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Sample records for adenylyl cyclase type

  1. Disruption of Epac1 protects the heart from adenylyl cyclase type 5-mediated cardiac dysfunction.

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    Cai, Wenqian; Fujita, Takayuki; Hidaka, Yuko; Jin, Huiling; Suita, Kenji; Prajapati, Rajesh; Liang, Chen; Umemura, Masanari; Yokoyama, Utako; Sato, Motohiko; Okumura, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-17

    Type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5) plays an important role in the development of chronic catecholamine stress-induced heart failure and arrhythmia in mice. Epac (exchange protein activated by cAMP), which is directly activated by cAMP independent of protein kinase A, has been recently identified as a novel mediator of cAMP signaling in the heart. However, the role of Epac in AC5-mediated cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmias remains poorly understood. We therefore generated AC5 transgenic mice (AC5TG) with selective disruption of the Epac1 gene (AC5TG-Epac1KO), and compared their phenotypes with those of AC5TG after chronic isoproterenol (ISO) infusion. Decreased cardiac function as well as increased susceptibility to pacing-induced atrial fibrillation (AF) in response to ISO were significantly attenuated in AC5TG-Epac1KO mice, compared to AC5TG mice. Increased cardiac apoptosis and cardiac fibrosis were also concomitantly attenuated in AC5TG-Epac1KO mice compared to AC5TG mice. These findings indicate that Epac1 plays an important role in AC5-mediated cardiac dysfunction and AF susceptibility. PMID:27117748

  2. Calcium influx through L-type channels attenuates skeletal muscle contraction via inhibition of adenylyl cyclases.

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    Menezes-Rodrigues, Francisco Sandro; Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Duarte, Thiago; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2013-11-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by acetylcholine induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although this signaling pathway is independent of extracellular Ca(2+), L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) blockers have inotropic effects on frog skeletal muscles which occur by an unknown mechanism. Taking into account that skeletal muscle fiber expresses Ca(+2)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms and that cAMP is able to increase skeletal muscle contraction force, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) influx on mouse skeletal muscle contraction and the putative crosstalk between extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular cAMP signaling pathways. The effects of Cav blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) and extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA were evaluated on isometric contractility of mouse diaphragm muscle under direct electrical stimulus (supramaximal voltage, 2 ms, 0.1 Hz). Production of cAMP was evaluated by radiometric assay while Ca(2+) transients were assessed by confocal microscopy using L6 cells loaded with fluo-4/AM. Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine had positive inotropic effect, which was mimicked by removal of extracellular Ca(+2) with EGTA or Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. While phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX potentiates verapamil positive inotropic effect, it was abolished by AC inhibitors SQ22536 and NYK80. Finally, the inotropic effect of verapamil was associated with increased intracellular cAMP content and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that positive inotropic effects of Ca(2+) blockers depend on cAMP formation. Together, our results show that extracellular Ca(2+) modulates skeletal muscle contraction, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-sensitive AC. The cross-talk between extracellular calcium and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways appears to regulate the extent of skeletal muscle contraction responses.

  3. Bicarbonate-Regulated Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase

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    Wuttke MS

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC represents a novel form of mammalian adenylyl cyclase structurally, molecularly, and biochemically distinct from the G protein-regulated, transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs. sAC possesses no transmembrane domains and is insensitive to classic modulators of tmACs, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and P site ligands. Thus, sAC defines an independently regulated cAMP signaling system within mammalian cells. sAC is directly stimulated by bicarbonate ion both in vivo in heterologously expressing cells and in vitro using purified protein. sAC appears to be the predominant form of adenylyl cyclase (AC in mammalian sperm, and its direct activation by bicarbonate provides a mechanism for generating the cAMP required to complete the bicarbonate-induced processes necessary for fertilization, including hyperactivated motility, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction. Immunolocalization studies reveal sAC is also abundantly expressed in other tissues which respond to bicarbonate or carbon dioxide levels suggesting it may function as a general bicarbonate/CO(2 sensor throughout the body.

  4. Adenylyl cyclase types I and VI but not II and V are selectively inhibited by nitric oxide

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    J. Goldstein

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC isoforms catalyze the synthesis of 3',5'-cyclic AMP from ATP. These isoforms are critically involved in the regulation of gene transcription, metabolism, and ion channel activity among others. Nitric oxide (NO is a gaseous product whose synthesis from L-arginine is catalyzed by the enzyme NO synthase. It has been well established that NO activates the enzyme guanylyl cyclase, but little has been reported on the effects of NO on other important second messengers, such as AC. In the present study, the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a nitric oxide-releasing compound, on COS-7 cells transfected with plasmids containing AC types I, II, V and VI were evaluated. Total inhibition (~98.5% of cAMP production was observed in COS-7 cells transfected with the AC I isoform and previously treated with SNP (10 mM for 30 min, when stimulated with ionomycin. A high inhibition (~76% of cAMP production was also observed in COS-7 cells transfected with the AC VI isoform and previously treated with SNP (10 mM for 30 min, when stimulated with forskolin. No effect on cAMP production was observed in cells transfected with AC isoforms II and V.

  5. Pharmacological stimulation of type 5 adenylyl cyclase stabilizes heart rate under both microgravity and hypergravity induced by parabolic flight.

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    Bai, Yunzhe; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Jiao, Qibin; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Jin, Meihua; Cai, Wenqian; Jin, Hui-Ling; Fujita, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Suita, Kenji; Kurotani, Reiko; Yokoyama, Utako; Sato, Motohiko; Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5) functions in autonomic regulation in the heart. Based on that work, we hypothesized that pharmacological modulation of AC5 activity could regulate the autonomic control of the heart rate under micro- and hypergravity. To test this hypothesis, we selected the approach of activating AC5 activity in mice with a selective AC5 activator (NKH477) or inhibitor (vidarabine) and examining heart rate variability during parabolic flight. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals, a marker of total autonomic variability, was significantly greater under micro- and hypergravity in the vidarabine group, while there were no significant changes in the NKH477 group, suggesting that autonomic regulation was unstable in the vidarabine group. The ratio of low frequency and high frequency (HF) in heart rate variability analysis, a marker of sympathetic activity, became significantly decreased under micro- and hypergravity in the NKH477 group, while there was no such decrease in the vidarabine group. Normalized HF, a marker of parasympathetic activity, became significantly greater under micro- and hypergravity in the NKH477 group. In contrast, there was no such increase in the vidarabine group. This study is the first to indicate that pharmacological modulation of AC5 activity under micro- and hypergravity could be useful to regulate the autonomic control of the heart rate.

  6. Requirements for the adenylyl cyclases in the development of Dictyostelium.

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    Anjard, C; Söderbom, F; Loomis, W F

    2001-09-01

    It has been suggested that all intracellular signaling by cAMP during development of Dictyostelium is mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, since cells carrying null mutations in the acaA gene that encodes adenylyl cyclase can develop so as to form fruiting bodies under some conditions if PKA is made constitutive by overexpressing the catalytic subunit. However, a second adenylyl cyclase encoded by acrA has recently been found that functions in a cell autonomous fashion during late development. We have found that expression of a modified acaA gene rescues acrA- mutant cells indicating that the only role played by ACR is to produce cAMP. To determine whether cells lacking both adenylyl cyclase genes can develop when PKA is constitutive we disrupted acrA in a acaA- PKA-C(over) strain. When developed at high cell densities, acrA- acaA- PKA-C(over) cells form mounds, express cell type-specific genes at reduced levels and secrete cellulose coats but do not form fruiting bodies or significant numbers of viable spores. Thus, it appears that synthesis of cAMP is required for spore differentiation in Dictyostelium even if PKA activity is high. PMID:11566867

  7. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

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    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  8. delta-Opioid receptors are more efficiently coupled to adenylyl cyclase than to L-type Ca(2+) channels in transfected rat pituitary cells.

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    Prather, P L; Song, L; Piros, E T; Law, P Y; Hales, T G

    2000-11-01

    Opioid receptors often couple to multiple effectors within the same cell. To examine potential mechanisms that contribute to the specificity by which delta-receptors couple to distinct intracellular effectors, we stably transfected rat pituitary GH(3) cells with cDNAs encoding for delta-opioid receptors. In cells transfected with a relatively low delta-receptor density of 0.55 pmol/mg of protein (GH(3)DOR), activation of delta-receptors produced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity but was unable to alter L-type Ca(2+) current. In contrast, activation of delta-receptors in a clone that contained a higher density of delta-receptors (2.45 pmol/mg of protein) and was also coexpressed with mu-opioid receptors (GH(3)MORDOR), resulted in not only the expected inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity but also produced inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) current. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether these observations resulted from differences in delta-opioid receptor density between clones or interaction between delta- and mu-opioid receptors to allow the activation of different G proteins and signaling to Ca(2+) channels. Using the delta-opioid receptor alkylating agent SUPERFIT, reduction of available delta-opioid receptors in GH(3)MORDOR cells to a density similar to that of delta-opioid receptors in the GH(3)DOR clone resulted in abolishment of coupling to Ca(2+) channels, but not to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, although significantly greater amounts of all G proteins were activated by delta-opioid receptors in GH(3)MORDOR cells, delta-opioid receptor activation in GH(3)DOR cells resulted in coupling to the identical pattern of G proteins seen in GH(3)MORDOR cells. These findings suggest that different threshold densities of delta-opioid receptors are required to activate critical amounts of G proteins needed to produce coupling to specific effectors and that delta-opioid receptors couple more efficiently to adenylyl cyclase than to L-type Ca(2

  9. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for the survival and maturation of newly generated granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

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    Jie Luo

    Full Text Available The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3 is localized to olfactory cilia in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE and primary cilia in the adult mouse brain. Although AC3 has been strongly implicated in odor perception and olfactory sensory neuron (OSN targeting, its role in granule cells (GCs, the most abundant interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB, remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the deletion of AC3 leads to a significant reduction in the size of the MOB as well as the level of adult neurogenesis. The cell proliferation and cell cycle in the subventricular zone (SVZ, however, are not suppressed in AC3-/- mice. Furthermore, AC3 deletion elevates the apoptosis of GCs and disrupts the maturation of newly formed GCs. Collectively, our results identify a fundamental role for AC3 in the development of adult-born GCs in the MOB.

  10. AKAPs and Adenylyl Cyclase in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathology

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    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic AMP, generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review we discuss how interaction of AKAPs with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology. PMID:21978991

  11. Simultaneous stimulation of GABA and beta adrenergic receptors stabilizes isotypes of activated adenylyl cyclase heterocomplex

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    Robichon Alain

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated how the synthesis of cAMP, stimulated by isoproterenol acting through β-adrenoreceptors and Gs, is strongly amplified by simultaneous incubation with baclofen. Baclofen is an agonist of δ-aminobutyric acid type B receptors [GABAB], known to inhibit adenylyl cyclase via Gi. Because these agents have opposite effects on cAMP levels, the unexpected increase in cAMP synthesis when they are applied simultaneously has been intensively investigated. From previous reports, it appears that cyclase type II contributes most significantly to this phenomenon. Results We found that simultaneous application of isoproterenol and baclofen specifically influences the association/dissociation of molecules involved in the induction and termination of cyclase activity. Beta/gamma from [GABA]B receptor-coupled Gi has a higher affinity for adenylyl cyclase isoform(s when these isoforms are co-associated with Gs. Our data also suggest that, when beta/gamma and Gαs are associated with adenylyl cyclase isoform(s, beta/gamma from [GABA]B receptor-coupled Gi retards the GTPase activity of Gαs from adrenergic receptor. These reciprocal regulations of subunits of the adenylyl cyclase complex might be responsible for the drastic increase of cAMP synthesis in response to the simultaneous signals. Conclusions Simultaneous signals arriving at a particular synapse converge on molecular detectors of coincidence and trigger specific biochemical events. We hypothesize that this phenomenon comes from the complex molecular architectures involved, including scaffolding proteins that make reciprocal interactions between associated molecules possible. The biochemistry of simultaneous signaling is addressed as a key to synaptic function.

  12. Renal Phosphate Wasting in the Absence of Adenylyl Cyclase 6

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    Fenton, Robert A; Murray, Fiona; Dominguez Rieg, Jessica A.; Tang, Tong; Levi, Moshe; Rieg, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) enhance phosphate excretion by the proximal tubule of the kidney by retrieval of the sodium-dependent phosphate transporters (Npt2a and Npt2c) from the apical plasma membrane. PTH activates adenylyl cyclase (AC) through PTH 1 receptors and stimulates the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. However, the precise role and isoform(s) of AC in phosphate homeostasis are not known. We report here that mice lacking AC6 (AC6−/−) have increased...

  13. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

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    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

  14. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals

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    Tresguerres, M.; Barott, KL; Barron, ME; Roa, JN

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3 -, and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3 - sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sA...

  15. Product identification and adenylyl cyclase activity in chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum.

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    Witters, Erwin; Quanten, Lieve; Bloemen, Jo; Valcke, Roland; Van Onckelen, Harry

    2004-01-01

    In view of the ongoing debate on plant cyclic nucleotide metabolism, especially the functional presence of adenylyl cyclase, a novel detection method has been worked out to quantify the reaction product. Using uniformly labelled (15)N-ATP as a substrate for adenylyl cyclase, a qualitative and quantitative liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method was developed to measure de novo formed (15)N-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. Adenylyl cyclase activity was observed in chloroplasts obtained from Nicotiana tabacum cv. Petit Havana and the kinetic parameters and influence of various metabolic effectors are discussed in their context.

  16. Molecular Cloning,Expression,and Characterization of an Adenylyl Cyclase-associated Protein from Gossypium arboreum Fuzzless Mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    CAP,an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein,is predicted to be involved in cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction.Recently,we found that CAP may play an important role in fuzz-like fiber cell initiation in cotton.For the further research,we isolated two CAP homologues from wild type

  17. Molecular identification and functional characterization of an adenylyl cyclase from the honeybee.

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    Wachten, Sebastian; Schlenstedt, Jana; Gauss, Renate; Baumann, Arnd

    2006-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) serves as an important messenger in virtually all organisms. In the honeybee (Apis mellifera), cAMP-dependent signal transduction has been implicated in behavioural processes as well as in learning and memory. Key components of cAMP-signalling cascades are adenylyl cyclases. However, the molecular identities and biochemical properties of adenylyl cyclases are completely unknown in the honeybee. We have cloned a cDNA (Amac3) from honeybee brain that encodes a membrane-bound adenylyl cyclase. The Amac3 gene is an orthologue of the Drosophila ac39E gene. The corresponding proteins share an overall amino acid similarity of approximately 62%. Phylogenetically, AmAC3 belongs to group 1 adenylyl cyclases. Heterologously expressed AmAC3 displays basal enzymatic activity and efficient coupling to endogenous G protein signalling pathways. Stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors induces AmAC3 activity with an EC(50) of about 3.1 microm. Enzymatic activity is also increased by forskolin (EC(50) approximately 15 microm), a specific agonist of membrane-bound adenylyl cyclases. Similar to certain biogenic amine receptor genes of the honeybee, Amac3 transcripts are expressed in many somata of the brain, especially in mushroom body neurones. These results suggest that the enzyme serves in biogenic amine signal transduction cascades and in higher brain functions that contribute to learning and memory of the bee. PMID:16464235

  18. Functional characterization of transmembrane adenylyl cyclases from the honeybee brain.

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    Balfanz, Sabine; Ehling, Petra; Wachten, Sebastian; Jordan, Nadine; Erber, Joachim; Mujagic, Samir; Baumann, Arnd

    2012-06-01

    The second messenger cAMP has a pivotal role in animals' physiology and behavior. Intracellular concentrations of cAMP are balanced by cAMP-synthesizing adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cAMP-cleaving phosphodiesterases. Knowledge about ACs in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) is rather limited and only an ortholog of the vertebrate AC3 isoform has been functionally characterized, so far. Employing bioinformatics and functional expression we characterized two additional honeybee genes encoding membrane-bound (tm)ACs. The proteins were designated AmAC2t and AmAC8. Unlike the common structure of tmACs, AmAC2t lacks the first transmembrane domain. Despite this unusual topography, AmAC2t-activity could be stimulated by norepinephrine and NKH477 with EC(50s) of 0.07 μM and 3 μM. Both ligands stimulated AmAC8 with EC(50s) of 0.24 μM and 3.1 μM. In brain cryosections, intensive staining of mushroom bodies was observed with specific antibodies against AmAC8, an expression pattern highly reminiscent of the Drosophila rutabaga AC. In a current release of the honeybee genome database we identified three additional tmAC- and one soluble AC-encoding gene. These results suggest that (1) the AC-gene family in honeybees is comparably large as in other species, and (2) based on the restricted expression of AmAC8 in mushroom bodies, this enzyme might serve important functions in honeybee behavior. PMID:22426196

  19. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

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    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  20. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

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    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  1. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca2+ to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca2+ and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells

  2. [The influence of two-month treatment with bromocryptine on activity of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system in the myocardium and testes of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

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    Derkach, K V; Bondareva, V M; Moyseyuk, I V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are cardiovascular diseases and dysfunctions of the reproductive system, indicating the urgency of developing new approaches to their correction. Last years for the treatment of DM2 began to use bromocryptine (BC), the agonist of type 2 dopamine receptors, which not only restores the energy metabolism, but also prevents the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms and targets of BC action are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BC treatment on functional activity of adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the myocardium and testes of male rats with DM2, which is caused by high-fat diet and treatment with streptozotocin (25 mg/kg). The treatment with BC (60 days, orally at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg once every two days) was started 90 days after the beginning of high-fat diet. Diabetic rats had an increased body weight, elevated triglycerides level, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. The treatment with BC resulted in the restoration of glycometabolic indicators and in the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp), relaxin, and agonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β3-AR)--isoproterenol and norepinephrine were decreased in the miocardium of the diabetic rats. The corresponding effects of the β-agonists BRL-37344 and CL-316243 was preserved. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on forskolin-stimulated AC activity was attenuated, while the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline mediated through α2-AR increased. The treatment with BC resulted in the normalization of the adrenergic signaling in the myocardium and partially restoration of AC effects of relaxin and somatostatin. In the testes of diabetic rats, the basal and stimulated by GppNHp, forskolin, human chorionic gonadotropin and pituitary AC-activating polypeptide AC activity were decreased, and the

  3. New structural forms of a mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase Rv1625c

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    Deivanayaga Barathy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rv1625c is one of 16 adenylyl cyclases encoded in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In solution Rv1625c exists predominantly as a monomer, with a small amount of dimer. It has been shown previously that the monomer is active and the dimeric fraction is inactive. Both fractions of wild-type Rv1625c crystallized as head-to-head inactive domain-swapped dimers as opposed to the head-to-tail dimer seen in other functional adenylyl cyclases. About half of the molecule is involved in extensive domain swapping. The strain created by a serine residue located on a hinge loop and the crystallization condition might have led to this unusual domain swapping. The inactivity of the dimeric form of Rv1625c could be explained by the absence of the required catalytic site in the swapped dimer. A single mutant of the enzyme was also generated by changing a phenylalanine predicted to occur at the functional dimer interface to an arginine. This single mutant exists as a dimer in solution but crystallized as a monomer. Analysis of the structure showed that a salt bridge formed between a glutamate residue in the N-terminal segment and the mutated arginine residue hinders dimer formation by pulling the N-terminal region towards the dimer interface. Both structures reported here show a change in the dimerization-arm region which is involved in formation of the functional dimer. It is concluded that the dimerization arm along with other structural elements such as the N-terminal region and certain loops are vital for determining the oligomeric nature of the enzyme, which in turn dictates its activity.

  4. Purification of a RAS-responsive adenylyl cyclase complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by use of an epitope addition method.

    OpenAIRE

    J Field; Nikawa, J; Broek, D; MacDonald, B.; Rodgers, L; Wilson, I A; Lerner, R A; Wigler, M

    1988-01-01

    We developed a method for immunoaffinity purification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase based on creating a fusion with a small peptide epitope. Using oligonucleotide technology to encode the peptide epitope we constructed a plasmid that expressed the fusion protein from the S. cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase promoter ADH1. A monoclonal antibody previously raised against the peptide was used to purify adenylyl cyclase by affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme appeared to be ...

  5. Adenylyl cyclase 6 mediates loading-induced bone adaptation in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen L Lee; Hoey, David A.; Spasic, Milos; Tang, Tong; Hammond, H. Kirk; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are single, nonmotile, antenna-like structures extending from the apical membrane of most mammalian cells. They may mediate mechanotransduction, the conversion of external mechanical stimuli into biochemical intracellular signals. Previously we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), a membrane-bound enzyme enriched in primary cilia of MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells, may play a role in a primary cilium-dependent mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction in vitro. In this study...

  6. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  7. Molecular Cloning,Expression,and Characterization of an Adenylyl Cyclase-associated Protein from Gossypium arboreum Fuzzless Mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng; ZHAO Guo-hong; JIA Yin-hua; DU Xiong-ming

    2008-01-01

    @@ CAP,an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein,is predicted to be involved in cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction.Recently,we found that CAP may play an important role in fuzz-like fiber cell initiation in cotton.For the further research,we isolated two CAP homologues from wild type cotton Gossypium arboreum L.(DPL971) and its natural fuzzless mutant (DPL972).The gene consisted of an open reading frame of 1,416 nucleotides encoding a protein of 471 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 50.6 kDa.

  8. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Roa, Jinae N

    2014-03-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3(-), and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3(-) sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3(-)-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H(+) absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  9. Receptor number and caveolar co-localization determine receptor coupling efficiency to adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Xiang, Y; Regan, J W; Insel, P A

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many signaling molecules localize in microdomains of the plasma membrane, particularly caveolae. In this study, overexpression of adenylyl cyclase was used as a functional probe of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) compartmentation. We found that three endogenous receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes couple with different levels of efficiency to the activation of adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6), which localizes to caveolin-rich membrane fractions. Overexpression of AC6 enhanced the maximal cAMP response to beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR)-selective activation 3.7-fold, to beta(2)AR-selective activation only 1.6-fold and to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) not at all. Therefore, the rank order of efficacy in coupling to AC6 is beta(1)AR > beta(2)AR > prostaglandin E(2) receptor (EP(2)R). beta(2)AR coupling efficiency was greater when we overexpressed the receptor or blocked its desensitization by expressing betaARKct, an inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activation, but was not significantly greater when cells were treated with pertussis toxin. Assessment of receptor and AC expression indicated co-localization of AC5/6, beta(1)AR, and beta(2)AR, but not EP(2)R, in caveolin-rich membranes and caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates, likely explaining the observed activation of AC6 by betaAR subtypes but lack thereof by PGE(2). When cardiomyocytes were stimulated with a betaAR agonist, beta(2)AR were no longer found in caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates; an effect that was blocked by expression of betaARKct. Thus, agonist-induced translocation of beta(2)AR out of caveolae causes a sequestration of receptor from effector and likely contributes to the lower efficacy of beta(2)AR coupling to AC6 as compared with beta(1)AR, which do not similarly translocate. Therefore, spatial co-localization is a key determinant of efficiency of coupling by particular extracellular signals to activation of GPCR-linked effectors. PMID:11533056

  10. The Functional State of Hormone-Sensitive Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling System in Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander O. Shpakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM induces a large number of diseases of the nervous, cardiovascular, and some other systems of the organism. One of the main causes of the diseases is the changes in the functional activity of hormonal signaling systems which lead to the alterations and abnormalities of the cellular processes and contribute to triggering and developing many DM complications. The key role in the control of physiological and biochemical processes belongs to the adenylyl cyclase (AC signaling system, sensitive to biogenic amines and polypeptide hormones. The review is devoted to the changes in the GPCR-G protein-AC system in the brain, heart, skeletal muscles, liver, and the adipose tissue in experimental and human DM of the types 1 and 2 and also to the role of the changes in AC signaling in the pathogenesis and etiology of DM and its complications. It is shown that the changes of the functional state of hormone-sensitive AC system are dependent to a large extent on the type and duration of DM and in experimental DM on the model of the disease. The degree of alterations and abnormalities of AC signaling pathways correlates very well with the severity of DM and its complications.

  11. Conservation of functional domain structure in bicarbonate-regulated “soluble” adenylyl cyclases in bacteria and eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Mime; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2004-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionarily conserved bicarbonate sensor. In mammals, it is responsible for bicarbonate-induced, cAMP-dependent processes in sperm required for fertilization and postulated to be involved in other bicarbonate- and carbon dioxide-dependent functions throughout the body. Among eukaryotes, sAC-like cyclases have been detected in mammals and in the fungi Dictyostelium; these enzymes display extensive similarity extending through two cyclase catalytic domain...

  12. Adenylyl cyclase 6 mediates loading-induced bone adaptation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristen L; Hoey, David A; Spasic, Milos; Tang, Tong; Hammond, H Kirk; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-03-01

    Primary cilia are single, nonmotile, antenna-like structures extending from the apical membrane of most mammalian cells. They may mediate mechanotransduction, the conversion of external mechanical stimuli into biochemical intracellular signals. Previously we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), a membrane-bound enzyme enriched in primary cilia of MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells, may play a role in a primary cilium-dependent mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction in vitro. In this study, we determined whether AC6 deletion impairs loading-induced bone formation in vivo. Skeletally mature mice with a global knockout of AC6 exhibited normal bone morphology and responded to osteogenic chemical stimuli similar to wild-type mice. Following ulnar loading over 3 consecutive days, bone formation parameters were assessed using dynamic histomorphometry. Mice lacking AC6 formed significantly less bone than control animals (41% lower bone formation rate). Furthermore, there was an attenuated flow-induced increase in COX-2 mRNA expression levels in primary bone cells isolated from AC6 knockout mice compared to controls (1.3±0.1- vs. 2.6±0.2-fold increase). Collectively, these data indicate that AC6 plays a role in loading-induced bone adaptation, and these findings are consistent with our previous studies implicating primary cilia and AC6 in a novel mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:24277577

  13. A kinase-anchoring proteins and adenylyl cyclase in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W

    2011-10-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology, including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, AC, protein kinase A, and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review, we discuss how the interaction of A kinase-anchoring proteins with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology.

  14. Biological Activity of the Alternative Promoters of the Dictyostelium discoideum Adenylyl Cyclase A Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Centeno, Javier; Sastre, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    Amoebae of the Dictyostelium discoideum species form multicellular fruiting bodies upon starvation. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is used as intercellular signalling molecule in cell-aggregation, cell differentiation and morphogenesis. This molecule is synthesized by three adenylyl cyclases, one of which, ACA, is required for cell aggregation. The gene coding for ACA (acaA) is transcribed from three different promoters that are active at different developmental stages. Promoter 1 is active during cell-aggregation, promoters 2 and 3 are active in prespore and prestalk tip cells at subsequent developmental stages. The biological relevance of acaA expression from each of the promoters has been studied in this article. The acaA gene was expressed in acaA-mutant cells, that do not aggregate, under control of each of the three acaA promoters. acaA expression under promoter 1 control induced cell aggregation although subsequent development was delayed, very small fruiting bodies were formed and cell differentiation genes were expressed at very low levels. Promoter 2-driven acaA expression induced the formation of small aggregates and small fruiting bodies were formed at the same time as in wild-type strains and differentiation genes were also expressed at lower levels. Expression of acaA from promoter 3 induced aggregates and fruiting bodies formation and their size and the expression of differentiation genes were more similar to that of wild-type cells. Expression of acaA from promoters 1 and 2 in AX4 cells also produced smaller structures. In conclusion, the expression of acaA under control of the aggregation-specific Promoter 1 is able to induce cell aggregation in acaA-mutant strains. Expression from promoters 2 and 3 also recovered aggregation and development although promoter 3 induced a more complete recovery of fruiting body formation.

  15. Bicarbonate-sensitive soluble and transmembrane adenylyl cyclases in peripheral chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ana R; Holmes, Andrew P S; Sample, Vedangi; Kumar, Prem; Cann, Martin J; Monteiro, Emília C; Zhang, Jin; Gauda, Estelle B

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors by hypercapnia triggers a reflex ventilatory response via a cascade of cellular events, which includes generation of cAMP. However, it is not known if molecular CO2/HCO3(-) and/or H(+) mediate this effect and how these molecules contribute to cAMP production. We previously reported that the CB highly expresses HCO3(-)-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). In the present study we systematically characterize the role of sAC in the CB, comparing the effect of isohydric hypercapnia (IH) in cAMP generation through activation of sAC or transmembrane-adenylyl cyclase (tmAC). Pharmacological deactivation of sAC and tmAC decreased the CB cAMP content in normocapnia and IH with no differences between these two conditions. Changes from normocapnia to IH did not effect the degree of PKA activation and the carotid sinus nerve discharge frequency. sAC and tmAC are functional in CB but intracellular elevations in CO2/HCO3(-) in IH conditions on their own are insufficient to further activate these enzymes, suggesting that the hypercapnic response is dependent on secondary acidosis.

  16. Adenylyl cyclase 3 haploinsufficiency confers susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tao; Shen, Ying; Lee, Han-Woong; Yu, Rina; Park, Taesun

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 3 (Adcy3), a member of the mammalian adenylyl cyclase family responsible for generating the second messenger cAMP, has long been known to play an essential role in olfactory signal transduction. Here, we demonstrated that Adcy3 heterozygous null mice displayed increased visceral adiposity in the absence of hyperphagia and developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines on both chow and high-fat diet (HFD). Of note, HFD decreased the Adcy3 expression in white adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. We also report for the first time that Adcy3 haploinsufficiency resulted in reduced expression of genes involved in thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and insulin signaling, with enhanced expression of genes related to adipogenesis in peripheral tissues of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cAMP signals generated by Adcy3 in peripheral tissues may play a pivotal role in modulating obesity and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27678003

  17. Characterization of Plasmodium falciparum adenylyl cyclase-β and its role in erythrocytic stage parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Salazar

    Full Text Available The most severe form of human malaria is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The second messenger cAMP has been shown to be important for the parasite's ability to infect the host's liver, but its role during parasite growth inside erythrocytes, the stage responsible for symptomatic malaria, is less clear. The P. falciparum genome encodes two adenylyl cyclases, the enzymes that synthesize cAMP, PfACα and PfACβ. We now show that one of these, PfACβ, plays an important role during the erythrocytic stage of the P. falciparum life cycle. Biochemical characterization of PfACβ revealed a marked pH dependence, and sensitivity to a number of small molecule inhibitors. These inhibitors kill parasites growing inside red blood cells. One particular inhibitor is selective for PfACβ relative to its human ortholog, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC; thus, PfACβ represents a potential target for development of safe and effective antimalarial therapeutics.

  18. Analgesic effects of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor NB001 on bone cancer pain in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wen-bo; Yang, Qi; Guo, Yan-yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Dong-sheng; Cheng, Qiang; Li, Xiao-ming; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Jian-ning; Liu, Gang; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer pain, especially the one caused by metastasis in bones, is a severe type of pain. Pain becomes chronic unless its causes and consequences are resolved. With improvements in cancer detection and survival among patients, pain has been considered as a great challenge because traditional therapies are partially effective in terms of providing relief. Cancer pain mechanisms are more poorly understood than neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. Chronic inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain are influenced by NB001, an adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1)-specific inhibitor with analgesic effects. In this study, the analgesic effects of NB001 on cancer pain were evaluated. Results Pain was induced by injecting osteolytic murine sarcoma cell NCTC 2472 into the intramedullary cavity of the femur of mice. The mice injected with sarcoma cells for four weeks exhibited significant spontaneous pain behavior and mechanical allodynia. The continuous systemic application of NB001 (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, twice daily for three days) markedly decreased the number of spontaneous lifting but increased the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold. NB001 decreased the concentrations of cAMP and the levels of GluN2A, GluN2B, p-GluA1 (831), and p-GluA1 (845) in the anterior cingulate cortex, and inhibited the frequency of presynaptic neurotransmitter release in the anterior cingulate cortex of the mouse models. Conclusions NB001 may serve as a novel analgesic to treat bone cancer pain. Its analgesic effect is at least partially due to the inhibition of AC1 in anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:27612915

  19. Differential activation of yeast adenylyl cyclase by Ras1 and Ras2 depends on the conserved N terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, N; Segal, M; Marbach, I; Levitzki, A

    1995-11-21

    Although both Ras1 and Ras2 activate adenylyl cyclase in yeast, a number of differences can be observed regarding their function in the cAMP pathway. To explore the relative contribution of conserved and variable domains in determining these differences, chimeric RAS1-RAS2 or RAS2-RAS1 genes were constructed by swapping the sequences encoding the variable C-terminal domains. These constructs were expressed in a cdc25ts ras1 ras2 strain. Biochemical data show that the difference in efficacy of adenylyl cyclase activation between the two Ras proteins resides in the highly conserved N-terminal domain. This finding is supported by the observation that Ras2 delta, in which the C-terminal domain of Ras2 has been deleted, is a more potent activator of the yeast adenylyl cyclase than Ras1 delta, in which the C-terminal domain of Ras1 has been deleted. These observations suggest that amino acid residues other than the highly conserved residues of the effector domain within the N terminus may determine the efficiency of functional interaction with adenylyl cyclase. Similar levels of intracellular cAMP were found in Ras1, Ras1-Ras2, Ras1 delta, Ras2, and Ras2-Ras1 strains throughout the growth curve. This was found to result from the higher expression of Ras1 and Ras1-Ras2, which compensate for their lower efficacy in activating adenylyl cyclase. These results suggest that the difference between the Ras1 and the Ras2 phenotype is not due to their different efficacy in activating the cAMP pathway and that the divergent C-terminal domains are responsible for these differences, through interaction with other regulatory elements. PMID:7479926

  20. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role

    OpenAIRE

    Barott, K.L.; Helman, Y.; Haramaty, L.; Barron, M. E.; Hess, K.C.; Buck, J.; Levin, L. R.; Tresguerres, M.

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in ...

  1. Allosteric activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase by calmodulin: molecular dynamics and mutagenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwa, Edithe; Davi, Marilyne; Chenal, Alexandre; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2014-07-25

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin is an essential toxin that allows Bordetella pertussis to invade eukaryotic cells, where it is activated after binding to calmodulin (CaM). Based on the crystal structure of the AC catalytic domain in complex with the C-terminal half of CaM (C-CaM), our previous molecular dynamics simulations (Selwa, E., Laine, E., and Malliavin, T. (2012) Differential role of calmodulin and calcium ions in the stabilization of the catalytic domain of adenyl cyclase CyaA from Bordetella pertussis. Proteins 80, 1028–1040) suggested that three residues (i.e. Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360)) might be important for stabilizing the AC/CaM interaction. These residues belong to a loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC, which is located at the interface between CaM and the AC catalytic loop. In the present study, we conducted the in silico and in vitro characterization of three AC variants, where one (Asn(347); ACm1A), two (Arg(338) and Asp(360); ACm2A), or three residues (Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360); ACm3A) were substituted with Ala. Biochemical studies showed that the affinities of ACm1A and ACm2A for CaM were not affected significantly, whereas that of ACm3A was reduced dramatically. To understand the effects of these modifications, molecular dynamics simulations were performed based on the modified proteins. The molecular dynamics trajectories recorded for the ACm3AC-CaM complex showed that the calcium-binding loops of C-CaM exhibited large fluctuations, which could be related to the weakened interaction between ACm3A and its activator. Overall, our results suggest that the loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC is crucial during CaM binding for stabilizing the AC catalytic loop in an active configuration.

  2. In silico prediction of tyrosinase and adenylyl cyclase inhibitors from natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Pedro; Tong, Henry H Y; Chao, Chi M

    2014-02-01

    Although many herbal medicines are effective in the treatment of hyperpigmentation, the potency of different constituents remains unknown. In this work, more than 20,000 herbal ingredients from 453 herbs were docked into the crystal structures of adenylyl cyclase and a human homology tyrosinase model using Surflex-Dock. These two enzymes are responsible for melanin production and inhibition of them may attain a skin-whitening effect superior to currently available agents. The essential drug properties for topical formulation of the herbal ingredients, including skin permeability, sensitization, irritation, corrosive and carcinogenic properties were predicted by Dermwin, Skin Sensitization Alerts (SSA), Skin Irritation Corrosion Rules Estimation Tool (SICRET) and Benigni/Bossa rulebase module of Toxtree. Moreover, similarity ensemble and pharmacophore mapping approaches were used to forecast other potential targets for these herbal compounds by the software, SEArch and PharmMapper. Overall, this study predicted seven compounds to have advanced drug-like properties over the well-known effective tyrosinase inhibitors, arbutin and kojic acid. These seven compounds have the highest potential for further in vitro and in vivo investigation with the aim of developing safe and high-efficacy skin-whitening agents.

  3. Molecular Cloning, and Characterization of an Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein from Gossypium arboreum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng; ZHAO Guo-hong; JIA Yin-hua; DU Xiong-ming

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clone CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) gene from Gossypium arboreum L. and develop a platform for expressing and purifying CAP protein, which is a base for the construction and function researches of CAP. In this work, a CAP homolog from cotton (DPL971) ovule was identified and cloned. And the cDNA sequence consisted of an open reading frame of 1416 nucleotides encoding a protein of 471 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 50.6 kDa. To gain insight on the CAP role in cotton fiber development, the cloned CAP cDNA was expressed. A significant higher yield pure protein was obtained with the chromatographic method. Further experiments showed that the purified protein can bind with the actin in vitro indicating that the recombinant cotton CAP is functional. The procedure described here produced high yield pure protein through one chromatographic step, suitable for further structure-function studies.

  4. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Hassan Biswas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain. In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins.

  5. Ectopic expression of cyclase associated protein CAP restores the streaming and aggregation defects of adenylyl cyclase a deficient Dictyostelium discoideum cells

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    Sultana Hameeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion, an integral part of D. discoideum development, is important for morphogenesis and regulated gene expression in the multicellular context and is required to trigger cell-differentiation. G-protein linked adenylyl cyclase pathways are crucially involved and a mutant lacking the aggregation specific adenylyl cyclase ACA does not undergo multicellular development. Results Here, we have investigated the role of cyclase-associated protein (CAP, an important regulator of cell polarity and F-actin/G-actin ratio in the aca- mutant. We show that ectopic expression of GFP-CAP improves cell polarization, streaming and aggregation in aca- cells, but it fails to completely restore development. Our studies indicate a requirement of CAP in the ACA dependent signal transduction for progression of the development of unicellular amoebae into multicellular structures. The reduced expression of the cell adhesion molecule DdCAD1 together with csA is responsible for the defects in aca- cells to initiate multicellular development. Early development was restored by the expression of GFP-CAP that enhanced the DdCAD1 transcript levels and to a lesser extent the csA mRNA levels. Conclusions Collectively, our data shows a novel role of CAP in regulating cell adhesion mechanisms during development that might be envisioned to unravel the functions of mammalian CAP during animal embryogenesis.

  6. A mitochondrial CO2-adenylyl cyclase-cAMP signalosome controls yeast normoxic cytochrome c oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kenneth C; Liu, Jingjing; Manfredi, Giovanni; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Barrientos, Antoni

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria, the major source of cellular energy in the form of ATP, respond to changes in substrate availability and bioenergetic demands by employing rapid, short-term, metabolic adaptation mechanisms, such as phosphorylation-dependent protein regulation. In mammalian cells, an intramitochondrial CO2-adenylyl cyclase (AC)-cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway regulates aerobic energy production. One target of this pathway involves phosphorylation of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit 4-isoform 1 (COX4i1), which modulates COX allosteric regulation by ATP. However, the role of the CO2-sAC-cAMP-PKA signalosome in regulating COX activity and mitochondrial metabolism and its evolutionary conservation remain to be fully established. We show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, normoxic COX activity measured in the presence of ATP is 55% lower than in the presence of ADP. Moreover, the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 activity is present in mitochondria, and it contributes to the ATP-mediated regulation of COX through the normoxic subunit Cox5a, homologue of human COX4i1, in a bicarbonate-sensitive manner. Furthermore, we have identified 2 phosphorylation targets in Cox5a (T65 and S43) that modulate its allosteric regulation by ATP. These residues are not conserved in the Cox5b-containing hypoxic enzyme, which is not regulated by ATP. We conclude that across evolution, a CO2-sAC-cAMP-PKA axis regulates normoxic COX activity.

  7. Somatic 'soluble' adenylyl cyclase isoforms are unaffected in Sacy tm1Lex/Sacy tm1Lex 'knockout' mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Farrell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, Adcy10, or Sacy represents a source of the second messenger cAMP distinct from the widely studied, G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases. Genetic deletion of the second through fourth coding exons in Sacy(tm1Lex/Sacy(tm1Lex knockout mice results in a male sterile phenotype. The absence of any major somatic phenotype is inconsistent with the variety of somatic functions identified for sAC using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now use immunological and molecular biological methods to demonstrate that somatic tissues express a previously unknown isoform of sAC, which utilizes a unique start site, and which 'escapes' the design of the Sacy(tm1Lex knockout allele. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies reveal increased complexity at the sAC locus, and they suggest that the known isoforms of sAC play a unique function in male germ cells.

  8. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barott, K L; Helman, Y; Haramaty, L; Barron, M E; Hess, K C; Buck, J; Levin, L R; Tresguerres, M

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  9. Opioid and GABAB receptors differentially couple to an adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A downstream effector after chronic morphine treatment.

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    Elena Elizabeth Bagley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are intensely addictive, and cessation of their chronic use is associated with a highly aversive withdrawal syndrome. A cellular hallmark of withdrawal is an opioid sensitive protein kinase A-dependent increase in GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1 currents in periaqueductal gray (PAG neurons. Elevated GAT-1 activity directly increases GABAergic neuronal excitability and synaptic GABA release, which will enhance GABAergic inhibition of PAG output neurons. This reduced activity of PAG output neurons to several brain regions, including the hypothalamus and medulla, contributes to many of the PAG-mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces some of the PAG mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. Like the opioid receptors the GABAB receptor is a Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptor. This suggests it could be modulating GAT-1 activity in PAG neurons through its inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway. Opioid modulation of the GAT-1 activity can be detected by changes in the reversal potential of opioid membrane currents. We found that when opioids are reducing the GAT-1 cation conductance and increasing the GIRK conductance the opioid agonist reversal potential is much more negative than Ek. Using this approach for GABAB receptors we show that the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, does not couple to inhibition of GAT-1 currents during opioid withdrawal. It is possible this differential signaling of the two Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptors is due to the strong compartmentalization of the GABAB receptor that does not favor signaling to the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A/GAT-1 pathway. This highlights the importance of studying the effects of G-protein coupled receptors in native tissue with endogenous G-protein coupled receptors and the full complement of relevant proteins and signaling molecules. This study suggests that baclofen reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms through a non-GAT-1

  10. Impaired activation of adenylyl cyclase in lung of the Basenji-greyhound model of airway hyperresponsiveness: decreased numbers of high affinity beta-adrenoceptors.

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    Emala, C. W.; Aryana, A.; Hirshman, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. To evaluate mechanisms involved in the impaired beta-adrenoceptor stimulation of adenylyl cyclase in tissues from the Basenji-greyhound (BG) dog model of airway hyperresponsiveness, we compared agonist and antagonist binding affinity of beta-adrenoceptors, beta-adrenoceptor subtypes, percentage of beta-adrenoceptors sequestered, and coupling of the beta-adrenoceptor to Gs alpha in lung membranes from BG and control mongrel dogs. We found that lung membranes from the BG dog had higher total...

  11. Role of the bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase in pH sensing and metabolic regulation

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    Jung-Chin eChang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionarily conserved soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, adcy10 was recently identified as a unique source of cAMP in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Its activity is regulated by bicarbonate and fine-tuned by calcium. As such, and in conjunction with carbonic anhydrase (CA, sAC constitutes an HCO3-/CO¬2/pH sensor. In both alpha-intercalated cells of the collecting duct and the clear cells of the epididymis, sAC is expressed at significant level and involved in pH homeostasis via apical recruitment of vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA in a PKA-dependent manner. In addition to maintenance of pH homeostasis, sAC is also involved in metabolic regulation such as coupling of Krebs cycle to oxidative phosphorylation via bicarbonate/CO2 sensing. Additionally, sAC also regulates CFTR channel and plays an important role in regulation of barrier function and apoptosis. These observations suggest that sAC, via bicarbonate-sensing, plays an important role in maintaining homeostatic status of cells against fluctuations in their microenvironment.

  12. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  13. Inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in amygdala blocks the effect of audiogenic seizure kindling in genetically epilepsy-prone rats.

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    Tupal, Srinivasan; Faingold, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Genetically epilepsy-prone rats of the severe seizure strain (GEPR-9s) exhibit audiogenic seizures (AGS) beginning with wild running and ending with tonic hind limb extension (TE). AGS kindling in GEPR-9s involves periodic repetition of >/=14 seizures over 7-21 days and results in prolonged seizures and an additional phase of generalized post-tonic clonus (PTC) that follows TE. AGS kindling behavior changes are long-lasting and involve expansion of the requisite seizure neuronal network from the brainstem to include the amygdala, mediated by neuroplasticity in lateral amygdala. Recent evidence indicates that focal activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in lateral amygdala leads to precipitous acquisition of AGS-kindled seizure behaviors, suggesting that activation of AC activity is important in development and maintenance of AGS kindling. The present study further examined the role of AC in AGS-kindled seizures in GEPR-9s by focally inhibiting AC in the amygdala. Bilateral microinjection of an AC inhibitor, SQ22,536 (0.25 and 0.50 nmol/side), in AGS-kindled GEPR-9s selectively blocked PTC during AGS at 1 h after microinjection, but the pre-kindled AGS behaviors remained intact. The incidence of PTC during AGS returned to pre-drug levels 12 h after the lower dose of SQ22,536 (0.25 nmol/side). However, after the higher dose of SQ22,536 (0.5 nmol/side), complete return to AGS with PTC was seen in all GEPR-9s at 120 h. These results indicate that maintenance of AGS kindling-mediated PTC in GEPR-9s may involve activation of AC. These data provide further evidence for the involvement of AC in the epileptogenic mechanisms subserving AGS kindling.

  14. Nucleotidyl cyclase activity of particulate guanylyl cyclase A: comparison with particulate guanylyl cyclases E and F, soluble guanylyl cyclase and bacterial adenylyl cyclases CyaA and edema factor.

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    Kerstin Y Beste

    Full Text Available Guanylyl cyclases (GCs regulate many physiological processes by catalyzing the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP. The GC family consists of seven particulate GCs (pGCs and a nitric oxide-activated soluble GC (sGC. Rat sGC α1β1 possesses much broader substrate specificity than previously assumed. Moreover, the exotoxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor (EF from Bacillus anthracis possess nucleotidyl cyclase (NC activity. pGC-A is a natriuretic peptide-activated homodimer with two catalytic sites that act cooperatively. Here, we studied the NC activity of rat pGC-A in membranes of stably transfected HEK293 cells using a highly sensitive and specific HPLC-MS/MS technique. GTP and ITP were effective, and ATP and XTP were only poor, pGC-A substrates. In contrast to sGC, pGC-A did not use CTP and UTP as substrates. pGC-E and pGC-F expressed in bovine rod outer segment membranes used only GTP as substrate. In intact HEK293 cells, pGC-A generated only cGMP. In contrast to pGCs, EF and CyaA showed very broad substrate-specificity. In conclusion, NCs exhibit different substrate-specificities, arguing against substrate-leakiness of enzymes and pointing to distinct physiological functions of cyclic purine and pyrimidine nucleotides.

  15. [HCO3-]-regulated expression and activity of soluble adenylyl cyclase in corneal endothelial and Calu-3 cells

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    Cui Miao

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bicarbonate activated Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase (sAC is a unique cytoplasmic and nuclear signaling mechanism for the generation of cAMP. HCO3- activates sAC in bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCECs, increasing [cAMP] and stimulating PKA, leading to phosphorylation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR and increased apical Cl- permeability. Here, we examined whether HCO3- may also regulate the expression of sAC and thereby affect the production of cAMP upon activation by HCO3- and the stimulation of CFTR in BCECs. Results RT-competitive PCR indicated that sAC mRNA expression in BCECs is dependent on [HCO3-] and incubation time in HCO3-. Immunoblots showed that 10 and 40 mM HCO3- increased sAC protein expression by 45% and 87%, respectively, relative to cells cultured in the absence of HCO3-. Furthermore, 40 mM HCO3- up-regulated sAC protein expression in Calu-3 cells by 93%. On the other hand, sAC expression in BCECs and Calu-3 cells was unaffected by changes in bath pH or osmolarity. Interestingly, BCECs pre-treated with10 μM adenosine or 10 μM forskolin, which increase cAMP levels, showed decreased sAC mRNA expression by 20% and 30%, respectively. Intracellular cAMP production by sAC paralleled the time and [HCO3-]-dependent expression of sAC. Bicarbonate-induced apical Cl- permeability increased by 78% (P 3-. However for cells cultured in the absence of HCO3-, apical Cl- permeability increased by only 10.3% (P > 0.05. Conclusion HCO3- not only directly activates sAC, but also up-regulates the expression of sAC. These results suggest that active cellular uptake of HCO3- can contribute to the basal level of cellular cAMP in tissues that express sAC.

  16. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide inhibits gli1 gene expression and proliferation in primary medulloblastoma derived tumorsphere cultures

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    Dong Hongmei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog (HH signaling is critical for the expansion of granule neuron precursors (GNPs within the external granular layer (EGL during cerebellar development. Aberrant HH signaling within GNPs is thought to give rise to medulloblastoma (MB - the most commonly-observed form of malignant pediatric brain tumor. Evidence in both invertebrates and vertebrates indicates that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA antagonizes HH signalling. Receptors specific for the neuropeptide pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP, gene name ADCYAP1 are expressed in GNPs. PACAP has been shown to protect GNPs from apoptosis in vitro, and to interact with HH signaling to regulate GNP proliferation. PACAP/ptch1 double mutant mice exhibit an increased incidence of MB compared to ptch1 mice, indicating that PACAP may regulate HH pathway-mediated MB pathogenesis. Methods Primary MB tumorsphere cultures were prepared from thirteen ptch1+/-/p53+/- double mutant mice and treated with the smoothened (SMO agonist purmorphamine, the SMO antagonist SANT-1, the neuropeptide PACAP, the PKA activator forskolin, and the PKA inhibitor H89. Gene expression of gli1 and [3H]-thymidine incorporation were assessed to determine drug effects on HH pathway activity and proliferation, respectively. PKA activity was determined in cell extracts by Western blotting using a phospho-PKA substrate antibody. Results Primary tumor cells cultured for 1-week under serum-free conditions grew as tumorspheres and were found to express PAC1 receptor transcripts. Gli1 gene expression was significantly reduced by SANT-1, PACAP and forskolin, but was unaffected by purmorphamine. The attenuation of gli1 gene expression by PACAP was reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89, which also blocked PKA activation. Treatment of tumorsphere cultures with PACAP, forskolin, and SANT-1 for 24 or 48 hours reduced proliferation. Conclusions Primary tumorspheres derived from ptch1+/-/p53

  17. Adenylyl cyclase is required for cAMP production, growth, conidial germination, and virulence in the citrus green mold pathogen Penicillium digitatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weili; Wang, Mingshuang; Wang, Jiye; Zhu, Congyi; Chung, Kuang-Ren; Li, Hongye

    2016-11-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the causative agent of green mold decay on citrus fruit. The cAMP-mediated signaling pathway plays an important role in the transduction of extracellular signals and has been shown to regulate a wide range of developmental processes and pathogenicity in fungal pathogens. We cloned and characterized a Pdac1 gene of P. digitatum, which encodes a polypeptide similar to fungal adenylyl cyclases. Using a loss-of-function mutation in the Pdac1 gene we demonstrated a critical requirement for hyphal growth and conidial germination. Deletion of Pdac1 resulted in decreased accumulation of cAMP and down-regulation of genes encoding a G protein α subunit, both catalytic and regulatory subunits of PKA, and two transcriptional regulators StuA and Som1. Fungal mutants lacking Pdac1 produced abundant conidia, which failed to germinate effectively and displayed an elevated sensitivity to heat treatment. Pdac1 mutant failed to utilize carbohydrates effectively and thus displayed severe growth retardation on rich and synthetic media. Slow growth seen in the Pdac1 mutants could be due to a defect in nutrient sensing and acquisition. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Pdac1 was primarily expressed at the early stage of infection. Fungal pathogenicity assayed on citrus fruit revealed that P. digitatum strains impaired for Pdac1 delayed lesion formation. Our results highlight important regulatory roles of adenylyl cyclase-mediated cAMP production in P. digitatum and provide insights into the critical role of cAMP in fungal growth, development and virulence. PMID:27664719

  18. Dysregulation of TrkB phosphorylation and proBDNF protein in adenylyl cyclase 1 and 8 knockout mice in a model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susick, Laura L; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Hool, Steven M; Conti, Alana C

    2016-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates neuron growth and is regulated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs). Mice lacking AC1/8 (DKO) have a basal reduction in the dendritic complexity of medium spiny neurons in the caudate putamen and demonstrate increased neurotoxicity in the striatum following acute neonatal ethanol exposure compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting a compromise in BDNF regulation under varying conditions. Although neonatal ethanol exposure can negatively impact BDNF expression, little is known about the effect on BDNF receptor activation and its downstream signaling, including Akt activation, an established neuroprotective pathway. Therefore, here we determined the effects of AC1/8 deletion and neonatal ethanol administration on BDNF and proBDNF protein expression, and activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), Akt, ERK1/2, and PLCγ. WT and DKO mice were treated with a single dose of 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline at postnatal days 5-7 to model late-gestational alcohol exposure. Striatal and cortical tissues were analyzed using a BDNF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoblotting for proBDNF, phosphorylated and total TrkB, Akt, ERK1/2, and PLCɣ1. Neither postnatal ethanol exposure nor AC1/8 deletion affected total BDNF protein expression at any time point in either region examined. Neonatal ethanol increased the expression of proBDNF protein in the striatum of WT mice 6, 24, and 48 h after exposure, with DKO mice demonstrating a reduction in proBDNF expression 6 h after exposure. Six and 24 h after ethanol administration, phosphorylation of full-length TrkB in the striatum was significantly reduced in WT mice, but was significantly increased in DKO mice only at 24 h. Interestingly, 48 h after ethanol, both WT and DKO mice demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated full-length TrkB. In addition, Akt and PLCɣ1 phosphorylation was also decreased in ethanol-treated DKO mice 48 h after injection. These data demonstrate

  19. Adenylyl cyclase A expression is tip-specific in Dictyostelium slugs and directs StatA nuclear translocation and CudA gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerke-van Wijk, I; Fukuzawa, M; Devreotes, P N; Schaap, P

    2001-06-01

    cAMP oscillations, generated by adenylyl cyclase A (ACA), coordinate cell aggregation in Dictyostelium and have also been implicated in organizer function during multicellular development. We used a gene fusion of the ACA promoter with a labile lacZ derivative to study the expression pattern of ACA. During aggregation, most cells expressed ACA, but thereafter expression was lost in all cells except those of the anterior tip. Before aggregation, ACA transcription was strongly upregulated by nanomolar cAMP pulses. Postaggregative transcription was sustained by nanomolar cAMP pulses, but downregulated by a continuous micromolar cAMP stimulus and by the stalk-cell-inducing factor DIF. Earlier work showed that the transcription factor StatA displays tip-specific nuclear translocation and directs tip-specific expression of the nuclear protein CudA, which is essential for culmination. Both StatA and CudA were present in nuclei throughout the entire slug in an aca null mutant that expresses ACA from the constitutive actin15 promoter. This suggests that the tip-specific expression of ACA directs tip-specific nuclear translocation of StatA and tip-specific expression of CudA.

  20. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 in metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakurina, G. V.; Kolegova, E. S.; Cheremisina, O. V.; Zavyalov, A. A.; Shishkin, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    Progression of tumors and metastasis in particular is one of the main reasons of the high mortality rate among cancer patients. The primary role in developing metastases plays cell locomotion which requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Form, dynamics, localization and mechanical properties of the actin cytoskeleton are regulated by a variety of actin-binding proteins, which include the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). The study is devoted to the investigation of CAP1 level depending on the presence or absence of metastases in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results show the contribution of CAP1 to SCCHN and NSCLC progression. We detected the connection between the tissue protein CAP1 level and the stage of NSCLC and SCCHN disease. Also the levels of the CAP1 protein in tissues of primary tumors and metastases in lung cancer were different. Our data showed that CAP is important in the development of metastases, which suggests further perspectives in the study of this protein for projecting metastasis of NSCLC and SCCHN.

  1. Water absorption and bicarbonate secretion in the intestine of the sea bream are regulated by transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M; Fuentes, Juan

    2012-12-01

    In the marine fish intestine luminal, HCO₃⁻ can remove divalent ions (calcium and magnesium) by precipitation in the form of carbonate aggregates. The process of epithelial HCO₃⁻ secretion is under endocrine control, therefore, in this study we aimed to characterize the involvement of transmembrane (tmACs) and soluble (sACs) adenylyl cyclases on the regulation of bicarbonate secretion (BCS) and water absorption in the intestine of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). We observed that all sections of sea bream intestine are able to secrete bicarbonate as measured by pH-Stat in Ussing chambers. In addition, gut sac preparations reveal net water absorption in all segments of the intestine, with significantly higher absorption rates in the anterior intestine that in the rectum. BCS and water absorption are positively correlated in all regions of the sea bream intestinal tract. Furthermore, stimulation of tmACs (10 μM FK + 500 μM IBMX) causes a significant decrease in BCS, bulk water absorption and short circuit current (Isc) in a region dependent manner. In turn, stimulation of sACs with elevated HCO₃⁻ results in a significant increase in BCS, and bulk water absorption in the anterior intestine, an action completely reversed by the sAC inhibitor KH7 (200 μM). Overall, the results reveal a functional relationship between BCS and water absorption in marine fish intestine and modulation by tmACs and sAC. In light of the present observations, it is hypothesized that the endocrine effects on intestinal BCS and water absorption mediated by tmACs are locally and reciprocally modulated by the action of sACs in the fish enterocyte, thus fine-tuning the process of carbonate aggregate production in the intestinal lumen.

  2. Angiotensin II enhances adenylyl cyclase signaling via Ca2+/calmodulin. Gq-Gs cross-talk regulates collagen production in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Naugle, Jennifer E; Hase, Miki; Gregorian, Caroline; Swaney, James S; Insel, Paul A; Brunton, Laurence L; Meszaros, J Gary

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts regulate formation of extracellular matrix in the heart, playing key roles in cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. In this study, we sought to characterize cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways and its impact on modulating collagen synthesis by cardiac fibroblasts. Angiotensin II (ANG II) activates cell proliferation and collagen synthesis but also potentiates cyclic AMP (cAMP) production stimulated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-AR). The potentiation of beta-AR-stimulated cAMP production by ANG II is reduced by phospholipase C inhibition and enhanced by overexpression of Gq. Ionomycin and thapsigargin increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and potentiated isoproterenol- and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, whereas chelation of Ca2+ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid/AM inhibited such potentiation. Inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, protein kinase C, or Gbetagamma did not alter this cross-talk. Immunoblot analyses showed prominent expression of adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), a Ca2+-activated isoform, along with AC2, AC4, AC5, AC6, and AC7. Of those isoforms, only AC3 and AC5/6 proteins were detected in caveolin-rich fractions. Overexpression of AC6 increased betaAR-stimulated cAMP accumulation but did not alter the size of the ANG II potentiation, suggesting that the cross-talk is AC isoform-specific. Isoproterenol-mediated inhibition of serum-stimulated collagen synthesis increased from 31 to 48% in the presence of ANG II, indicating that betaAR-regulated collagen synthesis increased in the presence of ANG II. These data indicate that ANG II potentiates cAMP formation via Ca2+-dependent activation of AC activity, which in turn attenuates collagen synthesis and demonstrates one functional consequence of cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:12711600

  3. Localization of adenylyl cyclase isoforms and G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells: expression in caveolin-rich and noncaveolin domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Head, Brian P; Gregorian, Caroline; Seasholtz, Tammy M; Insel, Paul A

    2002-11-01

    A number of different agonists activate G protein-coupled receptors to stimulate adenylyl cyclase (AC), increase cAMP formation, and promote relaxation in vascular smooth muscle. To more fully understand this stimulation of AC, we assessed the expression, regulation, and compartmentation of AC isoforms in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detected expression of AC3, AC5, and AC6 mRNA, whereas immunoblot analysis indicated expression of AC3 and AC5/6 protein primarily in caveolin-rich membrane (cav) fractions relative to noncaveolin (noncav) fractions. Beta(1)-adrenergic receptors (AR), beta(2)AR, and G(s) were detected in both cav and noncav fractions, whereas the prostanoid receptors EP(2)R and EP(4)R were excluded from cav fractions. We used an adenoviral construct to increase AC6 expression. Overexpressed AC6 localized only in noncav fractions. Two-fold overexpression of AC6 caused enhancement of forskolin-, isoproterenol- and prostaglandin E(2)-stimulated cAMP formation but no changes in basal levels of cAMP. At higher levels of AC6 overexpression, basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were increased. Stimulation of cAMP levels by agents that increase Ca(2+) in native cells was consistent with the expression of AC3, but overexpression of AC6, which is inhibited by Ca(2+), blunted the Ca(2+)-stimulable cAMP response. These data indicate that: 1) RASMC express multiple AC isoforms that localize in both caveolin-rich and noncaveolin domains, 2) expression of AC6 in non-caveolin-rich membranes can increase basal levels of cAMP and response to several stimulatory agonists, and 3) Ca(2+)-mediated regulation of cAMP formation depends upon expression of different AC isoforms in RASMC. Compartmentation of GPCRs and AC is different in cardiomyocytes than in RASMC, indicating that targeting of these components to caveolin-rich membranes can be cell-specific. Moreover, our results imply that the

  4. Diurnal variation of the adenylyl cyclase type 1 in the rat pineal gland.

    OpenAIRE

    Tzavara, E T; Pouille, Y; Defer, N; Hanoune, J

    1996-01-01

    Nocturnal melatonin production in the pineal gland is under the control of norepinephrine released from superior cervical ganglia afferents in a rhythmic manner, and of cyclic AMP. Cyclic AMP increases the expression of serotonin N-acetyltransferase and of inducible cAMP early repressor that undergo circadian oscillations crucial for the maintenance and regulation of the biological clock. In the present study, we demonstrate a circadian pattern of expression of the calcium/calmodulin activate...

  5. Ser⁄ Thr residues at α3⁄β5 loop of Gαs are important in morphine-induced adenylyl cyclase sensitization but not mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedabadi, Mohammad; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Albert, Paul R.; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Rahimian, Reza; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Ghahremani, Mohammad H.

    2015-01-01

    The signaling switch of β2-adrenergic and μ1-opioid receptors from stimulatory G-protein (Gαs) to inhibitory G-protein (Gαi) (and vice versa) influences adenylyl cyclase (AC) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1 ⁄ 2 activation. Post-translational modifications, including dephosphorylation of Gαs, enhance opioid receptor coupling to Gαs. In the present study, we substituted the Ser ⁄ Thr residues of Gαs at the α3 ⁄ β5 and α4 ⁄ β6 loops aiming to study the role of Gαs lacking Ser ⁄ Thr phosphorylation with respect to AC sensitization and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Isoproterenol increased the cAMP concentration (EC50 = 22.8 ± 3.4 μM) in Gαs-transfected S49 cyc– cells but not in nontransfected cells. However, there was no significant difference between the Gαs-wild-type (wt) and mutants. Morphine (10 μM) inhibited AC activity more efficiently in cyc– compared to Gαs-wt introduced cells (P < 0.05); however, we did not find a notable difference between Gαs-wt and mutants. Interestingly, Gαs-wt transfected cells showed more sensitization with respect to AC after chronic morphine compared to nontransfected cells (101 ± 12% versus 34 ± 6%; P < 0.001); μ1-opioid receptor interacted with Gαs, and both co-immunoprecipitated after chronic morphine exposure. Furthermore, mutation of T270A and S272A (P < 0.01), as well as T270A, S272A and S261A (P < 0.05), in α3 ⁄ β5, resulted in a higher level of AC supersensitization. ERK1⁄ 2 phosphorylation was rapidly induced by isoproterenol (by 9.5 ± 2.4-fold) and morphine (22 ± 2.2-fold) in Gαs-transfected cells; mutations of α3 ⁄ β5 and α4 ⁄ β6 did not affect the pattern or extent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. The findings of the present study show that Gαs interacts with the μ1-opioid receptor, and the Ser ⁄ Thr mutation to Ala at the α3 ⁄ β5 loop of Gαs enhances morphine-induced AC sensitization. In addition, Gαs was required for

  6. Adenylyl cyclase-5 in the dorsal striatum function as a molecular switch for the generation of behavioral preferences for cue-directed food choices

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hannah; Kim, Tae-Kyung; KIM, Ji-Eun; Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Yunjin; Kang, Minkyung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2014-01-01

    Background Behavioral choices in habits and innate behaviors occur automatically in the absence of conscious selection. These behaviors are not easily modified by learning. Similar types of behaviors also occur in various mental illnesses including drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and autism. However, underlying mechanisms are not clearly understood. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating unconditioned preferred behaviors in food...

  7. Receptor-Type Guanylyl Cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C) Regulates De Novo Lumen Formation during Drosophila Tracheal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Unisha

    2016-01-01

    Lumen formation and maintenance are important for the development and function of essential organs such as the lung, kidney and vasculature. In the Drosophila embryonic trachea, lumena form de novo to connect the different tracheal branches into an interconnected network of tubes. Here, we identify a novel role for the receptor type guanylyl cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C) in de novo lumen formation in the Drosophila trachea. We show that in embryos mutant for gyc76C or its downsteam effector protein kinase G (PKG) 1, tracheal lumena are disconnected. Dorsal trunk (DT) cells of gyc76C mutant embryos migrate to contact each other and complete the initial steps of lumen formation, such as the accumulation of E-cadherin (E-cad) and formation of an actin track at the site of lumen formation. However, the actin track and E-cad contact site of gyc76C mutant embryos did not mature to become a new lumen and DT lumena did not fuse. We also observed failure of the luminal protein Vermiform to be secreted into the site of new lumen formation in gyc76C mutant trachea. These DT lumen formation defects were accompanied by altered localization of the Arf-like 3 GTPase (Arl3), a known regulator of vesicle-vesicle and vesicle-membrane fusion. In addition to the DT lumen defect, lumena of gyc76C mutant terminal cells were shorter compared to wild-type cells. These studies show that Gyc76C and downstream PKG-dependent signaling regulate de novo lumen formation in the tracheal DT and terminal cells, most likely by affecting Arl3-mediated luminal secretion. PMID:27642749

  8. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  9. Trpc2-expressing sensory neurons in the mouse main olfactory epithelium of type B express the soluble guanylate cyclase Gucy1b2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Masayo; Mombaerts, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Chemoreception in the mouse olfactory system occurs primarily at two chemosensory epithelia in the nasal cavity: the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal epithelium. The canonical chemosensory neurons in the MOE, the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), express the odorant receptor (OR) gene repertoire, and depend on Adcy3 and Cnga2 for chemosensory signal transduction. The canonical chemosensory neurons in the vomeronasal epithelium, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs), express two unrelated vomeronasal receptor (VR) gene repertoires, and involve Trpc2 for chemosensory signal transduction. Recently we reported the discovery of two types of neurons in the mouse MOE that express Trcp2 in addition to Cnga2. These cell types can be distinguished at the single-cell level by expression of Adcy3: positive, type A and negative, type B. Some type A cells express OR genes. Thus far there is no specific gene or marker for type B cells, hampering further analyses such as physiological recordings. Here, we show that among MOE cells, type B cells are unique in their expression of the soluble guanylate cyclase Gucy1b2. We came across Gucy1b2 in an explorative approach based on Long Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (LongSAGE) that we applied to single red-fluorescent cells isolated from whole olfactory mucosa and vomeronasal organ of mice of a novel Trcp2-IRES-taumCherry gene-targeted strain. The generation of a novel Gucy1b2-IRES-tauGFP gene-targeted strain enabled us to visualize coalescence of axons of type B cells into glomeruli in the main olfactory bulb. Our molecular and anatomical analyses define Gucy1b2 as a marker for type B cells within the MOE. The Gucy1b2-IRES-tauGFP strain will be useful for physiological, molecular, cellular, and anatomical studies of this newly described chemosensory subsystem. PMID:25701815

  10. Mice lacking the ADP ribosyl cyclase CD38 exhibit attenuated renal vasoconstriction to angiotensin II, endothelin-1, and norepinephrine

    OpenAIRE

    Thai, Tiffany L.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2009-01-01

    ADP ribosyl (ADPR) cyclases comprise a family of ectoenzymes recently shown to influence cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in a variety of cell types. At least two ADPR cyclase family members have been identified in mammals: CD38 and CD157. We recently found reduced renal vascular reactivity to angiotensin II (ANG II), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of the broad ADPR cyclase inhibitor nicotinamide. We hypothesized that CD38 mediates effects attributed to ADPR cyclase....

  11. Guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum with the topology of mammalian adenylate cyclase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J; Snippe, H; Kleineidam, RG; Van Haastert, PJM

    2001-01-01

    The core of adenylate and guanylate cyclases is formed by an intramolecular ol intermolecular dimer of two cyclase domains arranged in an antiparallel fashion. Metazoan membrane-bound adenylate cyclases are composed of 12 transmembrane spanning regions, and two cyclase domains which function as a he

  12. Asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases (CrtLm) from non-photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L; Picataggio, S; Rouvière, P E; Cheng, Q

    2004-03-01

    Carotenoids have important functions in photosynthesis, nutrition, and protection against oxidative damage. Some natural carotenoids are asymmetrical molecules that are difficult to produce chemically. Biological production of carotenoids using specific enzymes is a potential alternative to extraction from natural sources. Here we report the isolation of lycopene beta-cyclases that selectively cyclize only one end of lycopene or neurosporene. The crtLm genes encoding the asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases were isolated from non-photosynthetic bacteria that produced monocyclic carotenoids. Co-expression of these crtLm genes with the crtEIB genes from Pantoea stewartii (responsible for lycopene synthesis) resulted in the production of monocyclic gamma-carotene in Escherichia coli. The asymmetric cyclization activity of CrtLm could be inhibited by the lycopene beta-cyclase inhibitor 2-(4-chlorophenylthio)-triethylamine (CPTA). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that bacterial CrtL-type lycopene beta-cyclases might represent an evolutionary link between the common bacterial CrtY-type of lycopene beta-cyclases and plant lycopene beta- and epsilon-cyclases. These lycopene beta-cyclases may be used for efficient production of high-value asymmetrically cyclized carotenoids. PMID:14740205

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans Senses CO2 through the Carbonic Anhydrase Can2 and the Adenylyl Cyclase Cac1

    OpenAIRE

    Mogensen, Estelle Gewiss; Janbon, Guilhem; Chaloupka, James; Steegborn, Clemens; Fu, Man Shun; Moyrand, Frédérique; Klengel, Torsten; Pearson, David S.; Geeves, Michael A.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A.

    2006-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungal pathogen of humans, causes fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Its virulence is mainly determined by the elaboration of a polysaccharide capsule surrounding its cell wall. During its life, C. neoformans is confronted with and responds to dramatic variations in CO2 concentrations; one important morphological change triggered by the shift from its natural habitat (0.033% CO2) to infected hosts (5% CO2) is the induction of capsule biosynthesis. In ce...

  14. Primary cilium-dependent mechanosensing is mediated by adenylyl cyclase 6 and cyclic AMP in bone cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Ronald Y.; Temiyasathit, Sara; Tummala, Padmaja; Quah, Clarence C.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia are chemosensing and mechanosensing organelles that regulate remarkably diverse processes in a variety of cells. We previously showed that primary cilia play a role in mediating mechanosensing in bone cells through an unknown mechanism that does not involve extracellular Ca2+-dependent intracellular Ca2+ release, which has been implicated in all other cells that transduce mechanical signals via the cilium. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism linking primary cilia and bone ce...

  15. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagami, Alessandro S; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) is found in human trigeminocervical complex and can trigger migraine. PACAP levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in cat elevated PACAP levels in cranial blood. Patients...

  16. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency. PMID:26567315

  17. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field. PMID:27030537

  18. Molecular cloning and amplification of the adenylate cyclase gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J Y; Clegg, D O; Koshland, D E

    1981-01-01

    A segment of DNA containing cya, the gene for adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1], has been isolated from Salmonella typhimurium. The phage lambda gt4 was used as a cloning vector and adenylate cyclase-positive hybrid phages were isolated that complemented adenylate cyclase-negative bacteria. The cloned DNA fragment encodes a polypeptide of molecular weight 81,000 that gives rise to adenylate cyclase activity. This protein represents a functional mutant of the ...

  19. Diterpene Cyclases and the Nature of the Isoprene Fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rong; Zhang, Yonghui; Mann, Francis M.; Huang, Cancan; Mukkamala, Dushyant; Hudock, Michael P.; Mead, Matthew; Prisic, Sladjana; Wang, Ke; Lin, Fu-Yang; Chang, Ting-Kai; Peters, Reuben; Oldfield, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The structures and mechanism of action of many terpene cyclases are known, but there are no structures of diterpene cyclases. Here, we propose structural models based on bioinformatics, site-directed mutagenesis, domain swapping, enzyme inhibition and spectroscopy that help explain the nature of diterpene cyclase structure, function, and evolution. Bacterial diterpene cyclases contain ∼20 α-helices and the same conserved “QW” and DxDD motifs as in triterpene cyclases, indicating the presence of a βγ barrel structure. Plant diterpene cyclases have a similar catalytic motif and βγ-domain structure together with a third, α-domain, forming an αβγ structure, and in H+-initiated cyclases, there is an EDxxD-like Mg2+/diphosphate binding motif located in the γ-domain. The results support a new view of terpene cyclase structure and function and suggest evolution from ancient (βγ) bacterial triterpene cyclases to (βγ) bacterial and thence to (αβγ) plant diterpene cyclases. PMID:20602361

  20. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the β-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the β-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and β-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. β-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using [125I]iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed β1- and β2-type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in β-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the β1-adrenergic subtype. This BAT β-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial β-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of β-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability

  1. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  2. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed.

  3. Compressive stress induces dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain via RhoA phosphorylation by the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Takemoto

    Full Text Available Mechanical stress that arises due to deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM either stretches or compresses cells. The cellular response to stretching has been actively studied. For example, stretching induces phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC via the RhoA/RhoA-associated protein kinase (ROCK pathway, resulting in increased cellular tension. In contrast, the effects of compressive stress on cellular functions are not fully resolved. The mechanisms for sensing and differentially responding to stretching and compressive stress are not known. To address these questions, we investigated whether phosphorylation levels of MRLC were affected by compressive stress. Contrary to the response in stretching cells, MRLC was dephosphorylated 5 min after cells were subjected to compressive stress. Compressive loading induced activation of myosin phosphatase mediated via the dephosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853. Because myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853 is phosphorylated only by ROCK, compressive loading may have induced inactivation of ROCK. However, GTP-bound RhoA (active form increased in response to compressive stress. The compression-induced activation of RhoA and inactivation of its effector ROCK are contradictory. This inconsistency was due to phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser188 that reduced affinity of RhoA to ROCK. Treatment with the inhibitor of protein kinase A that phosphorylates RhoA (Ser188 induced suppression of compression-stimulated MRLC dephosphorylation. Incidentally, stretching induced phosphorylation of MRLC, but did not affect phosphorylation levels of RhoA (Ser188. Together, our results suggest that RhoA phosphorylation is an important process for MRLC dephosphorylation by compressive loading, and for distinguishing between stretching and compressing cells.

  4. GH4ZD10 cells expressing rat 5-HT1A receptors coupled to adenylyl cyclase are a model for the postsynaptic receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, C J; Ahlgren, P. C.; Brännström, G

    1992-01-01

    1. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) stimulated adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) production by cultured GH4ZD10 cells with an EC50 value of about 7 nM. The extracellularly recovered cyclic AMP predominated, and was reduced by co-incubation with 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl-amino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), whereas dopamine (0.1-30 microM) did not reduce VIP-stimulated cyclic AMP production. 2. The responses to 5-HT and 8-OH-DPAT were blocked by (-)...

  5. Adenyl cyclase in the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Ryan, K J

    1971-09-21

    This study demonstrated that the human placenta possesses an adenyl cyclase system responsive to catecholamines and sodium flouride (NaF). 2.5 gm human term placentas were homogenized, centrifuged, washed, resuspended, and used as the enzyme system when placed with various agents. Incubations and the determination of adenosine 3', 5' monophosphate (cyclic AMP) formed were performed. Samples stimulated by .0001 M catecholamines (L-epinephrine or L-norepinephrine) or .01 M NaF had higher levels of cyclic AMP than the controls (p. 005 for catecholamine-treated samples and p. 001 for NaF-treated samples). A concentration of .0001 M L-epinephrine or L-norepinephrine appeared to be a maximum effective dose and .0000001 M a minimum. L=epinephrine was 10 times as effective in the stimulation as L-norepinephrine. With .0001 M, 499 and 439 pmoles/10 minutes per 25 mg of tissue was formed, whereas in the control (no added hormones) 256 pmoles/10 minutes were formed. 3.2% ethanol activated the system by a small amount (p.02). Propranolol alone did not appear to have any effect; however, the effect of .0001 M L-epinephrine was reduced by 95% in the presence of .00001 M propranolol. Propranolol had no effect on NaF-stimulated activity.

  6. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Rattner, Jerome B. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Hoorn, Frans A. van der, E-mail: fvdhoorn@ucalgary.ca [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada)

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  7. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  8. Inhibition of the adenylylation of liver plasma membrane-bound proteins by plant and mammalian lectins

    OpenAIRE

    San José, Esteban; Villalobo, Eduarde; Gabius, Hans-J.; Villalobo, Antonio

    1993-01-01

    Liver plasma membrane contains four major (130-kDa, 120-kDa, 110-kDa and 100-kDa) sialic acid-containing glycopolypeptides that are able to undergo adenylylation, as well as phosphorylation (San José et al. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265; 20653-20661). To gain insight into the regulation of these processes, lectins are employed to probe the extent of influence of their interaction with membrane fractions for these reactions. We demonstrate that the beta-galactoside-specific lectins from bovine hea...

  9. The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase revisited: role of 2-ketoglutarate in the regulation of glutamine synthetase adenylylation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P; Peliska, J A; Ninfa, A J

    1998-09-15

    The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS) by reversible adenylylation has provided one of the classical paradigms for signal transduction by cyclic cascades. Yet, many mechanistic features of this regulation remain to be elucidated. We examined the regulation of GS adenylylation state in a reconstituted system containing GS, adenylyltransferase (ATase), the PII signal transduction protein that controls ATase, and the uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase/UR), which has a role in regulating PII. In this reconstituted bicyclic cascade system, the adenylylation state of GS was regulated reciprocally by the small molecule effectors 2-ketoglutarate and glutamine at physiological effector concentrations. By examination of the individual regulatory monocycles and comparison to the bicyclic system and existing data, we could deduce that the only sensors of 2-ketoglutarate were PII and PII-UMP. At physiological conditions, we observed that the main role of 2-ketoglutarate in bringing about the deadenylylation of GS was to inhibit GS adenylylation, and this was due to the allosteric regulation of PII activity. Glutamine acted as an allosteric regulator of both ATase and UTase/UR. We also compared the regulation of GS adenylylation state to the regulation of phosphorylation state of the transcription factor NRI (NtrC) in a reconstituted bicyclic system containing NRI, the bifunctional kinase/phosphatase NRII (NtrB), PII, and the UTase/UR. This comparison indicated that, at a fixed 2-ketoglutarate concentration, the regulation of GS adenylylation state by glutamine was sharper and occurred at a higher concentration than did the regulation of NRI phosphorylation. The possible biological implications of this regulatory arrangement are discussed. PMID:9737857

  10. Monospecific antibody against Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase protects from Pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Faiz Kazi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acellular pertussis vaccines has been largely accepted world-wide however, there are reports about limitedantibody response against these vaccines suggesting that multiple antigens should be included in acellular vaccinesto attain full protection. The aim of present study was to evaluate the role of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase as aprotective antigen.Materials and methods: Highly mono-specific antibody against adenylate cyclase (AC was raised in rabbits usingnitrocellulose bound adenylate cyclase and the specificity was assessed by immuoblotting. B.pertussis 18-323, wasincubated with the mono-specific serum and without serum as a control. Mice were challenged intra-nasally and pathophysiolgicalresponses were recorded.Results: The production of B.pertussis adenylate cyclase monospecific antibody that successfully recognized on immunoblotand gave protection against fatality (p< 0.01 and lung consolidation (p <0.01. Mouse weight gain showedsignificant difference (p< 0.05.Conclusion: These preliminary results highlight the role of the B.pertussis adenylate cyclase as a potential pertussisvaccine candidate. B.pertussis AC exhibited significant protection against pertussis in murine model. J Microbiol InfectDis 2012; 2(2: 36-43Key words: Pertussis; monospecific; antibody; passive-protection

  11. Glucagon and adenylate cyclase: binding studies and requirements for activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, G S; Fletcher, M A; Klein, I

    1975-01-01

    Solubilization of myocardial adenylate cyclase abolished responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, two of the hormones which activate the membrane-bound enzyme. Adenylate cyclase freed of detergent by DEAE-cellulose chromatography continues to remain unresponsive to hormone stimulation. However, adding purified bovine brain phospholipids--phosphotidylserine and monophosphatidylinositol--restored responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, respectively. 125-i-glucagon binding appeared to be independent of phospholipid, since equal binding was observed in the presence or absence of detergent and in the presence or absence of phospholipids. Chromatography of the solubilized preparation on Sephadex G-100 WAS CHARACTERIZED BY 125-I-glucagon binding and fluoride-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activity appearing in the fractions consistent with the void volume, suggesting a molecular weight greater than 100,000 for the receptor-adenylate cyclase complex. Prior incubation of the binding peak with 125-I-glucagon and rechromatography of the bound glucagon on Sephadex G-100 shifted its elution to a later fraction consistent with a smaller-molecular-weight peak. The molecular weight of this material was 24,000 to 28,000, as determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The latter findings are consistent with a dissociable receptor site for glucagon on myocardial adenylate cyclase. PMID:165684

  12. Prokaryotic squalene-hopene cyclases can be converted to citronellal cyclases by single amino acid exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedenburg, Gabriele; Breuer, Michael; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Squalene-hopene cyclases (SHCs) are prokaryotic enzymes that catalyse the cyclisation of the linear precursor squalene to pentacyclic hopene. Recently, we discovered that a SHC cloned from Zymomonas mobilis (ZMO-1548 gene product) has the unique property to cyclise the monoterpenoid citronellal to isopulegol. In this study, we performed saturation mutagenesis of three amino acids of the catalytic centre of ZMO-1548 (F428, F486 and W555), which had been previously identified to interact with enzyme-bound substrate. Replacement of F428 by tyrosine increased hopene formation from squalene, but isopulegol-forming activity was strongly reduced or abolished in all muteins of position 428. W555 was essential for hopene formation; however, three muteins (W555Y, W428F or W555T) revealed enhanced cyclisation efficiency with citronellal. The residue at position 486 turned out to be the most important for isopulegol-forming activity. While the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine favoured cyclisation activity with squalene, several small and/or hydrophobic residues such as cysteine, alanine or isoleucine and others reduced activity with squalene but greatly enhanced isopulegol formation from citronellal. Replacement of the conserved aromatic residue corresponding to F486 to cysteine in other SHCs cloned from Z. mobilis (ZMO-0872), Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (SHC(Aac)), Acetobacter pasteurianus (SHC(Apa)), Streptomyces coelicolor (SHC(Sco)) and Bradyrhizobium japonicum (SHC(Bja)) resulted in more or less strong isopulegol-forming activities from citronellal. In conclusion, many SHCs can be converted to citronellal cyclases by mutagenesis of the active centre thus broadening the applicability of this interesting class of biocatalyst. PMID:22526778

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the human guanylyl cyclase C receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rashna Bhandari; Roy Mathew; K Vijayachandra; Sandhya S Visweswariah

    2000-12-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation events are key components of several cellular signal transduction pathways. This study describes a novel method for identification of substrates for tyrosine kinases. Co-expression of the tyrosine kinase EphB1 with the intracellular domain of guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in Escherichia coli cells resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of GCC, indicating that GCC is a potential substrate for tyrosine kinases. Indeed, GCC expressed in mammalian cells is tyrosine phosphorylated, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation may play a role in regulation of GCC signalling. This is the first demonstration of tyrosine phosphorylation of any member of the family of membrane-associated guanylyl cyclases.

  14. Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Complexes Shape the Photoresponses of Retinal Rods and Cones

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Hong eWen; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Makino, Clint L.

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrate rods and cones, photon capture by rhodopsin leads to the destruction of cyclic GMP (cGMP) and the subsequent closure of cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) ion channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Replenishment of cGMP and reopening of the channels limit the growth of the photon response and are requisite for its recovery. In different vertebrate retinas, there may be as many as four types of membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs) for cGMP synthesis. Ten neuronal Ca2+ sensor prote...

  15. Pertussis toxin inhibits cAMP-induced desensitization of adenylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    cAMP binds to surface receptors of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, transducing the signal to adenylate cyclase, guanylate cyclase and to chemotaxis. The activation of adenylate cyclase is maximal after 1 min and then declines to basal levels due to desensitization, which is composed of two component

  16. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin differentially modulates toll-like receptor-stimulated activation, migration and T cell stimulatory capacity of dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Adkins

    Full Text Available Adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA is a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis. The toxin targets CD11b-expressing phagocytes and delivers into their cytosol an adenylyl cyclase (AC enzyme that subverts cellular signaling by increasing cAMP levels. In the present study, we analyzed the modulatory effects of CyaA on adhesive, migratory and antigen presenting properties of Toll-like receptor (TLR-activated murine and human dendritic cells (DCs. cAMP signaling of CyaA enhanced TLR-induced dissolution of cell adhesive contacts and migration of DCs towards the lymph node-homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 in vitro. Moreover, we examined in detail the capacity of toxin-treated DCs to induce CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses. Exposure to CyaA decreased the capacity of LPS-stimulated DCs to present soluble protein antigen to CD4+ T cells independently of modulation of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production, and enhanced their capacity to promote CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells in vitro. In addition, CyaA decreased the capacity of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce CD8(+ T cell proliferation and limited the induction of IFN-γ producing CD8(+ T cells while enhancing IL-10 and IL-17-production. These results indicate that through activation of cAMP signaling, the CyaA may be mobilizing DCs impaired in T cell stimulatory capacity and arrival of such DCs into draining lymph nodes may than contribute to delay and subversion of host immune responses during B. pertussis infection.

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the putative deprotonation site of squalene-hopene cyclase from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

    OpenAIRE

    SATO, Tsutomu; Kouda, Masanori; HOSHINO, Tsutomu; 佐藤, 努

    2004-01-01

    To provide insight into the catalytic mechanism for the final deprotonation reaction of squalene-hopene cyclase (SHC) from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, mutagenesis experiments were conducted for the following ten residues: Thr41, Glu45, Glu93, Arg127, Trp133, Gln262, Pro263, Tyr267, Phe434 and Phe437. An X-ray analysis of SHC has revealed that two types of water molecules ("front water" and "back waters") were involved around the deprotonation site. The results of these mutagenesis experi...

  18. Soluble guanylate cyclase : a potential therapeutic target for heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Marti, Catherine N.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Roessig, Lothar; Greene, Stephen J.; Boehm, Michael; Burnett, John C.; Campia, Umberto; Cleland, John G. F.; Collins, Sean P.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Levy, Phillip D.; Metra, Marco; Pitt, Bertram; Ponikowski, Piotr; Sato, Naoki; Voors, Adriaan A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Butler, Javed

    2013-01-01

    The number of annual hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) and the mortality rates among patients hospitalized for HF remains unacceptably high. The search continues for safe and effective agents that improve outcomes when added to standard therapy. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase

  19. General base-general acid catalysis by terpenoid cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Travis A; Christianson, David W

    2016-07-01

    Terpenoid cyclases catalyze the most complex reactions in biology, in that more than half of the substrate carbon atoms often undergo changes in bonding during the course of a multistep cyclization cascade that proceeds through multiple carbocation intermediates. Many cyclization mechanisms require stereospecific deprotonation and reprotonation steps, and most cyclization cascades are terminated by deprotonation to yield an olefin product. The first bacterial terpenoid cyclase to yield a crystal structure was pentalenene synthase from Streptomyces exfoliatus UC5319. This cyclase generates the hydrocarbon precursor of the pentalenolactone family of antibiotics. The structures of pentalenene synthase and other terpenoid cyclases reveal predominantly nonpolar active sites typically lacking amino acid side chains capable of serving general base-general acid functions. What chemical species, then, enables the Brønsted acid-base chemistry required in the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes? The most likely candidate for such general base-general acid chemistry is the co-product inorganic pyrophosphate. Here, we briefly review biological and nonbiological systems in which phosphate and its derivatives serve general base and general acid functions in catalysis. These examples highlight the fact that the Brønsted acid-base activities of phosphate derivatives are comparable to the Brønsted acid-base activities of amino acid side chains.

  20. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, L.T.; Nie, Z.M.; Mende, T.J.; Richardson, S.; Chavan, A.; Kolaczkowska, E.; Watt, D.S.; Haley, B.E.; Ho, R.J. (Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking (125I)PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by (125I)PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that (a) no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, (b) the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and (c) this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  1. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking [125I]PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by [125I]PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that [a] no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, [b] the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and [c] this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase

  2. Differences in the control of basal L-type Ca(2+) current by the cyclic AMP signaling cascade in frog, rat, and human cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinys, Rimantas; Bogdelis, Andrius; Rimkutė, Lina; Jurevičius, Jonas; Skeberdis, Vytenis Arvydas

    2016-07-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) mediate the positive inotropic effects of catecholamines by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs), which provide Ca(2+) for the initiation and regulation of cell contraction. The overall effect of cAMP-modulating agents on cardiac calcium current (I Ca,L) and contraction depends on the basal activity of LTCCs which, in turn, depends on the basal activities of key enzymes involved in the cAMP signaling cascade. Our current work is a comparative study demonstrating the differences in the basal activities of β-ARs, adenylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterases, phosphatases, and LTCCs in the frog and rat ventricular and human atrial myocytes. The main conclusion is that the basal I Ca,L, and consequently the contractile function of the heart, is secured from unnecessary elevation of its activity and energy consumption at the several "checking-points" of cAMP-dependent signaling cascade and the loading of these "checking-points" may vary in different species and tissues. PMID:26676115

  3. Olfactory dysfunction in type I pseudohypoparathyroidism: dissociation from Gs alpha protein deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, R L; Fernandez, A D; Levine, M A; Moses, A; McKeown, D A

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of variably decreased olfactory ability in Type Ia pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), a syndrome in which generalized hormone resistance is associated with deficiency of the alpha chain of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gs alpha) of adenylyl cyclase, has been used to support the hypothesis that Gs alpha plays a major role in human olfactory transduction. However, only a limited number of olfactory tests have been administered to such patients, and these patients have other problems that might cause or contribute to their olfactory dysfunction, including an unusual constellation of skeletal and developmental deficits termed Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). In this study, we administered tests of odor detection, identification, and memory to (i) 13 patients with Type Ia PHP; (ii) 8 patients with Type Ib PHP; (iii) 7 patients with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP); and (iv) 3 sets of normal controls matched to these groups on the basis of age, gender, and smoking history. Although we confirm that PHP Type Ia patients evidence olfactory dysfunction, we also demonstrate that (i) patients with Type Ib PHP, who have no AHO, no generalized hormone resistance, and normal Gs alpha activity, also evidence olfactory dysfunction relative to matched controls; and (ii) patients with PPHP, who have AHO, no generalized hormone resistance, and deficient Gs alpha protein activity, have relatively normal olfactory function. These observations do not support the hypothesis that the olfactory dysfunction associated with PHP is the result of generalized Gs alpha protein deficiency and imply that other mechanisms (e.g. ones associated with PTH or PTHrP resistance) are responsible for the olfactory deficits of this disorder.

  4. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of a eukaryotic guanylate cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Michael A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soluble guanylate cyclases generate cyclic GMP when bound to nitric oxide, thereby linking nitric oxide levels to the control of processes such as vascular homeostasis and neurotransmission. The guanylate cyclase catalytic module, for which no structure has been determined at present, is a class III nucleotide cyclase domain that is also found in mammalian membrane-bound guanylate and adenylate cyclases. Results We have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of a soluble guanylate cyclase from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at 2.55 Å resolution, and show that it is a dimeric molecule. Conclusion Comparison of the structure of the guanylate cyclase domain with the known structures of adenylate cyclases confirms the close similarity in architecture between these two enzymes, as expected from their sequence similarity. The comparison also suggests that the crystallized guanylate cyclase is in an inactive conformation, and the structure provides indications as to how activation might occur. We demonstrate that the two active sites in the dimer exhibit positive cooperativity, with a Hill coefficient of ~1.5. Positive cooperativity has also been observed in the homodimeric mammalian membrane-bound guanylate cyclases. The structure described here provides a reliable model for functional analysis of mammalian guanylate cyclases, which are closely related in sequence.

  5. Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Complexes Shape the Photoresponses of Retinal Rods and Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong eWen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate rods and cones, photon capture by rhodopsin leads to the destruction of cyclic GMP (cGMP and the subsequent closure of cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG ion channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Replenishment of cGMP and reopening of the channels limit the growth of the photon response and are requisite for its recovery. In different vertebrate retinas, there may be as many as four types of membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs for cGMP synthesis. Ten neuronal Ca2+ sensor proteins could potentially modulate their activities. The mouse is proving to be an effective model for characterizing the roles of individual components because its relative simplicity can be reduced further by genetic engineering. There are two types of guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs and two types of GCs in mouse rods, whereas cones express one type of GCAP and one type of GC. Mutant mouse rods and cones bereft of both GCAPs have large, long lasting photon responses. Thus, GCAPs normally mediate negative feedback tied to the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+ that accelerates GC activity to curtail the growth and duration of the photon response. Rods from other mutant mice that express a single GCAP type reveal how the two GCAPs normally work together as a team. Because of its lower Ca2+ affinity, GCAP1 is the first responder that senses the initial decrease in Ca2+ following photon absorption and acts to limit response amplitude. GCAP2, with a higher Ca2+ affinity, is recruited later during the course of the photon response as Ca2+ levels continue to decline further. The main role of GCAP2 is to provide for a timely response recovery and it is particularly important after exposure to very bright light. The multiplicity of GC isozymes and GCAP homologs in the retinas of other vertebrates confers greater flexibility in shaping the photon responses in order to tune visual sensitivity, dynamic range and frequency response.

  6. Allosteric regulation of the state of adenylylation of glutamine synthetase in permeabilized cell preparations of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Song, H Y

    1989-08-01

    Following a freeze-thaw cycle, and the treatment of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides with the nonionic detergent Lubrol PX, the permeabilized cell suspensions can be assayed directly both for the intracellular levels of glutamine synthetase and the state of adenylylation (i.e. the average number n of adenylylated subunits/dodecameric molecules). It seems that all components of the bicycle system are retained if cells grown with low concentrations of ammonia as the sole nitrogen source are used. The value of n was dependent upon the concentration of substrates (ATP, Pi) and allosteric effectors (ATP, glutamine and alpha-ketoglutarate) of adenylytransferase. The value of n affected by UTP, the specific substrate of the uridylyltransferase shows first the evidence that the bicycle cascade control system studied in Escherichia coli may exist in this phototrophic bacterium. PMID:2575389

  7. Atrial natriuretic factor receptor guanylate cyclase, ANF-RGC, transduces two independent signals, ANF and Ca2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa eDuda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Atrial natriuretic factor receptor guanylate cyclase, ANF-RGC, was the first discovered member of the mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase family. The hallmark feature of the family is that a single protein contains both the site for recognition of the regulatory signal and the ability to transduce it into the production of the second messenger, cyclic GMP. For over two decades, the family has been classified into two subfamilies, the hormone receptor subfamily with ANF-RGC being its paramount member, and the Ca2+ modulated subfamily, which includes the rod outer segment guanylate cyclases, ROS-GC1 and 2, and the olfactory neuroepithelial guanylate cyclase, ONE-GC. ANF-RGC is the receptor and the signal transducer of the most hypotensive hormones, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP. After binding these hormones at the extracellular domain it, at its intracellular domain, signals activation of the C-terminal catalytic module and accelerates the production of cyclic GMP. Cyclic GMP then serves the second messenger role in biological responses of ANF and BNP such as natriuresis, diuresis, vasorelaxation and anti-proliferation. Very recently another modus operandi for ANF-RGC was revealed. Its crux is that ANF-RGC activity is also regulated by Ca2+. The Ca2+ sensor neurocalcin  mediates this signaling mechanism. Strikingly, the Ca2+ and ANF signaling mechanisms employ separate structural motifs of ANF-RGC in modulating its core catalytic domain in accelerating the production of cyclic GMP. In this review the biochemistry and physiology of these mechanisms with emphasis on cardiovascular regulation will be discussed.

  8. The Effect of Long-Term Intranasal Serotonin Treatment on Metabolic Parameters and Hormonal Signaling in Rats with High-Fat Diet/Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira V. Derkach

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 was carried out using regulators of the brain signaling systems. In DM2 the level of the brain serotonin is reduced. So far, the effect of the increase of the brain serotonin level on DM2-induced metabolic and hormonal abnormalities has been studied scarcely. The present work was undertaken with the aim of filling this gap. DM2 was induced in male rats by 150-day high-fat diet and the treatment with low dose of streptozotocin (25 mg/kg on the 70th day of experiment. From the 90th day, diabetic rats received for two months intranasal serotonin (IS at a daily dose of 20 μg/rat. The IS treatment of diabetic rats decreased the body weight, and improved glucose tolerance, insulin-induced glucose utilization, and lipid metabolism. Besides, it restored hormonal regulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC activity in the hypothalamus and normalized AC stimulation by β-adrenergic agonists in the myocardium. In nondiabetic rats the same treatment induced metabolic and hormonal alterations, some of which were similar to those in DM2 but expressed to a lesser extent. In conclusion, the elevation of the brain serotonin level may be regarded as an effective approach to treat DM2 and its complications.

  9. A Novel Function for Arabidopsis CYCLASE1 in Programmed Cell Death Revealed by Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Analysis of Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah J; Kroon, Johan T M; Simon, William J; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Programmed cell death is essential for plant development and stress adaptation. A detailed understanding of the signal transduction pathways that regulate plant programmed cell death requires identification of the underpinning protein networks. Here, we have used a protagonist and antagonist of programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin B1 as probes to identify key cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis. Our hypothesis was that changes in the abundance of cell death-regulatory proteins induced by the protagonist should be blocked or attenuated by concurrent treatment with the antagonist. We focused on proteins present in the mobile phase of the extracellular matrix on the basis that they are important for cell-cell communications during growth and stress-adaptive responses. Salicylic acid, a plant hormone that promotes programmed cell death, and exogenous ATP, which can block fumonisin B1-induced cell death, were used to treat Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures prior to isobaric-tagged relative and absolute quantitation analysis of secreted proteins. A total of 33 proteins, whose response to salicylic acid was suppressed by ATP, were identified as putative cell death-regulatory proteins. Among these was CYCLASE1, which was selected for further analysis using reverse genetics. Plants in which CYCLASE1 gene expression was knocked out by insertion of a transfer-DNA sequence manifested dramatically increased cell death when exposed to fumonisin B1 or a bacterial pathogen that triggers the defensive hypersensitive cell death. Although pathogen inoculation altered CYCLASE1 gene expression, multiplication of bacterial pathogens was indistinguishable between wild type and CYCLASE1 knockout plants. However, remarkably severe chlorosis symptoms developed on gene knockout plants in response to inoculation with either a virulent bacterial pathogen or a disabled mutant that is incapable of causing disease in wild type plants. These results show that CYCLASE1, which

  10. Ginsenoside Rb1 selectively inhibits the activity of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-ying LIN; Li-min CHEN; Jing ZHANG; Xiao-dong PAN; Yuan-gui ZHU; Qin-yong YE; Hua-pin HUANG; Xiao-chun CHEN

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of ginsenoside Rb1 on voltage-gated calcium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and the modulatory mechanism.Methods:Cultured hippocampal neurons were prepared from Sprague Dawley rat embryos.Whole-cell configuration of the patchclamp technique was used to record the voltage-gated calcium currents (VGCCs)from the hippocampal neurons,and the effect of Rb1 was examined.Results:Rb1 (2-100 μmol/L)inhibited VGCCs in a concentration-dependent manner,and the current was mostly recovered upon wash-out.The specific L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor nifedipine (10 μmol/L)occluded Rb1-induced inhibition on VGCCs.Neither the selective N-type Ca2+ channel blocker ω-conotoxin-GVlA (1 μmoVL),nor the selective P/Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker ωo-agatoxin IVA (30 nmol/L)diminished Rb1-sensitive VGCCs.Rb1 induced a leftward shift of the steady-state inactivation curve of Ica to a negative potential without affecting its activation kinetics or reversal potential in the I-V curve.The inhibitory effect of Rb1 was neither abolished by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin (10 μmol/L),nor by the PKA inhibitor H-89 (10 μmol/L).Conclusion:Ginsenoside Rb1 selectively inhibits the activity of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels,without affecting the N-type or P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in hippocampal neurons,cAMP-PKA signaling pathway is not involved in this effect.

  11. Distribution and protective function of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP in the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya eNakamachi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, which is found in 27- or 38-amino acid forms, belongs to the VIP/glucagon/secretin family. PACAP and its three receptor subtypes are expressed in neural tissues, with PACAP known to exert a protective effect against several types of neural damage. The retina is considered to be part of the central nervous system, and retinopathy is a common cause of profound and intractable loss of vision. This review will examine the expression and morphological distribution of PACAP and its receptors in the retina, and will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the protective effect of PACAP against different kinds of retinal damage, such as that identified in association with diabetes, ultraviolet light, hypoxia, optic nerve transection, and toxins. This article will also address PACAP-mediated protective pathways involving retinal glial cells.

  12. Degeneration of the olfactory guanylyl cyclase D gene during primate evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Young

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mammalian olfactory system consists of several subsystems that detect specific sets of chemical cues and underlie a variety of behavioral responses. Within the main olfactory epithelium at least three distinct types of chemosensory neurons can be defined by their expression of unique sets of signal transduction components. In rodents, one set of neurons expresses the olfactory-specific guanylyl cyclase (GC-D gene (Gucy2d, guanylyl cyclase 2d and other cell-type specific molecules. GC-D-positive neurons project their axons to a small group of atypical "necklace" glomeruli in the olfactory bulb, some of which are activated in response to suckling in neonatal rodents and to atmospheric CO2 in adult mice. Because GC-D is a pseudogene in humans, signaling through this system appears to have been lost at some point in primate evolution. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used a combination of bioinformatic analysis of trace-archive and genome-assembly data and sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA to determine when during primate evolution the functional gene was lost. Our analysis reveals that GC-D is a pseudogene in a large number of primate species, including apes, Old World and New World monkeys and tarsier. In contrast, the gene appears intact and has evolved under purifying selection in mouse, rat, dog, lemur and bushbaby. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that signaling through GC-D-expressing cells was probably compromised more than 40 million years ago, prior to the divergence of New World monkeys from Old World monkeys and apes, and thus cannot be involved in chemosensation in most primates.

  13. The Involvement of Ser1898 of the Human L-Type Calcium Channel in Evoked Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Bachnoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A PKA consensus phosphorylation site S1928 at the α11.2 subunit of the rabbit cardiac L-type channel, CaV1.2, is involved in the regulation of CaV1.2 kinetics and affects catecholamine secretion. This mutation does not alter basal CaV1.2 current properties or regulation of CaV1.2 current by PKA and the beta-adrenergic receptor, but abolishes CaV1.2 phosphorylation by PKA. Here, we test the contribution of the corresponding PKA phosphorylation site of the human α11.2 subunit S1898, to the regulation of catecholamine secretion in bovine chromaffin cells. Chromaffin cells were infected with a Semliki-Forest viral vector containing either the human wt or a mutated S1898A α11.2 subunit. Both subunits harbor a T1036Y mutation conferring nifedipine insensitivity. Secretion evoked by depolarization in the presence of nifedipine was monitored by amperometry. Depolarization-triggered secretion in cells infected with either the wt α11.2 or α11.2/S1898A mutated subunit was elevated to a similar extent by forskolin. Forskolin, known to directly activate adenylyl-cyclase, increased the rate of secretion in a manner that is largely independent of the presence of S1898. Our results are consistent with the involvement of additional PKA regulatory site(s at the C-tail of α11.2, the pore forming subunit of CaV1.2.

  14. Food restriction modulates β-adrenergic-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat liver during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenylate cyclase activities were studied in rat liver during postmaturational aging of male Fischer 344 rats fed ad libitum or restricted to 60% of the ad libitum intake. Catecholamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased by 200-300% between 6 and 24-27 mo of age in ad libitum-fed rats, whereas in food-restricted rats catecholamine response increased by only 58-84% between 6 and 30 mo. In ad libitum-fed rats, glucagon-stimulated enzyme activity also increased by 40% between 6 and 12 mo and in restricted rats a similar age-related increase was delayed until 18 mo. β-Adrenergic receptor density increased by 50% between 6 and 24 mo in livers from ad libitum-fed but not food-restricted rats and showed a highly significant correlation with maximal isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity over the postmaturational life span. Age-related increases in unstimulated (basal) adenylate cyclase activity and nonreceptor-mediated enzyme activation were retarded by food restriction. The results demonstrate that food restriction diminishes a marked age-related increase in β-adrenergic-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity of rat liver. Alterations of adrenergic-responsive adenylate cyclase with age and the modulatory effects of food restriction appear to be mediated by changes in both receptor and nonreceptor components of adenylate cyclase

  15. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  16. Inferring biological functions of guanylyl cyclases with computational methods

    KAUST Repository

    Alquraishi, May Majed

    2013-09-03

    A number of studies have shown that functionally related genes are often co-expressed and that computational based co-expression analysis can be used to accurately identify functional relationships between genes and by inference, their encoded proteins. Here we describe how a computational based co-expression analysis can be used to link the function of a specific gene of interest to a defined cellular response. Using a worked example we demonstrate how this methodology is used to link the function of the Arabidopsis Wall-Associated Kinase-Like 10 gene, which encodes a functional guanylyl cyclase, to host responses to pathogens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  17. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory.

  18. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-minLIANG; MingTANG; Chang-jinLIU; Hong-yanLUO; Yuan-longSONG; Xin-wuHU; Jiao-yaXI; Lin-linGAO; BinNIE; Su-yunLI; Ling-lingLAI; JuergenHESCHELER

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record ICa-L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of lCa.L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L current by 71.2 %±9.2% (n=8) and 11.3%±2.5% (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5%±3.5% (n=5) and 82.7%± 10.4% (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on lca.L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on lCa.L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  19. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin.

  20. Structure and mechanism of the diterpene cyclase ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W. (UIUC); (Iowa State); (Penn)

    2011-09-20

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase reveals three {alpha}-helical domains ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the {beta}{gamma} domains in ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase but exclusively in the {alpha} domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions.

  1. Structure and Mechanism of the Diterpene Cyclase ent-Copalyl Diphosphate Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) reveals three α-helical domains (α, β, γ), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the βγ domains in CPS but exclusively in the α domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions. PMID:21602811

  2. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin. PMID:22642150

  3. Dimerization Domain of Retinal Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase 1 (RetGC1) Is an Essential Part of Guanylyl Cyclase-activating Protein (GCAP) Binding Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    The photoreceptor-specific proteins guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) bind and regulate retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase 1 (RetGC1) but not natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA). Study of RetGC1 regulation in vitro and its association with fluorescently tagged GCAP in transfected cells showed that R822P substitution in the cyclase dimerization domain causing congenital early onset blindness disrupted RetGC1 ability to bind GCAP but did not eliminate its affinity for another photoreceptor-specific protein, retinal degeneration 3 (RD3). Likewise, the presence of the NPRA dimerization domain in RetGC1/NPRA chimera specifically disabled binding of GCAPs but not of RD3. In subsequent mapping using hybrid dimerization domains in RetGC1/NPRA chimera, multiple RetGC1-specific residues contributed to GCAP binding by the cyclase, but the region around Met(823) was the most crucial. Either positively or negatively charged residues in that position completely blocked GCAP1 and GCAP2 but not RD3 binding similarly to the disease-causing mutation in the neighboring Arg(822). The specificity of GCAP binding imparted by RetGC1 dimerization domain was not directly related to promoting dimerization of the cyclase. The probability of coiled coil dimer formation computed for RetGC1/NPRA chimeras, even those incapable of binding GCAP, remained high, and functional complementation tests showed that the RetGC1 active site, which requires dimerization of the cyclase, was formed even when Met(823) or Arg(822) was mutated. These results directly demonstrate that the interface for GCAP binding on RetGC1 requires not only the kinase homology region but also directly involves the dimerization domain and especially its portion containing Arg(822) and Met(823).

  4. Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Calmodulin, Adenylyl Cyclase, and Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Are Required for Late, but Not Early, Long-Term Memory Formation in the Honeybee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee "Apis mellifera," olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM)…

  5. Prunetin signals via G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30(GPER1): Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP-mediated activation of MAPK signaling induces Runx2 expression in osteoblasts to promote bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kainat; Pal, Subhashis; Yadav, Manisha; Maurya, Rakesh; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-12-01

    Prunetin is found in red clover and fruit of Prunus avium (red cherry). The effect of prunetin on osteoblast function, its mode of action and bone regeneration in vivo were investigated. Cultures of primary osteoblasts, osteoblastic cell line and HEK293T cells were used for various in vitro studies. Adult female rats received drill-hole injury at the femur diaphysis to assess the bone regenerative effect of prunetin. Prunetin at 10nM significantly (a) increased proliferation and differentiation of primary cultures of osteoblasts harvested from rats and (b) promoted formation of mineralized nodules by bone marrow stromal/osteoprogenitor cells. At this concentration, prunetin did not activate any of the two nuclear estrogen receptors (α and β). However, prunetin triggered signaling via a G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30/GPER1, and enhanced cAMP levels in osteoblasts. G15, a selective GPR30 antagonist, abolished prunetin-induced increases in osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and intracellular cAMP. In osteoblasts, prunetin up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) protein through cAMP-dependent Erk/MAP kinase activation that ultimately resulted in the up-regulation of GPR30. Administration of prunetin at 0.25mg/kg given to rats stimulated bone regeneration at the site of drill hole and up-regulated Runx2 expression in the fractured callus and the effect was comparable to human parathyroid hormone, the only clinically used osteogenic therapy. We conclude that prunetin promotes osteoinduction in vivo and the mechanism is defined by signaling through GPR30 resulting in the up-regulation of the key osteogenic gene Runx2 that in turn up-regulates GPR30. PMID:26345541

  6. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C’s role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention. PMID:27688649

  7. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C’s role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention.

  8. Upregulation of CREM/ICER suppresses wound endothelial CRE-HIF-1α-VEGF-dependent signaling and impairs angiogenesis in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad S. Bitar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired angiogenesis and endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes constitute dominant risk factors for non-healing wounds and most forms of cardiovascular disease. We propose that diabetes shifts the ‘angiogenic balance’ in favor of an excessive anti-angiogenic phenotype. Herein, we report that diabetes impairs in vivo sponge angiogenic capacity by decreasing VEGF expression and fibrovascular invasion, and reciprocally enhances the formation of angiostatic molecules, such as thrombospondins, NFκB and FasL. Defective in vivo angiogenesis prompted cellular studies in cultured endothelial cells derived from subcutaneous sponge implants (SIECs of control and Goto-Kakizaki rats. Ensuing data from diabetic SIECs demonstrated a marked upregulation in cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling, possibly stemming from increased expression of adenylyl cyclase isoforms 3 and 8, and decreased expression of PDE3. Mechanistically, we found that oxidative stress and PKA activation in diabetes enhanced CREM/ICER expression. This reduces IRS2 cellular content by inhibiting cAMP response element (CRE transcriptional activity. Consequently, a decrease in the activity of Akt-mTOR ensued with a concomitant reduction in the total and nuclear protein levels of HIF-1α. Limiting HIF-1α availability for the specific hypoxia response elements in diabetic SIECs elicited a marked reduction in VEGF expression, both at the mRNA and protein levels. These molecular abnormalities were illustrated functionally by a defect in various pro-angiogenic properties, including cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. A genetic-based strategy in diabetic SIECs using siRNAs against CREM/ICER significantly augmented the PKA-dependent VEGF expression. To this end, the current data identify the importance of CREM/ICER as a negative regulator of endothelial function and establish a link between CREM/ICER overexpression and impaired angiogenesis during the course of diabetes. Moreover, it could

  9. Mapping Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Protein Disulfide Isomerase Regions of Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J Heckler

    Full Text Available Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC is a heterodimeric nitric oxide (NO receptor that produces cyclic GMP. This signaling mechanism is a key component in the cardiovascular system. NO binds to heme in the β subunit and stimulates the catalytic conversion of GTP to cGMP several hundred fold. Several endogenous factors have been identified that modulate sGC function in vitro and in vivo. In previous work, we determined that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI interacts with sGC in a redox-dependent manner in vitro and that PDI inhibited NO-stimulated activity in cells. To our knowledge, this was the first report of a physical interaction between sGC and a thiol-redox protein. To characterize this interaction between sGC and PDI, we first identified peptide linkages between sGC and PDI, using a lysine cross-linking reagent and recently developed mass spectrometry analysis. Together with Flag-immunoprecipitation using sGC domain deletions, wild-type (WT and mutated PDI, regions of sGC involved in this interaction were identified. The observed data were further explored with computational modeling to gain insight into the interaction mechanism between sGC and oxidized PDI. Our results indicate that PDI interacts preferentially with the catalytic domain of sGC, thus providing a mechanism for PDI inhibition of sGC. A model in which PDI interacts with either the α or the β catalytic domain is proposed.

  10. The role of transcriptional regulation in maintaining the availability of mycobacterial adenylate cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Casey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium species have a complex cAMP regulatory network indicated by the high number of adenylate cyclases annotated in their genomes. However the need for a high level of redundancy in adenylate cyclase genes remains unknown. We have used semiquantitiative RT-PCR to examine the expression of eight Mycobacterium smegmatis cyclases with orthologs in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where cAMP has recently been shown to be important for virulence. All eight cyclases were transcribed in all environments tested, and only four demonstrated environmental-mediated changes in transcription. M. smegmatis genes MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4279 were upregulated during starvation conditions while MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4924 were downregulated in H2O2 and MSMEG_3780 was downregulated in low pH and starvation. Promoter fusion constructs containing M. tuberculosis H37Rv promoters showed consistent regulation compared to their M. smegmatis orthologs. Overall our findings indicate that while low levels of transcriptional regulation occur, regulation at the mRNA level does not play a major role in controlling cellular cyclase availability in a given environment.

  11. Role of soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the physiological effects of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severina, I S

    1998-07-01

    In this review the molecular mechanisms underlying the antihypertensive and antiaggregatory actions of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. It has been shown that these effects are directly connected with the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and the accumulation of cyclic 3;,5;-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). The mechanism of guanylate cyclase activation by NO is analyzed, especially the role and biological significance of the nitrosyl--heme complex formed as a result of interaction of guanylate cyclase heme with NO and the role of sulfhydryl groups of the enzyme in this process. Using new approaches for studying the antihypertensive and antiaggregatory actions of nitric oxide in combination with the newly obtained data on the regulatory role of guanylate cyclase in the platelet aggregation process, the most important results were obtained regarding the molecular bases providing for a directed search for and creation of new effective antihypertensive and antiaggregatory preparations. In studying the molecular mechanism for directed activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by new NO donors, a series of hitherto unknown enzyme activators generating NO and involved in the regulation of hemostasis and vascular tone were revealed. PMID:9721331

  12. Cloning and Characterization of Oxidosqualene Cyclases from Kalanchoe daigremontiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonghua; Yeats, Trevor; Han, Hong; Jetter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The first committed step in triterpenoid biosynthesis is the cyclization of oxidosqualene to polycyclic alcohols or ketones C30H50O. It is catalyzed by single oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) enzymes that can carry out varying numbers of carbocation rearrangements and, thus, generate triterpenoids with diverse carbon skeletons. OSCs from diverse plant species have been cloned and characterized, the large majority of them catalyzing relatively few rearrangement steps. It was recently predicted that special OSCs must exist that can form friedelin, the pentacyclic triterpenoid whose formation involves the maximum possible number of rearrangement steps. The goal of the present study, therefore, was to clone a friedelin synthase from Kalanchoe daigremontiana, a plant species known to accumulate this triterpenoid in its leaf surface waxes. Five OSC cDNAs were isolated, encoding proteins with 761–779 amino acids and sharing between 57.4 and 94.3% nucleotide sequence identity. Heterologous expression in yeast and GC-MS analyses showed that one of the OSCs generated the steroid cycloartenol together with minor side products, whereas the other four enzymes produced mixtures of pentacyclic triterpenoids dominated by lupeol (93%), taraxerol (60%), glutinol (66%), and friedelin (71%), respectively. The cycloartenol synthase was found expressed in all leaf tissues, whereas the lupeol, taraxerol, glutinol, and friedelin synthases were expressed only in the epidermis layers lining the upper and lower surfaces of the leaf blade. It is concluded that the function of these enzymes is to form respective triterpenoid aglycones destined to coat the leaf exterior, probably as defense compounds against pathogens or herbivores. PMID:20610397

  13. Cooperative phenomena in binding and activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase by calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhss, A; Krin, E; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Danchin, A; Glaser, P; Bârzu, O

    1993-01-25

    The catalytic domain of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase located within the first 400 amino acids of the protein can be cleaved by trypsin in two subdomains (T25 and T18) corresponding to ATP-(T25) and calmodulin (CaM)-(T18) binding sites. Reassociation of subdomains by CaM is a cooperative process, which is a unique case among CaM-activated enzymes. To understand better the molecular basis of this phenomenon, we used several approaches such as partial deletions of the adenylate cyclase gene, isolation of peptides of various size, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments. We found that a stretch of 72 amino acid residues overlapping the carboxyl terminus of T25 and the amino terminus of T18 accounts for 90% of the binding energy of adenylate cyclase-CaM complex. The hydrophobic "side" of the helical region situated around Trp242 plays a major role in the interaction of adenylate cyclase with CaM, whereas basic residues that alternate with acidic residues in bacterial enzyme play a much less important role. The amino-terminal half of the catalytic domain of adenylate cyclase contributes only 10% to the binding energy of CaM, whereas the last 130 amino acid residues are not at all involved in binding. However, these segments of adenylate cyclase might affect protein/protein interaction and catalysis by propagating conformational changes to the CaM-binding sequence which is located in the middle of the catalytic domain of bacterial enzyme. PMID:8420945

  14. A human skeletal overgrowth mutation increases maximal velocity and blocks desensitization of guanylyl cyclase-B☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jerid W.; Dickey, Deborah M.; Miura, Kohji; Michigami, Toshimi; Ozono, Keiichi; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2015-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) increases long bone growth by stimulating guanylyl cyclase (GC)-B/NPR-B/NPR2. Recently, a Val to Met missense mutation at position 883 in the catalytic domain of GC-B was identified in humans with increased blood cGMP levels that cause abnormally long bones. Here, we determined how this mutation activates GC-B. In the absence of CNP, cGMP levels in cells expressing V883M-GC-B were increased more than 20 fold compared to cells expressing wild-type (WT)-GC-B, and the addition of CNP only further increased cGMP levels 2-fold. In the absence of CNP, maximal enzymatic activity (Vmax) of V883M-GC-B was increased 15-fold compared to WT-GC-B but the affinity of the enzymes for substrate as revealed by the Michaelis constant (Km) was unaffected. Surprisingly, CNP decreased the Km of V883M-GC-B 10-fold in a concentration dependent manner without increasing Vmax. Unlike the WT enzyme the Km reduction of V883M-GC-B did not require ATP. Unexpectedly, V883M-GC-B, but not WT-GC-B, failed to inactivate with time. Phosphorylation elevated but was not required for the activity increase associated with the mutation because the Val to Met substitution also activated a GC-B mutant lacking all known phosphorylation sites. We conclude that the V883M mutation increases maximal velocity in the absence of CNP, eliminates the requirement for ATP in the CNP-dependent Km reduction, and disrupts the normal inactivation process. PMID:23827346

  15. Glucose Repression of Fbp1 Transcription in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe Is Partially Regulated by Adenylate Cyclase Activation by a G Protein α Subunit Encoded by Gpa2 (Git8)

    OpenAIRE

    Nocero, M.; Isshiki, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Hoffman, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, genetic studies have identified genes that are required for glucose repression of fbp1 transcription. The git2 gene, also known as cyr1, encodes adenylate cyclase. Adenylate cyclase converts ATP into the second messenger cAMP as part of many eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. The git1, git3, git5, git7, git8 and git10 genes act upstream of adenylate cyclase, presumably encoding an adenylate cyclase activation pathway. In mammalian cells, a...

  16. Role of Guanylate Cyclase Activating Proteins in photoreceptor cells of the retina in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    López del Hoyo, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, it has been done a thoroughly research about the role of Guanylate Cyclase Activating Proteins (GCAPs) in photoreceptor cells of the retina as activity regulators of Retinal Guanylate Cyclase (RetGC), which allow to restore cGMP levels to darkness ones when intracellular Ca2+ falls. However, little is known about: a) ¿What determines GCAPs distribution within the cell?, b) ¿Which other functions GCAP proteins, GCAP1 and GCAP2, carry out at other cellular compartm...

  17. [THE THYROID STATUS OF RATS IMMUNIZED WITH PEPTIDES DERIVED FROM THE EXTRACELLULAR REGIONS OF THE TYPES 3 AND 4 MELANOCORTIN RECEPTORS AND THE 1B-SUBTYPE 5-HYDROXYTRYPTAMINE RECEPTOR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, K V; Moyseuk, I V; Shpakova, E A; Sphakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    The activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis is controlled by the brain neurotransmitter systems, including the melanocortin signaling system. Pharmacological inhibition of type 4 melanocortin receptor (M4R) leads to disruption of the functioning of HPT axis and to reduction of the level of thyroid hormones. At the same time, the data on how prolonged inhibition of M4R affects this axis and on its role in regulation of M3R are absent. The relationship between the thyroid status and the activity of 1B-subtype 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HT1BR) is scarcely explored. The aim of this work to study the effects of chronic inhibition of M3R, M4R and 5-HT1BR induced by immunization of rats with BSA-conjugated peptide derived from the extracellular regions of these receptors on the thyroid status and the activity of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the thyroid glarid (TG) of the immunized animals. In rats immunized with the peptides K-[TSLHL WNRSSHGLHG11-25]-A of M4R, A[PTNPYCICTTAH269-280]-A of M3R and. [QAKAEE-EVSEC(Acm)-VVNTDH189-205]-A of 5-HT1BR levels of thyroid hormones such as fT4, tT4 and tT3 were significantly reduced. In rats immunized with M4R and M3R peptides, an increase of TSH was detected whereas in the animals immunized with 5-HT1BR peptide the level of TSH, on the contrary, was reduced. In the TG of rats immunized with M4R and M3R peptides, the stimulatory effects of hormones (TSH, PA-CAP-3 8) and GppNHp on adenylyl cyclase activity were attenuated, and the changes were most pronounced in the case M4R peptide immunization. After immunization with 5-HT1BR peptide the stimulatory effects of TSH, PACAP-38 and GppNHp were retained. Thus, the main cause of thyroid hormones deficit in rats immunized with M4R and M3R peptides was the decreased sensitivity of ACSS thyrocytes to TSH, whereas in rats iimunized with 5-HT1BR peptide the deficit of thyroid hormones was associated with decreased

  18. Pituitary Adenlylate Cyclase Activating Peptide Protects Adult Neural Stem Cells from a Hypoglycaemic milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Shiva; Lietzau, Grazyna; Lundberg, Mathias; Nathanson, David; Nyström, Thomas; Patrone, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglycaemia is a common side-effect of glucose-lowering therapies for type-2 diabetic patients, which may cause cognitive/neurological impairment. Although the effects of hypoglycaemia in the brain have been extensively studied in neurons, how hypoglycaemia impacts the viability of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) has been poorly investigated. In addition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of how hypoglycaemia regulates NSCs survival have not been characterized. Recent work others and us have shown that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist Exendin-4 stimulate NSCs survival against glucolipoapoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro system where to study the effects of hypoglycaemia on NSC survival. Furthermore, we determine the potential role of PACAP and Exendin-4 in counteracting the effect of hypoglycaemia. A hypoglycaemic in vitro milieu was mimicked by exposing subventricular zone-derived NSC to low levels of glucose. Moreover, we studied the potential involvement of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress by quantifying protein levels of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and mRNA levels of CHOP. We show that PACAP via PAC-1 receptor and PKA activation counteracts impaired NSC viability induced by hypoglycaemia. The protective effect induced by PACAP correlated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, Exendin-4 was ineffective. The results show that hypoglycaemia decreases NSC viability and that this effect can be substantially counteracted by PACAP via PAC-1 receptor activation. The data supports a potential therapeutic role of PAC-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of neurological complications, based on neurogenesis impairment by hypoglycaemia. PMID:27305000

  19. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2016-03-05

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

  20. Characterization and phylogenetic epitope mapping of CD38 ADPR cyclase in the cynomolgus macaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titti Fausto

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CD38 transmembrane glycoprotein is an ADP-ribosyl cyclase that moonlights as a receptor in cells of the immune system. Both functions are independently implicated in numerous areas related to human health. This study originated from an inherent interest in studying CD38 in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis, a species closely related to humans that also represents a cogent animal model for the biomedical analysis of CD38. Results A cDNA was isolated from cynomolgus macaque peripheral blood leukocytes and is predicted to encode a type II membrane protein of 301 amino acids with 92% identity to human CD38. Both RT-PCR-mediated cDNA cloning and genomic DNA PCR surveying were possible with heterologous human CD38 primers, demonstrating the striking conservation of CD38 in these primates. Transfection of the cDNA coincided with: (i surface expression of cynomolgus macaque CD38 by immunofluorescence; (ii detection of ~42 and 84 kDa proteins by Western blot and (iii the appearance of ecto-enzymatic activity. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against the cynomolgus CD38 ectodomain and were either species-specific or cross-reactive with human CD38, in which case they were directed against a common disulfide-requiring conformational epitope that was mapped to the C-terminal disulfide loop. Conclusion This multi-faceted characterization of CD38 from cynomolgus macaque demonstrates its high genetic and biochemical similarities with human CD38 while the immunological comparison adds new insights into the dominant epitopes of the primate CD38 ectodomain. These results open new prospects for the biomedical and pharmacological investigations of this receptor-enzyme.

  1. Multiple diguanylate cyclase-coordinated regulation of pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yicai; Yuan, Mingjun; Mohanty, Anee;

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide signalling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays an essential role in regulating microbial virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and degraded by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes. One...

  2. Age-associated alterations in hepatic. beta. -adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, S.M.; Herring, P.A.; Arinze, I.J.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of age on catecholamine regulation of hepatic glycogenolysis and on hepatic adenylate cyclase was studied in male rats up to 24 mo of age. Epinephrine and norepinephrine stimulated glycogenolysis in isolated hepatocytes at all age groups studied. Isoproterenol, however, stimulated glycogenolysis only at 24 mo. In isolated liver membranes, usual activators of adenylate cyclase increased the activity of the enzyme considerably more in membranes from 24-mo-old rats than in membranes from either 3- or 22-mo-old rats. The Mn/sup 2 +/-dependent activity of the cyclase was increased by 2.9-fold in 3-mo-old animals and approx. 5.7-fold in 24-mo-old rats, indicating a substantial age-dependent increase in the intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit. The density of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor, as measured by the binding of (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol to plasma membranes, was 5-8 fmol/mg protein in rats aged 3-12 mo but increased to 19 fmol/mg protein in 24-mo-old rats. Computer-aided analysis of isoproterenol competition of the binding indicated a small age-dependent increase in the proportion of ..beta..-receptors in the high-affinity state. These observations suggest that ..beta..-receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis in the aged rat is predicated upon increases in the density of ..beta..-receptors as well as increased intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  3. Unusual guanylyl cyclases and cGMP signaling in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, D.M.; Bosgraaf, L.; van Haastert, P. J. M.

    2004-01-01

    cGMP is used as a second messenger in many eukaryotes. cGMP signaling requires at least three components: Guanylyl cyclases synthesize cGMP from GTP. Specific cGMP-binding proteins propagate the signal, usually by phosphorylation of their target Finally, phosphodiesterases terminate the cGMP signal

  4. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide stimulates renin secretion via activation of PAC1 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hautmann, Matthias; Friis, Ulla G; Desch, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    Besides of its functional role in the nervous system, the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular function. Therefore, PACAP is a potent vasodilator in several vascular beds, including the renal vasculature. Because t...

  5. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  6. Receptor binding and adenylate cyclase activities of glucagon analogues modified in the N-terminal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, R.L.; Pelton, J.T.; Trivedi, D.; Johnson, D.G.; Coy, D.H.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Hruby, V.J.

    1986-04-08

    In this study, we determined the ability of four N-terminally modified derivatives of glucagon, (3-Me-His1,Arg12)-, (Phe1,Arg12)-, (D-Ala4,Arg12)-, and (D-Phe4)glucagon, to compete with 125I-glucagon for binding sites specific for glucagon in hepatic plasma membranes and to activate the hepatic adenylate cyclase system, the second step involved in producing many of the physiological effects of glucagon. Relative to the native hormone, (3-Me-His1,Arg12)glucagon binds approximately twofold greater to hepatic plasma membranes but is fivefold less potent in the adenylate cyclase assay. (Phe1,Arg12)glucagon binds threefold weaker and is also approximately fivefold less potent in adenylate cyclase activity. In addition, both analogues are partial agonists with respect to adenylate cyclase. These results support the critical role of the N-terminal histidine residue in eliciting maximal transduction of the hormonal message. (D-Ala4,Arg12)glucagon and (D-Phe4)glucagon, analogues designed to examine the possible importance of a beta-bend conformation in the N-terminal region of glucagon for binding and biological activities, have binding potencies relative to glucagon of 31% and 69%, respectively. (D-Ala4,Arg12)glucagon is a partial agonist in the adenylate cyclase assay system having a fourfold reduction in potency, while the (D-Phe4) derivative is a full agonist essentially equipotent with the native hormone. These results do not necessarily support the role of an N-terminal beta-bend in glucagon receptor recognition. With respect to in vivo glycogenolysis activities, all of the analogues have previously been reported to be full agonists.

  7. Lethality of glnD null mutations in Azotobacter vinelandii is suppressible by prevention of glutamine synthetase adenylylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colnaghi, R; Rudnick, P; He, L; Green, A; Yan, D; Larson, E; Kennedy, C

    2001-05-01

    GlnD is a pivotal protein in sensing intracellular levels of fixed nitrogen and has been best studied in enteric bacteria, where it reversibly uridylylates two related proteins, PII and GlnK. The uridylylation state of these proteins determines the activities of glutamine synthetase (GS) and NtrC. Results presented here demonstrate that glnD is an essential gene in Azotobacter vinelandii. Null glnD mutations were introduced into the A. vinelandii genome, but none could be stably maintained unless a second mutation was present that resulted in unregulated activity of GS. One mutation, gln-71, occurred spontaneously to give strain MV71, which failed to uridylylate the GlnK protein. The second, created by design, was glnAY407F (MV75), altering the adenylylation site of GS. The gln-71 mutation is probably located in glnE, encoding adenylyltransferase, because introducing the Escherichia coli glnE gene into MV72, a glnD(+) derivative of MV71, restored the regulation of GS activity. GlnK-UMP is therefore apparently required for GS to be sufficiently deadenylylated in A. vinelandii for growth to occur. The DeltaglnD GS(c) isolates were Nif(-), which could be corrected by introducing a nifL mutation, confirming a role for GlnD in mediating nif gene regulation via some aspect of the NifL/NifA interaction. MV71 was unexpectedly NtrC(+), suggesting that A. vinelandii NtrC activity might be regulated differently than in enteric organisms. PMID:11320130

  8. Blocking the L-type Ca2+ channel (Cav 1.2) is the key mechanism for the vascular relaxing effect of Pterodon spp. and its isolated diterpene methyl-6α-acetoxy-7β-hydroxyvouacapan-17β-oate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Reis, Carolina; de Andrade, Daniela Medeiros Lobo; Junior Neves, Bruno; de Almeida Ribeiro Oliveira, Leandra; Pinho, José Felippe; da Silva, Leidiane Pinha; Dos Santos Cruz, Jader; Bara, Maria Teresa Freitas; Andrade, Carolina Horta; Rocha, Matheus Lavorenti

    2015-10-01

    Pterodon spp. Vogel (Fabaceae), popularly known as "sucupira", has ethnopharmacological application which is described as having antispasmodic and relaxant effects. Hence, it was hypothesized that sucupira oil-resin (SOR) could induce smooth muscle relaxation. So, this study investigated the mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect of SOR and its isolated diterpene (methyl-6α-acetoxy-7β-hydroxyvouacapan-17β-oate). Vascular reactivity experiments were performed using rat aortic rings (n=5-8) with (E+) or without endothelium (E-) in an isolated bath organ. The SOR (0-56 μg/mL) relaxed phenylephrine (E+: 86.7±7.1%; E-: 92.3±4.7%) and KCl contracted rings (E-: 97.1±2.8%). In the same way, diterpene (0-48 μg/mL) also relaxed phenylephrine (E+: 94.5±3.6%; E-: 92.2±3.4%) and KCl contracted rings (E-: 99.7±0.2%). The pre-incubation of arterial rings with cyclopiazonic acid (reticular Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor), tetraethylammonium (K+ channels blocker) or MDL-12,330A (adenylyl cyclesinhibitor) did not modify either SOR- or diterpeneinduced vasorelaxation. However, ODQ (guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) impaired only diterpene-induced vasorelaxation. SOR and diterpene significantly reduced CaCl2-induced contraction stimulated by Bay K8644 (1 μM), phenylephrine (0.1 μM) or KCl solution (40 mM). Computational molecular docking studies demonstrated that the vasodilator effect of diterpene relies on blocking the Cav 1.2 channel, and patch clamp results showed that diterpene substantially decreased the ionic current through Cav 1.2 in freshly dissociated vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings suggest that SOR and its isolated diterpene induce endothelium-independent vascular relaxation by blocking the L-type Ca2+ channel (Cav 1.2).

  9. Identification of the chlE gene encoding oxygen-independent Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Kaori; Minamizaki, Kei; Fujita, Yuichi

    2015-08-01

    The fifth ring (E-ring) of chlorophyll (Chl) a is produced by Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (MPE) cyclase. There are two evolutionarily unrelated MPE cyclases: oxygen-independent (BchE) and oxygen-dependent (ChlA/AcsF) MPE cyclases. Although ChlA is the sole MPE cyclase in Synechocystis PCC 6803, it is yet unclear whether BchE exists in cyanobacteria. A BLAST search suggests that only few cyanobacteria possess bchE. Here, we report that two bchE candidate genes from Cyanothece strains PCC 7425 and PCC 7822 restore the photosynthetic growth and bacteriochlorophyll production in a bchE-lacking mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus. We termed these cyanobacterial bchE orthologs "chlE."

  10. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the circulation after sumatriptan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Petersen, Jesper Troensegaard;

    2013-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain is still elusive, but increasingly researchers focus on the neuropeptides in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. The parasympathetic neurotransmitters, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating...

  11. Six git genes encode a glucose-induced adenylate cyclase activation pathway in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Susan M. Byrne; Hoffman, Charles S.

    1993-01-01

    An important eukaryotic signal transduction pathway involves the regulation of the effector enzyme adenylate cyclase, which produces the second messenger, cAMP. Previous genetic analyses demonstrated that glucose repression of transcription of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbp1 gene requires the function of adenylate cyclase, encoded by the git2 gene. As mutations in git2 and in six additional git genes are suppressed by exogenous cAMP, these ‘upstream’ git genes were proposed to act to produ...

  12. Identification of residues essential for catalysis and binding of calmodulin in Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, P; Elmaoglou-Lazaridou, A; Krin, E.; Ladant, D.; Bârzu, O; Danchin, A

    1989-01-01

    In order to identify molecular features of the calmodulin (CaM) activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis, a truncated cya gene was fused after the 459th codon in frame with the alpha-lacZ' gene fragment and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant, 604 residue long protein was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. The kinetic parameters of the recombinant protein are very similar to that of adenylate cyclase purified from B.pertussis culture sup...

  13. The cyclic-di-GMP diguanylate cyclase CdgA has a role in biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Mata, Alberto; López-Lara, Lilia I; Xiqui-Vázquez, Ma Luisa; Jijón-Moreno, Saúl; Romero-Osorio, Angelica; Baca, Beatriz E

    2016-04-01

    In bacteria, proteins containing GGDEF domains are involved in production of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Here we report that the cdgA gene encoding diguanylate cyclase A (CdgA) is involved in biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. Biofilm quantification using crystal violet staining revealed that inactivation of cdgA decreased biofilm formation. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of green-fluorescent protein-labeled bacteria showed that, during static growth, the biofilms had differential levels of development: bacteria harboring a cdgA mutation exhibited biofilms with considerably reduced thickness compared with those of the wild-type Sp7 strain. Moreover, DNA-specific staining and treatment with DNase I, and epifluorescence studies demonstrated that extracellular DNA and EPS are components of the biofilm matrix in Azospirillum. After expression and purification of the CdgA protein, diguanylate cyclase activity was detected. The enzymatic activity of CdgA-producing cyclic c-di-GMP was determined using GTP as a substrate and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD(+)) and Mg(2)(+) as cofactors. Together, our results revealed that A. brasilense possesses a functional c-di-GMP biosynthesis pathway.

  14. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism. PMID:26980729

  15. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism.

  16. The Inhibitory Effect of Non-Substrate and Substrate DNA on the Ligation and Self-Adenylylation Reactions Catalyzed by T4 DNA Ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert J; Evans, Thomas C; Lohman, Gregory J S

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases are essential both to in vivo replication, repair and recombination processes, and in vitro molecular biology protocols. Prior characterization of DNA ligases through gel shift assays has shown the presence of a nick site to be essential for tight binding between the enzyme and its dsDNA substrate, with no interaction evident on dsDNA lacking a nick. In the current study, we observed a significant substrate inhibition effect, as well as the inhibition of both the self-adenylylation and nick-sealing steps of T4 DNA ligase by non-nicked, non-substrate dsDNA. Inhibition by non-substrate DNA was dependent only on the total DNA concentration rather than the structure; with 1 μg/mL of 40-mers, 75-mers, or circular plasmid DNA all inhibiting ligation equally. A >15-fold reduction in T4 DNA ligase self-adenylylation rate when in the presence of high non-nicked dsDNA concentrations was observed. Finally, EMSAs were utilized to demonstrate that non-substrate dsDNA can compete with nicked dsDNA substrates for enzyme binding. Based upon these data, we hypothesize the inhibition of T4 DNA ligase by non-nicked dsDNA is direct evidence for a two-step nick-binding mechanism, with an initial, nick-independent, transient dsDNA-binding event preceding a transition to a stable binding complex in the presence of a nick site.

  17. Identifying functional domains within terpene cyclases using a domain-swapping strategy.

    OpenAIRE

    Back, K; Chappell, J.

    1996-01-01

    Cyclic terpenes and terpenoids are found throughout nature. They comprise an especially important class of compounds from plants that mediate plant- environment interactions, and they serve as pharmaceutical agents with antimicrobial and anti-tumor activities. Molecular comparisons of several terpene cyclases, the key enzymes responsible for the multistep cyclization of C10, C15, and C20 allylic diphosphate substrates, have revealed a striking level of sequence similarity and conservation of ...

  18. An improved technique for the rapid chemical characterisation of bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S; Pahirulzaman, Khomaizon A K; Rabe, Patrick; Klapschinski, Tim A

    2014-04-14

    A derivative of the pET28c(+) expression vector was constructed. It contains a yeast replication system (2μ origin of replication) and a yeast selectable marker (URA3), and can be used for gene cloning in yeast by efficient homologous recombination, and for heterologous expression in E. coli. The vector was used for the expression and chemical characterisation of three bacterial terpene cyclases. PMID:24573945

  19. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Otto; Christin Naumann; Wolfgang Brandt; Claus Wasternack; Bettina Hause

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant stress responses and development. A crucial step in JA biosynthesis is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC). Four genes encoding functional AOCs (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3 and AOC4) have been characterized for Arabidopsis thaliana in terms of organ- and tissue-specific expression, mutant phenotypes, promoter activities and initial in vivo protein interaction studies suggesting functional redundancy and diversification, including first hints at enz...

  20. Adenylate cyclase activity along the rabbit nephron as measured in single isolated segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, M; Chabardès, D; Montégut, M; Clique, A; Morel, F

    1975-01-01

    A method is described, which allows adenylate cyclase activity measurement in single pieces of various nephron segments. Tubular samples of 0.5 to 2 mm length were isolated by microdissection from collagenase treated slices of rabbit kidney. A photograph of each piece was taken in order to measure its length. After a permeabilisation treatment involving preincubation in a hypoosmotic medium and a freezing step, each sample was incubated for 30 mm at 30 degrees C in a medium containing high specific (alpha-32-P)-ATP 3-10-4 M, final volume 2.5 mu 1. The (32P)-cAMP formed was separated from the other labelled nucleotides by filtering the incubate on a dry aluminium oxide microcolumn, 3H cAMP was added as a tracer for measuring cAMP recovery. The sensitivity of the method was found to be a few fentomoles (10-15 M) cAMP. cAMP generation increased linearly as a function of the incubation time up to more than 30 min, and as a function of the length of the segment used. Control and fluoride (5 mM) stimulated adenvlate cyclase activities were measured in the following segments of the nephron: early proximal convoluted tubule (PCT), pars recta of the proximal tubule (PR), thin descending limb of the loop (TDL), cortical portion of the thick ascending limb (CAL), distal convoluted tubule (dct), first branched portion of the collecting tubule (BCT), further cortical (CCT) and medullary (MCT) portions of the collecting tubule. Mean control adenylate cyclase activity varied from 7 (PR) to 75 (BCT) fmoles/mm/30 min. Flouride addition resulted in a 10 (BCT) to 50 (PR) fold increase in enzyme activity. Series of replicates gave a scatter equal to plus or minus 20% (S.D. as a per cent of the mean). The method described appears to be suitable to determine which nephron segments contain hormone-dependent adenylate cyclase.

  1. A Comparative Analysis of the Sugar Phosphate Cyclase Superfamily Involved in Primary and Secondary Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiumei; Flatt, Patricia M.; Schlörke, Oliver; Zeeck, Axel; Dairi, Tohru; Mahmud, Taifo

    2007-01-01

    Sugar Phosphate Cyclases (SPCs) catalyze the cyclization of sugar phosphates to produce a variety of cyclitol intermediates that serve as the building blocks of many primary metabolites, e.g., aromatic amino acids, and clinically relevant secondary metabolites, e.g., aminocyclitol/aminoglycoside and ansamycin antibiotics. Feeding experiments with isotopically-labeled cyclitols revealed that cetoniacytone A, a unique C7N-aminocyclitol antibiotic isolated from an insect endophytic Actinomyces s...

  2. Elevation of lutein content in tomato: a biochemical tug-of-war between lycopene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorio, Giovanni; Yildirim, Arzu; Stigliani, Adriana Lucia; D'Ambrosio, Caterina

    2013-11-01

    Lutein is becoming increasingly important in preventive medicine due to its possible role in maintaining good vision and in preventing age-related maculopathy. Average daily lutein intake in developed countries is often below suggested daily consumption levels, and lutein supplementation could be beneficial. Lutein is also valuable in the food and feed industries and is emerging in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical markets. Currently, lutein is obtained at high cost from marigold petals, and synthesis alternatives are thus desirable. Tomato constitutes a promising starting system for production as it naturally accumulates high levels of lycopene. To develop tomato for lutein synthesis, the tomato Red Setter cultivar was transformed with the tomato lycopene ε-cyclase-encoding gene under the control of a constitutive promoter, and the HighDelta (HD) line, characterised by elevated lutein and δ-carotene content in ripe fruits, was selected. HD was crossed to the transgenic HC line and to RS(B) with the aim of converting all residual fruit δ-carotene to lutein. Fruits of both crosses were enriched in lutein and presented unusual carotenoid profiles. The unique genetic background of the crosses used in this study permitted an unprecedented analysis of the role and regulation of the lycopene cyclase enzymes in tomato. A new defined biochemical index, the relative cyclase activity ratio, was used to discern post-transcriptional regulation of cyclases, and will help in the study of carotenoid biosynthesis in photosynthetic plant species and particularly in those, like tomato, that have been domesticated for the production of food, feed or useful by-products. PMID:24141052

  3. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteome harbors undiscovered multi-domain molecules with functional guanylyl cyclase catalytic centers

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-07-08

    Background: Second messengers link external cues to complex physiological responses. One such messenger, 3\\',5\\'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), has been shown to play a key role in many physiological responses in plants. However, in higher plants, guanylyl cyclases (GCs), enzymes that generate cGMP from guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) have remained elusive until recently. GC search motifs constructed from the alignment of known GCs catalytic centers form vertebrates and lower eukaryotes have led to the identification of a number of plant GCs that have been characterized in vitro and in vivo.Presentation of the hypothesis.Recently characterized GCs in Arabidopsis thaliana contributed to the development of search parameters that can identify novel candidate GCs in plants. We hypothesize that there are still a substantial number (> 40) of multi-domain molecules with potentially functional GC catalytic centers in plants that remain to be discovered and characterized. Testing the hypothesis. The hypothesis can be tested, firstly, by computational methods constructing 3D models of selected GC candidates using available crystal structures as templates. Homology modeling must include substrate docking that can provide support for the structural feasibility of the GC catalytic centers in those candidates. Secondly, recombinant peptides containing the GC domain need to be tested in in vitro GC assays such as the enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and/or in mass spectrometry based cGMP assays. In addition, quantification of in vivo cGMP transients with fluorescent cGMP-reporter assays in wild-type or selected mutants will help to elucidate the biological role of novel GCs.Implications of the hypothesis.If it turns out that plants do harbor a large number of functional GC domains as part of multi-domain enzymes, then major new insights will be gained into the complex signal transduction pathways that link cGMP to fundamental processes such as ion transport

  4. Adenylate cyclase toxin promotes internalisation of integrins and raft components and decreases macrophage adhesion capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Martín

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT that must be post-translationally palmitoylated in the bacterium cytosol to be active. The toxin targets phagocytes expressing the CD11b/CD18 integrin receptor. It delivers a catalytic adenylate cyclase domain into the target cell cytosol producing a rapid increase of intracellular cAMP concentration that suppresses bactericidal functions of the phagocyte. ACT also induces calcium fluxes into target cells. Biochemical, biophysical and cell biology approaches have been applied here to show evidence that ACT and integrin molecules, along with other raft components, are rapidly internalized by the macrophages in a toxin-induced calcium rise-dependent process. The toxin-triggered internalisation events occur through two different routes of entry, chlorpromazine-sensitive receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-independent internalisation, maybe acting in parallel. ACT locates into raft-like domains, and is internalised, also in cells devoid of receptor. Altogether our results suggest that adenylate cyclase toxin, and maybe other homologous pathogenic toxins from the RTX (Repeats in Toxin family to which ACT belongs, may be endowed with an intrinsic capacity to, directly and efficiently, insert into raft-like domains, promoting there its multiple activities. One direct consequence of the integrin removal from the cell surface of the macrophages is the hampering of their adhesion ability, a fundamental property in the immune response of the leukocytes that could be instrumental in the pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis.

  5. The first structure of a bacterial diterpene cyclase: CotB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Ronja; Görner, Christian; Hirte, Max; Brück, Thomas; Loll, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    Sesquiterpenes and diterpenes are a diverse class of secondary metabolites that are predominantly derived from plants and some prokaryotes. The properties of these natural products encompass antitumor, antibiotic and even insecticidal activities. Therefore, they are interesting commercial targets for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Owing to their structural complexity, these compounds are more efficiently accessed by metabolic engineering of microbial systems than by chemical synthesis. This work presents the first crystal structure of a bacterial diterpene cyclase, CotB2 from the soil bacterium Streptomyces melanosporofaciens, at 1.64 Å resolution. CotB2 is a diterpene cyclase that catalyzes the cyclization of the linear geranylgeranyl diphosphate to the tricyclic cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol. The subsequent oxidation of cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol by two cytochrome P450 monooxygenases leads to bioactive cyclooctatin. Plasticity residues that decorate the active site of CotB2 have been mutated, resulting in alternative monocyclic, dicyclic and tricyclic compounds that show bioactivity. These new compounds shed new light on diterpene cyclase reaction mechanisms. Furthermore, the product of mutant CotB2(W288G) produced the new antibiotic compound (1R,3E,7E,11S,12S)-3,7,18-dolabellatriene, which acts specifically against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This opens a sustainable route for the industrial-scale production of this bioactive compound.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the glutaminyl cyclase from Carica papaya latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarkan, Mohamed [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Clantin, Bernard; Bompard, Coralie [CNRS-UMR 8525, Institut de Biologie de Lille, BP 477, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, F-59021 Lille (France); Belrhali, Hassan [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 181, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Baeyens-Volant, Danielle [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Looze, Yvan [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale, Institut de Pharmacie-ULB CP206/04, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Villeret, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.villeret@ibl.fr [CNRS-UMR 8525, Institut de Biologie de Lille, BP 477, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, F-59021 Lille (France); Wintjens, René, E-mail: vincent.villeret@ibl.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale, Institut de Pharmacie-ULB CP206/04, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    The glutaminyl cyclase isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to 1.7 Å resolution. In living systems, the intramolecular cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues is accomplished by glutaminyl cyclase enzymes (EC 2.3.2.5). While in mammals these enzymes are involved in the synthesis of hormonal and neurotransmitter peptides, the physiological role played by the corresponding plant enzymes still remains to be unravelled. Papaya glutaminyl cyclase (PQC), a 33 kDa enzyme found in the latex of the tropical tree Carica papaya, displays an exceptional resistance to chemical and thermal denaturation as well as to proteolysis. In order to elucidate its enzymatic mechanism and to gain insights into the structural determinants underlying its remarkable stability, PQC was isolated from papaya latex, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.82, b = 81.23, c = 108.17 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  7. Identification of Adenyl Cyclase Activity in a Disease Resistance Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Hussein, Rana

    2012-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide, cAMP, is an important signaling molecule in animals and plants. However, in plants the enzymes that synthesize this second messenger, adenyl cyclases (ACs), remain elusive. Given the physiological importance of cAMP in signaling, particularly in response to biotic and abiotic stresses, it is thus important to identify and characterize ACs in higher plants. Using computational approaches, a disease resistance protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, At3g04220 was found to have an AC catalytic center motif. In an attempt to prove that this candidate has adenyl cyclases activity in vitro, the coding sequence of the putative AC catalytic domain of this protein was cloned and expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. The nucleotide cyclase activity of the recombinant protein was examined using cyclic nucleotide enzyme immunoassays. In parallel, the expression of At3g04220 was measured in leaves under three different stress conditions in order to determine under which conditions the disease resistance protein could function. Results show that the purified recombinant protein has Mn2+ dependent AC activity in vitro, and the expression analysis supports a role for At3g04220 and cAMP in plant defense.

  8. Reconstitution of the GTP-dependent adenylate cyclase from products of the yeast CYR1 and RAS2 genes in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Uno, I.; Mitsuzawa, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Tanaka, K; Oshima, T.; Ishikawa, T

    1985-01-01

    Plasmids carrying the CYR1 gene of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which encodes adenylate cyclase, were introduced into the cya mutant strain of Escherichia coli. The transformants had a GTP-independent adenylate cyclase activity but did not produce cAMP. The E. coli transformant carrying the yeast RAS2 or RAS2val19 gene had no adenylate cyclase activity. Transformant cells carrying both CYR1 and RAS2 produced GTP-dependent adenylate cyclase and cAMP, and those carrying CYR1 and RAS2val19 pr...

  9. Cloning of the Lycopene β-cyclase Gene in Nicotiana tabacum and Its Overexpression Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Shi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are important pigments in plants that play crucial roles in plant growth and in plant responses to environmental stress. Lycopene β cyclase (β-LCY functions at the branch point of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, catalyzing the cyclization of lycopene. Here, a β-LCY gene from Nicotiana tabacum, designated as Ntβ-LCY1, was cloned and functionally characterized. Robust expression of Ntβ-LCY1 was found in leaves, and Ntβ-LCY1 expression was obviously induced by salt, drought, and exogenous abscisic acid treatments. Strong accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes resulted from Ntβ-LCY1 overexpression. Additionally, compared to wild-type plants, transgenic plants with overexpression showed enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stress with higher abscisic acid levels and lower levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species. Conversely, transgenic RNA interference plants had a clear albino phenotype in leaves, and some plants did not survive beyond the early developmental stages. The suppression of Ntβ-LCY1 expression led to lower expression levels of genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and to reduced accumulation of carotenoids, chlorophyll, and abscisic acid. These results indicate that Ntβ-LCY1 is not only a likely cyclization enzyme involved in carotenoid accumulation but also confers salt and drought stress tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum.

  10. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Moran, Jeffery H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Department of Public Health, Public Health Laboratory, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Prather, Paul L., E-mail: pratherpaull@uams.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  11. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018 and JWH-073 are synthetic cannabinoids present in abused K2 products. • JWH-018, JWH-073 and

  12. Structure of RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Kevin K.; Bingman, Craig A.; Cheng, Chin L.; Phillips, George N.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3′-phosphate to form a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA–AMP and RNA(3′)pp(5′)A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3′-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes s...

  13. Structure of the polyketide cyclase SnoaL reveals a novel mechanism for enzymatic aldol condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Azmiri; Kallio, Pauli; Jansson, Anna; Wang, Ji-Shu; Niemi, Jarmo; Mäntsälä, Pekka; Schneider, Gunter

    2004-01-01

    SnoaL belongs to a family of small polyketide cyclases, which catalyse ring closure steps in the biosynthesis of polyketide antibiotics produced in Streptomyces. Several of these antibiotics are among the most used anti-cancer drugs currently in use. The crystal structure of SnoaL, involved in nogalamycin biosynthesis, with a bound product, has been determined to 1.35 Å resolution. The fold of the subunit can be described as a distorted α+β barrel, and the ligand is bound in the hydrophobic i...

  14. Aldosterone increases oxidant stress to impair guanylyl cyclase activity by cysteinyl thiol oxidation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bradley A; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A

    2009-03-20

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO(.)); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO(.) to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10(-9)-10(-7) mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a beta(1)-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO(.) sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC beta(1)-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H(2)O(2) did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO(.)-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC.

  15. Mechanism of activation of particulate guanylate cyclase by atrial natriuretic peptide as deduced from radiation inactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between the receptor (Rc) for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the effector enzyme particulate guanylate cyclase (GC) has been studied by radiation inactivation. Irradiation of bovine lung membranes produced an increase in GC activity at low radiation doses followed by a dose-dependent reduction at higher doses. This deviation from linearity in the inactivation curve disappeared when lung membranes were pretreated with ANP. Essentially identical results were also obtained with adrenal membranes. Based on these radiation inactivation data, the following dissociative mechanism of activation of particulate guanylate cyclase by ANP has been proposed: Rc.GC(inactive) + ANP----Rc.ANP + GC(active)

  16. Expression, purification and crystallization of a plant polyketide cyclase from Cannabis sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinmei; Matsui, Takashi; Mori, Takahiro; Taura, Futoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Plant polyketides are a structurally diverse family of natural products. In the biosynthesis of plant polyketides, the construction of the carbocyclic scaffold is a key step in diversifying the polyketide structure. Olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC) from Cannabis sativa L. is the only known plant polyketide cyclase that catalyzes the C2-C7 intramolecular aldol cyclization of linear pentyl tetra-β-ketide-CoA to generate olivetolic acid in the biosynthesis of cannabinoids. The enzyme is also thought to belong to the dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein family. However, because of a lack of functional analysis of other plant DABB proteins and low sequence identity with the functionally distinct bacterial DABB proteins, the catalytic mechanism of OAC has remained unclear. To clarify the intimate catalytic mechanism of OAC, the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 1.40 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 47.3, c = 176.0 Å. Further crystallographic analysis will provide valuable insights into the structure-function relationship and catalytic mechanism of OAC.

  17. Phosphorylation-independent regulation of the diguanylate cyclase WspR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita De

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals that trigger bacterial pathogenesis and biofilm formation are mediated by changes in the level of cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP, a unique eubacterial second messenger. Tight regulation of cellular c-di-GMP concentration is governed by diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are responsible for its production and degradation, respectively. Here, we present the crystal structure of the diguanylate cyclase WspR, a conserved GGDEF domain-containing response regulator in Gram-negative bacteria, bound to c-di-GMP at an inhibitory site. Biochemical analyses revealed that feedback regulation involves the formation of at least three distinct oligomeric states. By switching from an active to a product-inhibited dimer via a tetrameric assembly, WspR utilizes a novel mechanism for modulation of its activity through oligomerization. Moreover, our data suggest that these enzymes can be activated by phosphodiesterases. Thus, in addition to the canonical pathways via phosphorylation of the regulatory domains, both product and enzyme concentration contribute to the coordination of c-di-GMP signaling. A structural comparison reveals resemblance of the oligomeric states to assemblies of GAF domains, widely used regulatory domains in signaling molecules conserved from archaea to mammals, suggesting a similar mechanism of regulation.

  18. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. The effect of adrenergic receptor—adenyl cyclase system on myocardial ischemic preconditioning in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANXiao-Li; LANJi-Cheng; 等

    2002-01-01

    In order to study the effects of every part of adrenergic receptor-adenyl cyclase system on ischemic preconditioning of myocardium in rats in vivo,SD rats were divided into three groups:IP group,I/R group and CON group.Rate were received surgical procedure and undergone left coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion.Hearts were extracted to analyze the infarct size by TTC staining,to measure serum myocardial enzymes,to study β-AR Bamx and Kd by radioligand binding assay of receptors(RAB),and to check the activity of AC and the content of cAMP by radioimmunoassay(RIA).The infarct area was found much smaller in IP group than I/R group(P<0.001);CK,CK-MB and LDH were found significantly higher in I/R group (P<0.001),The Bmax of β-AR in IP group were higher than in I/R group (P<0.001), No difference of Kd could be seen between IP and I/R group,In IP group,the activity of Ac and the content of cAMP were higher than I/R group(P<0.05 and 0.001,respectively).It is concluded that ischemic preconditioning can protect the hearts from necrosis and reduce endo-enzyme leakage.The system of adrenergic receptor-adenyl cyclase system probably takes part in the protection of the IP.

  20. [The influence of immunization of rats with BSA-conjugated peptide 269-280 of type 3 melanocortin receptor on the metabolic parameters and thyroid functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, K V; Shpakova, E A; Zharova, O A; Bondareva, V M; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the approaches to study the role of the brain hormonal signaling systems in the regulation of biochemical and physiological processes is their shutdown using the antibodies generated to peptides corresponding to extracellular regions of receptors. The brain type 3 melanocortin receptors (M3R) play an important role in the central regulation of the metabolism and the endocrine system. However, the influence of prolonged inhibition of M3R on energy metabolism, insulin resistance, and thyroid gland (TG) function is practically not studied. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of prolonged repeated immunization of male rats with the BSA-conjugated peptide Ala-[Pro-Thr-Asn-Pro-Tyr-Cys-Ile-Cys-Thr-Thr-Ala-His269-280]-Ala (A[269- 280]A) corresponding to the third extracellular loop of M3R on their metabolic parameters and functional activity of TG. 9 months after the first immunization, the weight of rats was reduced and after 12-13 months was significantly lower than in controls. The weight of abdominal and brown adipose tissues, on the contrary, increased. At the same timeline there was an increase in the fasting glucose and insulin levels, and increase of the HOMA-IR index (by 75%) indicating that immunized animals develop insulin resistance. The rats have increased glucose utilization due to an increase of insulin production by pancreatic β-cells. 12 months after the first immunization, the increase of the triglycerides level (by 74%) and the ratio of LDL- and HDL-cholesterol (by 36%) were revealed. 13 months after the start of immunization, the levels of free and total thyroxine and total triiodothyronine significantly decreased. In the TG plasma membranes of immunized rats the weakening adenylyl cyclase stimulating effect of thyroid-stimulating hormone was detected. Thus, long-term decrease in the bra- in M3R activity due to repeated immunization of rats with BSA-conjugated peptide A[269-280]A induces the disturbances of the peripheral

  1. Overexpression of glutaminyl cyclase, the enzyme responsible for pyroglutamate A{beta} formation, induces behavioral deficits, and glutaminyl cyclase knock-out rescues the behavioral phenotype in 5XFAD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawhar, Sadim; Wirths, Oliver; Schilling, Stephan; Graubner, Sigrid; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Bayer, Thomas A

    2011-02-11

    Pyroglutamate-modified Aβ (AβpE3-42) peptides are gaining considerable attention as potential key players in the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) due to their abundance in AD brain, high aggregation propensity, stability, and cellular toxicity. Overexpressing AβpE3-42 induced a severe neuron loss and neurological phenotype in TBA2 mice. In vitro and in vivo experiments have recently proven that the enzyme glutaminyl cyclase (QC) catalyzes the formation of AβpE3-42. The aim of the present work was to analyze the role of QC in an AD mouse model with abundant AβpE3-42 formation. 5XFAD mice were crossed with transgenic mice expressing human QC (hQC) under the control of the Thy1 promoter. 5XFAD/hQC bigenic mice showed significant elevation in TBS, SDS, and formic acid-soluble AβpE3-42 peptides and aggregation in plaques. In 6-month-old 5XFAD/hQC mice, a significant motor and working memory impairment developed compared with 5XFAD. The contribution of endogenous QC was studied by generating 5XFAD/QC-KO mice (mouse QC knock-out). 5XFAD/QC-KO mice showed a significant rescue of the wild-type mice behavioral phenotype, demonstrating the important contribution of endogenous mouse QC and transgenic overexpressed QC. These data clearly demonstrate that QC is crucial for modulating AβpE3-42 levels in vivo and prove on a genetic base the concept that reduction of QC activity is a promising new therapeutic approach for AD.

  2. Absence of the cbb3 Terminal Oxidase Reveals an Active Oxygen-Dependent Cyclase Involved in Bacteriochlorophyll Biosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangyu E.; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The characteristic green color associated with chlorophyll pigments results from the formation of an isocyclic fifth ring on the tetrapyrrole macrocycle during the biosynthesis of these important molecules. This reaction is catalyzed by two unrelated cyclase enzymes employing different chemistries. Oxygenic phototrophs such as plants and cyanobacteria utilize an oxygen-dependent enzyme, the major component of which is a diiron protein named AcsF, while BchE, an oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster protein, dominates in phototrophs inhabiting anoxic environments, such as the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We identify a potential acsF in this organism and assay for activity of the encoded protein in a strain lacking bchE under various aeration regimes. Initially, cells lacking bchE did not demonstrate AcsF activity under any condition tested. However, on removal of a gene encoding a subunit of the cbb3-type respiratory terminal oxidase, cells cultured under regimes ranging from oxic to micro-oxic exhibited cyclase activity, confirming the activity of the oxygen-dependent enzyme in this model organism. Potential reasons for the utilization of an oxygen-dependent enzyme in anoxygenic phototrophs are discussed. IMPORTANCE The formation of the E ring of bacteriochlorophyll pigments is the least well characterized step in their biosynthesis, remaining enigmatic for over 60 years. Two unrelated enzymes catalyze this cyclization step; O2-dependent and O2-independent forms dominate in oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, respectively. We uncover the activity of an O2-dependent enzyme in the anoxygenic purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, initially by inactivation of the high-affinity terminal respiratory oxidase, cytochrome cbb3. We propose that the O2-dependent form allows for the biosynthesis of a low level of bacteriochlorophyll under oxic conditions, so that a rapid initiation of photosynthetic processes is possible for

  3. Lentiviral expression of retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (RetGC1 restores vision in an avian model of childhood blindness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Williams

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA is a genetically heterogeneous group of retinal diseases that cause congenital blindness in infants and children. Mutations in the GUCY2D gene that encodes retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (retGC1 were the first to be linked to this disease group (LCA type 1 [LCA1] and account for 10%-20% of LCA cases. These mutations disrupt synthesis of cGMP in photoreceptor cells, a key second messenger required for function of these cells. The GUCY1*B chicken, which carries a null mutation in the retGC1 gene, is blind at hatching and serves as an animal model for the study of LCA1 pathology and potential treatments in humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A lentivirus-based gene transfer vector carrying the GUCY2D gene was developed and injected into early-stage GUCY1*B embryos to determine if photoreceptor function and sight could be restored to these animals. Like human LCA1, the avian disease shows early-onset blindness, but there is a window of opportunity for intervention. In both diseases there is a period of photoreceptor cell dysfunction that precedes retinal degeneration. Of seven treated animals, six exhibited sight as evidenced by robust optokinetic and volitional visual behaviors. Electroretinographic responses, absent in untreated animals, were partially restored in treated animals. Morphological analyses indicated there was slowing of the retinal degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: Blindness associated with loss of function of retGC1 in the GUCY1*B avian model of LCA1 can be reversed using viral vector-mediated gene transfer. Furthermore, this reversal can be achieved by restoring function to a relatively low percentage of retinal photoreceptors. These results represent a first step toward development of gene therapies for one of the more common forms of childhood blindness.

  4. The magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (oxidative) cyclase system. Studies on the mechanism and specificity of the reaction sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C J; Mansfield, K E; Rezzano, I N; Hanamoto, C M; Smith, K M; Castelfranco, P A

    1988-10-15

    Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase activity was assayed in isolated developing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. var. Beit Alpha) chloroplasts [Chereskin, Wong & Castelfranco (1982) Plant Physiol. 70, 987-993]. The presence of both 6- and 7-methyl esterase activities was detected, which permitted the use of diester porphyrins in a substrate-specificity study. It was found that: (1) the 6-methyl acrylate derivative of Mg-protoporphyrin monomethyl ester was inactive as a substrate for cyclization; (2) only one of the two enantiomers of 6-beta-hydroxy-Mg-protoporphyrin dimethyl ester had detectable activity as a substrate for the cyclase; (3) the 2-vinyl-4-ethyl-6-beta-oxopropionate derivatives of Mg-protoporphyrin mono- or di-methyl ester were approx. 4 times more active as substrates for cyclization than the corresponding divinyl forms; (4) at the level of Mg-protoporphyrin there was no difference in cyclase activity between the 4-vinyl and 4-ethyl substrates; (5) reduction of the side chain of Mg-protoporphyrin in the 2-position from a vinyl to an ethyl resulted in a partial loss of cyclase activity. This work suggests that the original scheme for cyclization proposed by Granick [(1950) Harvey Lect. 44, 220-245] should now be modified by the omission of the 6-methyl acrylate derivative of Mg-protoporphyrin monomethyl ester and the introduction of stereo-specificity at the level of the hydroxylated intermediate.

  5. BIOTIC STRESS IMPACT ON ACTIVITY OF VARIOUS FORMS OF ADENYLATE CYCLASE IN ORGANELLES OF POTATO PLANT CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomovatskaya L.A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding significant interest towards study of adenylate cyclase plant signal system, there is still no complete picture of functioning and regulation mechanisms of this signal system in plants under biotic stress. With this in view, our study was aimed at identification of various forms of adenylate cyclase (transmembrane and “soluble” in the nucleus and chloroplasts of potato cells and modulation of their activity under the impact of exopolysaсcharides ofpotato ring rot pathogen. The investigations conducted allowed to conclude that two forms of adenylate cyclase function in nuclei and chloroplasts of potato plants: transmembrane and “soluble”. Activity of these forms of the enzyme extracted from plant cells of the two potato varieties contrasted by resistance to potato ring rot pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, changed in the reverse manner with the mediated impact of exopolysaсcharides secreted by virulent and mucinous strain of bacterial pathogen: in the plants of resistant сultivar it increased, in the plants of sensitive сultivar it was oppressed. It was concluded that activity of both forms of adenylate cyclase directly depended on the degree of resistance of a particular potato variety to given pathogen.

  6. An approach to mimicking the sesquiterpene cyclase phase by nickel-promoted diene/alkyne cooligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, Dane; Götz, Daniel C G; Baran, Phil S

    2012-01-20

    Artificially mimicking the cyclase phase of terpene biosynthesis inspires the invention of new methodologies, since working with carbogenic frameworks containing minimal functionality limits the chemist's toolbox of synthetic strategies. For example, the construction of terpene skeletons from five-carbon building blocks would be an exciting pathway to mimic in the laboratory. Nature oligomerizes, cyclizes, and then oxidizes γ,γ-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) to all of the known terpenes. Starting from isoprene, the goal of this work was to mimic Nature's approach for rapidly building molecular complexity. In principle, the controlled oligomerization of isoprene would drastically simplify the synthesis of terpenes used in the medicine, perfumery, flavor, and materials industries. This article delineates our extensive efforts to cooligomerize isoprene or butadiene with alkynes in a controlled fashion by zerovalent nickel catalysis building off the classic studies by Wilke and co-workers. PMID:22229741

  7. Moonlighting kinases with guanylate cyclase activity can tune regulatory signal networks

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2012-02-01

    Guanylate cyclase (GC) catalyzes the formation of cGMP and it is only recently that such enzymes have been characterized in plants. One family of plant GCs contains the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain of leucine rich repeat receptor like kinases such as the phytosulfokine and brassinosteroid receptors. In vitro studies show that both the kinase and GC domain have catalytic activity indicating that these kinase-GCs are examples of moonlighting proteins with dual catalytic function. The natural ligands for both receptors increase intracellular cGMP levels in isolated mesophyll protoplast assays suggesting that the GC activity is functionally relevant. cGMP production may have an autoregulatory role on receptor kinase activity and/or contribute to downstream cell expansion responses. We postulate that the receptors are members of a novel class of receptor kinases that contain functional moonlighting GC domains essential for complex signaling roles.

  8. Adenylate cyclase 5 is required for melanophore and male pattern development in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Verena A; Künstner, Axel; Koch, Iris; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Langenecker, Tobias; Hoffmann, Margarete; Sharma, Eshita; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Guppies (Poecilia reticulata) are colorful fish that have attracted the attention of pigmentation researchers for almost a century. Here, we report that the blond phenotype of the guppy is caused by a spontaneous mutation in the guppy ortholog of adenylate cyclase 5 (adcy5). Using double digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, we linked the blond phenotype to a candidate region of 118 kb, in which we subsequently identified a 2-bp deletion in adcy5 that alters splicing and leads to a premature stop codon. We show that adcy5, which affects life span and melanoma growth in mouse, is required for melanophore development and formation of male orange pigmentation traits in the guppy. We find that some components of the male orange pattern are particularly sensitive to loss of Adcy5 function. Our work thus reveals a function for Adcy5 in patterning of fish color ornaments.

  9. The roles of cysteines in the heme domain of human soluble guanylate cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang Zhong; Xiao Xiao Liu; Jie Pan; Zhong Xian Huang; Xiang Shi Tan

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a critical heme-containing enzyme involved in NO signaling.The dimerization of sGC subunits is necessary for its bioactivity and its mechanism is a striiking and an indistinct issue.The roles of heme domain cysteines of the sGC on the dimerization and heme binding were investigated herein.The site-directed mutations of three conserved cysteines (C78A,C 122A and C 174S) were studied systematically and the three mutants were characterized by gel filtration analysis,UV-vis spectroscopy and heime transfer examination.Cys78 was involved in heme binding but not referred to the dimerization,while Cys174 was demonstrated to be involved in the homodimerization.These results provide new insights into the cysteine-related dimerization regulation of sGC.

  10. Reconstitution of a fungal meroterpenoid biosynthesis reveals the involvement of a novel family of terpene cyclases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takayuki; Tokunaga, Kinya; Matsuda, Yudai; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Kushiro, Tetsuo

    2010-10-01

    Meroterpenoids are hybrid natural products of both terpenoid and polyketide origin. We identified a biosynthetic gene cluster that is responsible for the production of the meroterpenoid pyripyropene in the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus through reconstituted biosynthesis of up to five steps in a heterologous fungal expression system. The cluster revealed a previously unknown terpene cyclase with an unusual sequence and protein primary structure. The wide occurrence of this sequence in other meroterpenoid and indole-diterpene biosynthetic gene clusters indicates the involvement of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of various terpenoid-bearing metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria. In addition, a novel polyketide synthase that incorporated nicotinyl-CoA as the starter unit and a prenyltransferase, similar to that in ubiquinone biosynthesis, was found to be involved in the pyripyropene biosynthesis. The successful production of a pyripyropene analogue illustrates the catalytic versatility of these enzymes for the production of novel analogues with useful biological activities.

  11. Characterization of a Fungal Thioesterase Having Claisen Cyclase and Deacetylase Activities in Melanin Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagstad, Anna L; Hill, Eric A; Labonte, Jason W; Townsend, Craig A

    2012-01-01

    Summary Melanins are a broad class of darkly-pigmented macromolecules formed by oxidative polymerization of phenolic monomers. In fungi, melanins are known virulence factors that contribute to pathogenicity. Their biosynthesis generally involves polymerization of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene via a 1,3,6,8- tetrahydroxynaphthalene (THN) precursor assembled by multidomain, nonreducing polyketide synthases. Multiple, convergent routes to THN have evolved in fungi. Parallel heptaketide and hexaketide pathways exist that utilize conventional C-terminal thioesterase/Claisen cyclase domains and separate side-chain deacylases. Here, in vitro characterization of Pks1 from Colletotrichum lagenarium establishes a true THN synthase with a bifunctional thioesterase (TE) catalyzing both cyclization and deacetylation of an enzyme-bound hexaketide substrate. Chimeric TE domains were generated by swapping lid regions of active sites between classes of melanin TEs to gain insight into this unprecedented catalysis of carbon–carbon bond making and breaking by an α/β-hydrolase fold enzyme. PMID:23261597

  12. Interaction of retinal guanylate cyclase with the alpha subunit of transducin: potential role in transducin localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Nair, K Saidas; Levay, Konstantin; Peshenko, Igor V; Crabb, John W; Dizhoor, Alexander M; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2009-02-01

    Vertebrate phototransduction is mediated by cGMP, which is generated by retGC (retinal guanylate cyclase) and degraded by cGMP phosphodiesterase. Light stimulates cGMP hydrolysis via the G-protein transducin, which directly binds to and activates phosphodiesterase. Bright light also causes relocalization of transducin from the OS (outer segments) of the rod cells to the inner compartments. In the present study, we show experimental evidence for a previously unknown interaction between G(alphat) (the transducin alpha subunit) and retGC. G(alphat) co-immunoprecipitates with retGC from the retina or from co-transfected COS-7 cells. The retGC-G(alphat) complex is also present in cones. The interaction also occurs in mice lacking RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signalling 9), a protein previously shown to associate with both G(alphat) and retGC. The G(alphat)-retGC interaction is mediated primarily by the kinase homology domain of retGC, which binds GDP-bound G(alphat) stronger than the GTP[S] (GTPgammaS; guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) form. Neither G(alphat) nor G(betagamma) affect retGC-mediated cGMP synthesis, regardless of the presence of GCAP (guanylate cyclase activating protein) and Ca2+. The rate of light-dependent transducin redistribution from the OS to the inner segments is markedly accelerated in the retGC-1-knockout mice, while the migration of transducin to the OS after the onset of darkness is delayed. Supplementation of permeabilized photoreceptors with cGMP does not affect transducin translocation. Taken together, these results suggest that the protein-protein interaction between G(alphat) and retGC represents a novel mechanism regulating light-dependent translocation of transducin in rod photoreceptors.

  13. Isolation and characterization of glutaminyl cyclases from Drosophila: evidence for enzyme forms with different subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Stephan; Lindner, Christiane; Koch, Birgit; Wermann, Michael; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; von Bohlen, Alex; Rudolph, Thomas; Reuter, Gunter; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-09-25

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) present in plants and vertebrates catalyze the formation of pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) from N-terminal glutamine. Pyroglutamyl hormones also identified in invertebrates imply the involvement of QC activity during their posttranslational maturation. Database mining led to the identification of two genes in Drosophila, which putatively encode QCs, CG32412 (DromeQC) and CG5976 (isoDromeQC). Analysis of their primary structure suggests different subcellular localizations. While DromeQC appeared to be secreted due to an N-terminal signal peptide, isoDromeQC contains either an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting or a secretion signal due to generation of different transcripts from gene CG5976. According to the prediction, homologous expression of the corresponding cDNAs in S2 cells revealed either secreted protein in the medium or intracellular QC activity. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemistry support export of isoDromeQC into the mitochondrion. For enzymatic characterization, DromeQC and isoDromeQC were expressed heterologously in Pichia pastoris and Escherichia coli, respectively. Compared to mammalian QCs, the specificity constants were about 1 order of magnitude lower for most of the analyzed substrates. The pH dependence of the specificity constant was similar for both enzymes, indicating the necessity of an unprotonated substrate amino group and two protonated groups of the enzyme, resulting in an asymmetric bell-shaped characteristic. The determination of the metal content of DromeQC revealed equimolar protein-bound zinc. These results prove conserved enzymatic mechanisms between QCs from invertebrates and mammals. Drosophila is the first organism for which isoenzymes of glutaminyl cyclase have been isolated. The identification of a mitochondrial QC points toward yet undiscovered physiological functions of these enzymes. PMID:17722885

  14. Adenosine diphosphate ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase and adenylylation of glutamine synthetase control ammonia excretion in ethylenediamine-resistant mutants of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A; Tripathi, A K

    2006-10-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a nitrogen-fixing, root-colonizing bacterium that brings about plant-growth-promoting effects mainly because of its ability to produce phytohormones. Ethylenediamine (EDA)-resistant mutants of A. brasilense were isolated and screened for their higher ability to decrease acetylene and release ammonia in the medium. One of the mutants showed considerably higher levels of acetylene decrease and ammonia excretion. Nitrogenase activity of this mutant was relatively resistant to inhibition by NH(4)Cl. Adenosine triphosphate ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in the mutant did not increase even in presence of 10 mM NH(4)Cl. Although the mutant showed decreased glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, neither the levels of GS synthesized by the mutant nor the NH (4) (+) -binding site in the GS differed from those of the parent. The main reason for the release of ammonia by the mutant seems to be the fixation of higher levels of nitrogen than its GS can assimilate, as well as higher levels of adenylylation of GS, which may decrease ammonia assimilation.

  15. Inhibition of Heat-Stable Toxin-Induced Intestinal Salt and Water Secretion by a Novel Class of Guanylyl Cyclase C Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Bijvelds, Marcel J. C.; Loos, Michaela; Bronsveld, Inez; Hellemans, Ann; Bongartz, Jean-Pierre; Ver Donck, Luc; Cox, Eric; de Jonge, Hugo R; Schuurkes, Jan A J; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains produce the heat-stable toxin, STa, which, by activation of the intestinal receptor-enzyme guanylyl cyclase (GC) C, triggers an acute, watery diarrhea. We set out to identify GCC inhibitors that may be of benefit for the treatment of infectious diarrheal disease. METHODS: Compounds that inhibit STa-induced cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) production were selected by performing cyclase assays on cells and membranes containing...

  16. Bordetella pertussis commits human dendritic cells to promote a Th1/Th17 response through the activity of adenylate cyclase toxin and MAPK-pathways.

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    Giorgio Fedele

    Full Text Available The complex pathology of B. pertussis infection is due to multiple virulence factors having disparate effects on different cell types. We focused our investigation on the ability of B. pertussis to modulate host immunity, in particular on the role played by adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA, an important virulence factor of B. pertussis. As a tool, we used human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDC, an ex vivo model useful for the evaluation of the regulatory potential of DC on T cell immune responses. The work compared MDDC functions after encounter with wild-type B. pertussis (BpWT or a mutant lacking CyaA (BpCyaA-, or the BpCyaA- strain supplemented with either the fully functional CyaA or a derivative, CyaA*, lacking adenylate cyclase activity. As a first step, MDDC maturation, cytokine production, and modulation of T helper cell polarization were evaluated. As a second step, engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLR 2 and TLR4 by B. pertussis and the signaling events connected to this were analyzed. These approaches allowed us to demonstrate that CyaA expressed by B. pertussis strongly interferes with DC functions, by reducing the expression of phenotypic markers and immunomodulatory cytokines, and blocking IL-12p70 production. B. pertussis-treated MDDC promoted a mixed Th1/Th17 polarization, and the activity of CyaA altered the Th1/Th17 balance, enhancing Th17 and limiting Th1 expansion. We also demonstrated that Th1 effectors are induced by B. pertussis-MDDC in the absence of IL-12p70 through an ERK1/2 dependent mechanism, and that p38 MAPK is essential for MDDC-driven Th17 expansion. The data suggest that CyaA mediates an escape strategy for the bacterium, since it reduces Th1 immunity and increases Th17 responses thought to be responsible, when the response is exacerbated, for enhanced lung inflammation and injury.

  17. The Arabidopsis thalianaK+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas

    2015-11-27

    Adenylate Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognized as an important signaling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP71-100 is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP71-100 generates cAMP in vitro.

  18. The Arabidopsis thaliana K(+)-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Younis, Inas; Wong, Aloysius; Gehring, Chris

    2015-12-21

    Adenylate cyclases (ACs) catalyse the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognised as an important signalling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K(+)-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP7(1-100) is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP7(1-100) generates cAMP in vitro. PMID:26638082

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrazoles and indazoles as activators of the nitric oxide receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwood, D L; Brummell, D G; Budworth, J; Burtin, G E; Campbell, R O; Chana, S S; Charles, I G; Fernandez, P A; Glen, R C; Goggin, M C; Hobbs, A J; Kling, M R; Liu, Q; Madge, D J; Meillerais, S; Powell, K L; Reynolds, K; Spacey, G D; Stables, J N; Tatlock, M A; Wheeler, K A; Wishart, G; Woo, C K

    2001-01-01

    Database searching and compound screening identified 1-benzyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyloxy)indazole (benzydamine, 3) as a potent activator of the nitric oxide receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase. A comprehensive structure-activity relationship study surrounding 3 clearly showed that the indazole C-3 dimethylaminopropyloxy substituent was critical for enzyme activity. However replacement of the indazole ring of 3 by appropriately substituted pyrazoles maintained enzyme activity. Compounds were evaluated for inhibition of platelet aggregation and showed a general lipophilicity requirement. Aryl-substituted pyrazoles 32, 34, and 43 demonstrated potent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and potent inhibition of platelet aggregation. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed that compound 32 exhibits modest oral bioavailability (12%). Furthermore 32 has an excellent selectivity profile notably showing no significant inhibition of phosphodiesterases or nitric oxide synthases. PMID:11141091

  20. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) contributes to the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in murine bone marrow via PACAP-specific receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhifang; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Jun; Miyamoto, Kazuyuki; Murai, Norimitsu; Sasaki, Shun; Matsumoto, Minako; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hiraizumi, Yutaka; Numazawa, Satoshi; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, encoded by adcyap1) plays an important role in ectodermal development. However, the involvement of PACAP in the development of other germ layers is still unclear. This study assessed the expression of a PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1) gene and protein in mouse bone marrow (BM). Cells strongly expressing PAC1(+) were large in size, had oval nuclei, and merged with CD34(+) cells, suggesting that the former were hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Compared with wild-type mice, adcyap1(-/-) mice exhibited lower multiple potential progenitor cell populations and cell frequency in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Exogenous PACAP38 significantly increased the numbers of colony forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM) with two peaks in semi-solid culture. PACAP also increased the expression of cyclinD1 and Ki67 mRNAs. These increases were completely and partially inhibited by the PACAP receptor antagonists, PACAP6-38 and VIP6-28, respectively. Little or no adcyap1 was expressed in BM and the number of CFU-GM colonies was similar in adcyap1(-/-) and wild-type mice. However, PACAP mRNA and protein were expressed in paravertebral sympathetic ganglia, which innervate tibial BM, and in the sympathetic fibers of BM cavity. These results suggested that sympathetic nerve innervation may be responsible for PACAP-regulated hematopoiesis in BM, mainly via PAC1. PMID:26925806

  1. Isolation and functional characterization of Lycopene β-cyclase (CYC-B) promoter from Solanum habrochaites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are a group of C40 isoprenoid molecules that play diverse biological and ecological roles in plants. Tomato is an important vegetable in human diet and provides the vitamin A precursor β-carotene. Genes encoding enzymes involved in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been cloned. However, regulation of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway and accumulation of specific carotenoid in chromoplasts are not well understood. One of the approaches to understand regulation of carotenoid metabolism is to characterize the promoters of genes encoding proteins involved in carotenoid metabolism. Lycopene β-cyclase is one of the crucial enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis pathway in plants. Its activity is required for synthesis of both α-and β-carotenes that are further converted into other carotenoids such as lutein, zeaxanthin, etc. This study describes the isolation and characterization of chromoplast-specific Lycopene β-cyclase (CYC-B) promoter from a green fruited S. habrochaites genotype EC520061. Results A 908 bp region upstream to the initiation codon of the Lycopene β-cyclase gene was cloned and identified as full-length promoter. To identify promoter region necessary for regulating developmental expression of the ShCYC-B gene, the full-length promoter and its three different 5' truncated fragments were cloned upstream to the initiation codon of GUS reporter cDNA in binary vectors. These four plant transformation vectors were separately transformed in to Agrobacterium. Agrobacterium-mediated transient and stable expression systems were used to study the GUS expression driven by the full-length promoter and its 5' deletion fragments in tomato. The full-length promoter showed a basal level activity in leaves, and its expression was upregulated > 5-fold in flowers and fruits in transgenic tomato plants. Deletion of -908 to -577 bp 5' to ATG decreases the ShCYC-B promoter strength, while deletion of -908 to -437 bp 5' to ATG led to

  2. Isolation and functional characterization of Lycopene β-cyclase (CYC-B promoter from Solanum habrochaites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnusamy Viswanathan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids are a group of C40 isoprenoid molecules that play diverse biological and ecological roles in plants. Tomato is an important vegetable in human diet and provides the vitamin A precursor β-carotene. Genes encoding enzymes involved in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been cloned. However, regulation of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway and accumulation of specific carotenoid in chromoplasts are not well understood. One of the approaches to understand regulation of carotenoid metabolism is to characterize the promoters of genes encoding proteins involved in carotenoid metabolism. Lycopene β-cyclase is one of the crucial enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis pathway in plants. Its activity is required for synthesis of both α-and β-carotenes that are further converted into other carotenoids such as lutein, zeaxanthin, etc. This study describes the isolation and characterization of chromoplast-specific Lycopene β-cyclase (CYC-B promoter from a green fruited S. habrochaites genotype EC520061. Results A 908 bp region upstream to the initiation codon of the Lycopene β-cyclase gene was cloned and identified as full-length promoter. To identify promoter region necessary for regulating developmental expression of the ShCYC-B gene, the full-length promoter and its three different 5' truncated fragments were cloned upstream to the initiation codon of GUS reporter cDNA in binary vectors. These four plant transformation vectors were separately transformed in to Agrobacterium. Agrobacterium-mediated transient and stable expression systems were used to study the GUS expression driven by the full-length promoter and its 5' deletion fragments in tomato. The full-length promoter showed a basal level activity in leaves, and its expression was upregulated > 5-fold in flowers and fruits in transgenic tomato plants. Deletion of -908 to -577 bp 5' to ATG decreases the ShCYC-B promoter strength, while deletion of -908

  3. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT{sub 1C} receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing ({sup 3}H)serotonin, ({sup 3}H)lysergic acid diethylamide or ({sup 3}H)dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor.

  4. Expression of nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase in the human ciliary body and trabecular meshwork

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-yi; MA Ning

    2012-01-01

    Background The role played by the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the aqueous humor dynamics is still unclear.This study was designed to investigate the expression and distribution of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms and guanylate cyclase (GC) in human ciliary body,trabecular meshwork and the Schlemm's canal.Methods Twelve eyes after corneal transplantation were used.Expression of three NOS isoforms (i.e.neuronal NOS (nNOS),inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS)) and GC were assessed in 10 eyes by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal or polyclonal antibody of NOS and GC.Ciliary bodies were dissected free and the total proteins were extracted.Western blotting was performed to confirm the protein expression of 3 NOS isoforms and GC.Results Expression of 3 NOS isoforms and GC were observed in the ciliary epithelium,ciliary muscle,trabecular meshwork and the endothelium of the Schlemm's canal.Immunoreactivity of nNOS was detected mainly along the apical cytoplasmic junction of the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) and pigmented epithelial (PE) cells.Protein expressions of 3 NOS isoforms and GC were confirmed in isolated human ciliary body by Western blotting.Conclusions The expression of NOS isoforms and GC in human ciliary body suggest the possible involvement of NO and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP,cGMP) signaling pathway in the ciliary body,and may play a role in both processes of aqueous humor formation and drainage.

  5. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Otto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonates (JAs are lipid-derived signals in plant stress responses and development. A crucial step in JA biosynthesis is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC. Four genes encoding functional AOCs (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3 and AOC4 have been characterized for Arabidopsis thaliana in terms of organ- and tissue-specific expression, mutant phenotypes, promoter activities and initial in vivo protein interaction studies suggesting functional redundancy and diversification, including first hints at enzyme activity control by protein-protein interaction. Here, these analyses were extended by detailed analysis of recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli. Treatment of purified AOC2 with SDS at different temperatures, chemical cross-linking experiments and protein structure analysis by molecular modelling approaches were performed. Several salt bridges between monomers and a hydrophobic core within the AOC2 trimer were identified and functionally proven by site-directed mutagenesis. The data obtained showed that AOC2 acts as a trimer. Finally, AOC activity was determined in heteromers formed by pairwise combinations of the four AOC isoforms. The highest activities were found for heteromers containing AOC4 + AOC1 and AOC4 + AOC2, respectively. All data are in line with an enzyme activity control of all four AOCs by heteromerization, thereby supporting a putative fine-tuning in JA formation by various regulatory principles.

  6. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Markus; Naumann, Christin; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant stress responses and development. A crucial step in JA biosynthesis is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC). Four genes encoding functional AOCs (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3 and AOC4) have been characterized for Arabidopsis thaliana in terms of organ- and tissue-specific expression, mutant phenotypes, promoter activities and initial in vivo protein interaction studies suggesting functional redundancy and diversification, including first hints at enzyme activity control by protein-protein interaction. Here, these analyses were extended by detailed analysis of recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli. Treatment of purified AOC2 with SDS at different temperatures, chemical cross-linking experiments and protein structure analysis by molecular modelling approaches were performed. Several salt bridges between monomers and a hydrophobic core within the AOC2 trimer were identified and functionally proven by site-directed mutagenesis. The data obtained showed that AOC2 acts as a trimer. Finally, AOC activity was determined in heteromers formed by pairwise combinations of the four AOC isoforms. The highest activities were found for heteromers containing AOC4 + AOC1 and AOC4 + AOC2, respectively. All data are in line with an enzyme activity control of all four AOCs by heteromerization, thereby supporting a putative fine-tuning in JA formation by various regulatory principles. PMID:27135223

  7. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators: a Novel Treatment Option for Heart Failure Associated with Cardiorenal Syndromes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Ruth F; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure in the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasingly common scenario and carries a poor prognosis. Clinicians lack tools for primary or secondary heart failure prevention in patients with cardiorenal syndromes. In patients without CKD, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and statins mitigate cardiovascular risk in large part due to salutary effects on the endothelium. In the setting of CKD, use of these therapies is limited by adverse effects of hyperkalemia in pre-dialysis CKD (ACE-I/ARB), or potential increased risk of stroke in end-stage renal disease (statins). The soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators are a novel class of medications that promote endothelial and myocardial function with no known risk of hyperkalemia or stroke. In this review, we discuss the evidence emerging from recent clinical trials of sGC stimulators in pulmonary hypertension and heart failure, the diseased pathways involved in cardiorenal syndromes likely to be restored by sGC stimulators, and several strategies for designing future clinical trials of cardiorenal syndromes that might shorten the timeline for discovery and approval of effective cardiovascular therapies in these high-risk patients. PMID:27118234

  8. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons.

  9. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Reverses Ammonium Metavanadate-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounira Tlili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of atmospheric vanadium is constantly increasing due to fossil fuel combustion. This environmental pollution favours vanadium exposure in particular to its vanadate form, causing occupational bronchial asthma and bronchitis. Based on the well admitted bronchodilator properties of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, we investigated the ability of this neuropeptide to reverse the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in rats. Exposure to ammonium metavanadate aerosols (5 mg/m3/h for 15 minutes induced 4 hours later an array of pathophysiological events, including increase of bronchial resistance and histological alterations, activation of proinflammatory alveolar macrophages, and increased oxidative stress status. Powerfully, PACAP inhalation (0.1 mM for 10 minutes alleviated many of these deleterious effects as demonstrated by a decrease of bronchial resistance and histological restoration. PACAP reduced the level of expression of mRNA encoding inflammatory chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, and KC and cytokines (IL-1α and TNF-α in alveolar macrophages and improved the antioxidant status. PACAP reverses the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness not only through its bronchodilator activity but also by counteracting the proinflammatory and prooxidative effects of the metal. Then, the development of stable analogs of PACAP could represent a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory respiratory disorders.

  10. Identification of small molecules inhibiting diguanylate cyclases to control bacterial biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Luo, Chunyuan; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Feng, Xiarong; Koestler, Benjamin; Waters, Christopher M; Palys, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria is an important virulence factor in the development of numerous chronic infections, thereby causing a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be resolved, as bacteria in biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotic therapy. An urgent need for new strategies to treat biofilm-based infections is critically needed. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widely conserved second-messenger signal essential for biofilm formation. The absence of this signalling system in higher eukaryotes makes it an attractive target for the development of new anti-biofilm agents. In this study, the results of an in silico pharmacophore-based screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors of diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes that synthesize c-di-GMP are described. Four small molecules, LP 3134, LP 3145, LP 4010 and LP 1062 that antagonize these enzymes and inhibit biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in a continuous-flow system are reported. All four molecules dispersed P. aeruginosa biofilms and inhibited biofilm development on urinary catheters. One molecule dispersed A. baumannii biofilms. Two molecules displayed no toxic effects on eukaryotic cells. These molecules represent the first compounds identified from an in silico screen that are able to inhibit DGC activity to prevent biofilm formation. PMID:24117391

  11. Structural features of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin that activates membrane-associated guanylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Shimonishi, Y

    2004-03-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), a small peptide of 18 or 19 amino acid residues produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, is the cause of acute diarrhea in infants and travelers in developing countries. ST triggers a biological response by binding to a membrane-associated guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) which is located on intestinal epithelial cell membranes. This binding causes an increase in the concentration of cGMP as a second messenger in cells and activates protein kinase A and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Here we describe the crystal structure of an ST at 0.89 A resolution. The molecule has a ring-shaped molecular architecture consisting of six peptide molecules with external and internal diameters of approximately 35 and 7 A, respectively and a thickness of approximately 11 A. The conserved residues at the central portion of ST are distributed on the outer surface of the ring-shaped peptide hexamer, suggesting that the hexamer may be implicated in the association with GC-C through these invariant residues. PMID:15049831

  12. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP participates in adipogenesis by activating ERK signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Arsenijevic

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP belongs to the secretin/glucagon/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP family. Its action can be mediated by three different receptor subtypes: PAC1, which has exclusive affinity for PACAP, and VPAC1 and VPAC2 which have equal affinity for PACAP and VIP. We showed that all three receptors are expressed in 3T3-L1 cells throughout their differentiation into adipocytes. We established the activity of these receptors by cAMP accumulation upon induction by PACAP. Together with insulin and dexamethasone, PACAP induced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cell line. PACAP increased cAMP production within 15 min upon stimulation and targeted the expression and phosphorylation of MAPK (ERK1/2, strengthened by the ERK1/2 phosphorylation being partially or completely abolished by different combinations of PACAP receptors antagonists. We therefore speculate that ERK1/2 activation is crucial for the activation of CCAAT/enhancer- binding protein β (C/EBPβ.

  13. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons. PMID:25135936

  14. A novel zf-MYND protein, CHB-3, mediates guanylyl cyclase localization to sensory cilia and controls body size of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabi Fujiwara

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are important sensory organelles, which are thought to be essential regulators of numerous signaling pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, defects in sensory cilium formation result in a small-body phenotype, suggesting the role of sensory cilia in body size determination. Previous analyses suggest that lack of normal cilia causes the small-body phenotype through the activation of a signaling pathway which consists of the EGL-4 cGMP-dependent protein kinase and the GCY-12 receptor-type guanylyl cyclase. By genetic suppressor screening of the small-body phenotype of a cilium defective mutant, we identified a chb-3 gene. Genetic analyses placed chb-3 in the same pathway as egl-4 and gcy-12 and upstream of egl-4. chb-3 encodes a novel protein, with a zf-MYND motif and ankyrin repeats, that is highly conserved from worm to human. In chb-3 mutants, GCY-12 guanylyl cyclase visualized by tagged GFP (GCY-12::GFP fails to localize to sensory cilia properly and accumulates in cell bodies. Our analyses suggest that decreased GCY-12 levels in the cilia of chb-3 mutants may cause the suppression of the small-body phenotype of a cilium defective mutant. By observing the transport of GCY-12::GFP particles along the dendrites to the cilia in sensory neurons, we found that the velocities and the frequencies of the particle movement are decreased in chb-3 mutant animals. How membrane proteins are trafficked to cilia has been the focus of extensive studies in vertebrates and invertebrates, although only a few of the relevant proteins have been identified. Our study defines a new regulator, CHB-3, in the trafficking process and also shows the importance of ciliary targeting of the signaling molecule, GCY-12, in sensory-dependent body size regulation in C. elegans. Given that CHB-3 is highly conserved in mammal, a similar system may be used in the trafficking of signaling proteins to the cilia of other species.

  15. The arabidopsis wall associated kinase-like 10 gene encodes a functional guanylyl cyclase and is co-expressed with pathogen defense related genes

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2010-01-26

    Background: Second messengers have a key role in linking environmental stimuli to physiological responses. One such messenger, guanosine 3?,5?-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), has long been known to be an essential signaling molecule in many different physiological processes in higher plants, including biotic stress responses. To date, however, the guanylyl cyclase (GC) enzymes that catalyze the formation of cGMP from GTP have largely remained elusive in higher plants. Principal Findings: We have identified an Arabidopsis receptor type wall associated kinase-like molecule (AtWAKL10) as a candidate GC and provide experimental evidence to show that the intracellular domain of AtWAKL10431-700 can generate cGMP in vitro. Further, we also demonstrate that the molecule has kinase activity indicating that AtWAKL10 is a twin-domain catalytic protein. A co-expression and stimulus-specific expression analysis revealed that AtWAKL10 is consistently coexpressed with well characterized pathogen defense related genes and along with these genes is induced early and sharply in response to a range of pathogens and their elicitors. Conclusions: We demonstrate that AtWAKL10 is a twin-domain, kinase-GC signaling molecule that may function in biotic stress responses that are critically dependent on the second messenger cGMP. © 2010 Meier et al.

  16. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Matthew M; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E; Frenkel, Mogen M; Reilly, Michael J; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  17. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko eHattori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP is a neuropeptide acting as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, or neurotrophic factor. PACAP is widely expressed throughout the brain and exerts its functions through the PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1. Recent studies reveal that genetic variants of the PACAP and PAC1 genes are associated with mental disorders, and several behavioral abnormalities of PACAP knockout (KO mice are reported. However, an insufficient number of backcrosses was made using PACAP KO mice on the C57BL/6J background due to their postnatal mortality. To elucidate the effects of PACAP on neuropsychiatric function, the PACAP gene was knocked out in F1 hybrid mice (C57BL/6J x 129SvEv for appropriate control of the genetic background. The PACAP KO mice were then subjected to a behavioral test battery. PACAP deficiency had no significant effects on neurological screen. As shown previously, the mice exhibited significantly increased locomotor activity in a novel environment and abnormal anxiety-like behavior, while no obvious differences between genotypes were shown in home cage activity. In contrast to previous reports, the PACAP KO mice showed normal prepulse inhibition and slightly decreased depression-like behavior. Previous study demonstrates that the social interaction in a resident-intruder test was decreased in PACAP KO mice. On the other hand, we showed that PACAP KO mice exhibited increased social interaction in Crawley’s three-chamber social approach test, although PACAP KO had no significant impact on social interaction in a home cage. PACAP KO mice also exhibited mild performance deficit in working memory in an eight-arm radial maze and the T-maze, while they did not show any significant abnormalities in the left-right discrimination task in the T-maze. These results suggest that PACAP has an important role in the regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, anxiety-like behavior and, potentially

  18. Characterization and Inhibition of a Class II Diterpene Cyclase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Francis M.; Prisic, Sladjana; Hu, Huayou; Xu, Meimei; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a widespread and devastating human pathogen, whose ability to infiltrate macrophage host cells from the human immune system is an active area of investigation. We have recently reported the discovery of a novel diterpene from M. tuberculosis, edaxadiene, whose ability to arrest phagosomal maturation in isolation presumably contributes to this critical process in M. tuberculosis infections. (Mann, F. M., Xu, M., Chen, X., Fulton, D. B., Russell, D. G., and Peters, R. J. (2009) J. Am. Chem. Soc., in press). Here, we present characterization of the class II diterpene cyclase that catalyzes the committed step in edaxadiene biosynthesis, i.e. the previously identified halimadienyl-diphosphate synthase (HPS; EC 5.5.1.16). Intriguingly, our kinetic analysis suggests a potential biochemical regulatory mechanism that triggers edaxadiene production upon phagosomal engulfment. Furthermore, we report characterization of potential HPS inhibitors: specifically, two related transition state analogs (15-aza-14,15-dihydrogeranylgeranyl diphosphate (7a) and 15-aza-14,15-dihydrogeranylgeranyl thiolodiphosphate (7b)) that exhibit very tight binding. Although arguably not suitable for clinical use, these nevertheless provide a basis for pharmaceutical design against this intriguing biosynthetic pathway. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that this pathway exists only in M. tuberculosis and is not functional in the closely related Mycobacterium bovis because of an inactivating frameshift in the HPS-encoding gene. Thus, we hypothesize that the inability to produce edaxadiene may be a contributing factor in the decreased infectivity and/or virulence of M. bovis relative to M. tuberculosis in humans. PMID:19574210

  19. A peptide against soluble guanylyl cyclase α1: a new approach to treating prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Gao

    Full Text Available Among the many identified androgen-regulated genes, sGCα1 (soluble guanylyl cyclase α1 appears to play a pivotal role in mediating the pro-cancer effects of androgens and androgen receptor. The classical role for sGCα1 is to heterodimerize with the sGCβ1 subunit, forming sGC, the enzyme that mediates nitric oxide signaling by catalyzing the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Our published data show that sGCα1 can drive prostate cancer cell proliferation independent of hormone and provide cancer cells a pro-survival function, via a novel mechanism for p53 inhibition, both of which are independent of sGCβ1, NO, and cGMP. All of these properties make sGCα1 an important novel target for prostate cancer therapy. Thus, peptides were designed targeting sGCα1 with the aim of disrupting this protein's pro-cancer activities. One peptide (A-8R was determined to be strongly cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells, rapidly inducing apoptosis. Cytotoxicity was observed in both hormone-dependent and, significantly, hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells, opening the possibility that this peptide can be used to treat the usually lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. In mouse xenograft studies, Peptide A-8R was able to stop tumor growth of not only hormone-dependent cells, but most importantly from hormone-independent cells. In addition, the mechanism of Peptide A cytotoxicity is generation of reactive oxygen species, which recently have been recognized as a major mode of action of important cancer drugs. Thus, this paper provides strong evidence that targeting an important AR-regulated gene is a new paradigm for effective prostate cancer therapy.

  20. Cloning and functional characterization of three branch point oxidosqualene cyclases from Withania somnifera (L.) dunal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Niha; Rana, Satiander; Razdan, Sumeer; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Hussain, Aashiq; Dhar, Rekha S; Vaishnavi, Samantha; Hamid, Abid; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2014-06-13

    Oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs) positioned at a key metabolic subdividing junction execute indispensable enzymatic cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene for varied triterpenoid biosynthesis. Such branch points present favorable gene targets for redirecting metabolic flux toward specific secondary metabolites. However, detailed information regarding the candidate OSCs covering different branches and their regulation is necessary for the desired genetic manipulation. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to characterize members of OSC superfamily from Withania somnifera (Ws), a medicinal plant of immense repute known to synthesize a large array of biologically active steroidal lactone triterpenoids called withanolides. Three full-length OSC cDNAs, β-amyrin synthase (WsOSC/BS), lupeol synthase (WsOSC/LS), and cycloartenol synthase (WsOSC/CS), having open reading frames of 2289, 2268, and 2277 bp, were isolated. Heterologous expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, LC-MS analyses, and kinetic studies confirmed their monofunctionality. The three WsOSCs were found to be spatially regulated at transcriptional level with WsOSC/CS being maximally expressed in leaf tissue. Promoter analysis of three WsOSCs genes resulted in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements. Further, transcript profiling under methyl jasmonate, gibberellic acid, and yeast extract elicitations displayed differential transcriptional regulation of each of the OSCs. Changes were also observed in mRNA levels under elicitations and further substantiated with protein expression levels by Western blotting. Negative regulation by yeast extract resulted in significant increase in withanolide content. Empirical evidence suggests that repression of competitive branch OSCs like WsOSC/BS and WsOSC/LS possibly leads to diversion of substrate pool toward WsOSC/CS for increased withanolide production.

  1. Functional analysis of the Phycomyces carRA gene encoding the enzymes phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Sanz

    Full Text Available Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism.

  2. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Finley, Natosha L., E-mail: finleynl@miamioh.edu [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Cell, Molecular, and Structural Biology Program, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken

  3. The fission yeast git5 gene encodes a Gbeta subunit required for glucose-triggered adenylate cyclase activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Landry, S; Pettit, M T; Apolinario, E; Hoffman, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Fission yeast adenylate cyclase is activated by the gpa2 Galpha subunit of a heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide binding protein (G protein). We show that the git5 gene, also required for this activation, encodes a Gbeta subunit. In contrast to another study, we show that git5 is not a negative regulator of the gpa1 Galpha involved in the pheromone response pathway. While 43% identical to mammalian Gbeta's, the git5 protein lacks the amino-terminal coiled-coil found in other Gbeta subunits, yet...

  4. Tyrosine Phosphatase TpbA Controls Rugose Colony Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Dephosphorylating Diguanylate Cyclase TpbB

    OpenAIRE

    Pu, Mingming; Wood, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatase TpbA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 is a negative regulator of the diguanylate cyclase TpbB. Inactivation of TpbA caused rugose colony morphology which is related to cell persistence in clinical infections. We show here that TpbA is a dual specific tyrosine phosphatase, that TpbB is phosphorylated, and that TpbA controls phosphorylation of TpbB at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues in vivo as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, TpbB is demonstrated to be a substrat...

  5. Hypoxia and glucose independently regulate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase system in cardiac myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha-Singh, K J; Honbo, N Y; Karliner, J S

    1991-01-01

    We explored the effects of two components of ischemia, hypoxia and glucose deprivation, on the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR)-adenylate cyclase system in a model of hypoxic injury in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. After 2 h of hypoxia in the presence of 5 mM glucose, cell surface beta AR density (3H-CGP-12177) decreased from 54.8 +/- 8.4 to 39 +/- 6.3 (SE) fmol/mg protein (n = 10, P less than 0.025), while cytosolic beta AR density (125I-iodocyanopindolol [ICYP]) increased by...

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of the Bacillus anthracis edema factor toxin gene: a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase.

    OpenAIRE

    Tippetts, M T; Robertson, D L

    1988-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis exotoxin is composed of a lethal factor, a protective antigen, and an edema factor (EF). EF is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase which elevates cyclic AMP levels within cells. The entire EF gene (cya) has been cloned in Escherichia coli, but EF gene expression by its own B. anthracis promoter could not be detected in E. coli. However, when the EF gene was placed downstream from the lac or the T7 promoter, enzymatically active EF was produced. The EF gene, like th...

  7. Effect of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Beta Adrenergic ReceptorAdenylate Cyclase System on Surfaces of Peripheral Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ailin; TIAN Yuke; JIN Shiao

    2000-01-01

    The experimental results showed that the level of CAMP, the ratio of cAPM to cGMP,IL-2R expression and IL-2 production in vitro in lymphocytes immediate and 2 weeks after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were significantly lower than those before anesthetics in the patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. These findings suggested that CPB could cause serious damage to adrenergic beta receptor-adenylate cyclase system on circulating lymphocytes surfaces,which might be one of the mechanisms resulting in immunosuppression after open heart surgery with CPB.

  8. Bifunctional homodimeric triokinase/FMN cyclase: contribution of protein domains to the activities of the human enzyme and molecular dynamics simulation of domain movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; Couto, Ana; Cabezas, Alicia; Pinto, Rosa María; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Canales, José; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2014-04-11

    Mammalian triokinase, which phosphorylates exogenous dihydroxyacetone and fructose-derived glyceraldehyde, is neither molecularly identified nor firmly associated to an encoding gene. Human FMN cyclase, which splits FAD and other ribonucleoside diphosphate-X compounds to ribonucleoside monophosphate and cyclic X-phosphodiester, is identical to a DAK-encoded dihydroxyacetone kinase. This bifunctional protein was identified as triokinase. It was modeled as a homodimer of two-domain (K and L) subunits. Active centers lie between K1 and L2 or K2 and L1: dihydroxyacetone binds K and ATP binds L in different subunits too distant (≈ 14 Å) for phosphoryl transfer. FAD docked to the ATP site with ribityl 4'-OH in a possible near-attack conformation for cyclase activity. Reciprocal inhibition between kinase and cyclase reactants confirmed substrate site locations. The differential roles of protein domains were supported by their individual expression: K was inactive, and L displayed cyclase but not kinase activity. The importance of domain mobility for the kinase activity of dimeric triokinase was highlighted by molecular dynamics simulations: ATP approached dihydroxyacetone at distances below 5 Å in near-attack conformation. Based upon structure, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, relevant residues were mutated to alanine, and kcat and Km were assayed whenever kinase and/or cyclase activity was conserved. The results supported the roles of Thr(112) (hydrogen bonding of ATP adenine to K in the closed active center), His(221) (covalent anchoring of dihydroxyacetone to K), Asp(401) and Asp(403) (metal coordination to L), and Asp(556) (hydrogen bonding of ATP or FAD ribose to L domain). Interestingly, the His(221) point mutant acted specifically as a cyclase without kinase activity.

  9. Studies on cell migration, adenylate cyclase and membrane-coating granules in the buccal epithelium of the zinc-deficient rabbit, including the influence of isoproterenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S Y

    1988-01-01

    Cell migration was slightly increased; cytochemical reaction deposits of adenylate cyclase and the area density of membrane-coating granules (MCG) were significantly increased. Upon isoproterenol stimulation, the MCG area density was significantly increased, whereas the cell migration rate was unchanged. Thus in zinc deficiency, there may be a simultaneous increase in the production and secretion of MCGs, in adenylate cyclase activity, and in cell migration. The non-significantly increased cell migration rate may not keep pace with the significantly increased cell-production rate, resulting in thickening of the epithelium.

  10. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of an Allene Oxide Cyclase Gene Associated with Fiber Strength in Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-man; ZHU You-min; TONG Xiang-chao; HU Wen-jing; CAI Cai-ping; GUO Wang-zhen

    2014-01-01

    Allene oxide cyclase (AOC) is one of the most important enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of the plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA). AOC catalyzes the conversion of allene oxide into 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), a precursor of JA. Using 28K cotton genome array hybridization, an expressed sequence tag (EST;GenBank accession no. ES792958) was investigated that exhibited signiifcant expression differences between lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM isogenic lines during ifber initiation stages. The EST was used to search the Gossypium EST database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) for corresponding cDNA sequences encoding full-length open reading frames (ORFs). Identiifed ORFs were conifrmed using transcriptional and genomic data. As a result, a novel gene encoding AOC in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum AOC;GenBank accession no. KF383427) was cloned and characterized. The 741-bp GhAOC gene comprises three exons and two introns and encodes a polypeptide of 246 amino acids. Two homologous copies were identiifed in the tetraploid cotton species G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 and G. barbadense cv. Hai7124, and one copy in the diploid cotton species G. herbaceum and G. raimondii. qRT-PCR showed that the GhAOC transcript was abundant in cotton ifber tissues from 8 to 23 days post anthesis (DPA), and the expression proifles were similar in the two cultivated tetraploid cotton species G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 and G. barbadense cv. Hai7124, with a higher level of transcription in the former. One copy of GhAOC in tetraploid cotton was localized to chromosome 24 (Chr. D8) using the subgenome-speciifc single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker analysis, which co-localized GhAOC to within 10 cM of a ifber strength quantitative trait locus (QTL) reported previously. GhAOC was highly correlated with ifber quality and strength (P=0.014) in an association analysis, suggesting a possible role in cotton ifber development, especially in secondary cell wall thickening.

  11. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase, A Multimodal Transduction Machine: History, Present and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar K Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sequel to these authors’ earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 parts. The first is HISTORICAL and covers MGC from the year 1963-1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its BIOCHEMICAL IDENTITY. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its EXPANSION. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of PHOTOTRANSDUCTION. Parts 4 to 7 cover its BIOCHEMISTRY and PHYSIOLOGY. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca2+ signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Part 8 demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be TRANSLATED into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Part 9 discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a [Ca2+]i bimodal switch and transcends its signaling role in other neural transduction processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca2+-dependent guanylate cycles activator, the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of ROS-GC transduction system beyond the photoreceptor cells to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in Part 10, discovery of ANOTHER CD-GCAP, NC, is made and its linkage with signaling of the inner plexiform layer neurons is established. Part 11 discusses linkage of the ROS-GC transduction system with other sensory transduction processes: Pineal gland, Olfaction and Gustation. In the

  12. Pharmacokinetic interaction profile of riociguat, a new soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickert, Verena; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Weiss, Johanna

    2014-08-01

    Riociguat is a new soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator under development for pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. So far, the interaction potential of riociguat with other drugs is nearly unknown. Therefore, we assessed in vitro the potency of riociguat to inhibit important drug metabolising enzymes (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) and drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1 and 1B3). In addition we evaluated its substrate characteristics for P-gp, BCRP, and the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1). We also assessed riociguat's inducing properties on important drug metabolising enzymes and transporters and investigated its ability to activate the pregnane-X-receptor (PXR). Riociguat was identified as a weak to moderate inhibitor of P-gp (f2-value: 11.7 ± 4.8 μM), BCRP (IC50 = 46.2 ± 20.3 μM), OATP1B1 (IC50 = 34.1 ± 3.15 μM), OATP1B3 (IC50 = 50.3 ± 7.5 μM), CYP2D6 (IC50 = 12.4 ± 0.74 μM), and CYP2C19 (IC50 = 46.1 ± 7.14 μM). Furthermore, it induced mRNA expression of BCRP/ABCG2 (3-fold at 20 μM) and to a lesser extent of CYP3A4 (2.3-fold at 20 μM), UGT1A4, and ABCB11. The only weak inducing properties were confirmed by weak activation of PXR. Considering its systemic concentrations its interaction potential as a perpetrator drug seems to be low. In contrast, our data suggest that riociguat is a P-gp substrate and might therefore act as a victim drug when co-administered with strong P-gp inductors or inhibitors. PMID:24657506

  13. Guanylate cyclase C deficiency causes severe inflammation in a murine model of spontaneous colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleana Harmel-Laws

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guanylate Cyclase C (GC-C; Gucy2c is a transmembrane receptor expressed in intestinal epithelial cells. Activation of GC-C by its secreted ligand guanylin stimulates intestinal fluid secretion. Familial mutations in GC-C cause chronic diarrheal disease or constipation and are associated with intestinal inflammation and infection. Here, we investigated the impact of GC-C activity on mucosal immune responses. METHODS: We utilized intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide to elicit a systemic cytokine challenge and then measured pro-inflammatory gene expression in colonic mucosa. GC-C(+/+ and GC-C(-/- mice were bred with interleukin (IL-10 deficient animals and colonic inflammation were assessed. Immune cell influx and cytokine/chemokine expression was measured in the colon of wildtype, IL-10(-/-, GC-C(+/+IL-10(-/- and GC-C(-/-IL-10(-/- mice. GC-C and guanylin production were examined in the colon of these animals and in a cytokine-treated colon epithelial cell line. RESULTS: Relative to GC-C(+/+ animals, intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide injection into GC-C(-/- mice increased proinflammatory gene expression in both whole colon tissue and in partially purified colonocyte isolations. Spontaneous colitis in GC-C(-/-IL-10(-/- animals was significantly more severe relative to GC-C(+/+IL-10(-/- mice. Unlike GC-C(+/+IL-10(-/- controls, colon pathology in GC-C(-/-IL-10(-/- animals was apparent at an early age and was characterized by severely altered mucosal architecture, crypt abscesses, and hyperplastic subepithelial lesions. F4/80 and myeloperoxidase positive cells as well as proinflammatory gene expression were elevated in GC-C(-/-IL-10(-/- mucosa relative to control animals. Guanylin was diminished early in colitis in vivo and tumor necrosis factor α suppressed guanylin mRNA and protein in intestinal goblet cell-like HT29-18-N2 cells. CONCLUSIONS: The GC-C signaling pathway blunts colonic mucosal inflammation that is initiated by

  14. Comparative analysis of diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Diana P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae can be found in environmental habitats as well as in hospital settings where it is commonly associated with nosocomial infections. One of the factors that contribute to virulence is its capacity to form biofilms on diverse biotic and abiotic surfaces. The second messenger Bis-(3’-5’-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP is a ubiquitous signal in bacteria that controls biofilm formation as well as several other cellular processes. The cellular levels of this messenger are controlled by c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation catalyzed by diguanylate cyclase (DGC and phophodiesterase (PDE enzymes, respectively. Many bacteria contain multiple copies of these proteins with diverse organizational structure that highlight the complex regulatory mechanisms of this signaling network. This work was undertaken to identify DGCs and PDEs and analyze the domain structure of these proteins in K. pneumoniae. Results A search for conserved GGDEF and EAL domains in three sequenced K. pneumoniae genomes showed that there were multiple copies of GGDEF and EAL containing proteins. Both single domain and hybrid GGDEF proteins were identified: 21 in K. pneumoniae Kp342, 18 in K. pneumoniae MGH 78578 and 17 in K. pneumoniae NTUH-K2044. The majority had only the GGDEF domain, most with the GGEEF motif, and hybrid proteins containing both GGDEF and EAL domains were also found. The I site for allosteric control was identified only in single GGDEF domain proteins and not in hybrid proteins. EAL-only proteins, containing either intact or degenerate domains, were also identified: 15 in Kp342, 15 in MGH 78578 and 10 in NTUH-K2044. Several input sensory domains and transmembrane segments were identified, which together indicate complex regulatory circuits that in many cases can be membrane associated. Conclusions The comparative analysis of proteins containing GGDEF/EAL domains in K. pneumoniae showed that most copies were shared among the

  15. Calpain-Mediated Processing of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Generates a Cytosolic Soluble Catalytically Active N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough pathogen, secretes several virulence factors among which adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT is essential for establishment of the disease in the respiratory tract. ACT weakens host defenses by suppressing important bactericidal activities of the phagocytic cells. Up to now, it was believed that cell intoxication by ACT was a consequence of the accumulation of abnormally high levels of cAMP, generated exclusively beneath the host plasma membrane by the toxin N-terminal catalytic adenylate cyclase (AC domain, upon its direct translocation across the lipid bilayer. Here we show that host calpain, a calcium-dependent Cys-protease, is activated into the phagocytes by a toxin-triggered calcium rise, resulting in the proteolytic cleavage of the toxin N-terminal domain that releases a catalytically active "soluble AC". The calpain-mediated ACT processing allows trafficking of the "soluble AC" domain into subcellular organella. At least two strategic advantages arise from this singular toxin cleavage, enhancing the specificity of action, and simultaneously preventing an indiscriminate activation of cAMP effectors throughout the cell. The present study provides novel insights into the toxin mechanism of action, as the calpain-mediated toxin processing would confer ACT the capacity for a space- and time-coordinated production of different cAMP "pools", which would play different roles in the cell pathophysiology.

  16. Cloning and Functional Analysis of Lycopeneε-Cyclase (IbLCYe) Gene from Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ling; ZHAI Hong; CHEN Wei; HE Shao-zhen; LIU Qing-chang

    2013-01-01

    This paper reported firstly successful cloning of lycopeneε-cyclase (IbLCYe) gene from sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), IbLCYe gene was cloned from sweetpotato cv. Nongdafu 14 with high carotenoid content. The 1 805 bp cDNA sequence of IbLCYe gene contained a 1 236 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 411 amino acids polypeptide with a molecular weight of 47 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.95. IbLCYe protein contained one potential lycopeneε-cyclase domain and one potential FAD (flavinadenine dinucleotide)/NAD(P) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate)-binding domain, indicating that this protein shares the typical characteristics of LCYe proteins. The gDNA of IbLCYe gene was 4 029 bp and deduced to contain 5 introns and 6 exons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of IbLCYe gene was significantly higher in the storage roots of Nongdafu 14 than those in the leaves and stems. Transgenic tobacco (cv. Wisconsin 38) expressing IbLCYe gene accumulated significantly moreβ-carotene compared to the untransformed control plants. These results showed that IbLCYe gene has an important function for the accumulation of carotenoids of sweetpotato.

  17. Isolation and functional characterization of a lycopene beta-cyclase gene that controls fruit colour of papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Luke C; Fanning, Kent; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Holton, Timothy A

    2010-01-01

    The colour of papaya fruit flesh is determined largely by the presence of carotenoid pigments. Red-fleshed papaya fruit contain lycopene, whilst this pigment is absent from yellow-fleshed fruit. The conversion of lycopene (red) to beta-carotene (yellow) is catalysed by lycopene beta-cyclase. This present study describes the cloning and functional characterization of two different genes encoding lycopene beta-cyclases (lcy-beta1 and lcy-beta2) from red (Tainung) and yellow (Hybrid 1B) papaya cultivars. A mutation in the lcy-beta2 gene, which inactivates enzyme activity, controls lycopene production in fruit and is responsible for the difference in carotenoid production between red and yellow-fleshed papaya fruit. The expression level of both lcy-beta1 and lcy-beta2 genes is similar and low in leaves, but lcy-beta2 expression increases markedly in ripe fruit. Isolation of the lcy-beta2 gene from papaya, that is preferentially expressed in fruit and is correlated with fruit colour, will facilitate marker-assisted breeding for fruit colour in papaya and should create possibilities for metabolic engineering of carotenoid production in papaya fruit to alter both colour and nutritional properties.

  18. A Single Residue Switch for Mg2+-dependent Inhibition Characterizes Plant Class II Diterpene Cyclases from Primary and Secondary Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Francis M.; Prisic, Sladjana; Davenport, Emily K.; Determan, Mara K.; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2010-01-01

    Class II diterpene cyclases mediate the acid-initiated cycloisomerization reaction that serves as the committed step in biosynthesis of the large class of labdane-related diterpenoid natural products, which includes the important gibberellin plant hormones. Intriguingly, these enzymes are differentially susceptible to inhibition by their Mg2+ cofactor, with those involved in gibberellin biosynthesis being more sensitive to such inhibition than those devoted to secondary metabolism, which presumably limits flux toward the potent gibberellin phytohormones. Such inhibition has been suggested to arise from intrasteric Mg2+ binding to the DXDD motif that cooperatively acts as the catalytic acid, whose affinity must then be modulated in some fashion. While further investigating class II diterpene cyclase catalysis, we discovered a conserved basic residue that seems to act as a counter ion to the DXDD motif, enhancing the ability of aspartic acid to carry out the requisite energetically difficult protonation of a carbon-carbon double bond and also affecting inhibitory Mg2+ binding. Notably, this residue is conserved as a histidine in enzymes involved in gibberellin biosynthesis and as an arginine in those dedicated to secondary metabolism. Interchanging the identity of these residues is sufficient to switch the sensitivity of the parent enzyme to inhibition by Mg2+. These striking findings indicate that this is a single residue switch for Mg2+ inhibition, which not only supports the importance of this biochemical regulatory mechanism in limiting gibberellin biosynthesis, but the importance of its release, presumably to enable higher flux, into secondary metabolism. PMID:20430888

  19. Structural and functional identification of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptor VPAC2 from the frog Rana tigrina rugulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, R L; Alexandre, D; Chan, S M; Anouar, Y; Pang, R T; Vaudry, H; Chow, B K

    2001-10-01

    Recently, a frog pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor (fPVR) has been characterized, and interestingly, this receptor exhibits characteristics of both mammalian PACAP type II receptors VPAC(1)R and VPAC(2)R. In order to investigate the receptors responsible for mediating the actions of VIP and PACAP in amphibians, in this report, a frog VPAC(2) receptor (fVPAC(2)R) cDNA was isolated. fVPAC(2)R shares 47.7, 46.9 and 62.5% amino acid sequence identity with fPVR, human VPAC(1)R and human VPAC(2)R respectively. Functionally, fVPAC(2)R, when expressed in CHO cells, was responsive to both frog peptides including VIP, PACAP38 and PACAP27 where the EC(50) values of these peptides in intracellular cAMP production were 0.15, 0.18 and 0.16 microM respectively. The pharmacological profiles of human peptides (VIP, PACAP38 and peptide histidine methionine) to stimulate frog and human VPAC(2)Rs were compared, and it was found that these peptides could only activate the frog receptor at micromolar concentrations. fVPAC(2)R was found to be widely distributed in various peripheral tissues as well as several regions of the brain. The presence of the receptor transcripts suggests the functional roles of the receptor in mediating the actions of PACAP and/or VIP in these tissues. As VIP and particularly PACAP27 are highly conserved peptides in vertebrate evolution, comparative studies of these peptides and their receptors in non-mammalian vertebrates should provide clues to better understand the physiology of these important peptides in human and other vertebrates. PMID:11564605

  20. Effect of Vericiguat, a Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator, on Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Patients With Worsening Chronic Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Greene, Stephen J; Butler, Javed;

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Worsening chronic heart failure (HF) is a major public health problem. OBJECTIVE: To determine the optimal dose and tolerability of vericiguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, in patients with worsening chronic HF and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). DESIGN, ...

  1. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide, nitric oxide synthase, and their receptors in human and rat sphenopalatine ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csati, A; Tajti, J; Kuris, A;

    2012-01-01

    for the demonstration of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), glutamine synthetase (GS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), VIP and PACAP common receptors (VPAC1, VPAC2), and PACAP receptor (PAC1). In addition, double labeling...

  2. Inhibition of Heat-Stable Toxin-Induced Intestinal Salt and Water Secretion by a Novel Class of Guanylyl Cyclase C Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvelds, Marcel J C; Loos, Michaela; Bronsveld, Inez; Hellemans, Ann; Bongartz, Jean-Pierre; Ver Donck, Luc; Cox, Eric; de Jonge, Hugo R; Schuurkes, Jan A J; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains produce the heat-stable toxin, STa, which, by activation of the intestinal receptor-enzyme guanylyl cyclase (GC) C, triggers an acute, watery diarrhea. We set out to identify GCC inhibitors that may be of benefit for the treatment of infectio

  3. Isotopically sensitive branching in the formation of cyclic monoterpenes: proof that (-)-alpha-pinene and (-)-beta-pinene are synthesized by the same monoterpene cyclase via deprotonation of a common intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.B.; Wheeler, C.J.; Cane, D.E.; Ebert, R.; Ha, H.J.

    1987-08-25

    To determine whether the bicyclic monoterpene olefins (-)-alpha-pinene and (-)-beta-pinene arise biosynthetically from the same monoterpene cyclase by alternate deprotonations of a common carbocationic intermediate, the product distributions arising from the acyclic precursor (10-/sup 2/H/sub 3/,1-/sup 3/H)geranyl pyrophosphate were compared with those resulting from incubation of (1-3H)geranyl pyrophosphate with (-)-pinene cyclase from Salvia officinalis. Alteration in proportions of the olefinic products generated by the partially purified pinene cyclase resulted from the suppression of the formation of (-)-beta-pinene (C10 deprotonation) by a primary deuterium isotope effect with a compensating stimulation of the formation of (-)-alpha-pinene (C4 deprotonation). (-)-Pinene cyclase as well as (+)-pinene cyclase also exhibited a decrease in the proportion of the acyclic olefin myrcene generated from the deuteriated substrate, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the commitment to cyclized products. The observation of isotopically sensitive branching, in conjunction with quantitation of the magnitude of the secondary deuterium isotope effect on the overall rate of product formation by the (+)- and (-)-pinene cyclases as well as two other monoterpene cyclases from the same tissue, supports the biosynthetic origin of (-)-alpha-pinene and (-)-beta-pinene by alternative deprotonations of a common enzymatic intermediate. A biogenetic scheme consistent with these results is presented, and alternate proposals for the origin of the pinenes are addressed.

  4. Isotopically sensitive branching in the formation of cyclic monoterpenes: proof that (-)-alpha-pinene and (-)-beta-pinene are synthesized by the same monoterpene cyclase via deprotonation of a common intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether the bicyclic monoterpene olefins (-)-alpha-pinene and (-)-beta-pinene arise biosynthetically from the same monoterpene cyclase by alternate deprotonations of a common carbocationic intermediate, the product distributions arising from the acyclic precursor [10-2H3,1-3H]geranyl pyrophosphate were compared with those resulting from incubation of [1-3H]geranyl pyrophosphate with (-)-pinene cyclase from Salvia officinalis. Alteration in proportions of the olefinic products generated by the partially purified pinene cyclase resulted from the suppression of the formation of (-)-beta-pinene (C10 deprotonation) by a primary deuterium isotope effect with a compensating stimulation of the formation of (-)-alpha-pinene (C4 deprotonation). (-)-Pinene cyclase as well as (+)-pinene cyclase also exhibited a decrease in the proportion of the acyclic olefin myrcene generated from the deuteriated substrate, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the commitment to cyclized products. The observation of isotopically sensitive branching, in conjunction with quantitation of the magnitude of the secondary deuterium isotope effect on the overall rate of product formation by the (+)- and (-)-pinene cyclases as well as two other monoterpene cyclases from the same tissue, supports the biosynthetic origin of (-)-alpha-pinene and (-)-beta-pinene by alternative deprotonations of a common enzymatic intermediate. A biogenetic scheme consistent with these results is presented, and alternate proposals for the origin of the pinenes are addressed

  5. Soluble guanylyl cyclase-activated cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits arterial smooth muscle cell migration independent of VASP-serine 239 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Andrew W; Martin, Danielle N; Shaver, Patti R; Adderley, Shaquria P; Stone, Joshua D; Joshi, Chintamani N; Francisco, Jake T; Lust, Robert M; Weidner, Douglas A; Shewchuk, Brian M; Tulis, David A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) accounts for over half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. Uncontrolled arterial smooth muscle (ASM) cell migration is a major component of CAD pathogenesis and efforts aimed at attenuating its progression are clinically essential. Cyclic nucleotide signaling has long been studied for its growth-mitigating properties in the setting of CAD and other vascular disorders. Heme-containing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) synthesizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and maintains vascular homeostasis predominantly through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can interfere with appropriate sGC signaling by oxidizing the cyclase heme moiety and so are associated with several CVD pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that heme-independent sGC activation by BAY 60-2770 (BAY60) maintains cGMP levels despite heme oxidation and inhibits ASM cell migration through phosphorylation of the PKG target and actin-binding vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). First, using the heme oxidant ODQ, cGMP content was potentiated in the presence of BAY60. Using a rat model of arterial growth, BAY60 significantly reduced neointima formation and luminal narrowing compared to vehicle (VEH)-treated controls. In rat ASM cells BAY60 significantly attenuated cell migration, reduced G:F actin, and increased PKG activity and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation (pVASP·S239) compared to VEH controls. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to generate overexpressing full-length wild type VASP (FL-VASP/WT), VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-mimetic (FL-VASP/239D) and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-resistant (FL-VASP/239A) ASM cell mutants. Surprisingly, FL-VASP/239D negated the inhibitory effects of FL-VASP/WT and FL-VASP/239A cells on migration. Furthermore, when FL-VASP mutants were treated with BAY60, only the FL-VASP/239D group showed reduced migration compared to its VEH controls

  6. Soluble guanylyl cyclase-activated cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits arterial smooth muscle cell migration independent of VASP-serine 239 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Andrew W; Martin, Danielle N; Shaver, Patti R; Adderley, Shaquria P; Stone, Joshua D; Joshi, Chintamani N; Francisco, Jake T; Lust, Robert M; Weidner, Douglas A; Shewchuk, Brian M; Tulis, David A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) accounts for over half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. Uncontrolled arterial smooth muscle (ASM) cell migration is a major component of CAD pathogenesis and efforts aimed at attenuating its progression are clinically essential. Cyclic nucleotide signaling has long been studied for its growth-mitigating properties in the setting of CAD and other vascular disorders. Heme-containing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) synthesizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and maintains vascular homeostasis predominantly through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can interfere with appropriate sGC signaling by oxidizing the cyclase heme moiety and so are associated with several CVD pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that heme-independent sGC activation by BAY 60-2770 (BAY60) maintains cGMP levels despite heme oxidation and inhibits ASM cell migration through phosphorylation of the PKG target and actin-binding vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). First, using the heme oxidant ODQ, cGMP content was potentiated in the presence of BAY60. Using a rat model of arterial growth, BAY60 significantly reduced neointima formation and luminal narrowing compared to vehicle (VEH)-treated controls. In rat ASM cells BAY60 significantly attenuated cell migration, reduced G:F actin, and increased PKG activity and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation (pVASP·S239) compared to VEH controls. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to generate overexpressing full-length wild type VASP (FL-VASP/WT), VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-mimetic (FL-VASP/239D) and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-resistant (FL-VASP/239A) ASM cell mutants. Surprisingly, FL-VASP/239D negated the inhibitory effects of FL-VASP/WT and FL-VASP/239A cells on migration. Furthermore, when FL-VASP mutants were treated with BAY60, only the FL-VASP/239D group showed reduced migration compared to its VEH controls

  7. Calcium-myristoyl Tug is a new mechanism for intramolecular tuning of calcium sensitivity and target enzyme interaction for guanylyl cyclase-activating protein 1: dynamic connection between N-fatty acyl group and EF-hand controls calcium sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Lim, Sunghyuk; Ames, James B; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2012-04-20

    Guanylyl cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP1), a myristoylated Ca(2+) sensor in vision, regulates retinal guanylyl cyclase (RetGC). We show that protein-myristoyl group interactions control Ca(2+) sensitivity, apparent affinity for RetGC, and maximal level of cyclase activation. Mutating residues near the myristoyl moiety affected the affinity of Ca(2+) binding to EF-hand 4. Inserting Phe residues in the cavity around the myristoyl group increased both the affinity of GCAP1 for RetGC and maximal activation of the cyclase. NMR spectra show that the myristoyl group in the L80F/L176F/V180F mutant remained sequestered inside GCAP1 in both Ca(2+)-bound and Mg(2+)-bound states. This mutant displayed much higher affinity for the cyclase but reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity of the cyclase regulation. The L176F substitution improved affinity of myristoylated and non-acylated GCAP1 for the cyclase but simultaneously reduced the affinity of Ca(2+) binding to EF-hand 4 and Ca(2+) sensitivity of the cyclase regulation by acylated GCAP1. The replacement of amino acids near both ends of the myristoyl moiety (Leu(80) and Val(180)) minimally affected regulatory properties of GCAP1. N-Lauryl- and N-myristoyl-GCAP1 activated RetGC in a similar fashion. Thus, protein interactions with the central region of the fatty acyl chain optimize GCAP1 binding to RetGC and maximize activation of the cyclase. We propose a dynamic connection (or "tug") between the fatty acyl group and EF-hand 4 via the C-terminal helix that attenuates the efficiency of RetGC activation in exchange for optimal Ca(2+) sensitivity. PMID:22383530

  8. Adenylate cyclase toxin-mediated delivery of the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin into mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Masaaki; Konda, Toshifumi

    2016-02-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) of Bordetella pertussis internalizes its catalytic domain into target cells. ACT can function as a tool for delivering foreign protein antigen moieties into immune effector cells to induce a cytotoxic T lymphocyte response. In this study, we replaced the catalytic domain of ACT with an enzymatically active protein moiety, the S1 (ADP-ribosyltransferase) subunit of pertussis toxin (PT). The S1 moiety was successfully internalized independent of endocytosis into sheep erythrocytes. The introduced polypeptide exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in CHO cells and induced clustering typical to PT. The results indicate that ACT can act as a vehicle for not only epitopes but also enzymatically active peptides to mammalian cells.

  9. Effects of cimetidine on adenylate cyclase activity of guinea pig gastric mucosa stimulated by histamine, sodium fluoride and 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, P; Westermann, E

    1976-08-01

    Cimetidine, a recently developed histamine H2-receptor blocking agent has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion in rat, cat, dog and man. To study the mode of action of cimetidine the modification of stimulatory effects of histamine, sodium flouride and 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate by cimetidine on the adenylate cyclase activity of guinea pig gastric mucosa was studied. The effect of cimetidine was also compared to that of metiamide, an older histamine H2-receptor antagonist. The effect of cimetidine was qualitatively similar to that of metiamide, i.e. a selective blockade of histamine H2-receptors. Quantitatively cimetidine was about 10-fold more potent than metiamide.

  10. Identification of a novel Arabidopsis thaliana nitric oxide-binding molecule with guanylate cyclase activity in vitro

    KAUST Repository

    Mulaudzi, Takalani

    2011-09-01

    While there is evidence of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent signalling via the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) in plants, guanylate cyclases (GCs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cGMP from guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) have until recently remained elusive and none of the candidates identified to-date are NO-dependent. Using both a GC and heme-binding domain specific (H-NOX) search motif, we have identified an Arabidopsis flavin monooxygenase (At1g62580) and shown electrochemically that it binds NO, has a higher affinity for NO than for O 2 and that this molecule can generate cGMP from GTP in vitro in an NO-dependent manner. © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Calcium influx rescues adenylate cyclase-hemolysin from rapid cell membrane removal and enables phagocyte permeabilization by toxin pores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Fiser

    Full Text Available Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA penetrates the cytoplasmic membrane of phagocytes and employs two distinct conformers to exert its multiple activities. One conformer forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize phagocyte membrane for efflux of cytosolic potassium. The other conformer conducts extracellular calcium ions across cytoplasmic membrane of cells, relocates into lipid rafts, translocates the adenylate cyclase enzyme (AC domain into cells and converts cytosolic ATP to cAMP. We show that the calcium-conducting activity of CyaA controls the path and kinetics of endocytic removal of toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. The enzymatically inactive but calcium-conducting CyaA-AC⁻ toxoid was endocytosed via a clathrin-dependent pathway. In contrast, a doubly mutated (E570K+E581P toxoid, unable to conduct Ca²⁺ into cells, was rapidly internalized by membrane macropinocytosis, unless rescued by Ca²⁺ influx promoted in trans by ionomycin or intact toxoid. Moreover, a fully pore-forming CyaA-ΔAC hemolysin failed to permeabilize phagocytes, unless endocytic removal of its pores from cell membrane was decelerated through Ca²⁺ influx promoted by molecules locked in a Ca²⁺-conducting conformation by the 3D1 antibody. Inhibition of endocytosis also enabled the native B. pertussis-produced CyaA to induce lysis of J774A.1 macrophages at concentrations starting from 100 ng/ml. Hence, by mediating calcium influx into cells, the translocating conformer of CyaA controls the removal of bystander toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. This triggers a positive feedback loop of exacerbated cell permeabilization, where the efflux of cellular potassium yields further decreased toxin pore removal from cell membrane and this further enhances cell permeabilization and potassium efflux.

  12. Overexpression of lycopene ε-cyclase gene from lycium chinense confers tolerance to chilling stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinyu; Diao, Jinjin; Ji, Jing; Wang, Gang; Li, Zhaodi; Wu, Jiang; Josine, Tchouopou Lontchi; Wang, Yurong

    2016-01-15

    Lutein plays an important role in protecting the photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage and eliminating ROS to render normal physiological function of cells. As a rate-limiting step for lutein synthesis in plants, lycopene ε-cyclase catalyzes lycopene to δ-carotene. We cloned a lycopene ε-cyclase gene (Lcε-LYC) from Lycium chinense (L. chinense), a deciduous woody perennial halophyte growing in various environmental conditions. The Lcε-LYC gene has an ORF of 1569bp encoding a protein of 522 aa. The deduced amino acid sequence of Lcε-LYC gene has higher homology with LycEs in other plants, such as Nicotiana tabacum and Solanum tuberosum. When L. chinense was exposed to chilling stress, relative expression of Lcε-LYC increased. To study the protective role of Lcε-LYC against chilling stress, we overexpressed the Lcε-LYC gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lcε-LYC overexpression led to an increase of lutein accumulation in transgenic A. thaliana, and the content of lutein decreased when transgenics were under cold conditions. In addition, the transgenic plants under chilling stress displayed higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) and less H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) than the control. Moreover, the photosynthesis rate, photosystem II activity (Fv/fm), and Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) also increased in the transgenetic plants. On the whole, overexpression of Lcε-LYC ameliorates photoinhibition and photooxidation, and decreases the sensitivity of photosynthesis to chilling stress in transgenic plants. PMID:26526130

  13. The functional activity of hypothalamic signaling systems in rats with neonatal diabetes mellitus treated with metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, K V; Sukhov, I B; Kuznetsova, L A; Buzanakov, D M; Shpakov, A O

    2016-03-01

    The effect of the two-month metformin treatment (200 mg/kg/day) of rats with the neonatal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus on the functional activity of hypothalamic signaling systems was studied. It was shown that metformin treatment restored the sensitivity of hypothalamic adenylyl cyclase signaling system to agonists of the type 4 melanocortin receptor and the type 2 dopamine receptor but did not influence significantly the functions of the insulin signaling system. These data suggest new targets and mechanisms of metformin action in the CNS, which may mediate its restoring effect on energy homeostasis impaired in diabetic pathology. PMID:27193707

  14. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S. K.; Kateriya, S.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2013-09-01

    The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr-Tyr cross-linking (o,o‧-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  15. Cloning and Characterization of Oxidosqualene Cyclases from Kalanchoe daigremontiana: ENZYMES CATALYZING UP TO 10 REARRANGEMENT STEPS YIELDING FRIEDELIN AND OTHER TRITERPENOIDS*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhonghua; Yeats, Trevor; Han, Hong; Jetter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The first committed step in triterpenoid biosynthesis is the cyclization of oxidosqualene to polycyclic alcohols or ketones C30H50O. It is catalyzed by single oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) enzymes that can carry out varying numbers of carbocation rearrangements and, thus, generate triterpenoids with diverse carbon skeletons. OSCs from diverse plant species have been cloned and characterized, the large majority of them catalyzing relatively few rearrangement steps. It was recently predicted that...

  16. Molekulare Analyse der Biosynthese octadecanoid-abgeleiteter Signalmoleküle durch Allenoxid-Synthase und Allenoxid- Cyclase aus Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) HEYNH.

    OpenAIRE

    Zerbe, Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Im Fokus dieser Dissertation stand die Untersuchung der Biosynthese des Phytohormons 12-oxo-Phytodiensäure durch die Allenoxid-Synthase (AOS) und die vier Allenoxid-Cyclase-Isoformen (AOC) aus Arabidopsis thaliana. Enzymatische Analysen der rekombinanten Proteine zeigten eine redundante Substratspezifität der AOC-Isoformen. Zudem belegen biochemische Interaktionsstudien, dass eine Komplexierung von AOS und AOC in vitro nicht essentiell ist. Gleichwohl lässt die erhöhte Stereoselek...

  17. ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) gene family members of Arabidopsis thaliana: tissue- and organ-specific promoter activities and in vivo heteromerization*

    OpenAIRE

    Stenzel, Irene; Otto, Markus; Delker, Carolin; Kirmse, Nils; Schmidt, Diana; Miersch, Otto; Hause, Bettina; Wasternack, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Jasmonates are important signals in plant stress responses and plant development. An essential step in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) is catalysed by ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) which establishes the naturally occurring enantiomeric structure of jasmonates. In Arabidopsis thaliana, four genes encode four functional AOC polypeptides (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3, and AOC4) raising the question of functional redundancy or diversification. Analysis of transcript accumulation revealed an organ-specifi...

  18. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide in the Central Amygdala Causes Anorexia and Body Weight Loss via the Melanocortin and the TrkB Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Iemolo, Attilio; Ferragud, Antonio; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1 receptor system represents one of the main regulators of the behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. Although induction of anorexia is a well-documented effect of PACAP, the central sites underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present studies addressed this question by examining the neuroanatomical, behavioral, and pharmacological mechanisms mediating the anorexi...

  19. The Role of Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide in the Neural Pathways Controlling the Lower Urinary Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; de Groat, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) are expressed in the neural pathways regulating the lower urinary tract. VIP-immunoreactivity (IR) is present in afferent and autonomic efferent neurons innervating the bladder and urethra, whereas PACAP-IR is present primarily in afferent neurons. Exogenously applied VIP relaxes bladder and urethral smooth muscle and excites parasympathetic neurons in bladder ganglia. PACAP relaxes bladder ...

  20. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Tzvia I; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh; Finley, Natosha L

    2014-10-10

    Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD's β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD's β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (Rh) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken together, our data provide new structural insights into the β-hairpin's role in stabilizing interactions between CyaA-ACD and N-CaM.

  1. A new recombinant pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-derived peptide efficiently promotes glucose uptake and glucose-dependent insulin secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ma; Tianjie Luo; Wenna Xu; Zulu Ye; An Hong

    2012-01-01

    The recombinant peptide,DBAYL,a promising therapeutic peptide for type 2 diabetes,is a new,potent,and highly selective agonist for VPAC2 generated through sitedirected mutagenesis based on sequence alignments of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP),vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP),and related analogs.The recombinant DBAYL was used to evaluate its effect and mechanism in blood glucose metabolism and utilization.As much as 28.9 mg recombinant DBAYL peptide with purity over 98% can be obtained from 1 I of Luria-Bertani medium culture by the method established in this study and the prepared DBAYL with four mutations (N10Q,V18L,N29Q,and M added to the N-terminal)were much more stable than BAY55-9837.The half-life of recombinant DBAYL was about 25 folds compared with that of BAY55-9837 in vitro.The bioactivity assay of DBAYL showed that it displaced [125I]PACAP38 and [125I]VIP from VPAC2 with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 48.4 ± 6.9 and 47.1 ± 4.9 nM,respectively,which were significantly lower than that of BAY55-9837,one established VPAC2 agonists.DBAYL enhances the cAMP accumulation in CHO cells expressing human VPAC2 with a half-maximal stimulatory concentration (EC5o) of 0.68 nM,whereas the receptor potency of DBAYL at human VPAC1 (ECso of 737 nM) was only 1/1083of that at human VPAC2,and DBAYL had no activity toward human PAC1 receptor.Western blot analysis of the key proteins of insulin receptor signaling pathway:insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and glucose transporter 4(GLUT4) indicated that the DBAYL could significantly induce the insulin-stimulated IRS-1 and GLUT4 expression more efficiently than BAY55-9837 and VIP in adipocytes.Compared with BAY55-9837 and PACAP38,the recombinant peptide DBAYL can more efficiently promote insulin release and decrease plasma glucose level in Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice.These results suggested that DBAYL could efficiently improve glucose uptake and glucose-dependent insulin

  2. (/sup 3/H)forskolin- and (/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol-binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1988-03-01

    The characteristics of the cardiac adenylate cyclase system were studied in rats fed diets containing fish oil (menhaden oil) and other oils. Adenylate cyclase activity generally was higher in cardiac homogenates and membranes of rats fed diet containing 10% menhaden oil than in the other oils. The increase in enzyme activity, especially in forskolin-stimulated activity, was associated with an increase in the concentration of the (/sup 3/H) forskolin-binding sites in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The beta-adrenergic receptor concentration was not significantly altered although the affinity for (/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol-binding was lower in membranes of rats fed menhaden oil than those fed the other oils. omega-3 fatty acids from menhaden oil were incorporated into the cardiac membrane phospholipids. The results suggest that the observed increase in myocardial adenylate cyclase activity of rats fed menhaden oil may be due to an increase in the number of the catalytic subunits of the enzyme or due to a greater availability of the forskolin-binding sites.

  3. Amidate prodrugs of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine as inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvoráková, Alexandra; Tloust'ová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is the key virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis that facilitates its invasion into the mammalian body. 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine diphosphate (PMEApp), the active metabolite of the antiviral drug bis(POM)PMEA (adefovir dipivoxil), has been shown to inhibit ACT. The objective of this study was to evaluate six novel amidate prodrugs of PMEA, both phenyloxy phosphonamidates and phosphonodiamidates, for their ability to inhibit ACT activity in the J774A.1 macrophage cell line. The two phenyloxy phosphonamidate prodrugs exhibited greater inhibitory activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 22 and 46 nM) than the phosphonodiamidates (IC50 = 84 to 3,960 nM). The inhibitory activity of the prodrugs correlated with their lipophilicity and the degree of their hydrolysis into free PMEA in J774A.1 cells. Although the prodrugs did not inhibit ACT as effectively as bis(POM)PMEA (IC50 = 6 nM), they were significantly less cytotoxic. Moreover, they all reduced apoptotic effects of ACT and prevented an ACT-induced elevation of intracellular [Ca(2+)]i. The amidate prodrugs were less susceptible to degradation in Caco-2 cells compared to bis(POM)PMEA, while they exerted good transepithelial permeability in this assay. As a consequence, a large amount of intact amidate prodrug is expected to be available to target macrophages in vivo. This feature makes nontoxic amidate prodrugs attractive candidates for further investigation as novel antimicrobial agents.

  4. Linalool from rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) oil inhibits adenylate cyclase in the retina, contributing to understanding its biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Lucia de Fatima S; Maia, José Guilherme S; de Parijós, Amanda M; de Souza, Rita Z; Barata, Lauro Euclides S

    2012-01-01

    Rosewood oil (RO) (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) is rich in linalool, a monoterpene alcohol, which has well studied anxiolytic, sedative and anticonvulsant effects. The inhibition of the increases in cAMP protects against seizures in a diversity of models of epilepsy. In this paper, the principal aim was to investigate the effects of RO, (±)-linalool and (-)-linalool) on adenylate cyclase. They were tested in chick retinas and forskolin was used to stimulate the enzyme target. The phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 4-(3-butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-imidazolidin-2-one, and the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist 3-isobutyl-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), were used to control the participation of phosphodiesterase and adenosine receptors in the resulting effects, respectively. The cAMP accumulation was measured by enzyme immune assay (EIA). Rosewood oil, (-)-linalool and (±)-linalool inhibited exclusively the cAMP accumulation stimulated by forskolin, even when adenosine receptors were blocked with IBMX. The IC(50) values (in μ m concentration range) calculated from their concentration response-curves were not statistically different, however, the compounds presented a different relative efficacy. These results extend the range of subcellular mechanisms underlying the relaxant action of linalool on the central nervous system.

  5. Synthesis of Triazole-Linked Analogues of c-di-GMP and Their Interactions with Diguanylate Cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernicola, Silvia; Torquati, Ilaria; Paiardini, Alessandro; Giardina, Giorgio; Rampioni, Giordano; Messina, Marco; Leoni, Livia; Del Bello, Fabio; Petrelli, Riccardo; Rinaldo, Serena; Cappellacci, Loredana; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2015-10-22

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widespread second messenger that plays a key role in bacterial biofilm formation. The compound's ability to assume multiple conformations allows it to interact with a diverse set of target macromolecules. Here, we analyzed the binding mode of c-di-GMP to the allosteric inhibitory site (I-site) of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and compared it to the conformation adopted in the catalytic site of the EAL phosphodiesterases (PDEs). An array of novel molecules has been designed and synthesized by simplifying the native c-di-GMP structure and replacing the charged phosphodiester backbone with an isosteric nonhydrolyzable 1,2,3-triazole moiety. We developed the first neutral small molecule able to selectively target DGCs discriminating between the I-site of DGCs and the active site of PDEs; this molecule represents a novel tool for mechanistic studies, particularly on those proteins bearing both DGC and PDE modules, and for future optimization studies to target DGCs in vivo.

  6. The phytosulfokine (PSK) receptor is capable of guanylate cyclase activity and enabling cyclic GMP-dependent signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe

    2011-04-19

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are sulfated pentapeptides that stimulate plant growth and differentiation mediated by the PSK receptor (PSKR1), which is a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase. We identified a putative guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in PSKR1 that is embedded within the kinase domain and hypothesized that the GC works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream PSK signaling. We expressed the recombinant complete kinase (cytoplasmic) domain of AtPSKR1 and show that it has serine/threonine kinase activity using the Ser/Thr peptide 1 as a substrate with an approximate Km of 7.5 μM and Vmax of 1800 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein. This same recombinant protein also has GC activity in vitro that is dependent on the presence of either Mg2+ or Mn2+. Overexpression of the full-length AtPSKR1 receptor in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts raised the endogenous basal cGMP levels over 20-fold, indicating that the receptor has GC activity in vivo. In addition, PSK-α itself, but not the non-sulfated backbone, induces rapid increases in cGMP levels in protoplasts. Together these results indicate that the PSKR1 contains dual GC and kinase catalytic activities that operate in vivo and that this receptor constitutes a novel class of enzymes with overlapping catalytic domains. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Identification of residues in the heme domain of soluble guanylyl cyclase that are important for basal and stimulated catalytic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmamalini Baskaran

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide signals through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, a heme-containing heterodimer. NO binds to the heme domain located in the N-terminal part of the β subunit of sGC resulting in increased production of cGMP in the catalytic domain located at the C-terminal part of sGC. Little is known about the mechanism by which the NO signaling is propagated from the receptor domain (heme domain to the effector domain (catalytic domain, in particular events subsequent to the breakage of the bond between the heme iron and Histidine 105 (H105 of the β subunit. Our modeling of the heme-binding domain as well as previous homologous heme domain structures in different states point to two regions that could be critical for propagation of the NO activation signal. Structure-based mutational analysis of these regions revealed that residues T110 and R116 in the αF helix-β1 strand, and residues I41 and R40 in the αB-αC loop mediate propagation of activation between the heme domain and the catalytic domain. Biochemical analysis of these heme mutants allows refinement of the map of the residues that are critical for heme stability and propagation of the NO/YC-1 activation signal in sGC.

  8. PPARgamma-dependent regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 amplifies the stimulatory effect of cAMP on renin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Michael; Schubert, Thomas; Schreiber, Andrea; Mayer, Sandra; Friedrich, Björn; Artunc, Ferruh; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-11-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays an important role in the regulation of renin gene expression. Nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is known to stimulate renin gene transcription acting through PPARγ-binding sequences in renin promoter. We show now that activation of PPARγ by unsaturated fatty acids or thiazolidinediones drastically augments the cAMP-dependent increase of renin mRNA in the human renin-producing cell line Calu-6. The underlying mechanism involves potentiation of agonist-induced cAMP increase and up-regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6) gene expression. We identified a palindromic element with a 3-bp spacer (Pal3) in AC6 intron 1 (AC6Pal3). AC6Pal3 bound PPARγ and mediated trans-activation by PPARγ agonist. AC6 knockdown decreased basal renin mRNA level and attenuated the maximal PPARγ-dependent stimulation of the cAMP-induced renin gene expression. AC6Pal3 decoy oligonucleotide abrogated the PPARγ-dependent potentiation of cAMP-induced renin gene expression. Treatment of mice with PPARγ agonist increased AC6 mRNA kidney levels. Our data suggest that in addition to its direct effect on renin gene transcription, PPARγ "sensitizes" renin gene to cAMP via trans-activation of AC6 gene. AC6 has been identified as PPARγ target gene with a functional Pal3 sequence.

  9. The effects of isatin (indole-2, 3-dione on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-induced hyperthermia in rats

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    Tóth Gábor

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that centrally administered natriuretic peptides and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP-38 have hyperthermic properties. Isatin (indole-2, 3-dione is an endogenous indole that has previously been found to inhibit hyperthermic effects of natriuretic peptides. In this study the aim was to investigate the effects of isatin on thermoregulatory actions of PACAP-38, in rats. Results One μg intracerebroventricular (icv. injection of PACAP-38 had hyperthermic effect in male, Wistar rats, with an onset of the effect at 2 h and a decline by the 6th h after administration. Intraperitoneal (ip. injection of different doses of isatin (25-50 mg/kg significantly decreased the hyperthermic effect of 1 μg PACAP-38 (icv., whereas 12.5 mg/kg isatin (ip. had no inhibiting effect. Isatin alone did not modify the body temperature of the animals. Conclusion The mechanisms that participate in the mediation of the PACAP-38-induced hyperthermia may be modified by isatin. The capability of isatin to antagonize the hyperthermia induced by all members of the natriuretic peptide family and by PACAP-38 makes it unlikely to be acting directly on receptors for natriuretic peptides or on those for PACAP in these hyperthermic processes.

  10. Regulation by the quorum sensor from Vibrio indicates a receptor function for the membrane anchors of adenylate cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltz, Stephanie; Bassler, Jens; Schultz, Joachim E

    2016-02-27

    Adenylate cyclases convert intra- and extracellular stimuli into a second messenger cAMP signal. Many bacterial and most eukaryotic ACs possess membrane anchors with six transmembrane spans. We replaced the anchor of the AC Rv1625c by the quorum-sensing receptor from Vibrio harveyi which has an identical 6TM design and obtained an active, membrane-anchored AC. We show that a canonical class III AC is ligand-regulated in vitro and in vivo. At 10 µM, the cholera-autoinducer CAI-1 stimulates activity 4.8-fold. A sequence based clustering of membrane domains of class III ACs and quorum-sensing receptors established six groups of potential structural and functional similarities. The data support the notion that 6TM AC membrane domains may operate as receptors which directly regulate AC activity as opposed and in addition to the indirect regulation by GPCRs in eukaryotic congeners. This adds a completely novel dimension of potential AC regulation in bacteria and vertebrates.

  11. Stress tolerance of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylate cyclase fil1 (CYR1) mutant depends on Hsp26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Cristina R; Ferreira, Mariana C; Silva, Carol L C; Tanghe, An; Neves, Maria J; Thevelein, Johan M; Rosa, Carlos A; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance in yeast is an important phenotype from an industrial point of view. It hampers optimal use of frozen dough applications as well as high gravity brewing fermentations because these applications require stress-tolerant yeast strains during active fermentation. Different mutants (e.g. fil1, an adenylate cyclase mutant CYR1(lys1682)) that are affected in this loss of stress resistance have been isolated, but so far the identification of the target genes important for the increased tolerance has failed. Previously we have shown that neither trehalose nor Hsp104 nor STRE-controlled genes are involved in the higher stress tolerance of the fil1 mutant. The contribution of other putative downstream factors of the PKA pathway was investigated and here we show that the small heat-shock protein Hsp26 is required for the high heat stress tolerance of the fil1 mutant, both in stationary phase cells as well as during active fermentation. PMID:20924200

  12. Dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 guanylyl cyclase in granulosa cells contributes to the LH-induced decrease in cGMP that causes resumption of meiosis in rat oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Jeremy R; Shuhaibar, Leia C; Edmund, Aaron B; Van Helden, Dusty A; Robinson, Jerid W; Uliasz, Tracy F; Baena, Valentina; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Potter, Lincoln R; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2014-09-01

    In mammals, the meiotic cell cycle of oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses. Much later, in preparation for fertilization, oocytes within preovulatory follicles resume meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone (LH). Before LH stimulation, the arrest is maintained by diffusion of cyclic (c)GMP into the oocyte from the surrounding granulosa cells, where it is produced by the guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2). LH rapidly reduces the production of cGMP, but how this occurs is unknown. Here, using rat follicles, we show that within 10 min, LH signaling causes dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 through a process that requires the activity of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP)-family members. The rapid dephosphorylation of NPR2 is accompanied by a rapid phosphorylation of the cGMP phosphodiesterase PDE5, an enzyme whose activity is increased upon phosphorylation. Later, levels of the NPR2 agonist C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in the follicle, and these sequential events contribute to the decrease in cGMP that causes meiosis to resume in the oocyte.

  13. The Arabidopsis thaliana brassinosteroid receptor (AtBRI1 contains a domain that functions as a guanylyl cyclase in vitro.

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    Lusisizwe Kwezi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guanylyl cyclases (GCs catalyze the formation of the second messenger guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP from guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP. Cyclic GMP has been implicated in an increasing number of plant processes, including responses to abiotic stresses such as dehydration and salt, as well as hormones. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Here we used a rational search strategy based on conserved and functionally assigned residues in the catalytic centre of annotated GCs to identify candidate GCs in Arabidopsis thaliana and show that one of the candidates is the brassinosteroid receptor AtBR1, a leucine rich repeat receptor like kinase. We have cloned and expressed a 114 amino acid recombinant protein (AtBR1-GC that harbours the putative catalytic domain, and demonstrate that this molecule can convert GTP to cGMP in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that AtBR1 may belong to a novel class of GCs that contains both a cytosolic kinase and GC domain, and thus have a domain organisation that is not dissimilar to that of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors, NPR1 and NPR2. The findings also suggest that cGMP may have a role as a second messenger in brassinosteroid signalling. In addition, it is conceivable that other proteins containing the extended GC search motif may also have catalytic activity, thus implying that a significant number of GCs, both in plants and animals, remain to be discovered, and this is in keeping with the fact that the single cellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains over 90 annotated putative CGs.

  14. Revisiting the kinetics of nitric oxide (NO) binding to soluble guanylate cyclase: The simple NO-binding model is incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballou, David P.; Zhao, Yunde; Brandish, Philip E.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a ferrous iron hemoprotein receptor for nitric oxide (NO). NO binding to the heme activates the enzyme 300-fold. sGC as isolated is five-coordinate, ferrous with histidine as the axial ligand. The NO-activated enzyme is a five-coordinate nitrosyl complex where the axial histidine bond is broken. Past studies using rapid-reaction kinetics demonstrated that both the formation of a six-coordinate intermediate and the conversion of the intermediate to the activated five-coordinate nitrosyl complex depended on the concentration of NO. A model invoking a second NO molecule as a catalyst for the conversion of the six-coordinate intermediate to the five-coordinate sGC–NO complex was proposed to explain the observed kinetic data. A recent study [Bellamy, T. C., Wood, J. & Garthwaite, J. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 507–510] concluded that a simple two-step binding model explains the results. Here we show through further analysis and simulations of previous data that the simple two-step binding model cannot be used to describe our results. Instead we show that a slightly more complex two-step binding model, where NO is used as a ligand in the first step and a catalyst in the second step, can describe our results quite satisfactorily. These new simulations combined with the previous activation data lead to the conclusion that the intermediate six-coordinate sGC–NO complex has substantial activity. The model derived from our simulations also can account for the slow deactivation of sGC that has been observed in vitro. PMID:12209005

  15. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

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    Linda S Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The nitric oxide (NO/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC.

  16. Soluble guanylate cyclase stimulation prevents fibrotic tissue remodeling and improves survival in salt-sensitive Dahl rats.

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    Sandra Geschka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A direct pharmacological stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC is an emerging therapeutic approach to the management of various cardiovascular disorders associated with endothelial dysfunction. Novel sGC stimulators, including riociguat (BAY 63-2521, have a dual mode of action: They sensitize sGC to endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO and also directly stimulate sGC independently of NO. Little is known about their effects on tissue remodeling and degeneration and survival in experimental malignant hypertension. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mortality, hemodynamics and biomarkers of tissue remodeling and degeneration were assessed in Dahl salt-sensitive rats maintained on a high salt diet and treated with riociguat (3 or 10 mg/kg/d for 14 weeks. Riociguat markedly attenuated systemic hypertension, improved systolic heart function and increased survival from 33% to 85%. Histological examination of the heart and kidneys revealed that riociguat significantly ameliorated fibrotic tissue remodeling and degeneration. Correspondingly, mRNA expression of the pro-fibrotic biomarkers osteopontin (OPN, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 in the myocardium and the renal cortex was attenuated by riociguat. In addition, riociguat reduced plasma and urinary levels of OPN, TIMP-1, and PAI-1. CONCLUSIONS: Stimulation of sGC by riociguat markedly improves survival and attenuates systemic hypertension and systolic dysfunction, as well as fibrotic tissue remodeling in the myocardium and the renal cortex in a rodent model of pressure and volume overload. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in diseases associated with impaired cardiovascular and renal functions.

  17. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene disruption causes increased adrenal angiotensin II and aldosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Di; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Somanna, Naveen K; Pandey, Kailash N

    2007-07-01

    Disruption of the guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene leads to elevated arterial blood pressure and congestive heart failure in mice lacking NPRA. This study was aimed at determining whether Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene copy number affects adrenal ANG II and aldosterone (Aldo) levels in a gene-dose-dependent manner in Npr1 gene-targeted mice. Adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels increased in 1-copy mice compared with 2-copy mice, but decreased in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. In contrast, renal ANG II levels decreased in 1-copy (25%), 3-copy (38%), and 4-copy (39%) mice compared with 2-copy mice. The low-salt diet stimulated adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (20 and 2,441%), 2-copy (15 and 2,339%), 3-copy (20 and 424%), and 4-copy (31 and 486%) mice, respectively. The high-salt diet suppressed adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (46 and 29%) and 2-copy (38 and 17%) mice. On the other hand, the low-salt diet stimulated renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (45%), 2-copy (45%), 3-copy (59%), and 4-copy (48%) mice. However, the high-salt diet suppressed renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (28%) and 2-copy (27%) mice. In conclusion, NPRA signaling antagonizes adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in a gene-dose dependent manner. Increased adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels may play an important role in elevated arterial blood pressure and progressive hypertension, leading to renal and vascular injury in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice.

  18. Cloning, tissue distribution and effects of fasting on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in largemouth bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie; Han, Linqiang; Bai, Junjie; Ma, Dongmei; Quan, Yingchun; Fan, Jiajia; Jiang, Peng; Yu, Lingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has a wide range of biological functions. We cloned the full-length cDNAs encoding PACAP and PACAP-related peptide (PRP) from the brain of largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides) and used real-time quantitative PCR to detect PRP-PACAP mRNA expression. The PRP-PACAP cDNA has two variants expressed via alternative splicing: a long form, which encodes both PRP and PACAP, and a short form, which encodes only PACAP. Sequence analysis results are consistent with a higher conservation of PACAP than PRP peptide sequences. The expression of PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts was highest in the forebrain, followed by the medulla, midbrain, pituitary, stomach, cerebellum, intestine, and kidney; however, these transcripts were either absent or were weakly expressed in the muscle, spleen, gill, heart, fatty tissue, and liver. The level of PACAP-short transcript expression was significantly higher than expression of the long transcript in the forebrain, cerebella, pituitary and intestine, but lower than that of the long transcript in the stomach. PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts were first detected at the blastula stage of embryogenesis, and the level of expression increased markedly between the muscular contraction stage and 3 d post hatch (dph). The expression of PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts decreased significantly in the brain following 4 d fasting compared with the control diet group. The down-regulation effect was enhanced as fasting continued. Conversely, expression levels increased significantly after 3 d of re-feeding. Our results suggest that PRP-PACAP acts as an important factor in appetite regulation in largemouth bass.

  19. Pituitary Adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide orchestrates neuronal regulation of the astrocytic glutamate-releasing mechanism system xc (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghai; Albano, Rebecca; Madayag, Aric; Raddatz, Nicholas; Mantsch, John R; Choi, SuJean; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate signaling is achieved by an elaborate network involving neurons and astrocytes. Hence, it is critical to better understand how neurons and astrocytes interact to coordinate the cellular regulation of glutamate signaling. In these studies, we used rat cortical cell cultures to examine whether neurons or releasable neuronal factors were capable of regulating system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate-releasing mechanism that is expressed primarily by astrocytes and has been shown to regulate synaptic transmission. We found that astrocytes cultured with neurons or exposed to neuronal-conditioned media displayed significantly higher levels of Sxc activity. Next, we demonstrated that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) may be a neuronal factor capable of regulating astrocytes. In support, we found that PACAP expression was restricted to neurons, and that PACAP receptors were expressed in astrocytes. Interestingly, blockade of PACAP receptors in cultures comprised of astrocytes and neurons significantly decreased Sxc activity to the level observed in purified astrocytes, whereas application of PACAP to purified astrocytes increased Sxc activity to the level observed in cultures comprised of neurons and astrocytes. Collectively, these data reveal that neurons coordinate the actions of glutamate-related mechanisms expressed by astrocytes, such as Sxc, a process that likely involves PACAP. A critical gap in modeling excitatory signaling is how distinct components of the glutamate system expressed by neurons and astrocytes are coordinated. In these studies, we found that system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate release mechanism expressed by astrocytes, is regulated by releasable neuronal factors including PACAP. This represents a novel form of neuron-astrocyte communication, and highlights the possibility that pathological changes involving astrocytic Sxc may stem from altered neuronal activity.

  20. Proatherosclerotic Effect of the α1-Subunit of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase by Promoting Smooth Muscle Phenotypic Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Mergia, Evanthia; Al-Hasani, Jaafar; Aherrahrou, Redouane; Stoelting, Stephanie; Kremer, Felix; Freyer, Jennifer; Koesling, Doris; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; de Wit, Cor; Aherrahrou, Zouhair

    2016-08-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a key enzyme of the nitric oxide signaling pathway, is formed as a heterodimer by various isoforms of its α and β subunit. GUCY1A3, encoding the α1 subunit, was identified as a risk gene for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, but its specific contribution to atherosclerosis remains unclear. This study sought to decipher the role of Gucy1a3 in atherosclerosis in mice. At age 32 weeks and after 20 weeks of standard or high-fat diet, Gucy1a3(-/-)/Ldlr(-/-) mice exhibited a significant reduction of the atherosclerotic plaque size at the aortic root and the aorta for high-fat diet animals as compared with Ldlr(-/-) control mice. Collagen content in plaques in the aortic root was reduced, suggesting an alteration of smooth muscle cell function. Proliferation and migration were reduced in Gucy1a3(-/-) primary aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs), and proliferation was also reduced in human AoSMCs after inhibition of sGC by 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one. Gucy1a3 deficiency in AoSMCs prevents their phenotypic switching, as indicated by the differential expression of marker proteins. The inherited Gucy1a3(-/-) loss exerts an atheroprotective effect. We suggest that sGC activity promotes the phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state, fostering the formation of atherosclerosis. Preventing this switch by sGC inhibition may provide a novel target in atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27315776

  1. Two Lycopene β-Cyclases Genes from Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) Encode Enzymes With Different Functional Efifciency During the Conversion of Lycopene-to-Provitamin A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-cheng; ZHOU Wen-jing; XU Qiang; TAO Neng-guo; YE Jun-li; GUO Fei; XU Juan; DENG Xiu-xin

    2013-01-01

    Citrus fruits are rich in carotenoids. In the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, lycopene β-cyclase (LCYb, EC:1.14.-.-) is a key regulatory enzyme in the catalysis of lycopene to β-carotene, an important dietary precursor of vitamin A for human nutrition. Two closely related lycopeneβ-cyclase cDNAs, designated CsLCYb1 and CsLCYb2, were isolated from the pulp of orange fruits (Citrus sinensis). The expression level of CsLCYb genes is lower in the lfavedo and juice sacs of a lycopene-accumulating genotype Cara Cara than that in common genotype Washington, and this might be correlated with lycopene accumulation in Cara Cara fruit. The CsLCYb1 efifciently converted lycopene into the bicyclicβ-carotene in an Escherichia coli expression system, but the CsLCYb2 exhibited a lower enzyme activity and converted lycopene into theβ-carotene and the monocyclic γ-carotene. In tomato transformation studies, expression of CsLCYb1 under the control of the caulilfower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S constitutive promoter resulted in a virtually complete conversion of lycopene intoβ-carotene, and the ripe fruits displayed a bright orange colour. However, the CsLCYb2 transgenic tomato plants did not show an altered fruit colour during development and maturation. In fruits of the CsLCYb1 transgenic plants, most of the lycopene was converted intoβ-carotene with provitamin A levels reaching about 700 µg g-1 DW. Unexpectedly, most transgenic tomatoes showed a reduction in total carotenoid accumulation, and this is consistent with the decrease in expression of endogenous carotenogenic genes in transgenic fruits. Collectively, these results suggested that the cloned CsLCYb1 and CsLCYb2 genes encoded two functional lycopene β-cyclases with different catalytic efifciency, and they may have potential for metabolite engineering toward altering pigmentation and enhancing nutritional value of food crops.

  2. Biosynthetic pathway for γ-cyclic sarcinaxanthin in Micrococcus luteus: heterologous expression and evidence for diverse and multiple catalytic functions of C(50) carotenoid cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Roman; Stafsnes, Marit H; Andreassen, Trygve; Goksøyr, Audun; Bruheim, Per; Brautaset, Trygve

    2010-11-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster (crtE, crtB, crtI, crtE2, crtYg, crtYh, and crtX) of the γ-cyclic C(50) carotenoid sarcinaxanthin in Micrococcus luteus NCTC2665. Expression of the complete and partial gene cluster in Escherichia coli hosts revealed that sarcinaxanthin biosynthesis from the precursor molecule farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) proceeds via C(40) lycopene, C(45) nonaflavuxanthin, C(50) flavuxanthin, and C(50) sarcinaxanthin. Glucosylation of sarcinaxanthin was accomplished by the crtX gene product. This is the first report describing the biosynthetic pathway of a γ-cyclic C(50) carotenoid. Expression of the corresponding genes from the marine M. luteus isolate Otnes7 in a lycopene-producing E. coli host resulted in the production of up to 2.5 mg/g cell dry weight sarcinaxanthin in shake flasks. In an attempt to experimentally understand the specific difference between the biosynthetic pathways of sarcinaxanthin and the structurally related ε-cyclic decaprenoxanthin, we constructed a hybrid gene cluster with the γ-cyclic C(50) carotenoid cyclase genes crtYg and crtYh from M. luteus replaced with the analogous ε-cyclic C(50) carotenoid cyclase genes crtYe and crtYf from the natural decaprenoxanthin producer Corynebacterium glutamicum. Surprisingly, expression of this hybrid gene cluster in an E. coli host resulted in accumulation of not only decaprenoxanthin, but also sarcinaxanthin and the asymmetric ε- and γ-cyclic C(50) carotenoid sarprenoxanthin, described for the first time in this work. Together, these data contributed to new insight into the diverse and multiple functions of bacterial C(50) carotenoid cyclases as key catalysts for the synthesis of structurally different carotenoids. PMID:20802040

  3. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Run Lei; Ke Zhang; Yanxia Wei; Min Chen; Weinstein, Lee S.; Yang Hong; Minyan Zhu; Hongchang Li; Huashun Li

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and cranio...

  4. Characterization of CYP264B1 and a terpene cyclase of a terpene biosynthesis gene cluster from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce56

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Thuy Thi Bich

    2011-01-01

    In the work presented here, CYP264B1 and the terpene cyclase GeoA of Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 have been characterized. CYP264B1 is able to convert norisoprenoids (a-ionone and b-ionone) and diverse sesquiterpene compounds, including nootkatone. Three products, 3-hydroxy-a-ionone, 3-hydroxy-b-ionone and 13-hydroxy-nootkatone were characterized using HPLC and 1H and 13C NMR. CYP264B1 is the first enzyme reported to be capable to hydroxylate regioselectively both norisoprenoids at the positi...

  5. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating-peptide and its receptor antagonists in development of acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Dai Chen; Zong-Guang Zhou; Zhao Wang; Hong-Kai Gao; Wen-Wei Yan; Cun Wang; Gao-Ping Zhao; Xiao-Hui Peng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating-peptide (PACAP) is a late member of the secretin/glucagon/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) family of brain-gut peptides. It is unknown whether PACAP takes part in the development of acute pancreatitis and whether PACAP or its antagonists can be used to suppress the progression of acute pancreatitis.We investigated the actions of PACAP and its receptor antagonists in acute pancreatitis on rats.METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with caerulein or 3.5% sodium taurocholate. The rats were continuously infused with 5-30 μg/kg PACAP via jugular vein within the first 90 min, while 10-100 μg/kg PACAP6-27 and (4-Cl-D-Phe6, Leu17) VIP (PACAP receptor antagonists) were intravenously infused for 1 h. Biochemical and histopathological assessments were made at 4 h after infusion. Pancreatic and duodenal PACAP concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Chinese ink-perfused pancreas was fixed, sectioned and cleared for counting the functional capillary density.RESULTS: PACAP augmented caerulein-induced pancreatitis and failed to ameliorate sodium taurocholate-induced pancreatitis. ELISA revealed that relative concentrations of PACAP in pancreas and duodenum were significantly increased in both sodium taurocholate- and caeruleininduced pancreatitis compared with those in normal controls.Unexpectedly, PACAP6-27 and (4-Cl-DPhe6, Leu17) VIP could induce mild acute pancreatitis and aggravate caeruleininduced pancreatitis with characteristic manifestations of acute hemorrhagic/necrotizing pancreatitis. Functional capillary density of pancreas was interpreted in the context of pancreatic edema, and calibrated functional capillary density (calibrated FCD), which combined measurement of functional capillary density with dry weight/wet weight ratio, was introduced. Hyperemia or congestion, rather than ischemia, characterized pancreatic microcirculatory changes in acute pancreatitis

  6. Comparison of soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators and activators in models of cardiovascular disease associated with oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H Costell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive and oxidized (NO-insensitive forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A (a non-depressor dose and a higher dose which lowered mean arterial pressure [MAP] by 5-10mmHg and equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R and spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD. In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552 but not GSK2181236A decreased urine output and mortality. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A attenuated cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and mortality. In addition, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output, microalbuminuria and MAP. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the sGC oxidative state is responsible for the vascular dysfunction. In summary, GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 provide partial benefit against hypertension-induced end organ damage. The differential beneficial effects observed between these compounds could reflect tissue-specific changes in the s

  7. Comparison of soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators and activators in models of cardiovascular disease associated with oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costell, Melissa H; Ancellin, Nicolas; Bernard, Roberta E; Zhao, Shufang; Upson, John J; Morgan, Lisa A; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Olzinski, Alan R; Ballard, Victoria L T; Herry, Kenny; Grondin, Pascal; Dodic, Nerina; Mirguet, Olivier; Bouillot, Anne; Gellibert, Francoise; Coatney, Robert W; Lepore, John J; Jucker, Beat M; Jolivette, Larry J; Willette, Robert N; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Behm, David J

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive) and oxidized (NO-insensitive) forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to those of NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A [a low, non-depressor dose, and a high dose which lowered mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 5-10 mmHg] and those of equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in (1) Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and (2) spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP) on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD). In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size 24 h after reperfusion. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria, and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy with preserved ejection fraction, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552, but not that of GSK2181236A, decreased urine output, and improved survival. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A, but not that of BAY 60-4552, attenuated the development of cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and improved survival. In addition to these effects, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output and microalbuminuria and attenuated the increase in MAP to a greater extent than did GSK2181236A. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP isolated aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to both GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the oxidative state of sGC is responsible

  8. Cyclic Stretch Induces Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Soluble Guanylate Cyclase in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Kathryn N. Farrow

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the pulmonary vasculature, mechanical forces such as cyclic stretch induce changes in vascular signaling, tone and remodeling. Nitric oxide is a potent regulator of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, which drives cGMP production, causing vasorelaxation. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and while iNOS expression increases during late gestation, little is known about how cyclic stretch impacts this pathway. In this study, PASMC were subjected to cyclic stretch of 20% amplitude and frequency of 1 Hz for 24 h and compared to control cells maintained under static conditions. Cyclic stretch significantly increased cytosolic oxidative stress as compared to static cells (62.9 ± 5.9% vs. 33.3 ± 5.7% maximal oxidation, as measured by the intracellular redox sensor roGFP. Cyclic stretch also increased sGCβ protein expression (2.5 ± 0.9-fold, sGC activity (1.5 ± 0.2-fold and cGMP levels (1.8 ± 0.2-fold, as well as iNOS mRNA and protein expression (3.0 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.7-fold, respectively relative to control cells. An antioxidant, recombinant human superoxide dismutase (rhSOD, significantly decreased stretch-induced cytosolic oxidative stress, but did not block stretch-induced sGC activity. Inhibition of iNOS with 1400 W or an iNOS-specific siRNA inhibited stretch-induced sGC activity by 30% and 68% respectively vs. static controls. In conclusion, cyclic stretch increases sGC expression and activity in an iNOS-dependent manner in PASMC from fetal lambs. The mechanism that produces iNOS and sGC upregulation is not yet known, but we speculate these effects represent an early compensatory mechanism to counteract the effects of stretch-induced oxidative stress. A better understanding of the interplay between these two distinct pathways could provide key insights into future avenues to treat infants with pulmonary hypertension.

  9. The soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat ameliorates pulmonary hypertension induced by hypoxia and SU5416 in rats.

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    Michaela Lang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nitric oxide (NO-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP signal-transduction pathway is impaired in many cardiovascular diseases, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521 is a stimulator of sGC that works both in synergy with and independently of NO to increase levels of cGMP. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of NO-sGC-cGMP signaling in a model of severe PAH and to evaluate the effects of sGC stimulation by riociguat and PDE5 inhibition by sildenafil on pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling in severe experimental PAH. METHODS AND RESULTS: Severe angioproliferative PAH was induced in rats by combined exposure to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor antagonist SU5416 and hypoxia (SUHx. Twenty-one days thereafter rats were randomized to receive either riociguat (10 mg/kg/day, sildenafil (50 mg/kg/day or vehicle by oral gavage, for 14 days until the day of the terminal hemodynamic measurements. Administration of riociguat or sildenafil significantly decreased right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP. Riociguat significantly decreased RV hypertrophy (RVH (0.55 ± 0.02, p<0.05, increased cardiac output (60.8 ± .8 mL/minute, p<0.05 and decreased total pulmonary resistance (4.03 ± 0.3 mmHg min(-1 ml(-1 100 g BW, p<0.05, compared with sildenafil and vehicle. Both compounds significantly decreased the RV collagen content and improved RV function, but the effects of riociguat on tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and RV myocardial performance were significantly better than those of sildenafil (p<0.05. The proportion of occluded arteries was significantly lower in animals receiving riociguat than in those receiving vehicle (p<0.05; furthermore, the neointima/media ratio was significantly lower in those receiving riociguat than in those receiving sildenafil or vehicle (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Riociguat and sildenafil significantly reduced

  10. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

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    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  11. Plecanatide and dolcanatide, novel guanylate cyclase-C agonists, ameliorate gastrointestinal inflammation in experimental models of murine colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kunwar; Shailubhai; Vaseem; Palejwala; Krishna; Priya; Arjunan; Sayali; Saykhedkar; Bradley; Nefsky; John; A; Foss; Stephen; Comiskey; Gary; S; Jacob; Scott; E; Plevy

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of orally administeredplecanatide or dolcanatide, analogs of uroguanylin, on amelioration of colitis in murine models.METHODS: The cyclic guanosine monophosphate(cG MP) stimulatory potency of plecanatide and dolcanatide was measured using a human colon carcinoma T84 cellbased assay. For animal studies all test agents were formulated in phosphate buffered saline. Sulfasalazine or 5-amino salicylic acid(5-ASA) served as positive controls. Effect of oral treatment with test agents on amelioration of acute colitis induced either by dextran sulfate sodium(DSS) in drinking water or by rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulfonic(TNBS) acid, was examined in BALB/c and/or BDF1 mice. Additionally, the effect of orally administered plecanatide on the spontaneous colitis in T-cell receptor alpha knockout(TCRα-/-) mice was also examined. Amelioration of colitis was assessed by monitoring severity of colitis, disease activity index and by histopathology. Frozen colon tissues were used to measure myeloperoxidase activity.RESULTS: Plecanatide and dolcanatide are structurally related analogs of uroguanylin, which is an endogenous ligand of guanylate cyclase-C(GC-C). As expected from the agonists of GC-C, both plecanatide and dolcanatide exhibited potent cG MP-stimulatory activity in T84 cells. Once-daily treatment by oral gavage with either of these analogs(0.05-0.5 mg/kg) ameliorated colitis in both DSS and TNBS-induced models of acute colitis, as assessed by body weight, reduction in colitis severity(P < 0.05) and disease activity index(P < 0.05). Amelioration of colitis by either of the drug candidates was comparable to that achieved by orally administered sulfasalazine or 5-ASA. Plecanatide also effectively ameliorated colitis in TCRα-/- mice, a model of spontaneous colitis. As dolcanatide exhibited higher resistance to proteolysis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices, it was selected for further studies. CONCLUSION: This is the first

  12. Modeling beta-adrenergic control of cardiac myocyte contractility in silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Brunton, Laurence L.; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic signaling pathway regulates cardiac myocyte contractility through a combination of feedforward and feedback mechanisms. We used systems analysis to investigate how the components and topology of this signaling network permit neurohormonal control of excitation-contraction coupling in the rat ventricular myocyte. A kinetic model integrating beta-adrenergic signaling with excitation-contraction coupling was formulated, and each subsystem was validated with independent biochemical and physiological measurements. Model analysis was used to investigate quantitatively the effects of specific molecular perturbations. 3-Fold overexpression of adenylyl cyclase in the model allowed an 85% higher rate of cyclic AMP synthesis than an equivalent overexpression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, and manipulating the affinity of Gs alpha for adenylyl cyclase was a more potent regulator of cyclic AMP production. The model predicted that less than 40% of adenylyl cyclase molecules may be stimulated under maximal receptor activation, and an experimental protocol is suggested for validating this prediction. The model also predicted that the endogenous heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor may enhance basal cyclic AMP buffering by 68% and increasing the apparent Hill coefficient of protein kinase A activation from 1.0 to 2.0. Finally, phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel and phospholamban were found sufficient to predict the dominant changes in myocyte contractility, including a 2.6x increase in systolic calcium (inotropy) and a 28% decrease in calcium half-relaxation time (lusitropy). By performing systems analysis, the consequences of molecular perturbations in the beta-adrenergic signaling network may be understood within the context of integrative cellular physiology.

  13. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, Tarsis F; Pávek, Petr; Trejtnar, František; Watts, Val J; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-08-01

    Novel small-molecule agents to treat Bordetella pertussis infections are highly desirable, as pertussis (whooping cough) remains a serious health threat worldwide. In this study, a series of 2-substituted derivatives of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir), in their isopropyl ester bis(L-phenylalanine) prodrug form, were designed and synthesized as potent inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) isolated from B. pertussis. The series consists of PMEA analogues bearing either a linear or branched aliphatic chain or a heteroatom at the C2 position of the purine moiety. Compounds with a small C2 substituent showed high potency against ACT without cytotoxic effects as well as good selectivity over human adenylate cyclase isoforms AC1, AC2, and AC5. The most potent ACT inhibitor was found to be the bisamidate prodrug of the 2-fluoro PMEA derivative (IC50 =0.145 μM). Although the bisamidate prodrugs reported herein exhibit overall lower activity than the bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) prodrug (adefovir dipivoxil), their toxicity and plasma stability profiles are superior. Furthermore, the bisamidate prodrug was shown to be more stable in plasma than in macrophage homogenate, indicating that the free phosphonate can be effectively distributed to target tissues, such as the lungs. Thus, ACT inhibitors based on acyclic nucleoside phosphonates may represent a new strategy to treat whooping cough.

  14. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masin, Jiri; Osickova, Adriana; Sukova, Anna; Fiser, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The whooping cough agent, Bordetella pertussis, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in host respiratory tract colonization. CyaA targets CR3-expressing cells and disrupts their bactericidal functions by delivering into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase enzyme that converts intracellular ATP to cAMP. In parallel, the hydrophobic domain of CyaA forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize cell membrane. The invasive AC and pore-forming domains of CyaA are linked by a segment that is unique in the RTX cytolysin family. We used mass spectrometry and circular dichroism to show that the linker segment forms α-helical structures that penetrate into lipid bilayer. Replacement of the positively charged arginine residues, proposed to be involved in target membrane destabilization by the linker segment, reduced the capacity of the toxin to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane. Substitutions of negatively charged residues then revealed that two clusters of negative charges within the linker segment control the size and the propensity of CyaA pore formation, thereby restricting the cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA. The ‘AC to Hly-linking segment’ thus appears to account for the smaller size and modest cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA pores, as compared to typical RTX hemolysins. PMID:27581058

  15. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S.K.; Kateriya, S. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut für Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-23

    Highlights: • Lyophilizing of NgPAC2 from Naegleria gruberi caused loss of BLUF domain activity. • Photo-induced tyrosine to flavin electron transfer in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Photo-induced Tyr–Tyr cross-linking to o,o′-dityrosine in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Photo-induced partial flavin cofactor reduction in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Two NgPAC2 conformations with fast and slow photo-induced electron transfer. - Abstract: The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr–Tyr cross-linking (o,o′-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  16. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin mobilizes its beta2 integrin receptor into lipid rafts to accomplish translocation across target cell membrane in two steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Bumba

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA binds the alpha(Mbeta(2 integrin (CD11b/CD18, Mac-1, or CR3 of myeloid phagocytes and delivers into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase (AC enzyme that converts ATP into the key signaling molecule cAMP. We show that penetration of the AC domain across cell membrane proceeds in two steps. It starts by membrane insertion of a toxin 'translocation intermediate', which can be 'locked' in the membrane by the 3D1 antibody blocking AC domain translocation. Insertion of the 'intermediate' permeabilizes cells for influx of extracellular calcium ions and thus activates calpain-mediated cleavage of the talin tether. Recruitment of the integrin-CyaA complex into lipid rafts follows and the cholesterol-rich lipid environment promotes translocation of the AC domain across cell membrane. AC translocation into cells was inhibited upon raft disruption by cholesterol depletion, or when CyaA mobilization into rafts was blocked by inhibition of talin processing. Furthermore, CyaA mutants unable to mobilize calcium into cells failed to relocate into lipid rafts, and failed to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane, unless rescued by Ca(2+ influx promoted in trans by ionomycin or another CyaA protein. Hence, by mobilizing calcium ions into phagocytes, the 'translocation intermediate' promotes toxin piggybacking on integrin into lipid rafts and enables AC enzyme delivery into host cytosol.

  17. Trpc2-expressing sensory neurons in the mouse main olfactory epithelium of type B express the soluble guanylate cyclase Gucy1b2

    OpenAIRE

    Omura, Masayo; Mombaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Chemoreception in the mouse olfactory system occurs primarily at two chemosensory epithelia in the nasal cavity: the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal epithelium. The canonical chemosensory neurons in the MOE, the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), express the odorant receptor (OR) gene repertoire, and depend on Adcy3 and Cnga2 for chemosensory signal transduction. The canonical chemosensory neurons in the vomeronasal epithelium, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs), expres...

  18. A homolog of the vertebrate pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is both necessary and instructive for the rapid formation of associative memory in an invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirger, Zsolt; László, Zita; Kemenes, Ildikó; Tóth, Gábor; Reglodi, Dóra; Kemenes, György

    2010-10-13

    Similar to other invertebrate and vertebrate animals, cAMP-dependent signaling cascades are key components of long-term memory (LTM) formation in the snail Lymnaea stagnalis, an established experimental model for studying evolutionarily conserved molecular mechanisms of long-term associative memory. Although a great deal is already known about the signaling cascades activated by cAMP, the molecules involved in the learning-induced activation of adenylate cyclase (AC) in Lymnaea remained unknown. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy in combination with biochemical and immunohistochemical methods, recently we have obtained evidence for the existence of a Lymnaea homolog of the vertebrate pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and for the AC-activating effect of PACAP in the Lymnaea nervous system. Here we first tested the hypothesis that PACAP plays an important role in the formation of robust LTM after single-trial classical food-reward conditioning. Application of the PACAP receptor antagonist PACAP6-38 around the time of single-trial training with amyl acetate and sucrose blocked associative LTM, suggesting that in this "strong" food-reward conditioning paradigm the activation of AC by PACAP was necessary for LTM to form. We found that in a "weak" multitrial food-reward conditioning paradigm, lip touch paired with sucrose, memory formation was also dependent on PACAP. Significantly, systemic application of PACAP at the beginning of multitrial tactile conditioning accelerated the formation of transcription-dependent memory. Our findings provide the first evidence to show that in the same nervous system PACAP is both necessary and instructive for fast and robust memory formation after reward classical conditioning.

  19. Mechanisms Responsible for the Trophic Effect of Beta-Adrenoceptors on the Ito Current Density in Type 1 Diabetic Rat Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Setién

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In diabetic ventricular myocytes, transient outward potassium current (Ito amplitude is severely reduced because of the impaired catecholamine release that characterizes diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Sympathetic nervous system exhibits a trophic effect on Ito since incubation of myocytes with noradrenaline restores current amplitude via beta-adrenoceptor (βAR stimulation. Here, we investigate the intracellular signalling pathway though which incubation of diabetic cardiomyocytes with the βAR agonist isoproterenol recovers Ito amplitude to normal values. Methods: Experiments were performed in ventricular myocytes isolated from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Ito current was recorded by using the patch-clamp technique. Kv4 channel expression was determined by immunofluorescence. Protein-protein interaction was determined by coimmunoprecipitation. Results: Stimulation of βAR activates first a Gαs protein, adenylyl cyclase and Protein Kinase A. PKA-phosphorylated receptor then switches to the Gαi protein. This leads to the activation of the βAR-Kinase-1 and further receptor phosphorylation and arrestin dependent internalization. The internalized receptor-arrestin complex recruits and activates cSrc and the MAPK cascade, where Ras, c-Raf1 and finally ERK1/2 mediate the increase in Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 protein abundance in the plasma membrane. Conclusion: β2AR stimulation activates a Gαs and Gαi protein dependent pathway where the ERK1/2 modulates the Ito current amplitude and the density of the Kv4.2 and Kv4.2 channels in the plasma membrane upon sympathetic stimulation in diabetic heart.

  20. Identification and characterization of Csh3 as an SH3 protein that interacts with fission yeast Cap1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takaharu; Kobayashi-Ooka, Yasuyo; Zhou, Guo-Lei; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cap1 has been identified as the (adenylyl) cyclase-associated protein. Cap1 was able to bind Cap1 itself and actin. Cap1 localized at the growing tip, and this localization was dependent on the Cap1 P2 region. In a two-hybrid screening using cap1 as bait, we isolated csh3, which encodes a protein of 296 amino acids with an SH3 domain and a proline/glutamine-rich region. The binding of Csh3 and Cap1 was confirmed by in vivo pull down assays. Cooperative functions of Csh3 and Cap1 were observed. Deletion of both csh3 and cap1 resulted in heightened sensitivity to CaCl2, while disruption of either gene alone did not have any effect in this regard. In addition, over-expression of csh3 or cap1 alone did not affect cell growth, while over-expression of both genes resulted in growth retardation. Finally, while Csh3-GFP localized to the cytoplasm in wild-type cells, its localization was altered in cap1Δ cells, suggesting that the interaction between Csh3 and Cap1 controls the cellular localization of Csh3. These results demonstrate that Cap1 in Schizo. pombe is a multifunctional protein that functions through interaction with Cap1 itself and other proteins including adenylyl cyclase, actin and Csh3.

  1. Effect of salinity on regulation mechanism of neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qun; Pan, Luqing; Ren, Qin; Wang, Lin; Miao, Jingjing

    2016-02-01

    The effects of low salinity (transferred from 31‰ to 26‰, 21‰, and 16‰) on the regulation pathways of neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network were investigated in Litopenaeus vannamei. The results showed that the hormones (corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone) and biogenic amines (dopamine, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine) concentrations in lower salinity groups increased significantly within 12 h. The gene expression of biogenic amine receptors showed that dopamine receptor D4 and α2 adrenergic receptor in lower salinity groups decreased significantly within 12 h, whereas the 5-HT7 receptor significantly increased within 1d. The second messenger synthetases (adenylyl cyclase, phospholipase C) and the second messengers (cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cyclic guanosine monophosphate) of lower salinity groups shared a similar trend in which adenylyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate reached the maximum at 12 h, whereas phospholipase C and cyclic guanosine monophosphate reached the minimum. The immune parameters (total hemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, phagocytic activity, crustin expression, antibacterial activity, C-type lectin expression, hemagglutinating activity) in lower salinity groups decreased significantly within 12 h. Except for the total hemocyte count, all the parameters recovered to the control levels afterwards. Therefore, it may be concluded that the neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network plays a principal role in adapting to salinity changes as the main center for sensing the stress and causes immune response in L. vannamei. PMID:26766179

  2. Effects of Yulangsan polysaccharide on monoamine neurotransmitters, adenylate cyclase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Liang; Renbin Huang; Xing Lin; Jianchun Huang; Zhongshi Huang; Huagang Liu

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress. The model mice were treated with Yulangsan polysaccharide (YLSPS; 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg) for 21 days, and compared with fluoxetine-treated and normal control groups. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunity and immunohistochemical staining showed that following treatment with YLSPS (300 and 600 mg/kg), monoamine neurotransmitter levels, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression were significantly elevated, and depression-like behaviors were improved. Open-field and novelty-suppressed feeding tests showed that mouse activity levels were increased and feeding latency was shortened following treatment. Our results indicate that YLSPS inhibits depression by upregulating monoamine neurotransmitters, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.

  3. Effect of peptides corresponding to extracellular domains of serotonin 1B/1D receptors and melanocortin 3 and 4 receptors on hormonal regulation of adenylate cyclase in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakova, E A; Derkach, K V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-03-01

    The ligand-recognizing part of G protein-coupled receptors consists of their extracellular loops and N-terminal domain. Identification of these sites is essential for receptor mapping and for the development and testing of new hormone system regulators. The peptides corresponding by their structure to extracellular loop 2 of serotonin 1B/1D receptor (peptide 1), extracellular loop 3 of melanocortin 3 receptor (peptide 2), and N-terminal domain of melanocortin 4 (peptide 3) were synthesized by the solid-phase method. In synaptosomal membranes isolated from rat brain, peptide 1 (10(-5)-10(-4) M) attenuated the effects of 5-nonyloxytryptamine (selective agonist of serotonin 1B/1D receptor) and to a lesser extent serotonin and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine acting on all the subtypes of serotonin receptor 1. Peptide 2 (10(-5)-10(-4) M) significantly reduced the adenylate cyclase-stimulating effect of γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (agonist of melanocortin receptor 3), but had no effect on the adenylate cyclase effect of THIQ (agonist melanocortin receptor 4). Peptide 3 reduced the adenylate cyclase-stimulating effects of THIQ and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (non-selective agonist of melanocortin receptors 3 and 4), but did not modulate the effect of γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. The effect of peptide 3 was weaker: it was observed at peptide 3 concentration of 10(-4) M. Peptides 1-3 did no change the adenylate cyclase-modulating effects of hormones acting through non-homologous receptors. Thus, the synthesized peptides specifically inhibited the regulatory effects of hormones acting through homologous receptors. This suggests that the corresponding extracellular domains are involved in ligand recognition and binding and determine functional activity of the receptor. PMID:24770752

  4. Effects of Yulangsan polysaccharide on monoamine neurotransmitters, adenylate cyclase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress☆

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Shuang; Huang, Renbin; Lin, Xing; Huang, Jianchun; Huang, Zhongshi; Liu, Huagang

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress. The model mice were treated with Yulangsan polysaccharide (YLSPS; 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg) for 21 days, and compared with fluoxetine-treated and normal control groups. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunity and immunohistochemical staining showed that following treatment with YLSPS (300 and 600 mg/kg), monoamine neurotransmitter levels, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity ...

  5. Molecular and functional characterization of a novel chromoplast-specific lycopene β-cyclase from Citrus and its relation to lycopene accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquézar, Berta; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Rodrigo, María J.

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are the main pigments responsible of the colouration of Citrus fruits. The β-cyclization of lycopene, catalysed by the lycopene β-cyclases (β-LCY), seems to be a key regulatory step of the carotenoid pathway. In the present study, two β-LCYs from orange fruits (Citrus sinensis), named Csβ-LCY1 and Csβ-LCY2 have been isolated and the activity of the encoded proteins was demonstrated by functional analysis. Csβ-LCY1 was expressed at low levels and remained relatively constant during fruit ripening while Csβ-LCY2 showed a chromoplast-specific expression and a marked induction in both peel and pulp of orange fruits in parallel with the accumulation of β,β-xanthophylls. The potential involvement of Csβ-LCY2 in the accumulation of lycopene, characteristic of some Citrus species such as red grapefruits, was investigated. Expression of Csβ-LCY2 and another seven carotenoid biosynthetic genes were studied in the peel and pulp of the high lycopene-accumulating grapefruit, Star Ruby, and compared with those of ordinary Navel orange. In Star Ruby, the accumulation of lycopene during fruit maturation was associated with a substantial reduction in the expression of both β-LCY2 and β-CHX genes with respect to Navel orange. Moreover, two different alleles of β-LCY2: β-LCY2a and β-LCY2b were isolated from both genotypes, and functional assays demonstrated that the lycopene β-cyclase activity of the allele b was almost null. Interestingly, Star Ruby grapefruit predominantly expressed the unfunctional β-LCY2b allele during fruit ripening whereas Navel oranges preferably expressed the functional allele. It is suggested that the presence of diverse alleles of the β-LCY2 gene, encoding enzymes with altered activity, with different transcript accumulation may be an additional regulatory mechanism of carotenoid synthesis involved in the accumulation of lycopene in red grapefruits. PMID:19325166

  6. Regulation of Neuronal Oxygen Responses in C. elegans Is Mediated through Interactions between Globin 5 and the H-NOX Domains of Soluble Guanylate Cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abergel, Zohar; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Zuckerman, Binyamin; Gross, Einav

    2016-01-20

    Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) are gas-binding proteins that control diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and synaptic plasticity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex of sGCs, GCY-35 and GCY-36, functions in oxygen (O2) sensing. Previous studies suggested that the neuroglobin GLB-5 genetically interacts with GCY-35, and that the inhibitory effect of GLB-5 on GCY-35 function is necessary for fast recovery from prolonged hypoxia. In this study, we identified mutations in gcy-35 and gcy-36 that impact fast recovery and other phenotypes associated with GLB-5, without undermining sGC activity. These mutations, heb1 and heb3, change conserved amino acid residues in the regulatory H-NOX domains of GCY-35 and GCY-36, respectively, and appear to suppress GLB-5 activity by different mechanisms. Moreover, we observed that short exposure to 35% O2 desensitized the neurons responsible for ambient O2 sensing and that this phenomenon does not occur in heb1 animals. These observations may implicate sGCs in neuronal desensitization mechanisms far beyond the specific case of O2 sensing in nematodes. The conservation of functionally important regions of sGCs is supported by examining site-directed mutants of GCY-35, which suggested that similar regions in the H-NOX domains of O2 and NO-sensing sGCs are important for heme/gas interactions. Overall, our studies provide novel insights into sGC activity and regulation, and implicate similar structural determinants in the control of both O2 and NO sensors. Significance statement: Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) control essential and diverse physiological processes, including memory processing. We used Caenorhabditis elegans to explore how a neuroglobin inhibits a complex of oxygen-sensing sGCs, identifying sGC mutants that resist inhibition. Resistance appears to arise by two different mechanisms: increased basal sGC activity or disruption of an interaction with neuroglobin. Our

  7. Calcium, acylation, and molecular confinement favor folding of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase CyaA toxin into a monomeric and cytotoxic form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Johanna C; Ntsogo Enguéné, V Yvette; Cannella, Sara E; Subrini, Orso; Hessel, Audrey; Debard, Sylvain; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2014-10-31

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, a multidomain protein of 1706 amino acids, is one of the major virulence factors produced by Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. CyaA is able to invade eukaryotic target cells in which it produces high levels of cAMP, thus altering the cellular physiology. Although CyaA has been extensively studied by various cellular and molecular approaches, the structural and functional states of the toxin remain poorly characterized. Indeed, CyaA is a large protein and exhibits a pronounced hydrophobic character, making it prone to aggregation into multimeric forms. As a result, CyaA has usually been extracted and stored in denaturing conditions. Here, we define the experimental conditions allowing CyaA folding into a monomeric and functional species. We found that CyaA forms mainly multimers when refolded by dialysis, dilution, or buffer exchange. However, a significant fraction of monomeric, folded protein could be obtained by exploiting molecular confinement on size exclusion chromatography. Folding of CyaA into a monomeric form was found to be critically dependent upon the presence of calcium and post-translational acylation of the protein. We further show that the monomeric preparation displayed hemolytic and cytotoxic activities suggesting that the monomer is the genuine, physiologically active form of the toxin. We hypothesize that the structural role of the post-translational acylation in CyaA folding may apply to other RTX toxins.

  8. Differential Contribution of the Guanylyl Cyclase-Cyclic GMP-Protein Kinase G Pathway to the Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells Stimulated by Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Carreira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an important inflammatory mediator involved in the initial boost in the proliferation of neural stem cells following brain injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the proliferative effect of NO are still unclear. The aim of this work was to investigate whether cyclic GMP (cGMP and the cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG are involved in the proliferative effect triggered by NO in neural stem cells. For this purpose, cultures of neural stem cells isolated from the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ were used. We observed that long-term exposure to the NO donor (24 h, NOC-18, increased the proliferation of SVZ cells in a cGMP-dependent manner, since the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ, prevented cell proliferation. Similarly to NOC-18, the cGMP analogue, 8-Br-cGMP, also increased cell proliferation. Interestingly, shorter exposures to NO (6 h increased cell proliferation in a cGMP-independent manner via the ERK/MAP kinase pathway. The selective inhibitor of PKG, KT5823, prevented the proliferative effect induced by NO at 24 h but not at 6 h. In conclusion, the proliferative effect of NO is initially mediated by the ERK/MAPK pathway, and at later stages by the GC/cGMP/PKG pathway. Thus, our work shows that NO induces neural stem cell proliferation by targeting these two pathways in a biphasic manner.

  9. HpDTC1, a Stress-Inducible Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase Involved in Momilactone Biosynthesis, Functions in Chemical Defence in the Moss Hypnum plumaeforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kazunori; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Sho; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Kimura, Honoka; Fujiwara, Kaoru; Natsume, Masahiro; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Hatano, Yuki; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Momilactones, which are diterpenoid phytoalexins with antimicrobial and allelopathic functions, have been found only in rice and the moss Hypnum plumaeforme. Although these two evolutionarily distinct plant species are thought to produce momilactones as a chemical defence, the momilactone biosynthetic pathway in H. plumaeforme has been unclear. Here, we identified a gene encoding syn-pimara-7,15-diene synthase (HpDTC1) responsible for the first step of momilactone biosynthesis in the moss. HpDTC1 is a bifunctional diterpene cyclase that catalyses a two-step cyclization reaction of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to syn-pimara-7,15-diene. HpDTC1 transcription was up-regulated in response to abiotic and biotic stress treatments. HpDTC1 promoter-GUS analysis in transgenic Physcomitrella patens showed similar transcriptional responses as H. plumaeforme to the stresses, suggesting that a common response system to stress exists in mosses. Jasmonic acid (JA), a potent signalling molecule for inducing plant defences, could not activate HpDTC1 expression. In contrast, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, an oxylipin precursor of JA in vascular plants, enhanced HpDTC1 expression and momilactone accumulation, implying that as-yet-unknown oxylipins could regulate momilactone biosynthesis in H. plumaeforme. These results demonstrate the existence of an evolutionarily conserved chemical defence system utilizing momilactones and suggest the molecular basis of the regulation for inductive production of momilactones in H. plumaeforme. PMID:27137939

  10. Improvement of copper tolerance of Arabidopsis by transgenic expression of an allene oxide cyclase gene, GhAOC1, in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuange Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Allene oxide cyclase (AOC, E 5.3.99.6 is an essential enzyme in the jasmonic acid (JA biosynthetic pathway and mediates a wide range of adaptive responses. In this report, five AOC genes (GhAOC1–GhAOC5 were cloned from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., sequenced, and characterized. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the transcripts of GhAOCs were abundantly expressed in roots and less in fibers, and regulated in cotton plants under methyl jasmonate (MeJA and CuCl2 stresses. To investigate the role of GhAOC under copper stress, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing cotton GhAOC1 under control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S promoter were generated. Compared to untransformed plants, GhAOC1-overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana plants exhibited markedly higher survival rate, shoot fresh weight, shoot dry weight, and photosynthetic efficiency, and reduced cell membrane damage and lipid peroxidation under copper stress. This study provides the first evidence that GhAOC1 plays an important role in copper stress tolerance.

  11. Improvement of copper tolerance of Arabidopsis by transgenic expression of an allene oxide cyclase gene, GhAOC1, in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuange Wang; Huaihua Liu; Qingguo Xin

    2015-01-01

    Allene oxide cyclase (AOC, E 5.3.99.6) is an essential enzyme in the jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthetic pathway and mediates a wide range of adaptive responses. In this report, five AOC genes (GhAOC1–GhAOC5) were cloned from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), sequenced, and characterized. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the transcripts of GhAOCs were abundantly expressed in roots and less in fibers, and regulated in cotton plants under methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and CuCl2 stresses. To investigate the role of GhAOC under copper stress, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing cotton GhAOC1 under control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S) promoter were generated. Compared to untransformed plants, GhAOC1-overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana plants exhibited markedly higher survival rate, shoot fresh weight, shoot dry weight, and photosynthetic efficiency, and reduced cell membrane damage and lipid peroxidation under copper stress. This study provides the first evidence that GhAOC1 plays an important role in copper stress tolerance.

  12. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J C; Cerda, A; Simpson, K; Lopez-Diaz, I; Carrera, E; Handford, M; Stange, C

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot, Dclcyb1 is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes, Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2 and Ntlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox, Ntcps and Ntks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2 and Ntggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression of Dclcyb1 induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition. PMID:26893492

  13. First report of the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) in crustaceans: conservation of its functions as growth promoting factor and immunomodulator in the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Juana María; Carpio, Yamila; Morales, Reynold; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tania; Ramos, Laida; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2013-12-01

    The high conservation of the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) sequence indicates that this peptide fulfills important biological functions in a broad spectrum of organisms. However, in invertebrates, little is known about its presence and its functions remain unclear. Up to now, in non-mammalian vertebrates, the majority of studies on PACAP have focused mainly on the localization, cloning and structural evolution of this peptide. As yet, little is known about its biological functions as growth factor and immunomodulator in lower vertebrates. Recently, we have shown that PACAP, apart from its neuroendocrine role, influences immune functions in larval and juvenile fish. In this work, we isolated for the first time the cDNA encoding the mature PACAP from a crustacean species, the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, corroborating its high degree of sequence conservation, when compared to sequences reported from tunicates to mammalian vertebrates. Based on this, we have evaluated the effects of purified recombinant Clarias gariepinus PACAP administrated by immersion baths on white shrimp growth and immunity. We demonstrated that PACAP improves hemocyte count, superoxide dismutase, lectins and nitric oxide synthase derived metabolites in treated shrimp related with an increase in total protein concentration and growth performance. From our results, PACAP acts as a regulator of shrimp growth and immunity, suggesting that in crustaceans, as in vertebrate organisms, PACAP is an important molecule shared by both the endocrine and the immune systems.

  14. Reduced expression of NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase in reactive astrocytes of Alzheimer disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and multiple sclerosis brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrons, María Antonia; Pifarré, Paula; Ferrer, Isidre; Carot, José Miguel; García, Agustina

    2004-12-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains increased NO synthase (NOS) expression is found in reactive astrocytes surrounding amyloid plaques. We have recently shown that treatment with beta-amyloid peptides or IL-1beta down-regulates NO-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) in cultured astrocytes and in adult rat brain. In this work, we have examined sGC activity and expression in postmortem brain tissue of AD patients and matched controls. No significant alteration was observed in basal or NO-stimulated sGC activity, nor in sGC beta1 and alpha1 subunit levels in cortical extracts of AD brains. Immunohistochemistry showed intense and widespread labeling of sGC beta1 in cortical and hippocampal neurons and white matter fibrillar astrocytes, while grey matter astrocytes were faintly stained. In AD, expression of sGC in neurons and fibrillar astrocytes is not altered but is markedly reduced in reactive astrocytes surrounding amyloid plaques. Immunostaining for sGC beta1 was also lacking in reactive astrocytes in cortex and subcortical white matter in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brains and in subacute and chronic plaques in multiple sclerosis (MS) brains. Thus, induction of astrocyte reactivity is associated with decreased capacity to generate cGMP in response to NO both in vitro and in vivo. This effect may be related to the development of the astroglial inflammatory response. PMID:15571982

  15. Involvement of H1 and H2 receptors and soluble guanylate cyclase in histamine-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Kristine H.; Moor, Andrea N.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the roles of the H1 and H2 histamine receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, and soluble guanylate (sGC) cyclase in histamine-induced modulation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic pumping. Methods Isolated rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics were treated with 1–100 μM histamine. Histamine receptors were blocked with either the H1 antagonist mepyramine or the H2 antagonist cimetidine. The role of NO/sGC signaling was tested using the arginine analog L-NAME, the sGC inhibitor ODQ, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) as a positive control. Results Histamine applied at 100 μM decreased tone and contraction frequency (CF) of isolated rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics. Pharmacologic blockade of either H1 or H2 histamine receptors significantly inhibited the response to histamine. Pretreatment with ODQ, but not L-NAME, completely inhibited the histamine-induced decrease in tone. ODQ pretreatment also significantly inhibited SNP-induced lymphatic relaxation. Conclusions H1 and H2 histamine receptors are both involved in histamine-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics. NO synthesis does not appear to contribute to the histamine-induced response. However, sGC is critical for the histamine-induced decrease in tone and contributes to the drop in CF. PMID:24702851

  16. Testosterone regulates levels of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles of orchidectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Nur Siti Khadijah; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-01-15

    Secretions of chloride (Cl(-))- and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))-rich fluid by the seminal vesicles could involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which activity can be stimulated by cAMP generated from the reaction involving adenylate cyclase (AC). In this study, we investigated levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles under testosterone influence. Orchidectomized adult male rats received 7-day treatment with 125 or 250 μg/kg/day of testosterone with or without flutamide or finasteride. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and seminal vesicles were harvested for analyses of CFTR and AC protein expression level by Western blotting. Distribution of CFTR and AC in seminal vesicles was observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP and dihydrotestosterone in seminal vesicle homogenates were measured by ELISA. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, AC, and cAMP levels increased with increasing doses of testosterone (P seminal vesicle lumen with higher expression levels observed in testosterone-treated rats than in non-treated orchidectomized rats (P seminal vesicle homogenates after treatment with 250 μg/kg/day than with 125 μg/kg/day of testosterone (P seminal vesicles might contribute toward an increase in Cl(-) and HCO3(-) concentrations in the seminal fluid as reported under testosterone influence.

  17. HpDTC1, a Stress-Inducible Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase Involved in Momilactone Biosynthesis, Functions in Chemical Defence in the Moss Hypnum plumaeforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kazunori; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Sho; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Kimura, Honoka; Fujiwara, Kaoru; Natsume, Masahiro; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Hatano, Yuki; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-05-03

    Momilactones, which are diterpenoid phytoalexins with antimicrobial and allelopathic functions, have been found only in rice and the moss Hypnum plumaeforme. Although these two evolutionarily distinct plant species are thought to produce momilactones as a chemical defence, the momilactone biosynthetic pathway in H. plumaeforme has been unclear. Here, we identified a gene encoding syn-pimara-7,15-diene synthase (HpDTC1) responsible for the first step of momilactone biosynthesis in the moss. HpDTC1 is a bifunctional diterpene cyclase that catalyses a two-step cyclization reaction of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to syn-pimara-7,15-diene. HpDTC1 transcription was up-regulated in response to abiotic and biotic stress treatments. HpDTC1 promoter-GUS analysis in transgenic Physcomitrella patens showed similar transcriptional responses as H. plumaeforme to the stresses, suggesting that a common response system to stress exists in mosses. Jasmonic acid (JA), a potent signalling molecule for inducing plant defences, could not activate HpDTC1 expression. In contrast, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, an oxylipin precursor of JA in vascular plants, enhanced HpDTC1 expression and momilactone accumulation, implying that as-yet-unknown oxylipins could regulate momilactone biosynthesis in H. plumaeforme. These results demonstrate the existence of an evolutionarily conserved chemical defence system utilizing momilactones and suggest the molecular basis of the regulation for inductive production of momilactones in H. plumaeforme.

  18. Effect of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide on the autophagic activation observed in in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamine-Ajili, Asma; Fahmy, Ahmed M; Létourneau, Myriam; Chatenet, David; Labonté, Patrick; Vaudry, David; Fournier, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to destruction of the midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. This phenomenon is related to apoptosis and its activation can be blocked by the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). Growing evidence indicates that autophagy, a self-degradation activity that cleans up the cell, is induced during the course of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of neuronal disorders is yet poorly understood and the potential ability of PACAP to modulate the related autophagic activation has never been significantly investigated. Hence, we explored the putative autophagy-modulating properties of PACAP in in vitro and in vivo models of PD, using the neurotoxic agents 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), respectively, to trigger alterations of DA neurons. In both models, following the toxin exposure, PACAP reduced the autophagic activity as evaluated by the production of LC3 II, the modulation of the p62 protein levels, and the formation of autophagic vacuoles. The ability of PACAP to inhibit autophagy was also observed in an in vitro cell assay by the blocking of the p62-sequestration activity produced with the autophagy inducer rapamycin. Thus, the results demonstrated that autophagy is induced in PD experimental models and that PACAP exhibits not only anti-apoptotic but also anti-autophagic properties.

  19. Y1 receptors for neuropeptide Y are coupled to mobilization of intracellular calcium and inhibition of adenylate cyclase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakerlund, L; Gether, U; Fuhlendorff, J;

    1990-01-01

    Two types of binding sites have previously been described for neuropeptide Y (NPY), called Y1 and Y2 receptors. The intracellular events following Y1 receptor activation was studied in the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-MC. Both NPY and the specific Y1 receptor ligand, [Leu31,Pro34]-NPY, caused...

  20. Nitric Oxide Modulates the Temporal Properties of the Glutamate Response in Type 4 OFF Bipolar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielma, Alex H.; Agurto, Adolfo; Valdés, Joaquín; Palacios, Adrián G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in retinal signal processing, but its cellular actions are only partly understood. An established source of retinal NO are NOACs, a group of nNOS-expressing amacrine cells which signal onto bipolar, other amacrine and ganglion cells in the inner plexiform layer. Here, we report that NO regulates glutamate responses in morphologically and electrophysiologically identified type 4 OFF cone bipolar cells through activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase-cGMP-PKG pathway. The glutamate response of these cells consists of two components, a fast phasic current sensitive to kainate receptor agonists, and a secondary component with slow kinetics, inhibited by AMPA receptor antagonists. NO shortened the duration of the AMPA receptor-dependent component of the glutamate response, while the kainate receptor-dependent component remained unchanged. Application of 8-Br-cGMP mimicked this effect, while inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase or protein kinase G prevented it, supporting a mechanism involving a cGMP signaling pathway. Notably, perfusion with a NOS-inhibitor prolonged the duration of the glutamate response, while the NO precursor L-arginine shortened it, in agreement with a modulation by endogenous NO. Furthermore, NO accelerated the response recovery during repeated stimulation of type 4 cone bipolar cells, suggesting that the temporal response properties of this OFF bipolar cell type are regulated by NO. These results reveal a novel cellular mechanism of NO signaling in the retina, and represent the first functional evidence of NO modulating OFF cone bipolar cells. PMID:25463389

  1. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) regulate murine neural progenitor cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Eugene; May, Victor; Braas, Karen M; Shutz, Kristin C; Mao-Draayer, Yang

    2008-11-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NPC) have gained wide interest over the last decade from their therapeutic potential, either through transplantation or endogenous replacement, after central nervous system (CNS) disease and damage. Whereas several growth factors and cytokines have been shown to promote NPC survival, proliferation, or differentiation, the identification of other regulators will provide much needed options for NPC self-renewal or lineage development. Although previous studies have shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) can regulate stem/progenitor cells, the responses appeared variable. To examine the direct roles of these peptides in NPCs, postnatal mouse NPC cultures were withdrawn from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblastic growth factor (FGF) and maintained under serum-free conditions in the presence or absence of PACAP27, PACAP38, or VIP. The NPCs expressed the PAC1(short)null receptor isoform, and the activation of these receptors decreased progenitor cell apoptosis more than 80% from TUNEL assays and facilitated proliferation more than fivefold from bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) analyses. To evaluate cellular differentiation, replicate control and peptide-treated cultures were examined for cell fate marker protein and transcript expression. In contrast with previous work, PACAP peptides downregulated NPC differentiation, which appeared consistent with the proliferation status of the treated cells. Accordingly, these results demonstrate that PACAP signaling is trophic and can maintain NPCs in a multipotent state. With these attributes, PACAP may be able to promote endogenous NPC self-renewal in the adult CNS, which may be important for endogenous self-repair in disease and ageing processes.

  2. Cloning and characterization of oxidosqualene cyclases from Kalanchoe daigremontiana: enzymes catalyzing up to 10 rearrangement steps yielding friedelin and other triterpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonghua; Yeats, Trevor; Han, Hong; Jetter, Reinhard

    2010-09-24

    The first committed step in triterpenoid biosynthesis is the cyclization of oxidosqualene to polycyclic alcohols or ketones C(30)H(50)O. It is catalyzed by single oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) enzymes that can carry out varying numbers of carbocation rearrangements and, thus, generate triterpenoids with diverse carbon skeletons. OSCs from diverse plant species have been cloned and characterized, the large majority of them catalyzing relatively few rearrangement steps. It was recently predicted that special OSCs must exist that can form friedelin, the pentacyclic triterpenoid whose formation involves the maximum possible number of rearrangement steps. The goal of the present study, therefore, was to clone a friedelin synthase from Kalanchoe daigremontiana, a plant species known to accumulate this triterpenoid in its leaf surface waxes. Five OSC cDNAs were isolated, encoding proteins with 761-779 amino acids and sharing between 57.4 and 94.3% nucleotide sequence identity. Heterologous expression in yeast and GC-MS analyses showed that one of the OSCs generated the steroid cycloartenol together with minor side products, whereas the other four enzymes produced mixtures of pentacyclic triterpenoids dominated by lupeol (93%), taraxerol (60%), glutinol (66%), and friedelin (71%), respectively. The cycloartenol synthase was found expressed in all leaf tissues, whereas the lupeol, taraxerol, glutinol, and friedelin synthases were expressed only in the epidermis layers lining the upper and lower surfaces of the leaf blade. It is concluded that the function of these enzymes is to form respective triterpenoid aglycones destined to coat the leaf exterior, probably as defense compounds against pathogens or herbivores. PMID:20610397

  3. Chemostimuli for guanylyl cyclase-D-expressing olfactory sensory neurons promote the acquisition of preferences for foods adulterated with the rodenticide warfarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Robert Kelliher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many animals have the ability to acquire food preferences from conspecifics via social signals. For example, the coincident detection of a food odor by canonical olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs and agonists of the specialized OSNs expressing the receptor guanylyl cyclase GC-D (GC-D+ OSNs will promote a preference in recipient rodents for similarly odored foods. It has been hypothesized that these preferences are acquired and maintained regardless of the palatability or quality of the food. We assessed whether mice could acquire and maintain preferences for food that had been adulterated with the anticoagulant rodenticide warfarin. After olfactory investigation of a saline droplet containing either cocoa (2%, w/w or cinnamon (1%, w/w along with a GC-D+ OSN-specific chemostimulus (either of the guanylin-family peptides uroguanylin and guanylin; 1–50 nM, C57BL/6J mice exhibited robust preferences for unadulterated food containing the demonstrated odor. The peptide-dependent preference was observed even when the food contained warfarin (0.025% w/w. Repeated ingestion of warfarin-containing food over four days did not disrupt the preference, even though mice were not re-exposed to the peptide stimulus. Surprisingly, mice continued to prefer warfarin-adulterated food containing the demonstrated odor when presented with a choice of warfarin-free food containing a novel odor. Our results indicate that olfactory-mediated food preferences can be acquired and maintained for warfarin-containing foods and suggest that guanylin peptides may be effective stimuli for promoting the ingestion of foods or other edibles with low palatability or potential toxicity.

  4. Diguanylate cyclase null mutant reveals that C-Di-GMP pathway regulates the motility and adherence of the extremophile bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Matías; Deane, Shelly M; Ruiz, Lina; Rawlings, Douglas E; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319) that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process.

  5. Prolonged exposure of chromaffin cells to nitric oxide down-regulates the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase and corresponding mRNA and protein levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Rut; Torres, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the main receptor for nitric oxide (NO) when the latter is produced at low concentrations. This enzyme exists mainly as a heterodimer consisting of one α and one β subunit and converts GTP to the second intracellular messenger cGMP. In turn, cGMP plays a key role in regulating several physiological processes in the nervous system. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of a NO donor on sGC activity and its protein and subunit mRNA levels in a neural cell model. Results Continuous exposure of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture to the nitric oxide donor, diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETA/NO), resulted in a lower capacity of the cells to synthesize cGMP in response to a subsequent NO stimulus. This effect was not prevented by an increase of intracellular reduced glutathione level. DETA/NO treatment decreased sGC subunit mRNA and β1 subunit protein levels. Both sGC activity and β1 subunit levels decreased more rapidly in chromaffin cells exposed to NO than in cells exposed to the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, suggesting that NO decreases β1 subunit stability. The presence of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors effectively prevented the DETA/NO-induced down regulation of sGC subunit mRNA and partially inhibited the reduction in β1 subunits. Conclusions These results suggest that activation of PKG mediates the drop in sGC subunit mRNA levels, and that NO down-regulates sGC activity by decreasing subunit mRNA levels through a cGMP-dependent mechanism, and by reducing β1 subunit stability. PMID:12350235

  6. Optogenetic Modulation of an Adenylate Cyclase in Toxoplasma gondii Demonstrates a Requirement of the Parasite cAMP for Host-Cell Invasion and Stage Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anne; Arroyo-Olarte, Ruben Dario; Imkeller, Katharina; Hegemann, Peter; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection and transmission of the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii depends on its ability to switch between fast-replicating tachyzoite (acute) and quiescent bradyzoite (chronic) stages. Induction of cAMP in the parasitized host cells has been proposed to influence parasite differentiation. It is not known whether the parasite or host cAMP is required to drive this phenomenon. Other putative roles of cAMP for the parasite biology also remain to be identified. Unequivocal research on cAMP-mediated signaling in such intertwined systems also requires a method for an efficient and spatial control of the cAMP pool in the pathogen or in the enclosing host cell. We have resolved these critical concerns by expressing a photoactivated adenylate cyclase that allows light-sensitive control of the parasite or host-cell cAMP. Using this method, we reveal multiple roles of the parasite-derived cAMP in host-cell invasion, stage-specific expression, and asexual differentiation. An optogenetic method provides many desired advantages such as: (i) rapid, transient, and efficient cAMP induction in extracellular/intracellular and acute/chronic stages; (ii) circumvention of the difficulties often faced in cultures, i.e. poor diffusion, premature degradation, steady activation, and/or pleiotropic effects of cAMP agonists and antagonists; (iii) genetically encoded enzyme expression, thus inheritable to the cell progeny; and (iv) conditional and spatiotemporal control of cAMP levels. Importantly, a successful optogenetic application in Toxoplasma also illustrates its wider utility to study cAMP-mediated signaling in other genetically amenable two-organism systems such as in symbiotic and pathogen-host models. PMID:23525100

  7. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide in the Central Amygdala Causes Anorexia and Body Weight Loss via the Melanocortin and the TrkB Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iemolo, Attilio; Ferragud, Antonio; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1 receptor system represents one of the main regulators of the behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. Although induction of anorexia is a well-documented effect of PACAP, the central sites underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present studies addressed this question by examining the neuroanatomical, behavioral, and pharmacological mechanisms mediating the anorexia produced by PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a limbic structure implicated in the emotional components of ingestive behavior. Male rats were microinfused with PACAP (0-1 μg per rat) into the CeA and home-cage food intake, body weight change, microstructural analysis of food intake, and locomotor activity were assessed. Intra-CeA (but not intra-basolateral amygdala) PACAP dose-dependently induced anorexia and body weight loss without affecting locomotor activity. PACAP-treated rats ate smaller meals of normal duration, revealing that PACAP slowed feeding within meals by decreasing the regularity and maintenance of feeding from pellet-to-pellet; postprandial satiety was unaffected. Intra-CeA PACAP-induced anorexia was blocked by coinfusion of either the melanocortin receptor 3/4 antagonist SHU 9119 or the tyrosine kinase B (TrKB) inhibitor k-252a, but not the CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results indicate that the CeA is one of the brain areas through which the PACAP system promotes anorexia and that PACAP preferentially lessens the maintenance of feeding in rats, effects opposite to those of palatable food. We also demonstrate that PACAP in the CeA exerts its anorectic effects via local melanocortin and the TrKB systems, and independently from CRF. PMID:25649277

  8. Chemically Induced Cryptic Sesquiterpenoids and Expression of Sesquiterpene Cyclases in Botrytis cinerea Revealed New Sporogenic (+)-4-Epieremophil-9-en-11-ols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, Cristina; Moraga, Javier; Barua, Javier; González-Rodríguez, Victoria E; Aleu, Josefina; Durán-Patrón, Rosa; Macías-Sánchez, Antonio J; Hanson, James R; Viaud, Muriel; Hernández-Galán, Rosario; Garrido, Carlos; Collado, Isidro G

    2016-05-20

    The sequencing of the genomes of the B05.10 and T4 strains of the fungus Botrytis cinerea revealed an abundance of novel biosynthetic gene clusters, the majority of which were unexpected on the basis of the previous analyses of the fermentation of these and closely related species. By systematic alteration of easy accessible cultivation parameters, using chemical induction with copper sulfate, we have found a cryptic sesquiterpenoid family with new structures related to eremophil-9-ene, which had the basic structure of the sesquiterpene (+)-5-epiaristolochene ((+)-4-epieremophil-9-ene). An expression study of the sesquiterpene cyclase genes present in the Botrytis cinerea genome, under culture conditions, is reported. In general, a 3 day delay and a higher BcSTC genes expression were observed when copper (5 ppm) was fed to the fermentation broth. In addition, to the observed effect on the BcBOT2 (BcSTC1) gene, involved in the biosynthesis of the botrydial toxin, a higher expression level for BcSTC3 and BcSTC4 was observed with respect to the control in the strain B05.10. Interestingly, under copper conditions, the BcSTC4 gene was the most expressed gene in the Botrytis cinerea UCA992 strain. In vitro evaluation of the biological role of these metabolites indicates that they contributed to the conidial development in B. cinerea and appear to be involved in self-regulation of the production of asexual spores. Furthermore, they promoted the formation of complex appressoria or infection cushions.

  9. MRP4 Modulation of the Guanylate Cyclase-C/cGMP Pathway: Effects on Linaclotide-Induced Electrolyte Secretion and cGMP Efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernychev, Boris; Ge, Pei; Kessler, Marco M; Solinga, Robert M; Wachtel, Derek; Tobin, Jenny V; Thomas, Sara R; Lunte, Craig E; Fretzen, Angelika; Hannig, Gerhard; Bryant, Alexander P; Kurtz, Caroline B; Currie, Mark G; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada

    2015-10-01

    MRP4 mediates the efflux of cGMP and cAMP and acts as an important regulator of these secondary messengers, thereby affecting signaling events mediated by cGMP and cAMP. Immunofluorescence staining showed high MRP4 expression localized predominantly in the apical membrane of rat colonic epithelium. In vitro studies were performed using a rat colonic mucosal layer mounted in an Ussing chamber. Linaclotide activation of the guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C)/cGMP pathway induced a concentration-dependent increase in transepithelial ion current [short-circuit current (Isc)] across rat colonic mucosa (EC50: 9.2 nM). Pretreatment of colonic mucosa with the specific MRP4 inhibitor MK571 potentiated linaclotide-induced electrolyte secretion and augmented linaclotide-stimulated intracellular cGMP accumulation. Notably, pretreatment with the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil increased basal Isc, but had no amplifying effect on linaclotide-induced Isc. MRP4 inhibition selectively affected the activation phase, but not the deactivation phase, of linaclotide. In contrast, incubation with a GC-C/Fc chimera binding to linaclotide abrogated linaclotide-induced Isc, returning to baseline. Furthermore, linaclotide activation of GC-C induced cGMP secretion from the apical and basolateral membranes of colonic epithelium. MRP4 inhibition blocked cGMP efflux from the apical membrane, but not the basolateral membrane. These data reveal a novel, previously unrecognized mechanism that functionally couples GC-C-induced luminal electrolyte transport and cGMP secretion to spatially restricted, compartmentalized regulation by MRP4 at the apical membrane of intestinal epithelium. These findings have important implications for gastrointestinal disorders with symptoms associated with dysregulated fluid homeostasis, such as irritable bowel syndrome with constipation, chronic idiopathic constipation, and secretory diarrhea. PMID:26216942

  10. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide in the Central Amygdala Causes Anorexia and Body Weight Loss via the Melanocortin and the TrkB Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iemolo, Attilio; Ferragud, Antonio; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1 receptor system represents one of the main regulators of the behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. Although induction of anorexia is a well-documented effect of PACAP, the central sites underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present studies addressed this question by examining the neuroanatomical, behavioral, and pharmacological mechanisms mediating the anorexia produced by PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a limbic structure implicated in the emotional components of ingestive behavior. Male rats were microinfused with PACAP (0-1 μg per rat) into the CeA and home-cage food intake, body weight change, microstructural analysis of food intake, and locomotor activity were assessed. Intra-CeA (but not intra-basolateral amygdala) PACAP dose-dependently induced anorexia and body weight loss without affecting locomotor activity. PACAP-treated rats ate smaller meals of normal duration, revealing that PACAP slowed feeding within meals by decreasing the regularity and maintenance of feeding from pellet-to-pellet; postprandial satiety was unaffected. Intra-CeA PACAP-induced anorexia was blocked by coinfusion of either the melanocortin receptor 3/4 antagonist SHU 9119 or the tyrosine kinase B (TrKB) inhibitor k-252a, but not the CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results indicate that the CeA is one of the brain areas through which the PACAP system promotes anorexia and that PACAP preferentially lessens the maintenance of feeding in rats, effects opposite to those of palatable food. We also demonstrate that PACAP in the CeA exerts its anorectic effects via local melanocortin and the TrKB systems, and independently from CRF.

  11. Diguanylate cyclase null mutant reveals that C-Di-GMP pathway regulates the motility and adherence of the extremophile bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Castro

    Full Text Available An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs. We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319 that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process.

  12. Nitric oxide and guanylate cyclase signalling are differentially involved in gonadotrophin (LH) release responses to two endogenous GnRHs from goldfish pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meints, A N; Pemberton, J G; Chang, J P

    2012-08-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity is present in goldfish gonadotrophs. The present study investigated whether two native goldfish gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRHs), salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II, use NOS/nitric oxide (NO) and soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic (c)GMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signalling to stimulate maturational gonadotrophin [teleost gonadotrophin-II, luteinising hormone (LH)] release. In cell column perifusion experiments with dispersed goldfish pituitary cells, the application of three NOS inhibitors (aminoguanidine hemisulphate, 1400W and 7-nitroindazole) and two NO scavengers [2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) and rutin hydrate] reduced sGnRH-elicited, but not cGnRH-II-induced, LH increases. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) increased NO production in goldfish pituitary cells in static incubation. SNP-stimulated LH release in column perifusion was attenuated by PTIO and the sGC inhibitor 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-oneon (ODQ), and additive to responses elicited by cGnRH-II, but not sGnRH. ODQ and the PKG inhibitor KT5823 decreased sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-stimulated LH release. Similarly, the LH response to dibutyryl cGMP was reduced by KT5823. These results indicate that, although only sGnRH uses the NOS/NO pathway to stimulate LH release, both GnRHs utilise sGC/PKG to increase LH secretion. PMID:22487215

  13. Chemically Induced Cryptic Sesquiterpenoids and Expression of Sesquiterpene Cyclases in Botrytis cinerea Revealed New Sporogenic (+)-4-Epieremophil-9-en-11-ols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, Cristina; Moraga, Javier; Barua, Javier; González-Rodríguez, Victoria E; Aleu, Josefina; Durán-Patrón, Rosa; Macías-Sánchez, Antonio J; Hanson, James R; Viaud, Muriel; Hernández-Galán, Rosario; Garrido, Carlos; Collado, Isidro G

    2016-05-20

    The sequencing of the genomes of the B05.10 and T4 strains of the fungus Botrytis cinerea revealed an abundance of novel biosynthetic gene clusters, the majority of which were unexpected on the basis of the previous analyses of the fermentation of these and closely related species. By systematic alteration of easy accessible cultivation parameters, using chemical induction with copper sulfate, we have found a cryptic sesquiterpenoid family with new structures related to eremophil-9-ene, which had the basic structure of the sesquiterpene (+)-5-epiaristolochene ((+)-4-epieremophil-9-ene). An expression study of the sesquiterpene cyclase genes present in the Botrytis cinerea genome, under culture conditions, is reported. In general, a 3 day delay and a higher BcSTC genes expression were observed when copper (5 ppm) was fed to the fermentation broth. In addition, to the observed effect on the BcBOT2 (BcSTC1) gene, involved in the biosynthesis of the botrydial toxin, a higher expression level for BcSTC3 and BcSTC4 was observed with respect to the control in the strain B05.10. Interestingly, under copper conditions, the BcSTC4 gene was the most expressed gene in the Botrytis cinerea UCA992 strain. In vitro evaluation of the biological role of these metabolites indicates that they contributed to the conidial development in B. cinerea and appear to be involved in self-regulation of the production of asexual spores. Furthermore, they promoted the formation of complex appressoria or infection cushions. PMID:26900713

  14. Endurance training upregulates the nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway in the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Chrapusta, Stanisław J; Lukačova, Nadežda; Langfort, Józef

    2015-08-27

    The nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/sGC/cGMP) brain pathway plays an important role in motor control. We studied the effects of 6-week endurance training (running) of moderate intensity on this pathway by comparing, between sedentary and endurance-trained young adult male Wistar rats, the expression of endothelial (eNOS) and neuronal (nNOS) NO synthases and of α1, α2 and β1 GC subunits, as well as cGMP levels, in the brain cortex, hippocampus, striatum, midbrain and cerebellum. Additionally, we compared the respective regional expressions of BDNF and the BDNF receptor TrkB. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, the endurance-trained rats showed 3-fold higher spontaneous locomotor activity than their sedentary counterparts in an open-field test. Forty-eight hours after the completion of the training, the trained rats showed significantly elevated BDNF and TrKB mRNAs in the hippocampus, midbrain and striatum, and significantly increased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and striatum. Simultaneously, significant increases were found in mRNA and protein levels and activities of nNOS and eNOS as well as in mRNA and protein levels of GCα2 and GCβ1, but not GCα1, in the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum; no change in these variables was found in the cortex and hippocampus except for marked elevations in cortical GCβ1 mRNA and protein. Changes in regional cGMP levels paralleled those in eNOS, nNOS and GCα2 expression and NOSs' activities. These results suggest that favorable extrapyramidal motor effects of physical training are related to the enhanced activity of the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway in certain motor control-related subcortical brain regions.

  15. Adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP receptor protein modulate stress resistance and virulence capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Grant T; Norton, J Paul; Bower, Jean M; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    In many bacteria, the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) interacts with the transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP), forming active cAMP-CRP complexes that can control a multitude of cellular activities, including expanded carbon source utilization, stress response pathways, and virulence. Here, we assessed the role of cAMP-CRP as a regulator of stress resistance and virulence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the principal cause of urinary tract infections worldwide. Deletion of genes encoding either CRP or CyaA, the enzyme responsible for cAMP synthesis, attenuates the ability of UPEC to colonize the bladder in a mouse infection model, dependent on intact innate host defenses. UPEC mutants lacking cAMP-CRP grow normally in the presence of glucose but are unable to utilize alternate carbon sources like amino acids, the primary nutrients available to UPEC within the urinary tract. Relative to the wild-type UPEC isolate, the cyaA and crp deletion mutants are sensitive to nitrosative stress and the superoxide generator methyl viologen but remarkably resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and acid stress. In the mutant strains, H(2)O(2) resistance correlates with elevated catalase activity attributable in part to enhanced translation of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Acid resistance was promoted by both RpoS-independent and RpoS-dependent mechanisms, including expression of the RpoS-regulated DNA-binding ferritin-like protein Dps. We conclude that balanced input from many cAMP-CRP-responsive elements, including RpoS, is critical to the ability of UPEC to handle the nutrient limitations and severe environmental stresses present within the mammalian urinary tract.

  16. Session Types = Intersection Types + Union Types

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Luca

    2011-01-01

    We propose a semantically grounded theory of session types which relies on intersection and union types. We argue that intersection and union types are natural candidates for modeling branching points in session types and we show that the resulting theory overcomes some important defects of related behavioral theories. In particular, intersections and unions provide a native solution to the problem of computing joins and meets of session types. Also, the subtyping relation turns out to be a pre-congruence, while this is not always the case in related behavioral theories.

  17. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Types KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Types Print A A ... or straight hair instead of curly. ...Make Eight Blood Types The different markers that can be found in ...

  18. Nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase is differentially regulated by nuclear and non-nuclear estrogen pathways in anterior pituitary gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena P Cabilla

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2 regulates hormonal release as well as proliferation and cell death in the pituitary. The main nitric oxide receptor, nitric oxide sensitive- or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, is a heterodimer composed of two subunits, α and β, that catalyses cGMP formation. α1β1 is the most abundant and widely expressed heterodimer, showing the greater activity. Previously we have shown that E2 decreased sGC activity but exerts opposite effects on sGC subunits increasing α1 and decreasing β1 mRNA and protein levels. In the present work we investigate the mechanisms by which E2 differentially regulates sGC subunits' expression on rat anterior pituitary gland. Experiments were performed on primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells from adult female Wistar rats at random stages of estrous cycle. After 6 h of E2 treatment, α1 mRNA and protein expression is increased while β1 levels are down-regulated. E2 effects on sGC expression are partially dependent on de novo transcription while de novo translation is fully required. E2 treatment decreased HuR mRNA stabilization factor and increased AUF1 p37 mRNA destabilization factor. E2-elicited β1 mRNA decrease correlates with a mRNA destabilization environment in the anterior pituitary gland. On the other hand, after 6 h of treatment, E2-BSA (1 nM and E2-dendrimer conjugate (EDC, 1 nM were unable to modify α1 or β1 mRNA levels, showing that nuclear receptor is involved in E2 actions. However, at earlier times (3 h, 1 nM EDC causes a transient decrease of α1 in a PI3k-dependent fashion. Our results show for the first time that E2 is able to exert opposite actions in the anterior pituitary gland, depending on the activation of classical or non-classical pathways. Thus, E2 can also modify sGC expression through membrane-initiated signals bringing to light a new point of regulation in NO/sGC pathway.

  19. Saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity increases adenylate cyclase of myocardial β-adrenergic system and does not compromise cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vileigas, Danielle F; de Deus, Adriana F; da Silva, Danielle C T; de Tomasi, Loreta C; de Campos, Dijon H S; Adorni, Caroline S; de Oliveira, Scarlet M; Sant'Ana, Paula G; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos R; Cicogna, Antonio C

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic associated with high incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which the obesity leads cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated and few studies have evaluated the relationship between obesity and proteins involved in myocardial β-adrenergic (βA) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiac function and βA pathway components in myocardium of obese rats. Male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: control (n = 17; standard diet) and obese (n = 17; saturated high-fat diet) fed for 33 weeks. Nutritional profile and comorbidities were assessed. Cardiac structure and function was evaluated by macroscopic postmortem, echocardiographic and isolated papillary muscle analyzes. Myocardial protein expression of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, Gαs protein, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) was performed by Western blot. Cardiac cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and PKA activity were assessed by ELISA Obese rats showed increased adiposity index (P < 0.001) and several comorbidities as hypertension, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia compared with control rats. Echocardiographic assessment revealed increased left atrium diameter (C: 4.98 ± 0.38 vs. Ob: 5.47 ± 0.53, P = 0.024) and posterior wall shortening velocity (C: 37.1 ± 3.6 vs. Ob: 41.8 ± 3.8, P = 0.007) in obese group. Papillary muscle evaluation indicated that baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to isoproterenol stimulation were similar between the groups. Protein expression of myocardial AC was higher in obese group than in the control (C: 1.00 ± 0.21 vs. Ob: 1.25 ± 0.10, P = 0.025), whereas the other components were unchanged. These results suggest that saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity was not effective in triggering cardiac dysfunction and impair the beta-adrenergic signaling. PMID:27582064

  20. Activation of haem-oxidized soluble guanylyl cyclase with BAY 60-2770 in human platelets lead to overstimulation of the cyclic GMP signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila B Mendes-Silverio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC activators reactivate the haem-oxidized enzyme in vascular diseases. This study was undertaken to investigate the anti-platelet mechanisms of the haem-independent sGC activator BAY 60-2770 in human washed platelets. The hypothesis that sGC oxidation potentiates the anti-platelet activities of BAY 60-2770 has been tested. METHODS: Human washed platelet aggregation and adhesion assays, as well as flow cytometry for α(IIbβ(3 integrin activation and Western blot for α1 and β1 sGC subunits were performed. Intracellular calcium levels were monitored in platelets loaded with a fluorogenic calcium-binding dye (FluoForte. RESULTS: BAY 60-2770 (0.001-10 µM produced significant inhibition of collagen (2 µg/ml- and thrombin (0.1 U/ml-induced platelet aggregation that was markedly potentiated by the sGC inhibitor ODQ (10 µM. In fibrinogen-coated plates, BAY 60-2770 significantly inhibited platelet adhesion, an effect potentiated by ODQ. BAY 60-2770 increased the cGMP levels and reduced the intracellular Ca(2+ levels, both of which were potentiated by ODQ. The cell-permeable cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP (100 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and Ca(2+ levels in an ODQ-insensitive manner. The cAMP levels remained unchanged by BAY 60-2770. Collagen- and thrombin-induced α(IIbβ(3 activation was markedly inhibited by BAY 60-2770 that was further inhibited by ODQ. The effects of sodium nitroprusside (3 µM were all prevented by ODQ. Incubation with ODQ (10 µM significantly reduced the protein levels of α1 and β1 sGC subunits, which were prevented by BAY 60-2770. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory effects of BAY 60-2770 on aggregation, adhesion, intracellular Ca(2+ levels and α(IIbβ(3 activation are all potentiated in haem-oxidizing conditions. BAY 60-2770 prevents ODQ-induced decrease in sGC protein levels. BAY 60-2770 could be of therapeutic interest in cardiovascular diseases

  1. Signaling of pigment-dispersing factor (PDF in the Madeira cockroach Rhyparobia maderae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Wei

    Full Text Available The insect neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF is a functional ortholog of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, the coupling factor of the mammalian circadian pacemaker. Despite of PDF's importance for synchronized circadian locomotor activity rhythms its signaling is not well understood. We studied PDF signaling in primary cell cultures of the accessory medulla, the circadian pacemaker of the Madeira cockroach. In Ca²⁺ imaging studies four types of PDF-responses were distinguished. In regularly bursting type 1 pacemakers PDF application resulted in dose-dependent long-lasting increases in Ca²⁺ baseline concentration and frequency of oscillating Ca²⁺ transients. Adenylyl cyclase antagonists prevented PDF-responses in type 1 cells, indicating that PDF signaled via elevation of intracellular cAMP levels. In contrast, in type 2 pacemakers PDF transiently raised intracellular Ca²⁺ levels even after blocking adenylyl cyclase activity. In patch clamp experiments the previously characterized types 1-4 could not be identified. Instead, PDF-responses were categorized according to ion channels affected. Application of PDF inhibited outward potassium or inward sodium currents, sometimes in the same neuron. In a comparison of Ca²⁺ imaging and patch clamp experiments we hypothesized that in type 1 cells PDF-dependent rises in cAMP concentrations block primarily outward K⁺ currents. Possibly, this PDF-dependent depolarization underlies PDF-dependent phase advances of pacemakers. Finally, we propose that PDF-dependent concomitant modulation of K⁺ and Na⁺ channels in coupled pacemakers causes ultradian membrane potential oscillations as prerequisite to efficient synchronization via resonance.

  2. (Endo)cannabinoid signaling in human bronchial epithelial and smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gkoumassi, Effimia

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the pathways used by various (endo)cannabinoids in regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis, adenylyl cyclase and ERK signaling, in bronchial epithelial cells as well as smooth muscle cells. In DDT1 MF2 smooth muscle cells the synthetic cannabinoid CP55,940 increases [Ca2+]i by a

  3. Sensitization of Dictyostelium chemotaxis by phosphoinositide-3-kinase-mediated self-organizing signalling patches.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Postma; J. Roelofs; J. Goedhart; H.M. Loovers; A.J. Visser; P.J. van Haastert

    2004-01-01

    The leading edge of Dictyostelium cells in chemoattractant gradients can be visualized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged to the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain of cytosolic regulator of adenylyl cyclase (CRAC), which presumable binds phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)triphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)

  4. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a common second messenger that mediates numerous biological responses. Intracellular cAMP levels are increased by activation of G(s)-coupled G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and decreased by activation of G(i)-coupled GPCRs via the adenylyl cyclase. Man...

  5. Chloride secretion induced by phorbol dibutyrate and forskolin in the human colonic carcinoma cell line HT-29Cl.19A is regulated by different mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Bajnath (R.); K. Dekker (K.); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); J.A. Groot (J.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe human colonic carcinoma cell line HT29cl.19A responds to the protein kinase C activator PDB (4-β-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate), as it does to forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase), with a secretory response when the cells are grown on filters and studied at 36 °C. Previously, we s

  6. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Tocopherol Cyclase cDNA from Wheat (T. Aestivum L.)%小麦生育酚环化酶基因全长cDNA的克隆与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹礼平; 高和平

    2009-01-01

    生育酚环化酶(TC)是维生素E生物合成途径中的%Tocopherol cyclase (TC) is a key enzyme for plant vitamin E biosynthesis. The cDNA of wheat TC was cloned by RACE-PCR with primers designed based on a EST (BQ161011) sequence. The full-length cDNA sequence contained a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 1404 bp, which encoding 467 amino acid residues. Homology analysis of the deduced amino acid showed 91%, 88%, 71%, 68% and 67% identity with TC from rice, maize, sesame, potato and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. The result of phylogenetic analysis indicated that various TC sequences were clustered into three groups.

  7. Control of βAR- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-Dependent cAMP Dynamics in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chay, Andrew; Zamparo, Ilaria; Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela; Blackwell, Kim T

    2016-02-01

    Norepinephrine, a neuromodulator that activates β-adrenergic receptors (βARs), facilitates learning and memory as well as the induction of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Several forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) at the Schaffer collateral CA1 synapse require stimulation of both βARs and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). To understand the mechanisms mediating the interactions between βAR and NMDAR signaling pathways, we combined FRET imaging of cAMP in hippocampal neuron cultures with spatial mechanistic modeling of signaling pathways in the CA1 pyramidal neuron. Previous work implied that cAMP is synergistically produced in the presence of the βAR agonist isoproterenol and intracellular calcium. In contrast, we show that when application of isoproterenol precedes application of NMDA by several minutes, as is typical of βAR-facilitated LTP experiments, the average amplitude of the cAMP response to NMDA is attenuated compared with the response to NMDA alone. Models simulations suggest that, although the negative feedback loop formed by cAMP, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and type 4 phosphodiesterase may be involved in attenuating the cAMP response to NMDA, it is insufficient to explain the range of experimental observations. Instead, attenuation of the cAMP response requires mechanisms upstream of adenylyl cyclase. Our model demonstrates that Gs-to-Gi switching due to PKA phosphorylation of βARs as well as Gi inhibition of type 1 adenylyl cyclase may underlie the experimental observations. This suggests that signaling by β-adrenergic receptors depends on temporal pattern of stimulation, and that switching may represent a novel mechanism for recruiting kinases involved in synaptic plasticity and memory.

  8. Control of βAR- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA Receptor-Dependent cAMP Dynamics in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Chay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine, a neuromodulator that activates β-adrenergic receptors (βARs, facilitates learning and memory as well as the induction of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Several forms of long-term potentiation (LTP at the Schaffer collateral CA1 synapse require stimulation of both βARs and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs. To understand the mechanisms mediating the interactions between βAR and NMDAR signaling pathways, we combined FRET imaging of cAMP in hippocampal neuron cultures with spatial mechanistic modeling of signaling pathways in the CA1 pyramidal neuron. Previous work implied that cAMP is synergistically produced in the presence of the βAR agonist isoproterenol and intracellular calcium. In contrast, we show that when application of isoproterenol precedes application of NMDA by several minutes, as is typical of βAR-facilitated LTP experiments, the average amplitude of the cAMP response to NMDA is attenuated compared with the response to NMDA alone. Models simulations suggest that, although the negative feedback loop formed by cAMP, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA, and type 4 phosphodiesterase may be involved in attenuating the cAMP response to NMDA, it is insufficient to explain the range of experimental observations. Instead, attenuation of the cAMP response requires mechanisms upstream of adenylyl cyclase. Our model demonstrates that Gs-to-Gi switching due to PKA phosphorylation of βARs as well as Gi inhibition of type 1 adenylyl cyclase may underlie the experimental observations. This suggests that signaling by β-adrenergic receptors depends on temporal pattern of stimulation, and that switching may represent a novel mechanism for recruiting kinases involved in synaptic plasticity and memory.

  9. Type inference for correspondence types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Gordon, Andy; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2009-01-01

    We present a correspondence type/effect system for authenticity in a π-calculus with polarized channels, dependent pair types and effect terms and show how one may, given a process P and an a priori type environment E, generate constraints that are formulae in the Alternating Least Fixed......-Point (ALFP) logic. We then show how a reasonable model of the generated constraints yields a type/effect assignment such that P becomes well-typed with respect to E if and only if this is possible. The formulae generated satisfy a finite model property; a system of constraints is satisfiable if and only...... if it has a finite model. As a consequence, we obtain the result that type/effect inference in our system is polynomial-time decidable....

  10. Vibrio cholerae Infection of Drosophilamelanogaster Mimics the Human Disease Cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholera, the pandemic diarrheal disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae, continues to be a major public health challenge in the developing world. Cholera toxin, which is responsible for the voluminous stools of cholera, causes constitutive activation of adenylyl cyclase, resulting in the export of ions into the intestinal lumen. Environmental studies have demonstrated a close association between V. cholerae and many species of arthropods including insects. Here we report the susceptibility of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to oral V. cholerae infection through a process that exhibits many of the hallmarks of human disease: (i death of the fly is dependent on the presence of cholera toxin and is preceded by rapid weight loss; (ii flies harboring mutant alleles of either adenylyl cyclase, Gsalpha, or the Gardos K channel homolog SK are resistant to V. cholerae infection; and (iii ingestion of a K channel blocker along with V. cholerae protects wild-type flies against death. In mammals, ingestion of as little as 25 mug of cholera toxin results in massive diarrhea. In contrast, we found that ingestion of cholera toxin was not lethal to the fly. However, when cholera toxin was co-administered with a pathogenic strain of V. cholerae carrying a chromosomal deletion of the genes encoding cholera toxin, death of the fly ensued. These findings suggest that additional virulence factors are required for intoxication of the fly that may not be essential for intoxication of mammals. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time the mechanism of action of cholera toxin in a whole organism and the utility of D. melanogaster as an accurate, inexpensive model for elucidation of host susceptibility to cholera.

  11. Can the anti-inflammatory activities of β2-agonists be harnessed in the clinical setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theron AJ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Annette J Theron,1,2 Helen C Steel,1 Gregory R Tintinger,1 Charles Feldman,3 Ronald Anderson1 1Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, 2Tshwane Academic Division of the National Health Laboratory Service, Pretoria, 3Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Beta2-adrenoreceptor agonists (β2-agonists are primarily bronchodilators, targeting airway smooth muscle and providing critical symptomatic relief in conditions such as bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These agents also possess broad-spectrum, secondary, anti-inflammatory properties. These are mediated largely, though not exclusively, via interactions with adenylyl cyclase-coupled β2-adrenoreceptors on a range of immune and inflammatory cells involved in the immunopathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders of the airways. The clinical relevance of the anti-inflammatory actions of β2-agonists, although often effective in the experimental setting, remains contentious. The primary objectives of the current review are: firstly, to assess the mechanisms, both molecular and cell-associated, that may limit the anti-inflammatory efficacy of β2-agonists; secondly, to evaluate pharmacological strategies, several of which are recent and innovative, that may overcome these limitations. These are preceded by a consideration of the various types of β2-agonists, their clinical applications, and spectrum of anti-inflammatory activities, particularly those involving adenosine 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-mediated clearance of cytosolic calcium, and altered gene expression in immune and inflammatory cells. Keywords: adenylyl cyclase, corticosteroids, cyclic AMP, muscarinic

  12. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlyand, Leonid E; Philipson, Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  13. Diminished but Not Abolished Effect of Two His351 Mutants of Anthrax Edema Factor in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoran Zhao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Edema toxin (ET, which is composed of a potent adenylate cyclase (AC, edema factor (EF, and protective antigen (PA, is one of the major toxicity factors of Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we introduced mutations in full-length EF to generate alanine EF(H351A and arginine EF(H351R variants. In vitro activity analysis displayed that the adenylyl cyclase activity of both the mutants was significantly diminished compared with the wild-type EF. When the native and mutant toxins were administered subcutaneously in a mouse footpad edema model, severe acute swelling was evoked by wild-type ET, while the symptoms induced by mutant toxins were very minor. Systemic administration of these EF variants caused non-lethal hepatotoxicity. In addition, EF(H351R exhibited slightly higher activity in causing more severe edema than EF(H351A. Our findings demonstrate that the toxicity of ET is not abolished by substitution of EF residue His351 by alanine or arginine. These results also indicate the potential of the mouse footpad edema model as a sensitive method for evaluating both ET toxicity and the efficacy of candidate therapeutic agents.

  14. Diminished but Not Abolished Effect of Two His351 Mutants of Anthrax Edema Factor in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Taoran; Zhao, Xinghui; Liu, Ju; Meng, Yingying; Feng, Yingying; Fang, Ting; Zhang, Jinlong; Yang, Xiuxu; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Edema toxin (ET), which is composed of a potent adenylate cyclase (AC), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA), is one of the major toxicity factors of Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we introduced mutations in full-length EF to generate alanine EF(H351A) and arginine EF(H351R) variants. In vitro activity analysis displayed that the adenylyl cyclase activity of both the mutants was significantly diminished compared with the wild-type EF. When the native and mutant toxins were administered subcutaneously in a mouse footpad edema model, severe acute swelling was evoked by wild-type ET, while the symptoms induced by mutant toxins were very minor. Systemic administration of these EF variants caused non-lethal hepatotoxicity. In addition, EF(H351R) exhibited slightly higher activity in causing more severe edema than EF(H351A). Our findings demonstrate that the toxicity of ET is not abolished by substitution of EF residue His351 by alanine or arginine. These results also indicate the potential of the mouse footpad edema model as a sensitive method for evaluating both ET toxicity and the efficacy of candidate therapeutic agents. PMID:26848687

  15. Ca2+ influx and tyrosine kinases trigger Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT endocytosis. Cell physiology and expression of the CD11b/CD18 integrin major determinants of the entry route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Humans infected with Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough bacterium, show evidences of impaired host defenses. This pathogenic bacterium produces a unique adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT which enters human phagocytes and catalyzes the unregulated formation of cAMP, hampering important bactericidal functions of these immune cells that eventually cause cell death by apoptosis and/or necrosis. Additionally, ACT permeabilizes cells through pore formation in the target cell membrane. Recently, we demonstrated that ACT is internalised into macrophages together with other membrane components, such as the integrin CD11b/CD18 (CR3, its receptor in these immune cells, and GM1. The goal of this study was to determine whether ACT uptake is restricted to receptor-bearing macrophages or on the contrary may also take place into cells devoid of receptor and gain more insights on the signalling involved. Here, we show that ACT is rapidly eliminated from the cell membrane of either CR3-positive as negative cells, though through different entry routes, which depends in part, on the target cell physiology and characteristics. ACT-induced Ca(2+ influx and activation of non-receptor Tyr kinases into the target cell appear to be common master denominators in the different endocytic strategies activated by this toxin. Very importantly, we show that, upon incubation with ACT, target cells are capable of repairing the cell membrane, which suggests the mounting of an anti-toxin cell repair-response, very likely involving the toxin elimination from the cell surface.

  16. Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Lycopene Beta-cyclase Gene in Strelitzia reginae Banks%鹤望兰番茄红素β-环化酶基因SrLCYB的克隆及表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊荣辉; 黄敏玲; 钟淮钦; 林兵

    2016-01-01

    采用RACE方法从鹤望兰(Strelitzia reginae Banks)黄色花萼中克隆到1个LCYB基因(lycopene beta-cyclase,SrLCYB).其cDNA全长为1 908 bp(GenBank收录号:KT428725),具有完整的开放阅读框(open reading frame,ORF),共1 515个碱基,编码504个氨基酸.鹤望兰SrLCYB的氨基酸序列与其他物种都有一定的同源性,其中与百合的LCYB同源性最高,达到82%.系统进化树分析显示,鹤望兰SrLCYB与芭蕉蛋白亲缘关系较近.应用荧光定量PCR分析表明,SrLCYB在黄色花萼中高表达,且在花发育的始花期和盛花期表达量最高.应用UPLC(ultra performance liquidchromatography)对β-胡萝卜素含量进行分析,类β-胡萝卜素在黄色花萼中含量最高,且在花发育的盛花期含量最高.结果表明,SrLCYB基因表达与β-胡萝卜素含量成正相关.

  17. The excitation cascade of Limulus ventral photoreceptors: guanylate cyclase as the link between InsP3-mediated Ca2+ release and the opening of cGMP-gated channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisman John E

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early stages in the excitation cascade of Limulus photoreceptors are mediated by activation of Gq by rhodopsin, generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate by phospholipase-C and the release of Ca2+. At the end of the cascade, cGMP-gated channels open and generate the depolarizing receptor potential. A major unresolved issue is the intermediate process by which Ca2+ elevation leads to channel opening. Results To explore the role of guanylate cyclase (GC as a potential intermediate, we used the GC inhibitor guanosine 5'-tetraphosphate (GtetP. Its specificity in vivo was supported by its ability to reduce the depolarization produced by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. To determine if GC acts subsequent to InsP3 production in the cascade, we examined the effect of intracellular injection of GtetP on the excitation caused by InsP3 injection. This form of excitation and the response to light were both greatly reduced by GtetP, and they recovered in parallel. Similarly, GtetP reduced the excitation caused by intracellular injection of Ca2+. In contrast, this GC inhibitor did not affect the excitation produced by injection of a cGMP analog. Conclusion We conclude that GC is downstream of InsP3-induced Ca2+ release and is the final enzymatic step of the excitation cascade. This is the first invertebrate rhabdomeric photoreceptor for which transduction can be traced from rhodopsin photoisomerization to ion channel opening.

  18. Changes in brain mRNA levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide, and somatostatin during ovulatory luteinizing hormone and growth hormone surges in goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa, Luis Fabián; Stacey, Norm; Peter, Richard Ector

    2008-12-01

    In goldfish, circulating LH and growth hormone (GH) levels surge at the time of ovulation. In the present study, changes in gene expression of salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), somatostatin (SS) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) were analyzed during temperature- and spawning substrate-induced ovulation in goldfish. The results demonstrated that increases in PACAP gene expression during ovulation are best correlated with the GH secretion profile. These results suggest that PACAP, instead of GnRH, is involved in the control of GH secretion during ovulation. Increases of two of the SS transcripts during ovulation are interpreted as the activation of a negative feedback mechanism triggered by high GH levels. The results showed a differential regulation of sGnRH and cGnRH-II gene expression during ovulation, suggesting that sGnRH controls LH secretion, whereas cGnRH-II correlates best with spawning behavior. This conclusion is further supported by the finding that nonovulated fish induced to perform spawning behavior by prostaglandin F2alpha treatment increased cGnRH-II expression in both forebrain and midbrain, but decreased sGnRH expression in the forebrain. PMID:18815210

  19. Changes in vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and neuropeptide Y-ergic structures of the enteric nervous system in the carcinoma of the human large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Mirosław Łakomy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was aimed at immunohistochemical analysis of potential changes in the enteric nervous system caused by cancer of the large intestine. In this purpose, neurons and nerve fibers of intestinal plexuses containing neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and neuropeptide Y (NPY, in pathologically changed part of the large intestine were microscpically observed and compared. Samples were taken from patients operated due to cancer of the sigmoid colon and rectum. The number of neurons and density of nerve fibres containing neuropeptides found in sections with cancer tissues were compared to those observed in sections from the uninvolved intestinal wall. Changes relating to reductions in the number of NPY-ergic neurons and density of nerve fibres in submucous and myenteric plexuses in the sections with cancer tissues (pathological sections were statistically significant. A statistically similar presence of VIP-ergic and PACAP-ergic neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses was observed in both the pathological and control sections. On the other hand, in the pathological sections, VIP-ergic nerve fibres in the myenteric plexuses and PACAP-ergic nerve fibres in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses were found to be less dense. Analysis revealed changes in pathologically affected part of the large intestine may caused disruption of proper intestinal function. Observed changes in the neural elements which are responsible for relaxation of the intestine may suggest dysfunction in the innervation of this part of the colon.

  20. 腺嘌呤阻断"IP3-气味"诱导的嗅觉电流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈珊

    2001-01-01

    Vertebrate olfactory receptor neurons(ORNs) transduce odor stimuli into electrical signals by means of an adenylyl cyclase/ cAMP second messenger cascade, but it remains widely debated whether this cAMP cascade mediates transduction for all odorants or only certain odor classes. To address this problem, we have analyzed the generator currents induced by odors that failed to produce cAMP in previous biochemical assays but instead produced IP(3)("IP(3)-odors"). We show that in single salamander ORNs,sensory responses to"cAMP-odors" and IP(3)-odors are not mutually exclusive but coexist in the same cells. The currents induced by IP(3) odors exhibit identical biophysical properties as those iduced by cAMP odors or direct activation of the cAMP cascade. By disrupting adenylyl cyclase to block cAMP formation using two potent antagonists of adenylyl cyclase. SQ22536 and MDL12330A, we show that this molecular step is necessary for the transduction of both odor classes. To assess whether these results are also applicable to mam mals,we examine the electrophysiological responses to IP(3)-odors in intact mouse main olfactory epithelium (MOE) by recording field potentials. The results show that inhibition of adenylyl cyclas prevents EOG responses to both oder classes in mouse MOE,even when "hot spots" with heightened sensitivity to IP(3)-odors are examined.

  1. 阿尔茨海默病G蛋白-腺苷酸环化酶系统信号途经的机理、防治综述%Review of Mechanism Prevention and Treatment of G Protein-Adenylate Cyclase Signal Pathway in Alzheimer' s Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗本华; 张雪竹; 赵岚; 成海燕; 韩景献; 于建春

    2012-01-01

    在AD的发病过程中,多种信号分子的含量异常及分布改变,以及信息传递通路异常,在AD病理改变改变中发挥重要作用;信息传递与信号通路异常是AD发病机制的一个共同途径.第一,AD中,Gia、Gsa蛋白的表达差异是引起腺苷酸环化酶信号系统功能失调;第二,G蛋白的偶联活性的差异是引起腺苷酸环化酶系统信号功能失调的原因:(1)AC与Gia、Gsa蛋白偶联环节出现障碍是AD中AC功能失调的重要原因.(2)G蛋白及其GTP酶活性失常是AD信号转导功能障碍的原因;第三,AD中,G蛋白与受体偶联障碍及受体脱敏是影响G蛋白活性的重要方面;第四,配体激活G蛋白偶联受体的能力损害也是AD中AC功能失调的重要原因;最后,腺苷酸环化酶信号系统功能失调是导致AD病理改变的原因.AD中,G蛋白介导腺苷酸环化酶信号系统功能失调对AD的防治策略有重要启示作用.%In AD, both the abnormal content and the change of distribution of many kinds of signaling molecules and the abnormal signal pathways play very important roles in Alzheimer' s disease pathological change, and the abnormal information transfer and signal pathways are common channel in Alzheimer' s disease pathogenesis. Firstly,the difference of expressed content in Gsot and Gia protein is the important cause of functional disorder of adenylate cyclase signal system. Secondly, the difference of G protein coupled activity can bring about the functional disorder of adenylate cyclase signal system. (1) The coupled disorder between Gsα,Giα protein and adenylate cyclase can cause functional disorder of adenylate cyclase in AD. (2)The disorder of GT-Pase activity which can hydrolyses Gα-GTP into Gα-GDP is the important cause of signal transduction dysfunction. Thirdly, the receptors coupled G protein activity disorder and receptor desensitization are the important aspects of affecting G protein activity. Fourthly

  2. Effect of dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) on L-type calcium channel current and its pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Ying; Cai, Zheng-Xu; Li, Ping; Cai, Chun-Yu; Qu, Cheng-Long; Guo, Hui-Shu

    2010-09-24

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), a newly-described natriuretic peptide, relaxes gastrointestinal smooth muscle. L-type calcium channel currents play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contraction. The effect of DNP on L-type calcium channel currents in gastrointestinal tract is still unclear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of DNP on barium current (I(Ba)) through the L-type calcium channel in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs and cGMP-pathway mechanism. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record L-type calcium channel currents. The content of cGMP in guinea pig gastric antral smooth muscle and perfusion solution was measured using radioimmunoassay. DNP markedly enhanced cGMP levels in gastric antral smooth muscle tissue and in perfusion medium. DNP concentration-dependently inhibited I(Ba) in freshly isolated guinea pig gastric antral circular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of guinea pigs. DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was partially blocked by LY83583, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase. KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, almost completely blocked DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba). However, DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was potentiated by zaprinast, an inhibitor of cGMP-sensitive phosphodiesterase. Taken together, DNP inhibits L-type calcium channel currents via pGC-cGMP-PKG-dependent signal pathway in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs. PMID:20594955

  3. G Proteins and Regulation of Effector Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Dehpour

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors use a variety of membrane signalling mechanisms to translate information encoded in neurotransmitters, hormones, and growth factors into cellular responses.Collectively these mechanisms are refered to as transmembrane signalling or signal transduction. In the simplest example,the process involves a receptor protein-encompassed ion channel whose conductance is regulated by receptor activation.A second type of transmembrane signalling system involves the coupling of at least three separate components, a receptor protein, a guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein , and an effector mechanism. In some receptor" effector systems the signal transduction pathways is entirely confined to the membrane, in which no intracellular messenger is involved.Alternatively, the activity of an enzyme may be changed to generate a specific intracellular signal molecule or second messenger. Receptors in this latter category may regulate the activity of adenylyl cyclase in a positive manner through a stimulatory G protein( G or in a negative manner through an inhibitory G protein( G. thereby controlling the intracellular level of cAMP. Another membrane- associated enzyme, similar to adenylate cyclase, is phospholipase C which catalizes the hydrolysis of PIP2into IP3and DAG. Phospholipase C coupled receptors are physiologically very important because both products of the reaction act as a second messenger; diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C and IP3 stimulates calcium release from Intracellular stores.

  4. Sustained and selective suppression of intestinal cholesterol synthesis by Ro 48-8071, an inhibitor of 2,3-oxidosqualene:lanosterol cyclase, in the BALB/c mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Valasek, Mark A; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Repa, Joyce J; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-04-01

    The small intestine plays a fundamentally important role in regulating whole body cholesterol balance and plasma lipoprotein composition. This is articulated through the interplay of a constellation of genes that ultimately determines the net amount of chylomicron cholesterol delivered to the liver. Major advances in our insights into regulation of the cholesterol absorption pathway have been made using genetically manipulated mouse models and agents such as ezetimibe. One unresolved question is how a sustained pharmacological inhibition of intestinal cholesterol synthesis in vivo may affect cholesterol handling by the absorptive cells. Here we show that the lanosterol cyclase inhibitor, Ro 48-8071, when fed to BALB/c mice in a chow diet (20 mg/day/kg body weight), leads to a rapid and sustained inhibition (>50%) of cholesterol synthesis in the whole small intestine. Sterol synthesis was also reduced in the large intestine and stomach. In contrast, hepatic cholesterol synthesis, while markedly suppressed initially, rebounded to higher than baseline rates within 7 days. Whole body cholesterol synthesis, fractional cholesterol absorption, and fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretion were not consistently changed with Ro 48-8071 treatment. There were no discernible effects of this agent on intestinal histology as determined by H&E staining and the level of Ki67, an index of proliferation. The mRNA expression for multiple genes involved in intestinal cholesterol regulation including NPC1L1 was mostly unchanged although there was a marked rise in the mRNA level for the PXR target genes CYP3A11 and CES2A.

  5. Ca 2+ signaling by plant Arabidopsis thaliana Pep peptides depends on AtPepR1, a receptor with guanylyl cyclase activity, and cGMP-activated Ca 2+ channels

    KAUST Repository

    Qia, Zhi

    2010-11-18

    A family of peptide signaling molecules (AtPeps) and their plasma membrane receptor AtPepR1 are known to act in pathogendefense signaling cascades in plants. Little is currently known about the molecular mechanisms that link these signaling peptides and their receptor, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, to downstream pathogen-defense responses. We identify some cellular activities of these molecules that provide the context for a model for their action in signaling cascades. AtPeps activate plasma membrane inwardly conducting Ca 2+ permeable channels in mesophyll cells, resulting in cytosolic Ca 2+ elevation. This activity is dependent on their receptor as well as a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2). We also show that the leucine-rich repeat receptor- like kinase receptor AtPepR1 has guanylyl cyclase activity, generating cGMP from GTP, and that cGMP can activate CNGC2- dependent cytosolic Ca 2+ elevation. AtPep-dependent expression of pathogen-defense genes (PDF1.2, MPK3, and WRKY33) is mediated by the Ca 2+ signaling pathway associated with AtPep peptides and their receptor. The work presented here indicates that extracellular AtPeps, which can act as danger-associated molecular patterns, signal by interaction with their receptor, AtPepR1, a plasma membrane protein that can generate cGMP. Downstream from AtPep and AtPepR1 in a signaling cascade, the cGMP-activated channel CNGC2 is involved in AtPep- and AtPepR1-dependent inward Ca 2+ conductance and resulting cytosolic Ca 2+ elevation. The signaling cascade initiated by AtPeps leads to expression of pathogen- defense genes in a Ca 2+-dependent manner.

  6. Ca2+ signaling by plant Arabidopsis thaliana Pep peptides depends on AtPepR1, a receptor with guanylyl cyclase activity, and cGMP-activated Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi; Verma, Rajeev; Gehring, Chris; Yamaguchi, Yube; Zhao, Yichen; Ryan, Clarence A; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2010-12-01

    A family of peptide signaling molecules (AtPeps) and their plasma membrane receptor AtPepR1 are known to act in pathogen-defense signaling cascades in plants. Little is currently known about the molecular mechanisms that link these signaling peptides and their receptor, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, to downstream pathogen-defense responses. We identify some cellular activities of these molecules that provide the context for a model for their action in signaling cascades. AtPeps activate plasma membrane inwardly conducting Ca(2+) permeable channels in mesophyll cells, resulting in cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. This activity is dependent on their receptor as well as a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2). We also show that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase receptor AtPepR1 has guanylyl cyclase activity, generating cGMP from GTP, and that cGMP can activate CNGC2-dependent cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. AtPep-dependent expression of pathogen-defense genes (PDF1.2, MPK3, and WRKY33) is mediated by the Ca(2+) signaling pathway associated with AtPep peptides and their receptor. The work presented here indicates that extracellular AtPeps, which can act as danger-associated molecular patterns, signal by interaction with their receptor, AtPepR1, a plasma membrane protein that can generate cGMP. Downstream from AtPep and AtPepR1 in a signaling cascade, the cGMP-activated channel CNGC2 is involved in AtPep- and AtPepR1-dependent inward Ca(2+) conductance and resulting cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. The signaling cascade initiated by AtPeps leads to expression of pathogen-defense genes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner.

  7. 斜带石斑鱼PACAP的原核表达及活性分析%The prokaryotic expression and biological activity of the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in groupers Epinephelus coioides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江湧; 李文笙; 林浩然

    2005-01-01

    自1989年从绵羊下丘脑提取物发现垂体腺苷酸环化酶激活多肽(Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide,PACAP)以来(Miyata et al.,1989),已证明它能促进垂体激素释放,同时还具有神经递质、神经调质和神经营养等作用,使对PACAP的研究成为十分活跃的领域。PACAP属于血管活性肠肽(VIP)-胰高血糖素-生长激素释放因子-分泌素家族(Campbell and Scanes,1992)成员,已鉴别出包含27和38个氨基酸两种类型。对原索动物(McRory et al.,1997)、两栖类(蛙)(Alexandre et al.,2000)、爬行类(蜥蜴)(Pohland Wank,1998)、鸟类(鸡)(McRory et al.,1997),啮齿类(鼠)(Ghatei et al.,1993)等脊椎动物PACAP的研究多集中在结构与进化方面,对功能了解甚少。

  8. B-type Natriuretic Peptide circulating forms: Analytical and bioactivity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandle, Tim G; Richards, A Mark

    2015-08-25

    B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP), A-type and C-type Natriuretic Peptides (ANP and CNP) comprise a family of peptides that retain a common ring structure and conserved amino acid sequences. All are present in the heart, but only BNP and ANP are regarded as primarily cardiac secretory products. BNP and ANP, acting through a guanylyl cyclase receptor, increase sodium and water excretion by the kidney, induce vasodilation, reduce blood pressure, counteract the bioactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems and possess anti-hypertrophic and anti-fibrotic properties. BNP is synthesised in cardiomyocytes first as the precursor peptide preproBNP. Removal of the signal peptide from preproBNP produces proBNP which is cleaved to produce the biologically active carboxy-terminal BNP peptide and the inactive N-terminal fragment, NT-proBNP. BNP, NT-proBNP, proBNP and the C-terminal portion of the BNP signal peptide have been detected in human plasma as well as multiple sub-forms including truncated forms of BNP and NT-proBNP, as well as variable glycosylation of NT-proBNP and proBNP. The origin of these circulating forms, their potential bioactivity and their detection by current analytical methods are presented in this review. PMID:26160054

  9. Down-regulation of C-type natriuretic peptide receptor by vasonatrin peptide in cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-yan L(U); Miao-zhang ZHU; Dian-shi WANG; Jun YU; Hai-tao GUO; Yu-zhen HU; Qi-ming WEI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the regulatory effects of vasonatrin peptide (VNP) on the expression of C-type natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR-C) in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts. METHODS: Quantitative RTPCR was undertaken to evaluate the levels of NPR-C mRNA and radioimmunoassay was used to determine the formation of intracellular cGMP. RESULTS: Twenty-four hours hypoxic exposure increased the level of NPR-C mRNA in cardiomyocytes, while did not alter the expression of NPR-C in cardiac fibroblasts. VNP (1 × l0-8-1×10-6 mol/L) reduced the levels of NPR-C mRNA in cardiac myocytes induced by hypoxia in a concentration-dependent manner, and with high concentration (1×10-6 mol/L) also decreased the expression of NPR-C in cardiac fibroblasts and air-control cardiac myocytes. The inhibitory effects of VNP on the expression of NPR-C was mimicked by 8-bromo-cGMP 1×10-6 mol/L (a membrane permeable analog of cGMP). VNP (1×10-8-1×10-6 mol/L) increased the formation of intracellular guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in both cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts.HS-142-1, the particulate guanylyl cyclase-coupled receptor antagonist, partially abrogated the above effects of VNP. CONCLUSION: Hypoxic exposure for 24 h up-regulated the expression of NPR-C in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. VNP decreased the expression of NPR-C in cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts under both aircontrol and hypoxic condition, which was at least partially mediated by guanylate cyclase linked natriuretic peptide receptors through increasing the intracellular cGMP.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the transcriptional regulation of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-a gene: interactive roles of modified histones, histone acetyltransferase, p300, AND Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-03-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription.

  11. Types of Blood Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Double Red Cell Plasma Platelets Red Cells What blood donation type is best for me? **If you do not ... blood type, a whole blood donation is recommended** Blood Donation Types: Volunteer Donations The standard or most common type ...

  12. Blood Type Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Blood Type Game Printable Version Blood Type Game This feature requires version 6 or later ... many points as possible by matching the appropriate blood type of a donor to the blood type of ...

  13. Total synthesis: Towards artificial terpene cyclases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willot, Matthieu; Christmann, Mathias

    2010-07-01

    The plant-derived sesquiterpene englerin A is a potent inhibitor of several renal cancer cell lines. Two recent total syntheses have utilized cationic gold(I)-complexes to coax readily available open-chain precursors into englerin's challenging oxotricyclic core with enzyme-like precision.

  14. Guarded dependent type theory with coinductive types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizjak, Aleš; Grathwohl, Hans Bugge; Clouston, Ranald;

    2015-01-01

    We present guarded dependent type theory, gDTT, an extensional dependent type theory with a later' modality and clock quantifiers for programming and proving with guarded recursive and coinductive types. The later modality is used to ensure the productivity of recursive definitions in a modular...

  15. Transcriptional regulation induced by cAMP elevation in mouse Schwann cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Daniela; Zeis, Thomas; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, Schwann cell development is regulated by a variety of signals. Some of the aspects of Schwann cell differentiation can be reproduced in vitro in response to forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator elevating intracellular cAMP levels. Herein, the effect of forskolin treatment was investigated by a comprehensive genome-wide expression study on primary mouse Schwann cell cultures. Additional to myelin-related genes, many so far unconsidered genes were ascertained to be mod...

  16. Beta-arrestin-mediated activation of MAPK by inverse agonists reveals distinct active conformations for G protein-coupled receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Azzi, Mounia; Pascale G. Charest; Angers, Stéphane; Rousseau, Guy; Kohout, Trudy; Bouvier, Michel; Piñeyro, Graciela

    2003-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that signaling via G protein-coupled receptors is a diverse phenomenon involving receptor interaction with a variety of signaling partners. Despite this diversity, receptor ligands are commonly classified only according to their ability to modify G protein-dependent signaling. Here we show that beta2AR ligands like ICI118551 and propranolol, which are inverse agonists for Gs-stimulated adenylyl cyclase, induce partial agonist responses for the mitogen-activat...

  17. Anthrax edema toxin differentially regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced monocyte production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 by increasing intracellular cyclic AMP.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoover, D L; Friedlander, A M; Rogers, L.C.; Yoon, I. K.; Warren, R L; Cross, A S

    1994-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis exotoxins mediate most of the symptomatology of severe anthrax. In addition to a clinical syndrome reminiscent of septic shock, which may be mediated by cytokines produced by macrophages stimulated with lethal toxin, infected patients show profound edema at sites of infection. Edema is mediated by edema toxin (ET), which comprises of a binding molecule, protective antigen, and an active moiety, edema factor, which possesses intrinsic adenylyl cyclase activity. Intracellular...

  18. β-adrenoceptor responsiveness in hypertension: Effects of dietary NaCl intake

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    1 Adrenergic responsiveness may be an important determinant of peripheral resistance in man. We have demonstrated that vascular β-adrenergic responsiveness is reduced in young borderline hypertensive subjects. A parallel defect in β-adrenergic mediated adenylyl cyclase activity and β-adrenoceptor affinity for agonists also has been identified in lymphocytes from borderline hypertensive subjects. In contrast, it is unclear whether cardiac β-adrenergic responsiveness is altered.

  19. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Where Do I Begin With Type2? Living With Type 1 Diabetes Enroll in the Living WIth Type 2 Diabetes ... Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And Stay Fit Types ...

  20. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong (FSU); (Georgia)

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  1. Controlling fertilization and cAMP signaling in sperm by optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Vera; Alvarez, Luis; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Hegemann, Peter; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2015-01-20

    Optogenetics is a powerful technique to control cellular activity by light. The light-gated Channelrhodopsin has been widely used to study and manipulate neuronal activity in vivo, whereas optogenetic control of second messengers in vivo has not been examined in depth. In this study, we present a transgenic mouse model expressing a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (bPAC) in sperm. In transgenic sperm, bPAC mimics the action of the endogenous soluble adenylyl cyclase (SACY) that is required for motility and fertilization: light-stimulation rapidly elevates cAMP, accelerates the flagellar beat, and, thereby, changes swimming behavior of sperm. Furthermore, bPAC replaces endogenous adenylyl cyclase activity. In mutant sperm lacking the bicarbonate-stimulated SACY activity, bPAC restored motility after light-stimulation and, thereby, enabled sperm to fertilize oocytes in vitro. We show that optogenetic control of cAMP in vivo allows to non-invasively study cAMP signaling, to control behaviors of single cells, and to restore a fundamental biological process such as fertilization.

  2. 羊驼皮肤中可溶性鸟苷酸环化酶的表达差异%The Different Expression of Soluble Guanylate Cyclase in Alpaca Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊珍; 范瑞文; 杨姗姗; 石占全; 姬凯元; 董常生

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the function of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) in alpaca skin and coat color regulation,differential expression of sGC in skin of brown versus white alpacas was examined using quantitative real-time PCR(qRT-PCR),Western blotting and immunohistochemistry.Expression of sGC mRNA was lower (0.16 fold) in skin samples from brown alpacas relative to expression in skin of white alpacas with significant difference (P<0.01).Using a rabbit polyclonal sGC antibody,an immune reactive band corresponding to sGC was detected by Western blotting analysis in skin samples from white and brown alpacas,showing a weaker signal detected in the samples from brown alpacas with significant difference (P<0.01).The results of immunohistochemistry revealed that sGC was localized in the cytoplasm and intercellular substance of upper hair papilla in hair follicles of alpacas with white hair color,but was localized in ytoplasm and intercellular substance of lower hair bulb and outer root sheath cells in hair follicles of alpacas with brown hair color.Observed differential expression and localization of sGC in skin of white versus brown alpacas suggests a potential role in hair color regulation.%采用免疫组织化学、实时荧光定量PCR和Western blotting对可溶性鸟苷酸环化酶(sGC)在棕色和白色羊驼皮肤中的表达差异进行了研究,以探讨sGC在羊驼皮肤中的作用.实时荧光定量PCR结果显示,sGC在棕色羊驼皮肤中的相对表达量较低,是其在白色羊驼皮肤中的表达量的0.16倍,且差异极显著(P<0.01);Western blotting结果显示,在羊驼皮肤总蛋白中含有与兔多克隆抗体发生免疫阳性反应的条带,在棕色皮肤中的反应阳性弱于白色皮肤,且差异极显著(P<0.01);免疫组织化学结果表明,sGC免疫阳性主要分布在白色羊驼皮肤毛囊的毛球上方细胞及细胞间质,而在棕色羊驼皮肤毛囊中,sGC免疫阳性主要分布在毛球底部和外根鞘细胞及

  3. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ways to Give Close Are You at Risk? Home Prevention Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type ... To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type ...

  4. Guarded Cubical Type Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Bizjak, Aleš; Clouston, Ranald;

    2016-01-01

    types. This further expands the foundations of CTT as a basis for formalisation in mathematics and computer science. We present examples to demonstrate the expressivity of our type theory, all of which have been checked using a prototype type-checker implementation, and present semantics in a presheaf......This paper improves the treatment of equality in guarded dependent type theory (GDTT), by combining it with cubical type theory (CTT). GDTT is an extensional type theory with guarded recursive types, which are useful for building models of program logics, and for programming and reasoning with...... coinductive types. We wish to implement GDTT with decidable type-checking, while still supporting non-trivial equality proofs that reason about the extensions of guarded recursive constructions. CTT is a variation of Martin-L\\"of type theory in which the identity type is replaced by abstract paths between...

  5. Types and Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff; Meineche Smidt, Erik

    from suggesting an implementation, this connection lends a certain naturality to our type system. We also introduce a very general form of extended (recursive) type equations which are explained in terms of (monotone) alternating automata. Since types are simply equationally defined trees......A hierarchical type system for imperative programming languages gives rise to various computational problems, such as type equivalence, type ordering, etc. We present a particular class of finite automata which are shown to be isomorphic to type equations. All the relevant type concepts turn out...... to have well-known automata analogues, such as language equality, language inclusion, etc. This provides optimal or best known algorithms for the type system, by a process of translating type equations to automata, solving the analogous problem, and translating the result back to type equations. Apart...

  6. The type III secreted protein BspR regulates the virulence genes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kurushima

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica is closely related with B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, the causative agents of whooping cough. These pathogenic species share a number of virulence genes, including the gene locus for the type III secretion system (T3SS that delivers effector proteins. To identify unknown type III effectors in Bordetella, secreted proteins in the bacterial culture supernatants of wild-type B. bronchiseptica and an isogenic T3SS-deficient mutant were compared with iTRAQ-based, quantitative proteomic analysis method. BB1639, annotated as a hypothetical protein, was identified as a novel type III secreted protein and was designated BspR (Bordetella secreted protein regulator. The virulence of a BspR mutant (ΔbspR in B. bronchiseptica was significantly attenuated in a mouse infection model. BspR was also highly conserved in B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, suggesting that BspR is an essential virulence factor in these three Bordetella species. Interestingly, the BspR-deficient strain showed hyper-secretion of T3SS-related proteins. Furthermore, T3SS-dependent host cell cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity were also enhanced in the absence of BspR. By contrast, the expression of filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin, and adenylate cyclase toxin was completely abolished in the BspR-deficient strain. Finally, we demonstrated that BspR is involved in the iron-responsive regulation of T3SS. Thus, Bordetella virulence factors are coordinately but inversely controlled by BspR, which functions as a regulator in response to iron starvation.

  7. Type Inference with Inequalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    1991-01-01

    Type inference can be phrased as constraint-solving over types. We consider an implicitly typed language equipped with recursive types, multiple inheritance, 1st order parametric polymorphism, and assignments. Type correctness is expressed as satisfiability of a possibly infinite collection...... of (monotonic) inequalities on the types of variables and expressions. A general result about systems of inequalities over semilattices yields a solvable form. We distinguish between deciding typability (the existence of solutions) and type inference (the computation of a minimal solution). In our case, both...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0801 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0801 ref|NP_001092076.1| adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 1 (pituitary...) receptor type I [Gallus gallus] gb|ABQ63080.1| pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3244 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3244 ref|NP_001092076.1| adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 1 (pituitary...) receptor type I [Gallus gallus] gb|ABQ63080.1| pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-22-0273 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-22-0273 ref|NP_001092076.1| adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 1 (pituitary...) receptor type I [Gallus gallus] gb|ABQ63080.1| pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide

  11. Type Systems for Bigraphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsborg, Ebbe; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Sangiorgi, Davide

    We propose a novel and uniform approach to type systems for (process) calculi, which roughly pushes the challenge of designing type systems and proving properties about them to the meta-model of bigraphs. Concretely, we propose to define type systems for the term language for bigraphs, which...... of controls and a set of reaction rules, collectively a bigraphical reactive system (BRS). Possible advantages of developing bigraphical type systems include: a deeper understanding of a type system itself and its properties; transfer of the type systems to the concrete family of calculi that the BRS models......; and the possibility of modularly adapting the type systems to extensions of the BRS (with new controls). As proof of concept we present a model of a pi-calculus, develop an i/o-type system with subtyping on this model, prove crucial properties (including subject reduction) for this type system, and transfer...

  12. Multiparty Symmetric Sum Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse; Yoshida, Nobuko; Honda, Kohei

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a new theory of multiparty session types based on symmetric sum types, by which we can type non-deterministic orchestration choice behaviours. While the original branching type in session types can represent a choice made by a single participant and accepted by others...... determining how the session proceeds, the symmetric sum type represents a choice made by agreement among all the participants of a session. Such behaviour can be found in many practical systems, including collaborative workflow in healthcare systems for clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Processes...... with the symmetric sums can be embedded into the original branching types using conductor processes. We show that this type-driven embedding preserves typability, satisfies semantic soundness and completeness, and meets the encodability criteria adapted to the typed setting. The theory leads to an efficient...

  13. Type checking with open type functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrijvers, Tom; Jones, Simon Peyton; Chakravarty, Manual;

    2008-01-01

    We report on an extension of Haskell with open type-level functions and equality constraints that unifies earlier work on GADTs, functional dependencies, and associated types. The contribution of the paper is that we identify and characterise the key technical challenge of entailment checking; an......; and we give a novel, decidable, sound, and complete algorithm to solve it, together with some practically-important variants. Our system is implemented in GHC, and is already in active use....

  14. Evidence that the cAMP pathway controls emergence of both primary and appressorial germ tubes of barley powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinane, J; Dalvin, S; Bindslev, L; Hall, A; Gurr, S; Oliver, R

    2000-05-01

    Development of conidia of barley powdery mildew involves the formation of a primary germ tube (PGT), an appressorial germ tube (AGT), and an appressorium. Previously, it was found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) was involved in these developmental processes. Comparison of development on the host surface with two types of cellulose membrane revealed that frequency of PGT emergence was surface independent. On one type of cellulose, where the frequencies of both AGT and appressorial differentiation were similar to that on the host surface, cAMP levels and protein kinase A (PKA) activities had a biphasic pattern with peaks at 15 min and 4 h after inoculation (prior to PGT and AGT emergence, respectively). The effect of manipulating cAMP levels was tested on another type of cellulose membrane, which stimulated a lower degree of AGT and appressorial formation than the host surface. Cholera toxin and forskolin, activators of adenylyl cyclase, significantly increased PGT emergence, but cAMP did not. Cholera toxin, forskolin, and cAMP increased the frequency of AGT and appressorial formation, but in a time-dependent manner. PMID:10796015

  15. Dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors as new drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mest, H-J; Mentlein, R

    2005-04-01

    Inhibitors of the regulatory protease dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) are currently under development in preclinical and clinical studies (several pharmaceutical companies, now in Phase III) as potential drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Their development is based on the observation that DPP-IV rapidly inactivates the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which is released postprandially from the gut and increases insulin secretion. DPP-IV inhibitors stabilise endogenous GLP-1 at physiological concentrations, and induce insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner; therefore, they do not demonstrate any hypoglycaemic effects. Furthermore, they are orally bioavailable. In addition to their ability to protect GLP-1 against degradation, DPP-IV inhibitors also stabilise other incretins, including gastric inhibitory peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide. They also reduce the antagonistic and desensitising effects of the fragments formed by truncation of the incretins. In clinical studies, when used for the treatment of diabetes over a 1-year period, DPP-IV inhibitors show improved efficacy over time. This finding can be explained by a GLP-1-induced increase in the number of beta cells. Potential risks associated with DPP-IV inhibitors include the prolongation of the action of other peptide hormones, neuropeptides and chemokines cleaved by the protease, and their interaction with DPP-IV-related proteases. Based on their mode of action, DPP-IV inhibitors seem to be of particular value in early forms of type 2 diabetes, either alone or in combination with other types of oral agents. PMID:15770466

  16. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More ... Researchers Our Research Foundation Diabetes Pro: Professional Resources Online We Support Your Doctor Clinical Practice Guidelines Patient ...

  17. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home ... glucose levels normal. Type 2 is treated with lifestyle changes, oral medications (pills), and insulin. When glucose ...

  18. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High ... type 2 can control their blood glucose with healthy eating and being active. But, your doctor may need ...

  19. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  20. Types of Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about this condition, see Inflammatory Breast Cancer . Paget disease of the nipple This type of breast cancer ... carcinoma (this is a type of metaplastic carcinoma) Medullary carcinoma Mucinous (or colloid) carcinoma Papillary carcinoma Tubular ...

  1. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sign up for Tour de Cure! More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ... 1? - 2016-08-type-1.html Living w/ Diabetes Is Someone You Love New to Type 1? ...

  2. Blood Type Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Presents a blood type puzzle that provides a visual, hands-on mechanism by which students can examine blood group reactions. Offers students an opportunity to construct their own knowledge about blood types. (JRH)

  3. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts About ... more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help us get ...

  4. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the Uninsured Medicare Medicaid & CHIP For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday Life Children and Type ... Someone You Love New to Type 1? Even kids can learn to manage for a long, healthy ...

  5. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with Diabetes Home Recently Diagnosed Where Do I Begin With Type2? Living With Type 1 Diabetes ... Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I Eat? Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Non- ...

  6. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Type 2 Recently Diagnosed Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Control Complications Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Enroll in the Living With Type 2 Diabetes Program donate en -- Diabetes Must Be Stopped - 2016-06-donation- ...

  7. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the test. Know where you stand. More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ... 1? - 2016-08-type-1.html Living w/ Diabetes Is Someone You Love New to Type 1? ...

  8. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today for trusted info, recipes & more! More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ... 1? - 2016-08-type-1.html Living w/ Diabetes Is Someone You Love New to Type 1? ...

  9. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your ... of going into cells, it can cause two problems: Right away, your cells may be starved for ...

  10. Types of chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000910.htm Types of chemotherapy To use the sharing features on this page, ... or on cancer cells. How Doctors Choose Your Chemotherapy The type and dose of chemotherapy your doctor ...

  11. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... to later on. Some groups have a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes than others. Type ...

  12. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... People Working to Stop Diabetes Common Terms Diabetes Statistics Infographics Living with Diabetes Home Recently Diagnosed Where ... Basics Symptoms Type 1 Type 2 Gestational Myths Statistics Common Terms Genetics Living With Diabetes Recently Diagnosed ...

  13. Linearly Refined Session Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Baltazar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Session types capture precise protocol structure in concurrent programming, but do not specify properties of the exchanged values beyond their basic type. Refinement types are a form of dependent types that can address this limitation, combining types with logical formulae that may refer to program values and can constrain types using arbitrary predicates. We present a pi calculus with assume and assert operations, typed using a session discipline that incorporates refinement formulae written in a fragment of Multiplicative Linear Logic. Our original combination of session and refinement types, together with the well established benefits of linearity, allows very fine-grained specifications of communication protocols in which refinement formulae are treated as logical resources rather than persistent truths.

  14. Examining Office Type Preference

    OpenAIRE

    Rolfö, Linda; Eklund, Jörgen

    2015-01-01

    Office types and their environmental features influence performance and job satisfaction. Yet employees’ opinions are seldom considered when choosing office type. This paper suggests a method that investigates employees’ office type preferences and motives behind the preferences. The method proved to be quick and simple and provided a flow of current to preferred office type. A majority preferred the quiet cell office for its privacy while the open office was considered having a noisy and dis...

  15. Topologies on types: connections

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Xiong, Siyang

    2008-01-01

    For different purposes, economists may use different topologies on types. We char- acterize the relationship among these various topologies. First, we show that for any general types, convergence in the uniform-weak topology implies convergence in both the strategic topology and the uniform strategic topology. Second, we explicitly con- struct a type which is not the limit of any finite types under the uniform strategic topology, showing that the uniform strategic topology is strictly fi ner ...

  16. Identification and Localization of the Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase 10A in Bovine Testis and Mature Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Serge; Maréchal, Loïze; El Hajj, Hassan; Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Richard, François J.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is known to play highly important roles in sperm motility and acrosomal exocytosis. It is known to act through protein phosphorylation via PRKA and through the activation of guanine nucleotide exchange factors like EPAC. Sperm intracellular cAMP levels depend on the activity of adenylyl cyclases, mostly SACY, though transmembrane-containing adenylyl cyclases are also present, and on the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE) whose role is to degrade cAMP into 5’-AMP. The PDE superfamily is subdivided into 11 families (PDE1 to 11), which act on either cAMP or cGMP, or on both cAMP and cGMP although with different enzymatic properties. PDE10, which is more effective on cAMP than cGMP, has been known for almost 15 years and is mostly studied in the brain where it is associated with neurological disorders. Although a high level of PDE10A gene expression is observed in the testis, information on the identity of the isoforms or on the cell type that express the PDE10 protein is lacking. The objective of this study was to identify the PDE10A isoforms expressed in the testis and germ cells, and to determine the presence and localization of PDE10A in mature spermatozoa. As a sub-objective, since PDE10A transcript variants were reported strictly through analyses of bovine genomic sequence, we also wanted to determine the nucleotide and amino acid sequences by experimental evidence. Using RT-PCR, 5’- and 3’-RACE approaches we clearly show that PDE10A transcript variants X3 and X5 are expressed in bovine testis as well as in primary spermatocytes and spermatids. We also reveal using a combination of immunological techniques and proteomics analytical tools that the PDE10A isoform X4 is present in the area of the developing acrosome of spermatids and of the acrosome of mature spermatozoa. PMID:27548062

  17. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: lp-type-2, In this section Diabetes Basics Type 2 Facts About Type ... ensureArray(data.submitSurveyResponse.errors); $.each(surveyErrors, function () { if (this.errorField) { $('input[name="' + this.errorField + '"]').closest('.form-group') . ...

  18. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type 2 Diabetes Program donate en -- Donate Today - 2016-08-donation-en.html Donate Today Diabetes touches ... Chat Closed engagement en -- Need Type 2 Tips? - 2016-08-lwt2d-en.html Need Type 2 Tips? ...

  19. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or insulin to help you meet your target blood glucose levels. Type 2 usually gets worse over time – even if ... About Type 2 Recently Diagnosed Treatment and Care Blood Glucose ... Living With Type 2 Diabetes Program donate en -- Donate Today - 2016- ...

  20. Type Has Many Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ralph J.

    1996-01-01

    Affirms that taking time to learn type classification, terminology, and use will be a major step in producing more effective high school newspapers. Considers that desktop publishing is both a blessing and a curse when it comes to type use. Provides type use definitions. (PA)

  1. Diabetes Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

  2. Osteogenesis imperfecta type V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, Frank; Moffatt, Pierre; Cheung, Moira;

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type V is an autosomal dominant bone fragility disorder that we had described a decade ago. Recent research has shown that OI type V is caused by a recurrent c.-14C>T mutation in IFITM5. In the present study, we assessed all patients diagnosed with OI type V at our...

  3. Multiparty Symmetric Sum Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Nielsen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new theory of multiparty session types based on symmetric sum types, by which we can type non-deterministic orchestration choice behaviours. While the original branching type in session types can represent a choice made by a single participant and accepted by others determining how the session proceeds, the symmetric sum type represents a choice made by agreement among all the participants of a session. Such behaviour can be found in many practical systems, including collaborative workflow in healthcare systems for clinical practice guidelines (CPGs. Processes using the symmetric sums can be embedded into the original branching types using conductor processes. We show that this type-driven embedding preserves typability, satisfies semantic soundness and completeness, and meets the encodability criteria adapted to the typed setting. The theory leads to an efficient implementation of a prototypical tool for CPGs which automatically translates the original CPG specifications from a representation called the Process Matrix to symmetric sum types, type checks programs and executes them.

  4. Improving Precision of Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Johnni

    Types in programming languages provide a powerful tool for the programmer to document the code so that a large aspect of the intent can not only be presented to fellow programmers but also be checked automatically by compilers. The precision with which types model the behavior of programs...... is crucial to the quality of these automated checks, and in this thesis we present three different improvements to the precision of types in three different aspects of the Java programming language. First we show how to extend the type system in Java with a new type which enables the detection of unintended...... mixing of unrelated types. Secondly, we present an improvement of the type checking algorithm in Java which enables the compiler to detect and ease the use of a common programming idiom called guarded casts. Thirdly, we present an improvement of the precision with which classes generated by a parser...

  5. Interactions between Child Types and Classroom Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel; Kendall, Arthur J.

    Research is described which explores the hypothesis that different classroom situations may be optimal for different individuals. The approach used cluster analysis to identify student and classroom "types" whose interactions were then examined in an analysis of variance framework. About 1,300 fourth graders from 50 classrooms were involved in the…

  6. Associative learning in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Robert D; Byrne, John H

    2015-05-01

    This work reviews research on neural mechanisms of two types of associative learning in the marine mollusk Aplysia, classical conditioning of the gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex and operant conditioning of feeding behavior. Basic classical conditioning is caused in part by activity-dependent facilitation at sensory neuron-motor neuron (SN-MN) synapses and involves a hybrid combination of activity-dependent presynaptic facilitation and Hebbian potentiation, which are coordinated by trans-synaptic signaling. Classical conditioning also shows several higher-order features, which might be explained by the known circuit connections in Aplysia. Operant conditioning is caused in part by a different type of mechanism, an intrinsic increase in excitability of an identified neuron in the central pattern generator (CPG) for feeding. However, for both classical and operant conditioning, adenylyl cyclase is a molecular site of convergence of the two signals that are associated. Learning in other invertebrate preparations also involves many of the same mechanisms, which may contribute to learning in vertebrates as well. PMID:25877219

  7. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  8. Mastering TypeScript

    CERN Document Server

    Rozentals, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Whether you are a JavaScript developer aiming to learn TypeScript, or an experienced TypeScript developer wanting to take your skills to the next level, this book is for you. From basic to advanced language constructs, test-driven development, and object-oriented techniques, you will learn how to get the most out of the TypeScript language.

  9. Type II universal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  10. Types of Foreign Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    Foreign aid is given for many purposes and different intentions, yet most studies treat aid flows as a unitary concept. This paper uses factor analysis to separate aid flows into different types. The main types can be interpreted as aid for economic purposes, social purposes, and reconstruction......; a residual category captures remaining purposes. Estimating the growth effects of separable types of aid suggests that most aid has no effects while reconstruction aid has direct positive effects. Although this type only applies in special circumstances, it has become more prevalent in more recent years....

  11. TypeScript revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Maharry, Dan

    2013-01-01

    TypeScript Revealed is a quick 100-page guide to Anders Hejlsberg's new take on JavaScript. With this brief, fast-paced introduction to TypeScript, .NET, Web and Windows 8 application developers who are already familiar with JavaScript will easily get up to speed with TypeScript and decide whether or not to start incorporating it into their own development. TypeScript is 'JavaScript for Application-scale development'; a superset of JavaScript that brings to it an additional object-oriented-like syntax familiar to .NET programmers that compiles down into simple, clean JavaScript that any browse

  12. A host-specific virulence protein of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae is translocated into human epithelial cells by the Type III secretion system of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valinsky, Lea; Nisan, Israel; Tu, Xuanlin; Nisan, Gal; Rosenshine, Ilan; Hanski, Emanuel; Barash, Isaac; Manulis, Shulamit

    2002-03-01

    summary HsvG is a virulence factor that determines the host specificity of Erwinia herbicola pathovars gypsophilae and betae on gypsophila. We used the calmodulin adenylate cyclase reporter (CyaA) to demonstrate that HsvG is secreted and translocated into HeLa cells by the type III secretion system (TTSS) of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). A fusion of HsvG-CyaA containing 271 amino acids of the N-terminus of HsvG were introduced into a wild-type EPEC, espB mutant deficient in translocation and an escV mutant deficient in secretion. A significant secretion was detected in EPEC/HsvG-CyaA and its espB mutant, but not with the escV mutant. Translocation was only observed with the wild-type EPEC, and not with the other two mutants. To localize the secretion and translocation signals of HsvG, fusions containing 39, 11 and 3 amino acids of the N-terminus of HsvG were constructed and expressed in EPEC. A fusion containing the first 39 N-terminal amino acids of HsvG was secreted and translocated at significant level (31-35%) as compared to the original fusion. In contrast, fusions containing the 3 and 11 amino acids failed to be secreted and translocated. PMID:20569314

  13. Beyond Type D personality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Szabó, Balázs M;

    2009-01-01

    Type D personality has been associated with impaired health status in chronic heart failure (CHF), but other psychological factors may also be important.......Type D personality has been associated with impaired health status in chronic heart failure (CHF), but other psychological factors may also be important....

  14. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Haemophilus Influenzae type b Page Content Article Body If you’re like many parents, you may have been unfamiliar with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections until your pediatrician recommended a vaccine ...

  15. Types of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » Blood Transfusion » Types of Blood Transfusions Explore Blood Transfusion What Is... ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Blood Transfusions Blood is transfused either as whole blood ( ...

  16. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  17. Type 2 diabetes models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Dorte Xenia

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with type 2 diabetes in vivo models and techniques suitable for testing new anti-diabetic compounds. In particular, the testing of TRP antagonist for beneficial effects against type 2 diabetes is considered. There are many choices of both in vitro techniques and in vivo models...

  18. Calcium-Driven Folding of RTX Domain β-Rolls Ratchets Translocation of RTX Proteins through Type I Secretion Ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumba, Ladislav; Masin, Jiri; Macek, Pavel; Wald, Tomas; Motlova, Lucia; Bibova, Ilona; Klimova, Nela; Bednarova, Lucie; Veverka, Vaclav; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I; Barinka, Cyril; Sebo, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-binding RTX proteins are equipped with C-terminal secretion signals and translocate from the Ca(2+)-depleted cytosol of Gram-negative bacteria directly into the Ca(2+)-rich external milieu, passing through the "channel-tunnel" ducts of type I secretion systems (T1SSs). Using Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin, we solved the structure of an essential C-terminal assembly that caps the RTX domains of RTX family leukotoxins. This is shown to scaffold directional Ca(2+)-dependent folding of the carboxy-proximal RTX repeat blocks into β-rolls. The resulting intramolecular Brownian ratchets then prevent backsliding of translocating RTX proteins in the T1SS conduits and thereby accelerate excretion of very large RTX leukotoxins from bacterial cells by a vectorial "push-ratchet" mechanism. Successive Ca(2+)-dependent and cosecretional acquisition of a functional RTX toxin structure in the course of T1SS-mediated translocation, through RTX domain folding from the C-terminal cap toward the N terminus, sets a paradigm that opens for design of virulence inhibitors of major pathogens.

  19. Spironolactone treatment attenuates vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetic mice by decreasing oxidative stress and restoring NO/GC signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcondes A B; Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Cau, Stefany B A; Lopes, Rheure A M; Mestriner, Fabiola L A C; Fais, Rafael S; Touyz, Rhian M; Tostes, Rita C

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (DM2) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Aldosterone, which has pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory effects in the cardiovascular system, is positively regulated in DM2. We assessed whether blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) with spironolactone decreases reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated vascular dysfunction and improves vascular nitric oxide (NO) signaling in diabetes. Leptin receptor knockout [LepR(db)/LepR(db) (db/db)] mice, a model of DM2, and their counterpart controls [LepR(db)/LepR(+), (db/+) mice] received spironolactone (50 mg/kg body weight/day) or vehicle (ethanol 1%) via oral per gavage for 6 weeks. Spironolactone treatment abolished endothelial dysfunction and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser(1177)) in arteries from db/db mice, determined by acetylcholine-induced relaxation and Western Blot analysis, respectively. MR antagonist therapy also abrogated augmented ROS-generation in aorta from diabetic mice, determined by lucigenin luminescence assay. Spironolactone treatment increased superoxide dismutase-1 and catalase expression, improved sodium nitroprusside and BAY 41-2272-induced relaxation, and increased soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) β subunit expression in arteries from db/db mice. Our results demonstrate that spironolactone decreases diabetes-associated vascular oxidative stress and prevents vascular dysfunction through processes involving increased expression of antioxidant enzymes and sGC. These findings further elucidate redox-sensitive mechanisms whereby spironolactone protects against vascular injury in diabetes. PMID:26500555

  20. Spironolactone treatment attenuates vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetic mice by decreasing oxidative stress and restoring NO/GC signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes Alves Barbosa Da Silva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (DM2 increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Aldosterone, which has pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory effects in the cardiovascular system, is positively regulated in DM2. We assessed whether blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR with spironolactone decreases ROS-associated vascular dysfunction and improves vascular NO signaling in diabetes. Leptin receptor knockout [LepRdb/LepRdb (db/db] mice, a model of DM2, and their counterpart controls [LepRdb/LepR+, (db/+ mice] received spironolactone (50 mg/kg body weight/day or vehicle (ethanol 1% via oral per gavage for 6 weeks. Spironolactone treatment abolished the endothelial dysfunction and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177, determined by acetylcholine-induced relaxation and Western Blot analysis, respectively. MR antagonist therapy also abrogated augmented ROS-generation in aorta from diabetic mice, determined by lucigenin luminescence assay. Spironolactone treatment increased superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1 and catalase expression, improved sodium nitroprusside (SNP and BAY 41-2272-induced relaxation, as well as increased soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC subunit β protein expression in arteries from db/db mice. Our results demonstrate that spironolactone decreases diabetes-associated vascular oxidative stress and prevents vascular dysfunction through processes involving increased expression of antioxidant enzymes and sGC. These findings further elucidate redox-sensitive mechanisms whereby spironolactone protects against vascular injury in diabetes.

  1. Types Of Christian Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Petroman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christian tourism is asub-type of tourism where pilgrims travel alone or in group as missionaries orpilgrims or to spend their free time to recollect; it attracts a large numberof travellers. Christian tourism can be practiced by religious young people,missionaries, participants to religious convents, amateurs of religiouscruises, religious camps, visitors of religious attractions, religiousadventurers. Christian tourism can be considered a sub-type of religioustourism because of the large number of people involved in this type of tourismworldwide. Christian tourism as a sub-category of religious tourism coversthree main sub-types: traditional pilgrimage practiced by most world religions,missionary travel to different areas in the world, and confessional voyage. Thestructure of hospitality industry is common to all types of tourism but, fortraditional pilgrimage, there must be special places for the pilgrims to sleep,eat and pray, because they belong, in most cases, to the medium-income touristcategory.

  2. Making Type Inference Practical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff; Oxhøj, Nicholas; Palsberg, Jens

    1992-01-01

    We present the implementation of a type inference algorithm for untyped object-oriented programs with inheritance, assignments, and late binding. The algorithm significantly improves our previous one, presented at OOPSLA'91, since it can handle collection classes, such as List, in a useful way. Abo....... Experiments indicate that the implementation type checks as much as 100 lines pr. second. This results in a mature product, on which a number of tools can be based, for example a safety tool, an image compression tool, a code optimization tool, and an annotation tool. This may make type inference for object...

  3. P-type ATPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Michael G; Nissen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    P-type ATPases form a large superfamily of cation and lipid pumps. They are remarkably simple with only a single catalytic subunit and carry out large domain motions during transport. The atomic structure of P-type ATPases in different conformations, together with ample mutagenesis evidence, has provided detailed insights into the pumping mechanism by these biological nanomachines. Phylogenetically, P-type ATPases are divided into five subfamilies, P1-P5. These subfamilies differ with respect to transported ligands and the way they are regulated. PMID:21351879

  4. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturstudiet har vi arbeidet oss frem for å ...

  5. Type-II Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jihn E

    2016-01-01

    I will talk on our new theory on baryogenesis through type-II leptogenesis which is different from the well-known type-I leptogenesis. I will comment on the Jarlskog phases, $\\delta_{\\rm CKM}$ and $\\delta_{\\rm PMNS}$, in the CKM and PMNS matrices. In the type-II leptogenesis, the PMNS phase is used for Sakharov's condition on the global quantum number generation in the Universe. For this to be effective, the SU(2)$\\times$U(1) gauge symmetry must be broken during the leptogenesis epoch.

  6. Parametric Compositional Data Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Hvitved, Tom

    2012-01-01

    In previous work we have illustrated the benefits that compositional data types (CDTs) offer for implementing languages and in general for dealing with abstract syntax trees (ASTs). Based on Swierstra's data types \\'a la carte, CDTs are implemented as a Haskell library that enables the definition...... of recursive data types and functions on them in a modular and extendable fashion. Although CDTs provide a powerful tool for analysing and manipulating ASTs, they lack a convenient representation of variable binders. In this paper we remedy this deficiency by combining the framework of CDTs with Chlipala...

  7. Altered hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity in mice deficient in the PGE2 EP2 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongwei; Zhang, Jian; Breyer, Richard M.; Chen, Chu

    2008-01-01

    Our laboratory demonstrated previously that PGE2-induced modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission is via a presynaptic PGE2 EP2 receptor. However, little is known about whether the EP2 receptor is involved in hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. Here we show that long-term potentiation (LTP) at the hippocampal perforant path synapses was impaired in mice deficient in the EP2 (KO), while membrane excitability and passive properties in granule neurons were normal. Importantly, escape latency in the water maze in EP2 KO was longer than that in age-matched EP2 wild-type littermates (WT). We also observed that LTP was potentiated in EP2 WT animals that received lipopolysaccharide (LPS, i.p.), but not in EP2 KO. Bath application of PGE2 or butaprost, an EP2 receptor agonist, increased synaptic transmission and decreased paired-pulses ratio (PPR) in EP2 WT mice, but failed to induce the changes in EP2 KO mice. Meanwhile, synaptic transmission was elevated by application of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, both in EP2 KO and WT animals. In addition, the PGE2-enhanced synaptic transmission was significantly attenuated by application of PKA, IP3 or MAPK inhibitors in EP2 WT animals. Our results show that hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity is impaired in mice deficient in the EP2, suggesting that PGE2-EP2 signaling is important for hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. PMID:19012750

  8. Super-resolution imaging of ciliary microdomains in isolated olfactory sensory neurons using a custom two-color stimulated emission depletion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stephanie A.; Ozbay, Baris N.; Potcoava, Mariana; Salcedo, Ernesto; Restrepo, Diego; Gibson, Emily A.

    2016-06-01

    We performed stimulated emission depletion (STED) imaging of isolated olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) using a custom-built microscope. The STED microscope uses a single pulsed laser to excite two separate fluorophores, Atto 590 and Atto 647N. A gated timing circuit combined with temporal interleaving of the different color excitation/STED laser pulses filters the two channel detection and greatly minimizes crosstalk. We quantified the instrument resolution to be ˜81 and ˜44 nm, for the Atto 590 and Atto 647N channels. The spatial separation between the two channels was measured to be under 10 nm, well below the resolution limit. The custom-STED microscope is incorporated onto a commercial research microscope allowing brightfield, differential interference contrast, and epifluorescence imaging on the same field of view. We performed immunolabeling of OSNs in mice to image localization of ciliary membrane proteins involved in olfactory transduction. We imaged Ca2+-permeable cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel (Atto 594) and adenylyl cyclase type III (ACIII) (Atto 647N) in distinct cilia. STED imaging resolved well-separated subdiffraction limited clusters for each protein. We quantified the size of each cluster to have a mean value of 88±48 nm and 124±43 nm, for CNG and ACIII, respectively. STED imaging showed separated clusters that were not resolvable in confocal images.

  9. A conditioned visual orientation requires the ellipsoid body in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chao; Du, Yifei; Yuan, Deliang; Li, Meixia; Gong, Haiyun; Gong, Zhefeng; Liu, Li

    2014-01-01

    Orientation, the spatial organization of animal behavior, is an essential faculty of animals. Bacteria and lower animals such as insects exhibit taxis, innate orientation behavior, directly toward or away from a directional cue. Organisms can also orient themselves at a specific angle relative to the cues. In this study, using Drosophila as a model system, we established a visual orientation conditioning paradigm based on a flight simulator in which a stationary flying fly could control the rotation of a visual object. By coupling aversive heat shocks to a fly's orientation toward one side of the visual object, we found that the fly could be conditioned to orientate toward the left or right side of the frontal visual object and retain this conditioned visual orientation. The lower and upper visual fields have different roles in conditioned visual orientation. Transfer experiments showed that conditioned visual orientation could generalize between visual targets of different sizes, compactness, or vertical positions, but not of contour orientation. Rut-Type I adenylyl cyclase and Dnc-phosphodiesterase were dispensable for visual orientation conditioning. Normal activity and scb signaling in R3/R4d neurons of the ellipsoid body were required for visual orientation conditioning. Our studies established a visual orientation conditioning paradigm and examined the behavioral properties and neural circuitry of visual orientation, an important component of the insect's spatial navigation.

  10. Stable G protein-effector complexes in striatal neurons: mechanism of assembly and role in neurotransmitter signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Keqiang; Masuho, Ikuo; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Cao, Yan; Sasaki, Keita; Lai, Chun Wan J; Han, Pyung-Lim; Ueda, Hiroshi; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Xu, Baoji; Willardson, Barry M; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    In the striatum, signaling via G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors is essential for motor control. Critical to this process is the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5) that produces second messenger cAMP upon receptor-mediated activation by G protein Golf. However, the molecular organization of the Golf-AC5 signaling axis is not well understood. In this study, we report that in the striatum AC5 exists in a stable pre-coupled complex with subunits of Golf heterotrimer. We use genetic mouse models with disruption in individual components of the complex to reveal hierarchical order of interactions required for AC5-Golf stability. We further identify that the assembly of AC5-Golf complex is mediated by PhLP1 chaperone that plays central role in neurotransmitter receptor coupling to cAMP production motor learning. These findings provide evidence for the existence of stable G protein-effector signaling complexes and identify a new component essential for their assembly. PMID:26613416

  11. Different mechanisms of actions of genistein and quercetin on spontaneous contractions of rabbit duodenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Santos-Fagundes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are known to relax precontracted intestinal smooth muscle and delay intestinal transit or intestinal peristalsis. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of genistein and quercetin on spontaneous contractions of rabbit duodenum in vitro in an organ bath. Genistein and quercetin (0.1-10 µM reduced the amplitude of spontaneous contractions in the longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of rabbit duodenum, but they did not modify the frequency. Bay K8644 (L-type Ca2+ channel activator, apamin, charybdotoxin, and tetraetylammonium (K+ channel blockers reverted the inhibition of amplitude of spontaneous contractions induced by genistein in longitudinal and circular smooth muscle. H-89 (protein kinase A inhibitor antagonized the reduction of the amplitude of spontaneous contractions induced by quercetin in longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of duodenum, while 2,5-dideoxiadenosine (adenylyl cyclase inhibitor reverted only the reduction of the amplitude in circular smooth muscle. In conclusion, genistein and quercetin reduce the spontaneous contractions in the duodenum by different mechanisms of actions. The effect of genistein would be mediated by Ca2+ and K+ channels, while the effect of quercetin would be mediated by cAMP and protein kinase A.

  12. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Run; Zhang, Ke; Wei, Yanxia; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Hong, Yang; Zhu, Minyan; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development. PMID:26859889

  13. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run Lei

    Full Text Available The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development.

  14. Hormonal control of mammalian oocyte meiosis at diplotene stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meijia; Xia, Guoliang

    2012-04-01

    Mammalian oocytes grow and undergo meiosis within ovarian follicles. Fully grown oocytes are arrested at the first meiotic prophase by a mural granulosa origin "arrester" until a surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary at the mid-cycle stimulates the immature oocyte to resume meiosis. Recent evidence indicates that natriuretic peptide precursor type C (NPPC) produced by mural granulosa cells stimulates the generation of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) by cumulus cell natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2), which diffuses into oocyte via gap junctions and inhibits oocyte phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A) activity and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) hydrolysis and maintains meiotic arrest with a high intraoocyte cAMP level. This cAMP is generated through the activity of the Gs G-protein by the G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR3 and GPR12, and adenylyl cyclases (ADCY) endogenous to the oocyte. Further studies suggest that endocrine hormones, such as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), LH, 17β-estradiol (E2) and oocyte-derived paracrine factors (ODPFs), participate in oocyte meiosis possibly by the regulation of NPPC and/or NPR2. A detailed investigation of NPPC and NPR2 expression in follicle cells will elucidate the precise molecular mechanisms of gonadotropins, and control the arrest as well as resumption of meiosis.

  15. Voluntary running depreciates the requirement of Ca2+-stimulated cAMP signaling in synaptic potentiation and memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Qi; Sethna, Ferzin; Yan, Lily; Moon, Changjong; Yang, Miyoung; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-08-01

    Mental health and cognitive functions are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although having active lifestyle with physical exercise improves learning and memory, how it interacts with the specific key molecular regulators of synaptic plasticity is largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of voluntary running on long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation in mice lacking type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1), a neurospecific synaptic enzyme that contributes to Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP production. Following 1 mo of voluntary running-wheel exercise, the impaired LTP and object recognition memory in AC1 knockout (KO) mice were significantly attenuated. Running up-regulated exon II mRNA level of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), though it failed to increase exon I and IV mRNAs in the hippocampus of AC1 KO mice. Intrahippocampal infusion of recombinant BDNF was sufficient to rescue LTP and object recognition memory defects in AC1 KO mice. Therefore, voluntary running and exogenous BDNF application overcome the defective Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP signaling. Our results also demonstrate that alteration in Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP can affect the molecular outcome of physical exercise. PMID:27421897

  16. The smell of blue light: a new approach towards understanding an olfactory neuronal network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemens F Störtkuhl

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction is one of the most important senses throughout the animal kingdom. It enables animals to discriminate between a wide variety of attractive and repulsive odorants and often plays a decisive role in species specific communication. In recent years the analysis of olfactory systems both in vertebrates and invertebrates has attracted much scientific interest. In this context a pivotal question is how the properties and connectivities of individual neurons contribute to a functioning neuronal network that mediates odor-guided behavior. As a novel approach to analyze the role of individual neurons within a circuitry, techniques have been established that make use of light-sensitive proteins. In this review we introduce a non-invasive, optogenetic technique which was used to manipulate the activity of individual neurons in the olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Both channelrhodopsin-2 and the photosensitive adenylyl cyclase PAC α in individual olfactory receptor neurons of the olfactory system of Drosophila larvae allows stimulating individual receptor neurons by light. Depending on which particular olfactory receptor neuron is optogenetically activated, repulsion or attraction behavior can be induced, indicating which sensory neurons underlie which type of behavior.

  17. Description of vegetation types

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides descriptions of five vegetation types found in Iowa- oak savannah, mature hardwoods, floodplain woods, scrub woods, and riparian woods. Oak...

  18. Types of Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Types of Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... some features for hearing aids? What are hearing aids? Hearing aids are sound-amplifying devices designed to ...

  19. The type III manufactory

    CERN Document Server

    Palcoux, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Using unusual objects in the theory of von Neumann algebra, as the chinese game Go or the Conway game of life (generalized on finitely presented groups), we are able to build, by hands, many type III factors.

  20. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Diabetes Diabetes Myths A Day in the Life of Diabetes Famous People Working to Stop Diabetes ... CHIP For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday Life Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights ...

  1. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High ... You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  2. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I ... levels may hurt your eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. Some people with type 2 can control their ...

  3. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & ... Terms Genetics Living With Diabetes Recently Diagnosed Treatment & Care Complications Health Insurance For Parents & Kids Know Your Rights We ...

  4. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your diabetes. But, you are the most important person in managing your diabetes. You should know the basic steps ... to your doctor before starting any exercise program. People with type 1 ... MANAGING YOUR BLOOD SUGAR Checking your blood sugar level ...

  5. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License ... Find Your Local Office Find your local diabetes education program Calendar of Events Wellness Lives Here Drive ...

  6. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  7. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy 8 Tips for Caregivers Health Insurance Health ... type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, ...

  8. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Life Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's ... going into cells, it can cause two problems: Right away, your cells may be starved for energy. ...

  9. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... You at Risk? Home Prevention Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower ... Volunteer Opportunities Sponsorship and Exhibit Opportunities Diabetes Camp Learning at Camp Find a Camp Apply for Camp ...

  10. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... donate en -- Donate Today - 2016-08-donation-en.html Donate Today Diabetes touches everyone, and finding a ... urgent. Donate We Can Help - we-can-help.html Chat Online Chat Closed engagement en -- Need Type ...

  11. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... a Member Donate Now! One Time Monthly In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type ... time Give monthly Give in honor Give in memory Donate Now Why Give? Nearly 30 million battle ...

  12. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... to Stop Diabetes Awareness Programs Hispanic Heritage Month African American Programs Latino Programs Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians ... others. Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans/Pacific ...

  13. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To ... Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And ...

  14. Types of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Types of Diabetes Learn about Diabetes You can learn how to take care of ... to take care of your diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes is when your blood glucose, also called ...

  15. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Cost of Diabetes Research & Practice Home We Are Research Leaders World's Largest Diabetes Meeting Recent Advances Type 1 Research Highlights Research Excellence Honorees How Grant Money is ...

  16. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Find your leading role for type 2 diabetes management. » « Connect With Us Register for diabetes news, research ... Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day ...

  17. Tissue types (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports other tissues and binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph ...

  18. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Student Resources History of Diabetes Resources for School Projects How to Reference Our Site Diabetes Basics Myths ... Type 2 Diabetes Program Food & Fitness Food Recipes Planning Meals What Can I Eat Weight Loss Fitness ...

  19. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  20. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License ... Link Diabetes EXPO Upcoming Diabetes EXPOs EXPO Volunteer Opportunities Sponsorship and Exhibit Opportunities Diabetes Camp Learning at ...

  1. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday Life Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment ... seconds someone new is diagnosed. Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. ...

  2. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the Living WIth Type 2 Diabetes Program We Can Help Center for Information Legal Assistance Success ... Congress The Cost of Diabetes Research & Practice Home We Are Research Leaders World's Largest Diabetes Meeting Recent ...

  3. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Student Resources History of Diabetes Resources for School Projects How to Reference Our Site Diabetes Basics Myths ... Find your leading role for type 2 diabetes management. » « Connect With Us Register for diabetes news, research ...

  4. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... at School Tour de Cure Women's Series Destination Races Do-It-Yourself Fundraising Volunteer Center American Diabetes ... Diabetes Research & Practice Home We Are Research Leaders World's Largest Diabetes Meeting Recent Advances Type 1 Research ...

  5. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High ... prediabetes, and no one is excused. Take the test. Know where you stand. More from diabetes.org ...

  6. Facts about Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out to patients. You can also download the Spanish version. Last Reviewed: August 1, 2013 Last Edited: October 27, 2015 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: lp-type-2, In this section Diabetes Basics ...

  7. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... is Gestational Diabetes? How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Genetics of Diabetes Diabetes Myths A Day in the ... 1 Type 2 Gestational Myths Statistics Common Terms Genetics Living With Diabetes Recently Diagnosed Treatment & Care Complications ...

  8. Are You Still Typing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Irene; Yoder, Sharon

    1996-01-01

    Discusses word processing and desktop publishing and offers suggestions for creating documents that look more professional, including proportional type size, spacing, the use of punctuation marks, italics, tabs and margins, and paragraph styles. (LRW)

  9. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels normal. Type 2 is treated with lifestyle changes, ... starved for energy. Over time, high blood glucose levels may hurt your eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. ...

  10. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Stop Diabetes Awareness Programs Hispanic Heritage Month African American Programs Latino Programs Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and ... others. Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, ...

  11. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women ... 1 Type 2 Gestational Myths Statistics Common Terms Genetics Living With Diabetes Recently Diagnosed Treatment & Care Complications ...

  12. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Generation of Brilliant Researchers Our Research Foundation Diabetes Pro: Professional Resources Online We Support Your Doctor Clinical ... Type 2 Diabetes Recipes for Healthy Living Diabetes Pro: Professional Resources Shop Diabetes » Close nonprofit software

  13. Types Of Christian Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Petroman

    2015-01-01

    Christian tourism is asub-type of tourism where pilgrims travel alone or in group as missionaries orpilgrims or to spend their free time to recollect; it attracts a large numberof travellers. Christian tourism can be practiced by religious young people,missionaries, participants to religious convents, amateurs of religiouscruises, religious camps, visitors of religious attractions, religiousadventurers. Christian tourism can be considered a sub-type of religioustourism because of the large nu...

  14. Type extension trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    We introduce type extension trees as a formal representation language for complex combinatorial features of relational data. Based on a very simple syntax this language provides a unified framework for expressing features as diverse as embedded subgraphs on the one hand, and marginal counts...... of attribute values on the other. We show by various examples how many existing relational data mining techniques can be expressed as the problem of constructing a type extension tree and a discriminant function....

  15. Type Families with Class, Type Classes with Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano, Alejandro; Hage, Jurriaan; Bahr, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Type classes and type families are key ingredients in Haskell programming. Type classes were introduced to deal with ad-hoc polymorphism, although with the introduction of functional dependencies, their use expanded to type-level programming. Type families also allow encoding type-level functions...

  16. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru

    1997-04-04

    An LMFBR type reactor comprises a plurality of reactor cores in a reactor container. Namely, a plurality of pot containing vessels are disposed in the reactor vessel and a plurality of reactor cores are formed in a state where an integrated-type fuel assembly is each inserted to a pot, and a coolant pipeline is connected to each of the pot containing-vessel to cool the reactor core respectively. When fuels are exchanged, the integrated-type fuel assembly is taken out together with the pot from the reactor vessel in a state where the integrated-type fuel assembly is immersed in the coolants in the pot as it is. Accordingly, coolants are supplied to each of the pot containing-vessel connected with the coolant pipeline and circulate while cooling the integrated-type fuel assembly for every pot. Then, when the fuels are exchanged, the integrated type fuel assembly is taken out to the outside of the reactor together with the pot by taking up the pot from the pot-containing vessel. Then, neutron economy is improved to thereby improve reactor power and the breeding ratio. (N.H.)

  17. Congenital fiber type disproportion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissiedu, Juliana; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Type I muscle fiber atrophy in childhood can be encountered in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. Congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) is one such condition which presents as a nonprogressive muscle weakness. The diagnosis is often made after excluding other differential diagnostic considerations. We present a 2-year-9-month-old full term boy who presented at 2 months with an inability to turn his head to the right. Over the next couple of years, he showed signs of muscle weakness, broad based gait and a positive Gower's sign. He had normal levels of creatine kinase and normal electromyography. A biopsy of the vastus lateralis showed a marked variation in muscle fiber type. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-ase stains highlighted a marked type I muscle atrophy with rare scattered atrophic type II muscle fibers. No abnormalities were observed on the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or cytochrome oxidase stained sections. Ragged red fibers were not present on the trichrome stain. Abnormalities of glycogen or lipid deposition were not observed on the periodic acid-Schiff or Oil-Red-O stains. Immunostaining for muscular dystrophy associated proteins showed normal staining. Ultrastructural examination showed a normal arrangement of myofilaments, and a normal number and morphology for mitochondria. A diagnosis of CFTD was made after excluding other causes of type I atrophy including congenital myopathy. The lack of specific clinical and genetic disorder associated with CFTD suggests that it is a spectrum of a disease process and represents a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:26526626

  18. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  19. Nitric oxide up-regulates endothelial expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Medini, Sawsan; Bisha, Marion; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Bas, Murat; Kojda, Georg

    2016-07-15

    Increasing vascular NO levels following up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered beneficial in cardiovascular disease. Whether such beneficial effects exerted by increased NO-levels include the vascular renin-angiotensin system remains elucidated. Exposure of endothelial cells originated from porcine aorta, mouse brain and human umbilical veins to different NO-donors showed that expression of the angiotensin-II-type-2-receptor (AT2) mRNA and protein is up-regulated by activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase without changing AT2 mRNA stability. In mice, endothelial-specific overexpression of eNOS stimulated, while chronic treatment with the NOS-blocker l-nitroarginine inhibited AT2 expression. The NO-induced AT2 up-regulation was associated with a profound inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-activity. In endothelial cells this reduction of ACE-activity was reversed by either the AT2 antagonist PD 123119 or by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D. Furthermore, in C57Bl/6 mice an acute i.v. bolus of l-nitroarginine did not change AT2-expression and ACE-activity suggesting that inhibition of ACE-activity by endogenous NO is crucially dependent on AT2 protein level. Likewise, three weeks of either voluntary or forced exercise training increased AT2 expression and reduced ACE-activity in C57Bl/6 but not in mice lacking eNOS suggesting significance of this signaling interaction for vascular physiology. Finally, aortic AT2 expression is about 5 times greater in female as compared to male C57Bl/6 and at the same time aortic ACE activity is reduced in females by more than 50%. Together these findings imply that endothelial NO regulates AT2 expression and that AT2 may regulate ACE-activity. PMID:27235748

  20. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal