} of approximately 1.1 {micro}M. We describe a crystal structure of ErbB3 kinase bound to an ATP analogue, which resembles the inactive EGFR and ErbB4 kinase domains (but with a shortened {alpha}C-helix). Whereas mutations that destabilize this configuration activate EGFR and ErbB4 (and promote EGFR-dependent lung cancers), a similar mutation conversely inactivates ErbB3. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we delineate a reaction pathway for ErbB3-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer that does not require the conserved catalytic base and can be catalyzed by the 'inactive-like'configuration observed crystallographically. These findings suggest that ErbB3 kinase activity within receptor dimers may be crucial for signaling and could represent an important therapeutic target.

  19. Non-raft adenylyl cyclase 2 defines a cAMP signaling compartment that selectively regulates IL-6 expression in airway smooth muscle cells: differential regulation of gene expression by AC isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Amy S; Birg, Anna V; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2014-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms differ in their tissue distribution, cellular localization, regulation, and protein interactions. Most cell types express multiple AC isoforms. We hypothesized that cAMP produced by different AC isoforms regulates unique cellular responses in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC). Overexpression of AC2, AC3, or AC6 had distinct effects on forskolin (Fsk)-induced expression of a number of known cAMP-responsive genes. These data show that different AC isoforms can differentially regulate gene expression. Most notable, overexpression and activation of AC2 enhanced interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression, but overexpression of AC3 or AC6 had no effect. IL-6 production by BSMC was induced by Fsk and select G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, though IL-6 levels did not directly correlate with global cAMP levels. Treatment with PKA selective 6-Bnz-cAMP or Epac selective 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP cAMP analogs revealed a predominant role for PKA in cAMP-mediated induction of IL-6. IL-6 promoter mutations demonstrated that AP-1 and CRE transcription sites were required for Fsk to stimulate IL-6 expression. Our present study defines an AC2 cAMP signaling compartment that specifically regulates IL-6 expression in BSMC via Epac and PKA and demonstrates that other AC isoforms are excluded from this pool.

  20. [BETA-ADRENERGIC REGULATION OF THE ADENYLYL CYCLASE SIGNALING SYSTEM IN MYOCARDIUM AND BRAIN OF RATS WITH OBESITY AND TYPES 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND THE EFFECT OF LONG-TERM INTRANASAL INSULIN TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, L A; Sharova, T S; Pertseva, M N; Shpakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    The stimulating effect of norepinephrine, isoproterenol and selective β-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) agonists BRL 37344 and CL 316.243 on the adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the brain and myocardium of young and mature rats (disease induction at 2 and 4 months, respectively) with experimental obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), and the influence of long-term treatment of animals with intranasal insulin (I-I) were studied. The AC stimulatory effects of β-agonist isoproterenol in animals with obesity and DM2 was shown to be practically unchanged. The respective effects of norepinephrine on the AC activity were attenuated in the brain of young and mature rats and in the myocardium if mature rats, and the I-I treatment led to their partial recovery. In the brain and myocardium of mature rats with obesity and DM2, the enhancement of the AC stimulatory effects of β3-AR agonists was observed, white in young rats the influence of the same pathological conditions was lacking. The I-I treatment decreased the AC stimulatory effects of β3-agonists to their levels in the control. Since functional disruption of the adrenergic agonist-sensitive ACSS can lead to metabolic syndrome and DM2, the recovery of this system by the I-I treatment offers one of the ways to correct these diseases and their complications in the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  1. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions. Part 3. Hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1994-11-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the hydrolase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: The reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement [temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used]; the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 145 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  2. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Part 4. Lyases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1995-09-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the lyase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: the reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement (temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used); the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 106 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  3. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Part 2. Transferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1994-07-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the transferase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: the reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement [temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used]; the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 285 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  4. Mechanism of Intramolecular Rhodium- and Palladium-Catalyzed Alkene Alkoxyfunctionalizations

    KAUST Repository

    Vummaleti, Sai V. C.

    2015-11-13

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the reaction mechanism for the [Rh]-catalyzed intramolecular alkoxyacylation ([Rh] = [RhI(dppp)+] (dppp, 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) and [Pd]/BPh3 dual catalytic system assisted intramolecular alkoxycyanation ([Pd] = Pd-Xantphos) using acylated and cyanated 2-allylphenol derivatives as substrates, respectively. Our results substantially confirm the proposed mechanism for both [Rh]- and [Pd]/ BPh3-mediated alkoxyfunctionalizations, offering a detailed geometrical and energetical understanding of all the elementary steps. Furthermore, for the [Rh]-mediated alkoxyacylation, our observations support the hypothesis that the quinoline group of the substrate is crucial to stabilize the acyl metal complex and prevent further decarbonylation. For [Pd]/BPh3-catalyzed alkoxycyanation, our findings clarify how the Lewis acid BPh3 cocatalyst accelerates the only slow step of the reaction, corresponding to the oxidative addition of the cyanate O-CN bond to the Pd center. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  5. Microcalorimetric Study on Tyrosine Oxidation Catalyzed by Tyrosinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Through the method of initial heat release rate, the kinetic property of tyrosine oxidationcatalyzed by tyrosinase from Pseudomonas maltophilia was investigated using a LKB-2107 batchmicrocalorimeter. Tyrosine was catalyzed and oxidized into L-dopa, then into melanin catalyzed bytyrosinase. We found that the tyrosinase reaction obeyed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and at298.15K and pH 7.0, the initial exothermic rate (Ω0) are in the range of0.1567~0.5704 mJ@ s-1, themaximum exothermic rate (Ωmax) are in 0.4152 ~ 0.8143mol @ L-1, and mean value of the Michaelisconstant (Km) is 2.199±0.105×104 mol @ L-1.

  6. Polymerization of phenols catalyzed by peroxidase in nonaqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dordick, J.S.; Marletta, M.A.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Polymers produced by horseradish-peroxidase-catalyzed coupling of phenols have been explored as potential substitutes for phenol-formaldehyde resins. To overcome low substrate solubilities and product molecular weights in water, enzymatic polymerizations in aqueous-organic mixtures have been examined. Peroxidase vigorously polymerizes a number of phenols in mixtures of water with water-miscible solvents such as dioxane, acetone, dimethylformamide, and methyl formate with the solvent content up to 95%. As a result, various phenolic polymers with average molecular weights from 400 to 2.6 x 10/sup 4/ D were obtained depending on the reaction medium composition and the nature of the phenol. Peroxidase-catalyzed copolymerization of different phenols in 85% dioxane was demonstrated. Poly(p-phenylphenol) and poly(p-cresol) were enzymatically prepared on a gram scale. They had much higher melting points, and in addition, poly(p-phenylphenol) was found to have a much higher electrical conductivity than phenol-formaldehyde resins.

  7. Effect of urate on the lactoperoxidase catalyzed oxidation of adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvstad, Rolf A

    2004-12-01

    Lactoperoxidase is an iron containing enzyme, which is an essential component of the defense system of mammalian secretary fluids. The enzyme readily oxidizes adrenaline and other catecholamines to coloured aminochrome products. A Km-value of 1.21 mM and a catalytic constant (k = Vmax/[Enz]) of 15.5 x 10(3) min(-1) characterized the reaction between lactoperoxidase and adrenaline at pH 7.4. Urate was found to activate the enzyme catalyzed oxidation of adrenaline in a competitive manner, the effect decreasing with increasing adrenaline concentration. Lactoperoxidase was able to catalyze the oxidation of urate. However, urate was a much poorer substrate than adrenaline, and it seems unlikely that urate activates by functioning as a free, redox cycling intermediate between enzyme and adrenaline. The activation mechanism probably involves an urate-lactoperoxidase complex.

  8. Silylation of Dinitrogen Catalyzed by Hydridodinitrogentris(TriphenylphosphineCobalt(I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech I. Dzik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, homogeneous cobalt systems were reported to catalyze the reductive silylation of dinitrogen. In this study the investigations on the silylation of dinitrogen catalyzed by CoH(PPh33N2 are presented. We show that in the presence of the title compound, the reaction of N2 with trimethylsilylchloride and sodium yields, on average, 6.7 equivalents of tris(trimethylsilylamine per Co atom in THF (tetrahydrofuran. The aim was to elucidate whether the active catalyst is: (a the [Co(PPh33N2]− anion formed after two-electron reduction of the title compound; or (b a species formed via decomposition of CoH(PPh33N2 in the presence of the highly reactive substrates. Time profile, and IR and EPR spectroscopic investigations show instability of the pre-catalyst under the applied conditions which suggests that the catalytically active species is formed through in situ modification of the pre-catalyst.

  9. Technology transfer by multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyantyn Zuzik

    2003-01-01

    The paper analyses the issue of technology transfer by multinational corporations. The following questions are explored: (a) world market of technologies, the role of MNCs (b) Choice of the technology transfer mode, Dunning's OLI-theory as a factor of the choice of the mode of transfer (c) measurement and profitability of technology transfer (d) transfer of technology through partnerships, JVs, alliances and through M&As (e) aspects of technology transfer by services multinationals. Paper uti...

  10. Technology transfer by multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The paper analyses the issue of technology transfer by multinational corporations. The following questions are explored: (a) world market of technologies, the role of MNCs (b) Choice of the technology transfer mode, Dunning's OLI-theory as a factor of the choice of the mode of transfer (c) measurement and profitability of technology transfer (d) transfer of technology through partnerships, JVs, alliances and through M&As (e) aspects of technology transfer by services multinationals. Paper uti...

  11. Cell-surface acceleration of urokinase-catalyzed receptor cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Ploug, M; Behrendt, N;

    1997-01-01

    937 cell lysates, had the same amino termini as uPAR(2+3), generated by uPA in a purified system. In both cases cleavage had occurred at two positions in the hinge region connecting domain 1 and 2, between Arg83-Ala84 and Arg89-Ser90, respectively. The uPA-catalyzed cleavage of uPAR is a new negative...

  12. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijay Shrestha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N’,N’-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1 as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields.

  13. Pd-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination of aryl bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Geun; Milner, Phillip J; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2014-03-12

    On the basis of mechanism-driven reaction design, a Pd-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination of aryl bromides and iodides has been developed. The method exhibits a broad substrate scope, especially with respect to nitrogen-containing heteroaryl bromides, and proceeds with minimal formation of the corresponding reduction products. A facilitated ligand modification process was shown to be critical to the success of the reaction.

  14. Gold-catalyzed oxidative cycloadditions to activate a quinoline framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huple, Deepak B; Ghorpade, Satish; Liu, Rai-Shung

    2013-09-23

    Going for gold! Gold-catalyzed reactions of 3,5- and 3,6-dienynes with 8-alkylquinoline oxides results in an oxidative cycloaddition with high stereospecificity (see scheme; EWG = electron-withdrawing group); this process involves a catalytic activation of a quinoline framework. The reaction mechanism involves the intermediacy of α-carbonyl pyridinium ylides (I) in a concerted [3+2]-cycloaddition with a tethered alkene.

  15. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer.

  16. Copper-catalyzed Decarboxylative Hydroboration: Synthesis of Vinyl Boronic Esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irudayanathan, Francis Mariaraj; Raja, Gabriel Charles Edwin; Kim, Han-Sung; Na, Kyungsu; Lee, Sunwoo [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Vinyl boronic esters were synthesized from aryl alkynyl carboxylic acids and bis(pinacolato)diboron using a copper-catalyzed decarboxylative reaction. The reaction was conducted with CuI (10 mol %), bis-[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl]ether(20 mol %), and LiOMe (20 mol %) in DMSO at 50 .deg. C for 16 h. This method provided the desired vinyl boronic esters in good-to-moderate yields and showed good functional group tolerance.

  17. Silver-Catalyzed C(sp(3))-H Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Jun; Kanai, Motomu

    2017-03-17

    A silver-catalyzed chlorination of benzylic, tertiary, and secondary C(sp(3))-H bonds was developed. The reaction proceeded with as low as 0.2 mol % catalyst loading at room temperature under air atmosphere with synthetically useful functional group compatibility. The regioselectivity and reactivity tendencies suggest that the chlorination proceeded through a radical pathway, but an intermediate alkylsilver species cannot be ruled out.

  18. Comparing Ru and Fe-catalyzed olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poater, Albert; Chaitanya Vummaleti, Sai Vikrama; Pump, Eva; Cavallo, Luigi

    2014-08-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to explore the potential of Fe-based complexes with an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, as olefin metathesis catalysts. Apart from a less endothermic reaction energy profile, a small reduction in the predicted upper energy barriers (≈ 2 kcal mol(-1)) is calculated in the Fe catalyzed profile with respect to the Ru catalysed profile. Overall, this study indicates that Fe-based catalysts have the potential to be very effective olefin metathesis catalysts.

  19. Predictive Modeling of Metal-Catalyzed Polyolefin Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Khare, Neeraj Prasad

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation describes the essential modeling components and techniques for building comprehensive polymer process models for metal-catalyzed polyolefin processes. The significance of this work is that it presents a comprehensive approach to polymer process modeling applied to large-scale commercial processes. Most researchers focus only on polymerization mechanisms and reaction kinetics, and neglect physical properties and phase equilibrium. Both physical properties and phase equilib...

  20. Synthesis of heterocycles through transition-metal-catalyzed isomerization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishoey, Mette; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2014-07-14

    Metal-catalyzed isomerization of N- and O-allylic systems is emerging as an effective method to form synthetically useful iminium and oxocarbenium intermediates. In the presence of tethered nucleophiles, several recent examples illuminate this approach as a powerful strategy for the synthesis of structurally complex and diverse heterocycles. In this Concept article, we attempt to cover this area of research through a selection of recent versatile examples.

  1. Biodiesel by acid-catalyzed transesterification with butanol

    OpenAIRE

    Bynes, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Jatropha oil and Rapeseed oil was transesterified with n-butanol by the use of H2SO4. Before conducting the experiments a review of the effect of alcohol type was preformed. Alcohols from methanol to butanol, branched and straight, were reviewed for the effect on the acid catalyzed transesterification reaction. From the review it was found that propanol and butanol were the best for the acidic transesterification reaction. Variables such as time, temperature, alcohol amount and catalyst c...

  2. Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of N-Aryl Carbamates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Park, Nathaniel H.; Fors, Brett P.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of aryl carbamates was achieved by introducing alcohols into the reaction of palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling of ArX (X = Cl, OTf) with sodium cyanate. The use of aryl triflates as electrophilic components in this transformation allowed for an expanded substrate scope for direct synthesis of aryl isocyanates. This methodology provides direct access to major carbamate protecting groups, S-thiocarbamates, and diisocyanate precursors to polyurethane materials. PMID:23441814

  3. Cobalt-catalyzed formation of symmetrical biaryls and its mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncomble, Aurélien; Le Floch, Pascal; Gosmini, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    Effective devotion: An efficient cobalt-catalyzed method devoted to the formation of symmetrical biaryls is described avoiding the preparation of organometallic reagents. Various aromatic halides functionalized by a variety of reactive group reagents are employed. Preliminary DFT calculations have shown that the involvement of a Co(I)/Co(III) couple is realistic at least in the case of 1,3-diazadienes as ligands (FG = functional group).

  4. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogenic aromatic and heterocyclic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlewska-Roberts, Katarzyna M; Teitel, Candee H; Lay, Jackson O; Roberts, Dean W; Kadlubar, Fred F

    2004-12-01

    Lactoperoxidase, an enzyme secreted from the human mammary gland, plays a host defensive role through antimicrobial activity. It has been implicated in mutagenic and carcinogenic activation in the human mammary gland. The potential role of heterocyclic and aromatic amines in the etiology of breast cancer led us to examination of the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of the most commonly studied arylamine carcinogens: 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]-pyridine (PhIP), benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx). In vitro activation was performed with lactoperoxidase (partially purified from bovine milk or human milk) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and calf thymus DNA. Products formed during enzymatic activation were monitored by HPLC with ultraviolet and radiometric detection. Two of these products were characterized as hydrazo and azo derivatives by means of mass spectrometry. The DNA binding level of 3H- and 14C-radiolabeled amines after peroxidase-catalyzed activation was dependent on the hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the highest levels of carcinogen binding to DNA were observed at 100 microM H2O2. Carcinogen activation and the level of binding to DNA were in the order of benzidine > ABP > IQ > MeIQx > PhIP. One of the ABP adducts was identified, and the level at which it is formed was estimated to be six adducts/10(5) nucleotides. The susceptibility of aromatic and heterocyclic amines for lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation and the binding levels of activated products to DNA suggest a potential role of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogens in the etiology of breast cancer.

  5. Asymmetric Aldol Reaction Catalyzed by Modularly Designed Organocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sinha, Debarshi; Mandal, Tanmay; Gogoi, Sanjib; Goldman, Joshua J.; 赵从贵

    2012-01-01

    The self-assembly of the precatalyst modules, which are amino acids and cinchona alkaloid derivatives, leads to the direct formation of the desired organocatalysts without any synthesis. These modularly designed organocatalysts (MDOs) may be used for catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction the corresponding aldol products may be obtained in mediocre diastereoselectivities (up to 79 : 21 dr). Depending on structure of the aldehyde substrates, to excellent ee values (up to 92% ee) with moderate

  6. Asymmetric Stetter reactions catalyzed by thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparyan, Elena; Richter, Michael; Dresen, Carola; Walter, Lydia S; Fuchs, Georg; Leeper, Finian J; Wacker, Tobias; Andrade, Susana L A; Kolter, Geraldine; Pohl, Martina; Müller, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The intermolecular asymmetric Stetter reaction is an almost unexplored transformation for biocatalysts. Previously reported thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent PigD from Serratia marcescens is the first enzyme identified to catalyze the Stetter reaction of α,β-unsaturated ketones (Michael acceptor substrates) and α-keto acids. PigD is involved in the biosynthesis of the potent cytotoxic agent prodigiosin. Here, we describe the investigation of two new ThDP-dependent enzymes, SeAAS from Saccharopolyspora erythraea and HapD from Hahella chejuensis. Both show a high degree of homology to the amino acid sequence of PigD (39 and 51 %, respectively). The new enzymes were heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli, and the yield of soluble protein was enhanced by co-expression of the chaperone genes groEL/ES. SeAAS and HapD catalyze intermolecular Stetter reactions in vitro with high enantioselectivity. The enzymes possess a characteristic substrate range with respect to Michael acceptor substrates. This provides support for a new type of ThDP-dependent enzymatic activity, which is abundant in various species and not restricted to prodigiosin biosynthesis in different strains. Moreover, PigD, SeAAS, and HapD are also able to catalyze asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation reactions of aldehydes and α-keto acids, resulting in 2-hydroxy ketones.

  7. Anisotropic Morphological Changes in Goethite during Fe(2+)-Catalyzed Recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prachi; Gorski, Christopher A

    2016-07-19

    When goethite is exposed to aqueous Fe(2+), rapid and extensive Fe atom exchange can occur between solid-phase Fe(3+) and aqueous Fe(2+) in a process referred to as Fe(2+)-catalyzed recrystallization. This process can lead to the structural incorporation or release of trace elements, which has important implications for contaminant remediation and nutrient biogeochemical cycling. Prior work found that the process did not cause major changes to the goethite structure or morphology. Here, we further investigated if and how goethite morphology and aggregation behavior changed temporally during Fe(2+)-catalyzed recrystallization. On the basis of existing literature, we hypothesized that Fe(2+)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite would not result in changes to individual particle morphology or interparticle interactions. To test this, we reacted nanoparticulate goethite with aqueous Fe(2+) at pH 7.5 over 30 days and used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cryogenic TEM, and (55)Fe as an isotope tracer to observe changes in particle dimensions, aggregation, and isotopic composition over time. Over the course of 30 days, the goethite particles substantially recrystallized, and the particle dimensions changed anisotropically, resulting in a preferential increase in the mean particle width. The temporal changes in goethite morphology could not be completely explained by a single mineral-transformation mechanism but rather indicated that multiple transformation mechanisms occurred concurrently. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the morphology of goethite nanoparticles does change during recrystallization, which is an important step toward identifying the driving force(s) of recrystallization.

  8. Enzyme-catalyzed biocathode in a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Hu, Donghua; Zhang, Xiaohuan; Wang, Kunqi; Wang, Bin; Sun, Bo; Qiu, Zhidong

    2014-12-01

    A novel double-enzyme photoelectrochemical biofuel cell (PEBFC) has been developed by taking glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as the enzyme of the photoanode and biocathode to catalyze the oxidation of glucose and the reduction of oxygen. A H2-mesoporphyrin IX is used as a dye for a TiO2 film electrode to fabricate a photoanode. The horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is immobilized on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode to construct a biocathode which is used to catalyze the reduction of oxygen in the PEBFC for the first time. The biocathode exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity in the presence of O2. The performances of the PEBFC are obtained by current-voltage and power-voltage curves. The short-circuit current density (Isc), the open-circuit voltage (Voc), maximum power density (Pmax), fill factor (FF) and energy conversion efficiency (η) are 439 μA cm-2, 678 mV, 79 μW cm-2, 0.39 and 0.016%, respectively, and the incident photon-to-collected electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) is 32% at 350 nm. The Isc is higher than that of the PEBFC with Pt cathode, and the Voc is higher than that of the dye-sensitized solar cell or the enzyme-catalyzed biofuel cell operating individually, which demonstrates that the HRP is an efficient catalyst for the biocathode in the PEBFC.

  9. Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires: Growth methods, properties, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-12-01

    Metal-mediated vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a promising approach for the fabrication of silicon nanowires, although residual metal incorporation into the nanowires during growth can adversely impact electronic properties particularly when metals such as gold and copper are utilized. Aluminum, which acts as a shallow acceptor in silicon, is therefore of significant interest for the growth of p-type silicon nanowires but has presented challenges due to its propensity for oxidation. This paper summarizes the key aspects of aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth along with wire properties and device results. In the first section, aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth is discussed with a specific emphasis on methods to mitigate aluminum oxide formation. Next, the influence of growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor partial pressure, and hydrogen partial pressure on nanowire morphology is discussed, followed by a brief review of the growth of templated and patterned arrays of nanowires. Aluminum incorporation into the nanowires is then discussed in detail, including measurements of the aluminum concentration within wires using atom probe tomography and assessment of electrical properties by four point resistance measurements. Finally, the use of aluminum-catalyzed VLS growth for device fabrication is reviewed including results on single-wire radial p-n junction solar cells and planar solar cells fabricated with nanowire/nanopyramid texturing.

  10. Protection of wood from microorganisms by laccase-catalyzed iodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, M; Engel, J; Thöny-Meyer, L; Schwarze, F W M R; Ihssen, J

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, Norway spruce wood (Picea abies L.) was reacted with a commercial Trametes versicolor laccase in the presence of potassium iodide salt or the phenolic compounds thymol and isoeugenol to impart an antimicrobial property to the wood surface. In order to assess the efficacy of the wood treatment, a leaching of the iodinated and polymerized wood and two biotests including bacteria, a yeast, blue stain fungi, and wood decay fungi were performed. After laccase-catalyzed oxidation of the phenols, the antimicrobial effect was significantly reduced. In contrast, the enzymatic oxidation of iodide (I(-)) to iodine (I(2)) in the presence of wood led to an enhanced resistance of the wood surface against all microorganisms, even after exposure to leaching. The efficiency of the enzymatic wood iodination was comparable to that of a chemical wood preservative, VP 7/260a. The modification of the lignocellulose by the laccase-catalyzed iodination was assessed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) technique. The intensities of the selected lignin-associated bands and carbohydrate reference bands were analyzed, and the results indicated a structural change in the lignin matrix. The results suggest that the laccase-catalyzed iodination of the wood surface presents an efficient and ecofriendly method for wood protection.

  11. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algasaier, Sana I; Exell, Jack C; Bennet, Ian A; Thompson, Mark J; Gotham, Victoria J B; Shaw, Steven J; Craggs, Timothy D; Finger, L David; Grasby, Jane A

    2016-04-08

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5'-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5'-terminiin vivo Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5'-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5'-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr(40), Asp(181), and Arg(100)and a reacting duplex 5'-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5'-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage.

  12. Iron-Carbonyl-Catalyzed Redox-Neutral [4+2] Annulation of N-H Imines and Internal Alkynes by C-H Bond Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Teng; Zhao, Chongyang; He, Ruoyu; Chen, Hui; Wang, Congyang

    2016-04-18

    Stoichiometric C-H bond activation of arenes mediated by iron carbonyls was reported by Pauson as early as in 1965, yet the catalytic C-H transformations have not been developed. Herein, an iron-catalyzed annulation of N-H imines and internal alkynes to furnish cis-3,4-dihydroisoquinolines is described, and represents the first iron-carbonyl-catalyzed C-H activation reaction of arenes. Remarkablely, this is also the first redox-neutral [4+2] annulation of imines and alkynes proceeding by C-H activation. The reaction also features only cis stereoselectivity and excellent atom economy as neither base, nor external ligand, nor additive is required. Experimental and theoretical studies reveal an oxidative addition mechanism for C-H bond activation to afford a dinuclear ferracycle and a synergetic diiron-promoted H-transfer to the alkyne as the turnover-determining step.

  13. Possible intermediates of Cu(phen)-catalyzed C-O cross-coupling of phenol with an aryl bromide by in situ ESI-MS and EPR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Jie; Hsu, I-Jui; Tseng, Mei-Chun; Shyu, Shin-Guang

    2014-08-07

    The C-O coupling reaction between 2,4-dimethylphenol and 4-bromotoluene catalyzed by the CuI/K2CO3/phen system can be inhibited by the radical scavenger cumene. Complexes [Cu(i)(phen)(1-(2,4-dimethylphenoxy)-4-methylbenzene)](+) (denoted as A), {H[Cu(i)(phen)(2,4-dimethylphenoxy)]}(+) and [Cu(i)(2,4-dimethylphenoxy)2](-) (denoted as B) were observed by in situ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis of the copper(i)-catalyzed C-O coupling reaction under the catalytic reaction conditions indicating that they could be intermediates in the reaction. The in situ EPR study of the reaction solution detected the Cu(ii) species with a fitted g value of 2.188. A catalytic cycle with a single electron transfer (SET) step was proposed based on these observations.

  14. Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when…

  15. Prenyl transfer to aromatic substrates: genetics and enzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, Lutz

    2009-04-01

    Aromatic prenyltransferases catalyze the transfer of prenyl moieties to aromatic acceptor molecules and give rise to an astounding diversity of primary and secondary metabolites in plants, fungi and bacteria. Significant progress has been made in the biochemistry and genetics of this heterogeneous group of enzymes in the past years. After 30 years of extensive research on plant prenylflavonoid biosynthesis, finally the first aromatic prenyltransferases involved in the formation of these compounds have been cloned. In bacteria, investigations of the newly discovered family of ABBA prenyltransferases revealed a novel type of protein fold, the PT barrel. In fungi, a group of closely related indole prenyltransferase was found to carry out aromatic prenylations with different substrate specificity and regiospecificity, and to catalyze both regular and reverse prenylations.

  16. Synthetic Study of Dragmacidin E: Construction of the Core Structure Using Pd-Catalyzed Cascade Cyclization and Rh-Catalyzed Aminoacetoxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Naoya; Nakano, Shun-Ichi; Harada, Shingo; Hamada, Yasumasa; Nemoto, Tetsuhiro

    2017-03-03

    We developed a novel synthetic method of the core structure of dragmacidin E bearing a 7-membered ring-fused bis(indolyl)pyrazinone skeleton. Formation of the 7-membered ring-fused tricyclic indole skeleton was accomplished using a palladium-catalyzed Heck insertion-allylic amination cascade. Vicinal difunctionalization of the 7-membered ring was realized via a rhodium-catalyzed aminoacetoxylation.

  17. Theoretical views on activation of methane catalyzed by Hf2+ and oxidation of CO (x(1)Σ(+)) by N2O (x(1)Σ(+)) Catalyzed by HfO2+ and TaO2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Jingyan; Tie, Lu; Wang, Ben; Guo, Zhiguang

    2013-09-12

    The mechanisms of activation of CH4 catalyzed by (1/3)Hf(2+) and oxidation of CO by N2O catalyzed by (1/3)HfO(2+) or (2/4)TaO(2+) have been investigated using the B3LYP level of theory. For the activation of methane, the TSR (two-state reactivity) mechanism has been certified through the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) calculation and the Landau-Zener-type model. In the vicinity of the minimum energy crossing point (MECP), SOC equals 900.23 cm(-1) and the probability of intersystem crossing is approximately 0.62. Spin inversion makes the activation barrier decline from 1.63 to 0.57 eV. NBO analysis demonstrates that empty 6s and 5d orbitals of the Hf atom play the major role for the activation of C-H bonds. Finally, CH4 dehydrogenates to produce Hf-CH2(2+). For oxidation of CO by N2O catalyzed by HfO(2+) or TaO(2+), the covalent bonds between transition metal atoms and the oxygen atom restrict the freedom of valence electrons. Therefore, they are all SSR (single-state reactivity). The oxygen atom is directly extracted during the course of oxygen transfer, and its microscopic essence has been discussed. The detailed kinetic information of two catalytic cycles has been calculated by referencing the "energetic span (δE)" model. Finally, TOF(HfO(2+))/TOF(TaO(2+)) = 2.7 at 298.15 K, which has a good consistency with the experimental result.

  18. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Guy [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-06-29

    high temperatures and long reaction times. To address this issue, we have developed several new families of carbon- and boron-based ligands, which are even better donors. The corresponding metal complexes (particularly gold, rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium) of all these species will be tested in the Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov hydroamination of alkynes, allenes, and also alkenes with ammonia and hydrazine. We will also develop metal-free catalytic processes for the functionalization of ammonia and hydrazine. By possessing both a lone pair of electrons and an accessible vacant orbital, singlet carbenes resemble and can mimic the chemical behavior of transition metals. Our preliminary results demonstrate that specially designed carbenes can split the N–H bond of ammonia by an initial nucleophilic activation that prevents the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts, which is the major hurdle for the transition metal catalyzed functionalization of NH3. The use of purely organic compounds as catalysts will eliminate the major drawbacks of transition-metal-catalysis technology, which are the excessive cost of metal complexes (metal + ligands) and in many cases the toxicity of the metal.

  19. Development and industrial application of catalyzer for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis of Claus tail gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honggang Chang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of more strict national environmental protection laws, energy conservation, emission reduction and clean production will present higher requirements for sulfur recovery tail gas processing techniques and catalyzers. As for Claus tail gas, conventional hydrogenation catalyzers are gradually being replaced by low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers. This paper concentrates on the development of technologies for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis catalyzers, preparation of such catalyzers and their industrial application. In view of the specific features of SO2 hydrogenation and organic sulfur hydrolysis during low-temperature hydrogenation, a new technical process involving joint application of hydrogenation catalyzers and hydrolysis catalyzers was proposed. In addition, low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers and low-temperature hydrolysis catalyzers suitable for low-temperature conditions were developed. Joint application of these two kinds of catalyzers may reduce the inlet temperatures in the conventional hydrogenation reactors from 280 °C to 220 °C, at the same time, hydrogenation conversion rates of SO2 can be enhanced to over 99%. To further accelerate the hydrolysis rate of organic sulfur, the catalyzers for hydrolysis of low-temperature organic sulfur were developed. In lab tests, the volume ratio of the total sulfur content in tail gas can be as low as 131 × 10−6 when these two kinds of catalyzers were used in a proportion of 5:5 in volumes. Industrial application of these catalyzers was implemented in 17 sulfur recovery tail gas processing facilities of 15 companies. As a result, Sinopec Jinling Petrochemical Company had outstanding application performances with a tail gas discharging rate lower than 77.9 mg/m3 and a total sulfur recovery of 99.97%.

  20. Transfer Readiness Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) has implemented a prototype model for determining student transfer readiness as a primary means of assessing community college transfer effectiveness. This report provides definitions of transfer readiness and guidelines for colleges participating in the CCC transfer readiness study. First, a memorandum from…

  1. Making benefit transfers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, I.J.; Brouwer, R.; Ferrini, S.

    We develop and test guidance principles for benefits transfers. These argue that when transferring across relatively similar sites, simple mean value transfers are to be preferred but that when sites are relatively dissimilar then value function transfers will yield lower errors. The paper also...

  2. The Study of NADPH-Dependent Flavoenzyme-Catalyzed Reduction of Benzo[1,2-c]1,2,5-oxadiazole N-Oxides (Benzofuroxans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Šarlauskas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic reactivity of a series of benzo[1,2-c]1,2,5-oxadiazole N-oxides (benzofuroxans; BFXs towards mammalian single-electron transferring NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase (P-450R and two-electron (hydride transferring NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1 was examined in this work. Since the =N+ (→OO− moiety of furoxan fragments of BFXs bears some similarity to the aromatic nitro-group, the reactivity of BFXs was compared to that of nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs whose reduction mechanisms by these and other related flavoenzymes have been extensively investigated. The reduction of BFXs by both P-450R and NQO1 was accompanied by O2 uptake, which was much lower than the NADPH oxidation rate; except for annelated BFXs, whose reduction was followed by the production of peroxide. In order to analyze the possible quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs of the enzymatic reactivity of the compounds, their electron-accepting potency and other reactivity indices were assessed by quantum mechanical methods. In P-450R-catalyzed reactions, both BFXs and NACs showed the same reactivity dependence on their electron-accepting potency which might be consistent with an “outer sphere” electron transfer mechanism. In NQO1-catalyzed two-electron (hydride transferring reactions, BFXs acted as more efficient substrates than NACs, and the reduction efficacy of BFXs by NQO1 was in general higher than by single-electron transferring P-450R. In NQO1-catalyzed reactions, QSARs obtained showed that the reduction efficacy of BFXs, as well as that of NACs, was determined by their electron-accepting potency and could be influenced by their binding mode in the active center of NQO1 and by their global softness as their electronic characteristic. The reductive conversion of benzofuroxan by both flavoenzymes yielded the same reduction product of benzofuroxan, 2,3-diaminophenazine, with the formation of o-benzoquinone dioxime as a putative primary

  3. Kinetics and thermodynamics of peroxidase- and laccase-catalyzed oxidation of N-substituted phenothiazines and phenoxazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulys, J; Krikstopaitis, K; Ziemys, A

    2000-06-01

    Steady-state and single-turnover kinetics for the oxidation of the N-substituted phenothiazines (PTs) and phenoxazines (POs) catalyzed by fungal Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and Polyporus pinsitus laccase were investigated at pH 4-10. In the case of peroxidase, an apparent bimolecular rate constant (expressed as k(cat)/K(m)) varied from 1 x10(7)M(-1)s(-1) to 2.6 x 108 M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.0. The constants for PO oxidation were higher in comparison to PT. pH dependence revealed two or three ionizable groups with pKa values of 4.9-5.7 and 7.7-9.7 that significantly affected the activity of peroxidase. Single-turnover experiments showed that the limiting step of PT oxidation was reduction of compound II and second-order rate constants were obtained which were consistent with the constants at steady-state conditions. Laccase-catalyzed PT and PO oxidation rates were lower; apparent bimolecular rate constants varied from 1.8x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) to 2.0 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 5.3. PO constants were higher in comparison to PT, as was the case with peroxidase. The dependence of the apparent bimolecular constants of compound II or copper type 1 reduction, in the case of peroxidase or laccase, respectively, was analyzed in the framework of the Marcus outer-sphere electron-transfer theory. Peroxidase-catalyzed reactions with PT, as well as PO, fitted the same hyperbolic dependence with a maximal oxidation rate of 1.6 x 10(8)M(-1)s(-1) and a reorganization energy of 0.30 eV. The respective parameters for laccase were 5.0 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) and 0.29 eV.

  4. Demonstration test and evaluation of ultraviolet/ultraviolet catalyzed peroxide oxidation for groundwater remediation at Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    In the UItraviolet/Ultraviolet Catalyzed Groundwater Remediation program, W.J. Schafer Associates, Inc. (WJSA) demonstrated, tested and evaluated a new ultraviolet (UV) lamp integrated with an existing commercial technology employing UV catalyzed peroxide oxidation to destroy organics in groundwater at an Oak Ridge K-25 site. The existing commercial technology is the perox-pure{trademark} process of Peroxidation Systems Incorporated (PSI) that employs standard UV lamp technology to catalyze H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into OH radicals, which attack many organic molecules. In comparison to classical technologies for remediation of groundwater contaminated with organics, the perox-pure{trademark} process not only is cost effective but also reduces contaminants to harmless by-products instead of transferring the contaminants from one medium to another (such as in activated carbon or air stripping). Although the perox-pure{trademark} process is cost effective against many organics, it is not effective for some organic contaminants of interest to DOE such as TCA, which has the highest concentration of the organics at the K-25 test site. Contaminants such as TCA are treated more readily by direct photolysis using short wavelength UV light. WJSA has been developing a unique UV lamp which is very efficient in the short UV wavelength region. Consequently, combining this UV lamp with the perox-pure{trademark} process results in a means for treating essentially all organic contaminants. In the program reported here, the new UV lamp lifetime was improved and the lamp integrated into a PSI demonstration trailer. Even though this UV lamp operated at less than optimum power and UV efficiency, the destruction rate for the TCA was more than double that of the commercial unit. An optimized UV lamp may double again the destruction rate; i.e., a factor of four greater than the commercial system.

  5. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  6. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Siegel, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Further expanding on the changes made to the fifth edition, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 6th Edition continues to highlight the relevance of thermal radiative transfer and focus on concepts that develop the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The book explains the fundamentals of radiative transfer, introduces the energy and radiative transfer equations, covers a variety of approaches used to gauge radiative heat exchange between different surfaces and structures, and provides solution techniques for solving the RTE.

  7. The Notch pathway attenuates interleukin 1β (IL1β)-mediated induction of adenylyl cyclase 8 (AC8) expression during vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) trans-differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuylian, Zela; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Gueguen, Marie; Glorian, Martine; Rouxel, Clotilde; Merlet, Elise; Lipskaia, Larissa; Blaise, Régis; Mateo, Véronique; Limon, Isabelle

    2012-07-20

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) trans-differentiation, or their switch from a contractile/quiescent to a secretory/inflammatory/migratory state, is known to play an important role in pathological vascular remodeling including atherosclerosis and postangioplasty restenosis. Several reports have established the Notch pathway as tightly regulating VSMC response to various stress factors through growth, migration, apoptosis, and de-differentiation. More recently, we showed that alterations of the Notch pathway also govern VSMC acquisition of the inflammatory state, one of the major events accelerating atherosclerosis. We also evidenced that the inflammatory context of atherosclerosis triggers a de novo expression of adenylyl cyclase isoform 8 (AC8), associated with the properties developed by trans-differentiated VSMCs. As an initial approach to understanding the regulation of AC8 expression, we examined the role of the Notch pathway. Here we show that inhibiting the Notch pathway enhances the effect of IL1β on AC8 expression, amplifies its deleterious effects on the VSMC trans-differentiated phenotype, and decreases Notch target genes Hrt1 and Hrt3. Conversely, Notch activation resulted in blocking AC8 expression and up-regulated Hrt1 and Hrt3 expression. Furthermore, overexpressing Hrt1 and Hrt3 significantly decreased IL1β-induced AC8 expression. In agreement with these in vitro findings, the in vivo rat carotid balloon-injury model of restenosis evidenced that AC8 de novo expression coincided with down-regulation of the Notch3 pathway. These results, demonstrating that the Notch pathway attenuates IL1β-mediated AC8 up-regulation in trans-differentiated VSMCs, suggest that AC8 expression, besides being induced by the proinflammatory cytokine IL1β, is also dependent on down-regulation of the Notch pathway occurring in an inflammatory context.

  8. Acetic acid-catalyzed formation of N-phenylphthalimide from phthalanilic acid: a computational study of the mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-05-28

    In glacial acetic acid, phthalanilic acid and its monosubstituents are known to be converted to the corresponding phthalimides in relatively good yields. In this study, we computationally investigated the experimentally proposed two-step (addition-elimination or cyclization-dehydration) mechanism at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) level of theory for the unsubstituted phthalanilic acid, with an explicit acetic acid molecule included in the calculations. In the first step, a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the amide nitrogen. The second step is dehydration of the intermediate to give N-phenylphthalimide. In agreement with experimental findings, the second step has been shown to be rate-determining. Most importantly, both of the steps are catalyzed by an acetic acid molecule, which acts both as proton donor and acceptor. The present findings, along with those from our previous studies, suggest that acetic acid and other carboxylic acids (in their undissociated forms) can catalyze intramolecular nucleophilic attacks by amide nitrogens and breakdown of the resulting tetrahedral intermediates, acting simultaneously as proton donor and acceptor. In other words, double proton transfers involving a carboxylic acid molecule can be part of an extensive bond reorganization process from cyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  9. Role of Lewis acid additives in a palladium catalyzed directed C-H functionalization reaction of benzohydroxamic acid to isoxazolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athira, C; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-12-20

    Metallic salts as well as protic additives are widely employed in transition metal catalyzed C-H bond functionalization reactions to improve the efficiency of catalytic protocols. In one such example, ZnCl2 and pivalic acid are used as additives in a palladium catalyzed synthesis of isoxazolone from a readily available benzohydroxamic acid under one pot conditions. In this article, we present some important mechanistic insights into the role of ZnCl2 and pivalic acid, gained by using density functional theory (M06) computations. Two interesting modes of action of ZnCl2 are identified in various catalytic steps involved in the formation of isoxazolone. The conventional Lewis acid coordination wherein zinc chloride (ZnCl2·(DMA)) binds to the carbonyl group is found to be more favored in the C-H activation step. However, the participation of a hetero-bimetallic Pd-Zn species is preferred in reductive elimination leading to Caryl-N bond formation. Pivalic acid helps in relay proton transfer in C-H bond activation through a cyclometallation deprotonation (CMD) process. The explicit inclusion of ZnCl2 and solvent N,N-dimethyl acetamide (DMA) stabilizes the transition state and also helps reduce the activation barrier for the C-H bond activation step. The electronic communication between the two metal species is playing a crucial role in stabilizing the Caryl-N bond formation transition state through a Pd-Zn hetero-bimetallic interaction.

  10. Reaction pathway and free energy profile for papain-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-acetyl-Phe-Gly 4-nitroanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Donghui; Huang, Xiaoqin; Liu, Junjun; Tang, Mingsheng; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2013-07-30

    Possible reaction pathways for papain-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-acetyl-Phe-Gly 4-nitroanilide (APGNA) have been studied by performing pseudobond first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical-free energy (QM/MM-FE) calculations. The whole hydrolysis process includes two stages: acylation and deacylation. For the acylation stage of the catalytic reaction, we have explored three possible paths (A, B, and C) and the corresponding free energy profiles along the reaction coordinates. It has been demonstrated that the most favorable reaction path in this stage is path B consisting of two reaction steps: the first step is a proton transfer to form a zwitterionic form (i.e., Cys-S⁻/His-H⁺ ion-pair), and the second step is the nucleophilic attack on the carboxyl carbon of the substrate accompanied by the dissociation of 4-nitroanilide. The deacylation stage includes the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule on the carboxyl carbon of the substrate and dissociation between the carboxyl carbon of the substrate and the sulfhydryl sulfur of Cys25 side chain. The free energy barriers calculated for the acylation and deacylation stages are 20.0 and 10.7 kcal/mol, respectively. Thus, the acylation is rate-limiting. The overall free energy barrier calculated for papain-catalyzed hydrolysis of APGNA is 20.0 kcal/mol, which is reasonably close to the experimentally derived activation free energy of 17.9 kcal/mol.

  11. Theoretical investigation of the first-shell mechanism of acetylene hydration catalyzed by a biomimetic tungsten complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Fang; Liao, Rong-Zhen; Ding, Wan-Jian; Yu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Ruo-Zhuang

    2011-06-01

    The reaction mechanism of the hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde catalyzed by [W(IV)O(mnt)(2)](2-) (where mnt(2-) is 1,2-dicyanoethylenedithiolate) is studied using density functional theory. Both the uncatalyzed and the catalyzed reaction are considered to find out the origin of the catalysis. Three different models are investigated, in which an aquo, a hydroxo, or an oxo coordinates to the tungsten center. A first-shell mechanism is suggested, similarly to recent calculations on tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase. The acetylene substrate first coordinates to the tungsten center in an η(2) fashion. Then, the tungsten-bound hydroxide activates a water molecule to perform a nucleophilic attack on the acetylene, resulting in the formation of a vinyl anion and a tungsten-bound water molecule. This is followed by proton transfer from the tungsten-bound water molecule to the newly formed vinyl anion intermediate. Tungsten is directly involved in the reaction by binding and activating acetylene and providing electrostatic stabilization to the transition states and intermediates. Three other mechanisms are also considered, but the associated energetic barriers were found to be very high, ruling out those possibilities.

  12. Isonitrile iron(II) complexes with chiral N2P2 macrocycles in the enantioselective transfer hydrogenation of ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Raphael; Mezzetti, Antonio

    2014-12-19

    Bis(isonitrile) iron(II) complexes bearing a C2-symmetric N2P2 macrocyclic ligand, which are easily prepared from the corresponding bis(acetonitrile) analogue, catalyze the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of a broad scope of ketones in excellent yields (up to 98%) and with high enantioselectivity (up to 91% ee).

  13. A SABATH Methyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens catalyzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Nan [ORNL; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Universite Joseph Fourier, France; Moon, Hong S [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Kapteyn, Jeremy [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University; Zhuang, Xiaofeng [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu [Laboratory of Evolutionary Biology, National Institute for Biology, 38 Nishigounaka; Stewart, Neal C. [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Gang, David R. [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University; Chen, Feng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01

    Known SABATH methyltransferases, all of which were identified from seed plants, catalyze methylation of either the carboxyl group of a variety of low molecular weight metabolites or the nitrogen moiety of precursors of caffeine. In this study, the SABATH family from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens was identified and characterized. Four SABATH-like sequences (PpSABATH1, PpSABATH2, PpSABATH3, and PpSABATH4) were identified from the P. patens genome. Only PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 showed expression in the leafy gametophyte of P. patens. Full-length cDNAs of PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were cloned and expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were tested for methyltransferase activity with a total of 75 compounds. While showing no activity with carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing compounds, PpSABATH1 displayed methyltransferase activity with a number of thiols. PpSABATH2 did not show activity with any of the compounds tested. Among the thiols analyzed, PpSABATH1 showed the highest level of activity with thiobenzoic acid with an apparent Km value of 95.5 lM, which is comparable to those of known SABATHs. Using thiobenzoic acid as substrate, GC MS analysis indicated that the methylation catalyzed by PpSABATH1 is on the sulfur atom. The mechanism for S-methylation of thiols catalyzed by PpSABATH1 was partially revealed by homology-based structural modeling. The expression of PpSABATH1 was induced by the treatment of thiobenzoic acid. Further transgenic studies showed that tobacco plants overexpressing PpSABATH1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to thiobenzoic acid, suggesting that PpSABATH1 have a role in the detoxification of xenobiotic thiols.

  14. Physio-pathological roles of transglutaminase-catalyzed reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariangela; Ricotta; Maura; Iannuzzi; Giulia; De; Vivo; Vittorio; Gentile

    2010-01-01

    Transglutaminases(TGs) are a large family of related and ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins.The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of a glutaminyl residue of a protein/peptide substrate to a lysyl residue of a protein/peptide co-substrate.In addition to lysyl residues,other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines(to form mono-or bi-substituted/crosslinked adducts) or-OH groups(to form ester linkages) .In the absence of co-substrates,the nucleophile may be water,resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue.The TG enzymes are also capable of catalyzing other reactions important for cell viability.The distribution and the physiological roles of TG enzymes have been widely studied in numerous cell types and tissues and their roles in several diseases have begun to be identified."Tissue" TG(TG2) ,a member of the TG family of enzymes,has definitely been shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for a very widespread human pathology:i.e.celiac disease(CD) .TG activity has alsobeen hypothesized to be directly involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for several other human diseases,including neurodegenerative diseases,which are often associated with CD.Neurodegenerative diseases,such as Alzheimer’s disease,Parkinson’s disease,supranuclear palsy,Huntington’s disease and other recently identified polyglutamine diseases,are characterized,in part,by aberrant cerebral TG activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains.In this review,we discuss the physio-pathological role of TG-catalyzed reactions,with particular interest in the molecular mechanisms that could involve these enzymes in the physio-pathological processes responsible for human neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Energy harvesting by implantable abiotically catalyzed glucose fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerzenmacher, S.; von Stetten, F. [Laboratory for MEMS Applications, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Ducree, J. [HSG-IMIT, Wilhelm-Schickard-Str. 10, D-78052 Villingen-Schwenningen (Germany); Zengerle, R. [Laboratory for MEMS Applications, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); HSG-IMIT, Wilhelm-Schickard-Str. 10, D-78052 Villingen-Schwenningen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Implantable glucose fuel cells are a promising approach to realize an autonomous energy supply for medical implants that solely relies on the electrochemical reaction of oxygen and glucose. Key advantage over conventional batteries is the abundant availability of both reactants in body fluids, rendering the need for regular replacement or external recharging mechanisms obsolete. Implantable glucose fuel cells, based on abiotic catalysts such as noble metals and activated carbon, have already been developed as power supply for cardiac pacemakers in the late-1960s. Whereas, in vitro and preliminary in vivo studies demonstrated their long-term stability, the performance of these fuel cells is limited to the {mu}W-range. Consequently, no further developments have been reported since high-capacity lithium iodine batteries for cardiac pacemakers became available in the mid-1970s. In recent years research has been focused on enzymatically catalyzed glucose fuel cells. They offer higher power densities than their abiotically catalyzed counterparts, but the limited enzyme stability impedes long-term application. In this context, the trend towards increasingly energy-efficient low power MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) implants has revived the interest in abiotic catalysts as a long-term stable alternative. This review covers the state-of-the-art in implantable abiotically catalyzed glucose fuel cells and their development since the 1960s. Different embodiment concepts are presented and the historical achievements of academic and industrial research groups are critically reviewed. Special regard is given to the applicability of the concept as sustainable micro-power generator for implantable devices. (author)

  16. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  17. Theoretical Study of the Effects of Di-Muonic Molecules on Muon-Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    MOLECULES ON MUON -CATALYZED FUSION DISSERTATION Eugene V. Sheely, Lieutenant Colonel, USA DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY...THEORETICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DI-MUONIC MOLECULES ON MUON -CATALYZED FUSION DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty...potential of enhancing the muon -catalyzed fusion reaction rate. In order to study these di-muonic molecules a method of non-adiabatic quantum mechanics

  18. Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative cross coupling of potassium polyfluorobenzoates with aryl bromides, chlorides, and triflates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Rui; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Yuan-Ye; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lei

    2010-03-05

    Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative cross coupling of potassium polyfluorobenzoates with aryl bromides, chlorides, and triflates is achieved by using diglyme as the solvent. The reaction is useful for synthesis of polyfluorobiaryls from readily accessible and nonvolatile polyfluorobenzoate salts. Unlike the Cu-catalyzed decarboxylation cross coupling where oxidative addition is the rate-limiting step, in the Pd-catalyzed version decarboxylation is the rate-limiting step.

  19. Lipase-catalyzed enantioselective esterification of flurbiprofen with n-butanol

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The influences of water activity and solvent hydrophobicity on the kinetics of the lipase-catalyzed enantioselective esterification of flurbiprofen with n-butanol were investigated. The solvent effect was not similar for lipases from Candida rugosa (Crl), Mucor javanicus (Mjl), and porcine pancreas (Ppl). The lipase-catalyzed reaction rates in different solvents across a wide range of water activities revealed that the Ppl-catalyzed reaction exhibited no enantioselectivity and no substantial ...

  20. Facile Rh(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Fluorinated Pyridines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuming; Bergman, Robert G.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    A Rh(III)-catalyzed C–H functionalization approach was developed for the preparation of multi-substituted 3-fluoropyridines from α-fluoro-α,β-unsaturated oximes and alkynes. Oximes substituted with aryl, heteroaryl and alkyl β-substituents were effective coupling partners, as were symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes with aryl and alkyl substituents. The first examples of coupling α,β-unsaturated oximes with terminal alkynes was also demonstrated and proceeded with uniformly high regioselectivity to provide single 3-fluoropyridine regioisomers. Reactions were also conveniently set up in air on the bench top. PMID:25992591

  1. Rhodium(NHC)-catalyzed O-arylation of aryl bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Min; Chang, Sukbok

    2011-05-06

    The first example of the rhodium-catalyzed O-arylation of aryl bromides is reported. While the right combination of rhodium species and N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) offered an effective catalytic system enabling the arylation to proceed, the choice of NHC was determined to be most important. The developed O-arylation protocol has a wide range of substrate scope, high functional group tolerance, and flexibility allowing a complementary route to either N- or O-arylation depending on the choice of NHC.

  2. Triphenylphosphine-Catalyzed Michael Addition of Alcohols to Acrylic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU, Hai-Ling; JIANG, Huan-Feng; WANG, Yu-Gang

    2007-01-01

    A facile triphenylphosphine-catalyzed Michael addition of alcohols to acrylic compounds was described. The reaction was carried out in open air at refluxing temperature in the presence of 10 mol% PPh3. Michael addition of saturated and unsaturated alcohols to acrylonitrile or acrylates has been examined. The reaction gaveβ-alkoxy derivatives with isolated yields of 5%-79%. PPh3 is cheaper and more stable than those trialkylphosphines previously used for the similar reactions, and the products can be easily separated from the reaction mixture via distillation.

  3. Synthesis of Dihydrobenzofurans via Palladium-Catalyzed Heteroannulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman Vladimirovich Rozhkov

    2004-12-19

    Palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation of 1,3-dienes with 3-iodo-2-alkenols, and 2-iodo-2-alkenols, as well as their amino analogs, affords the corresponding cyclic ethers and amines respectively. The presence of a {beta}-hydrogen in the vinylic halide results in {beta}-hydride elimination giving the corresponding alkyne. The presence of a bulky group in the {alpha}-position of the vinylic halide results in failure or reduced amounts of annulation products. A chloride source, pyridine base and electron-rich phosphine are essential for this reaction.

  4. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Mistrik, Martin; Neelsen, Kai J

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression...... a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks....... of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity...

  5. Production of Chemoenzymatic Catalyzed Monoepoxide Biolubricant: Optimization and Physicochemical Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Jumat Salimon; Nadia Salih; Bashar Mudhaffar Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is converted to per-carboxylic acid catalyzed by an immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435). This per-carboxylic acid is only intermediate and epoxidized itself in good yields and almost without consecutive reactions. Monoepoxide linoleic acid 9(12)-10(13)-monoepoxy 12(9)-octadecanoic acid (MEOA) was optimized using D-optimal design. At optimum conditions, higher yield% (82.14) and medium oxirane oxygen content (OOC) (4.91%) of MEOA were predicted at 15 μL ...

  6. Synthesis of Dihydrobenzofurans via Palladium-Catalyzed Heteroannulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkov, Roman Vladimirovich [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation of 1,3-dienes with 3-iodo-2-alkenols, and 2-iodo-2-alkenols, as well as their amino analogs, affords the corresponding cyclic ethers and amines respectively. The presence of a β-hydrogen in the vinylic halide results in β-hydride elimination giving the corresponding alkyne. The presence of a bulky group in the α-position of the vinylic halide results in failure or reduced amounts of annulation products. A chloride source, pyridine base and electron-rich phosphine are essential for this reaction.

  7. Urea- and Thiourea-Catalyzed Aminolysis of Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Marine; Yau, Honman; Jean-Gérard, Ludivine; Auvergne, Rémi; Benazet, Dominique; Schreiner, Peter R; Caillol, Sylvain; Andrioletti, Bruno

    2016-08-23

    The aminolysis of (poly)carbonates by (poly)amines provides access to non-isocyanate polyurethanes (NIPUs) that are toxic-reagent-free analogues of polyurethanes (PUs). Owing to their low reactivity, the ring opening of cyclic carbonates requires the use of a catalyst. Herein, we report that the more available and cheaper ureas could advantageously be used for catalyzing the formation of NIPUs at the expense of the thiourea analogues. In addition, we demonstrate a medium-range pKa of the (thio)urea and an unqeual substitution pattern is critical for controlling the efficiency of the carbonate opening.

  8. Synthesis of heterocycles through transition-metal-catalyzed isomerization reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishøy, Mette; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland

    2014-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed isomerization of N- and O-allylic systems is emerging as an effective method to form synthetically useful iminium and oxocarbenium intermediates. In the presence of tethered nucleophiles, several recent examples illuminate this approach as a powerful strategy for the synthesis...... versatile method to form iminium and oxocarbenium ions. Given the number of reactions involving these highly electrophilic intermediates, this concept provides a sea of opportunities for heterocycle synthesis, (see scheme; Nu=nucleophile). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim....

  9. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of monoacylglycerol in a homogeneous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Julieta B; Nascimento, Maria G; Ninow, Jorge L

    2003-04-01

    The 1,3-regiospecifique lipase, Lipozyme IM, catalyzed the esterification of lauric acid and glycerol in a homogeneous system. To overcome the drawback of the insolubility of glycerol in hexane, which is extensively used in enzymatic synthesis, a mixture of n-hexane/tert-butanol (1:1, v/v) was used leading to a monophasic system. The conversion of lauric acid into monolaurin was 65% in 8 h, when a molar ratio of glycerol to fatty acid (5:1) was used with the fatty acid at 0.1 M, and the phenomenon of acyl migration was minimized.

  10. Iodine - catalyzed prins cyclization of aliphatic and aromatic ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, K.R.; Reddy, K.; Silva Junior, Luiz F., E-mail: luizfsjr@iq.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQ/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Fundamental

    2013-09-15

    Iodine-catalyzed Prins cyclization of homoallylic alcohols and ketones was investigated. Anhydrous conditions and inert atmosphere are not required in this metal-free protocol. The reaction of 2-(3,4-dihydronaphthalene-1-yl)propan-1-ol with six aliphatic symmetric ketones gave the desired products in 67-77% yield. Cyclization was performed with four aliphatic unsymmetric ketones, leading to corresponding pyrans in 66-76% yield. Prins cyclization was also accomplished with four aromatic ketones in 37-66% yield. Finally, Prins cyclization of the monoterpene isopulegol and acetone was successfully achieved. (author)

  11. Comparing Ru and Fe-catalyzed olefin metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to explore the potential of Fe-based complexes with an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, as olefin metathesis catalysts. Apart from a less endothermic reaction energy profile, a small reduction in the predicted upper energy barriers (≈ 2 kcal mol -1) is calculated in the Fe catalyzed profile with respect to the Ru catalysed profile. Overall, this study indicates that Fe-based catalysts have the potential to be very effective olefin metathesis catalysts. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  12. Catalyzing new product adoption at the base of the pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Marinakis, Y.D.; Walsh, S. T.; Harms, R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the more perplexing of the entrepreneurial issues at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) is how to catalyze new product adoption by BoP consumers. Because S-shaped adoption dynamics are the result of cultural transmission bias, the question can be rephrased as, how can an entrepreneur overcome conformity bias. We modified the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to include conformity bias. We then qualitatively applied the model to three examples from the literature, namely fuel stoves in Darfu...

  13. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases: two enzyme families catalyze the same reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Piskur, Jure

    2005-01-01

    Mammals have four deoxyribonucleoside kinases, the cytoplasmic (TK1) and mitochondrial (TK2) thymidine kinases, and the deoxycytidine (dCK) and deoxyguanosine (dGK) kinases, which salvage the precursors for nucleic acids synthesis. In addition to the native deoxyribonucleoside substrates, the kin......, the kinases can phosphorylate and thereby activate a variety of anti-cancer and antiviral prodrugs. Recently, the crystal structure of human TK1 has been solved and has revealed that enzymes with fundamentally different origins and folds catalyze similar, crucial cellular reactions....

  14. Kinetics of acid-catalyzed cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M E; Gonzales, N O; Zimmerman, L W; Yang, J

    2006-03-17

    The cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide, in the presence of sulfuric acid, to form phenol and acetone has been examined by adiabatic calorimetry. As expected, acid can catalyze cumene hydroperoxide reaction at temperatures below that of thermally-induced decomposition. At elevated acid concentrations, reactivity is also observed at or below room temperature. The exhibited reactivity behavior is complex and is significantly affected by the presence of other species (including the products). Several reaction models have been explored to explain the behavior and these are discussed.

  15. Rhodium catalyzed asymmetric Pauson-Khand reaction using SDP ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The activity and enantiocontrol ability of the chiral catalysts prepared from spiro diphosphine ligands, SDP, and rhodium precursor were investigated in the asymmetric catalytic Pauson-Khand reaction. The results showed that SDP ligands were very effective in Rh-catalyzed Pauson-Khand reaction, and their complexes with rhodium could convert a variety of 1,6-enyne compounds into bicyclopentone derivatives under CO atmosphere in high yields with good enantioselectivities. The SbF6- was found to be a suitable counter anion of the catalyst, and 1,2-dichloroethane was the best choice of the solvent for Pauson-Khand reaction.

  16. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases: two enzyme families catalyze the same reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Piskur, Jure

    2005-01-01

    Mammals have four deoxyribonucleoside kinases, the cytoplasmic (TK1) and mitochondrial (TK2) thymidine kinases, and the deoxycytidine (dCK) and deoxyguanosine (dGK) kinases, which salvage the precursors for nucleic acids synthesis. In addition to the native deoxyribonucleoside substrates, the kin......, the kinases can phosphorylate and thereby activate a variety of anti-cancer and antiviral prodrugs. Recently, the crystal structure of human TK1 has been solved and has revealed that enzymes with fundamentally different origins and folds catalyze similar, crucial cellular reactions....

  17. Computational Study of Symmetric Methylation on Histone Arginine Catalyzed by Protein Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT5 through QM/MM MD and Free Energy Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Yue

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs catalyze the transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet to arginine residues. There are three types of PRMTs (I, II and III that produce different methylation products, including asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA and monomethylarginine (MMA. Since these different methylations can lead to different biological consequences, understanding the origin of product specificity of PRMTs is of considerable interest. In this article, the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD and free energy simulations are performed to study SDMA catalyzed by the Type II PRMT5 on the basis of experimental observation that the dimethylated product is generated through a distributive fashion. The simulations have identified some important interactions and proton transfers during the catalysis. Similar to the cases involving Type I PRMTs, a conserved Glu residue (Glu435 in PRMT5 is suggested to function as general base catalyst based on the result of the simulations. Moreover, our results show that PRMT5 has an energetic preference for the first methylation on Nη1 followed by the second methylation on a different ω-guanidino nitrogen of arginine (Nη2.The first and second methyl transfers are estimated to have free energy barriers of 19–20 and 18–19 kcal/mol respectively. The computer simulations suggest a distinctive catalytic mechanism of symmetric dimethylation that seems to be different from asymmetric dimethylation.

  18. Optimization of Alkali Catalyzed Transesterification of Safflower Oil for Production of Biodiesel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Math, M. C; Chandrashekhara, K. N

    2016-01-01

      The Central Composite Design is used for the optimization of alkaline catalyzed transesterification parameters such as methanol quantity, catalytic concentration, and rotational speed by keeping...

  19. Organizational innovation: a comprehensive model for catalyzing organizational development and change in a rapidly changing world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steiber, Annika; Alänge, Sverker

    2015-01-01

    ..., especially the processes through which organizational innovations are created, diffused, and sustained. There is thus a need for a more comprehensive understanding of mechanisms catalyzing organizational development...

  20. Glycolic Acid-Catalyzed Deamidation of Asparagine Residues in Degrading PLGA Matrices: A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyoshi Manabe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA is a strong candidate for being a drug carrier in drug delivery systems because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, in degrading PLGA matrices, the encapsulated peptide and protein drugs can undergo various degradation reactions, including deamidation at asparagine (Asn residues to give a succinimide species, which may affect their potency and/or safety. Here, we show computationally that glycolic acid (GA in its undissociated form, which can exist in high concentration in degrading PLGA matrices, can catalyze the succinimide formation from Asn residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. A two-step mechanism was studied by quantum-chemical calculations using Ace-Asn-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHCH3 as a model compound. The first step is cyclization (intramolecular addition to form a tetrahedral intermediate, and the second step is elimination of ammonia from the intermediate. Both steps involve an extensive bond reorganization mediated by a GA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The present findings are expected to be useful in the design of more effective and safe PLGA devices.