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Sample records for adenylyl cyclase isoforms

  1. Bicarbonate disruption of the pulmonary endothelial barrier via activation of endogenous soluble adenylyl cyclase, isoform 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiako, Boniface; Calchary, Wendy; Xu, Ningyong; Kunstadt, Ryan; Richardson, Bianca; Nix, Jessica; Sayner, Sarah L

    2013-07-15

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that cAMP signals within the pulmonary endothelium are highly compartmentalized, and this compartmentalization is critical to maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. Studies demonstrate that the exogenous soluble bacterial toxin, ExoY, and heterologous expression of the forskolin-stimulated soluble mammalian adenylyl cyclase (AC) chimera, sACI/II, elevate cytosolic cAMP and disrupt the pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier. The barrier-disruptive effects of cytosolic cAMP generated by exogenous soluble ACs are in contrast to the barrier-protective effects of subplasma membrane cAMP generated by transmembrane AC, which strengthens endothelial barrier integrity. Endogenous soluble AC isoform 10 (AC10 or commonly known as sAC) lacks transmembrane domains and localizes within the cytosolic compartment. AC10 is uniquely activated by bicarbonate to generate cytosolic cAMP, yet its role in regulation of endothelial barrier integrity has not been addressed. Here we demonstrate that, within the pulmonary circulation, AC10 is expressed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), yet expression in PAECs is lower. Furthermore, pulmonary endothelial cells selectively express bicarbonate cotransporters. While extracellular bicarbonate generates a phosphodiesterase 4-sensitive cAMP pool in PMVECs, no such cAMP response is detected in PAECs. Finally, addition of extracellular bicarbonate decreases resistance across the PMVEC monolayer and increases the filtration coefficient in the isolated perfused lung above osmolality controls. Collectively, these findings suggest that PMVECs have a bicarbonate-sensitive cytosolic cAMP pool that disrupts endothelial barrier integrity. These studies could provide an alternative mechanism for the controversial effects of bicarbonate correction of acidosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome patients.

  2. Somatic 'soluble' adenylyl cyclase isoforms are unaffected in Sacy tm1Lex/Sacy tm1Lex 'knockout' mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Farrell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, Adcy10, or Sacy represents a source of the second messenger cAMP distinct from the widely studied, G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases. Genetic deletion of the second through fourth coding exons in Sacy(tm1Lex/Sacy(tm1Lex knockout mice results in a male sterile phenotype. The absence of any major somatic phenotype is inconsistent with the variety of somatic functions identified for sAC using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now use immunological and molecular biological methods to demonstrate that somatic tissues express a previously unknown isoform of sAC, which utilizes a unique start site, and which 'escapes' the design of the Sacy(tm1Lex knockout allele. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies reveal increased complexity at the sAC locus, and they suggest that the known isoforms of sAC play a unique function in male germ cells.

  3. Adenylyl cyclases in the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Maria Eugenia; Gorelick, Fred; Glaser, Shannon

    2014-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a group of widely distributed enzymes whose functions are very diverse. There are nine known transmembrane AC isoforms activated by Gαs. Each has its own pattern of expression in the digestive system and differential regulation of function by Ca(2+) and other intracellular signals. In addition to the transmembrane isoforms, one AC is soluble and exhibits distinct regulation. In this review, the basic structure, regulation and physiological roles of ACs in the digestive system are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Andreas; Meili, Dimirela; Salathe, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) was recently identified as a widely expressed intracellular source of cAMP in mammalian cells. sAC is evolutionary, structurally, and biochemically distinct from the G-protein-responsive transmembranous adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). The structure of the catalytic unit of sAC is similar to tmAC, but sAC does not contain transmembranous domains, allowing localizations independent of the membranous...

  5. Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclase isoform AC1 is preferentially expressed in guinea-pig sino-atrial node cells and modulates the I(f) pacemaker current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, Paul; Parrington, John; Odia, Efe; Simpson, Alasdair; Collins, Thomas; Terrar, Derek

    2007-08-01

    Ca(2+)-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (AC) are known to play important roles in neurons but have not previously been reported in the heart. Here we present the first evidence for selective expression of Ca(2+)-stimulated AC in the sino-atrial node (SAN) but not in ventricular muscle of the guinea-pig heart. The AC1 isoform of Ca(2+)-stimulated AC was shown to be present in SAN, both as mRNA using RT-PCR and as protein using immuno-blotting with a specific antibody. Confocal immuno-fluorescence studies detected membrane localization of AC1 in SAN cells, but no AC1 in ventricular muscle. Ca(2+)-stimulated AC8 may also be present in SAN. The functional importance of AC activity was investigated by monitoring activation of I(f) (gated by hyperpolarization and regulated by cAMP, which shifts activation to more depolarized voltages). Basal activity of AC in isolated SAN myocytes was demonstrated by the observations that an inhibitor of AC activity (MDL 12330A, 10 microm) shifted activation in the hyperpolarizing direction, while inhibition of phosphodiesterases (IBMX, 100 microm) shifted I(f) activation in the depolarizing direction. Buffering cytosolic Ca(2+) with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (by exposure to BAPTA-AM) shifted activation of I(f) in the hyperpolarizing direction, and under these conditions the AC inhibitor MDL had little or no further effect. The actions of BAPTA were overcome by exposure to forskolin (10 microm), a direct stimulator of all AC isoforms, to restore cAMP levels. These effects are consistent with the functional importance of Ca(2+)-stimulated AC, which is expected to be fundamental to initiation and regulation of the heartbeat.

  6. Activation of Adenylyl Cyclase Causes Stimulation of Adenosine Receptors

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    Thomas Pleli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Signaling of Gs protein-coupled receptors (GsPCRs is accomplished by stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, causing an increase of the intracellular cAMP concentration, activation of the intracellular cAMP effectors protein kinase A (PKA and Epac, and an efflux of cAMP, the function of which is still unclear. Methods: Activation of adenylyl cyclase by GsPCR agonists or cholera toxin was monitored by measurement of the intracellular cAMP concentration by ELISA, anti-phospho-PKA substrate motif phosphorylation by immunoblotting, and an Epac-FRET assay in the presence and absence of adenosine receptor antagonists or ecto-nucleotide phosphodiesterase/pyrophosphatase2 (eNPP2 inhibitors. The production of AMP from cAMP by recombinant eNPP2 was measured by HPLC. Extracellular adenosine was determined by LC-MS/MS, extracellular ATP by luciferase and LC-MS/MS. The expression of eNPP isoenzymes 1-3 was examined by RT-PCR. The expression of multidrug resistance protein 4 was suppressed by siRNA. Results: Here we show that the activation of GsPCRs and the GsPCRs-independent activation of Gs proteins and adenylyl cyclase by cholera toxin induce stimulation of cell surface adenosine receptors (A2A or A2B adenosine receptors. In PC12 cells stimulation of adenylyl cyclase by GsPCR or cholera toxin caused activation of A2A adenosine receptors by an autocrine signaling pathway involving cAMP efflux through multidrug resistance protein 4 and hydrolysis of released cAMP to AMP by eNPP2. In contrast, in PC3 cells cholera toxin- and GsPCR-induced stimulation of adenylyl cyclase resulted in the activation of A2B adenosine receptors. Conclusion: Our findings show that stimulation of adenylyl cyclase causes a remarkable activation of cell surface adenosine receptors.

  7. cAMP Signaling Compartmentation: Adenylyl Cyclases as Anchors of Dynamic Signaling Complexes.

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    Johnstone, Timothy B; Agarwal, Shailesh R; Harvey, Robert D; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2018-04-01

    It is widely accepted that cAMP signaling is compartmentalized within cells. However, our knowledge of how receptors, cAMP signaling enzymes, effectors, and other key proteins form specific signaling complexes to regulate specific cell responses is limited. The multicomponent nature of these systems and the spatiotemporal dynamics involved as proteins interact and move within a cell make cAMP responses highly complex. Adenylyl cyclases, the enzymatic source of cAMP production, are key starting points for understanding cAMP compartments and defining the functional signaling complexes. Three basic elements are required to form a signaling compartment. First, a localized signal is generated by a G protein-coupled receptor paired to one or more of the nine different transmembrane adenylyl cyclase isoforms that generate the cAMP signal in the cytosol. The diffusion of cAMP is subsequently limited by several factors, including expression of any number of phosphodiesterases (of which there are 24 genes plus spice variants). Finally, signal response elements are differentially localized to respond to cAMP produced within each locale. A-kinase-anchoring proteins, of which there are 43 different isoforms, facilitate this by targeting protein kinase A to specific substrates. Thousands of potential combinations of these three elements are possible in any given cell type, making the characterization of cAMP signaling compartments daunting. This review will focus on what is known about how cells organize cAMP signaling components as well as identify the unknowns. We make an argument for adenylyl cyclases being central to the formation and maintenance of these signaling complexes. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. Neuronal Expression of Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in the Mammalian Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jonathan; Martinez, Jennifer; Milner, Teresa A.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic 3’, 5’-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a critical and ubiquitous second messenger involved in a multitude of signaling pathways. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a novel source of cAMP subject to unique localization and regulation. It was originally discovered in mammalian testis and found to be activated by bicarbonate and calcium. sAC has been implicated in diverse processes, including astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling and axonal outgrowth of neurons. However, despite these func...

  9. Crystallization of the class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Natasha; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Reddy, Prasad T.; Gallagher, D. Travis

    2006-01-01

    The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Y. pestis has been crystallized in an orthorhombic form suitable for structure determination. The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis has been cloned and crystallized in both a triclinic and an orthorhombic form. An amino-terminal His-tagged construct, from which the tag was removed by thrombin, crystallized in a triclinic form diffracting to 1.9 Å, with one dimer per asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 33.5, b = 35.5, c = 71.8 Å, α = 88.7, β = 82.5, γ = 65.5°. Several mutants of this construct crystallized but diffracted poorly. A non-His-tagged native construct (179 amino acids, MW = 20.5 kDa) was purified by conventional chromatography and crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 . These crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 56.8, b = 118.6, c = 144.5 Å, diffract to 3 Å and probably have two dimers per asymmetric unit and V M = 3.0 Å 3 Da −1 . Both crystal forms appear to require pH below 5, complicating attempts to incorporate nucleotide ligands into the structure. The native construct has been produced as a selenomethionine derivative and crystallized for phasing and structure determination

  10. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

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    Lucie Hejnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adenylyl cyclase (AC signaling system plays a crucial role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Here we analyzed the key components of myocardial AC signaling in the developing chick embryo and assessed the impact of selected β-blocking agents on this system. Application of metoprolol and carvedilol, two commonly used β-blockers, at embryonic day (ED 8 significantly downregulated (by about 40% expression levels of AC5, the dominant cardiac AC isoform, and the amount of Gsα protein at ED9. Activity of AC stimulated by forskolin was also significantly reduced under these conditions. Interestingly, when administered at ED4, these drugs did not produce such profound changes in the myocardial AC signaling system, except for markedly increased expression of Giα protein. These data indicate that β-blocking agents can strongly derange AC signaling during the first half of embryonic heart development.

  11. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  12. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonatesensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Tresguerres, M; Barott, KL; Barron, ME; Roa, JN

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO 3 - , and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO 3 - sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition...

  13. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca 2+ to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca 2+ and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells

  14. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  15. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejnová, L.; Hahnová, K.; Kočková, Radka; Svatůňková, Jarmila; Sedmera, David; Novotný, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, č. 2014 (2014), s. 463123 ISSN 2314-6133 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : embryonic heart * embryotoxicity * adenylyl cyclase * G protein * beta-blocking agents Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.579, year: 2014

  16. Agonist-induced desensitization of adenylyl cyclase in Y1 adrenocortical tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, M.F.; Tsao, J.; Pon, D.J.; Schimmer, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    Y1 adrenocortical tumor cells (Y1DS) and Y1 mutants resistant to ACTH-induced desensitization of adenylyl cyclase (Y1DR) were transfected with a gene encoding the mouse beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2-AR). Transfectants expressed beta 2-ARs that were able to stimulate adenylyl cyclase activity and steroid biosynthesis. These transfectants were used to explore the basis for the DR mutation in Y1 cells. The authors demonstrate that beta-adrenergic agonists desensitize the adenylyl cyclase system in transfected Y1DS cells whereas transfected Y1DR cells are resistant to desensitization by beta-adrenergic agonists. The fate of the beta 2-ARs during desensitization was evaluated by photoaffinity labelling with [125I]iodocyanopindolol diazerine. Desensitization of Y1DS transfectants was accompanied by a modest loss in receptor density that was insufficient to account for the complete loss of responsiveness to beta-adrenergic agonists. The extent of receptor loss induced by beta-adrenergic agonists in Y1DR transfectants exceeded that in the Y1DS transfectants indicating that the mutation which protects Y1DR cells from agonist-induced desensitization is prior to receptor down-regulation in the desensitization pathway. From these results we infer that ACTH and isoproterenol desensitize adenylyl cyclase by a common pathway and that receptor loss is not a major component of the desensitization process in these cells

  17. Platelet adenylyl cyclase activity as a biochemical trait marker for predisposition to alcoholism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratsma, J.E.; Gunning, W.B.; Leurs, R.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated a reduced G(s)-protein stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in the brain and blood cells of alcoholics. We investigated this phenomenon in platelets of children of alcoholics (COA), i.e., of children at high risk for the acquisition of alcoholism and (as yet) not

  18. The effect of alcohol on recombinant proteins derived from mammalian adenylyl cyclase

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    Emily Qualls-Creekmore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling pathway is implicated in the development of alcohol use disorder. Previous studies have demonstrated that ethanol enhances the activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC in an isoform specific manner; AC7 is most enhanced by ethanol, and regions responsible for enhancement by ethanol are located in the cytoplasmic domains of the AC7 protein. We hypothesize that ethanol modulates AC activity by directly interacting with the protein and that ethanol effects on AC can be studied using recombinant AC in vitro. AC recombinant proteins containing only the C1a or C2 domains of AC7 and AC9 individually were expressed in bacteria, and purified. The purified recombinant AC proteins retained enzymatic activity and isoform specific alcohol responsiveness. The combination of the C1a or C2 domains of AC7 maintained the same alcohol cutoff point as full-length AC7. We also find that the recombinant AC7 responds to alcohol differently in the presence of different combinations of activators including MnCl2, forskolin, and Gsα. Through a series of concentration-response experiments and curve fitting, the values for maximum activities, Hill coefficients, and EC50 were determined in the absence and presence of butanol as a surrogate of ethanol. The results suggest that alcohol modulates AC activity by directly interacting with the AC protein and that the alcohol interaction with the AC protein occurs at multiple sites with positive cooperativity. This study indicates that the recombinant AC proteins expressed in bacteria can provide a useful model system to investigate the mechanism of alcohol action on their activity.

  19. Regulation of hormone-receptor coupling to adenylyl cyclase. Effects of GTP and GDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, R; Abramowitz, J; Bordelon-Riser, M; Blume, A J; Birnbaumer, L

    1980-11-10

    GDP and GTP regulation of receptor-mediated stimulation of adenylyl cyclases in membranes of S49 murine lymphoma cells (S49), NS-20 murine neuroblastoma cells (NS-20), rabbit corpora lutea (CL), and turkey erythrocytes were studied under assay conditions which minimized conversion of added GTP to GDP and of added GDP to GTP. Hormonal stimulation in all systems required guanine nucleotide addition. In the presence of GTP, adenylyl cyclase activity in S49, NS-20, and CL was stimulated respectively by isoproterenol and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), by PGE1 and the adenosine analog, phenylisopropyladenosine, and by PGE1 and isoproterenol, with the first of the listed stimulants eliciting higher activities than the second. Activity in turkey erythrocyte membranes was stimulated by isoproterenol. GDP was partially effective in promoting hormonal stimulation, being able to sustain stimulation by isoproterenol and PGE1 in S49 cell membranes and by PGE1 in CL membranes. In NS-20 membranes, both GDP and guanosine-5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) were inhibitory on basal activity, yet promoted limited but significant stimulation by PGE1. In turkey erythrocytes, stimulation by isoproterenol could not be elicited with GDP or GDP beta S. Thus, although less effective than GTP in promoting hormonal stimulation of several adenylyl cyclase systems, GDP was clearly not inactive. Concentration effect curves for active hormone in the presence of GDP had higher apparent Ka values than in the presence of GTP. In spite of differences between the effects of GTP and GDP on hormonal stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activities, GTP and GDP affected equally well isoproterenol binding, regardless of whether or not its receptor could be shown to stimulate adenylyl cyclase in the presence of GDP. Determination of transphosphorylation of GDP to GTP showed that at saturating concentrations, the proportion of GDP converted to GTP is negligible and unaffected by hormonal stimulation. Concentrations

  20. Spatial resolution of cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldieri, Giusi

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptor signaling starts at the plasma membrane and continues at endosomal stations. In this issue, Inda et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201512075) show that different forms of adenylyl cyclase are activated at the plasma membrane versus endosomes, providing a rationale for the spatial encoding of cAMP signaling. PMID:27402955

  1. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

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    Zippin, Jonathan H.; Farrell, Jeanne; Huron, David; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Hess, Kenneth C.; Fischman, Donald A.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation. PMID:14769862

  2. Antiarrhythmic effect of prolonged morphine exposure is accompanied by altered myocardial adenylyl cyclase signaling in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škrabalová, J.; Neckář, Jan; Hejnová, L.; Bartoňová, I.; Kolář, František; Novotný, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2012), s. 351-359 ISSN 1734-1140 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA501110901 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 429511 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rat myocardium * morphine * adenylyl cyclase * G-proteins * arrhythmias Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.965, year: 2012

  3. Transgenic rescue of defective Cd36 enhances myocardial adenylyl cyclase signaling in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klevstig, M.; Manakov, D.; Kašparová, D.; Brabcová, I.; Papoušek, František; Žurmanová, J.; Zídek, Václav; Šilhavý, Jan; Neckář, Jan; Pravenec, Michal; Kolář, František; Nováková, O.; Novotný, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 465, č. 10 (2013), s. 1477-1486 ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX01110901; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0505 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : SHR rats * Cd36 * heart * beta-Adrenergic receptors * Adenylyl cyclase * Protein kinase A Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.073, year: 2013

  4. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  5. Dependence of electrical activity and calcium influx-controlled prolactin release on adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway in pituitary lactotrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gonzalez-Iglesias, A. E.; Jiang, Y.; Tomič, M.; Kretschmannová, K.; Andric, S. A.; Zemková, Hana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 9 (2006), s. 2231-2246 ISSN 0888-8809 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : adenylyl cyclase * intracellular calcium concentration * lactotrophs Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.967, year: 2006

  6. Role of the bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase in pH sensing and metabolic regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Jung-Chin; Oude-Elferink, Ronald P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, adcy10) was recently identified as a unique source of cAMP in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Its activity is regulated by bicarbonate and fine tuned by calcium. As such, and in conjunction with carbonic an hydrase ( CA), sAC constitutes an

  7. Endothelial CD99 signals through soluble adenylyl cyclase and PKA to regulate leukocyte transendothelial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard L.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.; Winger, Ryan C.; Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    CD99 is a critical regulator of leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM). How CD99 signals during this process remains unknown. We show that during TEM, endothelial cell (EC) CD99 activates protein kinase A (PKA) via a signaling complex formed with the lysine-rich juxtamembrane cytoplasmic tail of CD99, the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin, and soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). PKA then stimulates membrane trafficking from the lateral border recycling compartment to sites of TEM, facilitating the passage of leukocytes across the endothelium. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of EC sAC or PKA, like CD99 blockade, arrests neutrophils and monocytes partway through EC junctions, in vitro and in vivo, without affecting leukocyte adhesion or the expression of relevant cellular adhesion molecules. This is the first description of the CD99 signaling pathway in TEM as well as the first demonstration of a role for sAC in leukocyte TEM. PMID:26101266

  8. pH sensing via bicarbonate-regulated ‘soluble’ adenylyl cyclase (sAC

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    Nawreen eRahman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC is a source of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP. sAC is directly regulated by bicarbonate (HCO3- ions. In living cells, HCO3- ions are in nearly instantaneous equilibrium with carbon dioxide (CO2 and pH due to the ubiquitous presence of carbonic anhydrases. Numerous biological processes are regulated by CO2, HCO3-, and/or pH, and in a number of these, sAC has been shown to function as a physiological CO2/HCO3/pH sensor. In this review, we detail the known pH sensing functions of sAC, and we discuss two highly-studied, pH-dependent pathways in which sAC might play a role.

  9. G protein-coupled receptors form stable complexes with inwardly rectifying potassium channels and adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Natalie; Ethier, Nathalie; Oak, James N; Pei, Lin; Liu, Fang; Trieu, Phan; Rebois, R Victor; Bouvier, Michel; Hebert, Terence E; Van Tol, Hubert H M

    2002-11-29

    A large number of studies have demonstrated co-purification or co-immunoprecipitation of receptors with G proteins. We have begun to look for the presence of effector molecules in these receptor complexes. Co-expression of different channel and receptor permutations in COS-7 and HEK 293 cells in combination with co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the dopamine D(2) and D(4), and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (beta(2)-AR) form stable complexes with Kir3 channels. The D(4)/Kir3 and D(2) receptor/Kir3 interaction does not occur when the channel and receptor are expressed separately and mixed prior to immunoprecipitation, indicating that the interaction is not an artifact of the experimental protocol and reflects a biosynthetic event. The observed complexes are stable in that they are not disrupted by receptor activation or modulation of G protein alpha subunit function. However, using a peptide that binds Gbetagamma (betaARKct), we show that Gbetagamma is critical for dopamine receptor-Kir3 complex formation, but not for maintenance of the complex. We also provide evidence that Kir3 channels and another effector, adenylyl cyclase, are stably associated with the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor and can be co-immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antibodies. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have shown that in living cells under physiological conditions, beta(2)AR interacts directly with Kir3.1/3.4 and Kir3.1/3.2c heterotetramers as well as with adenylyl cyclase. All of these interactions are stable in the presence of receptor agonists, suggesting that these signaling complexes persist during signal transduction. In addition, we provide evidence that the receptor-effector complexes are also found in vivo. The observation that several G protein-coupled receptors form stable complexes with their effectors suggests that this arrangement might be a general feature of G protein-coupled signal transduction.

  10. A HCO(3)(-)-dependent mechanism involving soluble adenylyl cyclase for the activation of Ca²⁺ currents in locus coeruleus neurons.

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    Imber, Ann N; Santin, Joseph M; Graham, Cathy D; Putnam, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    Hypercapnic acidosis activates Ca²⁺ channels and increases intracellular Ca²⁺ levels in neurons of the locus coeruleus, a known chemosensitive region involved in respiratory control. We have also shown that large conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels, in conjunction with this pathway, limits the hypercapnic-induced increase in firing rate in locus coeruleus neurons. Here, we present evidence that the Ca²⁺ current is activated by a HCO(3)(-)-sensitive pathway. The increase in HCO(3)(-) associated with hypercapnia activates HCO(3)(-)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (soluble adenylyl cyclase). This results in an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels and activation of Ca²⁺ channels via cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase A. We also show the presence of soluble adenylyl cyclase in the cytoplasm of locus coeruleus neurons, and that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate analogue db-cyclic adenosine monophosphate increases Ca²⁺i. Disrupting this pathway by decreasing HCO(3)(-) levels during acidification or inhibiting either soluble adenylyl cyclase or protein kinase A, but not transmembrane adenylyl cyclase, can increase the magnitude of the firing rate response to hypercapnia in locus coeruleus neurons from older neonates to the same extent as inhibition of K⁺ channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Constitutive inhibitory action of muscarinic receptors on adenylyl cyclase in cardiac membranes and its stereospecific suppression by hyoscyamine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčný, Jan; Gualtieri, F.; Tuček, Stanislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2002), s. 131-137 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011910; GA ČR GA309/99/0214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * adenylyl cyclase * constitutive activity of receptors Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 0.984, year: 2002

  12. Modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by baclofen in the developing rat brain: difference between cortex, thalamus and hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejnová, Lucie; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Novotný, Jiří; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel; Svoboda, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 1 (2002), s. 9-12 ISSN 0304-3940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0207; GA ČR GA309/01/0255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : GABA(B) receptors * baclofen * adenylyl cyclase Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.100, year: 2002

  13. Type 7 adenylyl cyclase is involved in the ethanol and CRF sensitivity of GABAergic synapses in mouse central amygdala

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    Maureen T. Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe GABAergic system in the central amygdala (CeA plays a major role in ethanol dependence and in the anxiogenic response to ethanol withdrawal. Previously, we found that both ethanol and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF increase GABAergic transmission in mouse and rat CeA neurons, in part by enhancing the release of GABA via activation of presynaptic CRF1 receptors. CRF1 receptors are coupled to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC, which produces the second messenger cyclic AMP. There are nine isoforms of AC, but we recently found that CRF1 receptors in the pituitary were coupled to the Type 7 AC (AC7. Therefore, using an in vitro electrophysiological approach in brain slices, here we have investigated a possible role of the AC7 signaling pathway in ethanol and CRF effects on CeA GABAergic synapses of genetically modified mice with diminished brain Adcy7 activity (HET compared to their littermate male wild type (WT mice. We found no significant differences in basal membrane properties, mean baseline amplitude of evoked GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs, or paired-pulse facilitation (PPF of GABAA-IPSPs between HET and WT mice. In CeA neurons of WT mice, ethanol superfusion significantly augmented (by 39% GABAA-IPSPs and decreased PPF (by 25%, suggesting increased presynaptic GABA release. However, these effects were absent in HET mice. CRF superfusion also significantly augmented IPSPs (by 38% and decreased PPF (by 23% in WT CeA neurons, and still elicited a significant but smaller (by 13% increase of IPSP amplitude, but no effect on PPF, in HET mice. These electrophysiological data suggest that AC7 plays an important role in ethanol and CRF modulation of presynaptic GABA release in CeA and thus may underlie ethanol-related behaviors such as anxiety and dependence.

  14. Elevated Adenylyl Cyclase 9 Expression Is a Potential Prognostic Biomarker for Patients with Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hua; Wang, Kun; Jin, Jun-Feng; Jin, He; Yang, Lihua; Zou, Yidan; Du, Biaoyan; Liu, Xiaodong

    2018-01-02

    BACKGROUND Adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9) is an enzyme that modulates signal transduction by producing the second messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of ADCY9 expression with clinicopathological features and disease-free survival of colon cancer patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunohistochemistry staining with ADCY9 antibody was performed on a tissue microarray. Immunoreactivity scores (IRS) were recorded and applied for association analysis. ADCY9 mRNA expression and clinicopathogical information were also extracted from TCGA colon cancer dataset and analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models.  RESULTS ADCY9 IRS was significantly higher (P=0.002) in tumor tissues (6.40±1.26, n=200) than in adjacent normal samples (4.13±0.83, n=8). The IRS and mRNA expression of ADCY9 were correlated to colon cancer TNM staging. Longer disease-free survival was observed in patients with lower ADCY9 expression (P=0.001). In the multivariate models, ADCY9 expression level (hazard ratio [HR] 5.495, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.753-17.227, P=0.003), and distant metastasis (HR 4.329, 95% CI 1.374-13.636, P=0.012) were still associated with disease-free survival. CONCLUSIONS High ADCY9 expression is a poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival in colon cancer.

  15. Photomanipulation of antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation of Escherichia coli heterologously expressing photoactivated adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Konno, Noriko; Haneda, Yukari; Yamamori, Baku; Iseki, Mineo; Shibusawa, Mami; Ono, Yasushi; Kodaira, Ken-ichi; Funada, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2012-01-01

    A cyaA-deficient Escherichia coli strain was transformed by a plasmid carrying the gene for BsPAC, a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase identified from a Beggiatoa sp., and was subjected to an antibiotic susceptibility assay and biofilm formation assay under a light or dark condition. Cells expressing BsPAC that were incubated under blue light (470 nm) were more susceptible to fosfomycin, nalidixic acid and streptomycin than were cells incubated in the dark. Cells expressing BsPAC formed more biofilms when incubated under the light than did cells cultured in the dark. We concluded from these observations that it is possible to determine the importance of cAMP in antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation of E. coli by photomanipulating the cellular cAMP level by the use of BsPAC. A site-directed mutant of BsPAC in which Tyr7 was replaced by Phe functioned even in the dark, indicating that Tyr7 plays an important role in photoactivation of BsPAC. Results of mutational analysis of BsPAC should contribute to an understanding of the molecular basis for photoactivation of the protein.

  16. Adenylyl cyclase plays a regulatory role in development, stress resistance and secondary metabolism in Fusarium fujikuroi.

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    Jorge García-Martínez

    Full Text Available The ascomycete fungus Fusarium fujikuroi (Gibberella fujikuroi MP-C produces secondary metabolites of biotechnological interest, such as gibberellins, bikaverin, and carotenoids. Production of these metabolites is regulated by nitrogen availability and, in a specific manner, by other environmental signals, such as light in the case of the carotenoid pathway. A complex regulatory network controlling these processes is recently emerging from the alterations of metabolite production found through the mutation of different regulatory genes. Here we show the effect of the targeted mutation of the acyA gene of F. fujikuroi, coding for adenylyl cyclase. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of the AcyA protein showed different phenotypic alterations, including reduced growth, enhanced production of unidentified red pigments, reduced production of gibberellins and partially derepressed carotenoid biosynthesis in the dark. The phenotype differs in some aspects from that of similar mutants of the close relatives F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides: contrary to what was observed in these species, ΔacyA mutants of F. fujikuroi showed enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress (H(2O(2, but no change in heavy metal resistance or in the ability to colonize tomato tissue, indicating a high versatility in the regulatory roles played by cAMP in this fungal group.

  17. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

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    Kabir Hassan Biswas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain. In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins.

  18. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

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    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655

  19. Effects of abstinence and family history for alcoholism on platelet adenylyl cyclase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menninger, J A; Barón, A E; Tabakoff, B

    1998-12-01

    Platelet adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was measured in 32 alcohol-dependent subjects and 27 control subjects who were categorized as either family history-positive (FHP) or family history-negative (FHN) for alcoholism. The interview and blood sample collections were performed shortly after cessation of heavy drinking in the alcoholic group, and repeat blood samples were obtained at the end of the first and second weeks of monitored abstinence. Control subjects received the same interview and provided blood samples at the time of the interview. When subjects were not segregated for FHP or FHN status, there were no statistically significant differences in basal, cesium fluoride (CsF)-, or forskolin-stimulated mean AC activities between the controls and the alcoholics, at study entry or with 1 or 2 weeks of abstinence. On the other hand, over the 2-week course of sobriety from heavy drinking, the CsF-stimulated AC activity of FHP alcohol-dependent subjects decreased significantly (p = 0.03). FHP alcohol-dependent subjects after 2 weeks of sobriety had significantly lower mean CsF-stimulated AC activity than FHN controls (p = 0.04), whereas the FHN alcoholic subjects' CsF-stimulated AC activity did not differ significantly from FHN controls at this point in time. When all subjects were pooled and then categorized as either FHP or FHN, there was a significant difference in mean CsF-stimulated AC activity (p = 0.02) between the FHP and FHN subject groups. Genetic factors and abstinence appear to have roles in determining low platelet AC activity in alcoholic and nonalcoholic subjects. CsF-stimulated platelet AC activity, in particular, appears to act as a trait marker for a genetic vulnerability to developing alcoholism, but recent heavy drinking in male alcoholics is a factor that can mask differences between FHP and FHN subjects.

  20. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Israel, Lars [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Noegel, Angelika A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Schleicher, Michael [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Holak, Tad A. [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany)

    2004-05-15

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an {alpha}-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by {beta}-strands.

  1. Differential Intraocular Pressure Measurements by Tonometry and Direct Cannulation After Treatment with Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Jarel K; Roy Chowdhury, Uttio; Manzar, Zahid; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Fautsch, Michael P; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2017-10-01

    To validate the increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) caused by soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) inhibitors and determine reasons behind variation in IOP measurements performed by tonometry. C57BL/6J mice were administered DMSO solubilized sAC inhibitors (KH7 or LRE-1) by intraperitoneal injection. Two hours post-treatment, mice were anesthetized with avertin or ketamine/xylazine/acepromazine (KXA). IOP was measured by a rebound tonometer or direct cannulation of the anterior chamber. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to measure anterior chamber depth and corneal thickness in live mice. Outflow facility was measured in perfused, enucleated mouse eyes. Compared with DMSO controls, KH7 treatment caused an increased IOP in avertin- and KXA-anesthetized mice when measured by direct cannulation [avertin: 14.4 ± 2.1 mmHg vs. 11.1 ± 1.0 mmHg (P = 0.003); KXA: 14.4 ± 1.0 mmHg vs. 11.3 ± 0.8 mmHg (P < 0.001)] and tonometry [avertin: 10.8 ± 1.4 mmHg vs. 7.4 ± 0.6 mmHg (P < 0.001); KXA: 11.9 ± 0.9 mmHg vs. 10.3 ± 1.7 mmHg (P = 0.283)]. However, treatment with KH7 in nonanesthetized mice showed a significant decrease in IOP measured by tonometry and compared with DMSO-treated animals [13.1 ± 2.6 mmHg vs. 15.6 ± 0.5 mmHg (P = 0.003)]. Both KH7- and DMSO-treated groups anesthetized with avertin showed increased corneal thickness, whereas KH7-treated mice anesthetized with KXA exhibited a shallower anterior chamber compared with untreated mice. KH7 decreased outflow facility by 85.1% in nonanesthetized, enucleated eyes (P < 0.003). Systemically administered DMSO and anesthesia have significant effects on anterior chamber characteristics, resulting in altered IOP readings measured by tonometry. In the presence of DMSO and anesthesia, tonometry IOP readings should be confirmed with direct cannulation.

  2. Adenylyl cyclase alpha and cAMP signaling mediate Plasmodium sporozoite apical regulated exocytosis and hepatocyte infection.

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    Takeshi Ono

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria starts with the infection of the liver of the host by Plasmodium sporozoites, the parasite form transmitted by infected mosquitoes. Sporozoites migrate through several hepatocytes by breaching their plasma membranes before finally infecting one with the formation of an internalization vacuole. Migration through host cells induces apical regulated exocytosis in sporozoites. Here we show that apical regulated exocytosis is induced by increases in cAMP in sporozoites of rodent (P. yoelii and P. berghei and human (P. falciparum Plasmodium species. We have generated P. berghei parasites deficient in adenylyl cyclase alpha (ACalpha, a gene containing regions with high homology to adenylyl cyclases. PbACalpha-deficient sporozoites do not exocytose in response to migration through host cells and present more than 50% impaired hepatocyte infectivity in vivo. These effects are specific to ACalpha, as re-introduction of ACalpha in deficient parasites resulted in complete recovery of exocytosis and infection. Our findings indicate that ACalpha and increases in cAMP levels are required for sporozoite apical regulated exocytosis, which is involved in sporozoite infection of hepatocytes.

  3. Adenylyl cyclase-mediated effects contribute to increased Isoprenaline-induced cardiac contractility in TRPM4-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Sebastian; Mathar, Ilka; Vennekens, Rudi; Freichel, Marc

    2014-09-01

    TRPM4 and TRPM5 proteins belong to the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channel family and form Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation channels. Recently we showed a significant increase of Isoprenaline-induced inotropy in TRPM4-deficient (Trpm4(-/-)) mice. This is caused by increased Ca(2+) entry via L-type calcium channels due to faster action potential repolarization in Trpm4(-/-) ventricular myocytes [Mathar et al., 2013]. Here, we investigated the contribution of various steps of the β-adrenergic signalling cascade to the augmented positive inotropic response in the absence of TRPM4, and whether the closely related TRPM5 additively contributes to this process using TRPM4/TRPM5-double deficient (Trpm4/Trpm5((-/-)2)) mice. We performed contractility measurements on isolated papillary muscles from wild type, Trpm4(-/-) and Trpm4/Trpm5((-/-)2) mice. As shown in Trpm4(-/-) mice, Isoprenaline-induced inotropy in Trpm4/Trpm5((-/-)2) papillary muscles was significantly increased compared to wild type, whereas basal, frequency- and Ca(2+)-dependent contractility was unaltered. Equivalent to Isoprenaline, activation of adenylyl cyclase using Forskolin led to a significantly increased twitch force in Trpm4(-/-) heart preparations whereas the Isoprenaline-mediated increase in cAMP level was comparable to wild type mice. Notably, the positive inotropic response evoked by phosphodiesterase inhibition with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) was unchanged between both genotypes. Furthermore, experiments performed with increasing concentrations of IBMX after prestimulation with Forskolin and vice versa did not provide evidence that the increased β-adrenergic positive inotropic response in TRPM4-deficient papillary muscles is due to differences in accumulation of cAMP. Compared to inhibition of phosphodiesterase, the rise of intracellular cAMP by activating adenylyl cyclase is accompanied by ATP breakdown. To test the relevance of TRPM4 during forced ATP consumption we

  4. Similarly potent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by P-site inhibitors in hearts from wild type and AC5 knockout mice.

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    Joerg H Braeunig

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5 was described as major cardiac AC isoform. The knockout of AC5 (AC5KO exerted cardioprotective effects in heart failure. Our study explored the impact of AC5KO on mouse heart AC activities and evaluated putative AC5-selective inhibitors. In cardiac membranes from AC5KO mice, basal AC activity was decreased, while AC stimulation was intact. The putative AC5-selective P-site inhibitors SQ22,536 [9-(tetra-hydro-2-furanyl-9H-purin-6-amine], vidarabine (9-β-D-arabinosyladenine and NKY80 [2-amino-7-(2-furanyl-7,8-dihydro-5(6H-quinazolinone] inhibited recombinant AC5 more potently than AC2 and AC1, but selectivity was only modest (∼4-40-fold. These compounds inhibited cardiac AC from WT and AC5KO mice with similar potencies. In conclusion, AC regulation in AC5KO hearts was unimpaired, questioning the supposed dominant role of AC5 in the heart. Moreover, the AC inhibitors SQ22,536, NKY80 and vidarabine lack adequate selectivity for AC5 and, therefore, do not present suitable tools to study AC5-specific functions.

  5. Crosstalk between adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism under red blood cell microrheological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravyov, Alexei V; Tikhomirova, Irina A; Maimistova, Alla A; Bulaeva, Svetlana V; Zamishlayev, Andrey V; Batalova, Ekaterina A

    2010-01-01

    There are evidences that red blood cell (RBC) deformation and aggregation change under their incubation with catecholamines and it is connected with activation of intracellular signaling pathways. The present study was designed to explore the adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism of RBCs together with their microrheological changes. The washed RBCs were resuspended in PBS. In each of the three research sessions RBC suspensions were divided into two aliquots: 1) control (without drug) and 2) with an appropriate drug. After cell incubation RBC deformability (RBCD) and aggregation (RBCA) were estimated. RBC incubation with catecholamines resulted in RBCD changes by 18-30%. RBCs incubation with forskolin facilitated an increase of RBCD by 17% (p RBCA; whereas red cell deformability was changed only slightly. On the other hand, Ca2+ entry blocking into the cells by verapamil has led to significant RBCA decrease and RBCD rise. The obtained results make us believe that RBCD change was closely associated with Ca2+ control mechanisms. An effect of Ca2+ concentration increase on RBC microrheology was removed, if it was preliminary added to incubation medium EGTA as Ca2+ chelator. It was found that all four PDE inhibitors: IBMX, vinpocetine, rolipram, pentoxifylline decreased RBCA significantly and, quite the contrary, they increased red cell deformability. Our data have shown that Ca2+ entry increase was accompanied by red cell aggregation rise, while adenylyl cyclase-cAMP system stimulation led to red cell deformability increase and its aggregation lowered. The crosstalk between two intracellular signaling systems is probably connected with phosphodiesterase activity.

  6. Opioid and GABAB receptors differentially couple to an adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A downstream effector after chronic morphine treatment.

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    Elena Elizabeth Bagley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are intensely addictive, and cessation of their chronic use is associated with a highly aversive withdrawal syndrome. A cellular hallmark of withdrawal is an opioid sensitive protein kinase A-dependent increase in GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1 currents in periaqueductal gray (PAG neurons. Elevated GAT-1 activity directly increases GABAergic neuronal excitability and synaptic GABA release, which will enhance GABAergic inhibition of PAG output neurons. This reduced activity of PAG output neurons to several brain regions, including the hypothalamus and medulla, contributes to many of the PAG-mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces some of the PAG mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. Like the opioid receptors the GABAB receptor is a Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptor. This suggests it could be modulating GAT-1 activity in PAG neurons through its inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway. Opioid modulation of the GAT-1 activity can be detected by changes in the reversal potential of opioid membrane currents. We found that when opioids are reducing the GAT-1 cation conductance and increasing the GIRK conductance the opioid agonist reversal potential is much more negative than Ek. Using this approach for GABAB receptors we show that the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, does not couple to inhibition of GAT-1 currents during opioid withdrawal. It is possible this differential signaling of the two Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptors is due to the strong compartmentalization of the GABAB receptor that does not favor signaling to the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A/GAT-1 pathway. This highlights the importance of studying the effects of G-protein coupled receptors in native tissue with endogenous G-protein coupled receptors and the full complement of relevant proteins and signaling molecules. This study suggests that baclofen reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms through a non-GAT-1

  7. Rat striatal muscarinic receptors coupled to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity: potent block by the selective m4 ligand muscarinic toxin 3 (MT3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olianas, M C; Adem, A; Karlsson, E; Onali, P

    1996-05-01

    1. In rat striatal membranes, muscarinic toxin 3 (MT3), a selective ligand of the cloned m4 receptor subtype, antagonized the acetylcholine (ACh) inhibition of forskolin- and dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities with pA2 values of 8.09 and 8.15, respectively. 2. In radioligand binding experiments, MT3 increased the Kd but did not change the Bmax value of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine (3H]-NMS) binding to rat striatal muscarinic receptors. The toxin displaced the major portion of the [3H]-NMS binding sites with a Ki of 8.0 nM. 3. In rat myocardium, MT3 antagonized the ACh inhibition of adenylyl cyclase with a Ki value of 860 nM. 4. In rat cerebral cortical membranes prelabelled with [3H]-myo-inositol, MT3 counteracted the methacholine stimulation of [3H]-inositol phosphates formation with a Ki value of 113 nM. 5. The present study shows that MT3 is a potent antagonist of the striatal muscarinic receptors coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. This finding provides strong evidence for the classification of these receptors as pharmacologically equivalent to the m4 gene product (M4). On the other hand, the weaker potencies of MT3 in antagonizing the muscarinic responses in cerebral cortex and in the heart are consistent with the reported lower affinities of the toxin for the cloned m1 and m2 receptor subtypes, respectively.

  8. Retigeric acid B attenuates the virulence of Candida albicans via inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity targeted by enhanced farnesol production.

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    Wenqiang Chang

    Full Text Available Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen, undergoes yeast-to-hyphal switch which has long been identified as a key fungal virulence factor. We showed here that the lichen-derived small molecule retigeric acid B (RAB acted as an inhibitor that significantly inhibited the filamentation of C. albicans, leading to the prolonged survival of nematodes infected by C. albicans. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis and intracellular cAMP measurement revealed RAB regulated the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway by reducing cAMP level to inhibit the hyphae formation. Confocal microscopic observation showed RAB induced the expression of Dpp3, synthesizing more farnesol, which was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy detection. An adenylyl cyclase activity assay demonstrated RAB could repress the activity of Cdc35 through stimulating farnesol synthesis, thus causing a decrease in cAMP synthesis, leading to retarded yeast-to-hyphal transition. Moreover, reduced levels of intracellular cAMP resulted in the inhibition of downstream adhesins. Together, these findings indicate that RAB stimulates farnesol production that directly inhibits the Cdc35 activity, reducing the synthesis of cAMP and thereby causing the disruption of the morphologic transition and attenuating the virulence of C. albicans. Our work illustrates the underlying mechanism of RAB-dependent inhibition of the yeast-to-hyphal switch and provides a potential application in treating the infection of C. albicans.

  9. Role of the bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase in pH sensing and metabolic regulation

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    Jung-Chin eChang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionarily conserved soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, adcy10 was recently identified as a unique source of cAMP in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Its activity is regulated by bicarbonate and fine-tuned by calcium. As such, and in conjunction with carbonic anhydrase (CA, sAC constitutes an HCO3-/CO¬2/pH sensor. In both alpha-intercalated cells of the collecting duct and the clear cells of the epididymis, sAC is expressed at significant level and involved in pH homeostasis via apical recruitment of vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA in a PKA-dependent manner. In addition to maintenance of pH homeostasis, sAC is also involved in metabolic regulation such as coupling of Krebs cycle to oxidative phosphorylation via bicarbonate/CO2 sensing. Additionally, sAC also regulates CFTR channel and plays an important role in regulation of barrier function and apoptosis. These observations suggest that sAC, via bicarbonate-sensing, plays an important role in maintaining homeostatic status of cells against fluctuations in their microenvironment.

  10. Genetic Ablation of Type III Adenylyl Cyclase Exerts Region-Specific Effects on Cilia Architecture in the Mouse Nose.

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    Rosemary C Challis

    Full Text Available We recently reported that olfactory sensory neurons in the dorsal zone of the mouse olfactory epithelium exhibit drastic location-dependent differences in cilia length. Furthermore, genetic ablation of type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII, a key olfactory signaling protein and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, disrupts the cilia length pattern and results in considerably shorter cilia, independent of odor-induced activity. Given the significant impact of ACIII on cilia length in the dorsal zone, we sought to further investigate the relationship between cilia length and ACIII level in various regions throughout the mouse olfactory epithelium. We employed whole-mount immunohistochemical staining to examine olfactory cilia morphology in phosphodiesterase (PDE 1C-/-;PDE4A-/- (simplified as PDEs-/- hereafter and ACIII-/- mice in which ACIII levels are reduced and ablated, respectively. As expected, PDEs-/- animals exhibit dramatically shorter cilia in the dorsal zone (i.e., where the cilia pattern is found, similar to our previous observation in ACIII-/- mice. Remarkably, in a region not included in our previous study, ACIII-/- animals (but not PDEs-/- mice have dramatically elongated, comet-shaped cilia, as opposed to characteristic star-shaped olfactory cilia. Here, we reveal that genetic ablation of ACIII has drastic, location-dependent effects on cilia architecture in the mouse nose. These results add a new dimension to our current understanding of olfactory cilia structure and regional organization of the olfactory epithelium. Together, these findings have significant implications for both cilia and sensory biology.

  11. Genetic Ablation of Type III Adenylyl Cyclase Exerts Region-Specific Effects on Cilia Architecture in the Mouse Nose.

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    Challis, Rosemary C; Tian, Huikai; Yin, Wenbin; Ma, Minghong

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that olfactory sensory neurons in the dorsal zone of the mouse olfactory epithelium exhibit drastic location-dependent differences in cilia length. Furthermore, genetic ablation of type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), a key olfactory signaling protein and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, disrupts the cilia length pattern and results in considerably shorter cilia, independent of odor-induced activity. Given the significant impact of ACIII on cilia length in the dorsal zone, we sought to further investigate the relationship between cilia length and ACIII level in various regions throughout the mouse olfactory epithelium. We employed whole-mount immunohistochemical staining to examine olfactory cilia morphology in phosphodiesterase (PDE) 1C-/-;PDE4A-/- (simplified as PDEs-/- hereafter) and ACIII-/- mice in which ACIII levels are reduced and ablated, respectively. As expected, PDEs-/- animals exhibit dramatically shorter cilia in the dorsal zone (i.e., where the cilia pattern is found), similar to our previous observation in ACIII-/- mice. Remarkably, in a region not included in our previous study, ACIII-/- animals (but not PDEs-/- mice) have dramatically elongated, comet-shaped cilia, as opposed to characteristic star-shaped olfactory cilia. Here, we reveal that genetic ablation of ACIII has drastic, location-dependent effects on cilia architecture in the mouse nose. These results add a new dimension to our current understanding of olfactory cilia structure and regional organization of the olfactory epithelium. Together, these findings have significant implications for both cilia and sensory biology.

  12. Deletion of Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase Perturbs the Postnatal Maturation of Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Olfactory Cilium Ultrastructure in Mice.

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    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Mengdi; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Yanfen; Storm, Daniel R; Wang, Zhenshan

    2017-01-01

    Type 3 adenylyl cyclase (Adcy3) is localized to the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and is an essential component of the olfactory cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathway. Although the role of this enzyme in odor detection and axonal projection in OSNs was previously characterized, researchers will still have to determine its function in the maturation of postnatal OSNs and olfactory cilium ultrastructure. Previous studies on newborns showed that the anatomic structure of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of Adcy3 knockout mice ( Adcy3 -/- ) is indistinguishable from that of their wild-type littermates ( Adcy3 +/+ ), whereas the architecture and associated composition of MOE are relatively underdeveloped at this early age. The full effects of sensory deprivation on OSNs may not also be exhibited in such age. In the present study, following a comparison of postnatal OSNs in seven-, 30-, and 90-day-old Adcy3 -/- mice and wild-type controls ( Adcy 3 +/+ ), we observed that the absence of Adcy3 leads to cumulative defects in the maturation of OSNs. Upon aging, Adcy3 -/- OSNs exhibited increase in immature cells and reduction in mature cells along with elevated apoptosis levels. The density and ultrastructure of Adcy3 -/- cilia were also disrupted in mice upon aging. Collectively, our results reveal an indispensable role of Adcy3 in postnatal maturation of OSNs and maintenance of olfactory cilium ultrastructure in mice through adulthood.

  13. β3GnT2 maintains adenylyl cyclase-3 signaling and axon guidance molecule expression in the olfactory epithelium.

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    Henion, Timothy R; Faden, Ashley A; Knott, Thomas K; Schwarting, Gerald A

    2011-04-27

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), odorant receptor stimulation generates cAMP signals that function in both odor detection and the regulation of axon guidance molecule expression. The enzyme that synthesizes cAMP, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), is coexpressed in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) with poly-N-acetyllactosamine (PLN) oligosaccharides determined by the glycosyltransferase β3GnT2. The loss of either enzyme results in similar defects in olfactory bulb (OB) innervation and OSN survival, suggesting that glycosylation may be important for AC3 function. We show here that AC3 is extensively modified with N-linked PLN, which is essential for AC3 activity and localization. On Western blots, AC3 from the wild-type OE migrates diffusely as a heavily glycosylated 200 kDa band that interacts with the PLN-binding lectin LEA. AC3 from the β3GnT2(-/-) OE loses these PLN modifications, migrating instead as a 140 kDa glycoprotein. Furthermore, basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production is reduced 80-90% in the β3GnT2(-/-) OE. Although AC3 traffics normally to null OSN cilia, it is absent from axon projections that aberrantly target the OB. The cAMP-dependent guidance receptor neuropilin-1 is also lost from β3GnT2(-/-) OSNs and axons, while semaphorin-3A ligand expression is upregulated. In addition, kirrel2, a mosaically expressed adhesion molecule that functions in axon sorting, is absent from β3GnT2(-/-) OB projections. These results demonstrate that PLN glycans are essential in OSNs for proper AC3 localization and function. We propose that the loss of cAMP-dependent guidance cues is also a critical factor in the severe axon guidance defects observed in β3GnT2(-/-) mice.

  14. Salt-induced Na+/K+-ATPase-α/β expression involves soluble adenylyl cyclase in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, Mirja; Nedele, Johanna; Schelleckes, Katrin; Bondareva, Olga; Lenders, Malte; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Schmitz, Boris; Brand, Eva

    2017-10-01

    High dietary salt intake may lead to vascular stiffness, which predicts cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, and myocardial and cerebral infarctions as well as renal impairment. The vascular endothelium is a primary target for deleterious salt effects leading to dysfunction and endothelial stiffness. We hypothesize that the Ca 2+ - and bicarbonate-activated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) contributes to Na + /K + -ATPase expression regulation in vascular endothelial cells and is an important regulator of endothelial stiffness. In vitro stimulation of vascular endothelial cells with high sodium (150 mM Na + )-induced Na + /K + -ATPase-α and Na + /K + -ATPase-β protein expression determined by western blot. Promoter analyses revealed increased cAMP response element (CRE)-mediated Na + /K + -ATPase-α transcriptional activity under high sodium concentrations. Inhibition of sAC by the specific inhibitor KH7 or siRNA reduced the sodium effects. Flame photometry revealed increased intracellular sodium concentrations in response to high sodium stimulations, which were paralleled by elevated ATP levels. Using atomic force microscopy, a nano-technique that measures cellular stiffness and deformability, we detected significant endothelial stiffening under increased sodium concentrations, which was prevented by inhibition of sAC using KH7 and Na + /K + -ATPase using ouabain. Furthermore, analysis of primary aortic endothelial cells in an in vitro aging model revealed an impaired Na + /K + -ATPase-α sodium response and elevated intracellular sodium levels with cellular aging. We conclude that sAC mediates sodium-induced Na + /K + -ATPase expression in vascular endothelium and is an important regulator of endothelial stiffness. The reactivity of Na + /K + -ATPase-α expression regulation in response to high sodium seems to be impaired in aging endothelial cells and might be a component of endothelial dysfunction.

  15. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide inhibits gli1 gene expression and proliferation in primary medulloblastoma derived tumorsphere cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Joseph R; Resnick, Daniel Z; Niewiadomski, Pawel; Dong, Hongmei; Liau, Linda M; Waschek, James A

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is critical for the expansion of granule neuron precursors (GNPs) within the external granular layer (EGL) during cerebellar development. Aberrant HH signaling within GNPs is thought to give rise to medulloblastoma (MB) - the most commonly-observed form of malignant pediatric brain tumor. Evidence in both invertebrates and vertebrates indicates that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) antagonizes HH signalling. Receptors specific for the neuropeptide pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP, gene name ADCYAP1) are expressed in GNPs. PACAP has been shown to protect GNPs from apoptosis in vitro, and to interact with HH signaling to regulate GNP proliferation. PACAP/ptch1 double mutant mice exhibit an increased incidence of MB compared to ptch1 mice, indicating that PACAP may regulate HH pathway-mediated MB pathogenesis. Primary MB tumorsphere cultures were prepared from thirteen ptch1 +/- /p53 +/- double mutant mice and treated with the smoothened (SMO) agonist purmorphamine, the SMO antagonist SANT-1, the neuropeptide PACAP, the PKA activator forskolin, and the PKA inhibitor H89. Gene expression of gli1 and [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation were assessed to determine drug effects on HH pathway activity and proliferation, respectively. PKA activity was determined in cell extracts by Western blotting using a phospho-PKA substrate antibody. Primary tumor cells cultured for 1-week under serum-free conditions grew as tumorspheres and were found to express PAC1 receptor transcripts. Gli1 gene expression was significantly reduced by SANT-1, PACAP and forskolin, but was unaffected by purmorphamine. The attenuation of gli1 gene expression by PACAP was reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89, which also blocked PKA activation. Treatment of tumorsphere cultures with PACAP, forskolin, and SANT-1 for 24 or 48 hours reduced proliferation. Primary tumorspheres derived from ptch1 +/- /p53 +/- mice exhibit constitutive HH pathway activity

  16. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide inhibits gli1 gene expression and proliferation in primary medulloblastoma derived tumorsphere cultures

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    Dong Hongmei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog (HH signaling is critical for the expansion of granule neuron precursors (GNPs within the external granular layer (EGL during cerebellar development. Aberrant HH signaling within GNPs is thought to give rise to medulloblastoma (MB - the most commonly-observed form of malignant pediatric brain tumor. Evidence in both invertebrates and vertebrates indicates that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA antagonizes HH signalling. Receptors specific for the neuropeptide pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP, gene name ADCYAP1 are expressed in GNPs. PACAP has been shown to protect GNPs from apoptosis in vitro, and to interact with HH signaling to regulate GNP proliferation. PACAP/ptch1 double mutant mice exhibit an increased incidence of MB compared to ptch1 mice, indicating that PACAP may regulate HH pathway-mediated MB pathogenesis. Methods Primary MB tumorsphere cultures were prepared from thirteen ptch1+/-/p53+/- double mutant mice and treated with the smoothened (SMO agonist purmorphamine, the SMO antagonist SANT-1, the neuropeptide PACAP, the PKA activator forskolin, and the PKA inhibitor H89. Gene expression of gli1 and [3H]-thymidine incorporation were assessed to determine drug effects on HH pathway activity and proliferation, respectively. PKA activity was determined in cell extracts by Western blotting using a phospho-PKA substrate antibody. Results Primary tumor cells cultured for 1-week under serum-free conditions grew as tumorspheres and were found to express PAC1 receptor transcripts. Gli1 gene expression was significantly reduced by SANT-1, PACAP and forskolin, but was unaffected by purmorphamine. The attenuation of gli1 gene expression by PACAP was reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89, which also blocked PKA activation. Treatment of tumorsphere cultures with PACAP, forskolin, and SANT-1 for 24 or 48 hours reduced proliferation. Conclusions Primary tumorspheres derived from ptch1+/-/p53

  17. A HCO3−-dependent mechanism involving soluble adenylyl cyclase for the activation of Ca2+ currents in locus coeruleus neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Ann N.; Santin, Joseph M.; Graham, Cathy D.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Hypercapnic acidosis activates Ca2+ channels and increases intracellular Ca2+ levels in neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC), a known chemosensitive region involved in respiratory control. We have also shown that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK), in conjunction with this pathway, limits the hypercapnic-induced increase in firing rate in LC neurons. Here, we present evidence that the Ca2+ current is activated by a HCO3−-sensitive pathway. The increase in HCO3− associated with hypercapnia activates HCO3−-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (sAC). This results in an increase in cAMP levels and activation of Ca2+ channels via cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA). We also show the presence of sAC in the cytoplasm of LC neurons, and that the cAMP analogue db-cAMP increases Ca2+i. Disrupting this pathway by decreasing HCO3− levels during acidification or inhibiting either sAC or PKA, but not transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (tmAC), can increase the magnitude of the firing rate response to hypercapnia in LC neurons from older neonates to the same extent as inhibition of BK channels. PMID:25092170

  18. Adenylyl cyclase is required for cAMP production, growth, conidial germination, and virulence in the citrus green mold pathogen Penicillium digitatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weili; Wang, Mingshuang; Wang, Jiye; Zhu, Congyi; Chung, Kuang-Ren; Li, Hongye

    2016-11-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the causative agent of green mold decay on citrus fruit. The cAMP-mediated signaling pathway plays an important role in the transduction of extracellular signals and has been shown to regulate a wide range of developmental processes and pathogenicity in fungal pathogens. We cloned and characterized a Pdac1 gene of P. digitatum, which encodes a polypeptide similar to fungal adenylyl cyclases. Using a loss-of-function mutation in the Pdac1 gene we demonstrated a critical requirement for hyphal growth and conidial germination. Deletion of Pdac1 resulted in decreased accumulation of cAMP and down-regulation of genes encoding a G protein α subunit, both catalytic and regulatory subunits of PKA, and two transcriptional regulators StuA and Som1. Fungal mutants lacking Pdac1 produced abundant conidia, which failed to germinate effectively and displayed an elevated sensitivity to heat treatment. Pdac1 mutant failed to utilize carbohydrates effectively and thus displayed severe growth retardation on rich and synthetic media. Slow growth seen in the Pdac1 mutants could be due to a defect in nutrient sensing and acquisition. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Pdac1 was primarily expressed at the early stage of infection. Fungal pathogenicity assayed on citrus fruit revealed that P. digitatum strains impaired for Pdac1 delayed lesion formation. Our results highlight important regulatory roles of adenylyl cyclase-mediated cAMP production in P. digitatum and provide insights into the critical role of cAMP in fungal growth, development and virulence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and characterization of muscarinic receptors potentiating the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by corticotropin-releasing hormone in membranes of rat frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onali, P; Olianas, M C

    1998-08-01

    In membranes of the rat frontal cortex, acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists were found to potentiate the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity elicited by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Oxotremorine-M, carbachol and methacholine were as effective as ACh, whereas oxotremorine and arecoline were much less effective. The facilitating effect of Ach was potently blocked by the M1 antagonists R-trihexyphenidyl, telenzepine and pirenzepine and by the M3 antagonists hexahydro-sila-difenidol and p-fluorohexahydro-sila-difenidol, whereas the M2 and M4 antagonists himbacine, methoctramine, AF-DX 116 and AQ-RA 741 were less potent. The mamba venom toxin MT-1, which binds with high affinity to M1 receptors, was also a potent blocker. The pharmacological profile of the muscarinic potentiation of CRH receptor activity was markedly different from that displayed by the muscarinic inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase, which could be detected in the same membrane preparations. Moreover, the intracerebral injection of pertussis toxin impaired the muscarinic inhibition of cyclic AMP formation and reduced the Ach stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding to membrane G proteins but failed to affect the facilitating effect on CRH receptor activity. The latter response was also insensitive to the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine and to the inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. These data demonstrate that in the rat frontal cortex, muscarinic receptors of the M1 subtype potentiate CRH transmission by interacting with pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins.

  20. Soluble adenylyl cyclase in vascular endothelium: gene expression control of epithelial sodium channel-α, Na+/K+-ATPase-α/β, and mineralocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Boris; Nedele, Johanna; Guske, Katrin; Maase, Martina; Lenders, Malte; Schelleckes, Michael; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva

    2014-04-01

    The Ca(2+)- and bicarbonate-activated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) has been identified recently as an important mediator of aldosterone signaling in the kidney. Nuclear sAC has been reported to stimulate cAMP response element-binding protein 1 phosphorylation via protein kinase A, suggesting an alternative cAMP pathway in the nucleus. In this study, we analyzed the sAC as a potential modulator of endothelial stiffness in the vascular endothelium. We determined the contribution of sAC to cAMP response element-mediated transcriptional activation in vascular endothelial cells and kidney collecting duct cells. Inhibition of sAC by the specific inhibitor KH7 significantly reduced cAMP response element-mediated promoter activity and affected cAMP response element-binding protein 1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, KH7 and anti-sAC small interfering RNA significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of epithelial sodium channel-α and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-α. Using atomic force microscopy, a nano-technique that measures stiffness and deformability of living cells, we detected significant endothelial cell softening after sAC inhibition. Our results suggest that the sAC is a regulator of gene expression involved in aldosterone signaling and an important regulator of endothelial stiffness. Additional studies are warranted to investigate the protective action of sAC inhibitors in humans for potential clinical use.

  1. Ocean acidification stimulates alkali signal pathway: A bicarbonate sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase from oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates physiological changes induced by CO2 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudan; Wang, Mengqiang; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) has been demonstrated to have severe effects on marine organisms, especially marine calcifiers. However, the impacts of OA on the physiology of marine calcifiers and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an acid-base sensor in response to [HCO 3 - ] and an intracellular source of cyclic AMP (cAMP). In the present study, an ortholog of sAC was identified from pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated as CgsAC) and the catalytic region of CgsAC was cloned and expressed. Similar to the native CgsAC from gill tissues, the recombinant CgsAC protein (rCgsAC) exhibited [HCO 3 - ] mediated cAMP-forming activity, which could be inhibited by a small molecule KH7. After 16days of CO 2 exposure (pH=7.50), the mRNA transcripts of CgsAC increased in muscle, mantle, hepatopancreas, gill, male gonad and haemocytes, and two truncated CgsAC forms of 45kD and 20kD were produced. Cytosolic CgsAC could be translocated from the cytoplasm and nuclei to the membrane in response to CO 2 exposure. Besides, CO 2 exposure could increase the production of cAMP and intracellular pH of haemocytes, which was regulated by CgsAC (pocean acidification on marine calcifiers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ethanol extract of the seed of Zizyphus jujuba var. spinosa potentiates hippocampal synaptic transmission through mitogen-activated protein kinase, adenylyl cyclase, and protein kinase A pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, So Yeon; Jung, In Ho; Yi, Jee Hyun; Choi, Tae Joon; Lee, Seungheon; Jung, Ji Wook; Yun, Jeanho; Lee, Young Choon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-03-22

    As the seed of Zizyphus jujuba var. spinosa (Bunge) Hu ex H.F. Chow (Rhamnaceae) has been used to sleep disturbances in traditional Chinese and Korean medicine, many previous studies have focused on its sedative effect. Recently, we reported the neuroprotective effect of the effect of Z. jujuba var. spinosa. However, its effects on synaptic function have not yet been studied. In this project, we examined the action of ethanol extract of the seed of Z. jujuba var. spinosa (DHP1401) on synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. To investigate the effects of DHP1401, field recordings were conducted using hippocampal slices (400µm). Object recognition test was introduced to examine whether DHP1401 affect normal recognition memory. DHP1401 (50μg/ml) induced a significant increase in synaptic activity in Shaffer collateral pathway in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase of synaptic responses was blocked by NBQX, a broad spectrum α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor antagonist, but not IEM-1460, a Ca 2+ -permeable AMPAR blocker. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor, SQ22536, an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, and PKI, a protein kinase A inhibitor, blocked DHP1401-induced increase in synaptic transmission. Finally, DHP1401 facilitated object recognition memory. These results suggest that DHP1401 increase synaptic transmission through increase of synaptic AMPAR transmission via MAPK, AC and PAK. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An adenylyl cyclase like-9 gene (NlAC9 influences growth and fecundity in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål (Hemiptera: Delphacidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LinQuan Ge

    Full Text Available The cAMP/PKA intracellular signaling pathway is launched by adenylyl cyclase (AC conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP to 3', 5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP and cAMP-dependent activation of PKA. Although this pathway is very well known in insect physiology, there is little to no information on it in some very small pest insects, such as the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens Stål. BPH is a destructive pest responsible for tremendous crop losses in rice cropping systems. We are investigating the potentials of novel pest management technologies from RNA interference perspective. Based on analysis of transcriptomic data, the BPH AC like-9 gene (NlAC9 was up-regulated in post-mating females, which led us to pose the hypothesis that NlAC9 is a target gene that would lead to reduced BPH fitness and populations. Targeting NlAC9 led to substantially decreased soluble ovarian protein content, yeast-like symbiont abundance, and vitellogenin gene expression, accompanied with stunted ovarian development and body size. Eggs laid were decreased and oviposition period shortened. Taken together, our findings indicated that NlAC9 exerted pronounced effects on female fecundity, growth and longevity, which strongly supports our hypothesis.

  4. An adenylyl cyclase like-9 gene (NlAC9) influences growth and fecundity in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, LinQuan; Gu, HaoTian; Huang, Bo; Song, Qisheng; Stanley, David; Liu, Fang; Yang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2017-01-01

    The cAMP/PKA intracellular signaling pathway is launched by adenylyl cyclase (AC) conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to 3', 5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent activation of PKA. Although this pathway is very well known in insect physiology, there is little to no information on it in some very small pest insects, such as the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens Stål. BPH is a destructive pest responsible for tremendous crop losses in rice cropping systems. We are investigating the potentials of novel pest management technologies from RNA interference perspective. Based on analysis of transcriptomic data, the BPH AC like-9 gene (NlAC9) was up-regulated in post-mating females, which led us to pose the hypothesis that NlAC9 is a target gene that would lead to reduced BPH fitness and populations. Targeting NlAC9 led to substantially decreased soluble ovarian protein content, yeast-like symbiont abundance, and vitellogenin gene expression, accompanied with stunted ovarian development and body size. Eggs laid were decreased and oviposition period shortened. Taken together, our findings indicated that NlAC9 exerted pronounced effects on female fecundity, growth and longevity, which strongly supports our hypothesis.

  5. Overexpression of Adenylyl Cyclase Encoded by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2212 Gene Confers Improved Fitness, Accelerated Recovery from Dormancy and Enhanced Virulence in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita O. Shleeva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Earlier we demonstrated that the adenylyl cyclase (AC encoded by the MSMEG_4279 gene plays a key role in the resuscitation and growth of dormant Mycobacterium smegmatis and that overexpression of this gene leads to an increase in intracellular cAMP concentration and prevents the transition of M. smegmatis from active growth to dormancy in an extended stationary phase accompanied by medium acidification. We surmised that the homologous Rv2212 gene of M. tuberculosis (Mtb, the main cAMP producer, plays similar physiological roles by supporting, under these conditions, the active state and reactivation of dormant bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we established Mtb strain overexpressing Rv2212 and compared its in vitro and in vivo growth characteristics with a control strain. In vitro, the AC-overexpressing pMindRv2212 strain demonstrated faster growth in a liquid medium, prolonged capacity to form CFUs and a significant delay or even prevention of transition toward dormancy. AC-overexpressing cells exhibited easier recovery from dormancy. In vivo, AC-overexpressing bacteria demonstrated significantly higher growth rates (virulence in the lungs and spleens of infected mice compared to the control strain, and, unlike the latter, killed mice in the TB-resistant strain before month 8 of infection. Even in the absence of selecting hygromycin B, all pMindRv2212 CFUs retained the Rv2212 insert during in vivo growth, strongly suggesting that AC overexpression is beneficial for bacteria. Taken together, our results indicate that cAMP supports the maintenance of Mtb cells vitality under unfavorable conditions in vitro and their virulence in vivo.

  6. Different effects of adenylyl cyclase activators and phosphodiesterases inhibitors on cervical cancer (HeLa) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdian, Davood; Shafiee-Nick, Reza; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi

    2014-05-01

    Breast and cervical cancers are the most common cancers in Iran and worldwide. Hormonal stimulation of cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (cAMP) and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA regulates cell growth by different mechanism. cAMP can stimulate cell growth in many cell types while inhibiting cell growth in others. In some cell lines have been shown that the proliferation of tumor cells is reduced by increasing cAMP in cells. In this study, we evaluate growth arrest of selective PDE3 and non-selective PDE inhibitors, which lead to increase level of cAMP in cervical (HeLa) and breast cancer (MCF7) cell lines have been studied. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of selective, non-selective PDE inhibitors, beta adrenergic receptor agonist and direct stimulator of adenylyl cyclase. Cell viability was quantitated by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were determined using PI staining of DNA fragmentation by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak). Result showed that selective PDE inhibitors decreased cell viability in HeLa and MCF-7 cells as a time-dependent manner. Non-selective inhibitor and beta-adrenergic receptor agonist also decrease cell viability but they are less powerful than selective PDE3 inhibitors. Forskolin had no effect in viability of cells. Analysis of DNA fragmentation by flow cytometry showed apoptosis involved in selective PDE3 inhibitors induced toxicity in HeLa cell. Thus, the growth inhibitory effects of selective PDE3 inhibitors are more effective than non-selective inhibitor. Further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism of action is on the field.

  7. Chronic Treatment with Escitalopram but Not R-Citalopram Translocates Gαs from Lipid Raft Domains and Potentiates Adenylyl Cyclase: A 5-Hydroxytryptamine Transporter-Independent Action of This Antidepressant Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanqiu

    2010-01-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Gαs from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Gαs in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Gαs in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Gαs content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Gαs localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Gαs and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Gαs from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs. PMID:19996298

  8. Chronic treatment with escitalopram but not R-citalopram translocates Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains and potentiates adenylyl cyclase: a 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-independent action of this antidepressant compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanqiu; Rasenick, Mark M

    2010-03-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Galpha(s) from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Galpha(s) in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Galpha(s) in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Galpha(s) content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Galpha(s) localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Galpha(s) and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Galpha(s) from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs.

  9. Adenylyl Cyclase 1 Is Required for Ethanol-Induced Locomotor Sensitization and Associated Increases in NMDA Receptor Phosphorylation and Function in the Dorsal Medial Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Kelly E; Oginsky, Max F; Susick, Laura L; Ramalingam, Sailesh; Ferrario, Carrie R; Conti, Alana C

    2017-11-01

    Neuroadaptive responses to chronic ethanol, such as behavioral sensitization, are associated with N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) recruitment. Ethanol enhances GluN2B-containing NMDAR function and phosphorylation (Tyr-1472) of the GluN2B-NMDAR subunit in the dorsal medial striatum (DMS) through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. Ethanol-induced phosphorylation of PKA substrates is partially mediated by calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1), which is enriched in the dorsal striatum. As such, AC1 is poised as an upstream modulator of ethanol-induced DMS neuroadaptations that promote drug responding, and thus represents a therapeutic target. Our hypothesis is that loss of AC1 activity will prevent ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization and associated DMS GluN2B-NMDAR adaptations. We evaluated AC1's contribution to ethanol-evoked locomotor responses and DMS GluN2B-NMDAR phosphorylation and function using AC1 knockout (AC1KO) mice. Results were mechanistically validated with the AC1 inhibitor, NB001. Acute ethanol (2.0 g/kg) locomotor responses in AC1KO and wild-type (WT) mice pretreated with NB001 (10 mg/kg) were comparable to WT ethanol controls. However, repeated ethanol treatment (10 days, 2.5 g/kg) failed to produce sensitization in AC1KO or NB001 pretreated mice, as observed in WT ethanol controls, following challenge exposure (2.0 g/kg). Repeated exposure to ethanol in the sensitization procedure significantly increased pTyr-1472 GluN2B levels and GluN2B-containing NMDAR transmission in the DMS of WT mice. Loss of AC1 signaling impaired ethanol-induced increases in DMS pGluN2B levels and NMDAR-mediated transmission. Together, these data support a critical and specific role for AC1 in striatal signaling that mediates ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization, and identify GluN2B-containing NMDARs as an important AC1 target. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  10. Inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase toxin, edema factor, from Bacillus anthracis by a series of 18 mono- and bis-(M)ANT-substituted nucleoside 5'-triphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Hesham; Dove, Stefan; Geduhn, Jens; König, Burkhard; Shen, Yuequan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis causes anthrax disease and exerts its deleterious effects by the release of three exotoxins, i.e. lethal factor, protective antigen and edema factor (EF), a highly active calmodulin-dependent adenylyl cyclase (AC). Conventional antibiotic treatment is ineffective against either toxaemia or antibiotic-resistant strains. Thus, more effective drugs for anthrax treatment are needed. Our previous studies showed that EF is differentially inhibited by various purine and pyrimidine nucleotides modified with N-methylanthraniloyl (MANT)- or anthraniloyl (ANT) groups at the 2'(3')-O-ribosyl position, with the unique preference for the base cytosine (Taha et al., Mol Pharmacol 75:693 (2009)). MANT-CTP was the most potent EF inhibitor (K (i), 100 nM) among 16 compounds studied. Here, we examined the interaction of EF with a series of 18 2',3'-O-mono- and bis-(M)ANT-substituted nucleotides, recently shown to be very potent inhibitors of the AC toxin from Bordetella pertussis, CyaA (Geduhn et al., J Pharmacol Exp Ther 336:104 (2011)). We analysed purified EF and EF mutants in radiometric AC assays and in fluorescence spectroscopy studies and conducted molecular modelling studies. Bis-MANT nucleotides inhibited EF competitively. Propyl-ANT-ATP was the most potent EF inhibitor (K (i), 80 nM). In contrast to the observations made for CyaA, introduction of a second (M)ANT-group decreased rather than increased inhibitor potency at EF. Activation of EF by calmodulin resulted in effective fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from tryptophan and tyrosine residues located in the vicinity of the catalytic site to bis-MANT-ATP, but FRET to bis-MANT-CTP was only small. Mutations N583Q, K353A and K353R differentially altered the inhibitory potencies of bis-MANT-ATP and bis-MANT-CTP. The nucleotide binding site of EF accommodates bulky bis-(M)ANT-substituted purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, but the fit is suboptimal compared to CyaA. These data provide a basis

  11. Essential Control of the Function of the Striatopallidal Neuron by Pre-coupled Complexes of Adenosine A2A-Dopamine D2 Receptor Heterotetramers and Adenylyl Cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Ferré

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The central adenosine system and adenosine receptors play a fundamental role in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. This is mostly achieved by the strategic co-localization of different adenosine and dopamine receptor subtypes in the two populations of striatal efferent neurons, striatonigral and striatopallidal, that give rise to the direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, respectively. With optogenetic techniques it has been possible to dissect a differential role of the direct and indirect pathways in mediating “Go” responses upon exposure to reward-related stimuli and “NoGo” responses upon exposure to non-rewarded or aversive-related stimuli, respectively, which depends on their different connecting output structures and their differential expression of dopamine and adenosine receptor subtypes. The striatopallidal neuron selectively expresses dopamine D2 receptors (D2R and adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR, and numerous experiments using multiple genetic and pharmacological in vitro, in situ and in vivo approaches, demonstrate they can form A2AR-D2R heteromers. It was initially assumed that different pharmacological interactions between dopamine and adenosine receptor ligands indicated the existence of different subpopulations of A2AR and D2R in the striatopallidal neuron. However, as elaborated in the present essay, most evidence now indicates that all interactions can be explained with a predominant population of striatal A2AR-D2R heteromers forming complexes with adenylyl cyclase subtype 5 (AC5. The A2AR-D2R heteromer has a tetrameric structure, with two homodimers, which allows not only multiple allosteric interactions between different orthosteric ligands, agonists, and antagonists, but also the canonical Gs-Gi antagonistic interaction at the level of AC5. We present a model of the function of the A2AR-D2R heterotetramer-AC5 complex, which acts as an integrative device of adenosine and dopamine signals that

  12. [Peptide 612-627 of thyrotropin receptor and its modified derivatives as the regulators of adenylyl cyclase in the rat thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, A O; Shpakova, E A; Tarasenko, I I; Derkach, K V

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of the specific activity of the thyroid gland is carried by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) through TSH receptor (TSHR). This receptor is coupled to different types of G-proteins, including the G(s)-proteins, through which TSH stimulates the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). As the application of TSH in medicine is limited, the development of selective regulators of TSHR with agonistic and antagonistic activity is carried out. One of the approaches to their creation is to develop the peptides corresponding to functionally important regions of TSHR which are located in its intracellular loops (ICL) and are involved in the binding and activation of G-proteins. We have synthesized peptide corresponding to the C-terminal region 612-627 of the third ICL of TSHR and its derivatives modified by palmitic acid residue (at the N- or the C-terminus) or by polylysine dendrimer (at the N-terminus), and studied their effect on the basal and TSH-stimulated AC activity in the membrane fraction isolated from the rat thyroid. The most active was peptide 612-627-K(Pal)A modified by palmitate at the C-terminus, where in TSHR the hydrophobic transmembrane region is located. At the micromolar concentrations the peptide increased AC activity and reduced the AC stimulating effect of TSH. The action of the 612-627-K(Pal)A has been directed onto TSHR homologous to it, as indicated by the following facts: 1) the inhibition of G(s)-protein, the downstream component of AC system, by treating the membranes with cholera toxin led to the blocking of peptide AC effect, 2) this effect was not detected in the tissues where no TSHR, 3) the peptide did not significantly affect the AC stimulating effects of hormones acting via other receptors. The unmodified peptide and the peptide with N-terminal dendrimer are far behind the 612-627-K(Pal)A in their ability to activate AC in the thyroid, while the peptide modified by palmitate at the N-terminus was inactive. At the same time, the peptide

  13. Adenylyl cyclase-5 in the dorsal striatum function as a molecular switch for the generation of behavioral preferences for cue-directed food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hannah; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Yunjin; Kang, Minkyung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2014-11-07

    Behavioral choices in habits and innate behaviors occur automatically in the absence of conscious selection. These behaviors are not easily modified by learning. Similar types of behaviors also occur in various mental illnesses including drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and autism. However, underlying mechanisms are not clearly understood. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating unconditioned preferred behaviors in food-choices. Mice lacking adenylyl cyclase-5 (AC5 KO mice), which is preferentially expressed in the dorsal striatum, consumed food pellets nearly one after another in cages. AC5 KO mice showed aversive behaviors to bitter tasting quinine, but they compulsively chose quinine-containing AC5 KO-pellets over fresh pellets. The unusual food-choice behaviors in AC5 KO mice were due to the gain of behavioral preferences for food pellets containing an olfactory cue, which wild-type mice normally ignored. Such food-choice behaviors in AC5 KO mice disappeared when whiskers were trimmed. Conversely, whisker trimming in wildtype mice induced behavioral preferences for AC5 KO food pellets, indicating that preferred food-choices were not learned through prior experience. Both AC5 KO mice and wildtype mice with trimmed whiskers had increased glutamatergic input from the barrel cortex into the dorsal striatum, resulting in an increase in the mGluR1-dependent signaling cascade. The siRNA-mediated inhibition of mGluR1 in the dorsal striatum in AC5 KO mice and wildtype mice with trimmed whiskers abolished preferred choices for AC5 KO food pellets, whereas siRNA-mediated inhibition of mGluR3 glutamate receptors in the dorsal striatum in wildtype mice induced behavioral preferences for AC5 KO food pellets, thus mimicking AC5 KO phenotypes. Our results show that the gain and loss of behavioral preferences for a specific cue-directed option were regulated by specific cellular factors in the dorsal striatum, such

  14. [Attenuation of inhibitory influence of hormones on adenylyl cyclase systems in the myocardium and brain of rats with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus and effect of intranasal insulin on it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Sharova, T S; Pertseva, M N; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    The functional state of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) and its regulation by hormones, the inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase (AC)--somatostatin (SST) in the brain and myocardium and 5-nonyloxytryptamine (5-NOT) in the brain of rats of different ages (5- and 7-month-old) with experimental obesity and a combination of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), and the effect of long-term treatment of animals with intranasally administered insulin (II) on ACSS were studied. It was shown that the basal AC activity in rats with obesity and DM2 was increased in the myocardium, and to the lesser extent in the brain, the treatment with II reducing this parameter. The AC stimulating effects of forskolin are decreased in the myocardium, but not in the brain, of rats with obesity and DM2. The treatment with II restored the AC action of forskolin in the 7-month-old animals, but has little effect on it in the 5-month-old rats. In obesity the basal AC activity and its stimulation by forskolin varied insignificantly and weakly changed in treatment of animals with II. The AC inhibitory effects of SST and 5-NOT in the investigated pathology are essentially attenuated, the effect of SST to the greatest extent, which we believe to be associated with a reduction in the functional activity of Gi-proteins. The II treatment of animals with obesity and with a combination of obesity and DM2 restored completely or partially the AC inhibiting effects of hormones, to the greatest extent in the brain. Since impaired functioning of ACSS is one of the causes of the metabolic syndrome and DM2, their elimination by treatments with II can be an effective approach to treat these diseases and their CNS and cardiovascular system complications.

  15. [The influence of two-month treatment with bromocryptine on activity of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system in the myocardium and testes of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, K V; Bondareva, V M; Moyseyuk, I V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are cardiovascular diseases and dysfunctions of the reproductive system, indicating the urgency of developing new approaches to their correction. Last years for the treatment of DM2 began to use bromocryptine (BC), the agonist of type 2 dopamine receptors, which not only restores the energy metabolism, but also prevents the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms and targets of BC action are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BC treatment on functional activity of adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the myocardium and testes of male rats with DM2, which is caused by high-fat diet and treatment with streptozotocin (25 mg/kg). The treatment with BC (60 days, orally at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg once every two days) was started 90 days after the beginning of high-fat diet. Diabetic rats had an increased body weight, elevated triglycerides level, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. The treatment with BC resulted in the restoration of glycometabolic indicators and in the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp), relaxin, and agonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β3-AR)--isoproterenol and norepinephrine were decreased in the miocardium of the diabetic rats. The corresponding effects of the β-agonists BRL-37344 and CL-316243 was preserved. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on forskolin-stimulated AC activity was attenuated, while the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline mediated through α2-AR increased. The treatment with BC resulted in the normalization of the adrenergic signaling in the myocardium and partially restoration of AC effects of relaxin and somatostatin. In the testes of diabetic rats, the basal and stimulated by GppNHp, forskolin, human chorionic gonadotropin and pituitary AC-activating polypeptide AC activity were decreased, and the

  16. [BETA-ADRENERGIC REGULATION OF THE ADENYLYL CYCLASE SIGNALING SYSTEM IN MYOCARDIUM AND BRAIN OF RATS WITH OBESITY AND TYPES 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND THE EFFECT OF LONG-TERM INTRANASAL INSULIN TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, L A; Sharova, T S; Pertseva, M N; Shpakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    The stimulating effect of norepinephrine, isoproterenol and selective β-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) agonists BRL 37344 and CL 316.243 on the adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the brain and myocardium of young and mature rats (disease induction at 2 and 4 months, respectively) with experimental obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), and the influence of long-term treatment of animals with intranasal insulin (I-I) were studied. The AC stimulatory effects of β-agonist isoproterenol in animals with obesity and DM2 was shown to be practically unchanged. The respective effects of norepinephrine on the AC activity were attenuated in the brain of young and mature rats and in the myocardium if mature rats, and the I-I treatment led to their partial recovery. In the brain and myocardium of mature rats with obesity and DM2, the enhancement of the AC stimulatory effects of β3-AR agonists was observed, white in young rats the influence of the same pathological conditions was lacking. The I-I treatment decreased the AC stimulatory effects of β3-agonists to their levels in the control. Since functional disruption of the adrenergic agonist-sensitive ACSS can lead to metabolic syndrome and DM2, the recovery of this system by the I-I treatment offers one of the ways to correct these diseases and their complications in the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  17. Characterization of two unusual guanylyl cyclases from Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Jeroen; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2002-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase A (GCA) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) encode GCs in Dictyostelium and have a topology similar to 12-transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase, respectively. We demonstrate that all detectable GC activity is lost in a cell line in which both genes have been inactivated. Cell

  18. The circadian neuropeptide PDF signals preferentially through a specific adenylate cyclase isoform AC3 in M pacemakers of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Duvall

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF is essential for normal circadian function in Drosophila. It synchronizes the phases of M pacemakers, while in E pacemakers it decelerates their cycling and supports their amplitude. The PDF receptor (PDF-R is present in both M and subsets of E cells. Activation of PDF-R stimulates cAMP increases in vitro and in M cells in vivo. The present study asks: What is the identity of downstream signaling components that are associated with PDF receptor in specific circadian pacemaker neurons? Using live imaging of intact fly brains and transgenic RNAi, we show that adenylate cyclase AC3 underlies PDF signaling in M cells. Genetic disruptions of AC3 specifically disrupt PDF responses: they do not affect other Gs-coupled GPCR signaling in M cells, they can be rescued, and they do not represent developmental alterations. Knockdown of the Drosophila AKAP-like scaffolding protein Nervy also reduces PDF responses. Flies with AC3 alterations show behavioral syndromes consistent with known roles of M pacemakers as mediated by PDF. Surprisingly, disruption of AC3 does not alter PDF responses in E cells--the PDF-R(+ LNd. Within M pacemakers, PDF-R couples preferentially to a single AC, but PDF-R association with a different AC(s is needed to explain PDF signaling in the E pacemakers. Thus critical pathways of circadian synchronization are mediated by highly specific second messenger components. These findings support a hypothesis that PDF signaling components within target cells are sequestered into "circadian signalosomes," whose compositions differ between E and M pacemaker cell types.

  19. Adenyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppe, D; Steer, M L

    1978-02-01

    Certain hormones regulate the activity of their target cells by stimulating adenyl cyclase, which is an enzyme located within the target cell's plasma membrane. Adenyl cyclase catalyzes the formation of cyclic AMP, which is released into the cell and modulates cell functions. In this communication the characteristics of adenyl cyclase are reviewed. The coupling between hormone receptors and this enzyme is discussed as is the ability of agents such as hormones, ATP, magnesium, calcium, guanine nucleotides and prostaglandins to alter cyclase activity. Several diseases that result from derangements of the adenyl cyclase system are known and the molecular bases for these diseases are discussed in this review.

  20. Substrate specificity determinants of class III nucleotidyl cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharambe, Nikhil G; Barathy, Deivanayaga V; Syed, Wajeed; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Colaςo, Melwin; Misquith, Sandra; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-10-01

    The two second messengers in signalling, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, are produced by adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases respectively. Recognition and discrimination of the substrates ATP and GTP by the nucleotidyl cyclases are vital in these reactions. Various apo-, substrate- or inhibitor-bound forms of adenylyl cyclase (AC) structures from transmembrane and soluble ACs have revealed the catalytic mechanism of ATP cyclization reaction. Previously reported structures of guanylyl cyclases represent ligand-free forms and inactive open states of the enzymes and thus do not provide information regarding the exact mode of substrate binding. The structures we present here of the cyclase homology domain of a class III AC from Mycobacterium avium (Ma1120) and its mutant in complex with ATP and GTP in the presence of calcium ion, provide the structural basis for substrate selection by the nucleotidyl cyclases at the atomic level. Precise nature of the enzyme-substrate interactions, novel modes of substrate binding and the ability of the binding pocket to accommodate diverse conformations of the substrates have been revealed by the present crystallographic analysis. This is the first report to provide structures of both the nucleotide substrates bound to a nucleotidyl cyclase. Coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank with accession numbers: 5D15 (Ma1120 CHD +ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0E (Ma1120 CHD +GTP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0H (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0G (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+GTP.Ca 2+ ). Adenylyl cyclase (EC number: 4.6.1.1). © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  2. Amidate prodrugs of 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA) as inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvořáková, Alexandra; Tloušťová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 281, Suppl S1 (2014), s. 729 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS EMBO 2014 Conference. 30.08.2014-04.09.2014, Paris] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302; GA MV VG20102015046 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * adenylyl cyclase toxin * inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  3. The Emerging Role of Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in Primary Biliary Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Jung-Chin; Beuers, Ulrich; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; previously referred to as primary biliary cirrhosis) is a chronic fibrosing cholangiopathy with the signature of an autoimmune disease and features of intrahepatic cholestasis. Immunosuppressing treatments are largely unsuccessful. Responsiveness to ursodeoxycholic

  4. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase Regulates Bile Salt-Induced Apoptosis in Human Cholangiocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Jung-Chin; Go, Simei; de Waart, Dirk R.; Munoz-Garrido, Patricia; Beuers, Ulrich; Paulusma, Coen C.; Oude Elferink, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (AE2), the principal bicarbonate secretor in the human biliary tree, is down-regulated in primary biliary cholangitis. AE2 creates a "bicarbonate umbrella" that protects cholangiocytes from the proapoptotic effects of bile salts by maintaining them deprotonated. We observed that

  5. Role of adenylyl cyclase 6 in the development of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Kristensen, Tina Bøgelund; Brooks, Heddwen L

    2017-01-01

    knockout (AC6(loxloxCre)) mice had approximately 50% lower urine osmolality and doubled water intake under baseline conditions compared with controls. Dietary Li(+) administration increased water intake and reduced urine osmolality in control, AC6(-/-), and AC6(loxloxCre) mice. Consistent with AC6......(-/-) mice, medullary AQP2 and pS256-AQP2 abundances were lower in AC6(loxloxCre) mice compared with controls under standard conditions, and levels were further reduced after Li(+) administration. AC6(loxloxCre) and control mice had a similar increase in the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen......-positive cells in response to Li(+). However, AC6(loxloxCre) mice had a higher number of H(+)-ATPase B1 subunit-positive cells under standard conditions and after Li(+) administration. Collectively, AC6 has a minor role in Li-NDI development but may be important for determining the intercalated cell...

  6. Mycobacterial adenylyl cyclases Rv1625c and Rv0386: orthodox vs. unorthodox catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Castro Pastrana, Lucila Isabel

    2004-01-01

    I report on two class III ACs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis which possess very different structural as well as catalytic characteristics: the mammalian-like membrane-anchored Rv1625c and the transcription-factor-attached Rv0386. As a complementary study to published data (Guo et al., 2001), additional point mutations were made which demonstrated the essential role of the six canonical amino acids for catalysis in Rv1625c. The cytosolic mutants of Rv1625c N372A, N372T and D300S were used to in...

  7. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otto, M.; Naumann, Ch.; Brandt, W.; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 3. ISSN 2223-7747 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Activity regulation * Arabidopsis allene oxide cyclase isoforms * Heteromerization Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S. (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Nevada); (Alliance Protein Labs.)

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  9. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca 2+ -binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-[ 125 I]-CaM-diazopyruvamide ( 125 I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca 2+ -enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca 2+ -dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. 125 I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca 2+ -dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of 125 I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000

  10. The hormonal regulation of adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, D; Im, M J; Pfeuffer, T; Hekman, M; Helmreich, E J; Levitzki, A

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of adenylate cyclase by hormones and by GTP regulatory proteins was investigated in native membrane systems and in systems reconstituted from purified components. These studies can be summarized as follows. The stimulatory beta 1-adrenoceptor catalyses the activation of a complex between the GTP stimulatory protein GS and the catalytic unit C. The agonist-receptor complex can activate a few cyclase units in native membrane systems as well as in reconstituted systems. GS from turkey erythrocytes is functionally different from rabbit liver GS, the latter being more amenable to activation by guanyl nucleotides in the absence of hormone. The coupling between the beta 1-adrenoceptor GS and C is efficient when compared with the coupling obtained in native membrane systems. GTP/GDP exchange at the alpha S subunit requires the presence of the beta gamma subunits. A mechanism for the inhibition of adenylate cyclase by the inhibitory GTP regulatory protein Gi is suggested.

  11. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency. © 2015 Lama and Ryan; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. Lymphocyte adenylate cyclase activity in immunosuppressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Brodde, O. E.

    1989-01-01

    In order to determine whether alterations of adenylate cyclase are involved in the immunosuppressive effect of glucocorticoid/cyclosporin treatment we measured basal, prostaglandin E1-, and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in lymphocyte membranes from kidney transplant patients undergoing

  13. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Theron

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase is a ubiquitous central enzyme in nitrogen metabolism that is controlled by up to four regulatory mechanisms, including adenylylation of some or all of the twelve subunits by adenylyl transferase. It is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tuberculosis, being essential for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is found extracellularly only in the pathogenic Mycobacterium strains. Human glutamine synthetase is not regulated by the adenylylation mechanism, so the adenylylated form of bacterial glutamine synthetase is of particular interest. Previously published reports show that, when M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli adenylyl transferase does not optimally adenylylate the M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase. Here, we demonstrate the production of soluble adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase in E. coli by the co-expression of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase and M. tuberculosis adenylyl transferase. The differential inhibition of adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase and deadenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase by ATP based scaffold inhibitors are reported. Compounds selected on the basis of their enzyme inhibition were also shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis in the BACTEC 460TB™ assay as well as the intracellular inhibition of M. tuberculosis in a mouse bone-marrow derived macrophage assay.

  14. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, A; Roth, R L; Hoppe, H; Parkinson, C; van der Westhuyzen, C W; Stoychev, S; Wiid, I; Pietersen, R D; Baker, B; Kenyon, C P

    2017-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is a ubiquitous central enzyme in nitrogen metabolism that is controlled by up to four regulatory mechanisms, including adenylylation of some or all of the twelve subunits by adenylyl transferase. It is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tuberculosis, being essential for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is found extracellularly only in the pathogenic Mycobacterium strains. Human glutamine synthetase is not regulated by the adenylylation mechanism, so the adenylylated form of bacterial glutamine synthetase is of particular interest. Previously published reports show that, when M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli adenylyl transferase does not optimally adenylylate the M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase. Here, we demonstrate the production of soluble adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase in E. coli by the co-expression of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase and M. tuberculosis adenylyl transferase. The differential inhibition of adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase and deadenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase by ATP based scaffold inhibitors are reported. Compounds selected on the basis of their enzyme inhibition were also shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis in the BACTEC 460TB™ assay as well as the intracellular inhibition of M. tuberculosis in a mouse bone-marrow derived macrophage assay.

  15. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of photo-activated adenylate cyclase nano-clusters from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut fuer Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Kateriya, S. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2012-01-02

    Graphical abstract: Protein color center emissions were observed in the wavelength range from 340 nm to 900 nm from nano-clusters of the photo-activated adenylate cyclase (nPAC) from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adenylyl cyclase nPAC in aqueous pH 7.5 buffer dissolved only to nano-clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-cluster size was determined by light attenuation (scattering) measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the nano-clusters was growing by coalescing during observation period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In nPAC nano-clusters color centers were present in emission range of 360-900 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nPAC color center emission is compared with fluorescent protein emission. - Abstract: The spectroscopic characteristics of BLUF (BLUF = sensor of blue light using flavin) domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC = Naegleria photo-activated cyclase) samples from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain is studied at room temperature. The absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic development in the dark was investigated over two weeks. Attenuation coefficient spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence excitation distributions were measured. Thawing of frozen nPAC samples gave solutions with varying protein nano-cluster size and varying flavin, tyrosine, tryptophan, and protein color-center emission. Protein color-center emission was observed in the wavelength range of 360-900 nm with narrow emission bands of small Stokes shift and broad emission bands of large Stokes shift. The emission spectra evolved in time with protein nano-cluster aging.

  16. Photo-dynamics of the BLUF domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC) from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut fuer Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Kateriya, Suneel [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2011-08-25

    Graphical abstract: The photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (nPAC) from Naegleria gruberi was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and its photo-cycling dynamics was studied by optical absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Highlights: {yields} Photo-activated adenylyl cyclase (nPAC) from Naegleria gruberi NEG-M was expressed. {yields} Photodynamics of BLUF domain in BLUF sensor - cyclase actuator protein was studied. {yields} Photo-excitation caused BLUF photo-cycling and permanent protein re-conformation. {yields} Re-conformed protein enabled photo-induced flavin reduction by proton transfer. {yields} Fluorescence of flavin in dark- and light-adapted state of nPAC was characterized. - Abstract: The amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M comprises a BLUF (blue light sensor using flavin) regulated adenylate cyclase (nPAC). The nPAC gene was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the photo-dynamics of the nPAC protein was studied by optical absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Blue-light exposure of nPAC caused a typical BLUF-type photo-cycle behavior (spectral absorption red-shift, fluorescence quenching, absorption and fluorescence recovery in the dark). Additionally, time-delayed reversible photo-induced one-electron reduction of fully oxidized flavin (Fl{sub ox}) to semi-reduced flavin (FlH{sup {center_dot}}) occurred. Furthermore, photo-excitation of FlH{sup {center_dot}} caused irreversible electron transfer to fully reduced anionic flavin (FlH{sup -}). A photo-induced electron transfer from Tyr or Trp to flavin (Tyr{sup {center_dot}+}-Fl{sup {center_dot}-} or Trp{sup {center_dot}+}-Fl{sup {center_dot}-} radical ion-pair formation) is thought to cause H-bond restructuring responsible for BLUF-type photo-cycling and permanent protein re-conformation enabling photo-induced flavin reduction by proton transfer. Some photo-degradation of Fl{sub ox} to lumichrome was observed. A model of the photo-dynamics of nPAC is developed.

  17. A Role for Calcium-Activated Adenylate Cyclase and Protein Kinase A in the Lens Src Family Kinase and Na,K-ATPase Response to Hyposmotic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2017-09-01

    Na,K-ATPase activity in lens epithelium is subject to control by Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs). Previously we showed hyposmotic solution causes an SFK-dependent increase in Na,K-ATPase activity in the epithelium. Here we explored the role of cAMP in the signaling mechanism responsible for the SFK and Na,K-ATPase response. Intact porcine lenses were exposed to hyposmotic Krebs solution (200 mOsm) then the epithelium was assayed for cAMP, SFK phosphorylation (activation) or Na,K-ATPase activity. An increase of cAMP was observed in the epithelium of lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution. In lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution SFK phosphorylation in the epithelium approximately doubled as did Na,K-ATPase activity and both responses were prevented by H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. The magnitude of the SFK response to hyposmotic solution was reduced by a TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 added to prevent TRPV4-mediated calcium entry, and by a cytoplasmic Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. The Na,K-ATPase activity response in the epithelium of lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution was abolished by BAPTA-AM. As a direct test of cAMP-dependent SFK activation, intact lenses were exposed to 8-pCPT-cAMP, a cell-permeable cAMP analog. 8-pCPT-cAMP caused robust SFK activation. Using Western blot, two calcium-activated adenylyl cyclases, ADCY3 and ADCY8, were detected in lens epithelium. Calcium-activated adenylyl cyclases are expressed in the lens epithelium and SFK activation is linked to a rise of cAMP that occurs upon hyposmotic challenge. The findings point to cAMP as a link between TRPV4 channel-mediated calcium entry, SFK activation, and a subsequent increase of Na,K-ATPase activity.

  18. Spinach Pyruvate Kinase Isoforms 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysdorfer, Chris; Bassham, James A.

    1984-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide Km values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The Ki for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a Ka of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a Ki of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, we suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation. PMID:16663425

  19. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagami, Alessandro S; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) is found in human trigeminocervical complex and can trigger migraine. PACAP levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in cat elevated PACAP levels in cranial blood. Patients...... with moderate or severe migraine headache had elevated PACAP in the external jugular vein during headache (n = 15), that was reduced 1 h after treatment with sumatriptan 6 mg (n = 11), and further reduced interictally (n = 9). The data suggest PACAP, or its receptors, are a promising target for migraine...

  20. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  1. Overexpression of functional human oxidosqualene cyclase in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kürten, Charlotte; Uhlén, Mathias; Syrén, Per-Olof

    2015-01-01

    The generation of multicyclic scaffolds from linear oxidosqualene by enzymatic polycyclization catalysis constitutes a cornerstone in biology for the generation of bioactive compounds. Human oxidosqualene cyclase (hOSC) is a membrane-bound triterpene cyclase that catalyzes the formation of the te...

  2. Receptors, adenylate cyclase, depression, and lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmaker, R H

    1981-04-01

    Although numerous studies have suggested that depression may be associated with a reduction in synaptic noradrenaline in the brain, direct beta-adrenergic receptor agonists have not been tested in the treatment of depression until recently. Moreover, newer theories of antidepressant action suggest that a reduction in beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity is a better correlate of antidepressant treatment than noradrenaline turnover changes. It is possible to evaluate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex in the human periphery by measuring the plasma cyclic AMP rise after adrenergic agonists. A clinical trial of the beta-2 adrenergic agonist salbutamol in depression provided an opportunity to test whether adrenergic receptor subsensitivity does occur during clinical antidepressant treatment. Plasma cyclic AMP before treatment with salbutamol rose 26% in response to salbutamol 0.25 mg iv. After 1 and 3 weeks of oral salbutamol treatment, depression scores declined significantly in 11 depressed patients, while the plasma cyclic AMP response to iv salbutamol declined over 60%. The beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase remained subsensitive 4 days after cessation of salbutamol therapy. The results support the concept that receptor sensitivity changes occur during human antidepressant therapy. Data are presented that Li, too, markedly reduces activity of beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase in humans. The effect was evaluated by studying the effect of Li at therapeutic serum concentrations on the plasma cyclic AMP response to subcutaneous epinephrine. The Li effect is specific, since the plasma cyclic AMP response to glucagon is not inhibited. The plasma cyclic GMP response to subcutaneous epinephrine, suggested as a model for presynaptic alpha-noradrenergic mechanisms, is also partially inhibited by Li therapy. Since cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP may be viewed as balancing substances, their interaction may provide a mechanism for Li's dual clinical effects in mania

  3. Inhibition of Heat-Stable Toxin-Induced Intestinal Salt and Water Secretion by a Novel Class of Guanylyl Cyclase C Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijvelds, Marcel J C; Loos, Michaela; Bronsveld, Inez; Hellemans, Ann; Bongartz, Jean-Pierre; Ver Donck, Luc; Cox, Eric; de Jonge, Hugo R; Schuurkes, Jan A J; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2015-12-01

    Many enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains produce the heat-stable toxin, STa, which, by activation of the intestinal receptor-enzyme guanylyl cyclase (GC) C, triggers an acute, watery diarrhea. We set out to identify GCC inhibitors that may be of benefit for the treatment of infectious diarrheal disease. Compounds that inhibit STa-induced cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) production were selected by performing cyclase assays on cells and membranes containing GCC, or the related GCA. The effect of leads on STa/GCC-dependent activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel was investigated in T84 cells, and in porcine and human intestinal tissue. Their effect on STa-provoked fluid transport was assessed in ligated intestinal loops in piglets. Four N-2-(propylamino)-6-phenylpyrimidin-4-one-substituted piperidines were shown to inhibit GCC-mediated cellular cGMP production. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations were ≤ 5 × 10(-7) mol/L, whereas they were >10 times higher for GCA. In T84 monolayers, these leads blocked STa/GCC-dependent, but not forskolin/adenylyl cyclase-dependent, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activity. GCC inhibition reduced STa-provoked anion secretion in pig jejunal tissue, and fluid retention and cGMP levels in STa-exposed loops. These GCC inhibitors blocked STa-provoked anion secretion in rectal biopsy specimens. We have identified a novel class of GCC inhibitors that may form the basis for development of future therapeutics for (infectious) diarrheal disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed.

  5. Soluble variants of human recombinant glutaminyl cyclase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Castaldo

    Full Text Available Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of (1H-(15N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Delivery of Large Heterologous Polypeptides across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Bordetella RTX Hemolysin Moiety Lacking the Adenylyl Cyclase Domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Jana; Kamanová, Jana; Jelínek, J.; Tomala, Jakub; Mašín, Jiří; Kosová, Martina; Staněk, Ondřej; Bumba, Ladislav; Michálek, J.; Kovář, Marek; Šebo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 3 (2012), s. 1181-1192 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200914; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717; GA ČR GAP301/11/0325; GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk 2B06161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : MHC CLASS -I * ESCHERICHIA-COLI * PRESENTATION PATHWAY Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.074, year: 2012

  7. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate metabolism in synaptic growth, strength, and precision: neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc phosphodiesterase and rut adenylyl cyclase mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-03-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrates that dnc mutations caused severe defects in nerve terminal morphology, characterized by unusually large synaptic boutons and aberrant innervation patterns. Interestingly, a counterbalancing effect led to rescue of the aberrant innervation patterns but the enlarged boutons in dnc rut double mutant remained as extreme as those in dnc. In contrast to dnc, rut mutations strongly affect synaptic transmission. Focal loose-patch recording data accumulated over 4 years suggest that synaptic currents in rut boutons were characterized by unusually large temporal dispersion and a seasonal variation in the amount of transmitter release, with diminished synaptic currents in summer months. Experiments with different rearing temperatures revealed that high temperature (29-30°C) decreased synaptic transmission in rut, but did not alter dnc and wild-type (WT). Importantly, the large temporal dispersion and abnormal temperature dependence of synaptic transmission, characteristic of rut, still persisted in dnc rut double mutants. To interpret these results in a proper perspective, we reviewed previously documented differential effects of dnc and rut mutations and their genetic interactions in double mutants on a variety of physiological and behavioral phenotypes. The cases of rescue in double mutants are associated with gradual developmental and maintenance processes whereas many behavioral and physiological manifestations on faster time scales could not be rescued. We discuss factors that could contribute to the effectiveness of counterbalancing interactions between dnc and rut mutations for phenotypic rescue.

  8. A Concise Synthesis of Forskolin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hylse, O.; Maier, L.; Kučera, R.; Perečko, Tomáš; Svobodová, Aneta; Kubala, Lukáš; Paruch, K.; Svenda, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 41 (2017), s. 12586-12589 ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : adenylyl-cyclase isoforms * key intermediate * enantioselective route Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  9. Monospecific antibody against Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase protects from Pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Faiz Kazi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acellular pertussis vaccines has been largely accepted world-wide however, there are reports about limitedantibody response against these vaccines suggesting that multiple antigens should be included in acellular vaccinesto attain full protection. The aim of present study was to evaluate the role of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase as aprotective antigen.Materials and methods: Highly mono-specific antibody against adenylate cyclase (AC was raised in rabbits usingnitrocellulose bound adenylate cyclase and the specificity was assessed by immuoblotting. B.pertussis 18-323, wasincubated with the mono-specific serum and without serum as a control. Mice were challenged intra-nasally and pathophysiolgicalresponses were recorded.Results: The production of B.pertussis adenylate cyclase monospecific antibody that successfully recognized on immunoblotand gave protection against fatality (p< 0.01 and lung consolidation (p <0.01. Mouse weight gain showedsignificant difference (p< 0.05.Conclusion: These preliminary results highlight the role of the B.pertussis adenylate cyclase as a potential pertussisvaccine candidate. B.pertussis AC exhibited significant protection against pertussis in murine model. J Microbiol InfectDis 2012; 2(2: 36-43Key words: Pertussis; monospecific; antibody; passive-protection

  10. Soluble guanylate cyclase : a potential therapeutic target for heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Marti, Catherine N.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Roessig, Lothar; Greene, Stephen J.; Boehm, Michael; Burnett, John C.; Campia, Umberto; Cleland, John G. F.; Collins, Sean P.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Levy, Phillip D.; Metra, Marco; Pitt, Bertram; Ponikowski, Piotr; Sato, Naoki; Voors, Adriaan A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Butler, Javed

    The number of annual hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) and the mortality rates among patients hospitalized for HF remains unacceptably high. The search continues for safe and effective agents that improve outcomes when added to standard therapy. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase

  11. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a swift saboteur of host defense

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtová, Jana; Kamanová, Jana; Šebo, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2006), s. 1-7 ISSN 1369-5274 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020406; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cyaa * scanning electron microscopy * cyclase toxin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 7.445, year: 2006

  12. Inhibitors of glutaminyl cyclases against Alzheimer´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolenko, Petr; Koch, B.; Schilling, S.; Rahfeld, J.-U.; Demuth, H.-U.; Stubbs, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2013), s. 16 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /11./. 14.03.2013-16.03.2013, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : glutaminyl cyclases * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  13. Diphtheria toxin can simultaneously bind to its receptor and adenylyl-(3',5')-uridine 3'-monophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, J.T.; Collins, C.M.; Collier, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin (DT) that was bound to receptors on BS-C-1 cells was able to bind approximately 1 molar equiv of adenylyl-(3',5')-uridine 3'-monophosphate (ApUp). In contrast, receptor-bound CRM197, a mutant form of toxin with greatly diminished affinity for dinucleotides, did not bind ApUp. Affinity of the dinucleotide for receptor-bound toxin differed from that for free toxin by less than an order of magnitude. These results indicate that the receptor site and the ApUp site on the toxin do not significantly overlap. BS-C-1 cells were incubated with or without 125 I-DT or CRM 197. They were then incubated with [ 32 P]ApUp, and assayed

  14. High skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase in malignant hyperthermia.

    OpenAIRE

    Willner, J H; Cerri, C G; Wood, D S

    1981-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia occurs in humans with several congenital myopathies, usually in response to general anesthesia. Commonly, individuals who develop this syndrome lack symptoms of muscle disease, and their muscle lacks specific pathological changes. A biochemical marker for this myopathy has not previously been available; we found activity of adenylate cyclase and content of cyclic AMP to be abnormally high in skeletal muscle. Secondary modification of protein phosphorylation could explai...

  15. Adenylate Cyclase-the More Membrane Associated, the Less Radiosensitive

    OpenAIRE

    ATTILA, TAKATS; VU HOA, BINH; KATALIN, OFFENMULLER; KATALIN, BODO; LORAND, BERTOK; GYORGY J., KOTELES; Frederic Joliot-Curie National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology

    1993-01-01

    A dose dependent but not parallel decreases were observed both in SH content and catalytic activity of "free" catalytic subunit after irradiation (0-3200 Gy), while SR groups of membrane-associated adenylate cyclase were insensitive (under 3200 Gy). An initial "radioactivation" of membrane-associated enzyme was found under 800 Gy, then an inhibition above 1600 Gy. The SH alkylating agent, N-ethylmaleimide resulted in a complete inactivation, both of membrane associated form of adenylate cycla...

  16. Interactions of fluoride and guanine nucleotides with thyroid adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, A; Wolff, J

    1982-02-18

    The activation of bovine thyroid adenylate cyclase (ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1) by Gpp(NH)p has been studied using steady-state kinetic methods. This activation is complex and may be characterized by two Gpp(NH)p binding sites of different affinities with measured constants: Ka1 = 0.1 micro M and Ka2 = 2.9 micro M. GDP beta S does not completely inhibit the Gpp(NH)p activation: analysis of the data is consistent with a single GDP beta S inhibitory site which is competitive with the weaker Gpp(NH)p site. Guanine nucleotide effects upon F- activation of adenylate cyclase have been studied. When App(NH)p is the substrate, 10 micro M GTP along with 10 mM NaF gives higher activity than NaF alone, while GDP together with NaF inhibits the activity by 50% relative to NaF. These features are not observed when the complex is assayed with ATP in the presence of a nucleotide regenerating system or when analogs Gpp)NH)p or GDP beta S are used along with NaF. These effects were studied in three other membrane systems using App(NH)p as substrate: rat liver, rat ovary and turkey erythrocyte. No consistent pattern of guanine nucleotide effects upon fluoride activation could be observed in the different membrane preparations. Previous experiments showed that the size of soluble thyroid adenylate cyclase changed whether membranes were preincubated with Gpp(NH)p or NaF. This size change roughly corresponded to the molecular weight of the nucleotide regulatory protein. This finding, coupled with the present data, suggests that two guanine nucleotide binding sites may be involved in regulating thyroid cyclase and that these sites may be on different protein chains.

  17. Adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin relevance for pertussis vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim; Mašín, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 10 (2014), s. 1215-1227 ISSN 1476-0584 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14547S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR GAP302/12/0460 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * antigen delivery * Bordetella pertussis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.210, year: 2014

  18. Dephosphorylation of sperm guanylate cyclase during sea urchin fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    When intact Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa are exposed to solubilized egg jelly, the electrophoretic mobility of an abundant sperm flagellar membrane protein changes from an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa to 150 kDa. A. punctulata spermatozoa can be labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P-labeled cells it was demonstrated that the mobility shift of the 160-kDa protein is due to dephosphorylation. The peptide resact (Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH/sub 2/) is the component of egg jelly which is responsible for inducing the dephosphorylation. The 160/150-kdal sperm membrane protein has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and identified as sperm guanylate cyclase. The enzymatic activity of the guanylate cyclase is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation state. Resact has been shown to act as a potent chemoattractant for A. punctulata spermatozoa. The chemotactic response is concentration-dependent, is abolished by pretreatment of the spermatozoa with resact, and shows an absolute requirement for external calcium. This work represents the first demonstration of animal sperm chemotaxis in response to a precisely-defined molecule of egg origin. The results established a new, biologically meaningful function for resact, and may implicate sperm guanylate cyclase and cGMP in flagellar function and the chemotactic response.

  19. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  20. Third Acivity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase (AC) Toxin-Hemolysin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišer, Radovan; Mašín, Jiří; Basler, Marek; Krůšek, Jan; Špuláková, V.; Konopásek, Ivo; Šebo, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 5 (2007), s. 2808-2820 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA AV ČR IAA5020406 Grant - others:XE(XE) LSHB-CT-2003-503582; Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 146/2005/B-BIO Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : bordetella * adenylate cyclase toxin * enzymatic aktivity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.581, year: 2007

  1. Does treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo alter human adenylate cyclase responsiveness in vitro?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Klüppel, M.; Philipp, T.; Brodde, O. E.

    1991-01-01

    1. Treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo can alter adenylate cyclase responsiveness in the human heart. We have determined the effects of treatment with four different beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo on the responsiveness of lymphocyte and platelet adenylate cyclase in vitro in

  2. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  3. Effects of PTH and Ca2+ on renal adenyl cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.T.; Neuman, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion on the adenylate cyclase system was studied in isolated, renal basal-lateral plasma membranes of the rat. Bovine parathyroid hormone (bPTH) and a guanyl triphosphate analogue, Gpp(NH)p were used to stimulate cyclase activity. Under conditions of maximal stimulation, calcium ions inhibited cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation, the formation rate falling exponentially with the calcium concentration. Fifty percent inhibition of either bPTH- or Gpp(NH)p-stimulated activity was given by approximately 50 μM Ca 2+ . Also the Hill coefficient for the inhibition was close to unity in both cases. The concentration of bPTH giving half-maximal stimulation of cAMP formation (1.8 x 10 -8 M) was unchanged by the presence of calcium. These data suggest that calcium acts at some point other than the initial hormone-receptor interaction, presumably decreasing the catalytic efficiency of the enzymic moiety of the membrane complex

  4. Antiangiogenic VEGF Isoform in Inflammatory Myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nila Volpi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antiangiogenic isoform A-165b on human muscle in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM and to compare distribution of angiogenic/antiangiogenic VEGFs, as isoforms shifts are described in other autoimmune disorders. Subjects and Methods. We analyzed VEGF-A165b and VEGF-A by western blot and immunohistochemistry on skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 patients affected with IIM (polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis and 6 control muscle samples. TGF-β, a prominent VEGF inductor, was analogously evaluated. Intergroup differences of western blot bands density were statistically examined. Endomysial vascularization, inflammatory score, and muscle regeneration, as pathological parameters of IIM, were quantitatively determined and their levels were confronted with VEGF expression. Results. VEGF-A165b was significantly upregulated in IIM, as well as TGF-β. VEGF-A was diffusely expressed on unaffected myofibers, whereas regenerating/atrophic myofibres strongly reacted for both VEGF-A isoforms. Most inflammatory cells and endomysial vessels expressed both isoforms. VEGF-A165b levels were in positive correlation to inflammatory score, endomysial vascularization, and TGF-β. Conclusions. Our findings indicate skeletal muscle expression of antiangiogenic VEGF-A165b and preferential upregulation in IIM, suggesting that modulation of VEGF-A isoforms may occur in myositides.

  5. The Escherichia coli adenylate cyclase complex. Stimulation by potassium and phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, E; Reddy, P; Gazdar, C; Peterkofsky, A

    1985-04-10

    In Escherichia coli, adenylate cyclase activity in toluene-treated cells can be inhibited by glucose while the activity in a broken cell preparation cannot. Adenylate cyclase activity in the permeabilized but not in broken cells is stimulated somewhat specifically and additively by potassium and phosphate. Kinetic studies show sigmoid substrate-velocity curves for the toluene-treated cells but hyperbolic curves for the broken cells. The stimulatory effects of potassium and phosphate on adenylate cyclase activity in tolulene-treated cells are associated with increases in the Vmax and Km for ATP. While the enzyme activity in toluene-treated cells shows a preference for magnesium over manganese, the reverse is observed in broken cells. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in toluene-treated cells requires the presence of the proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The PTS proteins can be phosphorylated in a P-enolpyruvate-dependent reaction. The stimulatory effects of ions will not occur if the PTS proteins are not phosphorylated. Since potassium phosphate stimulates both adenylate cyclase and PTS activities in toluene-treated cells, it is proposed that the effect of potassium phosphate on adenylate cyclase activity is mediated through an effect on the PTS. A model for dual regulation by glucose of adenylate cyclase activity is proposed. This model involves regulation of both the condition of the PTS proteins as well as the cellular concentration of phosphate.

  6. Food restriction modulates β-adrenergic-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat liver during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase activities were studied in rat liver during postmaturational aging of male Fischer 344 rats fed ad libitum or restricted to 60% of the ad libitum intake. Catecholamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased by 200-300% between 6 and 24-27 mo of age in ad libitum-fed rats, whereas in food-restricted rats catecholamine response increased by only 58-84% between 6 and 30 mo. In ad libitum-fed rats, glucagon-stimulated enzyme activity also increased by 40% between 6 and 12 mo and in restricted rats a similar age-related increase was delayed until 18 mo. β-Adrenergic receptor density increased by 50% between 6 and 24 mo in livers from ad libitum-fed but not food-restricted rats and showed a highly significant correlation with maximal isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity over the postmaturational life span. Age-related increases in unstimulated (basal) adenylate cyclase activity and nonreceptor-mediated enzyme activation were retarded by food restriction. The results demonstrate that food restriction diminishes a marked age-related increase in β-adrenergic-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity of rat liver. Alterations of adrenergic-responsive adenylate cyclase with age and the modulatory effects of food restriction appear to be mediated by changes in both receptor and nonreceptor components of adenylate cyclase

  7. The importance of conserved amino acids in heme-based globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehua Wan

    Full Text Available Globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases contain globin, middle, and diguanylate cyclase domains that sense O2 to synthesize c-di-GMP and regulate bacterial motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. However, relatively few studies have extensively examined the roles of individual residues and domains of globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases, which can shed light on their signaling mechanisms and provide drug targets. Here, we report the critical residues of two globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases, EcGReg from Escherichia coli and BpeGReg from Bordetella pertussis, and show that their diguanylate cyclase activity requires an intact globin domain. In the distal heme pocket of the globin domain, residues Phe42, Tyr43, Ala68 (EcGReg/Ser68 (BpeGReg, and Met69 are required to maintain full diguanylate cyclase activity. The highly conserved amino acids His223/His225 and Lys224/Lys226 in the middle domain of EcGReg/BpeGReg are essential to diguanylate cyclase activity. We also identified sixteen important residues (Leu300, Arg306, Asp333, Phe337, Lys338, Asn341, Asp342, Asp350, Leu353, Asp368, Arg372, Gly374, Gly375, Asp376, Glu377, and Phe378 in the active site and inhibitory site of the diguanylate cyclase domain of EcGReg. Moreover, BpeGReg266 (residues 1-266 and BpeGReg296 (residues 1-296, which only contain the globin and middle domains, can inhibit bacterial motility. Our findings suggest that the distal residues of the globin domain affect diguanylate cyclase activity and that BpeGReg may interact with other c-di-GMP-metabolizing proteins to form mixed signaling teams.

  8. Inferring biological functions of guanylyl cyclases with computational methods

    KAUST Repository

    Alquraishi, May Majed

    2013-09-03

    A number of studies have shown that functionally related genes are often co-expressed and that computational based co-expression analysis can be used to accurately identify functional relationships between genes and by inference, their encoded proteins. Here we describe how a computational based co-expression analysis can be used to link the function of a specific gene of interest to a defined cellular response. Using a worked example we demonstrate how this methodology is used to link the function of the Arabidopsis Wall-Associated Kinase-Like 10 gene, which encodes a functional guanylyl cyclase, to host responses to pathogens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  9. Differential localization of Acanthamoeba myosin I isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Acanthamoeba myosins IA and IB were localized by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in vegetative and phagocytosing cells and the total cell contents of myosins IA, IB, and IC were quantified by immunoprecipitation. The quantitative distributions of the three myosin I isoforms were then calculated from these data and the previously determined localization of myosin IC. Myosin IA occurs almost exclusively in the cytoplasm, where it accounts for approximately 50% of the total myosin I, in the cortex beneath phagocytic cups and in association with small cytoplasmic vesicles. Myosin IB is the predominant isoform associated with the plasma membrane, large vacuole membranes and phagocytic membranes and accounts for almost half of the total myosin I in the cytoplasm. Myosin IC accounts for a significant fraction of the total myosin I associated with the plasma membrane and large vacuole membranes and is the only myosin I isoform associated with the contractile vacuole membrane. These data suggest that myosin IA may function in cytoplasmic vesicle transport and myosin I-mediated cortical contraction, myosin IB in pseudopod extension and phagocytosis, and myosin IC in contractile vacuole function. In addition, endogenous and exogenously added myosins IA and IB appeared to be associated with the cytoplasmic surface of different subpopulations of purified plasma membranes implying that the different myosin I isoforms are targeted to specific membrane domains through a mechanism that involves more than the affinity of the myosins for anionic phospholipids. PMID:1447297

  10. Lipoprotein lipase isoelectric point isoforms in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badia-Villanueva, M.; Carulla, P.; Carrascal, M.

    2014-01-01

    -heparin plasma (PHP), LPL consists of a pattern of more than 8 forms of the same apparent molecular weight, but different isoelectric point (pI). In the present study we describe, for the first time, the existence of at least nine LPL pI isoforms in human PHP, with apparent pI between 6.8 and 8.6. Separation...

  11. New isoforms of rat Aquaporin-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moe, Svein Erik; Sorbo, Jan Gunnar; Søgaard, Rikke

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a brain aquaporin implicated in the pathophysiology of numerous clinical conditions including brain edema. Here we show that rat AQP4 has six cDNA isoforms, formed by alternative splicing. These are named AQP4a-f, where AQP4a and AQP4c correspond to the two classical M1 and M...

  12. Functional studies of sodium pump isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Michael Jakob

    The Na+,K+-ATPase is an essential ion pump found in all animal cells. It uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to export three Na+ and import two K+, both against their chemical gradients and for Na+ also against the electrical potential. Mammals require four Na+,K+-ATPase isoforms that each have...

  13. Up-regulation of adenylylcyclases I and II induced by long-term adaptation of rats to morphine fades away 20 days after morphine withdrawal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ujčíková, Hana; Dlouhá, Kateřina; Roubalová, Lenka; Vošahlíková, Miroslava; Kagan, Dmytro; Svoboda, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1810, č. 12 (2011), s. 1220-1229 ISSN 0304-4165 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : morphine * long-term adaptation * adenylyl cyclase isoforms I–IX * forebrain cortex * isolated plasma membranes Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.000, year: 2011

  14. Filamin isoforms in molluscan smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-López, Lucía; Hellman, Ulf; Ibarguren, Izaskun; Villamarín, J Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The role of filamin in molluscan catch muscles is unknown. In this work three proteins isolated from the posterior adductor muscle of the sea mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as homologous to mammalian filamin. They were named FLN-270, FLN-230 and FLN-105, according to their apparent molecular weight determined by SDS-PAGE: 270kDa, 230kDa and 105kDa, respectively. Both FLN-270 and FLN-230 contain the C-terminal dimerization domain and the N-terminal actin-binding domain typical of filamins. These findings, together with the data from peptide mass fingerprints, indicate that FLN-270 and FLN-230 are different isoforms of mussel filamin, with FLN-230 being the predominant isoform in the mussel catch muscle. De novo sequencing data revealed structural differences between both filamin isoforms at the rod 2 segment, the one responsible for the interaction of filamin with the most of its binding partners. FLN270 but not FLN230 was phosphorylated in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. As for the FLN-105, it would be an N-terminal proteolytic fragment generated from the FLN-270 isoform or a C-terminally truncated variant of filamin. On the other hand, a 45-kDa protein that copurifies with mussel catch muscle filamins was identified as the mussel calponin-like protein. The fact that this protein coelutes with the FLN-270 isoform from a gel filtration chromatography suggests a specific interaction between both proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Soluble Rat Lung Guanylate Cyclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandwein, Harvey; Lewicki, John; Murad, Ferid

    1981-07-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies to rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing) EC 4.6.1.2] have been produced by fusing spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice with SP-2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were detected by their ability to bind immobilized guanylate cyclase and by immunoprecipitation of purified enzyme in the presence of second (rabbit anti-mouse) antibody. After subcloning by limiting dilution, hybridomas were injected intraperitoneally into mice to produce ascitic fluid containing 2-5 mg of antibody per ml. The four antibodies obtained had titers of between 1:1580 and 1:3160 but were detectable at dilutions greater than 1:20,000. Soluble guanylate cyclase from several rat tissues were crossreactive with the four monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that the soluble enzyme from different rat tissues is antigenically similar. The antibodies also recognized soluble lung enzyme from rat, beef, and pig, while enzyme from rabbit was not crossreactive and mouse enzyme was recognized by only one of the antibodies. Particulate guanylate cyclase from a number of tissues had only minimal crossreactivity with the antibodies. Immunoprecipitated guanylate cyclase retained catalytic activity, could be activated with sodium nitroprusside, and was inhibited by cystamine. None of the antibodies were inhibitory under the conditions examined. These antibodies will be useful probes for the study of guanylate cyclase regulation and function under a variety of physiological conditions.

  16. Isoforms of murine and human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Hackler, R; Kold, B

    1998-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) and immunofixation of murine serum amyloid P component (SAP), purified and in serum, showed a distinct and strain-dependent isoform pattern with up to seven bands (pI 5.1-5.7). Neuraminidase treatment caused a shift of the isoforms to more basic pI values, but did...... of isoforms of human SAP required the presence of urea and higher SAP concentrations. TEF and immunofixation of SAP monomers showed five to eight isoforms, ranging from pI 4.7-5.7. IEF of SAP in human serum resulted in a less distinct pattern and more acidic isoforms. As with murine SAP, neuraminidase...

  17. Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Calmodulin, Adenylyl Cyclase, and Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Are Required for Late, but Not Early, Long-Term Memory Formation in the Honeybee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee "Apis mellifera," olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM)…

  18. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme. © 2014 Desai et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Structure of the turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T B; Lad, P M; Preston, M S; Kempner, E; Schlegel, W; Rodbell, M

    1981-02-01

    Target analysis of the turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] system showed that the molecular weight of the ground state enzyme increases from 92,000 with MnATP as substrate and no stimulatory ligands to 226,000 when activated by fluoride ion or by 5'-guanyl imidodiphosphate (p[NH]ppG) subsequent to clearance of previously bound GDP. The identical increment in size (130,000) suggests that the same regulatory unit is involved in the activation by both effectors. When assayed with isoproterenol and p[NH]ppG, the enzyme system displayed a further increment in size of 90,000 daltons. Based on binding of the antagonist 125I-labeled hydroxybenzylpindolol, the beta-adrenergic receptor is about 90,000 daltons or the same as that seen for activation of the enzyme by isoproterenol through the beta-adrenergic-receptor. Because single targets were seen for the ground state enzyme system under all conditions, it would appear that the various regulatory and catalytic components are structurally linked prior to activation by hormone, guanine nucleotides, and fluoride ion. Furthermore, based on reported subunit sizes of the nucleotide regulatory and receptor components are composed of multiple subunits, either homologous or heterologous in structure.

  20. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin promotes bacterial internalisation into non phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, César; Etxaniz, Asier; Uribe, Kepa B; Etxebarria, Aitor; González-Bullón, David; Arlucea, Jon; Goñi, Félix M; Aréchaga, Juan; Ostolaza, Helena

    2015-09-08

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, a respiratory infectious disease that is the fifth largest cause of vaccine-preventable death in infants. Though historically considered an extracellular pathogen, this bacterium has been detected both in vitro and in vivo inside phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. However the precise mechanism used by B. pertussis for cell entry, or the putative bacterial factors involved, are not fully elucidated. Here we find that adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), one of the important toxins of B. pertussis, is sufficient to promote bacterial internalisation into non-phagocytic cells. After characterization of the entry route we show that uptake of "toxin-coated bacteria" proceeds via a clathrin-independent, caveolae-dependent entry pathway, allowing the internalised bacteria to survive within the cells. Intracellular bacteria were found inside non-acidic endosomes with high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content, or "free" in the cytosol of the invaded cells, suggesting that the ACT-induced bacterial uptake may not proceed through formation of late endolysosomes. Activation of Tyr kinases and toxin-induced Ca(2+)-influx are essential for the entry process. We hypothesize that B. pertussis might use ACT to activate the endocytic machinery of non-phagocytic cells and gain entry into these cells, in this way evading the host immune system.

  1. Evidence that forskolin activates turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase through a noncatalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S A; Bilezikian, J P

    1983-02-01

    The diterpene forskolin has been reported to activate adenylate cyclase in a manner consistent with an interaction at the catalytic unit. However, some of its actions are more consistent with an interaction at the coupling unit that links the hormone receptor to the adenylate cyclase activity. This report adds support to the latter possibility. Under conditions that lead to stimulation of adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes by GTP, forskolin also becomes more active. Additional evidence to support an influence of forskolin upon adenylate cyclase via the GTP-coupling protein N includes the following: (i) forskolin, at submaximal concentrations, leads to enhanced sensitivity and responsiveness of isoproterenol-dependent adenylate cyclase activity in turkey erythrocyte membranes; (ii) under specified conditions, the nucleotide GDP, an inhibitor of the stimulating nucleotide GTP and its analog, guanyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), also markedly inhibits the action of forskolin; (iii) both Gpp(NH)p and forskolin are associated with a decrease in agonist affinity for the beta-adrenergic receptor. However, actions of forskolin in the turkey erythrocyte are not identical to those of GTP: (i) forskolin is never as potent as Gpp(NH)p in activating adenylate cyclase; (ii) the magnitude of synergism between isoproterenol and forskolin is not equal to that observed with isoproterenol and Gpp(NH)p; (iii) at high concentrations, forskolin inhibits antagonist binding to the beta-receptor. Forskolin appears to have several sites of action in the turkey erythrocyte membrane, including an influence upon the adenylate cyclase regulatory protein N.

  2. The role of transcriptional regulation in maintaining the availability of mycobacterial adenylate cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Casey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium species have a complex cAMP regulatory network indicated by the high number of adenylate cyclases annotated in their genomes. However the need for a high level of redundancy in adenylate cyclase genes remains unknown. We have used semiquantitiative RT-PCR to examine the expression of eight Mycobacterium smegmatis cyclases with orthologs in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where cAMP has recently been shown to be important for virulence. All eight cyclases were transcribed in all environments tested, and only four demonstrated environmental-mediated changes in transcription. M. smegmatis genes MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4279 were upregulated during starvation conditions while MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4924 were downregulated in H2O2 and MSMEG_3780 was downregulated in low pH and starvation. Promoter fusion constructs containing M. tuberculosis H37Rv promoters showed consistent regulation compared to their M. smegmatis orthologs. Overall our findings indicate that while low levels of transcriptional regulation occur, regulation at the mRNA level does not play a major role in controlling cellular cyclase availability in a given environment.

  3. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  4. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Lycopene β-Cyclase from Macrophytic Red Alga Bangia fuscopurpurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Jun Cao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene cyclases cyclize the open ends of acyclic lycopene (ψ,ψ-carotene into β- or ε-ionone rings in the crucial bifurcation step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Among all carotenoid constituents, β-carotene (β,β-carotene is found in all photosynthetic organisms, except for purple bacteria and heliobacteria, suggesting a ubiquitous distribution of lycopene β-cyclase activity in these organisms. In this work, we isolated a gene (BfLCYB encoding a lycopene β-cyclase from Bangia fuscopurpurea, a red alga that is considered to be one of the primitive multicellular eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms and accumulates carotenoid constituents with both β- and ε-rings, including β-carotene, zeaxanthin, α-carotene (β,ε-carotene and lutein. Functional complementation in Escherichia coli demonstrated that BfLCYB is able to catalyze cyclization of lycopene into monocyclic γ-carotene (β,ψ-carotene and bicyclic β-carotene, and cyclization of the open end of monocyclic δ-carotene (ε,ψ-carotene to produce α-carotene. No ε-cyclization activity was identified for BfLCYB. Sequence comparison showed that BfLCYB shares conserved domains with other functionally characterized lycopene cyclases from different organisms and belongs to a group of ancient lycopene cyclases. Although B. fuscopurpurea also synthesizes α-carotene and lutein, its enzyme-catalyzing ε-cyclization is still unknown.

  5. Determination of the turn-off reaction for the hormone-activated adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, D; Eckstein, F; Lowe, M; Selinger, Z

    1979-10-10

    Previous work suggested that hormonal activation of adenylate cyclase involves the introduction of GTP to the regulatory site, and subsequent hydrolysis of the bound GTP terminates the activation. In many tissues the turn-off GTPase reaction cannot be readily measured because of a high background of nonspecific GTP hydrolysis. To circumvent this problem a general assay for the turn-off reaction has now been developed. The adenylate cyclase is first activated by hormone and GTP and the introduction of GTP is then stopped either by addition of an excess of guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) or by addition of a receptor blocking agent. The decay of adenylate cyclase activity brought on by these inhibitors is used to calculate the rate constant of the turn-off reaction. In turkey erythrocyte and rat parotid membranes the rate constant of the decay process as determined with GDP beta S is similar to that determined with the beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol. The rate constants (min-1 at 30 degrees C) for various adenylate cyclase preparations are 10 for turkey erythrocyte, 7.5 for rat parotid, and 6.2 for the rat liver enzyme. The finding of similar rate constants in the various preparations indicates that GTP hydrolysis at the regulatory site is a general mechanism for terminating the activation of adenylate cyclase.

  6. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  7. Dynamics of adenylate cyclase regulation via heterotrimeric G-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde, Markus; Werthmann, Ruth C; von Hayn, Kathrin; Bünemann, Moritz

    2014-04-01

    A wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors either activate or inhibit ACs (adenylate cyclases), thereby regulating cellular cAMP levels and consequently inducing proper physiological responses. Stimulatory and inhibitory G-proteins interact directly with ACs, whereas G(q)-coupled receptors exert their effects primarily via Ca2+. Using the FRET-based cAMP sensor Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1)-cAMPS (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate), we studied cAMP levels in single living VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) or HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with subsecond temporal resolution. Stimulation of purinergic (VSMCs) or thrombin (HUVECs) receptors rapidly decreased cAMP levels in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline via a rise in Ca2+ and subsequent inhibition of AC5 and AC6. Specifically in HUVECs, we observed that, in the continuous presence of thrombin, cAMP levels climbed slowly after the initial decline with a delay of a little less than 1 min. The underlying mechanism includes phospholipase A2 activity and cyclo-oxygenase-mediated synthesis of prostaglandins. We studied further the dynamics of the inhibition of ACs via G(i)-proteins utilizing FRET imaging to resolve interactions between fluorescently labelled G(i)-proteins and AC5. FRET between Gα(i1) and AC5 developed at much lower concentration of agonist compared with the overall G(i)-protein activity. We found the dissociation of Gα(i1) subunits and AC5 to occur slower than the G(i)-protein deactivation. This led us to the conclusion that AC5, by binding active Gα(i1), interferes with G-protein deactivation and reassembly and thereby might sensitize its own regulation.

  8. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-01-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  9. Cloning and Characterization of Oxidosqualene Cyclases from Kalanchoe daigremontiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonghua; Yeats, Trevor; Han, Hong; Jetter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The first committed step in triterpenoid biosynthesis is the cyclization of oxidosqualene to polycyclic alcohols or ketones C30H50O. It is catalyzed by single oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) enzymes that can carry out varying numbers of carbocation rearrangements and, thus, generate triterpenoids with diverse carbon skeletons. OSCs from diverse plant species have been cloned and characterized, the large majority of them catalyzing relatively few rearrangement steps. It was recently predicted that special OSCs must exist that can form friedelin, the pentacyclic triterpenoid whose formation involves the maximum possible number of rearrangement steps. The goal of the present study, therefore, was to clone a friedelin synthase from Kalanchoe daigremontiana, a plant species known to accumulate this triterpenoid in its leaf surface waxes. Five OSC cDNAs were isolated, encoding proteins with 761–779 amino acids and sharing between 57.4 and 94.3% nucleotide sequence identity. Heterologous expression in yeast and GC-MS analyses showed that one of the OSCs generated the steroid cycloartenol together with minor side products, whereas the other four enzymes produced mixtures of pentacyclic triterpenoids dominated by lupeol (93%), taraxerol (60%), glutinol (66%), and friedelin (71%), respectively. The cycloartenol synthase was found expressed in all leaf tissues, whereas the lupeol, taraxerol, glutinol, and friedelin synthases were expressed only in the epidermis layers lining the upper and lower surfaces of the leaf blade. It is concluded that the function of these enzymes is to form respective triterpenoid aglycones destined to coat the leaf exterior, probably as defense compounds against pathogens or herbivores. PMID:20610397

  10. The landscape of isoform switches in human cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2017-01-01

    developed methods for identification and visualization of isoform switches with predicted functional consequences. Using these methods, we characterized isoform switching in RNA-seq data from >5,500 cancer patients covering 12 solid cancer types. Isoform switches with potential functional consequences were...... common, affecting approximately 19% of multiple transcript genes. Among these, isoform switches leading to loss of DNA sequence encoding protein domains were more frequent than expected, particularly in pancancer switches. We identified several isoform switches as powerful biomarkers: 31 switches were...... highly predictive of patient survival independent of cancer types. Our data constitute an important resource for cancer researchers, available through interactive web tools. Moreover, our methods, available as an R package, enable systematic analysis of isoform switches from other RNA-seq datasets...

  11. Specific Profile of Tau Isoforms in Argyrophylic Grain Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Rábano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Argyrophylic grain disease (AGD is a neurodegenerative condition that has been classified among the sporadic tauopathies. Entities in this group present intracellular aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau, giving rise to characteristic neuronal and glial inclusions. In different tauopathies, the proportion of several tau isoforms present in the aggregates shows specific patterns. AGD has been tentatively classified in the 4R group (predominance of 4R tau isoforms together with progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. Pick's disease is included in the 3R group (predominance of 3R isoforms, whereas tau pathology of Alzheimer's disease represents and intermediate group (3 or 4 repeats [3R plus 4R, respectively] isoforms. In this work, we have analyzed tau present in aggregates isolated from brain samples of patients with argyrophylic grain disease. Our results indicate that the main tau isoform present in aggregates obtained from patients with AGD is a hyperphosphorylated isoform containing exons 2 and 10 but lacking exon 3.

  12. Tumorigenic properties of alternative osteopontin isoforms in mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Sergey V., E-mail: Sergey.Ivanov@med.nyu.edu [Thoracic Surgery Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, NYU Langone Medical Center, 462 First Ave., Bellevue Hospital, Room 15N20, NY 10016 (United States); Ivanova, Alla V.; Goparaju, Chandra M.V.; Chen, Yuanbin; Beck, Amanda; Pass, Harvey I. [Thoracic Surgery Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, NYU Langone Medical Center, 462 First Ave., Bellevue Hospital, Room 15N20, NY 10016 (United States)

    2009-05-08

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is an inflammatory cytokine that we previously characterized as a diagnostic marker in patients with asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma (MM). While SPP1 shows both pro- and anti-tumorigenic biological effects, little is known about the molecular basis of these activities. In this study, we demonstrate that while healthy pleura possesses all three differentially spliced SPP1 isoforms (A-C), in clinical MM specimens isoform A is markedly up-regulated and predominant. To provide a clue to possible functions of the SPP1 isoforms we next performed their functional evaluation via transient expression in MM cell lines. As a result, we report that isoforms A-C demonstrate different activities in cell proliferation, wound closure, and invasion assays. These findings suggest different functions for SPP1 isoforms and underline pro-tumorigenic properties of isoforms A and B.

  13. Metallothionein isoform expression by breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, N L; Ackland, M L; Cornish, E J

    2000-08-01

    Expression of metallothionein (MT) isoforms by a human breast cancer cell line, PMC42, which retains many characteristics of normal breast epithelial cells and expresses functional estrogen receptors, was examined because it has been proposed that human breast cancer cells which are estrogen receptor positive can be differentiated from those which are estrogen receptor negative, by failure to express MT-1E [J.A. Friedline, S.H. Garrett, S. Somji, J.H. Todd, D. A. Sens, Differential expression of the MT-1E gene in estrogen-receptor positive and -negative breast cancer cell lines, Am. J. Pathol. 152 (1998) 23-27]. Using RT-PCR, PMC42 cells were found to transcribe genes for the MT isoforms IE, IX and 2A but not 1A or 1H. In order to examine which of the expressed isoforms might protect against metal toxicity, the cells were challenged with high concentrations of zinc and copper. Using competitive RT-PCR, cells resistant to 500 microM zinc showed 7+/-2 fold (SD, n=3) increases in expression of MT-1X and 6+/-3 fold increases in expression of MT-2A compared to control cells in normal media. For cells resistant to 250 microM copper the corresponding increases were 37+/-13 and 60+/-20 fold, whilst for control cells treated with 250 microM copper for only 6 h, increases were 10+/-3 and 6+/-3 fold. There was only a low level of expression of MT-1E in untreated cells and but a >120 fold increase in copper- resistant cells. Thus estrogen receptor positive cells cannot, in general, be differentiated from estrogen receptor negative cells by failure to express MT-1E, as suggested by Friedline et al. (1998). Increased expression of MT-1E, as well as MT-1X and MT-2A, protects against metal toxicity in PMC42 breast cancer cells.

  14. Expression of various sarcomeric tropomyosin isoforms in equine striated muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Dube, Syamalima; Chionuma, Henry; Matoq, Amr; Alshiekh-Nasany, Ruham; Abbott, Lynn; Poiesz, Bernard J.; Dube, Dipak K.

    2017-01-01

    In order to better understand the training and athletic activity of horses, we must have complete understanding of the isoform diversity of various myofibrillar protein genes like tropomyosin. Tropomyosin (TPM), a coiled-coil dimeric protein, is a component of thin filament in striated muscles. In mammals, four TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4) generate a multitude of TPM isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using different promoters. Unfortunately, our knowledge of TPM isoform diversi...

  15. In Vitro Assessment of Guanylyl Cyclase Activity of Plant Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen

    2017-05-31

    Cyclic nucleotides such as 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are increasingly recognized as key signaling molecules in plants, and a growing number of plant mononucleotide cyclases, both adenylate cyclases (ACs) and guanylate cyclases (GCs), have been reported. Catalytically active cytosolic GC domains have been shown to be part of many plant receptor kinases and hence directly linked to plant signaling and downstream cellular responses. Here we detail, firstly, methods to identify and express essential functional GC domains of receptor kinases, and secondly, we describe mass spectrometric methods to quantify cGMP generated by recombinant GCs from receptor kinases in vitro.

  16. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, [ 125 I]iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30 degree C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing [ 125 I]iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus

  17. Enhanced adenylate cyclase activity of turkey erythrocytes following treatment with beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J R; Nambi, P; Sibley, D R; Lefkowitz, R J

    1984-12-15

    The turkey erythrocyte contains a beta 1-adrenergic receptor-linked adenylate cyclase system. We have examined the effects of pretreatment with receptor antagonists on adenylate cyclase activity and the individual components in the pathway of enzyme activation in this system. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is increased by 30% (P less than 0.01) over control in membranes derived from cells preincubated with the antagonist propranolol. The effect is stereospecific and dose-related with a EC50 of 100 nM for the (-) isomer. The time course of effect is rapid being complete by 90 min. Non-receptor mediated stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by manganese ion, forskolin and NaF is similarly enhanced following propranolol pretreatment. Sensitization of adenylate cyclase activity also occurs following pretreatment with a number of antagonists but is not seen after preincubation with pindolol or practolol. Quantitation of beta-adrenergic receptor (R) density using [125I]cyanopindolol indicates no difference between membranes derived from control and antagonist pretreated cells. Coupling of R with the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (N) as assessed by high affinity agonist binding is unchanged following pretreatment. The efficacy of 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate Gpp(NH)p in producing a shift of agonist binding curves associated with destabilization of high affinity H-R-N complexes, is also the same (EC50 = 0.2 microM) in membranes from control and antagonist treated cells. The isoproterenol stimulated rate of release of [3H]GDP from membranes preloaded with [3H]GTP as an index of formation of an active form of the N protein is similarly unaffected by antagonist preincubation. We conclude that the mechanism of the observed sensitization of turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase by beta-adrenergic antagonists is receptor mediated and likely involves facilitation of N interaction with the catalytic subunit of the enzyme.

  18. Identification of a novel TDRD7 isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filonenko V. V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate the tudor domain-containing protein 7 (TDRD7 subcellular localization, which could be linked to diverse functions of this protein within the cell. Methods. In this study we employed cell imaging technique for detecting TDRD7 subcellular localization, Western blot analysis of HEK293 cell fractions with anti-TDRD7 monoclonal antibodies and bioinformatical search of possible TDRD7 isoforms in Uniprot, Ensemble, UCSC databases. Results. We have observed specific TDRD7-containing structures in cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus in HEK293 cells. The Western blot analysis of subcellular fractions (cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus allowed us to detect three lower immunoreactive bands, with the aproximate molecular weight of 130, 110 and 60 kDa (we termed them as TDRD7, TDRD7 and TDRD7 and specific subcellular localization. The bioinformatical analysis of TDRD7 primary structure allowed us to determine two alternative transcripts from TDRD7 gene coding for proteins with calculated molecular weight of 130 and 60 kDa. Conclusion. The presented data demonstrate the existence at protein level of potential TDRD7 isoforms: TDRD7, TDRD7 and TDRD7. The expression profile of these splice variants and their role in cells remains to be elucidated.

  19. Multiple lineage specific expansions within the guanylyl cyclase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran Damien M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guanylyl cyclases (GCs are responsible for the production of the secondary messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which plays important roles in a variety of physiological responses such as vision, olfaction, muscle contraction, homeostatic regulation, cardiovascular and nervous function. There are two types of GCs in animals, soluble (sGCs which are found ubiquitously in cell cytoplasm, and receptor (rGC forms which span cell membranes. The complete genomes of several vertebrate and invertebrate species are now available. These data provide a platform to investigate the evolution of GCs across a diverse range of animal phyla. Results In this analysis we located GC genes from a broad spectrum of vertebrate and invertebrate animals and reconstructed molecular phylogenies for both sGC and rGC proteins. The most notable features of the resulting phylogenies are the number of lineage specific rGC and sGC expansions that have occurred during metazoan evolution. Among these expansions is a large nematode specific rGC clade comprising 21 genes in C. elegans alone; a vertebrate specific expansion in the natriuretic receptors GC-A and GC-B; a vertebrate specific expansion in the guanylyl GC-C receptors, an echinoderm specific expansion in the sperm rGC genes and a nematode specific sGC clade. Our phylogenetic reconstruction also shows the existence of a basal group of nitric oxide (NO insensitive insect and nematode sGCs which are regulated by O2. This suggests that the primordial eukaryotes probably utilized sGC as an O2 sensor, with the ligand specificity of sGC later switching to NO which provides a very effective local cell-to-cell signalling system. Phylogenetic analysis of the sGC and bacterial heme nitric oxide/oxygen binding protein domain supports the hypothesis that this domain originated from a cyanobacterial source. Conclusion The most salient feature of our phylogenies is the number of lineage specific expansions

  20. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a unique combination of a pore-forming moiety with a cell-invading adenylate cyclase enzyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, Jiří; Osička, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 8 (2015) ISSN 2049-632X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/0460; GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * membrane penetration * pore-formation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.483, year: 2015

  1. Tocopherol isoforms in parenteral lipid emulsions and neutrophil activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanten, G.J.A.; Beunk, J.; Naber, A.H.J.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Tocopherol is a lipid-soluble anti-oxidant that exists in several isoforms. Patients on total parenteral nutrition depend on lipid emulsions for their tocopherol intake. In the present study, we analysed the content of tocopherol isoforms in various lipid emulsions. We also

  2. Expression, activation, and role of AKT isoforms in the uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabi, François; Asselin, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The three isoforms of AKT: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3, are crucial regulators of both normal and pathological cellular processes. Each of these isoforms exhibits a high level of homology and functional redundancy with each other. However, while being highly similar and structurally homologous, a rising amount of evidence is showing that each isoform possesses specific targets as well as preferential subcellular localization. The role of AKT has been studied extensively in reproductive processes, but isoform-specific roles are yet to be fully understood. This review will focus on the role of AKT in the uterus and its function in processes related to cell death and proliferation such as embryo implantation, decidualization, endometriosis, and endometrial cancer in an isoform-centric manner. In this review, we will cover the activation of AKT in various settings, localization of isoforms in subcellular compartments, and the effect of isoform expression on cellular processes. To fully understand the dynamic molecular processes taking place in the uterus, it is crucial that we better understand the physiological role of AKT isoforms as well as their function in the emergence of diseases. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  3. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Troponin proteins in cooperative interaction with tropomyosin are responsible for controlling the contraction of the striated muscles in response to changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. Contractility of the muscle is determined by the constituent protein isoforms, and the isoforms can switch over from one form to ...

  4. Age-associated alterations in hepatic β-adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, S.M.; Herring, P.A.; Arinze, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of age on catecholamine regulation of hepatic glycogenolysis and on hepatic adenylate cyclase was studied in male rats up to 24 mo of age. Epinephrine and norepinephrine stimulated glycogenolysis in isolated hepatocytes at all age groups studied. Isoproterenol, however, stimulated glycogenolysis only at 24 mo. In isolated liver membranes, usual activators of adenylate cyclase increased the activity of the enzyme considerably more in membranes from 24-mo-old rats than in membranes from either 3- or 22-mo-old rats. The Mn 2+ -dependent activity of the cyclase was increased by 2.9-fold in 3-mo-old animals and ∼ 5.7-fold in 24-mo-old rats, indicating a substantial age-dependent increase in the intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit. The density of the β-adrenergic receptor, as measured by the binding of [ 125 I]-iodocyanopindolol to plasma membranes, was 5-8 fmol/mg protein in rats aged 3-12 mo but increased to 19 fmol/mg protein in 24-mo-old rats. Computer-aided analysis of isoproterenol competition of the binding indicated a small age-dependent increase in the proportion of β-receptors in the high-affinity state. These observations suggest that β-receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis in the aged rat is predicated upon increases in the density of β-receptors as well as increased intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase

  5. Design and Synthesis of Fluorescent Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Potent Inhibitors of Bacterial Adenylate Cyclases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Břehová, Petra; Šmídková, Markéta; Skácel, Jan; Dračínský, Martin; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Velasquez, M. P. S.; Watts, V. J.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 22 (2016), s. 2534-2546 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * anthranilic acid Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.225, year: 2016

  6. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpace, P.J.; Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the β-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the β-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and β-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. β-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed β 1 - and β 2 -type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in β-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the β 1 -adrenergic subtype. This BAT β-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial β-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of β-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability

  7. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  8. Evidence for the existence of a sulfhydryl group in the adenylate cyclase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurat, A V; Yurkova, M S; Baranova, L A; Gulyaev, N N; Bulargina, T V; Severin, E S

    1985-03-01

    6-Cloro-9-beta-d-ribofuranosylpurine 5'-triphosphate (CIRTP) and 6-mercapto-9-beta-d-ribofuranosylpurine 5'-triphosphate (SRTP) irreversibly inhibit adenylate cyclase from rat brain. Adenosine 5'-[beta, gamma -imido] triphosphate protects the enzyme against inactivation by CIRTP and SRTP and acts as a competitive inhibitor with respect to ATP with the Ki value 2 X 10(-4) M. Study of the pH-dependence of the rate of the enzyme inactivation by CIRTP showed that pK for the group modified by this compound is equal to 7.45. Inactivation is first order with respect to the enzyme; the saturation effect is observed at the increased concentration of CIRTP. The k2 and KI values for irreversible inhibition of brain adenylate cyclase by CIRTP were 0.25 min-1 and 1.9 X 10(-4) M, respectively. Adenylate cyclase inhibition by SRTP is also time-dependent. Partial protection against the enzyme inactivation was observed. Dithiothreitol restores the activity of SRTP-inactivated adenylate cyclase. The results obtained indicate the presence of an -SH group in the purine amino group binding area of the enzyme active site.

  9. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide stimulates renin secretion via activation of PAC1 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hautmann, Matthias; Friis, Ulla G; Desch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Besides of its functional role in the nervous system, the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular function. Therefore, PACAP is a potent vasodilator in several vascular beds, including the renal vasculature. Because...

  10. Structure of glutaminyl cyclase from Drosophila melanogaster in space group I4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolenko, Petr; Koch, B.; Rahfeld, J.-U.; Schilling, S.; Demuth, H.-U.; Stubbs, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 4 (2013), s. 358-361 ISSN 1744-3091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : glutaminyl cyclases * Drosophila melanogaster * soaking Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2013

  11. Cryptic indole hydroxylation by a non-canonical terpenoid cyclase parallels bacterial xenobiotic detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Susann; Baunach, Martin; Baer, Philipp; Ishida-Ito, Mie; Sundaram, Srividhya; Xu, Zhongli; Groll, Michael; Hertweck, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Terpenoid natural products comprise a wide range of molecular architectures that typically result from C-C bond formations catalysed by classical type I/II terpene cyclases. However, the molecular diversity of biologically active terpenoids is substantially increased by fully unrelated, non-canonical terpenoid cyclases. Their evolutionary origin has remained enigmatic. Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of an unusual flavin-dependent bacterial indoloterpenoid cyclase, XiaF, together with a designated flavoenzyme-reductase (XiaP) that mediates a key step in xiamycin biosynthesis. The crystal structure of XiaF with bound FADH2 (at 2.4 Å resolution) and phylogenetic analyses reveal that XiaF is, surprisingly, most closely related to xenobiotic-degrading enzymes. Biotransformation assays show that XiaF is a designated indole hydroxylase that can be used for the production of indigo and indirubin. We unveil a cryptic hydroxylation step that sets the basis for terpenoid cyclization and suggest that the cyclase has evolved from xenobiotics detoxification enzymes.

  12. Vanadate stimulates adenylate cyclase via the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein by a mechanism differing from that of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawietz, W; Downs, R W; Spiegel, A M; Aurbach, G D

    1982-03-01

    Vanadate stimulates adenylate cyclase activity in turkey erythrocyte membranes. The maximal stimulation is 7-fold over basal at 3 mM vanadate; higher concentrations are inhibitory. A suboptimal concentration of fluoride (1 mM) together with vanadate (3 mM) activates adenylate cyclase in a non-additive manner; cyclase activation by optimal fluoride (10 mM) is inhibited by vanadate (3 mM). There is no stimulation by vanadate of adenylate cyclase activity (measured either with Mg2+ or Mn2+) in CYC- S49 lymphoma cell membranes. Vanadate (3 mM) shows no effect on binding of Beta-adrenergic agonists or antagonists to the [3H] (-)-dihydroalprenolol binding site in turkey erythrocyte membranes. These results suggest that the effect of vanadate on Adenylate cyclase is mediated through the nucleotide regulatory protein and may act by a mechanism similar to fluoride. However, in cholera toxic-treated membranes as well as in GDP-beta-S plus isoproterenol-treated membranes, fluoride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is significantly reduced, but vanadate stimulation is not. Our results suggest that although the actions of vanadate and fluoride in adenylate cyclase may each involve the nucleotide regulatory unit, the exact mechanisms of activation by the two anions differ.

  13. Receptor binding and adenylate cyclase activities of glucagon analogues modified in the N-terminal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.L.; Pelton, J.T.; Trivedi, D.; Johnson, D.G.; Coy, D.H.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Hruby, V.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, we determined the ability of four N-terminally modified derivatives of glucagon, [3-Me-His1,Arg12]-, [Phe1,Arg12]-, [D-Ala4,Arg12]-, and [D-Phe4]glucagon, to compete with 125I-glucagon for binding sites specific for glucagon in hepatic plasma membranes and to activate the hepatic adenylate cyclase system, the second step involved in producing many of the physiological effects of glucagon. Relative to the native hormone, [3-Me-His1,Arg12]glucagon binds approximately twofold greater to hepatic plasma membranes but is fivefold less potent in the adenylate cyclase assay. [Phe1,Arg12]glucagon binds threefold weaker and is also approximately fivefold less potent in adenylate cyclase activity. In addition, both analogues are partial agonists with respect to adenylate cyclase. These results support the critical role of the N-terminal histidine residue in eliciting maximal transduction of the hormonal message. [D-Ala4,Arg12]glucagon and [D-Phe4]glucagon, analogues designed to examine the possible importance of a beta-bend conformation in the N-terminal region of glucagon for binding and biological activities, have binding potencies relative to glucagon of 31% and 69%, respectively. [D-Ala4,Arg12]glucagon is a partial agonist in the adenylate cyclase assay system having a fourfold reduction in potency, while the [D-Phe4] derivative is a full agonist essentially equipotent with the native hormone. These results do not necessarily support the role of an N-terminal beta-bend in glucagon receptor recognition. With respect to in vivo glycogenolysis activities, all of the analogues have previously been reported to be full agonists

  14. Identification of PAC1 receptor isoform mRNAs by real-time PCR in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajpru, Supaporn; McArthur, Angela J; Piggins, Hugh D; Sugden, David

    2002-09-30

    The pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) has been implicated in the photic resetting of the rodent circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). PACAP can exert its effects via VPAC1, VPAC2 and PAC1 G-protein coupled receptors. PAC1 and VPAC2, but not VPAC1, mRNA is expressed in rat SCN. A variety of PAC1 receptor splice variants have been described showing differences in ligand binding affinity and selectivity, G-protein coupling and ability to activate signal transduction pathways. The present experiments used PCR with isoform specific primers to determine which PAC1 variants are expressed in rat SCN. The PAC1(null) isoform and a variant containing a single 28-amino acid insert in the third intracellular (IC3) loop (hop1/2) were detected. No other IC3 variants (hip, hip-hop), N-terminal variants (PAC1(short), PAC1(very short) and PAC1(3a)) or the variant differing in transmembrane II and IV (PAC1TM4) were detected in SCN obtained at any time of day. A quantitative real-time PCR assay was established which measured combined expression of the PAC1(null/hop) variants in rat SCN during a 12:12-h light:dark (L:D) cycle. There was no significant variation of PAC1 mRNA expression (PAC1(null)+PAC1(hop)) with time of day. Nor was there a significant difference in the proportion of these two variants with time of day. These results indicate that the phase-dependency of the actions of PACAP on SCN firing and circadian behaviour are not mediated by changes in the level of expression of PAC1 receptor mRNA, nor by phase-dependent expression of PAC1 receptor variants with altered ligand binding, G-protein coupling or signalling characteristics. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Identification of the chlE gene encoding oxygen-independent Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Kaori; Minamizaki, Kei; Fujita, Yuichi

    2015-08-07

    The fifth ring (E-ring) of chlorophyll (Chl) a is produced by Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (MPE) cyclase. There are two evolutionarily unrelated MPE cyclases: oxygen-independent (BchE) and oxygen-dependent (ChlA/AcsF) MPE cyclases. Although ChlA is the sole MPE cyclase in Synechocystis PCC 6803, it is yet unclear whether BchE exists in cyanobacteria. A BLAST search suggests that only few cyanobacteria possess bchE. Here, we report that two bchE candidate genes from Cyanothece strains PCC 7425 and PCC 7822 restore the photosynthetic growth and bacteriochlorophyll production in a bchE-lacking mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus. We termed these cyanobacterial bchE orthologs "chlE." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional exchange of components between light-activated photoreceptor phosphodiesterase and hormone-activated adenylate cyclase systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitensky, M.W.; Wheeler, M.A.; Rasenick, M.M.; Yamazaki, A.; Stein, P.J.; Halliday, K.R.; Wheeler, G.L.

    1982-06-01

    Previous studies have noted profound similarities between the regulation of light-activated (3',5'-cyclic-nucleotide 5'-nucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.17) in retinal rods and hormone-activated adenylate cyclase (ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1) in a variety of tissues. We report ere the functional exchange of components isolated from the photoreceptor system, which displayed predicted functional characteristics when incubated with recipient adenylate cyclase systems from rat cerebral cortical and hypothalamic synaptic membranes and frog erythrocyte ghosts. We demonstrate functional exchange of photoreceptor components at each of three loci: the hormone receptor, the GTP-binding protein (GBP), and the catalytic moiety of adenylate cyclase. Illuminated (but not unilluminated) rhodopsin was found to mimic the hormone-receptor complex, causing GTP-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. The photoreceptor GBP complexed with guanosine 5'-(..beta..,..gamma..)imidotriphosphate (p(NH)ppG) produced a marked activation of recipient adenylate cyclase systems. Much smaller activation was observed when GBP was not complexed with p(NH)ppG. A heat-stable photoreceptor phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduced both basal and Mn/sup 2 +/-activated adenylate cyclase activites and this inhibition was reversed by photoreceptor GBPp(NH)ppG. These data demonstrate a remarkable functional compatibility between subunits of both systems and furthermore imply that specialized peptide domains responsible for protein-protein interactions are highly conserved.

  17. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubo Takeo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecdysone receptor (EcR regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. Results The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Conclusions Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional

  18. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2010-02-12

    The ecdysone receptor (EcR) regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF)-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional regulation mechanisms.

  19. Structure of glutaminyl cyclase from Drosophila melanogaster in space group I4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenko, Petr; Koch, Birgit; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Stubbs, Milton T.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of ligand-free glutaminyl cyclase from D. melanogaster has been determined in a novel crystal form belonging to space group I4. The structure of ligand-free glutaminyl cyclase (QC) from Drosophila melanogaster (DmQC) has been determined in a novel crystal form. The protein crystallized in space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.3, c = 72.7 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2 Å at the home source. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and was refined to an R factor of 0.169. DmQC exhibits a typical α/β-hydrolase fold. The electron density of three monosaccharides could be localized. The accessibility of the active site will facilitate structural studies of novel inhibitor-binding modes

  20. Characterization of the Human ?1?1 Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Marro, Mart?n L.; Peir?, Concepci?n; Panayiotou, Catherine M.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Meurer, Sabine; Schmidt, Harald H. H. W.; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the principal receptor for NO and plays a ubiquitous role in regulating cellular function. This is exemplified in the cardiovascular system where sGC governs smooth muscle tone and growth, vascular permeability, leukocyte flux, and platelet aggregation. As a consequence, aberrant NO-sGC signaling has been linked to diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, and stroke. Despite these key (patho)physiological roles, little is known about the expressional...

  1. Chemical shift assignments of polyketide cyclase_like protein CGL2373 from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chunjie; Hu, Rui; Ramelot, Theresa A; Kennedy, Michael A; Li, Xuegang; Yang, Yunhuang; Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Maili

    2017-10-01

    Protein CGL2373 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is 155 amino acids long and 17.7 kDa, is a member of the polyketide_cyc2 family. As a potential polyketide cyclase, it may play an important role in the biosynthesis of aromatic polyketides that are the source of many bioactive molecules. Here we report the complete 1 H, 13 C and 15 N chemical shift assignments of CGL2373, which lays a foundation for further structural and functional research.

  2. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands 3 H-N-methylscopolamine ( 3 H-NMS), 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB), and 3 H-pirenzepine. 3 H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, 3 H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by 3 H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for 3 H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure

  3. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  4. Quantification of potassium levels in cells treated with Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wald, Tomáš; Petry-Podgorska, Inga; Fišer, Radovan; Matoušek, Tomáš; Dědina, Jiří; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter; Mašín, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 450, APR 2014 (2014), s. 57-62 ISSN 0003-2697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR GA13-14547S; GA ČR GAP302/12/0460 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68081715 Keywords : Potassium * Adenylate cyclase toxin * RTX Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.219, year: 2014

  5. Interaction of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin with complement receptor 3 involves multivalent glycan binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasan, Shakir; Osičková, Adriana; Bumba, Ladislav; Novák, Petr; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 589, č. 3 (2015), s. 374-379 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Adenylate cyclase toxin * CD11b/CD18 * Complement receptor type 3 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.519, year: 2015

  6. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique ligand of the integrin complement receptor 3

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osička, Radim; Osičková, Adriana; Hasan, Shakir; Bumba, Ladislav; Černý, Jiří; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, DEC 9 (2015) ISSN 2050-084X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : E. coli * adenylate cyclase toxin * biochemistry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 8.282, year: 2015

  7. Different strictuctural requirements for adenylate cyclase toxin interactions with erythrocyte and liposome membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, Jiří; Konopásek, I.; Svobodová, J.; Šebo, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 1660, - (2004), s. 144-154 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IPP1050128; GA AV ČR IAA5020907 Grant - others:GA Howard Hughes Medical Institut(US) 55000334; GA(XE) QLK2-CT-1999-00556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : bordetella pertussis * adenylate cyclase toxin * membrane interaction Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.441, year: 2004

  8. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Subverts Phagocyte Function by RhoA Inhibition and Unproductive Ruffling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamanová, Jana; Kofroňová, Olga; Mašín, Jiří; Genth, H.; Vojtová, Jana; Linhartová, Irena; Benada, Oldřich; Just, I.; Šebo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 181, č. 8 (2008), s. 5587-5597 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk 2B06161; GA ČR GA310/08/0447 Grant - others:XE(XE) LSHB-CT-2003-503582 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : bordetella * adenylate cyclase toxin * rhoa Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 6.000, year: 2008

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the glutaminyl cyclase from Carica papaya latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarkan, Mohamed [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Clantin, Bernard; Bompard, Coralie [CNRS-UMR 8525, Institut de Biologie de Lille, BP 477, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, F-59021 Lille (France); Belrhali, Hassan [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 181, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Baeyens-Volant, Danielle [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Looze, Yvan [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale, Institut de Pharmacie-ULB CP206/04, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Villeret, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.villeret@ibl.fr [CNRS-UMR 8525, Institut de Biologie de Lille, BP 477, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, F-59021 Lille (France); Wintjens, René, E-mail: vincent.villeret@ibl.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale, Institut de Pharmacie-ULB CP206/04, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    The glutaminyl cyclase isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to 1.7 Å resolution. In living systems, the intramolecular cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues is accomplished by glutaminyl cyclase enzymes (EC 2.3.2.5). While in mammals these enzymes are involved in the synthesis of hormonal and neurotransmitter peptides, the physiological role played by the corresponding plant enzymes still remains to be unravelled. Papaya glutaminyl cyclase (PQC), a 33 kDa enzyme found in the latex of the tropical tree Carica papaya, displays an exceptional resistance to chemical and thermal denaturation as well as to proteolysis. In order to elucidate its enzymatic mechanism and to gain insights into the structural determinants underlying its remarkable stability, PQC was isolated from papaya latex, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.82, b = 81.23, c = 108.17 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  10. Identification of Adenyl Cyclase Activity in a Disease Resistance Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Hussein, Rana

    2012-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide, cAMP, is an important signaling molecule in animals and plants. However, in plants the enzymes that synthesize this second messenger, adenyl cyclases (ACs), remain elusive. Given the physiological importance of cAMP in signaling, particularly in response to biotic and abiotic stresses, it is thus important to identify and characterize ACs in higher plants. Using computational approaches, a disease resistance protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, At3g04220 was found to have an AC catalytic center motif. In an attempt to prove that this candidate has adenyl cyclases activity in vitro, the coding sequence of the putative AC catalytic domain of this protein was cloned and expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. The nucleotide cyclase activity of the recombinant protein was examined using cyclic nucleotide enzyme immunoassays. In parallel, the expression of At3g04220 was measured in leaves under three different stress conditions in order to determine under which conditions the disease resistance protein could function. Results show that the purified recombinant protein has Mn2+ dependent AC activity in vitro, and the expression analysis supports a role for At3g04220 and cAMP in plant defense.

  11. Adenylate cyclase toxin promotes internalisation of integrins and raft components and decreases macrophage adhesion capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Martín

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT that must be post-translationally palmitoylated in the bacterium cytosol to be active. The toxin targets phagocytes expressing the CD11b/CD18 integrin receptor. It delivers a catalytic adenylate cyclase domain into the target cell cytosol producing a rapid increase of intracellular cAMP concentration that suppresses bactericidal functions of the phagocyte. ACT also induces calcium fluxes into target cells. Biochemical, biophysical and cell biology approaches have been applied here to show evidence that ACT and integrin molecules, along with other raft components, are rapidly internalized by the macrophages in a toxin-induced calcium rise-dependent process. The toxin-triggered internalisation events occur through two different routes of entry, chlorpromazine-sensitive receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-independent internalisation, maybe acting in parallel. ACT locates into raft-like domains, and is internalised, also in cells devoid of receptor. Altogether our results suggest that adenylate cyclase toxin, and maybe other homologous pathogenic toxins from the RTX (Repeats in Toxin family to which ACT belongs, may be endowed with an intrinsic capacity to, directly and efficiently, insert into raft-like domains, promoting there its multiple activities. One direct consequence of the integrin removal from the cell surface of the macrophages is the hampering of their adhesion ability, a fundamental property in the immune response of the leukocytes that could be instrumental in the pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis.

  12. Adenylate cyclase toxin promotes internalisation of integrins and raft components and decreases macrophage adhesion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, César; Uribe, Kepa B; Gómez-Bilbao, Geraxane; Ostolaza, Helena

    2011-02-23

    Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) that must be post-translationally palmitoylated in the bacterium cytosol to be active. The toxin targets phagocytes expressing the CD11b/CD18 integrin receptor. It delivers a catalytic adenylate cyclase domain into the target cell cytosol producing a rapid increase of intracellular cAMP concentration that suppresses bactericidal functions of the phagocyte. ACT also induces calcium fluxes into target cells. Biochemical, biophysical and cell biology approaches have been applied here to show evidence that ACT and integrin molecules, along with other raft components, are rapidly internalized by the macrophages in a toxin-induced calcium rise-dependent process. The toxin-triggered internalisation events occur through two different routes of entry, chlorpromazine-sensitive receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-independent internalisation, maybe acting in parallel. ACT locates into raft-like domains, and is internalised, also in cells devoid of receptor. Altogether our results suggest that adenylate cyclase toxin, and maybe other homologous pathogenic toxins from the RTX (Repeats in Toxin) family to which ACT belongs, may be endowed with an intrinsic capacity to, directly and efficiently, insert into raft-like domains, promoting there its multiple activities. One direct consequence of the integrin removal from the cell surface of the macrophages is the hampering of their adhesion ability, a fundamental property in the immune response of the leukocytes that could be instrumental in the pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis.

  13. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  14. Differential Signature of the Centrosomal MARK4 Isoforms in Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Magnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4 is a serine-threonine kinase expressed in two spliced isoforms, MARK4L and MARK4S, of which MARK4L is a candidate for a role in neoplastic transformation. Methods: We performed mutation analysis to identify sequence alterations possibly affecting MARK4 expression. We then investigated the MARK4L and MARK4S expression profile in 21 glioma cell lines and 36 tissues of different malignancy grades, glioblastoma-derived cancer stem cells (GBM CSCs and mouse neural stem cells (NSCs by real-time PCR, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. We also analyzed the sub-cellular localisation of MARK4 isoforms in glioma and normal cell lines by immunofluorescence. Results: Mutation analysis rules out sequence variations as the cause of the altered MARK4 expression in glioma. Expression profiling confirms that MARK4L is the predominant isoform, whereas MARK4S levels are significantly decreased in comparison and show an inverse correlation with tumour grade. A high MARK4L/MARK4S ratio also characterizes undifferentiated cells, such as GBM CSCs and NSCs. Accordingly, only MARK4L is expressed in brain neurogenic regions. Moreover, while both MARK4 isoforms are localised to the centrosome and midbody in glioma and normal cells, the L isoform exhibits an additional nucleolar localisation in tumour cells. Conclusions: The observed switch towards MARK4L suggests that the balance between the MARK4 isoforms is carefully guarded during neural differentiation but may be subverted in gliomagenesis. Moreover, the MARK4L nucleolar localisation in tumour cells features this MARK4 isoform as a nucleolus-associated tumour marker.

  15. Expression of various sarcomeric tropomyosin isoforms in equine striated muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamalima Dube

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to better understand the training and athletic activity of horses, we must have complete understanding of the isoform diversity of various myofibrillar protein genes like tropomyosin. Tropomyosin (TPM, a coiled-coil dimeric protein, is a component of thin filament in striated muscles. In mammals, four TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4 generate a multitude of TPM isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using different promoters. Unfortunately, our knowledge of TPM isoform diversity in the horse is very limited. Hence, we undertook a comprehensive exploratory study of various TPM isoforms from horse heart and skeletal muscle. We have cloned and sequenced two sarcomeric isoforms of the TPM1 gene called TPM1α and TPM1κ, one sarcomeric isoform of the TPM2 and one of the TPM3 gene, TPM2α and TPM3α respectively. By qRT-PCR using both relative expression and copy number, we have shown that TPM1α expression compared to TPM1κ is very high in heart. On the other hand, the expression of TPM1α is higher in skeletal muscle compared to heart. Further, the expression of TPM2α and TPM3α are higher in skeletal muscle compared to heart. Using western blot analyses with CH1 monoclonal antibody we have shown the high expression levels of sarcomeric TPM proteins in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Due to the paucity of isoform specific antibodies we cannot specifically detect the expression of TPM1κ in horse striated muscle. To the best of our knowledge this is the very first report on the characterization of sarcmeric TPMs in horse striated muscle.

  16. Carotenoid analysis of sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas and functional identification of its lycopene β- and ε-cyclase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Takemura, Miho; Maoka, Takashi; Otani, Motoyasu; Misawa, Norihiko

    2016-09-01

    Sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas is known as a hexaploid species. Here, we analyzed carotenoids contained in the leaves and tubers of sweetpotato cultivars 'White Star' (WS) and W71. These cultivars were found to contain several carotenoids unique to sweetpotato tubers such as β-carotene-5,6,5',8'-diepoxide and β-carotene-5,8-epoxide. Next, we isolated two kinds of carotene cyclase genes that encode lycopene β- and ε-cyclases from the WS and W71 leaves, by RT-PCR and subsequent RACE. Two and three lycopene β-cyclase gene sequences were, respectively, isolated from WS, named IbLCYb1, 2, and from W71, IbLCYb3, 4, 5. Meanwhile, only a single lycopene ε-cyclase gene sequence, designated IbLCYe, was isolated from both WS and W71. These genes were separately introduced into a lycopene-synthesizing Escherichia coli transformed with the Pantoea ananatis crtE, crtB and crtI genes, followed by HPLC analysis. β-Carotene was detected in E. coli cells that carried IbLCYb1-4, indicating that the IbLCYb1-4 genes encode lycopene β-cyclase. Meanwhile, the introduction of IbLCYe into the lycopene-synthesizing E. coli led to efficient production of δ-carotene with a monocyclic ε-ring, providing evidence that the IbLCYe gene codes for lycopene ε-(mono)cyclase. Expression of the β- and ε-cyclase genes was analyzed as well.

  17. Tropomyosin isoforms bias actin track selection by vertebrate myosin Va

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sckolnick, Maria; Krementsova, Elena B.; Warshaw, David M.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms decorate actin with distinct spatial and temporal localization patterns in cells and thus may function to sort actomyosin processes by modifying the actin track affinity for specific myosin isoforms. We examined the effect of three Tpm isoforms on the ability of myosin Va (myoVa) to engage with actin in vitro in the absence or presence of the cargo adapter melanophilin (Mlph), which links myoVa to Rab27a-melanosomes for in vivo transport. We show that both the myosin motor domain and the cargo adapter Mlph, which has an actin-binding domain that acts as a tether, are sensitive to the Tpm isoform. Actin–Tpm3.1 and actin–Tpm1.8 were equal or better tracks compared to bare actin for myoVa-HMM based on event frequency, run length, and speed. The full-length myoVa-Mlph complex showed high-frequency engagement with actin-Tpm3.1 but not with actin-Tpm1.8. Actin–Tpm4.2 excluded both myoVa-HMM and full-length myoVa-Mlph from productive interactions. Of importance, Tpm3.1 is enriched in the dendritic protrusions and cortical actin of melanocytes, where myoVa-Mlph engages in melanosome transport. These results support the hypothesis that Tpm isoforms constitute an “actin–Tpm code” that allows for spatial and temporal sorting of actomyosin function in the cell. PMID:27535431

  18. Molecular cloning and pharmacology of functionally distinct isoforms of the human histamine H(3) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Goodman, M W; Burstein, E S

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of histamine H(3) receptors suggests the presence of distinct receptor isoforms or subtypes. We herein describe multiple, functionally distinct, alternatively spliced isoforms of the human H(3) receptor. Combinatorial splicing at three different sites creates at least six distinct...... receptor isoforms, of which isoforms 1, 2, and 4, encode functional proteins. Detailed pharmacology on isoforms 1 (unspliced receptor), and 2 (which has an 80 amino acid deletion within the third intracellular loop of the protein) revealed that both isoforms displayed robust responses to a series of known...... revealed a rank order of potency at both isoforms of clobenpropit>iodophenpropit>thioperamide, and these drugs are fivefold less potent at isoform 2 than isoform 1. To further explore the pharmacology of H(3) receptor function, we screened 150 clinically relevant neuropsychiatric drugs for H(3) receptor...

  19. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer- dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking...... for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying - and -type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2......) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis...

  20. Proteogenomic Analysis Identifies a Novel Human SHANK3 Isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Benthani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the SHANK3 gene have been associated with autism spectrum disorder. Individuals harboring different SHANK3 mutations display considerable heterogeneity in their cognitive impairment, likely due to the high SHANK3 transcriptional diversity. In this study, we report a novel interaction between the Mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC protein and a newly identified SHANK3 protein isoform in human colon cancer cells and mouse brain tissue. Hence, our proteogenomic analysis identifies a new human long isoform of the key synaptic protein SHANK3 that was not predicted by the human reference genome. Taken together, our findings describe a potential new role for MCC in neurons, a new human SHANK3 long isoform and, importantly, highlight the use of proteomic data towards the re-annotation of GC-rich genomic regions.

  1. Autocrine VEGF isoforms differentially regulate endothelial cell behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Yamamoto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF is involved in all the essential biology of endothelial cells, from proliferation to vessel function, by mediating intercellular interactions and monolayer integrity. It is expressed as three major alternative spliced variants. In mice, these are VEGF120, VEGF164, and VEGF188, each with different affinities for extracellular matrices and cell surfaces, depending on the inclusion of heparin-binding sites, encoded by exons 6 and 7. To determine the role of each VEGF isoform in endothelial homeostasis, we compared phenotypes of primary endothelial cells isolated from lungs of mice expressing single VEGF isoforms in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The differential expression and distribution of VEGF isoforms affect endothelial cell functions, such as proliferation, adhesion, migration and integrity, which are dependent on the stability of and affinity to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2. We found a correlation between autocrine VEGF164 and VEGFR2 stability, which is also associated with increased expression of proteins involved in cell adhesion. Endothelial cells expressing only VEGF188, which localizes to extracellular matrices or cell surfaces, presented a mesenchymal morphology and weakened monolayer integrity. Cells expressing only VEGF120 lacked stable VEGFR2 and dysfunctional downstream processes, rendering the cells unviable. Endothelial cells expressing these different isoforms in isolation also had differing rates of apoptosis, proliferation, and signaling via nitric oxide (NO synthesis. These data indicate that autocrine signaling of each VEGF isoform has unique functions on endothelial homeostasis and response to hypoxia, due to both distinct VEGF distribution and VEGFR2 stability, which appears to be, at least partly, affected by differential NO production. This study demonstrates that each autocrine VEGF isoform has a distinct effect on downstream functions, namely VEGFR2-regulated endothelial cell

  2. Cytochrome P450 isoform selectivity in human hepatic theobromine metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Simon; Miners, John O

    1999-01-01

    Aims The plasma clearance of theobromine (TB; 3,7-dimethylxanthine) is known to be induced in cigarette smokers. To determine whether TB may serve as a model substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, or possibly other isoforms, studies were undertaken to identify the individual human liver microsomal CYP isoforms responsible for the conversion of TB to its primary metabolites. Methods The kinetics of formation of the primary TB metabolites 3-methylxanthine (3-MX), 7-methylxanthine (7-MX) and 3,7-dimethyluric acid (3,7-DMU) by human liver microsomes were characterized using a specific hplc procedure. Effects of CYP isoform-selective xenobiotic inhibitor/substrate probes on each pathway were determined and confirmatory studies with recombinant enzymes were performed to define the contribution of individual isoforms to 3-MX, 7-MX and 3,7-DMU formation. Results The CYP1A2 inhibitor furafylline variably inhibited (0–65%) 7-MX formation, but had no effect on other pathways. Diethyldithiocarbamate and 4-nitrophenol, probes for CYP2E1, inhibited the formation of 3-MX, 7-MX and 3,7-DMU by ≈55–60%, 35–55% and 85%, respectively. Consistent with the microsomal studies, recombinant CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 exhibited similar apparent Km values for 7-MX formation and CYP2E1 was further shown to have the capacity to convert TB to both 3-MX and 3,7-DMU. Conclusions Given the contribution of multiple isoforms to 3-MX and 7-MX formation and the negligible formation of 3,7-DMU in vivo, TB is of little value as a CYP isoform-selective substrate in humans. PMID:10215755

  3. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Jay F; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Hoffmann, Federico G; Wang, Tobias; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes; Weber, Roy E

    2015-11-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer-dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying α- and β-type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis platura (Elapidae). We analyzed allosteric properties of snake Hbs in terms of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model and Adair four-step thermodynamic model. Hbs from each of the three species exhibited high intrinsic O2 affinities, low cooperativities, small Bohr factors in the absence of phosphates, and high sensitivities to ATP. Oxygenation properties of the snake Hbs could be explained entirely by allosteric transitions in the quaternary structure of intact tetramers, suggesting that ligation-dependent dissociation of Hb tetramers into αβ-dimers is not a universal feature of snake Hbs. Surprisingly, the major Hb isoform of the South American rattlesnake is homologous to the minor HbD of other amniotes and, contrary to the pattern of Hb isoform differentiation in birds and turtles, exhibits a lower O2 affinity than the HbA isoform. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jin, E-mail: petersdu2112@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Cell Proliferation and Regulation of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Xu, Zhe [Department of Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Core Laboratory for Clinical Medical Research, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); He, Dacheng [Key Laboratory for Cell Proliferation and Regulation of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Lu, Guanting, E-mail: guantlv@126.com [Beijing DnaLead Science and Technology Co., LTD, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Seven NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing were categorized into 3 groups: long, middle and short. • Both exons 15 and 16 in long NuMA were “hotspot” for alternative splicing. • Lower expression of short NuMA was observed in cancer cells compared with nonneoplastic controls. • Distinct localization pattern of short isoforms indicated different function from that of long and middle NuMA. - Abstract: The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30 years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two “hotspot” exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA’s various functions.

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel retinal isoform of dystrophin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Souza, V.N.; Sigesmund, D.A.; Man, N. [Hospital for Sick Children and Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have shown that dystrophin is required for normal function of the retina as measured by electroretinography (ERG). In these studies a genotype/phenotype correlation was found in which DMD/BMD patients with deletions in the central to distal region of the gene had abnormal ERGs, while patients with deletions in the 5{prime} end of the gene had a mild or normal retinal phenotype. A similar correlation was also observed in the mouse in which the mdx mouse having a mutation in exon 23 had a normal retinal phenotype, whereas the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse (mutation in intron 65) had an abnormal phenotype. Molecular analysis of both human and mouse retina indicated that at least two isoforms of dystrophin are expressed in the retina and localize to the outer plexiform layer, the synaptic junction between the photoreceptors, the bipolar cells, and the horizontal cells. Using a panel of monoclonal dystrophin antisera to analyze mdx mouse retina which does not contain full length dystrophin antisera, we showed that a shorter dystrophin isoform (approximately 260 kDa) was present and contained part of the rod, the cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains. The 5{prime} end of the transcript giving rise to this isoform was characterized and cloned using 5{prime}RACE. Sequence analysis indicated that this transcript contained a novel exon 1 consisting of 240 nucleotides and coded for a unique N-terminus of 13 amino acids. This isoform is distinct from the DP116 dystrophin isoform identified in peripheral nerve. From the functional analysis of DMD patients and dystrophic mice we conclude that this 260 kDa dystrophin isoform is required for normal retinal electrophysiology.

  6. WT1 Alternative Splicing: Role of Its Isoforms in Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasà, Daniela Maria; D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Maugeri, Grazia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; D'Agata, Velia

    2017-06-01

    Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), a tumor suppressor gene, was originally identified in the homonymous renal neoplasm but is also involved in other cancers. Its function is still unclear, since it acts both as a pro- and an anti-oncogene. At least 14 WT1 transcriptional variants have been described; yet most investigations have focused on a small number of isoforms. We describe their structural features and review the evidence of their involvement in cancer with emphasis on neuroblastoma. In future, full characterization of all WT1 isoforms is expected to identify new molecular tumor markers and/or therapeutic targets.

  7. Structure-Function Relationships Underlying the Capacity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin to Disarm Host Phagocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jakub; Černý, Ondřej; Osičková, Adriana; Linhartová, Irena; Mašín, Jiří; Bumba, Ladislav; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2017), s. 1-28, č. článku 300. E-ISSN 2072-6651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05919S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * Bordetella * cAMP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.030, year: 2016

  8. Alteration in adenylate cyclase response to aminergic stimulation following neonatal x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronister, R.B.; Palmer, G.C.; Gerbrandt, L.

    1980-01-01

    X-irradiation of the rat neonatal hippocampus produces severe alterations in the architectonic features of the mature hippocampus. The most prominent alteration is a marked depletion of the granule cells of the dentate gyrus, with a subsequent realignment of CA 4 cells. The present data also show that norepinephrine (NE), dopamine and histamine stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity is severely attenuated in the hippocampi of irradiated animals. This failure suggests that the NE fibers of irradiated subjects, although normal in content of NE, are not functional in some of their NE-effector actions

  9. Segments Crucial for Membrane Translocation and Pore-forming Activity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basler, Marek; Knapp, O.; Mašín, Jiří; Fišer, R.; Maier, E.; Benz, R.; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 17 (2007), s. 12419-12429 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA AV ČR IAA5020406 Grant - others:XE(XE) European Union 6th FP contract LSHB-CT-2003-503582 THERAVAC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : bordetella * adenylate cyclase toxin * ac membrane translocation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.581, year: 2007

  10. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IFMs) undergo post-transcriptional and post-translational isoform changes during pupal to adult metamorphosis to meet the high energy and mechanical demands of flight. Using a newly generated Gal4 strain (UH3-Gal4) which is expressed ...

  11. Analysis of protein isoforms: Can we do it better?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, 19-20 (2012), s. 2937-2948 ISSN 1615-9853 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : protein isoforms * intact protein analysis * novel proteomic approaches * identification * quantification Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.132, year: 2012

  12. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin; Xu, Zhe; He, Dacheng; Lu, Guanting

    2014-11-21

    The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two "hotspot" exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA's various functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Localization and functional characterization of the human NKCC2 isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carota, I; Theilig, F; Oppermann, M

    2010-01-01

    inhibited by bumetanide than by furosemide. A sequence analysis of the amino acids encoded by exon 4 variants revealed high similarities between human and rodent NKCC2 isoforms, suggesting that differences in ion transport characteristics between species may be related to sequence variations outside...

  14. Distinct Functions of Endophilin Isoforms in Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endophilin isoforms perform distinct characteristics in their interactions with N-type Ca2+ channels and dynamin. However, precise functional differences for the endophilin isoforms on synaptic vesicle (SV endocytosis remain unknown. By coupling RNA interference and electrophysiological recording techniques in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we investigated the functional differences of three isoforms of endophilin in SV endocytosis. The results showed that the amplitude of normalized evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in endophilin1 knockdown neurons decreased significantly for both single train and multiple train stimulations. Similar results were found using endophilin2 knockdown neurons, whereas endophilin3 siRNA exhibited no change compared with control neurons. Endophilin1 and endophilin2 affected SV endocytosis, but the effect of endophilin1 and endophilin2 double knockdown was not different from that of either knockdown alone. This result suggested that endophilin1 and endophilin2 functioned together but not independently during SV endocytosis. Taken together, our results indicate that SV endocytosis is sustained by endophilin1 and endophilin2 isoforms, but not by endophilin3, in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

  15. Isoforms of transferrin in psoriasis patients abusing alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Hoefkens (Peter); E.M. Higgins; R.J. Ward (Roberta); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe different isoforms of transferrin have been quantified by isoelectric focusing in the sera of psoriasis patients with and without a history of abusing alcohol. In both male and female psoriasis subjects abusing alcohol, there were significant increases in the

  16. FSH isoform composition of commercial gonadotrophin preparations: a neglected aspect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Westergaard, Lars Grabow; van Wely, Madelon

    2004-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of commercial gonadotrophin preparations has been the subject of an intense debate during recent years. Arguments have primarily focused on the origin of FSH activity (urine versus recombinant derived) and whether the preparation included LH-like activity. FSH isoform

  17. p63 isoforms regulate metabolism of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aguanno, Simona; Barcaroli, Daniela; Rossi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Mirco; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Cortese, Claudio; De Cola, Antonella; Volpe, Silvia; D'Agostino, Daniela; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Di Ilio, Carmine; Urbani, Andrea; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo

    2014-04-04

    p63 is an important regulator of epithelial development expressed in different variants containing (TA) or lacking (ΔN) the N-terminal transactivation domain. The different isoforms regulate stem-cell renewal and differentiation as well as cell senescence. Several studies indicate that p63 isoforms also play a role in cancer development; however, very little is known about the role played by p63 in regulating the cancer stem phenotype. Here we investigate the cellular signals regulated by TAp63 and ΔNp63 in a model of epithelial cancer stem cells. To this end, we used colon cancer stem cells, overexpressing either TAp63 or ΔNp63 isoforms, to carry out a proteomic study by chemical-labeling approach coupled to network analysis. Our results indicate that p63 is implicated in a wide range of biological processes, including metabolism. This was further investigated by a targeted strategy at both protein and metabolite levels. The overall data show that TAp63 overexpressing cells are more glycolytic-active than ΔNp63 cells, indicating that the two isoforms may regulate the key steps of glycolysis in an opposite manner. The mass-spectrometry proteomics data of the study have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium ( http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org ) via the PRIDE partner repository with data set identifiers PXD000769 and PXD000768.

  18. Molecular characters and expression analysis of a new isoform of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... 2Department of Biotechnology, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China. Accepted 3 September, 2008. Using reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the cDNA encoding a new isoform of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (BMEF2) was cloned from the brain of the strain ...

  19. Cloning, expression and alternative splicing of the novel isoform of hTCP11 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yong-xin; Zhang, Si-zhong; Wu, Qia-qing

    2003-01-01

    To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing.......To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing....

  20. Comparison of the in vivo and in vitro activities of adenylate cyclase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra(NCTC 7417)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padh, Harish; Venkitsubramanian, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    The incorporation of [ 14 C] adenine into the adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) fraction by whole cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was taken as a measure of the in vivo activity of adenylate cyclase. The in vivo activity of adenylate cyclase was significantly inhibited by glucose, thus suggesting that the low level of cyclic AMP in the presence of glucose is due to the inhibited synthesis of cyclic AMP. In vitro activity of adenylate cyclase had optimum pH of 8.5 and Km of 1.33 mM for ATP. Glucose and other sugars did not show significant inhibition of in vitro activity. The results suggest that the adenylate cyclase activity becomes less sensitive to glucose when the bacterial cells are disrupted, an analogy with eukaryotic adenylate cyclase which loses sensitivity to hormones when the cells are disrupted. (auth.)

  1. Kinetic and structural characterization of bacterial glutaminyl cyclases from Zymomonas mobilis and Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, David Ruiz; Parthier, Christoph; Jänckel, Nadine; Grandke, Julia; Stelter, Marco; Schilling, Stephan; Boehme, Mathias; Neumann, Piotr; Wolf, Raik; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Stubbs, Milton T; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    Although enzymes responsible for the cyclization of amino-terminal glutamine residues are present in both plant and mammal species, none have yet been characterized in bacteria. Based on low sequence homologies to plant glutaminyl cyclases (QCs), we cloned the coding sequences of putative microbial QCs from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmQC) and Myxococcus xanthus (MxQC). The two recombinant enzymes exhibited distinct QC activity, with specificity constants k(cat)/K(m) of 1.47±0.33 mm⁻¹ s⁻¹ (ZmQC) and 142±32.7 mm⁻¹ s⁻¹ (MxQC) towards the fluorescent substrate glutamine-7-amino-4-methyl-coumarine. The measured pH-rate profile of the second order rate constant displayed an interesting deviation towards the acidic limb of the pH chart in the case of ZmQC, whereas MxQC showed maximum activity in the mild alkaline pH range. Analysis of the enzyme variants ZmQCGlu⁴⁶Gln and MxQCGln⁴⁶Glu show that the exchanged residues play a significant role in the pH behaviour of the respective enzymes. In addition, we determined the three dimensional crystal structures of both enzymes. The tertiary structure is defined by a five-bladed β-propeller anchored by a core cation. The structures corroborate the putative location of the active site and confirm the proposed relation between bacterial and plant glutaminyl cyclases.

  2. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  3. Effects of sevoflurane on adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases activity in brain of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Changdong; Yang Jianping; Dai Tijun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of sevoflurane on c adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE) activity in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of rats, and to examine the role of cAMP in sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods: Fourty SD rats were delaminately designed and allocated randomly to 5 groups inhaling 1.5% sevoflurane i.e., no recovery (recovery group, n=8) and one hour after righting reflexrecovery (aware group, n=8). The brain tissues were rapidly dissected into cerebrocortex and hippocampus and brain stem.Then the adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases activity were assessed. Results: So far as the activity of AC is concerned, compared with the control group, the activity of AC in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem brain stem of induction group and anesthesia group, the cerebrocortex, and hippocampus in the recovery group were significantly increased; compared with those in the anesthesia group, the activity of AC in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of aware group were significantly decreased (P<0.05); For the activity of PDE, compared with the control group, the activity of PDE in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem in the induction group and anesthesia group was significantly decreased, compared with that in anesthesia group, the activity of PDE in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of recovery group and aware group was significantly increased (P<0.05). Conclusion: cAMP may play an important role in sevoflurane anesthesia. (authors)

  4. N Termini of apPDE4 Isoforms Are Responsible for Targeting the Isoforms to Different Cellular Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Park, Soo-Won; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Changhoon; Chae, Yeon-Su; Park, Hyungju; Kim, Min-Jeong; Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Nuribalhae; Kim, Hyoung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2010-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are known to play a key role in the compartmentalization of cAMP signaling; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying intracellular localization of different PDE isoforms are not understood. In this study, we have found that each of the supershort, short, and long forms of apPDE4 showed distinct localization in the…

  5. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A.; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A.

    2013-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness. -Highlights: • Each of the eight Arg isoforms was transfected in COS-7 cells. • Only the 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution in transfected cells. • The cytoplasmic isoforms and F-actin colocalize cortically and in cell protrusions. • Arg isoforms differently phosphorylate p190RhoGAP and CrkII. • Arg isoforms differently modulate stress fibers, cell protrusions and motility

  6. Differential regulation of macropinocytosis by Abi1/Hssh3bp1 isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja M Dubielecka

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Macropinocytosis, which is a constitutive cellular process of fluid and macromolecule uptake, is regulated by actin cytoskeleton rearrangements near the plasma membrane. Activation of Rac1, which is proposed to act upstream of the actin polymerization regulatory Wave 2 complex, has been found to correlate with enhanced macropinocytosis. One of the components of the Wave 2 complex is Abi1. Multiple, alternatively spliced isoforms of Abi1 are expressed in mammalian cells, but the functional significance of the various isoforms is unknown.Here, using flow cytometric assay analysis for Alexa Fluor 647, we demonstrate that Abi1 isoforms 2 and 3 differentially regulate macropinocytosis. LNCaP cells expressing isoform 3 had increased macropinocytic uptake that correlated with enhanced cell spreading and higher Rac1 activation in comparison to cells expressing isoform 2. Isoform 2 expressing cells had decreased macropinocytic uptake, but demonstrated greater sensitivity to Rac1 activation. Moreover, more isoform 2 was localized within the cytoplasm in comparison to isoform 3, which was more associated with the plasma membrane. Activated Rac1 was found to specifically bind to a site in exon 10 of isoform 2 in vitro. Because of alternative mRNA splicing, exon 10 is absent from isoform 3, precluding similar binding of activated Rac1. Both isoforms, however, bound to inactive Rac1 through the same non-exon 10 site. Thus, Abi1 isoform 3-containing Wave 2 complex exhibited a differential binding to activated vs. inactive Rac1, whereas isoform 2-containing Wave 2 complex bound activated or inactive Rac1 comparably.Based on these observations, we postulate that Abi1 isoforms differentially regulate macropinocytosis as a consequence of their different relative affinities for activated Rac1 in Wave 2 complex. These findings also raise the possibility that isoform-specific roles occur in other Abi1 functions.

  7. Effect of drugs on lipid methylation, receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling and cyclic AMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waarde, Aren; Van Haastert, P.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Intercellular communication in Dictyostelium discoldeum takes place by means of cyclic AMP-induced cyclic AMP-synthesis and secretion. Since phospholipid methylation has been suggested to play a role in receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling, we examined the effects of transmethylation inhibitors on

  8. Brain histamine H1- and H2-receptors and histamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase: effects of antipsychotics and antidepressants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupet, J.; Szuches-Myers, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Several classes of psychoactive compounds have been investigated for their effects on histamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cell-free preparations from the guinea-pig cerebral cortex. Their inhibitory actions on this enzyme system have been compared with their abilities to displace [ 3 H]pyrilamine and [ 3 H]cimetidine from histamine H 1 - and H 2 -receptor sites, respectively. The results of these studies show that compounds which inhibited the histamine-sensitive cyclase were also displacers of either [ 3 H]pyrilamine or [ 3 H]cimetidine or both 3 H-ligands from their binding sites. In spite of the lack of a correlation between binding and cyclase antagonism it was observed that compounds that displace both ligands showed greater inhibition of the cyclase than those that have affinities for sites labeled by one or the other ligand. It was concluded that antihistamines, the antipsychotics and the antidepressants share a common property through their antagonism of H 1 -receptors and that may be responsible for their sedative side effect. (Auth.)

  9. Mechanism of adenylate cyclase activation through the beta-adrenergic receptor: catecholamine-induced displacement of bound GDP by GTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, D; Selinger, Z

    1978-09-01

    The fate of the guanyl nucleotide bound to the regulatory site of adenylate cyclase was studied on a preparation of turkey erythrocyte membranes that was incubated with [3H]GTP plus isoproterenol and subsequently washed to remove hormone and free guanyl nucleotide. Further incubation of this preparation in the presence of beta-adrenergic agonists resulted in the release from the membrane of tritiated nucleotide, identified as [3H]GDP. The catecholamine-induced release of [3H]GDP was increased 2 to 3 times in the presence of the unlabeled guanyl nucleotides GTP, guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate [gpp(NH)p], GDP, and GMP, whereas adenine nucleotides had little effect. In the presence of Gpp(NH)p, isoproterenol induced the release of [3H]GDP and the activation of adenylate cyclase, both effects following similar time courses. The findings indicate that the inactive adenylate cyclase possesses tightly bound (GDP, produced by the hydrolysis of GTP at the regulatory site. The hormone stimulates adenylate cyclase activity by inducing an "opening" of the guanyl nucleotide site, resulting in dissociation of the bound GDP and binding of the activating guanosine triphosphate.

  10. Amidate Prodrugs of 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)Ethyl]Adenine as Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvořáková, Alexandra; Tloušťová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2014), s. 664-671 ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * adenylate cyclase toxin * ACT * inhibitors * PMEA * amidate prodrugs Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.476, year: 2014

  11. Isoform localization of Dectin-1 regulates the signaling quality of anti-fungal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mike; Müller, Jörg P; Spies-Weisshart, Bärbel; Gräfe, Christine; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin; Hochhaus, Andreas; Scholl, Sebastian; Schnetzke, Ulf

    2017-05-01

    Dectin-1 is recognized as a major receptor for fungal ß-glucans and contributes to anti-fungal immunity. Human monocyte populations express Dectin-1 isoforms A and B, which differ by the presence of a stalk region and its N-linked glycosylation site. Here, we analyzed the expression of both isoforms in human monocyte-derived cells. The cellular localization on cell lines stably expressing either Dectin-1 isoform A or B was studied by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Intracellular protein signaling and cytokine production were analyzed by immunoblotting and cytometric bead array, respectively. Monocyte-derived cells showed cell type-specific expression of the two isoforms. Glycosylated Dectin-1 isoform A was predominantly localized at the cell surface, non-glycosylated isoform B was retained intracellularly. Inhibition of glycosylation resulted in efficient abrogation of cell surface expression of isoform A. Signaling quality following Dectin-1 stimulation was reduced in isoform B cells. Differential isoform specific cytokine secretion was observed by cytometric bead array. We show here that n-glycosylation of Dectin-1 is crucial for its cell surface expression and consequently signal transduction. Taken together, unique cytokine secretion and varying expression levels of human Dectin-1 isoforms on monocyte-derived cells may indicate distinct isoform usage as a cell type-specific mechanism of regulating anti-fungal immunity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Kasper Damgaard; Peters, Günther H.J.; Harris, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis...... of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism...... in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been...

  13. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Aquino-Silva

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2 and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0. While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  14. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino-Silva M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2 and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0. While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  15. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidemand, Kasper D; Peters, Günther H; Harris, Pernille; Stensgaard, Eva; Christensen, Hans E M

    2017-11-21

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH 4 ) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been identified; i.e., only TPH1 displays substrate tryptophan inhibition. This study demonstrates that the difference can be traced to an active site loop which displays different properties in the TPH isoforms. Steady-state kinetic results of the isoforms, and variants with point mutations in a loop lining the active site, show that the kinetic parameters of only TPH1 are significantly changed upon mutations. Mutations in the active site loop of TPH1 result in an increase in the substrate inhibition constant, K i , and therefore turnover rate. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this substrate inhibition mechanism occurs through a closure of the cosubstrate, BH 4 , binding pocket, which is induced by Trp binding.

  16. Regulation of NADPH oxidase 5 by protein kinase C isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase5 (Nox5 is a novel Nox isoform which has recently been recognized as having important roles in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, fetal ventricular septal defect and cancer. The activity of Nox5 and production of reactive oxygen species is regulated by intracellular calcium levels and phosphorylation. However, the kinases that phosphorylate Nox5 remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that the phosphorylation of Nox5 is PKC dependent, but this contention was based on the use of pharmacological inhibitors and the isoforms of PKC involved remain unknown. Thus, the major goals of this study were to determine whether PKC can directly regulate Nox5 phosphorylation and activity, to identify which isoforms are involved in the process, and to understand the functional significance of this pathway in disease. We found that a relatively specific PKCα inhibitor, Ro-32-0432, dose-dependently inhibited PMA-induced superoxide production from Nox5. PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity was significantly reduced in cells with genetic silencing of PKCα and PKCε, enhanced by loss of PKCδ and the silencing of PKCθ expression was without effect. A constitutively active form of PKCα robustly increased basal and PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity and promoted the phosphorylation of Nox5 on Ser490, Thr494, and Ser498. In contrast, constitutively active PKCε potently inhibited both basal and PMA-dependent Nox5 activity. Co-IP and in vitro kinase assay experiments demonstrated that PKCα directly binds to Nox5 and modifies Nox5 phosphorylation and activity. Exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose significantly increased PKCα activation, and enhanced Nox5 derived superoxide in a manner that was in prevented by a PKCα inhibitor, Go 6976. In summary, our study reveals that PKCα is the primary isoform mediating the activation of Nox5 and this maybe of significance in our understanding of the vascular

  17. The plethora of PMCA isoforms: Alternative splicing and differential expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    In this review the four different genes of the mammalian plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and their spliced isoforms are discussed with respect to their tissue distribution, their differences during development and their importance for regulating Ca²⁺ homeostasis under different conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural differences between C-terminal regions of tropomyosin isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Śliwińska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropomyosins are actin-binding regulatory proteins which overlap end-to-end along the filament. High resolution structures of the overlap regions were determined for muscle and non-muscle tropomyosins in the absence of actin. Conformations of the junction regions bound to actin are unknown. In this work, orientation of the overlap on actin alone and on actin–myosin complex was evaluated by measuring FRET distances between a donor (AEDANS attached to tropomyosin and an acceptor (DABMI bound to actin’s Cys374. Donor was attached to the Cys residue introduced by site-directed mutagenesis near the C-terminal half of the overlap. The recombinant alpha-tropomyosin isoforms used in this study – skeletal muscle skTM, non-muscle TM2 and TM5a, and chimeric TM1b9a had various amino acid sequences of the N- and C-termini involved in the end-to-end overlap. The donor-acceptor distances calculated for each isoform varied between 36.4 Å and 48.1 Å. Rigor binding of myosin S1 increased the apparent FRET distances of skTM and TM2, but decreased the distances separating TM5a and TM1b9a from actin. The results show that isoform-specific sequences of the end-to-end overlaps determine orientations and dynamics of tropomyosin isoforms on actin. This can be important for specificity of tropomyosin in the regulation of actin filament diverse functions.

  19. Apolipoprotein (A) Isoform Distribution and Plasma Lipoprotein (a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma lipoprotein (a) Concentrations and apo(a) isoforms were determined in 101 healthy Nigerian subjects (M=63), F=38; age range 17-68 years), and coronary heart disease (CHD) patients (M=19, F=17, age range 30-79 years). Median Lp(a) level was 24.4 mg/di in the CHD patients and 22.1 mg/di in the controls.

  20. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E; Zarnke, Allison L; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B; Nickisch, Klaus J; Long, Henry W; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2018-01-12

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  1. Nitric oxide synthase isoforms in spontaneous and salt hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hojná, Silvie; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, Suppl. 2 (2007), S 338-S 338 ISSN 0263-6352. [European Meeting on Hypertension /17./. 15.06.2007-19.06.2007, Milan] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : nitric oxide synthase isoforms * spontaneous and salt hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  2. Gene isoform specificity through enhancer-associated antisense transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney S Onodera

    Full Text Available Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs, we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates.

  3. Gene Isoform Specificity through Enhancer-Associated Antisense Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Courtney S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Katzman, Sol; Jacobs, Frank; Greenberg, David; Salama, Sofie R.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs), we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates. PMID:22937057

  4. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E.; Zarnke, Allison L.; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G.; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B.; Nickisch, Klaus J.; Long, Henry W.; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2018-01-01

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  5. Association of gamma-tubulin isoforms with tubulin dimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2003), s. 197-198 ISSN 1065-6995. [The Plant Cytoskeleton: functional diversity and biotechnological implication. Kyjev, 23.09.2002-27.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5052004; GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : association * gamma-tubulin * isoforms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.092, year: 2003

  6. Conformational Flexibility Differentiates Naturally Occurring Bet v 1 Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarina Grutsch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The protein Bet v 1 represents the main cause for allergic reactions to birch pollen in Europe and North America. Structurally homologous isoforms of Bet v 1 can have different properties regarding allergic sensitization and Th2 polarization, most likely due to differential susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. Using NMR relaxation experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that the initial proteolytic cleavage sites in two naturally occurring Bet v 1 isoforms, Bet v 1.0101 (Bet v 1a and Bet v 1.0102 (Bet v 1d, are conformationally flexible. Inaccessible cleavage sites in helices and strands are highly flexible on the microsecond-millisecond time scale, whereas those located in loops display faster nanosecond-microsecond flexibility. The data consistently show that Bet v 1.0102 is more flexible and conformationally heterogeneous than Bet v 1.0101. Moreover, NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements reveal that the backbone amides in Bet v 1.0102 are significantly more solvent exposed, in agreement with this isoform’s higher susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. The differential conformational flexibility of Bet v 1 isoforms, along with the transient exposure of inaccessible sites to the protein surface, may be linked to proteolytic susceptibility, representing a potential structure-based rationale for the observed differences in Th2 polarization and allergic sensitization.

  7. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph D Hector

    Full Text Available Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5 cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3'-untranslated region (UTR, which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders.

  8. [Characterization of a malic enzyme isoform V from Mucor circinelloides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingtong; Chen, Haiqin; Song, Yuanda; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-04

    We aimed at characterizing a malic enzyme isoform V from Mucor circinelloides. me1 gene encoding malic enzyme isoform V was amplified and cloned into expression vector pET28a. High-purity recombinant protein BLME1 was obtained by affinity chromatography using. Ni-NTA column and characterized subsequently. The optimum conditions were pH at 8.0 and temperature at 33 degrees C. Under optimum conditions, BLME1 activity achieved 92.8 U/mg. The K(m) for L-malate and NADP+ were 0.74960 ± 0.06120 mmol/L and 0.22070 ± 0.01810 mmol/L, the V(max) for L-malate and NADP+ were 72.820 ± 1.077 U/mg and 86.110 ± 1.665 U/mg, respectively. In addition, ions played important roles in BLME1 activity; several ions such as Mn2+, Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+ could activate BLME1, whereas Ca2+, Cu2+ could be used as inhibitors. Additionally, the metabolic intermediates such as oxaloacetic acid and α-ketoglutaric acid inhibited the activity of BLME1, whereas succinic acid activated it. A malic enzyme isoform V from Mucor circinelloides was characterized, providing the references for further studies on this enzyme.

  9. Moonlighting kinases with guanylate cyclase activity can tune regulatory signal networks

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2012-02-01

    Guanylate cyclase (GC) catalyzes the formation of cGMP and it is only recently that such enzymes have been characterized in plants. One family of plant GCs contains the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain of leucine rich repeat receptor like kinases such as the phytosulfokine and brassinosteroid receptors. In vitro studies show that both the kinase and GC domain have catalytic activity indicating that these kinase-GCs are examples of moonlighting proteins with dual catalytic function. The natural ligands for both receptors increase intracellular cGMP levels in isolated mesophyll protoplast assays suggesting that the GC activity is functionally relevant. cGMP production may have an autoregulatory role on receptor kinase activity and/or contribute to downstream cell expansion responses. We postulate that the receptors are members of a novel class of receptor kinases that contain functional moonlighting GC domains essential for complex signaling roles.

  10. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  11. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of β-adrenergic receptors: in fact, [ 125 I]pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level

  12. Multiple diguanylate cyclase-coordinated regulation of pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yicai; Yuan, Mingjun; Mohanty, Anee

    2015-01-01

    intrinsic feature of c-di-GMP signalling is the abundance of DGCs and PDEs encoded by many bacterial species. It is unclear whether the different DGCs or PDEs coordinately establish the c-di-GMP regulation or function independently of each other. Here, we provide evidence that multiple DGCs are involved......The nucleotide signalling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays an essential role in regulating microbial virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and degraded by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes. One...... in regulation of c-di-GMP on synthesis of the major iron siderophore pyoverdine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Constitutive expression of the WspG or YedQ DGC in P.aeruginosa is able to induce its pyoverdine synthesis. Induction of pyoverdine synthesis by high intracellular c-di-GMP depends on the synthesis...

  13. Distribution and protective function of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP in the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya eNakamachi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, which is found in 27- or 38-amino acid forms, belongs to the VIP/glucagon/secretin family. PACAP and its three receptor subtypes are expressed in neural tissues, with PACAP known to exert a protective effect against several types of neural damage. The retina is considered to be part of the central nervous system, and retinopathy is a common cause of profound and intractable loss of vision. This review will examine the expression and morphological distribution of PACAP and its receptors in the retina, and will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the protective effect of PACAP against different kinds of retinal damage, such as that identified in association with diabetes, ultraviolet light, hypoxia, optic nerve transection, and toxins. This article will also address PACAP-mediated protective pathways involving retinal glial cells.

  14. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide promotes eccrine gland sweat secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, S; Watanabe, J; Ohtaki, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sweat secretion is the major function of eccrine sweat glands; when this process is disturbed (paridrosis), serious skin problems can arise. To elucidate the causes of paridrosis, an improved understanding of the regulation, mechanisms and factors underlying sweat production is required...... and several exocrine glands, the effects of PACAP on the process of eccrine sweat secretion have not been examined. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of PACAP on eccrine sweat secretion. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were used to determine the expression....... Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) exhibits pleiotropic functions that are mediated via its receptors [PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1R), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor type 1 (VPAC1R) and VPAC2R]. Although some studies have suggested a role for PACAP in the skin...

  15. Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Complexes Shape the Photoresponses of Retinal Rods and Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong eWen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate rods and cones, photon capture by rhodopsin leads to the destruction of cyclic GMP (cGMP and the subsequent closure of cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG ion channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Replenishment of cGMP and reopening of the channels limit the growth of the photon response and are requisite for its recovery. In different vertebrate retinas, there may be as many as four types of membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs for cGMP synthesis. Ten neuronal Ca2+ sensor proteins could potentially modulate their activities. The mouse is proving to be an effective model for characterizing the roles of individual components because its relative simplicity can be reduced further by genetic engineering. There are two types of guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs and two types of GCs in mouse rods, whereas cones express one type of GCAP and one type of GC. Mutant mouse rods and cones bereft of both GCAPs have large, long lasting photon responses. Thus, GCAPs normally mediate negative feedback tied to the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+ that accelerates GC activity to curtail the growth and duration of the photon response. Rods from other mutant mice that express a single GCAP type reveal how the two GCAPs normally work together as a team. Because of its lower Ca2+ affinity, GCAP1 is the first responder that senses the initial decrease in Ca2+ following photon absorption and acts to limit response amplitude. GCAP2, with a higher Ca2+ affinity, is recruited later during the course of the photon response as Ca2+ levels continue to decline further. The main role of GCAP2 is to provide for a timely response recovery and it is particularly important after exposure to very bright light. The multiplicity of GC isozymes and GCAP homologs in the retinas of other vertebrates confers greater flexibility in shaping the photon responses in order to tune visual sensitivity, dynamic range and frequency response.

  16. Synergism between soluble guanylate cyclase signaling and neuropeptides extends lifespan in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abergel, Rachel; Livshits, Leonid; Shaked, Maayan; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Gross, Einav

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen (O 2 ) homeostasis is important for all aerobic animals. However, the manner by which O 2 sensing and homeostasis contribute to lifespan regulation is poorly understood. Here, we use the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to address this question. We demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in the neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1 and a deletion mutation in the atypical soluble guanylate cyclase gcy-35 O 2 sensor interact synergistically to extend worm lifespan. The function of npr-1 and gcy-35 in the O 2 -sensing neurons AQR, PQR, and URX shortens the lifespan of the worm. By contrast, the activity of the atypical soluble guanylate cyclase O 2 sensor gcy-33 in these neurons is crucial for lifespan extension. In addition to AQR, PQR, and URX, we show that the O 2 -sensing neuron BAG and the interneuron RIA are also important for the lifespan lengthening. Neuropeptide processing by the proprotein convertase EGL-3 is essential for lifespan extension, suggesting that the synergistic effect of joint loss of function of gcy-35 and npr-1 is mediated through neuropeptide signal transduction. The extended lifespan is regulated by hypoxia and insulin signaling pathways, mediated by the transcription factors HIF-1 and DAF-16. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play an important function in lifespan lengthening. As HIF-1 and DAF-16 activities are modulated by ROS, we speculate that joint loss of function of gcy-35 and npr-1 extends lifespan through ROS signaling. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Radiation inactivation of multimeric enzymes: application to subunit interactions of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkman, A.S.; Skorecki, K.L.; Ausiello, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation inactivation has been applied extensively to determine the molecular weight of soluble enzyme and receptor systems from the slope of a linear ln (activity) vs. dose curve. Complex nonlinear inactivation curves are predicted for multimeric enzyme systems, composed of distinct subunits in equilibrium with multimeric complexes. For the system A1 + A2----A1A2, with an active A1A2 complex (associative model), the ln (activity) vs. dose curve is linear for high dissociation constant, K. If a monomer, A1, has all the enzyme activity (dissociative model), the ln (activity) vs. dose curve has an activation hump at low radiation dose if the inactive subunit, A2, has a higher molecular weight than A1 and has upward concavity when A2 is smaller than A1. In general, a radiation inactivation model for a multistep mechanism for enzyme activation fulfills the characteristics of an associative or dissociative model if the reaction step forming active enzyme is an associative or dissociative reaction. Target theory gives the molecular weight of the active enzyme subunit or complex from the limiting slope of the ln (activity) vs. dose curve at high radiation dose. If energy transfer occurs among subunits in the multimer, the ln (activity) vs. dose curve is linear for a single active component and is concave upward for two or more active components. The use of radiation inactivation as a method to determine enzyme size and multimeric subunit assembly is discussed with specific application to the hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase system. It is shown that the complex inactivation curves presented in the accompanying paper can be used select the best mechanism out of a series of seven proposed mechanisms for the activation of adenylate cyclase by hormone

  18. Serotonin-Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase in Neural Tissue and Its Similarity to the Serotonin Receptor: A Possible Site of Action of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, James A.; Greengard, Paul

    1974-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) that is activated specifically by low concentrations of serotonin has been identified in homogenates of the thoracic ganglia of an insect nervous system. The activation of this enzyme by serotonin was selectively inhibited by extremely low concentrations of D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 2-bromo-LSD, and cyproheptadine, agents which are known to block certain serotonin receptors in vivo. The inhibition was competitive with respect to serotonin, and the calculated inhibitory constant of LSD for this serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase was 5 nM. The data are consistent with a model in which the serotonin receptor of neural tissue is intimately associated with a serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase which mediates serotonergic neurotransmission. The results are also compatible with the possibility that some of the physiological effects of LSD may be mediated through interaction with serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. PMID:4595572

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Both these toxins are similar to each other in amino acid sequence but share no similarity with the adenylyl cyclase in E. coli, or enzymes present in the other classes of adenylyl cyclases (Danchin 1993). Whether these toxins can complement each other is not known. The Exo Y toxin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa shares ...

  20. PSA Isoforms' Velocities for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bektic, Jasmin

    2015-06-01

    Free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) and its molecular isoforms are suggested for enhancement of PSA testing in prostate cancer (PCa). In the present study we evaluated whether PSA isoforms' velocities might serve as a tool to improve early PCa diagnosis. Our study population included 381 men who had undergone at least one ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy whose pathologic examination yielded PCa or showed no evidence of prostatic malignancy. Serial PSA, fPSA, and proPSA measurements were performed on serum samples covering 7 years prior to biopsy using Beckmann Coulter Access immunoassays. Afterwards, velocities of PSA (PSAV), fPSA% (fPSA%V), proPSA% (proPSA%V) and the ratio proPSA/PSA/V were calculated and their ability to discriminate cancer from benign disease was evaluated. Among 381 men included in the study, 202 (53%) were diagnosed with PCa and underwent radical prostatectomy at our Department. PSAV, fPSA%V, proPSA%V as well as proPSA/PSA/V were able to differentiate significantly between PCa and non-cancerous prostate. The highest discriminatory power between cancer and benign disease has been observed two and one year prior to diagnosis with all measured parameters. Among all measured parameters, fPSA%V showed the best cancer specificity of 45.3% with 90% of sensitivity. In summary, our results highlight the value of PSA isoforms' velocity for early detection of PCa. Especially fPSA%V should be used in the clinical setting to increase cancer detection specificity. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of Tropomyosin 2 Gene Isoforms in Human Cardiac Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Syamalima Dube; Santhi Yalamanchili; Joseph Lachant; Lynn Abbott; Patricia Benz; Poiesz BJ; Dipak K Dube

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that although the transcript levels of TPM1α and TPM1k are expressed in human hearts in comparable levels, the level of TPM1α protein is ~90%. The proteins of TPM1κ and TPM2α are about 5% of the total sarcomeric TM. The TPM2 gene is known to generate three alternatively spliced isoforms, which are designated as TPM2α, TPM2β, and TPM2γ. The expression level of TPM2β and TPM2γ in human hearts is unknown. Using a series of primers pairs and probes for RNA PCR, we foun...

  2. The FU gene and its possible protein isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nöthen Markus M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FU is the human homologue of the Drosophila gene fused whose product fused is a positive regulator of the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci. Thus, FU may act as a regulator of the human counterparts of Ci, the GLI transcription factors. Since Ci and GLI are targets of Hedgehog signaling in development and morphogenesis, it is expected that FU plays an important role in Sonic, Desert and/or Indian Hedgehog induced cellular signaling. Results The FU gene was identified on chromosome 2q35 at 217.56 Mb and its exon-intron organization determined. The human developmental disorder Syndactyly type 1 (SD1 maps to this region on chromosome 2 and the FU coding region was sequenced using genomic DNA from an affected individual in a linked family. While no FU mutations were found, three single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. The expression pattern of FU was thoroughly investigated and all examined tissues express FU. It is also clear that different tissues express transcripts of different sizes and some tissues express more than one transcript. By means of nested PCR of specific regions in RT/PCR generated cDNA, it was possible to verify two alternative splicing events. This also suggests the existence of at least two additional protein isoforms besides the FU protein that has previously been described. This long FU and a much shorter isoform were compared for the ability to regulate GLI1 and GLI2. None of the FU isoforms showed any effects on GLI1 induced transcription but the long form can enhance GLI2 activity. Apparently FU did not have any effect on SUFU induced inhibition of GLI. Conclusions The FU gene and its genomic structure was identified. FU is a candidate gene for SD1, but we have not identified a pathogenic mutation in the FU coding region in a family with SD1. The sequence information and expression analyses show that transcripts of different sizes are expressed and subjected to alternative splicing

  3. Morphological, histochemical, and myosin isoform analysis of the diaphragm of adult horses, Equus caballus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, M A; Schutt, W A; Hermanson, J W

    1994-03-01

    The horse provides an interesting model for study of the structure and function of the mammalian diaphragm. Multiple regions of diaphragm from seven adult horses were prepared for histochemistry, immunocytochemistry, myosin heavy chain electrophoresis, and native myosin electrophoresis. Two additional adults were dissected to demonstrate myofiber and central tendon morphology and stained for acetylcholinesterase to demonstrate motor endplates. All regions of the adult diaphragm were histochemically characterized by a preponderance of type I fibers with some type IIa fibers. Type IIb fibers were absent in all adult specimens. Myosin heavy chain electrophoresis supported the histochemical study: two isoform bands were present on SDS gels that comigrated at the same rate as rat type I and IIa myosin heavy chain isoforms. No isoform was determined to comigrate with rat type IIb heavy chain isoforms. Native myosin isoform analysis revealed two isoforms that comigrated with rat FM-4 and FM-3 (FM = fast myosin) and two isoforms that comigrated with rat SM-1 and SM-2 (SM = slow myosin) isoforms. In some samples, a third slow native myosin isoform was observed that comigrated at the same rate as the SM-3 of the equine biceps brachii muscle. This doublet (or "triplet") of slow isoforms is unique to some horse muscles compared with other adult animals studied. It is not known if these multiple slow native myosin isoforms confer some functional advantage to the equine muscles. The adult equine diaphragm also differs in its morphology by having a large central tendon compared to that in other mammals, and is predominantly slow in fiber type and myosin isoform composition.

  4. The Arabidopsis thalianaK+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas

    2015-11-27

    Adenylate Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognized as an important signaling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP71-100 is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP71-100 generates cAMP in vitro.

  5. Prostaglandin D Synthase Isoforms from Cerebrospinal Fluid Vary with Brain Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Harrington

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione independent prostaglandin D synthase (Swissprot P41222, PTGDS has been identified in human cerebrospinal fluid and some changes in PTGDS in relation to disease have been reported. However, little is known of the extent that PTGDS isoforms fluctuate across a large range of congenital and acquired diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in PTGDS isoforms in such a population. Spinal fluid from 22 healthy study participants (normal controls with no classifiable neurological or psychiatric diagnosis was obtained and PTGDS isoforms were identified by specific immunostaining and mass spectrometry after denaturing 2D gel electrophoresis. The PTGDS isoforms in controls consisted of five charge isoforms that were always present and a small number of occasional, low abundance isoforms. A qualitative survey of 98 different people with a wide range of congenital and acquired diseases revealed striking changes. Loss of the control isoforms occurred in congenital malformations of the nervous system. Gain of additional isoforms occurred in some degenerative, most demyelinating and vasculitic diseases, as well as in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. A retrospective analysis of published data that quantified relative amounts of PTGDS in multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease compared to controls revealed significant dysregulation. It is concluded that qualitative and quantitative fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid PTGDS isoforms reflect both major and subtle brain pathophysiology.

  6. NHS-A isoform of the NHS gene is a novel interactor of ZO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiwani; Koh, Katrina S Y; Collin, Caitlin; Dave, Alpana; McMellon, Amy; Sugiyama, Yuki; McAvoy, John W; Voss, Anne K; Gécz, Jozef; Craig, Jamie E

    2009-08-15

    Mutations in the NHS (Nance-Horan Syndrome) gene lead to severe congenital cataracts, dental defects and sometimes mental retardation. NHS encodes two protein isoforms, NHS-A and -1A that display cell-type dependent differential expression and localization. Here we demonstrate that of these two isoforms, the NHS-A isoform associates with the cell membrane in the presence of intercellular contacts and it immunoprecipitates with the tight junction protein ZO-1 in MDCK (Madin Darby Canine Kidney) epithelial cells and in neonatal rat lens. The NHS-1A isoform however is a cytoplasmic protein. Both Nhs isoforms are expressed during mouse development. Immunolabelling of developing mouse with the anti-NHS antibody that detects both isoforms revealed the protein in the developing head including the eye and brain. It was primarily expressed in epithelium including neural epithelium and certain vascular endothelium but only weakly expressed in mesenchymal cells. In the epithelium and vascular endothelium the protein associated with the cell membrane and co-localized with ZO-1, which indirectly indicates expression of the Nhs-A isoform in these structures. Membrane localization of the protein in the lens vesicle similarly supports Nhs-A expression. In conclusion, the NHS-A isoform of NHS is a novel interactor of ZO-1 and may have a role at tight junctions. This isoform is important in mammalian development especially of the organs in the head.

  7. Novel protein isoforms of carcinoembryonic antigen are secreted from pancreatic, gastric and colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5) is an oncofetal cell surface glycoprotein. Because of its high expression in cancer cells and secretion into serum, CEA has been widely used as a serum tumor marker. Although other members of CEACAM family were investigated for splice variants/variants-derived protein isoforms, few studies about the variants of CEACAM5 have been reported. In this study, we demonstrated the existence of novel CEACAM5 splice variants and splice variant-derived protein isoforms in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines. Results We identified two novel CEACAM5 splice variants in gastrointestinal (pancreatic, gastric, and colorectal) cancer cell lines. One of the variants possessed an alternative minor splice site that allowed generation of GC-AG intron. Furthermore, CEA protein isoforms derived from the novel splice variants were expressed in cancer cell lines and those protein isoforms were secreted into the culture medium. Although CEA protein isoforms always co-existed with the full-length protein, the secretion patterns of these isoforms did not correlate with the expression patterns. Conclusions This is the first study to identify the expression of CEA isoforms derived from the novel splice variants processed on the unique splice site. In addition, we also revealed the secretion of those isoforms from gastrointestinal cancer cell lines. Our findings suggested that discrimination between the full-length and identified protein isoforms may improve the clinical utility of CEA as a tumor marker. PMID:24070190

  8. Multiple isoforms of β-TrCP display differential activities in the regulation of Wnt signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eunjeong; Kim, Hyunjoon; Kim, Rokki; Yun, Sangmoon; Kim, Minseong; Han, Jin-Kwan; Costantini, Frank; Jho, Eek-hoon

    2008-01-01

    The F-box proteins β-TrCP 1 and 2 (β-transducin repeat protein) have 2 and 3 isoforms, respectively, due to alternative splicing of exons encoding the N-terminal region. We identified an extra exon in between the previously known exons 1 and 2 of β-TrCP1 and β-TrCP2. Interestingly, sequence analysis suggested that many more isoforms are produced than previously identified, via the alternative splicing of all possible combination of exons II to V of β-TrCP1 and exons II to IV of β-TrCP2. Different mouse tissues show specific expression patterns of the isoforms, and the level of expression of the isoform that has been used in most published papers was very low. Yeast two-hybrid assays show that β-TrCP1 isoforms containing exon III, which are the most highly expressed isoforms in most tissues, do not interact with Skp1. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of transiently expressed β-TrCP1 isoforms suggests that the presence of exon III causes β-TrCP1 to localize in nuclei. Consistent with the above findings, isoforms including exon III showed a reduced ability to block ectopic embryonic axes induced via injection of Wnt8 or β-catenin in Xenopus embryos. Overall, our data suggest that isoforms of β-TrCPs generated by alternative splicing may have different biological roles. PMID:18929646

  9. Glycosylated Triterpenoid Saponin : a Specific Inhibitor of Diguanylate Cyclase from Acetobacter xylinum.Biological Activity and Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia, Ohana; Deborah P., Delmer; Gail, Volman; Moshe, Benziman; Department of Biological Chemistry, Institute of Life Scineces, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Section of Plant Biology, University of California Davis; Department of Biological Chemistry, Institute of Life Scineces, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Department of Biological Chemistry, Institute of Life Scineces, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    1998-01-01

    In a recent paper (Ohana et al.1998), we described the purification and structural charactrization of a novel glycosidic triterpenoid saponin (GTS), a specific inhibitor of diguanylate cyclase (dgc), the key regulatory enzyme of the cellulose synthesizing apparatus of the bacterium Acetobacter xylinum. This compound and an identical or very similar one were isolated from pea (Pisum sativum), and A.xylinum respectively. We now present the effects of GTS on the kinetic properties of dgc. The ob...

  10. Heterosubtypic protection against influenza A induced by adenylate cyclase toxoids delivering conserved HA2 subunit of hemagglutinin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staneková, Z.; Adkins, Irena; Kosová, Martina; Janulíková, J.; Šebo, Peter; Varečková, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 1 (2013), s. 24-35 ISSN 0166-3542 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA ČR GP310/09/P582 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxoid * Influenza A infection * Cross-protection Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.434, year: 2013

  11. The Receptor Guanylyl Cyclase Type D (GC-D) Ligand Uroguanylin Promotes the Acquisition of Food Preferences in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kelliher, Kevin R.; Zufall, Frank; Munger, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Rodents rely on olfactory stimuli to communicate information between conspecifics that is critical for health and survival. For example, rodents that detect a food odor simultaneously with the social odor carbon disulfide (CS2) will acquire a preference for that food. Disruption of the chemosensory transduction cascade in CS2-sensitive olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that express the receptor guanylyl cyclase type D (GC-D; GC-D+ OSNs) will prevent mice from acquiring these preferences. GC-D+...

  12. Pore formation by the Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin in lipid bilayer membranes: Role of voltage and pH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knapp, O.; Maier, E.; Mašín, Jiří; Šebo, Peter; Benz, R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1778, č. 1 (2008), s. 260-269 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5020406 Grant - others:XE(XE) QLK2-CT-1999-00556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * act * voltage Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.180, year: 2008

  13. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the circulation after sumatriptan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Petersen, Jesper Troensegaard

    2013-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain is still elusive, but increasingly researchers focus on the neuropeptides in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. The parasympathetic neurotransmitters, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating...... peptide-38 (PACAP38) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may be released from parasympathetic fibres and activate sensory nerve fibres during migraine attacks. Triptans are effective and well tolerated in acute migraine management but the exact mechanism of action is still debated. Triptans might...

  14. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT{sub 1C} receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing ({sup 3}H)serotonin, ({sup 3}H)lysergic acid diethylamide or ({sup 3}H)dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor.

  15. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB.20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT 1C receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing [ 3 H]serotonin, [ 3 H]lysergic acid diethylamide or [ 3 H]dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor

  16. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the [ 3 H]-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the [ 3 H]DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the β-adrenergic receptor in rat heart

  17. Cloning, expression, and characterization of epi-cedrol synthase, a sesquiterpene cyclase from Artemisia annua L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercke, P; Crock, J; Croteau, R; Brodelius, P E

    1999-09-15

    Sesquiterpene cyclases (synthases) catalyze the conversion of the isoprenoid intermediate farnesyl diphosphate to various sesquiterpene structural types. In plants, many sesquiterpenes are produced as defensive chemicals (phytoalexins) or mediators of chemical communication (i.e., pollinator attractants). A number of sesquiterpene synthases are present in Artemisia annua L. (annual wormwood). We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding one of these, epi-cedrol synthase. This clone contains a 1641-bp open reading frame coding for 547 amino acids (63.5 kDa), a 38-bp 5'-untranslated end, and a 272-bp 3'-untranslated sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence was 32 to 43% identical with the sequences of other known sesquiterpene cyclases from angiosperms. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant enzyme catalyzed the formation of both olefinic (3%) and oxygenated (97%) sesquiterpenes from farnesyl diphosphate. GC-MS analysis identified the olefins as alpha-cedrene (57% of the olefins), beta-cedrene (13%), (E)-beta-farnesene (5%), alpha-acoradiene (1%), (E)-alpha-bisabolene (8%), and three unknown olefins (16%) and the oxygenated sesquiterpenes (97% of total sesquiterpene generated, exclusive of farnesol and nerolidol) as cedrol (4%) and epi-cedrol (96%). epi-Cedrol synthase was not active with geranylgeranyl diphosphate as substrate, whereas geranyl diphosphate was converted to monoterpenes by the recombinant enzyme at a rate of about 15% of that observed with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate. The monoterpene olefin products are limonene (45%), terpinolene (42%), gamma-terpinene (8%), myrcene (5%), and alpha-terpinene (2%); a small amount of the monoterpene alcohol terpinen-4-ol is also produced. The pH optimum for the recombinant enzyme is 8.5-9.0 (with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate) and the K(m) values for farnesyl diphosphate are 0.4 and 1.3 microM at pH 7. 0 and 9.0, respectively. The K(m) for Mg(2+) is 80 microM at pH 7.0 and 9.0.

  18. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase catalytic Subdomain: Structure and Linkage with Calcium Sensors and Bicarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarangan Ravichandran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC is a ubiquitous multi-switching cyclic GMP generating signaling machine linked with countless physiological processes. In mammals it is encoded by seven distinct homologous genes. It is a single transmembrane spanning multi-modular protein; composed of integrated blocks and existing in homo-dimeric form. Its core catalytic domain (CCD module is a common transduction center where all incoming signals are translated into the production of cyclic GMP, a cellular signal second messenger. Crystal structure of the MGC’s CCD does not exist and its precise identity is ill-defined. Here, we define it at a sub-molecular level for the phototransduction-linked MGC, the rod outer segment guanylate cyclase type 1, ROS-GC1. (1 The CCD is a conserved 145-residue structural unit, represented by the segment V820-P964. (2 It exists as a homo-dimer and contains seven conserved catalytic elements (CEs wedged into seven conserved motifs. (3 It also contains a conserved 21-residue neurocalcin δ-modulated structural domain, V836-L857. (4 Site-directed mutagenesis documents that each of the seven CEs governs the cyclase’s catalytic activity. (5 In contrast to the soluble and the bacterium MGC which use Mn2+-GTP substrate for catalysis, MGC CCD uses the natural Mg2+-GTP substrate. (6 Strikingly, the MGC CCD requires anchoring by the Transmembrane Domain (TMD to exhibit its major (∼92% catalytic activity; in isolated form the activity is only marginal. This feature is not linked with any unique sequence of the TMD; there is minimal conservation in TMD. Finally, (7 the seven CEs control each of four phototransduction pathways- -two Ca2+-sensor GCAPs-, one Ca2+-sensor, S100B-, and one bicarbonate-modulated. The findings disclose that the CCD of ROS-GC1 has built-in regulatory elements that control its signal translational activity. Due to conservation of these regulatory elements, it is proposed that these elements also control the

  19. Calorimetric Study of Helix aspersa Maxima Hemocyanin Isoforms

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    Svetla Todinova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal unfolding of hemocyanin isoforms, β-HaH and αD+N-HaH, isolated from the hemolymph of garden snails Helix aspersa maxima, was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. One transition, with an apparent transition temperature (Tm at 79.88°C, was detected in the thermogram of β-HaH in 20 mM HEPES buffer, containing 0.1 M NaCl, 5 mM CaCl2, and 5 mM MgCl2, pH 7.0, at scan rate of 1.0°C min−1. By means of successive annealing procedure, two individual transitions were identified in the thermogram of αD+N-HaH. Denaturation of both hemocyanins was found to be an irreversible process. The scan-rate dependence of the calorimetric profiles indicated that the thermal unfolding of investigated hemocyanins was kinetically controlled. The thermal denaturation of the isoforms β-HaH and αD+N-HaH was described by the two-state irreversible model, and parameters of the Arrhenius equation were calculated.

  20. A Review of Metallothionein Isoforms and their Role in Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil kumar M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Metallothionein (MT is a protein which has several interesting biological effects and has been demonstrated increase focus on the role of MT in various biological systems in the past three decades. The studies on the role of MT were limited with few areas like apoptosis and antioxidants in selected organs even fifty years after its discovery. Now acknowledge the exploration of various isoforms of MT such as MT-I, MT-II, MT-III and MT-IV and other isoforms in various biological systems. Strong evidence exists that MT modulates complex diseases and the immune system in the body but the primary function of MT still remains unknown. This review's main objective is to explore the capability to specifically manipulate MT levels in cells and in animals to provide answers regarding how MT could impact those complex disease scenarios. The experimental result mentioned in this review related among MT, zinc, cadmium, diabetic, heart disease, bone retardation, neuro toxicity, kidney dysfunction, cancer, and brain suggest novel method for exploration and contribute significantly to the growing scientist to research further in this field.

  1. Expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C isoforms in native endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine M Béziau

    Full Text Available Phospholipase C (PLC comprises a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in a wide array of intracellular signalling pathways, including protein kinase C and intracellular calcium. Thirteen different mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into 6 families (PLC-β, γ, δ, ε, ζ and η based on their biochemical properties. Although the expression of PLC isoforms is tissue-specific, concomitant expression of different PLC has been reported, suggesting that PLC family is involved in multiple cellular functions. Despite their critical role, the PLC isoforms expressed in native endothelial cells (ECs remains undetermined. A conventional PCR approach was initially used to elucidate the mRNA expression pattern of PLC isoforms in 3 distinct murine vascular beds: mesenteric (MA, pulmonary (PA and middle cerebral arteries (MCA. mRNA encoding for most PLC isoforms was detected in MA, MCA and PA with the exception of η2 and β2 (only expressed in PA, δ4 (only expressed in MCA, η1 (expressed in all but MA and ζ (not detected in any vascular beds tested. The endothelial-specific PLC expression was then sought in freshly isolated ECs. Interestingly, the PLC expression profile appears to differ across the investigated arterial beds. While mRNA for 8 of the 13 PLC isoforms was detected in ECs from MA, two additional PLC isoforms were detected in ECs from PA and MCA. Co-expression of multiple PLC isoforms in ECs suggests an elaborate network of signalling pathways: PLC isoforms may contribute to the complexity or diversity of signalling by their selective localization in cellular microdomains. However in situ immunofluorescence revealed a homogeneous distribution for all PLC isoforms probed (β3, γ2 and δ1 in intact endothelium. Although PLC isoforms play a crucial role in endothelial signal transduction, subcellular localization alone does not appear to be sufficient to determine the role of PLC in the signalling microdomains found

  2. Nesprins: tissue-specific expression of epsilon and other short isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thuy Duong

    Full Text Available Nesprin-1-giant and nesprin-2-giant regulate nuclear positioning by the interaction of their C-terminal KASH domains with nuclear membrane SUN proteins and their N-terminal calponin-homology domains with cytoskeletal actin. A number of short isoforms lacking the actin-binding domains are produced by internal promotion. We have evaluated the significance of these shorter isoforms using quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting with site-specific monoclonal antibodies. Within a complete map of nesprin isoforms, we describe two novel nesprin-2 epsilon isoforms for the first time. Epsilon isoforms are similar in size and structure to nesprin-1-alpha. Expression of nesprin isoforms was highly tissue-dependent. Nesprin-2-epsilon-1 was found in early embryonic cells, while nesprin-2-epsilon-2 was present in heart and other adult tissues, but not skeletal muscle. Some cell lines lack shorter isoforms and express only one of the two nesprin genes, suggesting that either of the giant nesprins is sufficient for basic cell functions. For the first time, localisation of endogenous nesprin away from the nuclear membrane was shown in cells where removal of the KASH domain by alternative splicing occurs. By distinguishing between degradation products and true isoforms on western blots, it was found that previously-described beta and gamma isoforms are expressed either at only low levels or with a limited tissue distribution. Two of the shortest alpha isoforms, nesprin-1-alpha-2 and nesprin-2-alpha-1, were found almost exclusively in cardiac and skeletal muscle and a highly conserved and alternatively-spliced exon, available in both nesprin genes, was always included in these tissues. These "muscle-specific" isoforms are thought to form a complex with emerin and lamin A/C at the inner nuclear membrane and mutations in all three proteins cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and/or inherited dilated cardiomyopathy, disorders in which only skeletal muscle and

  3. Adenylate Cyclase Type III Is Not a Ubiquitous Marker for All Primary Cilia during Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Antal

    Full Text Available Adenylate cyclase type III (AC3 is localized in plasma membrane of neuronal primary cilium and can be used as a marker of this cilium. AC3 has also been detected in some other primary cilia such as those of fibroblasts, synoviocytes or astrocytes. Despite the presence of a cilium in almost all cell types, we show that AC3 is not a common marker of all primary cilia of different human and mouse tissues during development. In peripheral organs, AC3 is present mainly in primary cilia in cells of the mesenchymal lineage (fibroblasts, chondroblasts, osteoblasts-osteocytes, odontoblasts, muscle cells and endothelial cells. In epithelia, the apical cilium of renal and pancreatic tubules and of ductal plate in liver is AC3-negative whereas the cilium of basal cells of stratified epithelia is AC3-positive. Using fibroblasts cell culture, we show that AC3 appears at the plasma membrane of the primary cilium as soon as this organelle develops. The functional significance of AC3 localization at the cilium membrane in some cells but not others has to be investigated in relationship with cell physiology and expression at the cilium plasma membrane of specific upstream receptors.

  4. Glutaminyl Cyclases as Novel Targets for the Treatment of Septic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellvard, Annelie; Maresz, Katarzyna; Schilling, Stephan; Graubner, Sigrid; Heiser, Ulrich; Jonsson, Roland; Cynis, Holger; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Potempa, Jan; Mydel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis is a severe and rapidly debilitating disease mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we assess the antiarthritic efficiency of glutaminyl cyclase (QC) inhibitors. Methods. Mice were inoculated with an arthritogenic amount of S. aureus intravenously or by local administration into the knee joint. Animals were treated with QC inhibitors (PBD155 and PQ529) via chow during the experiment. QC and isoQC knockout mice were also analyzed for arthritis symptoms after local administration of bacteria. Results. Both QC inhibitors significantly delayed the onset of clinical signs of arthritis, and inhibitors significantly decreased weight loss in treated animals. Following intraarticular injection of S. aureus, PBD155-treated mice had lower levels of synovitis and bone erosion, as well as less myeloperoxidase in synovial tissue. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis revealed that PBD155 treatment affected the expression pattern of adhesion molecules, preventing the upregulation of cells expressing CD11b/CD18. Conclusion. The compounds investigated here represent a novel class of small molecular antiarthritic inhibitors. In our studies, they exerted strong antiinflammatory actions, and therefore they might be suited for disease-modifying treatment of infectious arthritis. PMID:23204180

  5. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysham, D.G.; Brotherton, A.F.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine

  6. Mapping Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Protein Disulfide Isomerase Regions of Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J Heckler

    Full Text Available Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC is a heterodimeric nitric oxide (NO receptor that produces cyclic GMP. This signaling mechanism is a key component in the cardiovascular system. NO binds to heme in the β subunit and stimulates the catalytic conversion of GTP to cGMP several hundred fold. Several endogenous factors have been identified that modulate sGC function in vitro and in vivo. In previous work, we determined that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI interacts with sGC in a redox-dependent manner in vitro and that PDI inhibited NO-stimulated activity in cells. To our knowledge, this was the first report of a physical interaction between sGC and a thiol-redox protein. To characterize this interaction between sGC and PDI, we first identified peptide linkages between sGC and PDI, using a lysine cross-linking reagent and recently developed mass spectrometry analysis. Together with Flag-immunoprecipitation using sGC domain deletions, wild-type (WT and mutated PDI, regions of sGC involved in this interaction were identified. The observed data were further explored with computational modeling to gain insight into the interaction mechanism between sGC and oxidized PDI. Our results indicate that PDI interacts preferentially with the catalytic domain of sGC, thus providing a mechanism for PDI inhibition of sGC. A model in which PDI interacts with either the α or the β catalytic domain is proposed.

  7. Site I Inactivation Impacts Calmodulin Calcium Binding and Activation of Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Christian W; Finley, Natosha L

    2017-11-30

    Site I inactivation of calmodulin (CaM) was used to examine the importance of aspartic acid 22 at position 3 in CaM calcium binding, protein folding, and activation of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin domain (CyaA-ACD). NMR calcium titration experiments showed that site I in the CaM mutant (D22A) remained largely unperturbed, while sites II, III, and IV exhibited calcium-induced conformational changes similar to wild-type CaM (CaMWt). Circular dichroism analyses revealed that D22A had comparable α -helical content to CaMWt, and only modest differences in α -helical composition were detected between CaMWt-CyaA-ACD and D22A-CyaA-ACD complexes. However, the thermal stability of the D22A-CyaA-ACD complex was reduced, as compared to the CaMWt-CyaA-ACD complex. Moreover, CaM-dependent activity of CyaA-ACD decreased 87% in the presence of D22A. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that D22A engages CyaA-ACD, likely through C -terminal mediated binding, and that site I inactivation exerts functional effects through the modification of stabilizing interactions that occur between N -terminal CaM and CyaA-ACD.

  8. Functional analysis of the sporulation-specific diadenylate cyclase CdaS in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cao; Ma, Yang; Wang, Xun; Xie, Yuqun; Ali, Maria K.; He, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a recently discovered bacterial secondary messenger molecule, which is associated with various physiological functions. In the genus Bacillus, the intracellular level and turnover of c-di-AMP are mainly regulated by three diadenylate cyclases (DACs), including DisA, CdaA and CdaS, and two c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterases (GdpP and PgpH). In this study, we demonstrated that CdaS protein from B. thuringiensis is a hexameric DAC protein that can convert ATP or ADP to c-di-AMP in vitro and the N-terminal YojJ domain is essential for the DAC activity. Based on the markerless gene knock-out method, we demonstrated that the transcription of cdaS was initiated by the sporulation-specific sigma factor σH and the deletion of cdaS significantly delayed sporulation and parasporal crystal formation. These findings contrast with similar experiments conducted using B. subtilis, wherein transcription of its cdaS was initiated by the sigma factor σG. Deletion of all the three DAC genes from a single strain was unsuccessful, suggesting that c-di-AMP is an indispensable molecule in B. thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated increased diversity of CdaS in the B. cereus and B. subtilis Bacillus subgroups. In summary, this study identifies important aspects in the regulation of c-di-AMP in the genus Bacillus. PMID:26441857

  9. Adenyl cyclase activator forskolin protects against Huntington's disease-like neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Mehan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term suppression of succinate dehydrogenase by selective inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid has been used in rodents to model Huntington's disease where mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damages are primary pathological hallmarks for neuronal damage. Improvements in learning and memory abilities, recovery of energy levels, and reduction of excitotoxicity damage can be achieved through activation of Adenyl cyclase enzyme by a specific phytochemical forskolin. In this study, intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg/kg 3-nitropropionic acid for 15 days in rats notably reduced body weight, worsened motor cocordination (grip strength, beam crossing task, locomotor activity, resulted in learning and memory deficits, greatly increased acetylcholinesterase, lactate dehydrogenase, nitrite, and malondialdehyde levels, obviously decreased adenosine triphosphate, succinate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione levels in the striatum, cortex and hippocampus. Intragastric administration of forskolin at 10, 20, 30 mg/kg dose-dependently reversed these behavioral, biochemical and pathological changes caused by 3-nitropropionic acid. These results suggest that forskolin exhibits neuroprotective effects on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced Huntington's disease-like neurodegeneration.

  10. Guanylate cyclase-C/cGMP: an emerging pathway in the regulation of visceral pain

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    Gerhard eHannig

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C expressed predominantly on intestinal epithelial cells by guanylin, uroguanylin or the closely related GC-C agonist peptide, linaclotide, stimulates generation and release of cyclic guanosine-3’,5’-monophosphate (cGMP. Evidence that the visceral analgesic effects of linaclotide are mediated by a novel, GC-C-dependent peripheral sensory mechanism was first demonstrated in animal models of visceral pain. Subsequent studies with uroguanylin or linaclotide have confirmed the activation of a GC-C/cGMP pathway leading to increased submucosal cGMP mediated by cGMP efflux pumps, which modulates intestinal nociceptor function resulting in peripheral analgesia. These effects can be reproduced by the addition of exogenous cGMP and support a role for GC-C/cGMP signaling in the regulation of visceral sensation, a physiological function that has not previously been linked to the GC-C/cGMP pathway. Notably, targeting the GC-C/cGMP pathway for treatment of gastrointestinal pain and abdominal sensory symptoms has now been validated in the clinic. In 2012, linaclotide was approved in the United States and European Union for the treatment of adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation.

  11. Biased activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase: the Janus face of thymoquinone

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    Charlotte Detremmerie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The natural compound thymoquinone, extracted from Nigella sativa (black cumin, is widely used in humans for its anti-oxidative properties. Thymoquinone is known for its acute endothelium-independent vasodilator effects in isolated rat aortae and pulmonary arteries, depending in part on activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The compound also improves endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries of ageing rodents and in aortae of rabbits treated with pyrogallol, by inhibiting oxidative stress. Serendipitously, thymoquinone was found to augment contractions in isolated arteries with endothelium of both rats and pigs. The endothelium-dependent augmentation it causes counterintuitively depends on biased activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC producing inosine 3ʹ,5ʹ-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic IMP rather than guanosine 3ʹ,5ʹ-cyclic monophosphate. This phenomenon shows a striking mechanistic similarity to the hypoxic augmentation previously observed in porcine coronary arteries. The cyclic IMP preferentially produced under thymoquinone exposure causes an increased contractility of arterial smooth muscle by interfering with calcium homeostasis. This brief review summarizes the vascular pharmacology of thymoquinone, focussing in particular on how the compound causes endothelium-dependent contractions by biasing the activity of sGC.

  12. Consistent expression of guanylyl cyclase-C in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal cancers.

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    Hadi Danaee

    Full Text Available The transmembrane receptor guanylate cyclase-C (GCC has been found to be expressed in colorectal cancers. However, limited data are available on GCC protein expression in non-colorectal gastrointestinal tumors and few studies have reported whether GCC protein expression was consistently preserved in synchronous primary and metastatic cancer tissues.GCC protein status was assessed by immunohistochemistry in tumor specimens from individuals (n = 627 with gastrointestinal tumors, including esophageal (n = 130, gastric (n = 276, pancreatic (n = 136, and colorectal (n = 85 primary and metastatic tumors. Tissue specimens consisted of tissue microarrays containing esophageal, gastric, pancreatic tumors, and whole-slide tissue sections from colorectal cancer patients with matching primary and metastatic tumors.Among the evaluated esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic tumors, the frequency of GCC positivity at the protein level ranged from 59% to 68%. GCC was consistently expressed in primary and matched/synchronous metastatic lesions of colorectal cancer tissues derived from the same patients.This observational study demonstrated the protein expression of GCC across various gastrointestinal malignancies. In all cancer histotypes, GCC protein localization was observed predominantly in the cytoplasm compared to the membrane region of tumor cells. Consistent immunohistochemistry detection of GCC protein expression in primary colorectal cancers and in their matched liver metastases suggests that the expression of GCC is maintained throughout the process of tumor progression and formation of metastatic disease.

  13. How adenylate cyclase choreographs the pas de deux of the receptors heteromerization dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, A S; Jackson, S N

    2013-05-15

    Our work suggests that heteromer formation, mainly involves linear motifs (LMs) found in disordered regions of proteins. Local disorder imparts plasticity to LMs. Most molecular recognition of proteins occurs between short linear segments, known as LMs. Interaction of short continuous epitopes is not constrained by sequence and has the advantage of resulting in interactions with micromolar affinities which suit transient, reversible complexes such as receptor heteromers. Electrostatic interactions between epitopes of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) involved, are the key step in driving heteromer formation forward. The first step in heteromerization, involves phosphorylating Ser/Thr in an epitope containing a casein kinase 1/2-consensus site. Our data suggest that dopaminergic neurotransmission, through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) slows down heteromerization. The negative charge, acquired by the phosphorylation of a Ser/Thr in a PKA consensus site in the Arg-rich epitope, affects the activity of the receptors involved in heteromerization by causing allosteric conformational changes, due to the repulsive effect generated by the negatively charged phosphate. In addition to modulating heteromerization, it affects the stability of the heteromers' interactions and their binding affinity. So here we have an instance where phosphorylation is not just an on/off switch, instead by weakening the noncovalent bond, heteromerization acts like a rheostat that controls the stability of the heteromer through activation or inhibition of adenylate cyclase by the neurotransmitter Dopamine depending on which Dopamine receptor it docks at. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Guanylyl cyclase C in colorectal cancer: susceptibility gene and potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jieru E; Li, Peng; Pitari, Giovanni M; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. While mechanisms underlying this disease have been elucidated over the past two decades, these molecular insights have failed to translate into efficacious therapy. The oncogenomic view of cancer suggests that terminal transformation reflects the sequential corruption of signal transduction circuits regulating key homeostatic mechanisms, whose multiplicity underlies the therapeutic resistance of most tumors to interventions targeting individual pathways. Conversely, the paucity of mechanistic insights into proximal pathophysiological processes that initiate and amplify oncogenic circuits preceding accumulation of mutations and transformation impedes development of effective prevention and therapy. In that context, guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), the intestinal receptor for the paracrine hormones guanylin and uroguanylin, whose early loss characterizes colorectal transformation, has emerged as a component of lineage-specific homeostatic programs organizing spatiotemporal patterning along the crypt-surface axis. Dysregulation of GCC signaling, reflecting hormone loss, promotes tumorigenesis through reprogramming of replicative and bioenergetic circuits and genomic instability. Compensatory upregulation of GCC in response to hormone loss provides a unique translational opportunity for prevention and treatment of colorectal tumors by hormone-replacement therapy.

  15. Regulation of intraocular pressure by soluble and membrane guanylate cyclases and their role in glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel S Buys

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by visual field defects that ultimately lead to irreversible blindness (1, 2. By the year 2020, an estimated 80 million people will have glaucoma, 11 million of which will be bilaterally blind. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is the most common type of glaucoma. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is currently the only risk factor amenable to treatment. How IOP is regulated and can be modulated remains a topic of active investigation. Available therapies, mostly geared towards lowering IOP, offer incomplete protection, and POAG often goes undetected until irreparable damage has been done, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches, drug targets, and biomarkers (3, 4. In this review, the role of soluble (nitric oxide (NO-activated and membrane-bound, natriuretic peptide (NP-activated guanylate cyclases that generate the secondary signaling molecule cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP in the regulation of IOP and in the pathophysiology of POAG will be discussed.

  16. Ligand requirements for the relaxation of adenylate cyclase from activated and inhibited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, P M; Reisinger, D M; Smiley, P A

    1983-06-21

    The turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase system binds tightly the inhibitory nucleotide GDP, and a pretreatment step with isoproterenol and GMP is required to restore activation. Under identical pretreatment conditions, the release of labeled nucleotide is complete within 1 min whereas the restoration of activation by Gpp(NH)p requires 15 min. A study of the ligand requirements of the slow step shows the following: (a) The role of GMP is that of an obligatory allosteric regulator. (b) Cholera toxin modification of the system abolishes the requirement for GMP with a considerable enhancement in the reaction rate. (c) GMP is without effect on the relaxation process with the activator Gpp(NH)p as the resident nucleotide. In sharp contrast, ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (without effect in a GDP-occupied complex) markedly potentiates alterations from the Gpp(NH)p-occupied state. (d) Formation of a GDP/guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) hybrid leads to the suppression of both F- and Gpp(NH)p activation. F- activation is restored by isoproterenol alone, while GMP is still required to restore Gpp(NH)p activation. The results suggest that covalent modification or nucleotide analogue occupancy of the regulatory complex can modify the allosteric role for GMP, with consequences for the rate of the slow step.

  17. Bioinformatics analysis of the oxidosqualene cyclase gene and the amino acid sequence in mangrove plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.

    2017-01-01

    This study described the bioinformatics methods to analyze seven oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, similarity, subcellular localization and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of seven mangrove OSC showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of seven mangrove OSC genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide were too low, indicated that no chloroplast transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove OSC genes. The target peptide value of mitochondria varied from 0.163 to 0.430, indicated it was possible to exist. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove OSC genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove OSC gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The phylogenetic tree shows that there are three clusters, Kandelia KcMS join with Bruguiera BgLUS, Rhizophora RsM1 was close to Bruguiera BgbAS, and Rhizophora RcCAS join with Kandelia KcCAS. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant OSC genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  18. Regulation of follitropin-sensitive adenylate cyclase by stimulatory and inhibitory forms of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in immature rat Sertoli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been designed to examine the role of guanine nucleotides in mediating FSH-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in Sertoli cell plasma membranes. Analysis of [ 3 H]GDP binding to plasma membranes suggested a single high affinity site with a K d = 0.24 uM. Competition studies indicated that GTP γ S was 7-fold more potent than GDP β S. Bound GDP could be released by FSH in the presence of GTP γ S, but not by FSH alone. Adenylate cyclase activity was enhanced 5-fold by FSH in the presence of GTP. Addition of GDP β S to the activated enzyme (FSH plus GTP) resulted in a time-dependent decay to basal activity within 20 sec. GDP β S competitively inhibited GTP γ S-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a K i = 0.18 uM. Adenylate cyclase activity was also demonstrated to be sensitive to the nucleotide bound state. In the presence of FSH, only the GTP γ S-bound form persisted even if GDP β S previously occupied all available binding sites. Two membrane proteins, M r = 43,000 and 48,000, were ADP·ribosylated using cholera toxin and labeling was enhanced 2 to 4-fold by GTP γ S but not by GDP β S. The M r = 43,000 and 48,000 proteins represented variant forms of G S . A single protein of M r = 40,000 (G i ) was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin in vitro. GTP inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with an IC 50 = 0.1 uM. The adenosine analog, N 6 ·phenylisopropyl adenosine enhanced GTP inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by an additional 15%. GTP-dependent inhibition of forskolin-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity was abolished in membranes prepared from Sertoli cells treated in culture with pertussis toxin

  19. Hemoglobin isoform differentiation and allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in the turtle, Trachemys scripta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Storz, Jay F.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2013-01-01

    -binding properties of isolated hemoglobin (Hb) isoforms, HbA and HbD, in the turtle Trachemys scripta. We determined the primary structures of the constituent subunits of the two Hb isoforms, and we related the measured functional properties to differences in O2 affinity between untreated hemolysates from...

  20. Molecular Pharmacology of VEGF-A Isoforms: Binding and Signalling at VEGFR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Chloe J; Mignone, Viviane W; Arruda, Maria Augusta; Alcobia, Diana C; Hill, Stephen J; Kilpatrick, Laura E; Woolard, Jeanette

    2018-04-23

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is a key mediator of angiogenesis, signalling via the class IV tyrosine kinase receptor family of VEGF Receptors (VEGFRs). Although VEGF-A ligands bind to both VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, they primarily signal via VEGFR2 leading to endothelial cell proliferation, survival, migration and vascular permeability. Distinct VEGF-A isoforms result from alternative splicing of the Vegfa gene at exon 8, resulting in VEGF xxx a or VEGF xxx b isoforms. Alternative splicing events at exons 5⁻7, in addition to recently identified posttranslational read-through events, produce VEGF-A isoforms that differ in their bioavailability and interaction with the co-receptor Neuropilin-1. This review explores the molecular pharmacology of VEGF-A isoforms at VEGFR2 in respect to ligand binding and downstream signalling. To understand how VEGF-A isoforms have distinct signalling despite similar affinities for VEGFR2, this review re-evaluates the typical classification of these isoforms relative to the prototypical, “pro-angiogenic” VEGF 165 a. We also examine the molecular mechanisms underpinning the regulation of VEGF-A isoform signalling and the importance of interactions with other membrane and extracellular matrix proteins. As approved therapeutics targeting the VEGF-A/VEGFR signalling axis largely lack long-term efficacy, understanding these isoform-specific mechanisms could aid future drug discovery efforts targeting VEGF receptor pharmacology.

  1. Thyroid hormone receptor isoform expression in livers of critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen-Timmer, Daphne C.; Peeters, Robin P.; Wouters, Pieter; Weekers, Frank; Visser, Theo J.; Fliers, Eric; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Bakker, Onno; Berghe, Greet Van Den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The THRA gene encodes two isoforms of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), TRalpha1 and TRalpha2. The ratio of these splice variants could have a marked influence on T3-regulated gene expression, especially during illness. DESIGN: We studied the expression of the isoforms TRbeta1, TRalpha1,

  2. RAGE receptor and its soluble isoforms in diabetes mellitus complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauren Isfer Anghebem Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hyperglycemia, which is present in all types of diabetes, increases the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. The interaction of AGEs with receptor of advanced glycation end-products (RAGE initiates a cascade of pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant processes that result in oxidative stress, stimulating the formation and accumulation of more AGE molecules. This cyclic process, denominated metabolic memory, may explain the persistency of diabetic vascular complications in patients with satisfactory glycemic control. The RAGE found in several cell membranes is also present in soluble isoforms (esRAGE and cRAGE, which are generated by alternative deoxyribonucleic acid splicing or by proteolytic cleavage. This review focuses on new research into these mediators as potential biomarkers for vascular complications in diabetes.

  3. Interactions of different carrageenan isoforms and flour components in breadmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, A E; Ribotta, P D; Ausar, S F; Fernández, C; Lanada, C A; Beltramo, D M

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of carrageenans with different sulfate contents on bread volume and dough rheological properties. Results showed that only lambda carrageenan, the most sulfated isoform, produced a significant increase in bread volume. In contrast, the different carrageenans induced a negative effect on the cookie factor. Alveographic and farinographic analyses indicated that dough rheological properties were differentially modified depending on whether lambda carrageenan was added to flour and then hydrated or vice versa. Analysis of the interaction between lambda carrageenan and flour components by infrared spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE indicated that a pool of low molecular weight hydrophobic gluten proteins interact with carrageenan. This interaction drastically changes their physicochemical properties since carrageenan-gluten protein complexes show a hydrophilic behavior. In addition, the results indicate that carrageenan sulfate groups and probably the amino groups of glutamines present in the primary structure of gluten proteins are involved in the interaction.

  4. Troponin T isoform expression is modulated during Atlantic Halibut metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn Lynda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flatfish metamorphosis is a thyroid hormone (TH driven process which leads to a dramatic change from a symmetrical larva to an asymmetrical juvenile. The effect of THs on muscle and in particular muscle sarcomer protein genes is largely unexplored in fish. The change in Troponin T (TnT, a pivotal protein in the assembly of skeletal muscles sarcomeres and a modulator of calcium driven muscle contraction, during flatfish metamophosis is studied. Results In the present study five cDNAs for halibut TnT genes were cloned; three were splice variants arising from a single fast TnT (fTnT gene; a fourth encoded a novel teleost specific fTnT-like cDNA (AfTnT expressed exclusively in slow muscle and the fifth encoded the teleost specific sTnT2. THs modified the expression of halibut fTnT isoforms which changed from predominantly basic to acidic isoforms during natural and T4 induced metamorphosis. In contrast, expression of red muscle specific genes, AfTnT and sTnT2, did not change during natural metamorphosis or after T4 treatment. Prior to and after metamorphosis no change in the dorso-ventral symmetry or temporal-spatial expression pattern of TnT genes and muscle fibre organization occurred in halibut musculature. Conclusion Muscle organisation in halibut remains symmetrical even after metamorphosis suggesting TH driven changes are associated with molecular adaptations. We hypothesize that species specific differences in TnT gene expression in teleosts underlies different larval muscle developmental programs which better adapts them to the specific ecological constraints.

  5. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  6. Functional Cooperativity between ABCG4 and ABCG1 Isoforms.

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    Zoltán Hegyi

    Full Text Available ABCG4 belongs to the ABCG subfamily, the members of which are half transporters composed of a single transmembrane and a single nucleotide-binding domain. ABCG proteins have a reverse domain topology as compared to other mammalian ABC transporters, and have to form functional dimers, since the catalytic sites for ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as the transmembrane domains are composed of distinct parts of the monomers. Here we demonstrate that ABCG4 can form homodimers, but also heterodimers with its closest relative, ABCG1. Both the full-length and the short isoforms of ABCG1 can dimerize with ABCG4, whereas the ABCG2 multidrug transporter is unable to form a heterodimer with ABCG4. We also show that contrary to that reported in some previous studies, ABCG4 is predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. While both ABCG1 and ABCG4 have been suggested to be involved in lipid transport or regulation, in accordance with our previous results regarding the long version of ABCG1, here we document that the expression of both the short isoform of ABCG1 as well as ABCG4 induce apoptosis in various cell types. This apoptotic effect, as a functional read-out, allowed us to demonstrate that the dimerization between these half transporters is not only a physical interaction but functional cooperativity. Given that ABCG4 is predominantly expressed in microglial-like cells and endothelial cells in the brain, our finding of ABCG4-induced apoptosis may implicate a new role for this protein in the clearance mechanisms within the central nervous system.

  7. Characterization of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas using novel prolactin receptor isoform specific antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heger Christopher D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactin is a polypeptide hormone responsible for proliferation and differentiation of the mammary gland. More recently, prolactin's role in mammary carcinogenesis has been studied with greater interest. Studies from our laboratory and from others have demonstrated that three specific isoforms of the prolactin receptor (PRLR are expressed in both normal and cancerous breast cells and tissues. Until now, reliable isoform specific antibodies have been lacking. We have prepared and characterized polyclonal antibodies against each of the human PRLR isoforms that can effectively be used to characterize human breast cancers. Methods Rabbits were immunized with synthetic peptides of isoform unique regions and immune sera affinity purified prior to validation by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Sections of ductal and lobular carcinomas were stained with each affinity purified isoform specific antibody to determine expression patterns in breast cancer subclasses. Results We show that the rabbit antibodies have high titer and could specifically recognize each isoform of PRLR. Differences in PRLR isoform expression levels were observed and quantified using histosections from xenografts of established human breast cancer cells lines, and ductal and lobular carcinoma human biopsy specimens. In addition, these results were verified by real-time PCR with isoform specific primers. While nearly all tumors contained LF and SF1b, the majority (76% of ductal carcinoma biopsies expressed SF1a while the majority of lobular carcinomas lacked SF1a staining (72% and 27% had only low levels of expression. Conclusions Differences in the receptor isoform expression profiles may be critical to understanding the role of PRL in mammary tumorigenesis. Since these antibodies are specifically directed against each PRLR isoform, they are valuable tools for the evaluation of breast cancer PRLR content and have potential clinical importance in

  8. D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic stimulation of adenylate cyclase in a clone derived from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmforth, A J; Ball, S G; Freshney, R I; Graham, D I; McNamee, H B; Vaughan, P F

    1986-09-01

    Clones have been isolated from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM. Homogenates of clone D384 contain an adenylate cyclase that is stimulated by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine), noradrenaline, and isoprenaline with Ka apparent values of 4, 56, and 2.7 microM, respectively. The Ka apparent value for dopamine was increased by the D-1 antagonist cis-flupenthixol, 25 and 100 nM, to 23 and 190 microM, respectively, but was unaffected by propranolol (1 microM). Noradrenaline stimulation of adenylate cyclase was only partially inhibited by either propranolol (10 microM) or cis-flupenthixol (1 microM). Propranolol (10 microM), but not cis-flupenthixol (1 microM), prevented stimulation by isoprenaline. The stimulation of adenylate cyclase by dopamine and noradrenaline remained unchanged in the presence of phentolamine (1 microM) and sulpiride (1 microM). These results suggest that clone D384 contains both D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase. Dopamine stimulates D384 adenylate cyclase through D-1 receptors, isoprenaline via beta-receptors, and noradrenaline through both receptors.

  9. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 μM isoproterenol and 50 μM GTP-γ-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 μM GTP-γ-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of β-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes

  10. Membrane guanylate cyclase, a multimodal transduction machine: history, present, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rameshwar K; Duda, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    A sequel to these authors' earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC) from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 sections. The first is historical and covers MGC from the year 1963-1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its biochemical identity. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its expansion. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of phototransduction. Sections ROS-GC, a Ca(2+)-Modulated Two Component Transduction System to Migration Patterns and Translations of the GCAP Signals Into Production of Cyclic GMP are Different cover its biochemistry and physiology. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca(2+) signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Section ROS-GC1 Gene Linked Retinal Dystrophies demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be translated into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Section Controlled By Low and High Levels of [Ca(2+)]i, ROS-GC1 is a Bimodal Transduction Switch discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a "[Ca(2+)]i bimodal switch" and transcends its signaling role in other neural processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca(2+)-dependent guanylate cyclase activator), the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of the ROS-GC transduction system beyond the phototransduction to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in section Ca(2

  11. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide promotes eccrine gland sweat secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S; Watanabe, J; Ohtaki, H; Matsumoto, M; Murai, N; Nakamachi, T; Hannibal, J; Fahrenkrug, J; Hashimoto, H; Watanabe, H; Sueki, H; Honda, K; Miyazaki, A; Shioda, S

    2017-02-01

    Sweat secretion is the major function of eccrine sweat glands; when this process is disturbed (paridrosis), serious skin problems can arise. To elucidate the causes of paridrosis, an improved understanding of the regulation, mechanisms and factors underlying sweat production is required. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) exhibits pleiotropic functions that are mediated via its receptors [PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1R), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor type 1 (VPAC1R) and VPAC2R]. Although some studies have suggested a role for PACAP in the skin and several exocrine glands, the effects of PACAP on the process of eccrine sweat secretion have not been examined. To investigate the effect of PACAP on eccrine sweat secretion. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were used to determine the expression and localization of PACAP and its receptors in mouse and human eccrine sweat glands. We injected PACAP subcutaneously into the footpads of mice and used the starch-iodine test to visualize sweat-secreting glands. Immunostaining showed PACAP and PAC1R expression by secretory cells from mouse and human sweat glands. PACAP immunoreactivity was also localized in nerve fibres around eccrine sweat glands. PACAP significantly promoted sweat secretion at the injection site, and this could be blocked by the PAC1R-antagonist PACAP6-38. VIP, an agonist of VPAC1R and VPAC2R, failed to induce sweat secretion. This is the first report demonstrating that PACAP may play a crucial role in sweat secretion via its action on PAC1R located in eccrine sweat glands. The mechanisms underlying the role of PACAP in sweat secretion may provide new therapeutic options to combat sweating disorders. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Allene oxide synthase, allene oxide cyclase and jasmonic acid levels in Lotus japonicus nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zdyb

    Full Text Available Jasmonic acid (JA, its derivatives and its precursor cis-12-oxo phytodienoic acid (OPDA form a group of phytohormones, the jasmonates, representing signal molecules involved in plant stress responses, in the defense against pathogens as well as in development. Elevated levels of JA have been shown to play a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza and in the induction of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In this study, the gene families of two committed enzymes of the JA biosynthetic pathway, allene oxide synthase (AOS and allene oxide cyclase (AOC, were characterized in the determinate nodule-forming model legume Lotus japonicus JA levels were to be analysed in the course of nodulation. Since in all L. japonicus organs examined, JA levels increased upon mechanical disturbance and wounding, an aeroponic culture system was established to allow for a quick harvest, followed by the analysis of JA levels in whole root and shoot systems. Nodulated plants were compared with non-nodulated plants grown on nitrate or ammonium as N source, respectively, over a five week-period. JA levels turned out to be more or less stable independently of the growth conditions. However, L. japonicus nodules formed on aeroponically grown plants often showed patches of cells with reduced bacteroid density, presumably a stress symptom. Immunolocalization using a heterologous antibody showed that the vascular systems of these nodules also seemed to contain less AOC protein than those of nodules of plants grown in perlite/vermiculite. Hence, aeroponically grown L. japonicus plants are likely to be habituated to stress which could have affected JA levels.

  13. Stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase prevents cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary hypertension and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Norbert; Lobo, Borja; Pichl, Alexandra; Parajuli, Nirmal; Seimetz, Michael; Puig-Pey, Raquel; Ferrer, Elisabet; Peinado, Víctor I; Domínguez-Fandos, David; Fysikopoulos, Athanasios; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Frey, Reiner; Schermuly, Ralph T; García-Lucio, Jéssica; Blanco, Isabel; Bednorz, Mariola; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Tadele, Elsa; Brandes, Ralf P; Grimminger, Jan; Klepetko, Walter; Jaksch, Peter; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Barberà, Joan A

    2014-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death worldwide. No therapy stopping progress of the disease is available. To investigate the role of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)-cGMP axis in development of lung emphysema and pulmonary hypertension (PH) and to test whether the sGC-cGMP axis is a treatment target for these conditions. Investigations were performed in human lung tissue from patients with COPD, healthy donors, mice, and guinea pigs. Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for up to 6 months and treated with BAY 63-2521. Guinea pigs were exposed to CS from six cigarettes per day for 3 months, 5 days per week and treated with BAY 41-2272. Both BAY compounds are sGC stimulators. Gene and protein expression analysis were performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Lung compliance, hemodynamics, right ventricular heart mass alterations, and alveolar and vascular morphometry were performed, as well as inflammatory cell infiltrate assessment. In vitro assays of cell adhesion, proliferation, and apoptosis have been done. The functionally essential sGC β1-subunit was down-regulated in patients with COPD and in CS-exposed mice. sGC stimulators prevented the development of PH and emphysema in the two different CS-exposed animal models. sGC stimulation prevented peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis of alveolar and endothelial cells, reduced CS-induced inflammatory cell infiltrate in lung parenchyma, and inhibited adhesion of CS-stimulated neutrophils. The sGC-cGMP axis is perturbed by chronic exposure to CS. Treatment of COPD animal models with sGC stimulators can prevent CS-induced PH and emphysema.

  14. Renoprotection by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in multiple myeloma and other kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Maderdrut, Jerome L; Lertora, Juan J L; Arimura, Akira; Batuman, Vecihi

    2008-01-10

    Renal involvement in patients with multiple myeloma complicates their treatment and shortens their life-span. The main renal lesion is a tubulointerstitial transformation with fibrosis, frequently associated with cast formation in the distal nephron that results from co-precipitation of pathological immunoglobulin light chains with Tamm-Horsfall proteins. The human renal proximal tubular reabsorption of excessive light chains by endocytosis causes cellular protein overload and activates the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB). The activation of NFkappaB promotes the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and activates signaling pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, Jun kinase, and p38 MAPK, thus promoting interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. We tested the concept that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), a member of the secretin/vasoactive intestinal peptide family, could prevent the development of cast nephropathies. PACAP38 inhibited myeloma light chain-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression with greater potency than dexamethasone, and attenuated the resulting cell damage in the renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. The results indicated that its effects are mediated through inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and nuclear translocation of the p50 subunit of NFkappaB via both the PAC(1) and VPAC(1) receptors. PACAP was also shown to be efficacious in other common in vivo animal models for kidney hypertrophies, including streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy and gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Thus, our studies suggest that PACAP38 could be used as a cytoprotective agent that would be effective in the treatment of renal tubule injury in multiple myeloma and other chronic kidney diseases.

  15. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide modulates catecholamine storage and exocytosis in PC12 cells.

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    Yan Dong

    Full Text Available A number of efforts have been made to understand how pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP functions as a neurotrophic and neuroprotective factor in Parkinson's disease (PD. Recently its effects on neurotransmission and underlying mechanisms have generated interest. In the present study, we investigate the effects of PACAP on catecholamine storage and secretion in PC12 cells with amperometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. PACAP increases quantal release induced by high K+ without significantly regulating the frequency of vesicle fusion events. TEM data indicate that the increased volume of the vesicle is mainly the result of enlargement of the fluidic space around the dense core. Moreover, the number of docked vesicles isn't modulated by PACAP. When cells are acutely treated with L-DOPA, the vesicular volume and quantal release both increase dramatically. It is likely that the characteristics of amperometric spikes from L-DOPA treated cells are associated with increased volume of individual vesicles rather than a direct effect on the mechanics of exocytosis. Treatment with PACAP versus L-DOPA results in different profiles of the dynamics of exocytosis. Release via the fusion pore prior to full exocytosis was observed with the same frequency following treatment with PACAP and L-DOPA. However, release events have a shorter duration and higher average current after PACAP treatment compared to L-DOPA. Furthermore, PACAP reduced the proportion of spikes having rapid decay time and shortened the decay time of both fast and slow spikes. In contrast, the distributions of the amperometric spike decay for both fast and slow spikes were shifted to longer time following L-DOPA treatment. Compared to L-DOPA, PACAP may produce multiple favorable effects on dopaminergic neurons, including protecting dopaminergic neurons against neurodegeneration and potentially regulating dopamine storage and release, making it a promising

  16. Pituitary Adenlylate Cyclase Activating Peptide Protects Adult Neural Stem Cells from a Hypoglycaemic milieu.

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    Shiva Mansouri

    Full Text Available Hypoglycaemia is a common side-effect of glucose-lowering therapies for type-2 diabetic patients, which may cause cognitive/neurological impairment. Although the effects of hypoglycaemia in the brain have been extensively studied in neurons, how hypoglycaemia impacts the viability of adult neural stem cells (NSCs has been poorly investigated. In addition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of how hypoglycaemia regulates NSCs survival have not been characterized. Recent work others and us have shown that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R agonist Exendin-4 stimulate NSCs survival against glucolipoapoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro system where to study the effects of hypoglycaemia on NSC survival. Furthermore, we determine the potential role of PACAP and Exendin-4 in counteracting the effect of hypoglycaemia. A hypoglycaemic in vitro milieu was mimicked by exposing subventricular zone-derived NSC to low levels of glucose. Moreover, we studied the potential involvement of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress by quantifying protein levels of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and mRNA levels of CHOP. We show that PACAP via PAC-1 receptor and PKA activation counteracts impaired NSC viability induced by hypoglycaemia. The protective effect induced by PACAP correlated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, Exendin-4 was ineffective. The results show that hypoglycaemia decreases NSC viability and that this effect can be substantially counteracted by PACAP via PAC-1 receptor activation. The data supports a potential therapeutic role of PAC-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of neurological complications, based on neurogenesis impairment by hypoglycaemia.

  17. Corruption of homeostatic mechanisms in the guanylyl cyclase C signaling pathway underlying colorectal tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, originates from the malignant transformation of intestinal epithelial cells. The intestinal epithelium undergoes a highly organized process of rapid regeneration along the crypt-villus axis, characterized by proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis, whose coordination is essential to maintaining the mucosal barrier. Disruption of these homeostatic processes predisposes cells to mutations in tumor suppressors or oncogenes, whose dysfunction provides transformed cells an evolutionary growth advantage. While sequences of genetic mutations at different stages along the neoplastic continuum have been established, little is known of the events initiating tumorigenesis prior to adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations. Here, we examine a role for the corruption of homeostasis induced by silencing novel tumor suppressors, including the intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 and its gene target guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), as early events predisposing cells to mutations in APC and other sequential genes that initiate colorectal cancer. CDX2 and GCC maintain homeostatic regeneration in the intestine by restricting cell proliferation, promoting cell maturation and adhesion, regulating cell migration and defending the intestinal barrier and genomic integrity. Elimination of CDX2 or GCC promotes intestinal tumor initiation and growth in aged mice, mice carrying APC mutations or mice exposed to carcinogens. The roles of CDX2 and GCC in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis, universal disruption in their signaling through silencing of hormones driving GCC, and the uniform overexpression of GCC by tumors underscore the potential value of oral replacement with GCC ligands as targeted prevention and therapy for colorectal cancer. PMID:20592492

  18. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2016-03-05

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

  19. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating

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    Matthew M. Hurley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger and hedonic-related (palatability drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding; surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding. In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc, through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive.

  20. Corruption of homeostatic mechanisms in the guanylyl cyclase C signaling pathway underlying colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Waldman, Scott A

    2010-08-01

    Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, originates from the malignant transformation of intestinal epithelial cells. The intestinal epithelium undergoes a highly organized process of rapid regeneration along the crypt-villus axis, characterized by proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis, whose coordination is essential to maintaining the mucosal barrier. Disruption of these homeostatic processes predisposes cells to mutations in tumor suppressors or oncogenes, whose dysfunction provides transformed cells an evolutionary growth advantage. While sequences of genetic mutations at different stages along the neoplastic continuum have been established, little is known of the events initiating tumorigenesis prior to adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations. Here, we examine a role for the corruption of homeostasis induced by silencing novel tumor suppressors, including the intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 and its gene target guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), as early events predisposing cells to mutations in APC and other sequential genes that initiate colorectal cancer. CDX2 and GCC maintain homeostatic regeneration in the intestine by restricting cell proliferation, promoting cell maturation and adhesion, regulating cell migration and defending the intestinal barrier and genomic integrity. Elimination of CDX2 or GCC promotes intestinal tumor initiation and growth in aged mice, mice carrying APC mutations or mice exposed to carcinogens. The roles of CDX2 and GCC in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis, universal disruption in their signaling through silencing of hormones driving GCC, and the uniform overexpression of GCC by tumors underscore the potential value of oral replacement with GCC ligands as targeted prevention and therapy for colorectal cancer.

  1. Nitroxyl (HNO stimulates soluble guanylyl cyclase to suppress cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and superoxide generation.

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    Eliane Q Lin

    Full Text Available New therapeutic targets for cardiac hypertrophy, an independent risk factor for heart failure and death, are essential. HNO is a novel redox sibling of NO• attracting considerable attention for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders, eliciting cGMP-dependent vasodilatation yet cGMP-independent positive inotropy. The impact of HNO on cardiac hypertrophy (which is negatively regulated by cGMP however has not been investigated.Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were incubated with angiotensin II (Ang II in the presence and absence of the HNO donor Angeli's salt (sodium trioxodinitrate or B-type natriuretic peptide, BNP (all 1 µmol/L. Hypertrophic responses and its triggers, as well as cGMP signaling, were determined.We now demonstrate that Angeli's salt inhibits Ang II-induced hypertrophic responses in cardiomyocytes, including increases in cardiomyocyte size, de novo protein synthesis and β-myosin heavy chain expression. Angeli's salt also suppresses Ang II induction of key triggers of the cardiomyocyte hypertrophic response, including NADPH oxidase (on both Nox2 expression and superoxide generation, as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK. The antihypertrophic, superoxide-suppressing and cGMP-elevating effects of Angeli's salt were mimicked by BNP. We also demonstrate that the effects of Angeli's salt are specifically mediated by HNO (with no role for NO• or nitrite, with subsequent activation of cardiomyocyte soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC and cGMP signaling (on both cGMP-dependent protein kinase, cGK-I and phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, VASP.Our results demonstrate that HNO prevents cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and that cGMP-dependent NADPH oxidase suppression contributes to these antihypertrophic actions. HNO donors may thus represent innovative pharmacotherapy for cardiac hypertrophy.

  2. Loss of guanylyl cyclase C (GCC signaling leads to dysfunctional intestinal barrier.

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    Xiaonan Han

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Guanylyl Cyclase C (GCC signaling via uroguanylin (UGN and guanylin activation is a critical mediator of intestinal fluid homeostasis, intestinal cell proliferation/apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. As a mechanism for some of these effects, we hypothesized that GCC signaling mediates regulation of intestinal barrier function.Paracellular permeability of intestinal segments was assessed in wild type (WT and GCC deficient (GCC-/- mice with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge, as well as in UGN deficient (UGN-/- mice. IFNγ and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK levels were determined by real time PCR. Expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs, phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC, and STAT1 activation were examined in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and intestinal mucosa. The permeability of Caco-2 and HT-29 IEC monolayers, grown on Transwell filters was determined in the absence and presence of GCC RNA interference (RNAi. We found that intestinal permeability was increased in GCC-/- and UGN-/- mice compared to WT, accompanied by increased IFNγ levels, MLCK and STAT1 activation in IECs. LPS challenge promotes greater IFNγ and STAT1 activation in IECs of GCC-/- mice compared to WT mice. Claudin-2 and JAM-A expression were reduced in GCC deficient intestine; the level of phosphorylated MLC in IECs was significantly increased in GCC-/- and UGN-/- mice compared to WT. GCC knockdown induced MLC phosphorylation, increased permeability in IEC monolayers under basal conditions, and enhanced TNFα and IFNγ-induced monolayer hyperpermeability.GCC signaling plays a protective role in the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier by regulating MLCK activation and TJ disassembly. GCC signaling activation may therefore represent a novel mechanism in maintaining the small bowel barrier in response to injury.

  3. Cloning and Functional Characterization of Three Branch Point Oxidosqualene Cyclases from Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Niha; Rana, Satiander; Razdan, Sumeer; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Hussain, Aashiq; Dhar, Rekha S.; Vaishnavi, Samantha; Hamid, Abid; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs) positioned at a key metabolic subdividing junction execute indispensable enzymatic cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene for varied triterpenoid biosynthesis. Such branch points present favorable gene targets for redirecting metabolic flux toward specific secondary metabolites. However, detailed information regarding the candidate OSCs covering different branches and their regulation is necessary for the desired genetic manipulation. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to characterize members of OSC superfamily from Withania somnifera (Ws), a medicinal plant of immense repute known to synthesize a large array of biologically active steroidal lactone triterpenoids called withanolides. Three full-length OSC cDNAs, β-amyrin synthase (WsOSC/BS), lupeol synthase (WsOSC/LS), and cycloartenol synthase (WsOSC/CS), having open reading frames of 2289, 2268, and 2277 bp, were isolated. Heterologous expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, LC-MS analyses, and kinetic studies confirmed their monofunctionality. The three WsOSCs were found to be spatially regulated at transcriptional level with WsOSC/CS being maximally expressed in leaf tissue. Promoter analysis of three WsOSCs genes resulted in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements. Further, transcript profiling under methyl jasmonate, gibberellic acid, and yeast extract elicitations displayed differential transcriptional regulation of each of the OSCs. Changes were also observed in mRNA levels under elicitations and further substantiated with protein expression levels by Western blotting. Negative regulation by yeast extract resulted in significant increase in withanolide content. Empirical evidence suggests that repression of competitive branch OSCs like WsOSC/BS and WsOSC/LS possibly leads to diversion of substrate pool toward WsOSC/CS for increased withanolide production. PMID:24770414

  4. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP knockout mice

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    Satoko eHattori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP is a neuropeptide acting as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, or neurotrophic factor. PACAP is widely expressed throughout the brain and exerts its functions through the PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1. Recent studies reveal that genetic variants of the PACAP and PAC1 genes are associated with mental disorders, and several behavioral abnormalities of PACAP knockout (KO mice are reported. However, an insufficient number of backcrosses was made using PACAP KO mice on the C57BL/6J background due to their postnatal mortality. To elucidate the effects of PACAP on neuropsychiatric function, the PACAP gene was knocked out in F1 hybrid mice (C57BL/6J x 129SvEv for appropriate control of the genetic background. The PACAP KO mice were then subjected to a behavioral test battery. PACAP deficiency had no significant effects on neurological screen. As shown previously, the mice exhibited significantly increased locomotor activity in a novel environment and abnormal anxiety-like behavior, while no obvious differences between genotypes were shown in home cage activity. In contrast to previous reports, the PACAP KO mice showed normal prepulse inhibition and slightly decreased depression-like behavior. Previous study demonstrates that the social interaction in a resident-intruder test was decreased in PACAP KO mice. On the other hand, we showed that PACAP KO mice exhibited increased social interaction in Crawley’s three-chamber social approach test, although PACAP KO had no significant impact on social interaction in a home cage. PACAP KO mice also exhibited mild performance deficit in working memory in an eight-arm radial maze and the T-maze, while they did not show any significant abnormalities in the left-right discrimination task in the T-maze. These results suggest that PACAP has an important role in the regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, anxiety-like behavior and, potentially

  5. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in fetal cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Stephen J; King, Jeffrey C; Brees, Carol K; Moore, Joseph P

    2014-09-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a centrally-acting peptide with highest concentration within the limbic area of the brain. PACAP is also expressed in and affects the functions of vascular and nervous tissues, endocrine glands, and the placenta. PACAP appears to be associated with the 'fight-or-flight' response to emergency partly through its effect on adrenal production of cortisol and catecholamines. We sought to explore the impact of labor as a stressor on the level of PACAP in the fetus, and hypothesized that PACAP levels would be increased when labor, abnormal fetal heart tracing, or fetal growth impairment was evident. Fetal cord venous blood samples were collected immediately after delivery from a random group of women undergoing either vaginal or Cesarean delivery. The blood was placed in chilled EDTA-aprotinin containing tubes, centrifuged, and stored at -80°C for PACAP immunoassay. Delivery data were abstracted for analysis. The level of PACAP in cord blood was similar in both males and females. There was a trend toward higher levels in the cord blood of fetuses delivered by Cesarean compared to those delivered vaginally. PACAP levels were unrelated to birth weight, Apgar scores, and the presence or absence of labor prior to delivery. While PACAP and its receptor are expressed in placenta, and PACAP protein is found in cord blood, no effect of labor stress on PACAP was found. Further research is needed to understand the role of PACAP in gestation and parturition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional analysis of the Phycomyces carRA gene encoding the enzymes phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase.

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    Catalina Sanz

    Full Text Available Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism.

  7. Pleiotropic and isoform-specific functions for Pitx2 in superior colliculus and hypothalamic neuronal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Mindy R.; Skidmore, Jennifer M.; Micucci, Joseph A.; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Hamada, Hiroshi; Martin, James F.; Martin, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during development is critical for proper neuronal differentiation and migration. Alternative splicing and differential isoform expression have been demonstrated for most mammalian genes, but their specific contributions to gene function are not well understood. In mice, the transcription factor gene Pitx2 is expressed as three different isoforms (PITX2A, PITX2B, and PITX2C) which have unique amino termini and common DNA binding homeodomains and carboxyl termini. The specific roles of these isoforms in neuronal development are not known. Here we report the onset of Pitx2ab and Pitx2c isoform-specific expression by E9.5 in the developing mouse brain. Using isoform-specific Pitx2 deletion mouse strains, we show that collicular neuron migration requires PITX2AB and that collicular GABAergic differentiation and targeting of hypothalamic projections require unique Pitx2 isoform dosage. These results provide insights into Pitx2 dosage and isoform-specific requirements underlying midbrain and hypothalamic development. PMID:23147109

  8. Biophysical, histopathological and pharmacological characterization of crotamine isoforms F22 and F32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Marcos H; Marangoni, Sérgio; Novello, José C; Leite, Gildo B; Prado-Franceschi, Julia; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa

    2003-03-01

    Two major crotamine isoforms (F22 and F32) were obtained after three chromatographic steps and were assayed in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. F32 and F22 (0.5 microg/ml, n=4) produced a facilitatory effect, which increased isometric twitch-tension by 300 and 230%, respectively, after a 120 min incubation. At a concentration of 0.1 microg/ml, both isoforms increased the twitch-tension by about 160%. However, when the isoforms were co-incubated (final concentration, 0.5 microg/ml) for 30 min prior to testing, they did not cause the facilitation seen with > or =0.1 microg/ml of each isoform alone. Histologically, F32 and F22 at 0.5 and 1 microg/ml were quantitatively alike in inducing tissue myonecrosis. However, a mixture of the two isoforms (final concentration, 0.5 microg/ml) significantly attenuated the damage seen with either toxin alone. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that the isoforms had the same molecular mass (4.8 kDa) and that they existed as monomers with a highly stable structure. These results indicate that F22 and F32 acted on muscle cells of the mouse phrenic-nerve diaphragm preparation through similar mechanisms. Since the isoforms did not produce the expected summation in the increase in muscle twitch-tension, it is possible that they may have different affinities for the sodium channel subunits.

  9. Inulin isoforms differ by repeated additions of one crystal unit cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D.; Barclay, Thomas G.; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R.; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    Inulin isoforms, especially delta inulin, are important biologically as immune activators and clinically as vaccine adjuvants. In exploring action mechanisms, we previously found regular increments in thermal properties of the seven-member inulin isoform series that suggested regular additions of some energetic structural unit. Because the previous isolates carried additional longer chains that masked defining ranges, these were contrasted with new isoform isolates comprising only inulin chain lengths defining that isoform. The new series began with 19 fructose units per chain (alpha-1 inulin), increasing regularly by 6 fructose units per isoform. Thus the ‘energetic unit’ equates to 6 fructose residues per chain. All isoforms showed indistinguishable X-ray diffraction patterns that were also identical with known inulin crystals. We conclude that an ‘energetic unit’ equates to one helix turn of 6 fructose units per chain as found in one unit cell of the inulin crystal. Each isoform chain comprised progressively more helix turns plus one additional fructose and glucose residues per chain. PMID:24528745

  10. Identification of a Genetic Factor Required for High γ-Isoform Concentration in Rice Vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Daisuke; Murata, Kazumasa; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2016-12-14

    The γ-isoforms of tocopherols (Tc) and tocotrienols (T3) possess high biological activities in comparison to the α-isoforms. The concentrations of Tc and T3 isoforms in rice (Oriza sativa) was cultivar-dependent. Using chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) and near isogenic lines (NILs) of indica cultivar "Kasalath" in a japonica cultivar "Koshihikari" genetic background, the Kasalath genomic segment on chromosome 2 was determined to be responsible for the high γ-isoform concentration: γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ-TMT) was identified as a candidate gene. An amino acid substitution in the coding region and several nucleotide polymorphisms, including an insertion of 10 base pairs in the promoter region, were identified. Gene expression analysis revealed that low expression levels of the γ-TMT gene in Kasalath were not associated with the γ-isoform concentration. Genetic variations in the coding region of the γ-TMT gene may play a major role in determining the γ-isoform concentration. This information could be used to breed rice with a high γ-isoform content.

  11. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  12. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Smith, Gina A; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-05-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A-VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Regulation of cardiac remodeling by cardiac Na/K-ATPase isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Catherine Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3. The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1 the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2 the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  14. Characterization of low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase isoforms in human breast cancer epithelial cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Irina; Costa, Luís; Bicho, Manuel; Coelho, Constança

    2013-05-01

    Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP) is a polymorphic protein with two major isoforms whose role in tumorigenesis is currently controversial. We characterized LMW-PTP genotype, isoform expression and activity in six different human breast cancer epithelial cell lines (ZR75, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-231BO, MCF7, MDA-MB-231BO2, MDA-MB-435) and compared them with MCF10A, a normal breast epithelial cell line. mRNA expression of the slow isoform was increased in almost all breast cancer cell lines and that of the fast isoform was reduced (p<0.05) in all breast cancer cell lines. Regarding enzymatic activity, only MCF7 had significantly lower (p<0.05) LMW-PTP activity compared to MCF10A. Since these are novel and previously unreported findings, we propose that the differential expression of LMW-PTP fast and slow isoforms suggests their opposite roles in the tumorigenic process, with the fast isoform being anti-oncogenic and the slow isoform being oncogenic.

  15. Identification and evolutionary analysis of tissue-specific isoforms of mitochondrial complex I subunit NDUFV3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Huynen, Martijn A; Arnold, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest respiratory chain complex. Despite the enormous progress made studying its structure and function in recent years, potential regulatory roles of its accessory subunits remained largely unresolved. Complex I gene NDUFV3, which occurs in metazoa, contains an extra exon that is only present in vertebrates and thereby evolutionary even younger than the rest of the gene. Alternative splicing of this extra exon gives rise to a short NDUFV3-S and a long NDUFV3-L protein isoform. Complexome profiling revealed that the two NDUFV3 isoforms are constituents of the multi-subunit complex I. Further mass spectrometric analyses of complex I from different murine and bovine tissues showed a tissue-specific expression pattern of NDUFV3-S and NDUFV3-L. Hence, NDUFV3-S was identified as the only isoform in heart and skeletal muscle, whereas in liver, brain, and lung NDUFV3-L was expressed as the dominant isoform, together with NDUFV3-S present in all tissues analyzed. Thus, we identified NDUFV3 as the first out of 30 accessory subunits of complex I present in vertebrate- and tissue-specific isoforms. Interestingly, the tissue-specific expression pattern of NDUFV3-S and NDUFV3-L isoforms was paralleled by changes in kinetic parameters, especially the substrate affinity of complex I. This may indicate a regulatory role of the NDUFV3 isoforms in different vertebrate tissues. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of cardiopulmonary bypass on beta adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase system on surfaces of peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, A; Tian, Y; Jin, S

    2000-01-01

    The experimental results showed that the level of CAMP, the ratio of cAPM to cGMP, IL-2R expression and IL-2 production in vitro in lymphocytes immediate and 2 weeks after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were significantly lower than those before anesthetics in the patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. These findings suggested that CPB could cause serious damage to adrenergic beta receptor-adenylate cyclase system on circulating lymphocytes surfaces, which might be one of the mechanisms resulting in immunosuppression after open heart surgery with CPB.

  17. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh; Finley, Natosha L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R h ) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken together

  18. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Finley, Natosha L., E-mail: finleynl@miamioh.edu [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Cell, Molecular, and Structural Biology Program, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of c-di-GMP using inclusion bodies of Thermotoga maritima full-length diguanylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovashkina, A S; Rymko, A N; Kvach, S V; Zinchenko, A I

    2012-12-15

    Recombinant full-length diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) of Thermotoga maritima with native and mutant allosteric sites were overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and characterized. It has been shown that target enzymes are produced substantially in the form of active inclusion bodies. Introduction of the mutation in allosteric site resulted in 7-fold increase of the T. maritima DGC activity. Possibility of applying full-length DGC of T. maritima in the form of inclusion bodies for synthesis of c-di-GMP was originally demonstrated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Learning-dependent gene expression of CREB1 isoforms in the molluscan brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayo Sadamoto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein1 (CREB1 has multiple functions in gene regulation. Various studies have reported that CREB1-dependent gene induction is necessary for memory formation and long-lasting behavioral changes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, we characterized Lymnaea CREB1 (LymCREB1 mRNA isoforms of spliced variants in the central nervous system (CNS of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Among these spliced variants, the three isoforms that code a whole LymCREB1 protein are considered to be the activators for gene regulation. The other four isoforms, which code truncated LymCREB1 proteins with no kinase inducible domain, are the repressors. For a better understanding of the possible roles of different LymCREB1 isoforms, the expression level of these isoform mRNAs was investigated by a real-time quantitative RT-PCR method. Further, we examined the changes in gene expression for all the isoforms in the CNS after conditioned taste aversion (CTA learning or backward conditioning as a control. The results showed that CTA learning increased LymCREB1 gene expression, but it did not change the activator/repressor ratio. Our findings showed that the repressor isoforms, as well as the activator ones, are expressed in large amounts in the CNS, and the gene expression of CREB1 isoforms appeared to be specific for the given stimulus. This was the first quantitative analysis of the expression patterns of CREB1 isoforms at the mRNA level and their association with learning behavior.

  1. Myosin isoform fiber type and fiber size in the tail of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazimihalis, P J; Gorvet, M A; Butcher, M T

    2013-01-01

    Muscle fiber type is a well studied property in limb muscles, however, much less is understood about myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression in caudal muscles of mammalian tails. Didelphid marsupials are an interesting lineage in this context as all species have prehensile tails, but show a range of tail-function depending on either their arboreal or terrestrial locomotor habits. Differences in prehensility suggest that MHC isoform fiber types may also be different, in that terrestrial opossums may have a large distribution of oxidative fibers for object carrying tasks instead of faster, glycolytic fiber types expected in mammals with long tails. To test this hypothesis, MHC isoform fiber type and their regional distribution (proximal/transitional/distal) were determined in the tail of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Fiber types were determined by a combination of myosin-ATPase histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and SDS-PAGE. Results indicate a predominance of the fast MHC-2A and -2X isoforms in each region of the tail. The presence of two fast isoforms, in addition to the slow MHC-1 isoform, was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. The overall MHC isoform fiber type distribution for the tail was: 25% MHC-1, 71% MHC-2A/X hybrid, and 4% MHC-1/2A hybrid. Oxidative MHC-2A/X isoform fibers were found to be relatively large in cross-section compared to slow, oxidative MHC-1 and MHC-1/2A hybrid fibers. A large percentage of fast MHC-2A/X hybrids fibers may be suggestive of an evolutionary transition in MHC isoform distribution (fast-to-slow fiber type) in the tail musculature of an opossum with primarily a terrestrial locomotor habit and adaptive tail-function. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The polysaccharide inulin is characterized by an extensive series of periodic isoforms with varying biological actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2013-01-01

    In studying the molecular basis for the potent immune activity of previously described gamma and delta inulin particles and to assist in production of inulin adjuvants under Good Manufacturing Practice, we identified five new inulin isoforms, bringing the total to seven plus the amorphous form. These isoforms comprise the step-wise inulin developmental series amorphous → alpha-1 (AI-1) → alpha-2 (AI-2) → gamma (GI) → delta (DI) → zeta (ZI) → epsilon (EI) → omega (OI) in which each higher isoform can be made either by precipitating dissolved inulin or by direct conversion from its precursor, both cases using regularly increasing temperatures. At higher temperatures, the shorter inulin polymer chains are released from the particle and so the key difference between isoforms is that each higher isoform comprises longer polymer chains than its precursor. An increasing trend of degree of polymerization is confirmed by end-group analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Inulin isoforms were characterized by the critical temperatures of abrupt phase-shifts (solubilizations or precipitations) in water suspensions. Such (aqueous) “melting” or “freezing” points are diagnostic and occur in strikingly periodic steps reflecting quantal increases in noncovalent bonding strength and increments in average polymer lengths. The (dry) melting points as measured by modulated differential scanning calorimetry similarly increase in regular steps. We conclude that the isoforms differ in repeated increments of a precisely repeating structural element. Each isoform has a different spectrum of biological activities and we show the higher inulin isoforms to be more potent alternative complement pathway activators. PMID:23853206

  3. Detection of VEGF-A(xxx)b isoforms in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David O; Mavrou, Athina; Qiu, Yan; Carter, James G; Hamdollah-Zadeh, Maryam; Barratt, Shaney; Gammons, Melissa V; Millar, Ann B; Salmon, Andrew H J; Oltean, Sebastian; Harper, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) can be generated as multiple isoforms by alternative splicing. Two families of isoforms have been described in humans, pro-angiogenic isoforms typified by VEGF-A165a, and anti-angiogenic isoforms typified by VEGF-A165b. The practical determination of expression levels of alternative isoforms of the same gene may be complicated by experimental protocols that favour one isoform over another, and the use of specific positive and negative controls is essential for the interpretation of findings on expression of the isoforms. Here we address some of the difficulties in experimental design when investigating alternative splicing of VEGF isoforms, and discuss the use of appropriate control paradigms. We demonstrate why use of specific control experiments can prevent assumptions that VEGF-A165b is not present, when in fact it is. We reiterate, and confirm previously published experimental design protocols that demonstrate the importance of using positive controls. These include using known target sequences to show that the experimental conditions are suitable for PCR amplification of VEGF-A165b mRNA for both q-PCR and RT-PCR and to ensure that mispriming does not occur. We also provide evidence that demonstrates that detection of VEGF-A165b protein in mice needs to be tightly controlled to prevent detection of mouse IgG by a secondary antibody. We also show that human VEGF165b protein can be immunoprecipitated from cultured human cells and that immunoprecipitating VEGF-A results in protein that is detected by VEGF-A165b antibody. These findings support the conclusion that more information on the biology of VEGF-A165b isoforms is required, and confirm the importance of the experimental design in such investigations, including the use of specific positive and negative controls.

  4. Urinary human chorionic gonadotropin isoform concentrations in doping control samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butch, Anthony W; Woldemariam, Getachew A

    2016-11-01

    Anti-doping laboratories routinely use immunoassays to measure urinary concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). To minimize immunoassay differences and false positive screen results from inactive isoforms (free β-subunit (hCGβ), β-subunit core fragment (hCGβcf)) laboratories now use intact hCG instead of total hCG immunoassays to measure hCG. To determine the distribution of hCG isoforms in urine, we determined the concentrations of intact hCG, hCGβ, and hCGβcf in male urine samples based on immunoassay total hCG concentrations using a sequential immunoextraction and a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. hCG was isolated using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads and unique tryptic peptides were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Negative samples with detectable but low total hCG concentrations (1.2-3.5 pmol/L) had intact and hCGβ concentrations <1.2 pmol/L, and hCGβcf concentrations <2.3 pmol/L by LC-MS/MS. Urine samples from an athlete receiving hCG had intact hCG concentrations ranging from 18.8 to 57.6 pmol/L, hCGβ concentrations <0.7 pmol/L, and hCGβcf concentrations ranging from 94 to 243% of the intact hCG concentration. In 27 atypical samples with total hCG concentrations ranging from 16.7 to 412.7 pmol/L with intact hCG <2.7 pmol/L by immunoassay, all samples had intact hCG concentrations <3.8 pmol/L and hCGβ concentrations <6.2 pmol/L by LC-MS/MS. hCGβcf concentrations by LC-MS/MS varied widely and ranged from 1.03 to 21.9 pmol/L. In summary, total hCG immunoassays significantly overestimate hCG concentrations and can produce false positive results. Although the intact hCG immunoassay slightly overestimates hCG concentrations compared to LC-MS/MS, it can distinguish between cases of hCG use and atypical cases with elevated total hCG concentrations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. SnoI, a novel alternatively spliced isoform of the ski protooncogene homolog, sno.

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson-White, S

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a novel human isoform of sno, snoI for insertion. SnoI contains 1330 nucleotides inserted in place of 7 nucleotides of the snoN mRNA. Sno is a member of the ski protooncogene family, which has been implicated in muscle development. The two previously known sno alternatively spliced isoforms are snoN (684 amino acids), and snoA (415 amino acids); snoI encodes a truncated isoform of 399 amino acids (44,298 MW). Southern blot experiments show that snoI contains a thi...

  6. Protocol for high-resolution electrophoresis separation of myosin heavy chain isoforms in bovine skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Brigitte; Barboiron, Christiane; Chadeyron, David; Jurie, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    In this short communication we describe a specific protocol for SDS-PAGE separation of adult bovine myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoforms. The conditions defined in this protocol allow a good separation with a good reproducibility of the four MyHC isoforms (MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb) identified in adult skeletal muscle of this species. This procedure uses mini-gel electrophoresis system and does not involve preparation of gradient separating gels. In addition, this protocol can also be applied to the electrophoretic separation of ovine and camel MyHC isoforms. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Differential susceptibility of RAE-1 isoforms to mouse cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapovic, Jurica; Lenac, Tihana; Antulov, Ronald; Polic, Bojan; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Koszinowski, Ulrich H; Krmpotic, Astrid; Jonjic, Stipan

    2009-08-01

    The NKG2D receptor is one of the most potent activating natural killer cell receptors involved in antiviral responses. The mouse NKG2D ligands MULT-1, RAE-1, and H60 are regulated by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) proteins m145, m152, and m155, respectively. In addition, the m138 protein interferes with the expression of both MULT-1 and H60. We show here that one of five RAE-1 isoforms, RAE-1delta, is resistant to downregulation by MCMV and that this escape has functional importance in vivo. Although m152 retained newly synthesized RAE-1delta and RAE-1gamma in the endoplasmic reticulum, no viral regulator was able to affect the mature RAE-1delta form which remains expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. This differential susceptibility to downregulation by MCMV is not a consequence of faster maturation of RAE-1delta compared to RAE-1gamma but rather an intrinsic property of the mature surface-resident protein. This difference can be attributed to the absence of a PLWY motif from RAE-1delta. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for a novel mechanism of host escape from viral immunoevasion of NKG2D-dependent control.

  8. Inhibition of myo-inositol monophosphatase isoforms by aromatic phosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzhorn, A J; Hoflack, J; Pelton, P D; Strasser, F; Chanal, M C; Piettre, S R

    1998-10-01

    alpha-Hydroxyphosphonates are moderately potent (Ki = 6-600 microM) inhibitors of the enzyme myo-inositol monophosphatase (McLeod et al., Med. Chem. Res. 1992, 2, 96). Hydroxy-[4-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphtyl-1-oxy)phenyl]methyl phosphonate (3) was resynthesized and its inhibitory potency towards the recombinant bovine brain enzyme confirmed (Ki = 20 microM). Similar aromatic difluoro-, keto-, and ketodifluorophosphonates (5, 7, 9) were inactive. Compound 3 was 15-fold less active on the human as compared to the bovine enzyme. Molecular modeling suggested that the hydrophobic part of the inhibitor interacts with amino acid side chains that are located at the interface between the enzyme subunits in an area (amino acids 175-185) with low similarity between the two isozymes. Phe-183 in the human enzyme was replaced with leucine, the corresponding residue in the bovine isoform. The three isozymes (human wild-type, bovine wild-type and human F183L) had similar kinetic properties, except that the bovine enzyme was less effectively inhibited by high concentrations of the activator Mg2+. The F183L mutant enzyme had a twofold increased affinity for compound 3 as compared to the human wild-type form. We conclude that residue 183 contributes to the binding of aromatic hydroxyphosphonates to IMPase, but it is not the only determining factor for inhibitor specificity with respect to different isozymes.

  9. Arogenate Dehydratase Isoforms Differentially Regulate Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingbo; Man, Cong; Li, Danning; Tan, Huijuan; Xie, Ye; Huang, Jirong

    2016-12-05

    Anthocyanins, a group of L-phenylalanine (Phe)-derived flavonoids, have been demonstrated to play important roles in plant stress resistance and interactions between plants and insects. Although the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway and its regulatory mechanisms have been extensively studied, it remains unclear whether the level of Phe supply affects anthocyanin biosynthesis. Here, we investigated the roles of arogenate dehydratases (ADTs), the key enzymes that catalyze the conversion of arogenate into Phe, in sucrose-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that all six ADT isoforms function redundantly in anthocyanin biosynthesis but have differential contributions. ADT2 contributes the most to anthocyanin accumulation, followed by ADT1 and ADT3, and ADT4-ADT6. We found that anthocyanin content is positively correlated with the levels of Phe and sucrose-induced ADT transcripts in seedlings. Consistently, addition of Phe to the medium could dramatically increase anthocyanin content in the wild-type plants and rescue the phenotype of the adt1 adt3 double mutant regarding the anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, transgenic plants overexpressing ADT4, which appears to be less sensitive to Phe than overexpression of ADT2, hyperaccumulate Phe and produce elevated level of anthocyanins. Taken together, our results suggest that the level of Phe is an important regulatory factor for sustaining anthocyanin biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase, A Multimodal Transduction Machine: History, Present and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar K Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sequel to these authors’ earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 parts. The first is HISTORICAL and covers MGC from the year 1963-1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its BIOCHEMICAL IDENTITY. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its EXPANSION. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of PHOTOTRANSDUCTION. Parts 4 to 7 cover its BIOCHEMISTRY and PHYSIOLOGY. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca2+ signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Part 8 demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be TRANSLATED into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Part 9 discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a [Ca2+]i bimodal switch and transcends its signaling role in other neural transduction processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca2+-dependent guanylate cycles activator, the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of ROS-GC transduction system beyond the photoreceptor cells to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in Part 10, discovery of ANOTHER CD-GCAP, NC, is made and its linkage with signaling of the inner plexiform layer neurons is established. Part 11 discusses linkage of the ROS-GC transduction system with other sensory transduction processes: Pineal gland, Olfaction and Gustation. In the

  11. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteome harbors undiscovered multi-domain molecules with functional guanylyl cyclase catalytic centers

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-07-08

    Background: Second messengers link external cues to complex physiological responses. One such messenger, 3\\',5\\'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), has been shown to play a key role in many physiological responses in plants. However, in higher plants, guanylyl cyclases (GCs), enzymes that generate cGMP from guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) have remained elusive until recently. GC search motifs constructed from the alignment of known GCs catalytic centers form vertebrates and lower eukaryotes have led to the identification of a number of plant GCs that have been characterized in vitro and in vivo.Presentation of the hypothesis.Recently characterized GCs in Arabidopsis thaliana contributed to the development of search parameters that can identify novel candidate GCs in plants. We hypothesize that there are still a substantial number (> 40) of multi-domain molecules with potentially functional GC catalytic centers in plants that remain to be discovered and characterized. Testing the hypothesis. The hypothesis can be tested, firstly, by computational methods constructing 3D models of selected GC candidates using available crystal structures as templates. Homology modeling must include substrate docking that can provide support for the structural feasibility of the GC catalytic centers in those candidates. Secondly, recombinant peptides containing the GC domain need to be tested in in vitro GC assays such as the enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and/or in mass spectrometry based cGMP assays. In addition, quantification of in vivo cGMP transients with fluorescent cGMP-reporter assays in wild-type or selected mutants will help to elucidate the biological role of novel GCs.Implications of the hypothesis.If it turns out that plants do harbor a large number of functional GC domains as part of multi-domain enzymes, then major new insights will be gained into the complex signal transduction pathways that link cGMP to fundamental processes such as ion transport

  12. Decreased Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Contributes to Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Chronic Doxorubicin Treatment in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenwijngaert, Sara; Swinnen, Melissa; Walravens, Ann-Sophie; Beerens, Manu; Gillijns, Hilde; Caluwé, Ellen; Tainsh, Robert E; Nathan, Daniel I; Allen, Kaitlin; Brouckaert, Peter; Bartunek, Jozef; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B; Janssens, Stefan P; Buys, Emmanuel S

    2017-02-01

    The use of doxorubicin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent, is limited by cardiotoxicity. We tested the hypothesis that decreased soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) enzyme activity contributes to the development of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Doxorubicin administration (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [IP]) reduced cardiac sGC activity in wild-type (WT) mice. To investigate whether decreased sGC activity contributes to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, we studied mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deficiency of the sGC α1-subunit (mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of exon 6 of the sGCα1 allele [sGCα1 -/-CM ]). After 12 weeks of doxorubicin administration (2 mg/kg/week IP), left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction was greater in sGCα1 -/-CM than WT mice. To further assess whether reduced sGC activity plays a pathogenic role in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, we studied a mouse model in which decreased cardiac sGC activity was induced by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of a dominant negative sGCα1 mutant (DNsGCα1) upon doxycycline removal (Tet-off). After 8 weeks of doxorubicin administration, DNsGCα1 tg/+ , but not WT, mice displayed LV systolic dysfunction and dilatation. The difference in cardiac function and remodeling between DNsGCα1 tg/+ and WT mice was even more pronounced after 12 weeks of treatment. Further impairment of cardiac function was attenuated when DNsGCα1 gene expression was inhibited (beginning at 8 weeks of doxorubicin treatment) by administering doxycycline. Furthermore, doxorubicin-associated reactive oxygen species generation was higher in sGCα1-deficient than WT hearts. Innovation and Conclusion: These data demonstrate that a reduction in cardiac sGC activity worsens doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice and identify sGC as a potential therapeutic target. Various pharmacological sGC agonists are in clinical development or use and may represent a promising approach to limit doxorubicin-associated cardiotoxicity

  13. The prelimbic cortex muscarinic M₃ receptor-nitric oxide-guanylyl cyclase pathway modulates cardiovascular responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassini, Aline; Antero, Leandro S; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Joca, Sâmia R; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2015-05-01

    The prelimbic cortex (PL), a limbic structure, sends projections to areas involved in the control of cardiovascular responses. Stimulation of the PL with acetylcholine (ACh) evokes depressor and tachycardiac responses mediated by local PL muscarinic receptors. Early studies demonstrated that stimulation of muscarinic receptors induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and cyclic guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) formation. Hence, this study investigates which PL muscarinic receptor subtype is involved in the cardiovascular response induced by ACh and tests the hypothesis that cardiovascular responses caused by muscarinic receptor stimulation in the PL are mediated by local NO and cGMP formation. PL pretreatment with J104129 (an M3 receptor antagonist) blocked the depressor and tachycardiac response evoked by injection of ACh into the PL. Pretreatment with either pirenzepine (an M1 receptor antagonist) or AF-DX 116 (an M2 and M4 receptor antagonist) did not affect cardiovascular responses evoked by ACh. Moreover, similarly to the antagonism of PL M3 receptors, pretreatment with N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine (an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase), carboxy-PTIO(S)-3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylglicine (an NO scavenger), or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolol-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) blocked both the depressor and the tachycardiac response evoked by ACh. The current results demonstrate that cardiovascular responses evoked by microinjection of ACh into the PL are mediated by local activation of the M3 receptor-NO-guanylate cyclase pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Characterisation of two genes for guanylate cyclase activator protein (GCAP1 and GCAP2) in the Japanese pufferfish, Fugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Susan E; Stinton, Inez; Cottrill, Phillippa; Deery, Evelyne; Newbold, Richard; Warren, Martin J; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Hunt, David M

    2002-08-19

    cDNA and genomic clones encoding guanylate cyclase activating proteins (GCAP1 and GCAP2) in the Japanese puffer fish (Fugu rubripes) were identified by probing, respectively, a retinal cDNA library and a whole genomic cosmid library with human GCAP1 and GCAP2 cDNA probes. Clones were identified as GCAP1 and GCAP2 on the basis of amino acid identity with the equivalent frog sequences and their placement into GCAP1 and GCAP2 clades within a GCAP phylogenetic tree. The Fugu genes have an identical four exon/three intron structure to GCAP1 and GCAP2 genes from other vertebrates but the introns are smaller, with the result that the four exons spread over approximately 1 kb of DNA in each case. The two genes are separated on to separate cosmids. However, the results of Southern analysis of the cosmids and of genomic DNA are consistent with a tail-to-tail gene arrangement, as in other species, but with a surprisingly large intergenic separation of around 18.7 kb. Recombinant Fugu GCAP1 failed to activate human retinal guanylate cyclase (retGC) in vitro although CD spectroscopy shows that the protein is folded with a similar secondary structure to that of human GCAP1. The failure to activate may be due therefore to a lack of molecular compatibility in this heterologous assay system.

  15. Probing the Molecular Mechanism of Human Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activation by NO in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Huijuan; Xu, Qiming; Zhou, Yajun; Tan, Li; Nagawa, Shingo; Huang, Zhong-Xian; Tan, Xiangshi

    2017-02-23

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heme-containing metalloprotein in NO-sGC-cGMP signaling. NO binds to the heme of sGC to catalyze the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP, which plays a critical role in several physiological processes. However, the molecular mechanism for sGC to mediate the NO signaling remains unclear. Here fluorophore FlAsH-EDT 2 and fluorescent proteins were employed to study the NO-induced sGC activation. FlAsH-EDT 2 labeling study revealed that NO binding to the H-NOX domain of sGC increased the distance between H-NOX and PAS domain and the separation between H-NOX and coiled-coil domain. The heme pocket conformation changed from "closed" to "open" upon NO binding. In addition, the NO-induced conformational change of sGC was firstly investigated in vivo through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The results both in vitro and in vivo indicated the conformational change of the catalytic domain of sGC from "open" to "closed" upon NO binding. NO binding to the heme of H-NOX domain caused breaking of Fe-N coordination bond, initiated the domain moving and conformational change, induced the allosteric effect of sGC to trigger the NO-signaling from H-NOX via PAS &coiled-coil to the catalytic domain, and ultimately stimulates the cyclase activity of sGC.

  16. The cytoplasmic 60 kDa progesterone receptor isoform predominates in the human amniochorion and placenta at term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Stephen C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism that initiates human parturition has been proposed to be 'functional progesterone withdrawal' whereby the 116 kDa B-isoform of the progesterone receptor (PR-B switches in favour of the 94 kDa A-isoform (PR-A in reproductive tissues. Recently, other PR isoforms, PR-S, PR-C and PR-M generated from the same gene have been identified and partially characterised. Methods and Results Using immunohistochemical, western blotting and RT-PCR techniques, evidence is provided that indicates the major PR isoform present in human term fetal membranes (amnion and chorion and syncytiotrophoblast of the placenta is neither of the classical nuclear PR-B or PR-A isoforms but is the N-terminally truncated 60 kDa PR-C isoform. Evidence is also provided that this 60 kDa isoform resides in the cytoplasm of the expressing cell types. Data are also presented to show that PR-B, PR-A and PR-S isoforms are essentially absent from the amnion and chorion, whereas PR isoforms A, B, C and S are all present in the decidua, with PR-A being the major isoform. The syncytiotrophoblast of the placenta contains the cytoplasmic 60 kDa isoform, but not isoforms PR-A, PR-B or PR-S. Conclusion The major PR isoform in the amnion, chorion and placenta is a 60 kDa protein that could be PR-C, suggesting that the cytoplasmic isoform has a specific role in extra-embryonic tissues and may be involved in the regulation of human parturition.

  17. Development of isoform-specific sensors of polypeptide GalNAc-transferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Schjoldager, Katrine T

    2014-01-01

    Humans express up to 20 isoforms of GalNAc-transferase (herein T1-T20) that localize to the Golgi apparatus and initiate O-glycosylation. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and diseases arise upon misregulation of specific isoforms....... Surprisingly, molecular probes to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity are lacking and there exist no effective global or isoform-specific inhibitors. Here we describe the development of T2- and T3-isoform specific fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway. Each sensor yielded little signal...... when glycosylated but was strongly activated in the absence of its glycosylation. Specificity of each sensor was assessed in HEK cells with either the T2 or T3 enzymes deleted. Although the sensors are based on specific substrates of the T2 and T3 enzymes, elements in or near the enzyme recognition...

  18. Receptor-isoform-selective insulin analogues give tissue-preferential effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienberg, Sara Gry; Bouman, Stephan D; Sørensen, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    The relative expression patterns of the two IR (insulin receptor) isoforms, +/- exon 11 (IR-B/IR-A respectively), are tissue-dependent. Therefore we have developed insulin analogues with different binding affinities for the two isoforms to test whether tissue-preferential biological effects can...... be attained. In rats and mice, IR-B is the most prominent isoform in the liver (> 95%) and fat (> 90%), whereas in muscles IR-A is the dominant isoform (> 95%). As a consequence, the insulin analogue INS-A, which has a higher relative affinity for human IR-A, had a higher relative potency [compared with HI...... (human insulin)] for glycogen synthesis in rat muscle strips (26%) than for glycogen accumulation in rat hepatocytes (5%) and for lipogenesis in rat adipocytes (4%). In contrast, the INS-B analogue, which has an increased affinity for human IR-B, had higher relative potencies (compared with HI...

  19. Altered β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Isoforms in Mexican Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. Sánchez-González

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP isoforms ratio as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s Disease and to assess its relationship with demographic and genetic variables of the disease.

  20. The Structure and Function of the Na,K-ATPase Isoforms in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V. Clausen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The sodium and potassium gradients across the plasma membrane are used by animal cells for numerous processes, and the range of demands requires that the responsible ion pump, the Na,K-ATPase, can be fine-tuned to the different cellular needs. Therefore, several isoforms are expressed of each of the three subunits that make a Na,K-ATPase, the alpha, beta and FXYD subunits. This review summarizes the various roles and expression patterns of the Na,K-ATPase subunit isoforms and maps the sequence variations to compare the differences structurally. Mutations in the Na,K-ATPase genes encoding alpha subunit isoforms have severe physiological consequences, causing very distinct, often neurological diseases. The differences in the pathophysiological effects of mutations further underline how the kinetic parameters, regulation and proteomic interactions of the Na,K-ATPase isoforms are optimized for the individual cellular needs.

  1. The Structure and Function of the Na,K-ATPase Isoforms in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Michael V; Hilbers, Florian; Poulsen, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    The sodium and potassium gradients across the plasma membrane are used by animal cells for numerous processes, and the range of demands requires that the responsible ion pump, the Na,K-ATPase, can be fine-tuned to the different cellular needs. Therefore, several isoforms are expressed of each of the three subunits that make a Na,K-ATPase, the alpha, beta and FXYD subunits. This review summarizes the various roles and expression patterns of the Na,K-ATPase subunit isoforms and maps the sequence variations to compare the differences structurally. Mutations in the Na,K-ATPase genes encoding alpha subunit isoforms have severe physiological consequences, causing very distinct, often neurological diseases. The differences in the pathophysiological effects of mutations further underline how the kinetic parameters, regulation and proteomic interactions of the Na,K-ATPase isoforms are optimized for the individual cellular needs.

  2. Progesterone receptor isoform A may regulate the effects of neoadjuvant aglepristone in canine mammary carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guil-Luna, Silvia; Stenvang, Jan; Brünner, Nils

    2014-01-01

    , A and B, transcribed from a single gene. Experimental studies in human breast cancer suggest that the differential expression of progesterone receptor isoforms has implications for hormone therapy responsiveness. This study examined the effects of the antiprogestin aglepristone on cell proliferation and m......RNA expression of progesterone receptor isoforms A and B in mammary carcinomas in dogs treated with 20 mg/Kg of aglepristone (n¿=¿22) or vehicle (n¿=¿5) twice before surgery.ResultsFormalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples taken before and after treatment were used to analyse total progesterone receptor......-receptor positive and isoform-A positive tumours in aglepristone-treated dogs.ConclusionsThese findings suggest that the antiproliferative effects of aglepristone in canine mammary carcinomas are mediated by progesterone receptor isoform A....

  3. Enhanced protein electrophoresis technique for separating human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Talmadge, R. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Talmadge and Roy (J. Appl. Physiol. 1993, 75, 2337-2340) previously established a sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) protocol for separating all four rat skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb); however, when applied to human muscle, the type II MHC isoforms (Ila, IIx) are not clearly distinguished. In this brief paper we describe a modification of the SDS-PAGE protocol which yields distinct and consistent separation of all three adult human MHC isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx) in a minigel system. MHC specificity of each band was confirmed by Western blot using three monoclonal IgG antibodies (mAbs) immunoreactive against MHCI (mAb MHCs, Novacastra Laboratories), MHCI+IIa (mAb BF-35), and MHCIIa+IIx (mAb SC-71). Results provide a valuable SDS-PAGE minigel technique for separating MHC isoforms in human muscle without the difficult task of casting gradient gels.

  4. Enhanced expression of two discrete isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in experimental and human diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    Full Text Available We recently reported on the enhanced expression of two isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 in human renal transplantation delayed graft function. These consist of the conventional secreted, full length MMP-2 isoform (FL-MMP-2 and a novel intracellular N-Terminal Truncated isoform (NTT-MMP-2 generated by oxidative stress-mediated activation of an alternate promoter in the MMP-2 first intron. Here we evaluated the effect of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus on the in vitro and in vivo expression of the two MMP-2 isoforms.We quantified the abundance of the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcripts by qPCR in HK2 cells cultured in high glucose or 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE and tested the effects of the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC. The streptozotocin (STZ murine model of Type I diabetes mellitus and renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy were used in this study.Both isoforms of MMP-2 in HK2 cells were upregulated by culture in high glucose or with HHE. PDTC treatment did not suppress high glucose-mediated FL-MMP-2 expression but potently inhibited NTT-MMP-2 expression. With STZ-treated mice, renal cortical expression of both isoforms was increased (FL-MMP-2, 1.8-fold; NTT-MMP-2, greater than 7-fold. Isoform-specific immunohistochemical staining revealed low, but detectable levels of the FL-MMP-2 isoform in controls, while NTT-MMP-2 was not detected. While there was a modest increase in tubular epithelial cell staining for FL-MMP-2 in STZ-treated mice, NTT-MMP-2 was intensely expressed in a basolateral pattern. FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 isoform expression as quantified by qPCR were both significantly elevated in renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy (12-fold and 3-fold, respectively.The expression of both isoforms of MMP-2 was enhanced in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy and in human diabetic nephropathy. Selective MMP-2 isoform inhibition could offer a novel approach for the treatment of diabetic renal

  5. Electrophoretic Mobility of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Revisited: Application of MALDI TOF/TOF Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arnoštová, P.; Jedelsky, P. L.; Soukup, Tomáš; Žurmanová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2011, - (2011), e634253 ISSN 1110-7243 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX01110901; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cardiac MyHC isoforms * MyHC isoform mobility * effect of thyroid hormones * mass spectrometry * SDS - PAGE and western blot Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.436, year: 2011

  6. Recombinant erythropoietin in humans has a prolonged effect on circulating erythropoietin isoform distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Jacob Aachmann-Andersen

    Full Text Available The membrane-assisted isoform immunoassay (MAIIA quantitates erythropoietin (EPO isoforms as percentages of migrated isoforms (PMI. We evaluated the effect of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO on the distribution of EPO isoforms in plasma in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, cross-over study. 16 healthy subjects received either low-dose Epoetin beta (5000 IU on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13; high-dose Epoetin beta (30.000 IU on days 1, 2 and 3 and placebo on days 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13; or placebo on all days. PMI on days 4, 11 and 25 was determined by interaction of N-acetyl glucosamine with the glycosylation dependent desorption of EPO isoforms. At day 25, plasma-EPO in both rhEPO groups had returned to values not different from the placebo group. PMI with placebo, reflecting the endogenous EPO isoforms, averaged 82.5 (10.3 % (mean (SD. High-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI on days 4 and 11 to 31.0 (4.2% (p<0.00001 and 45.2 (7.3% (p<0.00001. Low-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI on days 4 and 11 to 46.0 (12.8% (p<0.00001 and 46.1 (10.4% (p<0.00001. In both rhEPO groups, PMI on day 25 was still decreased (high-dose Epoetin beta: 72.9 (19.4% (p=0.029; low-dose Epoetin beta: 73.1 (17.8% (p=0.039. In conclusion, Epoetin beta leaves a footprint in the plasma-EPO isoform pattern. MAIIA can detect changes in EPO isoform distribution up til at least three weeks after administration of Epoetin beta even though the total EPO concentration has returned to normal.

  7. Pleiotropic and isoform-specific functions for Pitx2 in superior colliculus and hypothalamic neuronal development

    OpenAIRE

    Waite, Mindy R.; Skidmore, Jennifer M.; Micucci, Joseph A.; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Hamada, Hiroshi; Martin, James F.; Martin, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during development is critical for proper neuronal differentiation and migration. Alternative splicing and differential isoform expression have been demonstrated for most mammalian genes, but their specific contributions to gene function are not well understood. In mice, the transcription factor gene Pitx2 is expressed as three different isoforms (PITX2A, PITX2B, and PITX2C) which have unique amino termini and common DNA binding homeodomains and c...

  8. Splice Expression Variation Analysis (SEVA) for Inter-tumor Heterogeneity of Gene Isoform Usage in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Bahman; Guo, Theresa; Considine, Michael; Florea, Liliana; Kagohara, Luciane T; Stein-O'Brien, Genevieve L; Kelley, Dylan; Flam, Emily; Zambo, Kristina D; Ha, Patrick K; Geman, Donald; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A; Gaykalova, Daria A; Favorov, Alexander V; Fertig, Elana J

    2018-01-12

    Current bioinformatics methods to detect changes in gene isoform usage in distinct phenotypes compare the relative expected isoform usage in phenotypes. These statistics model differences in isoform usage in normal tissues, which have stable regulation of gene splicing. Pathological conditions, such as cancer, can have broken regulation of splicing that increases the heterogeneity of the expression of splice variants. Inferring events with such differential heterogeneity in gene isoform usage requires new statistical approaches. We introduce Splice Expression Variability Analysis (SEVA) to model increased heterogeneity of splice variant usage between conditions (e.g., tumor and normal samples). SEVA uses a rank-based multivariate statistic that compares the variability of junction expression profiles within one condition to the variability within another. Simulated data show that SEVA is unique in modeling heterogeneity of gene isoform usage, and benchmark SEVA's performance against EBSeq, DiffSplice, and rMATS that model differential isoform usage instead of heterogeneity. We confirm the accuracy of SEVA in identifying known splice variants in head and neck cancer and perform cross-study validation of novel splice variants. A novel comparison of splice variant heterogeneity between subtypes of head and neck cancer demonstrated unanticipated similarity between the heterogeneity of gene isoform usage in HPV-positive and HPV-negative subtypes and anticipated increased heterogeneity among HPV-negative samples with mutations in genes that regulate the splice variant machinery. These results show that SEVA accurately models differential heterogeneity of gene isoform usage from RNA-seq data. SEVA is implemented in the R/Bioconductor package GSReg. bahman@jhu.edu, ejfertig@jhmi.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. The Na, K-ATPase β-Subunit Isoforms Expression in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Moonlighting Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotoli, Deborah; Cejas, Mariana-Mayela; Maeso, María-del-Carmen; Pérez-Rodríguez, Natalia-Dolores; Morales, Manuel; Ávila, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma. Recent studies point out that gliomas exploit ion channels and transporters, including Na, K-ATPase, to sustain their singular growth and invasion as they invade the brain parenchyma. Moreover, the different isoforms of the β-subunit of Na, K-ATPase have been implicated in regulating cellular dynamics, particularly during cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the Na, K-ATPase β subunit isoform subcellular expression patterns in all cell types responsible for microenvironment heterogeneity of GBM using immunohistochemical analysis. All three isoforms, β1, β2/AMOG (Adhesion Molecule On Glia) and β3, were found to be expressed in GBM samples. Generally, β1 isoform was not expressed by astrocytes, in both primary and secondary GBM, although other cell types (endothelial cells, pericytes, telocytes, macrophages) did express this isoform. β2/AMOG and β3 positive expression was observed in the cytoplasm, membrane and nuclear envelope of astrocytes and GFAP (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein) negative cells. Interestingly, differences in isoforms expression have been observed between primary and secondary GBM: in secondary GBM, β2 isoform expression in astrocytes was lower than that observed in primary GBM, while the expression of the β3 subunit was more intense. These changes in β subunit isoforms expression in GBM could be related to a different ionic handling, to a different relationship between astrocyte and neuron (β2/AMOG) and to changes in the moonlighting roles of Na, K-ATPase β subunits as adaptor proteins and transcription factors. PMID:29117147

  11. The Na, K-ATPase β-Subunit Isoforms Expression in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Moonlighting Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Rotoli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common form of malignant glioma. Recent studies point out that gliomas exploit ion channels and transporters, including Na, K-ATPase, to sustain their singular growth and invasion as they invade the brain parenchyma. Moreover, the different isoforms of the β-subunit of Na, K-ATPase have been implicated in regulating cellular dynamics, particularly during cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the Na, K-ATPase β subunit isoform subcellular expression patterns in all cell types responsible for microenvironment heterogeneity of GBM using immunohistochemical analysis. All three isoforms, β1, β2/AMOG (Adhesion Molecule On Glia and β3, were found to be expressed in GBM samples. Generally, β1 isoform was not expressed by astrocytes, in both primary and secondary GBM, although other cell types (endothelial cells, pericytes, telocytes, macrophages did express this isoform. β2/AMOG and β3 positive expression was observed in the cytoplasm, membrane and nuclear envelope of astrocytes and GFAP (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein negative cells. Interestingly, differences in isoforms expression have been observed between primary and secondary GBM: in secondary GBM, β2 isoform expression in astrocytes was lower than that observed in primary GBM, while the expression of the β3 subunit was more intense. These changes in β subunit isoforms expression in GBM could be related to a different ionic handling, to a different relationship between astrocyte and neuron (β2/AMOG and to changes in the moonlighting roles of Na, K-ATPase β subunits as adaptor proteins and transcription factors.

  12. Genomic organization and the tissue distribution of alternatively spliced isoforms of the mouse Spatial gene

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    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The stromal component of the thymic microenvironment is critical for T lymphocyte generation. Thymocyte differentiation involves a cascade of coordinated stromal genes controlling thymocyte survival, lineage commitment and selection. The "Stromal Protein Associated with Thymii And Lymph-node" (Spatial gene encodes a putative transcription factor which may be involved in T-cell development. In the testis, the Spatial gene is also expressed by round spermatids during spermatogenesis. Results The Spatial gene maps to the B3-B4 region of murine chromosome 10 corresponding to the human syntenic region 10q22.1. The mouse Spatial genomic DNA is organised into 10 exons and is alternatively spliced to generate two short isoforms (Spatial-α and -γ and two other long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε comprising 5 additional exons on the 3' site. Here, we report the cloning of a new short isoform, Spatial-β, which differs from other isoforms by an additional alternative exon of 69 bases. This new exon encodes an interesting proline-rich signature that could confer to the 34 kDa Spatial-β protein a particular function. By quantitative TaqMan RT-PCR, we have shown that the short isoforms are highly expressed in the thymus while the long isoforms are highly expressed in the testis. We further examined the inter-species conservation of Spatial between several mammals and identified that the protein which is rich in proline and positive amino acids, is highly conserved. Conclusions The Spatial gene generates at least five alternative spliced variants: three short isoforms (Spatial-α, -β and -γ highly expressed in the thymus and two long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε highly expressed in the testis. These alternative spliced variants could have a tissue specific function.

  13. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    living organisms. There are two types of nucleotide cyclases, adenylyl cyclases that produce 3′5′- cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and guanylyl cyclases that synthesize the corresponding guanosine ... rather than just their substrate specificity, sequence analysis appears to be a key tool for classification.

  14. Adsorption Behavior of Charge Isoforms of Monoclonal Antibodies on Strong Cation Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinebach, Fabian; Wälchli, Ruben; Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the adsorption behavior of the different charge isoforms of the same monoclonal antibody (mAb) on strong cation-exchange resins is analyzed. While charge isoforms of the same antibody mainly differ in their effective charge, the similar structure and size allows developing a simplified model, which describes the adsorption behavior of mAb charge isoforms independently of the number of isoforms with only four parameters. In contrast to classical model-based descriptions of the adsorption isotherm, the proposed work enables retrieving some physical meaning in the definition of the model parameters. These model parameters are determined for several resin-antibody combinations. Thereby it is found that for mAbs on commercial cation exchangers an effective resin charge density of 0.22 ± 0.08 mmol mL -1 of solid phase is used for protein binding, which was found to be independent of the absolute resin charge density measured by titration. The presented results help to understand the adsorption behavior of mAbs on cation-exchangers, which is applicable both for the isolation of the main charge isoform or for preserving a certain charge isoform pattern during the polishing processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Recombinant erythropoietin in humans has a prolonged effect on circulating erythropoietin isoform distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Just Christensen, Søren; Lisbjerg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-assisted isoform immunoassay (MAIIA) quantitates erythropoietin (EPO) isoforms as percentages of migrated isoforms (PMI). We evaluated the effect of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) on the distribution of EPO isoforms in plasma in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, cross......-over study. 16 healthy subjects received either low-dose Epoetin beta (5000 IU on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13); high-dose Epoetin beta (30.000 IU on days 1, 2 and 3 and placebo on days 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13); or placebo on all days. PMI on days 4, 11 and 25 was determined by interaction of N......-acetyl glucosamine with the glycosylation dependent desorption of EPO isoforms. At day 25, plasma-EPO in both rhEPO groups had returned to values not different from the placebo group. PMI with placebo, reflecting the endogenous EPO isoforms, averaged 82.5 (10.3) % (mean (SD)). High-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI...

  16. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from my lab has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP) and therefore this trait appears highly conserved among higher plants. This level of conservation suggests that the existence of ACP isoforms is not merely the results of neutral gene duplications. We have developed techniques to examine a wider range of species. Acyl carrier proteins can be labelled very specifically and to high specific activity using H-palmitate and the E. coli enzyme acyl-ACP synthetase. Isoforms were then resolved by western blotting and native PAGE of H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed the leaf tissue of the monocots Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicots including Arabidopsis thallina, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the cycad, Dioon edule, Ginkgo biloba, the gymnosperm Pinus, the fern Anernia phyllitidis and Psilotum nudum, the most primitive known extant vascular plant, were also found to have multiple ACP isoforms as were the nonvascular liverwort, Marchantia and moss, Polytrichum. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, the uniellular alge Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single elecrophotetic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants.

  17. Isoforms of green fluorescent protein differ from each other in solvent molecules 'trapped' inside this protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhova, Kseniya F; Marchenkov, Victor V; Melnik, Tatiana N; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been studied quite thoroughly, however, up to now some experimental data have not been explained explicitly. For example, under native conditions this protein can have two isoforms differing in their mobility in gel. In this case, no differences between the isoforms are revealed under denaturing conditions. In order to understand the difference in the isoforms of this protein, we have investigated GFP-cycle3 using mass spectrometry, gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography, microcalorimetry, and spectroscopy methods under varying conditions. We have also designed and studied three mutant forms of this protein with substitutions of amino acid residues inside the GFP barrel. The mutations have allowed us to influence the formation of different GFP isoforms. Each of the mutant proteins has predominantly only one isoform. As a result of the performed research, it can be concluded that most likely the GFP isoforms differ in the solvent molecules 'trapped' inside the GFP barrel. In their turn, these molecules have an effect on the protein charge and consequently on its mobility at electrophoresis under native conditions.

  18. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

  19. Molecular modeling study on tunnel behavior in different histone deacetylase isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundarapandian Thangapandian

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs have emerged as effective therapeutic targets in the treatment of various diseases including cancers as these enzymes directly involved in the epigenetic regulation of genes. However the development of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors has been a challenge till date since all HDAC enzymes possess conserved tunnel-like active site. In this study, using molecular dynamics simulation we have analyzed the behavior of tunnels present in HDAC8, 10, and 11 enzymes of class I, II, and IV, respectively. We have identified the equivalent tunnel forming amino acids in these three isoforms and found that they are very much conserved with subtle differences to be utilized in selective inhibitor development. One amino acid, methionine of HDAC8, among six tunnel forming residues is different in isoforms of other classes (glutamic acid (E in HDAC10 and leucine (L in HDAC 11 based on which mutations were introduced in HDAC11, the less studied HDAC isoform, to observe the effects of this change. The HDAC8-like (L268M mutation in the tunnel forming residues has almost maintained the deep and narrow tunnel as present in HDAC8 whereas HDAC10-like (L268E mutation has changed the tunnel wider and shallow as observed in HDAC10. These results explained the importance of the single change in the tunnel formation in different isoforms. The observations from this study can be utilized in the development of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors.

  20. Characterization of 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in the Echinococcus granulosus pathogenic larval stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Aline; Vargas, Daiani M; Monteiro, Karina M; Meneghetti, Bruna V; Dutra, Cristine S; Paredes, Rodolfo; Galanti, Norbel; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-04-03

    The 14-3-3 protein family of eukaryotic regulators was studied in Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease. These proteins mediate important cellular processes in eukaryotes and are expected to play important roles in parasite biology. Six isoforms of E. granulosus 14-3-3 genes and proteins (Eg14-3-3.1-6) were analyzed, and their phylogenetic relationships were established with bona fide 14-3-3 orthologous proteins from eukaryotic species. Eg14-3-3 isoforms with previous evidence of expression (Eg14-3-3.1-4) in E. granulosus pathogenic larval stage (metacestode) were cloned, and recombinant proteins were used for functional studies. These protein isoforms were detected in different components of E. granulosus metacestode, including interface components with the host. The roles that are played by Eg14-3-3 proteins in parasite biology were inferred from the repertoires of interacting proteins with each isoform, as assessed by gel overlay, cross-linking, and affinity chromatography assays. A total of 95 Eg14-3-3 protein ligands were identified by mass spectrometry. Eg14-3-3 isoforms have shared partners (44 proteins), indicating some overlapping functions; however, they also bind exclusive partners (51 proteins), suggesting Eg14-3-3 functional specialization. These ligand repertoires indicate the involvement of Eg14-3-3 proteins in multiple biochemical pathways in the E. granulosus metacestode and note some degree of isoform specialization.

  1. Down-regulation of Cell Surface Cyclic AMP Receptors and Desensitization of Cyclic AMP-stimulated Adenylate Cyclase by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium discoideum. Kinetics and Concentration Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    cAMP binds to Dictyostelium discoideum surface receptors and induces a transient activation of adenylate cyclase, which is followed by desensitization. cAMP also induces a loss of detectable surface receptors (down-regulation). Cells were incubated with constant cAMP concentrations, washed free of

  2. Effect of Vericiguat, a Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator, on Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Patients With Worsening Chronic Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Greene, Stephen J; Butler, Javed

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Worsening chronic heart failure (HF) is a major public health problem. OBJECTIVE: To determine the optimal dose and tolerability of vericiguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, in patients with worsening chronic HF and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). DESIGN, ...

  3. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide, nitric oxide synthase, and their receptors in human and rat sphenopalatine ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csati, A; Tajti, J; Kuris, A

    2012-01-01

    for the demonstration of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), glutamine synthetase (GS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), VIP and PACAP common receptors (VPAC1, VPAC2), and PACAP receptor (PAC1). In addition, double labeling...

  4. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, T. F.; Pávek, P.; Trejtnar, F.; Watts, V. J.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2015), s. 1351-1364 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * bisamidates * Bordetella pertussis * nucleosides * phosphonates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2015

  5. P120-catenin isoforms 1A and 3A differently affect invasion and proliferation of lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Dong Qianze; Zhao Yue; Dong Xinjun; Miao Yuan; Dai Shundong; Yang Zhiqiang; Zhang Di; Wang Yan; Li Qingchang; Zhao Chen; Wang Enhua

    2009-01-01

    Different isoforms of p120-catenin (p120ctn), a member of the Armadillo gene family, are variably expressed in different tissues as a result of alternative splicing and the use of multiple translation initiation codons. When expressed in cancer cells, these isoforms may confer different properties with respect to cell adhesion and invasion. We have previously reported that the p120ctn isoforms 1 and 3 were the most highly expressed isoforms in normal lung tissues, and their expression level was reduced in lung tumor cells. To precisely define their biological roles, we transfected p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A into the lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Enhanced expression of p120ctn isoform 1A not only upregulated E-cadherin and β-catenin, but also downregulated the Rac1 activity, and as a result, inhibited the ability of cells to invade. In contrast, overexpression of p120ctn isoform 3A led to the inactivation of Cdc42 and the activation of RhoA, and had a smaller influence on invasion. However, we found that isoform 3A had a greater ability than isoform 1A in both inhibiting the cell cycle and reducing tumor cell proliferation. The present study revealed that p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A differently regulated the adhesive, proliferative, and invasive properties of lung cancer cells through distinct mechanisms

  6. Alterations in mRNA 3' UTR Isoform Abundance Accompany Gene Expression Changes in Human Huntington's Disease Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Lindsay; Ashar-Patel, Ami; Pfister, Edith; Aronin, Neil

    2017-09-26

    The huntingtin gene has two mRNA isoforms that differ in their 3' UTR length. The relationship of these isoforms with Huntington's disease is not established. We provide evidence that the abundance of huntingtin 3' UTR isoforms differs between patient and control neural stem cells, fibroblasts, motor cortex, and cerebellum. Huntingtin 3' UTR isoforms, including a mid-3' UTR isoform, have different localizations, half-lives, polyA tail lengths, microRNA sites, and RNA-binding protein sites. Isoform shifts in Huntington's disease motor cortex are not limited to huntingtin; 11% of alternatively polyadenylated genes change the abundance of their 3' UTR isoforms. Altered expression of RNA-binding proteins may be associated with aberrant isoform abundance; knockdown of the RNA-binding protein CNOT6 in control fibroblasts leads to huntingtin isoform differences similar to those in disease fibroblasts. These findings demonstrate that mRNA 3' UTR isoform changes are a feature of molecular pathology in the Huntington's disease brain. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Distribution of the intracellular Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2b in pig brain subcellular fractions and cross-reaction with a monoclonal antibody raised against the enzyme isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, J M; Berengena, M; Sepúlveda, M R; Mata, A M

    2001-04-01

    The presence and distribution of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) isoform 2b in microsomes and other subcellular fractions isolated from pig brain has been demonstrated by the combined use of a specific antibody raised against the SERCA2b isoform and ATP phosphorylation experiments. All subcellular fractions show an approximately 110 kDa phosphorylated protein, the band intensity being stronger in microsomes. Preliminary treatment of the samples with trypsin generates two phosphorylated fragments of about 57 and 33 kDa in the presence of Ca(2+). The observed fragments are typical trypsinized products of the SERCA2b isoform. The monoclonal antibody Y/1F4 raised against the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (isoform 1) binds to the 110 kDa band in membranes isolated from brain. The binding was stronger in microsomes than in other fractions. Furthermore, this antibody also recognizes a clear band at around 115 kDa. This band is always stronger in plasma membrane than in synaptosomes or microsomes and is unaffected by trypsin. Phosphorylation studies in the absence of Ca(2+) suggest that the 115 kDa protein is not a Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  8. Expression of 14-3-3 protein isoforms in mouse oocytes, eggs and ovarian follicular development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Santanu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 14-3-3 (YWHA proteins are a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed family of proteins. Seven mammalian isoforms of 14-3-3 are known (β, γ, ε, ζ, η, τ and, σ. These proteins associate with many intracellular proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes including regulation of the cell cycle, metabolism and protein trafficking. We are particularly interested in the role of 14-3-3 in meiosis in mammalian eggs and the role 14-3-3 proteins may play in ovarian function. Therefore, we examined the expression of 14-3-3 proteins in mouse oocyte and egg extracts by Western blotting after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, viewed fixed cells by indirect immunofluorescence, and examined mouse ovarian cells by immunohistochemical staining to study the expression of the different 14-3-3 isoforms. Results We have determined that all of the mammalian 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in mouse eggs and ovarian follicular cells including oocytes. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of isolated oocytes and eggs confirmed the presence of all of the isoforms with characteristic differences in some of their intracellular localizations. For example, some isoforms (β, ε, γ, and ζ are expressed more prominently in peripheral cytoplasm compared to the germinal vesicles in oocytes, but are uniformly dispersed within eggs. On the other hand, 14-3-3η is diffusely dispersed in the oocyte, but attains a uniform punctate distribution in the egg with marked accumulation in the region of the meiotic spindle apparatus. Immunohistochemical staining detected all isoforms within ovarian follicles, with some similarities as well as notable differences in relative amounts, localizations and patterns of expression in multiple cell types at various stages of follicular development. Conclusions We found that mouse oocytes, eggs and follicular cells within the ovary express all seven isoforms of the 14-3-3 protein. Examination of the

  9. A novel antithrombotic effect of sulforaphane via activation of platelet adenylate cyclase: ex vivo and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Chen, Wei-Fan; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Duen-Suey; Hsiao, George; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate, which can be found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cabbage. Sulforaphane was found to have very potent inhibitory effects on tumor growth through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of sulforaphane on platelet activation and its relative issues. Activation of platelets caused by arterial thrombosis is relevant to a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine the in vivo antithrombotic effects of sulforaphane and its possible mechanisms in platelet activation. Sulforaphane (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) was effective in reducing the mortality of ADP-induced acute pulmonary thromboembolism in mice. Other in vivo studies also revealed that sulforaphane (0.25 mg/kg) significantly prolonged platelet plug formation in mice. In addition, sulforaphane (15-75 μM) exhibited more-potent activity of inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Sulforaphane inhibited platelet activation accompanied by inhibiting relative Ca(2+) mobilization; phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt; and hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation. Sulforaphane markedly increased cyclic (c)AMP, but not cyclic (c)GMP levels, and stimulated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, but not ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxal in-1-one), an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, obviously reversed the sulforaphane-mediated effects on platelet aggregation; PKC activation, p38 MAPK, Akt and VASP phosphorylation; and OH(●) formation. Furthermore, a PI3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002) and a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) both significantly diminished PKC activation and p38 MAPK and Akt phosphorylation; in contrast, a PKC inhibitor (RO318220) did not diminish p38 MAPK or Akt phosphorylation stimulated by collagen. This

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3586 (DacA is a diadenylate cyclase that converts ATP or ADP into c-di-AMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinlan Bai

    Full Text Available Cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP and cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP are recently identified signaling molecules. c-di-GMP has been shown to play important roles in bacterial pathogenesis, whereas information about c-di-AMP remains very limited. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3586 (DacA, which is an ortholog of Bacillus subtilis DisA, is a putative diadenylate cyclase. In this study, we determined the enzymatic activity of DacA in vitro using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, mass spectrometry (MS and thin layer chromatography (TLC. Our results showed that DacA was mainly a diadenylate cyclase, which resembles DisA. In addition, DacA also exhibited residual ATPase and ADPase in vitro. Among the potential substrates tested, DacA was able to utilize both ATP and ADP, but not AMP, pApA, c-di-AMP or GTP. By using gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation, we further demonstrated that DacA existed as an octamer, with the N-terminal domain contributing to tetramerization and the C-terminal domain providing additional dimerization. Both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains were essential for the DacA's enzymatically active conformation. The diadenylate cyclase activity of DacA was dependent on divalent metal ions such as Mg(2+, Mn(2+ or Co(2+. DacA was more active at a basic pH rather than at an acidic pH. The conserved RHR motif in DacA was essential for interacting with ATP, and mutation of this motif to AAA completely abolished DacA's diadenylate cyclase activity. These results provide the molecular basis for designating DacA as a diadenylate cyclase. Our future studies will explore the biological function of this enzyme in M. tuberculosis.

  11. Quantification and localization of phosphorylated myosin I isoforms in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, I C; Corigliano-Murphy, A; Korn, E D

    1995-08-01

    The actin-activated Mg(2+)-ATPase activities of the three myosin I isoforms in Acanthamoeba castellanii are significantly expressed only after phosphorylation of a single site in the myosin I heavy chain. Synthetic phosphorylated and unphosphorylated peptides corresponding to the phosphorylation site sequences, which differ for the three myosin I isoforms, were used to raise isoform-specific antibodies that recognized only the phosphorylated myosin I or the total myosin I isoform (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated), respectively. With these antisera, the amounts of total and phosphorylated isoform were quantified, the phosphomyosin I isoforms localized, and the compartmental distribution of the phosphomyosin isoforms determined. Myosin IA, which was almost entirely in the actin-rich cortex, was 70-100% phosphorylated and particularly enriched under phagocytic cups. Myosins IB and IC were predominantly associated with plasma membranes and large vacuole membranes, where they were only 10-20% phosphorylated, whereas cytoplasmic myosins IB and IC, like cytoplasmic myosin IA, were mostly phosphorylated (60-100%). Moreover, phosphomyosin IB was concentrated in actively motile regions of the plasma membrane. More than 20-fold more phosphomyosin IC and 10-fold more F-actin were associated with the membranes of contracting contractile vacuoles (CV) than of filling CVs. As the total amount of CV-associated myosin IC remained constant, it must be phosphorylated at the start of CV contraction. These data extend previous proposals for the specific functions of myosin I isozymes in Acanthamoeba (Baines, I.C., H. Brzeska, and E.D. Korn. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 119: 1193-1203): phosphomyosin IA in phagocytosis, phosphomyosin IB in phagocytosis and pinocytosis, and phosphomyosin IC in contraction of the CV.

  12. Conditional ablation of the RFX4 isoform 1 transcription factor: Allele dosage effects on brain phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    Full Text Available Regulatory factor X4 (RFX4 isoform 1 is a recently discovered isoform of the winged helix transcription factor RFX4, which can bind to X-box consensus sequences that are enriched in the promoters of cilia-related genes. Early insertional mutagenesis studies in mice first identified this isoform, and demonstrated that it was crucial for mouse brain development. RFX4 isoform 1 is the only RFX4 isoform significantly expressed in the mouse fetal and adult brain. In this study, we evaluated conditional knock-out (KO mice in which one or two floxed alleles of Rfx4 were deleted early in development through the use of a Sox2-Cre transgene. Heterozygous deletion of Rfx4 resulted in severe, non-communicating congenital hydrocephalus associated with hypoplasia of the subcommissural organ. Homozygous deletion of Rfx4 resulted in formation of a single ventricle in the forebrain, and severe dorsoventral patterning defects in the telencephalon and midbrain at embryonic day 12.5, a collection of phenotypes that resembled human holoprosencephaly. No anatomical abnormalities were noted outside the brain in either case. At the molecular level, transcripts encoded by the cilia-related gene Foxj1 were significantly decreased, and Foxj1 was identified as a direct gene target of RFX4 isoform 1. The phenotypes were similar to those observed in the previous Rfx4 insertional mutagenesis studies. Thus, we provide a novel conditional KO animal model in which to investigate the downstream genes directly and/or indirectly regulated by RFX4 isoform 1. This model could provide new insights into the pathogenesis of obstructive hydrocephalus and holoprosencephaly in humans, both relatively common and disabling birth defects.

  13. Expression of sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isoforms in masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Trinks, Pablo W; Richard, Susana B; Di Croce, Daniel E; Takara, Delia

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) isoforms in rabbit masticatory muscles compared with those in fast-twitch muscle. It was hypothesized that combined expression of the SERCA isoforms in fast- and slow-twitch muscles accounts for lower Ca-ATPase activity. SERCA was isolated by differential centrifugation, the isoforms were determined by ELISA, and the activity of each isoform was measured using a colorimetric method. Activity was tested for significance by anova, and the distribution of isoforms was assessed using the chi-square test (P < 0.05) and correlated to SERCA activity using Spearman's rank correlation. SERCA1 was predominant (90.5%) in fast-twitch muscle, whereas a mixture of SERCA isoforms was found in masticatory muscles: 62-78% was SERCA2, 20-37% was SERCA1, and the SERCA3 content was negligible. Depressor muscles showed a significantly higher content (77.8%) of SERCA2, and elevator muscles showed a higher content (35.4%) of SERCA1. Elevator muscles showed higher expression of SERCA2a (58%), and depressor muscles showed higher expression of SERCA2b (20%). The SERCA1 content was mainly SERCA1a and significantly higher for elevator muscles (33%), whereas depressor muscles showed a higher content of SERCA1b (4%). The SERCA1 content of fast-twitch muscle was mainly SERCA1a (88.5%). It is concluded that the mixture of different SERCA isoforms, along with a substantial content of SERCA2b, in masticatory muscles would support lower Ca-ATPase activity and calcium transport. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  14. Identification of novel monocistronic HTLV-1 mRNAs encoding functional Rex isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Francesca; Cavallari, Ilaria; Andresen, Vibeke; Valeri, Valerio W; D'Agostino, Donna M; Franchini, Genoveffa; Ciminale, Vincenzo

    2015-07-02

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) gene expression is controlled by the key regulatory proteins Tax and Rex. The concerted action of these proteins results in a two-phase kinetics of viral expression that depends on a time delay between their action. However, it is difficult to explain this delay, as Tax and Rex are produced from the same mRNA. In the present study we investigated whether HTLV-1 may produce novel mRNA species capable of expressing Rex and Tax independently. Results revealed the expression of three alternatively spliced transcripts coding for novel Rex isoforms in infected cell lines and in primary samples from infected patients. One mRNA coded for a Tax isoform and a Rex isoform, and two mRNAs coded for Rex isoforms but not Tax. Functional assays showed that these Rex isoforms exhibit activity comparable to canonic Rex. An analysis of the temporal expression of these transcripts upon ex vivo culture of cells from infected patients and cell lines transfected with a molecular clone of HTLV-1 revealed early expression of the dicistronic tax/rex mRNAs followed by the monocistronic mRNAs coding for Rex isoforms. The production of monocistronic HTLV-1 mRNAs encoding Rex isoforms with comparable activity to canonical Rex, but with distinct timing, would support a prolonged duration of Rex function with gradual loss of Tax, and is consistent with the two-phase expression kinetics. A thorough understanding of these regulatory circuits will shed light on the basis of viral latency and provide groundwork to develop strategies for eradicating persistent infections.

  15. Drosophila TRPA1 isoforms detect UV light via photochemical production of H2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntur, Ananya R.; Gu, Pengyu; Takle, Kendra; Chen, Jingyi; Xiang, Yang; Yang, Chung-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel is an evolutionarily conserved detector of temperature and irritant chemicals. Here, we show that two specific isoforms of TRPA1 in Drosophila are H2O2 sensitive and that they can detect strong UV light via sensing light-induced production of H2O2. We found that ectopic expression of these H2O2-sensitive Drosophila TRPA1 (dTRPA1) isoforms conferred UV sensitivity to light-insensitive HEK293 cells and Drosophila neurons, whereas expressing the H2O2-insensitive isoform did not. Curiously, when expressed in one specific group of motor neurons in adult flies, the H2O2-sensitive dTRPA1 isoforms were as competent as the blue light-gated channelrhodopsin-2 in triggering motor output in response to light. We found that the corpus cardiacum (CC) cells, a group of neuroendocrine cells that produce the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) in the larval ring gland endogenously express these H2O2-sensitive dTRPA1 isoforms and that they are UV sensitive. Sensitivity of CC cells required dTRPA1 and H2O2 production but not conventional phototransduction molecules. Our results suggest that specific isoforms of dTRPA1 can sense UV light via photochemical production of H2O2. We speculate that UV sensitivity conferred by these isoforms in CC cells may allow young larvae to activate stress response—a function of CC cells—when they encounter strong UV, an aversive stimulus for young larvae. PMID:26443856

  16. Identification of alternatively translated Tetherin isoforms with differing antiviral and signaling activities.

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    Luis J Cocka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin (BST-2/CD317/HM1.24 is an IFN induced transmembrane protein that restricts release of a broad range of enveloped viruses. Important features required for Tetherin activity and regulation reside within the cytoplasmic domain. Here we demonstrate that two isoforms, derived by alternative translation initiation from highly conserved methionine residues in the cytoplasmic domain, are produced in both cultured human cell lines and primary cells. These two isoforms have distinct biological properties. The short isoform (s-Tetherin, which lacks 12 residues present in the long isoform (l-Tetherin, is significantly more resistant to HIV-1 Vpu-mediated downregulation and consequently more effectively restricts HIV-1 viral budding in the presence of Vpu. s-Tetherin Vpu resistance can be accounted for by the loss of serine-threonine and tyrosine motifs present in the long isoform. By contrast, the l-Tetherin isoform was found to be an activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling whereas s-Tetherin does not activate NF-κB. Activation of NF-κB requires a tyrosine-based motif found within the cytoplasmic tail of the longer species and may entail formation of l-Tetherin homodimers since co-expression of s-Tetherin impairs the ability of the longer isoform to activate NF-κB. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for control of Tetherin antiviral and signaling function and provide insight into Tetherin function both in the presence and absence of infection.

  17. Differential CARM1 Isoform Expression in Subcellular Compartments and among Malignant and Benign Breast Tumors.

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    David Shlensky

    Full Text Available Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1 is a coactivator for ERα and cancer-relevant transcription factors, and can methylate diverse cellular targets including histones. CARM1 is expressed in one of two alternative splice isoforms, full-length CARM1 (CARM1FL and truncated CARM1 (CARM1ΔE15. CARM1FL and CARM1ΔE15 function differently in transcriptional regulation, protein methylation, and mediation of pre-mRNA splicing in cellular models.To investigate the functional roles and the prognosis potential of CARM1 alternative spliced isoforms in breast cancer, we used recently developed antibodies to detect differential CARM1 isoform expression in subcellular compartments and among malignant and benign breast tumors.Immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 and BG-1 cell lines demonstrated that CARM1ΔE15 is the dominant isoform expressed in the cytoplasm, and CARM1FL is more nuclear localized. CARM1ΔE15 was found to be more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibition than CARM1FL, indicating that the truncated isoform may be the oncogenic form. Clinical cancer samples did not have significantly higher expression of CARM1FL or CARM1ΔE15 than benign breast samples at the level of mRNA or histology. Furthermore neither CARM1FL nor CARM1ΔE15 expression correlated with breast cancer molecular subtypes, tumor size, or lymph node involvement.The analysis presented here lends new insights into the possible oncogenic role of CARM1ΔE15. This study also demonstrates no obvious association of CARM1 isoform expression and clinical correlates in breast cancer. Recent studies, however, have shown that CARM1 expression correlates with poor prognosis, indicating a need for further studies of both CARM1 isoforms in a large cohort of breast cancer specimens.

  18. Identification of a novel Arabidopsis thaliana nitric oxide-binding molecule with guanylate cyclase activity in vitro

    KAUST Repository

    Mulaudzi, Takalani

    2011-09-01

    While there is evidence of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent signalling via the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) in plants, guanylate cyclases (GCs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cGMP from guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) have until recently remained elusive and none of the candidates identified to-date are NO-dependent. Using both a GC and heme-binding domain specific (H-NOX) search motif, we have identified an Arabidopsis flavin monooxygenase (At1g62580) and shown electrochemically that it binds NO, has a higher affinity for NO than for O 2 and that this molecule can generate cGMP from GTP in vitro in an NO-dependent manner. © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Invasion of Dendritic Cells, Macrophages and Neutrophils by the Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin: A Subversive Move to Fool Host Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Adkins, Irena; Klimova, Nela; Sebo, Peter

    2017-09-21

    Adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) is released in the course of B. pertussis infection in the host's respiratory tract in order to suppress its early innate and subsequent adaptive immune defense. CD11b-expressing dendritic cells (DC), macrophages and neutrophils are professional phagocytes and key players of the innate immune system that provide a first line of defense against invading pathogens. Recent findings revealed the capacity of B. pertussis CyaA to intoxicate DC with high concentrations of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which ultimately skews the host immune response towards the expansion of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells. CyaA-induced cAMP signaling swiftly incapacitates opsonophagocytosis, oxidative burst and NO-mediated killing of bacteria by neutrophils and macrophages. The subversion of host immune responses by CyaA after delivery into DC, macrophages and neutrophils is the subject of this review.

  20. Invasion of Dendritic Cells, Macrophages and Neutrophils by the Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin: A Subversive Move to Fool Host Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Fedele

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA is released in the course of B. pertussis infection in the host’s respiratory tract in order to suppress its early innate and subsequent adaptive immune defense. CD11b-expressing dendritic cells (DC, macrophages and neutrophils are professional phagocytes and key players of the innate immune system that provide a first line of defense against invading pathogens. Recent findings revealed the capacity of B. pertussis CyaA to intoxicate DC with high concentrations of 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, which ultimately skews the host immune response towards the expansion of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells. CyaA-induced cAMP signaling swiftly incapacitates opsonophagocytosis, oxidative burst and NO-mediated killing of bacteria by neutrophils and macrophages. The subversion of host immune responses by CyaA after delivery into DC, macrophages and neutrophils is the subject of this review.

  1. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 CruA (sll0147) encodes lycopene cyclase and requires bound chlorophyll a for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-03-01

    The genome of the model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, encodes two paralogs of CruA-type lycopene cyclases, SynPCC7002_A2153 and SynPCC7002_A0043, which are denoted cruA and cruP, respectively. Unlike the wild-type strain, a cruA deletion mutant is light-sensitive, grows slowly, and accumulates lycopene, γ-carotene, and 1-OH-lycopene; however, this strain still produces β-carotene and other carotenoids derived from it. Expression of cruA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (cruA 6803 ) in Escherichia coli strains that synthesize either lycopene or γ-carotene did not lead to the synthesis of either γ-carotene or β-carotene, respectively. However, expression of this orthologous cruA 6803 gene (sll0147) in the Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cruA deletion mutant produced strains with phenotypic properties identical to the wild type. CruA 6803 was purified from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 by affinity chromatography, and the purified protein was pale yellow-green due to the presence of bound chlorophyll (Chl) a and β-carotene. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the partly purified protein in the presence of lithium dodecylsulfate at 4 °C confirmed that the protein was yellow-green in color. When purified CruA 6803 was assayed in vitro with either lycopene or γ-carotene as substrate, β-carotene was synthesized. These data establish that CruA 6803 is a lycopene cyclase and that it requires a bound Chl a molecule for activity. Possible binding sites for Chl a and the potential regulatory role of the Chl a in coordination of Chl and carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  2. Calcium influx rescues adenylate cyclase-hemolysin from rapid cell membrane removal and enables phagocyte permeabilization by toxin pores.

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    Radovan Fiser

    Full Text Available Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA penetrates the cytoplasmic membrane of phagocytes and employs two distinct conformers to exert its multiple activities. One conformer forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize phagocyte membrane for efflux of cytosolic potassium. The other conformer conducts extracellular calcium ions across cytoplasmic membrane of cells, relocates into lipid rafts, translocates the adenylate cyclase enzyme (AC domain into cells and converts cytosolic ATP to cAMP. We show that the calcium-conducting activity of CyaA controls the path and kinetics of endocytic removal of toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. The enzymatically inactive but calcium-conducting CyaA-AC⁻ toxoid was endocytosed via a clathrin-dependent pathway. In contrast, a doubly mutated (E570K+E581P toxoid, unable to conduct Ca²⁺ into cells, was rapidly internalized by membrane macropinocytosis, unless rescued by Ca²⁺ influx promoted in trans by ionomycin or intact toxoid. Moreover, a fully pore-forming CyaA-ΔAC hemolysin failed to permeabilize phagocytes, unless endocytic removal of its pores from cell membrane was decelerated through Ca²⁺ influx promoted by molecules locked in a Ca²⁺-conducting conformation by the 3D1 antibody. Inhibition of endocytosis also enabled the native B. pertussis-produced CyaA to induce lysis of J774A.1 macrophages at concentrations starting from 100 ng/ml. Hence, by mediating calcium influx into cells, the translocating conformer of CyaA controls the removal of bystander toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. This triggers a positive feedback loop of exacerbated cell permeabilization, where the efflux of cellular potassium yields further decreased toxin pore removal from cell membrane and this further enhances cell permeabilization and potassium efflux.

  3. C-type natriuretic peptide and the guanylyl cyclase receptors in the rat ovary are modulated by the estrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, M; Reis, A M; Mukaddam-Daher, S; Dam, T V; Farookhi, R; Gutkowska, J

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that rat ovaries synthesize atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and express the cognate guanylyl cyclase (GC-A and GC-B) receptors for ANP. Since another natriuretic peptide, termed the C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), can also interact with these receptors, we have investigated whether rat ovaries express CNP and if so, whether the concentration of this natriuretic peptide and the guanylyl-cyclase receptors are influenced by the estrous cycle. CNP mRNA was detected in rat ovaries using a reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy. RIA of ovarian extracts, obtained at the individual days of the estrous cycle, revealed the presence of immunoreactive CNP. The highest levels of CNP were detected at proestrus and were approximately 4-fold higher than the levels seen at any other stage of the cycle. GC-A and GC-B receptors were detected using quantitative autoradiography after application of either [125I]ANP or [125I]-tyr0CNP to sections of frozen ovaries. The highest specific binding of each radiolabeled ligand was seen in ovaries from proestrous animals. The GC-B receptors were localized to the membrana granulosa of developing ovarian follicles. Using quantitative PCR, we determined that levels of GC-A and GC-B mRNAs were highest in the ovaries of proestrous animals and were approximately 2- to 3-fold higher than the levels seen at diestrus. These findings demonstrate that a natriuretic peptide system, consisting of ligands and receptors, is present in the rat ovary. Since CNP and the GC receptors show coordinate estrous cycle-dependent variation with maximal expression at proestrus, we speculate that the natriuretic peptides may play an important role in either the development of ovulatory follicles or in the ovulatory process.

  4. Enzymatic synthesis and characterizations of cyclic GDP-ribose. A procedure for distinguishing enzymes with ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, R M; Walseth, T F; Fryxell, K; Branton, W D; Lee, H C

    1994-12-02

    Cyclic nucleotides such as cAMP and cGMP are second messengers subserving various signaling pathways. Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), a recently discovered member of the family, is derived from NAD+ and is a mediator of Ca2+ mobilization in various cellular systems. The synthesis and degradation of cADPR are, respectively, catalyzed by ADP-ribosyl cyclase and cADPR hydrolase. CD38, a differentiation antigen of B lymphocytes, has recently been shown to be a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing both the formation and hydrolysis of cADPR. The overall reaction catalyzed by CD38 is the formation of ADP-ribose and nicotinamide from NAD+, identical to that catalyzed by NADase. The difficulties in detecting the formation of cADPR have led to frequent identification of CD38 as a classical NADase. In this study, we show that both ADP-ribosyl cyclase and CD38, but not NADase, can cyclize nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide (NGD+) producing a new nucleotide. Analyses by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy indicate the product is cyclic GDP-ribose (cGDPR) with a structure similar to cADPR except with guanine replacing adenine. Compared to cADPR, cGDPR is a more stable compound showing 2.8 times more resistance to heat-induced hydrolysis. These results are consistent with a catalytic scheme for CD38 where the cyclization of the substrate precedes the hydrolytic reaction. Spectroscopic analyses show that cGDPR is fluorescent and has an absorption spectrum different from both NGD+ and GDPR, providing a very convenient way for monitoring its enzymatic formation. The use of NGD+ as substrate for assaying the cyclization reaction was found to be applicable to pure enzymes as well as crude tissue extracts making it a useful diagnostic tool for distinguishing CD38-like enzymes from degradative NADases.

  5. Alternative Splicing of the Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Receptor PAC1: Mechanisms of Fine Tuning of Brain Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna eBlechman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA encoding for the neuropeptide receptor PAC1/ADCYAP1R1 generates multiple protein products that exhibit pleiotropic activities. Recent studies in mammals and zebrafish have implicated some of these splice isoforms in control of both cellular and body homeostasis. Here, we review the regulation of PAC1 splice variants and their underlying signal transduction and physiological processes in the nervous system.

  6. Do anti-angiogenic VEGF (VEGFxxxb isoforms exist? A cautionary tale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Harris

    Full Text Available Splicing of the human vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A gene has been reported to generate angiogenic (VEGFxxx and anti-angiogenic (VEGFxxxb isoforms. Corresponding VEGFxxxb isoforms have also been reported in rat and mouse. We examined VEGFxxxb expression in mouse fibrosarcoma cell lines expressing all or individual VEGF isoforms (VEGF120, 164 or 188, grown in vitro and in vivo, and compared results with those from normal mouse and human tissues. Importantly, genetic construction of VEGF164 and VEGF188 expressing fibrosarcomas, in which exon 7 is fused to the conventional exon 8, precludes VEGFxxxb splicing from occurring. Thus, these two fibrosarcoma cell lines provided endogenous negative controls. Using RT-PCR we show that primers designed to simultaneously amplify VEGFxxx and VEGFxxxb isoforms amplified only VEGFxxx variants in both species. Moreover, only VEGFxxx species were generated when mouse podocytes were treated with TGFβ-1, a reported activator of VEGFxxxb splice selection in human podocytes. A VEGF164/120 heteroduplex species was identified as a PCR artefact, specifically in mouse. VEGFxxxb isoform-specific PCR did amplify putative VEGFxxxb species in mouse and human tissues, but unexpectedly also in VEGF188 and VEGF164 fibrosarcoma cells and tumours, where splicing to produce true VEGFxxxb isoforms cannot occur. Moreover, these products were only consistently generated using reverse primers spanning more than 5 bases across the 8b/7 or 8b/5 splice junctions. Primer annealing to VEGFxxx transcripts and amplification of exon 8b primer 'tails' explained the artefactual generation of VEGFxxxb products, since the same products were generated when the PCR reactions were performed with cDNA from VEGF164/VEGF188 'knock-in' vectors used in the generation of single VEGF isoform-expressing transgenic mice from which the fibrosarcoma lines were developed. Collectively, our results highlight important pitfalls in data

  7. Allosteric Mutant IDH1 Inhibitors Reveal Mechanisms for IDH1 Mutant and Isoform Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoling; Baird, Daniel; Bowen, Kimberly; Capka, Vladimir; Chen, Jinyun; Chenail, Gregg; Cho, YoungShin; Dooley, Julia; Farsidjani, Ali; Fortin, Pascal; Kohls, Darcy; Kulathila, Raviraj; Lin, Fallon; McKay, Daniel; Rodrigues, Lindsey; Sage, David; Touré, B. Barry; van der Plas, Simon; Wright, Kirk; Xu, Ming; Yin, Hong; Levell, Julian; Pagliarini, Raymond A. (Novartis)

    2017-03-01

    Oncogenic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations contribute to cancer via production of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we characterize two structurally distinct mutant- and isoform-selective IDH1 inhibitors that inhibit 2-HG production. Both bind to an allosteric pocket on IDH1, yet shape it differently, highlighting the plasticity of this site. Oncogenic IDH1R132H mutation destabilizes an IDH1 “regulatory segment,” which otherwise restricts compound access to the allosteric pocket. Regulatory segment destabilization in wild-type IDH1 promotes inhibitor binding, suggesting that destabilization is critical for mutant selectivity. We also report crystal structures of oncogenic IDH2 mutant isoforms, highlighting the fact that the analogous segment of IDH2 is not similarly destabilized. This intrinsic stability of IDH2 may contribute to observed inhibitor IDH1 isoform selectivity. Moreover, discrete residues in the IDH1 allosteric pocket that differ from IDH2 may also guide IDH1 isoform selectivity. These data provide a deeper understanding of how IDH1 inhibitors achieve mutant and isoform selectivity.

  8. Novel frataxin isoforms may contribute to the pathological mechanism of Friedreich ataxia.

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    Haiyan Xia

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by frataxin (FXN deficiency. The nervous system and heart are the most severely affected tissues. However, highly mitochondria-dependent tissues, such as kidney and liver, are not obviously affected, although the abundance of FXN is normally high in these tissues. In this study we have revealed two novel FXN isoforms (II and III, which are specifically expressed in affected cerebellum and heart tissues, respectively, and are functional in vitro and in vivo. Increasing the abundance of the heart-specific isoform III significantly increased the mitochondrial aconitase activity, while over-expression of the cerebellum-specific isoform II protected against oxidative damage of Fe-S cluster-containing aconitase. Further, we observed that the protein level of isoform III decreased in FRDA patient heart, while the mRNA level of isoform II decreased more in FRDA patient cerebellum compared to total FXN mRNA. Our novel findings are highly relevant to understanding the mechanism of tissue-specific pathology in FRDA.

  9. Nesprin-2 epsilon: A novel nesprin isoform expressed in human ovary and Ntera-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Le Thanh [Wolfson Centre for Inherited Neuromuscular Disease, RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry SY10 7AG (United Kingdom); Boehm, Sabrina V.; Roberts, Roland G. [Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, King' s College London, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Morris, Glenn E., E-mail: glennmanc@hotmail.com [Wolfson Centre for Inherited Neuromuscular Disease, RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry SY10 7AG (United Kingdom); Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Keele ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} A novel epsilon isoform of nesprin-2 has been discovered. {yields} This 120 kDa protein was predicted by bioinformatic analysis, but has not previously been observed. {yields} It is the main isoform expressed in a teratocarcinoma cell line and is also found in ovary. {yields} Like other nesprins, it is located at the nuclear envelope. {yields} We suggest it may have a role in very early development or in some ovary-specific function. -- Abstract: The nuclear envelope-associated cytoskeletal protein, nesprin-2, is encoded by a large gene containing several internal promoters that produce shorter isoforms. In a study of Ntera-2 teratocarcinoma cells, a novel isoform, nesprin-2-epsilon, was found to be the major mRNA and protein product of the nesprin-2 gene. Its existence was predicted by bioinformatic analysis, but this is the first direct demonstration of both the mRNA and the 120 kDa protein which is located at the nuclear envelope. In a panel of 21 adult and foetal human tissues, the nesprin-2-epsilon mRNA was strongly expressed in ovary but was a minor isoform elsewhere. The expression pattern suggests a possible link with very early development and a likely physiological role in ovary.

  10. Evolution of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA catalytic subunit isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Søberg

    Full Text Available The 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase, or protein kinase A (PKA, pathway is one of the most versatile and best studied signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. The two paralogous PKA catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ, encoded by the genes PRKACA and PRKACB, respectively, are among the best understood model kinases in signal transduction research. In this work, we explore and elucidate the evolution of the alternative 5' exons and the splicing pattern giving rise to the numerous PKA catalytic subunit isoforms. In addition to the universally conserved Cα1/Cβ1 isoforms, we find kinase variants with short N-termini in all main vertebrate classes, including the sperm-specific Cα2 isoform found to be conserved in all mammals. We also describe, for the first time, a PKA Cα isoform with a long N-terminus, paralogous to the PKA Cβ2 N-terminus. An analysis of isoform-specific variation highlights residues and motifs that are likely to be of functional importance.

  11. Elevated serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5a levels in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jhih; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Sun, Yu-Shan; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Chu, Der-Ming; Chen, Wei-Liang; Wu, Li-Wei

    2017-09-29

    Tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a is expressed in tumor-associated macrophages and is a biomarker of chronic inflammation. Herein, we correlated serum tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a levels with metabolic syndrome status and made comparisons with traditional markers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein and interleukin-6. One hundred healthy volunteers were randomly selected, and cut-off points for metabolic syndrome related inflammatory biomarkers were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Linear and logistic regression models were subsequently used to correlate inflammatory markers with the risk of metabolic syndrome. Twenty-two participants met the criteria for metabolic syndrome, and serum tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a levels of >5.8 μg/L were associated with metabolic syndrome (c-statistics, 0.730; p = 0.001; 95% confidence interval, 0.618-0.842). In addition, 1 μg/L increases in tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a levels were indicative of a 1.860 fold increase in the risk of metabolic syndrome (p = 0.012). Elevated serum tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a levels are associated with the risk of metabolic syndrome, with a cut-off level of 5.8 μg/L.

  12. Adiponectin Isoforms Differentially Affect Gene Expression and the Lipidome of Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Wanninger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Adiponectin (APN exerts multiple beneficial effects in obesity and protects from liver injury. Different APN isoforms circulate in serum, and here, the effect of low molecular weight (LMW and higher molecular weight (HMW APN on primary human hepatocytes (PHH has been analyzed. APN is not detected in hepatocyte lysates; levels are strongly increased by HMW-APN, but not by LMW-APN, suggesting the distinct uptake/degradation of APN isoforms by PHH. Several genes with a role in fibrosis, glucose and lipid metabolism known to be regulated by HMW-APN are not affected by the LMW-isoform. Follistatin is reduced by HMW-APN and induced by LMW-APN in supernatants of PHH. Fibroblast growth factor 21 is repressed by both isoforms. Cellular triglycerides and cholesterol levels are not reduced by APN. Total phospholipids, including plasmalogens and sphingomyelins, are not changed upon APN incubation, while distinct species are either induced or repressed. Unexpectedly, total ceramide is increased by LMW-APN. Current data show that APN isoforms differentially affect hepatocyte gene expression, but do not grossly alter the hepatocyte lipidome.

  13. Nesprin-2 epsilon: A novel nesprin isoform expressed in human ovary and Ntera-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Le Thanh; Boehm, Sabrina V.; Roberts, Roland G.; Morris, Glenn E.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel epsilon isoform of nesprin-2 has been discovered. → This 120 kDa protein was predicted by bioinformatic analysis, but has not previously been observed. → It is the main isoform expressed in a teratocarcinoma cell line and is also found in ovary. → Like other nesprins, it is located at the nuclear envelope. → We suggest it may have a role in very early development or in some ovary-specific function. -- Abstract: The nuclear envelope-associated cytoskeletal protein, nesprin-2, is encoded by a large gene containing several internal promoters that produce shorter isoforms. In a study of Ntera-2 teratocarcinoma cells, a novel isoform, nesprin-2-epsilon, was found to be the major mRNA and protein product of the nesprin-2 gene. Its existence was predicted by bioinformatic analysis, but this is the first direct demonstration of both the mRNA and the 120 kDa protein which is located at the nuclear envelope. In a panel of 21 adult and foetal human tissues, the nesprin-2-epsilon mRNA was strongly expressed in ovary but was a minor isoform elsewhere. The expression pattern suggests a possible link with very early development and a likely physiological role in ovary.

  14. Proteome analysis of brown spider venom: identification of loxnecrogin isoforms in Loxosceles gaucho venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Leandro F; Laugesen, Sabrina; Botelho, Elvio D; Ricart, Carlos A O; Fontes, Wagner; Barbaro, Katia C; Roepstorff, Peter; Sousa, Marcelo V

    2005-05-01

    Brown spiders of the Loxosceles genus are distributed worldwide. In Brazil, eight species are found in Southern states, where the envenomation by Loxosceles venom (loxoscelism) is a health problem. The mechanism of the dermonecrotic action of Loxosceles venom is not totally understood. Two isoforms of dermonecrotic toxins (loxnecrogins) from L. gaucho venom have been previously purified, and showed sequence similarities to sphingomyelinase. Herein we employed a proteomic approach to obtain a global view of the venom proteome, with a particular interest in the loxnecrogin isoforms' pattern. Proteomic two-dimensional gel electrophoresis maps for L. gaucho, L. intermedia, and L. laeta venoms showed a major protein region (30-35 kDa, pI 3-10), where at least eight loxnecrogin isoforms could be separated and identified. Their characterization used a combined approach composed of Edman chemical sequencing, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and electrospray ionization-quadropole-time of flight tandem mass spectrometry leading to the identification of sphingomyelinases D. The venom was also pre-fractionated by gel filtration on a Superose 12 fast protein liqiud chromatography column, followed by capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Eleven possible loxnecrogin isoforms around 30-32 kDa were detected. The identification of dermonecrotic toxin isoforms in L. gaucho venom is an important step towards understanding the physiopathology of the envenomation, leading to improvements in the immunotherapy of loxoscelism.

  15. Measurement of hepcidin isoforms in human serum by liquid chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Simon; Couchman, Lewis; Sharp, Paul; Macdougall, Iain; Moniz, Cajetan

    2017-03-01

    Hepcidin-25 is the master regulator of iron homeostasis. N-truncated isoforms of hepcidin-25 have been identified (hepcidin-20, -22, -24), although data on the concentrations of these isoforms are sparse. Serum was mixed with aqueous formic acid, and the supernatant loaded onto a 96-well-SPE-plate. Eluted analytes were analyzed using LC-HR-MS. Forty-seven paired dipotassium-EDTA human plasma and serum samples were analyzed. The LLOQ was 1 μg/l (all analytes). Accuracy and precision were acceptable. There was a good correlation (R 2 >0.90, all analytes) between matrices. The median (range) serum hepcidin-20, -22, -24 and -25 concentrations measured were 4 (1-40), 8 (2-20), 8 (1-50) and 39 (1-334) μg/l, respectively. LC-HR-MS is widely applicable to the measurement of hepcidin-25, and truncated isoforms.

  16. The ROCK isoforms differentially regulate the morphological characteristics of carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, Rachel J; Leih, Mitchell J; Parekh, Aron

    2017-06-26

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activity drives cell migration via actomyosin contractility. During invasion, individual cancer cells can transition between 2 modes of migration, mesenchymal and amoeboid. Changes in ROCK activity can cause a switch between these migration phenotypes which are defined by distinct morphologies. However, recent studies have shown that the ROCK isoforms are not functionally redundant as previously thought. Therefore, it is unclear whether the ROCK isoforms play different roles in regulating migration phenotypes. Here, we found that ROCK1 and ROCK2 differentially regulate carcinoma cell morphology resulting in intermediate phenotypes that share some mesenchymal and amoeboid characteristics. These findings suggest that the ROCK isoforms play unique roles in the phenotypic plasticity of mesenchymal carcinoma cells which may have therapeutic implications.

  17. Distribution of protein kinase Mzeta and the complete protein kinase C isoform family in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, M U; Benedikz, Eirikur; Hernandez, I

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of at least ten isoforms, nine of which are expressed in brain (alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, delta, straightepsilon, eta, zeta, iota/lambda). Our previous studies have shown that many of these PKCs participate in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region...... Mzeta (PKMzeta). In this study, we used immunoblot and immunocytochemical techniques with isoform-specific antisera to examine the distribution of the complete family of PKC isozymes and PKMzeta in rat brain. Each form of PKC showed a widespread distribution in the brain with a distinct regional pattern...... of high and low levels of expression. PKMzeta, the predominant form of PKM in brain, had high levels in hippocampus, frontal and occipital cortex, striatum, and hypothalamus. In the hippocampus, each isoform was expressed in a characteristic pattern, with zeta prominent in the CA1 stratum radiatum...

  18. Changes in claudin isoform expression in the gill during salinity shifts and smoltification of Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steffen; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    Permeability changes of the gill epithelium of euryhaline teleosts are imperative during salinity acclimation. This study examined the expression patterns of 5 claudin isoforms in the salmon gill. These are membrane proteins being major determinants of selective and gross tight junction permeabil......Permeability changes of the gill epithelium of euryhaline teleosts are imperative during salinity acclimation. This study examined the expression patterns of 5 claudin isoforms in the salmon gill. These are membrane proteins being major determinants of selective and gross tight junction...... expression was confirmed by RT-QPCR. We examined the expression profile during the parr-smolt transformation (PST) in freshwater and during acclimation to sea water (SW). During PST, claudin 10e expression peaked in May, coinciding with optimal SW tolerance. The other claudin isoforms were not influenced...

  19. The Invasion and Metastasis Promotion Role of CD97 Small Isoform in Gastric Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daren; Trojanowicz, Bogusz; Ye, Longyun

    2012-01-01

    CD97 is over-expressed in the majority of gastric adenocarcinomas and is associated with its dedifferentiation and aggressiveness. Our previous results demonstrated that out of three CD97 isoforms tested, only the small one was able to promote increased invasiveness in vitro. Based on these data we...... further aimed to investigate the role of CD97 small isoform in gastric cancer progression in vivo by employing the cells with a stable CD97 small isoform knock-down and an orthotopic gastric cancer mouse model. We could demonstrate that the knock down of CD97/EGF1,2,5, led to a significant decrease...... in the number of cells penetrating the gelatin coated membrane as compared with control cells. In the gastric cancer mouse model, both the hypodermic and the orthotopic yielded tumor masses of the CD97/EGF1,2,5kd group and were significantly smaller than the control. Metastatic tumor cell number in early...

  20. The α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 are required to maintain normal pulmonary vascular resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Li

    Full Text Available Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension associated with structural alterations in pulmonary vessels and sustained vasoconstriction. The transcriptional mechanisms responsible for these distinctive changes are unclear. We have previously reported that CREB1 is activated in the lung in response to alveolar hypoxia but not in other organs. To directly investigate the role of α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 in the regulation of pulmonary vascular resistance we examined the responses of mice in which these isoforms of CREB1 had been inactivated by gene mutation, leaving only the β isoform intact (CREB(αΔ mice. Here we report that expression of CREB regulated genes was altered in the lungs of CREB(αΔ mice. CREB(αΔ mice had greater pulmonary vascular resistance than wild types, both basally in normoxia and following exposure to hypoxic conditions for three weeks. There was no difference in rho kinase mediated vasoconstriction between CREB(αΔ and wild type mice. Stereological analysis of pulmonary vascular structure showed characteristic wall thickening and lumen reduction in hypoxic wild-type mice, with similar changes observed in CREB(αΔ. CREB(αΔ mice had larger lungs with reduced epithelial surface density suggesting increased pulmonary compliance. These findings show that α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 regulate homeostatic gene expression in the lung and that normal activity of these isoforms is essential to maintain low pulmonary vascular resistance in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions and to maintain the normal alveolar structure. Interventions that enhance the actions of α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 warrant further investigation in hypoxic lung diseases.

  1. Different characteristics and nucleotide binding properties of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C Thomas

    Full Text Available We recently reported that Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, clustered into macrostructures in response to decreased nucleotide levels and that there were differences between the IMPDH isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. We hypothesised that the Bateman domains, which are present in both isoforms and serve as energy-sensing/allosteric modules in unrelated proteins, would contribute to isoform-specific differences and that mutations situated in and around this domain in IMPDH1 which give rise to retinitis pigmentosa (RP would compromise regulation. We employed immuno-electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructure of IMPDH macrostructures and live-cell imaging to follow clustering of an IMPDH2-GFP chimera in real-time. Using a series of IMPDH1/IMPDH2 chimera we demonstrated that the propensity to cluster was conferred by the N-terminal 244 amino acids, which includes the Bateman domain. A protease protection assay suggested isoform-specific purine nucleotide binding characteristics, with ATP protecting IMPDH1 and AMP protecting IMPDH2, via a mechanism involving conformational changes upon nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain without affecting IMPDH catalytic activity. ATP binding to IMPDH1 was confirmed in a nucleotide binding assay. The RP-causing mutation, R224P, abolished ATP binding and nucleotide protection and this correlated with an altered propensity to cluster. Collectively these data demonstrate that (i the isoforms are differentially regulated by AMP and ATP by a mechanism involving the Bateman domain, (ii communication occurs between the Bateman and catalytic domains and (iii the RP-causing mutations compromise such regulation. These findings support the idea that the IMPDH isoforms are subject to distinct regulation and that regulatory defects contribute to human disease.

  2. Expression of heparanase isoforms in intervertebral discs classified according to Pfirrmann grading system for disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis; Oliveira, Lilian Zerbinatti de; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2013-06-01

    This is a quantitative study of heparanase isoforms expression in degenerative and nondegenerative intervertebral discs (IVDs). To quantify the expression of both heparanase isoforms (HPSE1 and HPSE2) in IVD tissues as classified by different degeneration grades using the Pfirrmann grading system, and to correlate the expression with the loss of extracellular matrix molecules observed in patients with the disease. The loss of proteoglycans as observed in IVD degeneration may occur due to the enhanced expression of matrix degrading enzymes, such as heparanase. However, the heparanase function in IVD degeneration remains unclear. This study comprised 53 surgical samples of degenerative discs obtained from patients with lumbar disc degeneration and 12 control samples collected from healthy individuals without any degenerative lumbar disc alterations who had accidental spine fractures.All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging based on the Pfirrmann grading system for disc degeneration. Only the specimens that were classified according to magnetic resonance imaging evaluations as Pfirrmann grades I, II, III, and IV were analyzed.The tissue sections of the disc samples were subject to immunohistochemical staining with antibodies against the heparanase isoforms and to quantitative real time PCR to amplify heparanase isoforms cDNA. Protein and mRNA expressions were quantified. Analysis of variance and Student t test were used to compare the means of the study populations. The data demonstrated a gradual increase in both the heparanase isoform protein expression and disc degeneration progression. Besides, mRNA expression of both heparanase isoforms were significantly higher in degenerative than nondegenerative IVDs. The overexpression of HPSE1 and HPSE2 in the intervertebral degenerated discs suggests a role for these factors in mediating extracellular matrix remodeling in degenerative discs during disease development.

  3. Protein chemical characterization of Gc globulin (vitamin D-binding protein) isoforms; Gc-1f, Gc-1s and Gc-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Maja; Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Laursen, Inga

    2007-01-01

    exchange chromatography. The separated isoforms and several commercial preparations of individual isoforms were characterized by mass spectrometry. This revealed that the major isoforms were non-glycosylated. Compared to the Gc-1f isoform the other dominating isoforms represented an Asp/Glu substitution...... (Gc-1s) and a Thr/Lys substitution (Gc-2) in agreement with DNA sequencing studies. The commercial preparations were found to represent mainly one or two isoforms. An O-linked glycan with a mass of 656 Da and terminating with a sialic acid residue was detected on a minor proportion of Gc globulin...

  4. The Long Isoform of Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Enters the Nucleus And, Rather than Catalyzing Nontemplated Nucleotide Addition, Modulates the Catalytic Activity of the Short Isoform

    OpenAIRE

    Benedict, Cindy L.; Gilfillan, Susan; Kearney, John F.

    2001-01-01

    During variable/diversity/joining (V[D]J) recombination, the enzyme terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (Tdt) adds random nucleotides at the junctions of the rearranging gene segments, increasing diversity of the antibody (Ab) and T cell receptor repertoires. Two splice variants of Tdt have been described, but only one (short isoform of Tdt [TdtS]) has been convincingly demonstrated to catalyze nontemplated (N) addition in vitro. We have expressed each splice variant of Tdt in transgenic (T...

  5. VEGF121b and VEGF165b are weakly angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pio Ruben

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different isoforms of VEGF-A (mainly VEGF121, VEGF165 and VEGF189 have been shown to display particular angiogenic properties in the generation of a functional tumor vasculature. Recently, a novel class of VEGF-A isoforms, designated as VEGFxxxb, generated through alternative splicing, have been described. Previous studies have suggested that these isoforms may inhibit angiogenesis. In the present work we have produced recombinant VEGF121/165b proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris and constructed vectors to overexpress these isoforms and assess their angiogenic potential. Results Recombinant VEGF121/165b proteins generated either in yeasts or mammalian cells activated VEGFR2 and its downstream effector ERK1/2, although to a lesser extent than VEGF165. Furthermore, treatment of endothelial cells with VEGF121/165b increased cell proliferation compared to untreated cells, although such stimulation was lower than that induced by VEGF165. Moreover, in vivo angiogenesis assays confirmed angiogenesis stimulation by VEGF121/165b isoforms. A549 and PC-3 cells overexpressing VEGF121b or VEGF165b (or carrying the PCDNA3.1 empty vector, as control and xenotransplanted into nude mice showed increased tumor volume and angiogenesis compared to controls. To assess whether the VEGFxxxb isoforms are differentially expressed in tumors compared to healthy tissues, immunohistochemical analysis was conducted on a breast cancer tissue microarray. A significant increase (p xxxb and total VEGF-A protein expression in infiltrating ductal carcinomas compared to normal breasts was observed. A positive significant correlation (r = 0.404, p = 0.033 between VEGFxxxb and total VEGF-A was found. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that VEGF121/165b are not anti-angiogenic, but weakly angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A. In addition, VEGFxxxb isoforms are up-regulated in breast cancer in comparison with non malignant breast tissues. These results are to be taken

  6. Cloning, expression and identification of an isoform of human stromal cell derived factor-1α

    OpenAIRE

    LIANG, YIN-KU; PING, WEI; BIAN, LIU-JIAO

    2015-01-01

    Human stromal cell derived factor-1α (hSDF-1α), a chemotactic factor of stem cells, regulates inflammation, promotes the mobilization of stem cells and induces angiogenesis following ischemia. Six SDF-1 isoforms, SDF-1α, SDF-1β, SDF-1γ, SDF-1δ, SDF-1ε and SDF-1ϕ, which all contain a signal peptide at the N-terminus, have been reported. In the present study a special isoform of hSDF-1α is described that does not contain the N-terminal signal peptide sequence. The hSDF-1α gene was cloned with t...

  7. Effect of renal replacement therapy on retinol-binding protein 4 isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Simone K; Henze, Andrea; Nagl, Britta

    2009-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels are elevated in the serum of patients with kidney dysfunction. We recently showed that RBP4 isoforms including apo-RBP4 (RBP4 not bound to retinol) and RBP4 truncated at the C-terminus (RBP4-L, RBP4-LL) are increased in the serum of patients with kidney dis...... diseases but not in serum of patients with various liver diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of renal replacement therapy on RBP4 isoforms....

  8. Two Isoforms of Clp Peptidase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Control Distinct Aspects of Cellular Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Branwen M.; Breidenstein, Elena B. M.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Reffuveille, Fany; Mawla, Gina D.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Baker, Tania A.

    2017-01-01

    Caseinolytic peptidases (ClpPs) regulate diverse aspects of cellular physiology in bacteria. Some species have multiple ClpPs, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in which there is an archetypical isoform, ClpP1, and a second isoform, ClpP2, about which little is known. Here, we use phenotypic assays to investigate the biological roles of ClpP1 and ClpP2 and biochemical assays to characterize purified ClpP1, ClpP2, ClpX, and ClpA. Interestingly, ClpP1 and ClpP2 have d...

  9. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding two normal isoforms of bovine stem cell factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J H; Hikono, H; Ohtaki, M; Kubota, T; Sakurai, M

    1994-08-11

    The cDNA clones encoding two isoforms of bovine stem cell factor (bSCF) were obtained using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and their sequences were determined. The deduced amino acid sequences of the longer and shorter isoforms of bSCF consist, respectively, of 274 and 246 residues and show a high degree of identity to those of SCFs of different animal species. Northern blot analysis with the cDNA revealed the expression of a 5.8 kilobase bSCF RNA in fetal bovine tissues.

  10. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S. K.; Kateriya, S.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2013-09-01

    The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr-Tyr cross-linking (o,o‧-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  11. Cloning of allene oxide cyclase gene from Leymus mollis and analysis of its expression in wheat?Leymus chromosome addition lines

    OpenAIRE

    Eltayeb Habora, Mohamed Elsadig; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Oka, Mariko; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Leymus mollis (Triticeae; Poaceae) is a useful genetic resource for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) breeding via wide hybridization to introduce its chromosomes and integrate its useful traits into wheat. Leymus mollis is highly tolerant to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity and resistant to various diseases, but the genetic mechanisms controlling its physiological tolerance remain largely unexplored. We identified and cloned an allene oxide cyclase (AOC) gene from L. mollis that was ...

  12. SMRT has tissue-specific isoform profiles that include a form containing one CoRNR box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, Stephen; Malartre, Marianne; Sharpe, Colin

    2005-01-01

    SMRT acts as a corepressor for a range of transcription factors. The amino-terminal part of the protein includes domains that mainly mediate transcriptional repression whilst the carboxy-terminal part includes domains that interact with nuclear receptors using up to three motifs called CoRNR boxes. The region of the SMRT primary transcript encoding the interaction domains is subject to alternative splicing that varies the inclusion of the third CoRNR box. The profile in mice includes an abundant, novel SMRT isoform that possesses just one CoRNR box. Mouse tissues therefore express SMRT isoforms containing one, two or three CoRNR boxes. In frogs, the SMRT isoform profile is tissue-specific. The mouse also shows distinct profiles generated by differential expression levels of the SMRT transcript isoforms. The formation of multiple SMRT isoforms and their tissue-specific regulation indicates a mechanism, whereby cells can define the repertoire of transcription factors regulated by SMRT

  13. The characterization of soybean oil body integral oleosin isoforms and the effects of alkaline pH on them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanyun; Zhao, Luping; Ying, Yusang; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-06-15

    Oil body, an organelle in seed cell (naturally pre-emulsified oil), has great potentials to be used in food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and other applications requiring stable oil-in-water emulsions. Researchers have tried to extract oil body by alkaline buffers, which are beneficial for removing contaminated proteins. But it is not clear whether alkaline buffers could remove oil body integral proteins (mainly oleosins), which could keep oil body integrity and stability. In this study, seven oleosin isoforms were identified for soybean oil body (three isoforms, 24 kDa; three isoforms, 18 kDa; one isoform, 16kDa). Oleosins were not glycoproteins and 24 kDa oleosin isoforms possessed less thiol groups than 18 kDa ones. It was found that alkaline pH not only removed contaminated proteins but also oleosins, and more and more oleosins were removed with increasing alkaline pH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Germacrene C synthase from Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VFNT cherry tomato: cDNA isolation, characterization, and bacterial expression of the multiple product sesquiterpene cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, S M; Crock, J; Dowdle-Rizzo, B; Lemaux, P G; Croteau, R

    1998-03-03

    Germacrene C was found by GC-MS and NMR analysis to be the most abundant sesquiterpene in the leaf oil of Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VFNT Cherry, with lesser amounts of germacrene A, guaia-6,9-diene, germacrene B, beta-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene, and germacrene D. Soluble enzyme preparations from leaves catalyzed the divalent metal ion-dependent cyclization of [1-3H]farnesyl diphosphate to these same sesquiterpene olefins, as determined by radio-GC. To obtain a germacrene synthase cDNA, a set of degenerate primers was constructed based on conserved amino acid sequences of related terpenoid cyclases. With cDNA prepared from leaf epidermis-enriched mRNA, these primers amplified a 767-bp fragment that was used as a hybridization probe to screen the cDNA library. Thirty-one clones were evaluated for functional expression of terpenoid cyclase activity in Escherichia coli by using labeled geranyl, farnesyl, and geranylgeranyl diphosphates as substrates. Nine cDNA isolates expressed sesquiterpene synthase activity, and GC-MS analysis of the products identified germacrene C with smaller amounts of germacrene A, B, and D. None of the expressed proteins was active with geranylgeranyl diphosphate; however, one truncated protein converted geranyl diphosphate to the monoterpene limonene. The cDNA inserts specify a deduced polypeptide of 548 amino acids (Mr = 64,114), and sequence comparison with other plant sesquiterpene cyclases indicates that germacrene C synthase most closely resembles cotton delta-cadinene synthase (50% identity).

  15. Galanin can inhibit insulin release by a mechanism other than membrane hyperpolarization or inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, G W; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y; Yada, T; Russo, L L; Bliss, C R; Cormont, M; Monge, L; Van Obberghen, E

    1989-05-05

    -dependent Ca2+ channels. One suggested mechanism for the action of galanin is inhibition of adenylate cyclase. However, it was found that galanin inhibits insulin release even in the presence of 8-Br-cAMP, an agent which effectively bypasses adenylate cyclase. Therefore, an additional mechanism for the inhibitory effect of galanin must be present. All of the effects of galanin were sensitive to pertussis toxin. These data suggest two G-protein-dependent actions of galanin, one to hyperpolarize the plasma membrane and one at a distal point in stimulus-secretion coupling, close to the exocytotic event.

  16. Dispatch. Dictyostelium chemotaxis: fascism through the back door?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insall, Robert

    2003-04-29

    Aggregating Dictyostelium cells secrete cyclic AMP to attract their neighbours by chemotaxis. It has now been shown that adenylyl cyclase is enriched in the rear of cells, and this localisation is required for normal aggregation.

  17. HPLC separation of human serum albumin isoforms based on their isoelectric points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Lucía; Torres, María José; Schopfer, Francisco; Freeman, Bruce A.; Armas, Larissa; Ricciardi, Alejandro; Alvarez, Beatriz; Radi, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in plasma. Cys34, the only free Cys residue, is the predominant plasma thiol and a relevant sacrificial antioxidant. Both in vivo circulating HSA and pharmaceutical preparations are heterogeneous with respect to the oxidation state of Cys34. In this work, we developed an external pH gradient chromatofocusing procedure that allows the analysis of the oxidation status of HSA in human plasma and biopharmaceutical products based on the different apparent isoelectric points and chemical properties of the redox isoforms. Specifically, reduced-mercury blocked HSA (HSA–SHg+), HSA with Cys34 oxidized to sulfenic acid (HSA–SOH) and HSA oxidized to sulfinate anion (HSA–SO2−) can be separated with resolutions of 1.4 and 3.1 (first and last pair) and hence quantified and purified. In addition, an N-terminally degraded isoform (HSA3–585) in different redox states can be resolved as well. Confirmation of the identity of the chromatofocusing isolated isoforms was achieved by high resolution whole protein MS. It is proposed that the chromatofocusing procedure can be used to produce more exact and complete descriptions of the redox status of HSA in vivo and in vitro. Finally, the scalability capabilities of the chromatofocusing procedure allow for the preparation of highly pure standards of several redox isoforms of HSA PMID:24316526

  18. Muscle-Type Specific Autophosphorylation of CaMKII Isoforms after Paced Contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, W.; Gevers, W.; van Overbeek, D.; de Haan, A.; Jaspers, R.T.; Hilbers, P.A.; van Riel, A.C.R.; Flueck, M.

    2014-01-01

    We explored to what extent isoforms of the regulator of excitation-contraction and excitation-transcription coupling, calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) contribute to the specificity of myocellular calcium sensing between muscle types and whether concentration transients in its

  19. IgE-binding potencies of three peach Pru p 1 isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Zhong-Shan; Zhou, Xiang; Yang, Zhao-Wei; Versteeg, Serge A.; Gao, Ling; Fu, Wan-Yi; Wang, Hui-Ying; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Akkerdaas, Jaap H.; van Ree, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Pru p 1, the Bet v 1 homologue from peach, has been identified as a clinically relevant allergen. Three isoforms have been described, two in peach fruit (Pru p 1.0101 and Pru p 1.0201) and one in pollen (Pru p 1.0301). The present study aimed to compare their IgE-binding potencies. Three Pru p 1

  20. Relative contributions of NOS isoforms during experimental colitis : endothelial-derived NOS maintains mucosal integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallance, BA; Dijkstra, G; Qiu, BS; van der Waaij, LA; van Goor, H; Jansen, PLM; Mashimo, H; Collins, SM

    2004-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in inflammatory bowel diseases has traditionally focused on the inducible form of NO synthase (iNOS). However, the constitutive endothelial (eNOS) and neuronal (nNOS) isoforms may also impact on colitis, either by contributing to the inflammation or by regulating

  1. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Benito, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte­-specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27562101

  2. Heparanase isoform expression and extracellular matrix remodeling in intervertebral disc degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Miller Reis Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the molecules involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and to identify and quantify heparanase isoforms present in herniated and degenerative discs. INTRODUCTION: Heparanase is an endo-beta-glucuronidase that specifically acts upon the heparan sulfate chains of proteoglycans. However, heparanase expression in degenerative intervertebral discs has not yet been evaluated. Notably, previous studies demonstrated a correlation between changes in the heparan sulfate proteoglycan pattern and the degenerative process associated with intervertebral discs. METHODS: Twenty-nine samples of intervertebral degenerative discs, 23 samples of herniated discs and 12 samples of non-degenerative discs were analyzed. The expression of both heparanase isoforms (heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR analysis. RESULTS: Heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 expression levels were significantly higher in the herniated and degenerative discs in comparison to the control tissues, suggesting a possible role of these proteins in the intervertebral degenerative process. CONCLUSION: The overexpression of heparanase isoforms in the degenerative intervertebral discs and the herniated discs suggests a potential role of both proteins in the mediation of inflammatory processes and in extracellular matrix remodeling. The heparanase-2 isoform may be involved in normal metabolic processes, as evidenced by its higher expression in the control intervertebral discs relative to the expression of heparanase-1.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-beta Isoforms for Early and Differential Dementia Diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyfs, Hanne; Van Broeck, Bianca; Timmers, Maarten; Fransen, Erik; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; De Deyn, Peter P.; Streffer, Johannes R.; Mercken, Marc; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Overlapping cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (CSF) levels between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and non-AD patients decrease differential diagnostic accuracy of the AD core CSF biomarkers. Amyloid-beta (A beta) isoforms might improve the AD versus non-AD differential diagnosis. Objective: To

  4. Quarternary structure and enzymological properties of the different hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Christian; Klint, Cecilia; Lindvall, Håkan

    2010-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) is a key enzyme in the mobilization of energy in the form of fatty acids from intracellular stores of neutral lipids. The enzyme has been shown to exist in different isoforms with different molecular masses (84 kDa, 89 kDa and 117 kDa) expressed in a tissue-dependen...

  5. Isoforms of human cytochrome-c oxidase. Subunit composition and steady-state kinetic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Dekker, H. L.; van den Bogert, C.; Nieboer, P.; van Gelder, B. F.; Muijsers, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    The subunit pattern and the steady-state kinetics of cytochrome-c oxidase from human heart, muscle, kidney and liver were investigated. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of immunopurified cytochrome-c oxidase preparations suggest that isoforms of subunit VIa exist, which show differences in

  6. Kinetics of local and systemic isoforms of serum amyloid A in bovine mastitic milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Niewold, T.A.; Kornalijnslijper, E.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise the serum amyloid A (SAA) response to intramammary inoculation of Escherichia coli and to examine the distribution of hepatically and extrahepatically pruduced SAA isoforms in plasma and milk fra cows with mastitis....

  7. The Role of Insulin Receptor Isoforms in Diabetes and Its Metabolic and Vascular Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Escribano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The insulin receptor (IR presents by alternative splicing two isoforms: IRA and IRB. The differential physiological and pathological role of both isoforms is not completely known, and it is determinant the different binding affinity for insulin-like growth factor. IRB is more abundant in adult tissues and it exerts mainly the metabolic actions of insulin, whereas IRA is mainly expressed in fetal and prenatal period and exerts mitogenic actions. However, the change in the expression profile of both IR isoforms and its dysregulation are associated with the development of different pathologies, such as cancer, insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. In some of them, there is a significant increase of IRA/IRB ratio conferring a proliferative and migratory advantage to different cell types and favouring IGF-II actions with a sustained detriment in the metabolic effects of insulin. This review discussed specifically the role of IR isoforms as well as IGF-IR in diabetes and its associated complications as obesity and atherosclerosis. Future research with new IR modulators might be considered as possible targets to improve the treatment of diabetes and its associated complications.

  8. Subcellular Targeting of Nine Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Isoforms from Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism. PMID:12913141

  9. ACA12 Is a Deregulated Isoform of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limonta, Margherita; Romanowsky, Shawn; Olivari, Claudio; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Rosenberg, Alexa; Harper, Jeffrey F.; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2014-01-01

    Plant auto-inhibited Ca2+-ATPases (ACA) are crucial in defining the shape of calcium transients and therefore in eliciting plant responses to various stimuli. Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes ten ACA isoforms that can be divided into four clusters based on gene structure and sequence homology. While isoforms from clusters 1, 2 and 4 have been characterized, virtually nothing is known about members of cluster 3 (ACA12 and ACA13). Here we show that a GFP-tagged ACA12 localizes at the plasma membrane and that expression of ACA12 rescues the phenotype of partial male sterility of a null mutant of the plasma membrane isoform ACA9, thus providing genetic evidence that ACA12 is a functional plasma membrane-resident Ca2+-ATPase. By ACA12 expression in yeast and purification by CaM-affinity chromatography, we show that, unlike other ACAs, the activity of ACA12 is not stimulated by CaM. Moreover, full length ACA12 is able to rescue a yeast mutant deficient in calcium pumps. Analysis of single point ACA12 mutants suggests that ACA12 loss of auto-inhibition can be ascribed to the lack of two acidic residues - highly conserved in other ACA isoforms - localized at the cytoplasmic edge of the second and third transmembrane segments. Together, these results support a model in which the calcium pump activity of ACA12 is primarily regulated by increasing or decreasing mRNA expression and/or protein translation and degradation. PMID:24101142

  10. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  11. Functional validation of a novel isoform of Na +/H+ antiporter from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-03-22

    Mar 22, 2007 ... We have cloned a novel isoform of a vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter from Pennisetum glaucum (PgNHX1) that contains 5 transmembrane domains in contrast to AtNHX1 and OsNHX1 which have 9 transmembrane domains. Recently we have shown that PgNHX1 could confer high level of salinity tolerance ...

  12. NMR resonance assignments of a hypoallergenic isoform of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahammer, Linda; Grutsch, Sarina; Wallner, Michael; Ferreira, Fatima; Tollinger, Martin

    2017-10-01

    In Northern America and Europe a great number of people are suffering from birch pollen allergy and pollen related food allergies. The trigger for these immunological reactions is the 17.5 kDa major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, which belongs to the family of PR-10 (pathogenesis-related) proteins. In nature, Bet v 1 occurs as a mixture of various isoforms that possess different immunological properties despite their high sequence identities. Bet v 1.0102 (Bet v 1d), which is investigated here, is a hypoallergenic isoform of Bet v 1 and a potential candidate for allergen-specific immunotherapy. We assigned the backbone and side chain 1 H, 13 C and 15 N resonances of this protein and predicted its secondary structure. The NMR-chemical shift data indicate that Bet v 1.0102 is composed of three α-helices and a seven stranded β-sheet, in agreement with the known structure of the hyperallergenic isoform Bet v 1.0101 (Bet v 1a). Our resonance assignments create the foundation for detailed characterization of the dynamic properties of Bet v 1 isoforms by NMR relaxation measurements.

  13. Aging-related alterations in the distribution of Ca2+-dependent PKC isoforms in rabbit hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, EA; Palm, IF; O'Connor, M; Maizels, ET; Hunzicker-Dunn, M; Disterhoft, J; O’Connor, M.; Palm, L.F.

    2004-01-01

    The immunocytochemical and subcellular localization of the Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (cPKC) isoforms (PKCalpha, beta1, beta2, and gamma) was examined in rabbit hippocampus of young (3 months of age; n = 11) and aging (36 months of age; n = 14) subjects. Detailed immunocytochemical analyses

  14. Alternative NF-κB Isoforms in the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction and Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    Full Text Available The Drosophila NF-κB protein Dorsal is expressed at the larval neuromuscular junction, where its expression appears unrelated to known Dorsal functions in embryonic patterning and innate immunity. Using confocal microscopy with domain-specific antisera, we demonstrate that larval muscle expresses only the B isoform of Dorsal, which arises by intron retention. We find that Dorsal B interacts with and stabilizes Cactus at the neuromuscular junction, but exhibits Cactus independent localization and an absence of detectable nuclear translocation. We further find that the Dorsal-related immune factor Dif encodes a B isoform, reflecting a conservation of B domains across a range of insect NF-κB proteins. Carrying out mutagenesis of the Dif locus via a site-specific recombineering approach, we demonstrate that Dif B is the major, if not sole, Dif isoform in the mushroom bodies of the larval brain. The Dorsal and Dif B isoforms thus share a specific association with nervous system tissues as well as an alternative protein structure.

  15. Occurrence of NaK-ATPase isoforms during rat inner ear development and functional implications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, T.A.; Kuijpers, W.; Curfs, J.H.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the presence of NaK-ATPase isoforms in the developing inner ear of the rat and studied the importance of functional subunit combinations in endolymph homeostasis. The findings were: (a) the combination alpha 1 beta 1 is found in epithelial, mesenchymal, and neural inner ear cells

  16. Tyrosinase activity and isoform composition in separate tissues during development of Agaricus bisporus fruit bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van J.; Wichers, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    During growth of Agaricus bisporus fruit bodies the amount of active tyrosinase increased. The amount of active tyrosinase can be related to the degree of browning, as opposed to the fully activated tyrosinase level. Isoelectric focusing revealed that active and latent tyrosinase isoforms having

  17. Proteomic Validation of Transcript Isoforms, Including Those Assembled from RNA-Seq Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tay, Aidan P; Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Twine, Natalie a

    2015-01-01

    Human proteome analysis now requires an understanding of protein isoforms. We recently published the PG Nexus pipeline, which facilitates high confidence validation of exons and splice junctions by integrating genomics and proteomics data. Here we comprehensively explore how RNA-seq transcriptomi...

  18. Distinct Temporal Regulation of RET Isoform Internalization: Roles of Clathrin and AP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, Mathieu J F; Yoganathan, Piriya; Bone, Leslie N; Lian, Eric; Fetz, Andrew; Antonescu, Costin N; Mulligan, Lois M

    2015-11-01

    The RET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) contributes to kidney and nervous system development, and is implicated in a number of human cancers. RET is expressed as two protein isoforms, RET9 and RET51, with distinct interactions and signaling properties that contribute to these processes. RET isoforms are internalized from the cell surface into endosomal compartments in response to glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) ligand stimulation but the specific mechanisms of RET trafficking remain to be elucidated. Here, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to demonstrate that RET internalization occurs primarily through clathrin coated pits (CCPs). Activated RET receptors colocalize with clathrin, but not caveolin. The RET51 isoform is rapidly and robustly recruited to CCPs upon GDNF stimulation, while RET9 recruitment occurs more slowly and is less pronounced. We showed that the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) interacts directly with each RET isoform through its AP2 μ subunit, and is important for RET internalization. Our data establish that interactions with the AP2 complex promote RET receptor internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis but that RET9 and RET51 have distinct internalization kinetics that may contribute to differences in their biological functions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A novel MCPH1 isoform complements the defective chromosome condensation of human MCPH1-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Gavvovidis

    Full Text Available Biallelic mutations in MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly (MCPH with the cellular phenotype of defective chromosome condensation. MCPH1 encodes a multifunctional protein that notably is involved in brain development, regulation of chromosome condensation, and DNA damage response. In the present studies, we detected that MCPH1 encodes several distinct transcripts, including two major forms: full-length MCPH1 (MCPH1-FL and a second transcript lacking the six 3' exons (MCPH1Δe9-14. Both variants show comparable tissue-specific expression patterns, demonstrate nuclear localization that is mediated independently via separate NLS motifs, and are more abundant in certain fetal than adult organs. In addition, the expression of either isoform complements the chromosome condensation defect found in genetically MCPH1-deficient or MCPH1 siRNA-depleted cells, demonstrating a redundancy of both MCPH1 isoforms for the regulation of chromosome condensation. Strikingly however, both transcripts are regulated antagonistically during cell-cycle progression and there are functional differences between the isoforms with regard to the DNA damage response; MCPH1-FL localizes to phosphorylated H2AX repair foci following ionizing irradiation, while MCPH1Δe9-14 was evenly distributed in the nucleus. In summary, our results demonstrate here that MCPH1 encodes different isoforms that are differentially regulated at the transcript level and have different functions at the protein level.

  20. Comparison of inhibition capability of scutellarein and scutellarin towards important liver UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guang-You; Cao, Yun-Feng; Hu, Cui-Min; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Hong, Mo; Zhu, Zhi-Tu

    2014-03-01

    Scutellarin is an important bioactive flavonoid extracted from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz, and scutellarein is the corresponding aglycone of scutellarin. The present study aims to compare the inhibition potential of scutellarin and scutellarein towards several important UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms, including UGT1A1, UGT1A6, UGT1A9 and UGT2B7. It was demonstrated that scutellarein exerted stronger inhibition towards the tested UGT isoforms than scutellarin. Furthermore, the inhibition kinetic type and parameters (Ki ) were determined for the scutellarein's inhibition towards these UGT isoforms. Competitive inhibition of scutellarein towards all these UGT isoforms was demonstrated, and the Ki values were calculated to be 0.02, 5.0, 5.8 and 35.9 μM for UGT1A1, 1A6, 1A9 and 2B7, respectively. Using in vivo maximum plasma concentration of scutellarein in rat, the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation was performed to predict in vivo situation, indicating the most possible in vivo adverse effects due to the inhibition of scutellarein towards UGT1A1. All these results remind us to monitor the utilization of scutellarin and scutellarein, and the herbs containing these two components. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The activity and isoforms of NADP-malic enzyme in Nicotiana benthamiana plants under biotic stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doubnerová, V.; Jirásková, A.; Janošková, M.; Müller, Karel; Baťková, Petra; Synková, Helena; Čeřovská, Noemi; Ryšlavá, H.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2007), s. 281-289 ISSN 0231-5882 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : NADP * malic enzyme isoforms * Nicotiana benthamiana Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.286, year: 2007 http://www.gpb.sav.sk/2007-4.htm

  2. Cloning, Sequencing, and the Expression of the Elusive Sarcomeric TPM4α Isoform in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak K. Dube

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, tropomyosin is encoded by four known TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4 each of which can generate a number of TPM isoforms via alternative splicing and/or using alternate promoters. In humans, the sarcomeric isoform(s of each of the TPM genes, except for the TPM4, have been known for a long time. Recently, on the basis of computational analyses of the human genome sequence, the predicted sequence of TPM4α has been posted in GenBank. We designed primer-pairs for RT-PCR and showed the expression of the transcripts of TPM4α and a novel isoform TPM4δ in human heart and skeletal muscle. qRT-PCR shows that the relative expression of TPM4α and TPM4δ is higher in human cardiac muscle. Western blot analyses using CH1 monoclonal antibodies show the absence of the expression of TPM4δ protein (~28 kDa in human heart muscle. 2D western blot analyses with the same antibody show the expression of at least nine distinct tropomyosin molecules with a mass ~32 kD and above in adult heart. By Mass spectrometry, we determined the amino acid sequences of the extracted proteins from these spots. Spot “G” reveals the putative expression of TPM4α along with TPM1α protein in human adult heart.

  3. Of alphas and betas: distinct and overlapping functions of STAT3 isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewilde, Sarah; Vercelli, Alessandro; Chiarle, Roberto; Poli, Valeria

    2008-05-01

    STAT3 is a pleiotropic factor activated by many different signals including cytokines, growth factors and oncogenes. It is involved in a striking number of functions and can activate distinct repertoires of genes in different contexts. Like other STAT factors, STAT3 exists in two isoforms generated by alternative splicing, the full length STAT3alpha and the truncated STAT3beta, generally thought to act as a dominant negative factor. However, STAT3beta is not transcriptionally inactive and is able to both activate and repress genes depending on cellular environment. These unique properties of the STAT3beta isoform may contribute to the extraordinary functional complexity of STAT3 physiological and pathological actions, revealed by conditional mutagenesis studies and not yet fully understood. With this in mind, we try here to summarize what is known about the structure and function of the alpha and beta STAT3 isoforms, both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we report unpublished data describing the phenotype of mice where the STAT3alpha isoform was specifically ablated.

  4. Heparanase isoform expression and extracellular matrix remodeling in intervertebral disc degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Mader, Ana Maria; Milani, Carlo; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2011-01-01

    To determine the molecules involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and to identify and quantify heparanase isoforms present in herniated and degenerative discs. Heparanase is an endo-beta-glucuronidase that specifically acts upon the heparan sulfate chains of proteoglycans. However, heparanase expression in degenerative intervertebral discs has not yet been evaluated. Notably, previous studies demonstrated a correlation between changes in the heparan sulfate proteoglycan pattern and the degenerative process associated with intervertebral discs. Twenty-nine samples of intervertebral degenerative discs, 23 samples of herniated discs and 12 samples of non-degenerative discs were analyzed. The expression of both heparanase isoforms (heparanase-1 and heparanase-2) was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR analysis. Heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 expression levels were significantly higher in the herniated and degenerative discs in comparison to the control tissues, suggesting a possible role of these proteins in the intervertebral degenerative process. The overexpression of heparanase isoforms in the degenerative intervertebral discs and the herniated discs suggests a potential role of both proteins in the mediation of inflammatory processes and in extracellular matrix remodeling. The heparanase-2 isoform may be involved in normal metabolic processes, as evidenced by its higher expression in the control intervertebral discs relative to the expression of heparanase-1.

  5. Redundancy of IL-1 Isoform Signaling and Its Implications for Arterial Remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Beltrami-Moreira

    Full Text Available Mice deficient in IL-1 receptor 1 (hence unresponsive to both IL-1 isoforms α and β have impaired expansive arterial remodeling due to diminished expression of matrix-degrading enzymes, especially MMP-3. Emergence of IL-1 as a target in cardiovascular disease prompted the investigation of the redundancy of IL-1α and IL-1β in the induction of MMP-3 and other matrix-remodeling enzymes in human cells.Human primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and carotid endarterectomy specimens were stimulated with equimolar concentrations of IL-1α or IL-1β and analyzed protease expression by immunoblot and ELISA. Either IL-1α or IL-1β increased the expression of pro-MMP-3 in VSMCs, facilitated VSMC migration through Matrigel, and induced MMP-3 production in specimens from atheromatous plaques. VSMCs also secreted MMP-1 and Cathepsin S (CatS upon stimulation with IL-1α or IL-1β. IL-1 isoforms similarly increased MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression in carotid endarterectomy specimens. We examined the expression of MMP-3 and IL-1 isoforms by immunostaining of carotid atheromata, calculated the % positive areas, and tested associations by linear regression. MMP-3 colocalized with IL-1 isoforms in atheromata. MMP-3+ area in plaques positively associated with IL-1α+ (R2 = 0.61, P<0.001 and with IL-1β + areas (R2 = 0.68, P<0.001. MMP-3+ area within atheroma also associated with CD68+ area, but not with α-smooth muscle actin area.Either IL-1α or IL-1β can induce the expression of enzymes implicated in remodeling of the arterial extracellular matrix, and facilitate human VSMC migration in vitro. Human atheromata contain both IL-1 isoforms in association with immunoreactive MMP-3. This redundancy of IL-1 isoforms suggests that selective blocking of one IL-1 isoform should not impair expansive arterial remodeling, a finding with important clinical implications for therapeutic targeting of IL-1 in atherosclerosis.

  6. Kalrn promoter usage and isoform expression respond to chronic cocaine exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Xin-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The long-term effects of cocaine on behavior are accompanied by structural changes in excitatory glutamatergic synapses onto the medium spiny neurons of the striatum. The Kalrn gene encodes several functionally distinct isoforms; these multidomain guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs contain additional domains known to interact with phosphatidylinositides as well as with a number of different proteins. Through their activation of Rho proteins and their interactions with other proteins, the different Kalirin isoforms affect cytoskeletal organization. Chronic exposure of adult male rodents to cocaine increases levels of Kalirin 7 in the striatum. When exposed chronically to cocaine, mice lacking Kalirin 7, the major adult isoform, fail to show an increase in dendritic spine density in the nucleus accumbens, show diminished place preference for cocaine, and exhibit increased locomotor activity in response to cocaine. Results The use of alternate promoters and 3'-terminal exons of the mouse Kalrn gene were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. While the two most distal full-length Kalrn promoters are used equally in the prefrontal cortex, the more proximal of these promoters accounts for most of the transcripts expressed in the nucleus accumbens. The 3'-terminal exon unique to the Kalirin 7 isoform accounts for a greater percentage of the Kalrn transcripts in prefrontal cortex than in nucleus accumbens. Western blot analyses confirmed these differences. Chronic cocaine treatment increases usage of the promoter encoding the Δ-Kalirin isoforms but does not alter full-length Kalirin promoter usage. Usage of the 3'-terminal exon unique to Kalirin 7 increases following chronic cocaine exposure. Conclusions Kalrn promoter and 3'-terminal exon utilization are region-specific. In the nucleus accumbens, cocaine-mediated alterations in promoter usage and 3'-terminal exon usage favor expression of

  7. mRNA isoform diversity can obscure detection of miRNA-mediated control of translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Jennifer L.; Wei, Grace H.; Echner, Nicole; Humphreys, David T.; Beilharz, Traude H.; Preiss, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Reporter-based studies support inhibition of translation at the level of initiation as a substantial component of the miRNA mechanism, yet recent global analyses have suggested that they predominantly act through decreasing target mRNA stability. Cells commonly coexpress several processing isoforms of an mRNA, which may also differ in their regulatory untranslated regions (UTR). In particular, cancer cells are known to express high levels of short 3′ UTR isoforms that evade miRNA-mediated regulation, whereas longer 3′ UTRs predominate in nontransformed cells. To test whether mRNA isoform diversity can obscure detection of miRNA-mediated control at the level of translation, we assayed the responses of 11 endogenous let-7 targets to inactivation of this miRNA in HeLa cells, an intensively studied model system. We show that translational regulation in many cases appears to be modest when measuring the composite polysome profile of all extant isoforms of a given mRNA by density ultracentrifugation. In contrast, we saw clear effects at the level of translation initiation for multiple examples when selectively profiling mRNA isoforms carrying the 5′ or 3′ untranslated regions that were actually permissive to let-7 action, or when let-7 and a second targeting miRNA were jointly manipulated. Altogether, these results highlight a caveat to the mechanistic interpretation of data from global miRNA target analyses in transformed cells. Importantly, they reaffirm the importance of translational control as part of the miRNA mechanism in animal cells. PMID:21467217

  8. The Impact of Endurance Training on Human Skeletal Muscle Memory, Global Isoform Expression and Novel Transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maléne E Lindholm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Regularly performed endurance training has many beneficial effects on health and skeletal muscle function, and can be used to prevent and treat common diseases e.g. cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes and obesity. The molecular adaptation mechanisms regulating these effects are incompletely understood. To date, global transcriptome changes in skeletal muscles have been studied at the gene level only. Therefore, global isoform expression changes following exercise training in humans are unknown. Also, the effects of repeated interventions on transcriptional memory or training response have not been studied before. In this study, 23 individuals trained one leg for three months. Nine months later, 12 of the same subjects trained both legs in a second training period. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from both legs before and after both training periods. RNA sequencing analysis of all 119 skeletal muscle biopsies showed that training altered the expression of 3,404 gene isoforms, mainly associated with oxidative ATP production. Fifty-four genes had isoforms that changed in opposite directions. Training altered expression of 34 novel transcripts, all with protein-coding potential. After nine months of detraining, no training-induced transcriptome differences were detected between the previously trained and untrained legs. Although there were several differences in the physiological and transcriptional responses to repeated training, no coherent evidence of an endurance training induced transcriptional skeletal muscle memory was found. This human lifestyle intervention induced differential expression of thousands of isoforms and several transcripts from unannotated regions of the genome. It is likely that the observed isoform expression changes reflect adaptational mechanisms and processes that provide the functional and health benefits of regular physical activity.

  9. WNT5A encodes two isoforms with distinct functions in cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Bauer

    Full Text Available WNT5A, a member of the WNT family of secreted lipid-modified glycoproteins, is a critical regulator of a host of developmental processes, including limb formation, lung morphogenesis, intestinal elongation and mammary gland development. Altered WNT5A expression has been associated with a number of cancers. Interestingly, in certain types of cancers, such as hematological malignancies and colorectal carcinoma, WNT5A is inactivated and exerts a tumor suppressive function, while in other cancers, such as melanoma and gastric carcinoma, WNT5A is overexpressed and promotes tumor progression. The mechanism by which WNT5A achieves these distinct activities in cancers is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that the WNT5A gene produces two protein isoforms, WNT5A-long (WNT5A-L and WNT5A-short (WNT5A-S. Amino-terminal sequencing and a WNT5A-L specific antibody demonstrate that the mature and secreted isoforms are distinct, with WNT5A-L carrying an additional 18 N-terminal amino acids. Biochemical analysis indicates that both purified proteins are similar with respect to their stability, hydrophobicity and WNT/β-catenin signaling activity. Nonetheless, modulation of these two WNT5A isoforms, either through ectopic expression or knockdown, demonstrates that they exert distinct activities in cancer cell lines: while WNT5A-L inhibits proliferation of tumor cell lines, WNT5A-S promotes their growth. Finally, we show that expression of these two WNT5A isoforms is altered in breast and cervix carcinomas, as well as in the most aggressive neuroblastoma tumors. In these cancers, WNT5A-L is frequently down-regulated, whereas WNT5A-S is found overexpressed in a significant fraction of tumors. Altogether, our study provides evidence that the distinct activities of WNT5A in cancer can be attributed to the production of two WNT5A isoforms.

  10. SnoI, a novel alternatively spliced isoform of the ski protooncogene homolog, sno.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-White, S

    1993-09-25

    We have cloned and sequenced a novel human isoform of sno, snoI for insertion. SnoI contains 1330 nucleotides inserted in place of 7 nucleotides of the snoN mRNA. Sno is a member of the ski protooncogene family, which has been implicated in muscle development. The two previously known sno alternatively spliced isoforms are snoN (684 amino acids), and snoA (415 amino acids); snoI encodes a truncated isoform of 399 amino acids (44,298 MW). Southern blot experiments show that snoI contains a third alternative exon from the sno gene; a single sno gene can express all three isoforms of sno by alternative splicing. All three isoforms contain the region that is most similar to the ski proto-oncogene. The relationship between snoI and snoN is analogous to that between delta fosB and fosB, where a truncated form of the fosB transcription factor is produced by alternative splicing. We find conservation of human snoI-specific sequences in several mammalian species, in monkey, dog, cow, rabbit and pig, but not in rodents, whereas the common portion of the sno gene is conserved in all vertebrate species tested. SnoN, snoA, and ski mRNAs accumulate in many human tissues including skeletal muscle; the snoI alternative mRNA accumulates more specifically in skeletal muscle. SnoI is also expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma tumor, a tumor that contains differentiated skeletal muscle. The tissue-specific alternative splicing of human snoI, an mRNA in the ski/sno gene family, and the presence of sno mRNAs in muscle are consistent with a proposed role for the sno oncogene in muscle gene regulation.

  11. Isoform-specific proteasomal degradation of Rbfox3 during chicken embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kee K.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Kawamoto, Sachiyo, E-mail: kawamots@mail.nih.gov

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Protein stability of Rbfox3 splice isoforms is differentially regulated. • Rbfox3-d31, an Rbfox3 isoform lacking the RRM, is highly susceptible to degradation. • The protein stability of Rbfox3-d31 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the nuclear localization of Rbfox2. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the splicing activity of Rbfox2. - Abstract: Rbfox3, a neuron-specific RNA-binding protein, plays an important role in neuronal differentiation during development. An isoform Rbfox3-d31, which excludes the 93-nucleotide cassette exon within the RNA recognition motif of chicken Rbfox3, has been previously identified. However, the cellular functions of Rbfox3-d31 remain largely unknown. Here we find that Rbfox3-d31 mRNA is highly expressed during the early developmental stages of the chicken embryo, while Rbfox3-d31 protein is barely detected during the same stage due to its rapid degradation mediated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Importantly, this degradation is specific to the Rbfox3-d31 isoform and it does not occur with full-length Rbfox3. Furthermore, suppression of Rbfox3-d31 protein degradation with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 attenuates the splicing activity of another Rbfox family member Rbfox2 by altering the subcellular localization of Rbfox2. These results suggest that Rbfox3-d31 functions as a repressor for the splicing activity of the Rbfox family and its protein level is regulated in an isoform-specific manner in vivo.

  12. Multiple, but Concerted Cellular Activities of the Human Protein Hap46/BAG-1M and Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Gehring

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The closely related human and murine proteins Hap46/BAG-1M and BAG-1, respectively, were discovered more than a decade ago by molecular cloning techniques. These and the larger isoform Hap50/BAG-1L, as well as shorter isoforms, have the ability to interact with a seemingly unlimited array of proteins of completely unrelated structures. This problem was partially resolved when it was realized that molecular chaperones of the hsp70 heat shock protein family are major primary association partners, binding being mediated by the carboxy terminal BAG-domain and the ATP-binding domain of hsp70 chaperones. The latter, in turn, can associate with an almost unlimited variety of proteins through their substrate-binding domains, so that ternary complexes may result. The protein folding activity of hsp70 chaperones is affected by interactions with Hap46/BAG-1M or isoforms. However, there also exist several proteins which bind to Hap46/BAG-1M and isoforms independent of hsp70 mediation. Moreover, Hap46/BAG-1M and Hap50/BAG-1L, but not the shorter isoforms, can bind to DNA in a sequence-independent manner by making use of positively charged regions close to their amino terminal ends. This is the molecular basis for their effects on transcription which are of major physiological relevance, as discussed here in terms of a model. The related proteins Hap50/BAG-1L and Hap46/BAG-1M may thus serve as molecular links between such diverse bioactivities as regulation of gene expression and protein quality control. These activities are coordinated and synergize in helping cells to cope with conditions of external stress. Moreover, they recently became markers for the aggressiveness of several cancer types.

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_002755 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002755 gi|15841371 >1wc3A 2 197 10 178 6e-16 ... pdb|1YBU|D Chain D, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis...C, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Adenylyl Cyclase Rv1900c Chd, ... In Complex With A Substrat...e Analog. pdb|1YBU|B Chain B, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Adenylyl Cycl...ase Rv1900c Chd, ... In Complex With A Substrate Analog. pdb|1YBU|A Chain A, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|15609037 >1wc3A 2 197 10 178 6e-16 ... pdb|1YBU|D Chain D, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis...C, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Adenylyl Cyclase Rv1900c Chd, ... In Complex With A Substrat...e Analog. pdb|1YBU|B Chain B, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Adenylyl Cycl...ase Rv1900c Chd, ... In Complex With A Substrate Analog. pdb|1YBU|A Chain A, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31793093 >1wc3A 2 197 10 178 6e-16 ... pdb|1YBU|D Chain D, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis...C, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Adenylyl Cyclase Rv1900c Chd, ... In Complex With A Substrat...e Analog. pdb|1YBU|B Chain B, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Adenylyl Cycl...ase Rv1900c Chd, ... In Complex With A Substrate Analog. pdb|1YBU|A Chain A, ... Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

  16. CD-NP: a novel engineered dual guanylyl cyclase activator with anti-fibrotic actions in the heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando L Martin

    Full Text Available Natriuretic peptides (NPs are cardioprotective through the activation of guanylyl cyclase (GC receptors A and B. CD-NP, also known as cenderitide, is a novel engineered NP that was designed to uniquely serve as a first-in-class dual GC receptor agonist. Recognizing the aldosterone suppressing actions of GC-A activation and the potent inhibitory actions on collagen synthesis and fibroblast proliferation through GC-B activation, the current study was designed to establish the anti-fibrotic actions of CD-NP, administered subcutaneously, in an experimental rat model of early cardiac fibrosis induced by unilateral nephrectomy (UNX. Our results demonstrate that a two week subcutaneous infusion of CD-NP significantly suppresses left ventricular fibrosis and circulating aldosterone, while preserving both systolic and diastolic function, in UNX rats compared to vehicle treated UNX rats. Additionally we also confirmed, in vitro, that CD-NP significantly generates the second messenger, cGMP, through both the GC-A and GC-B receptors. Taken together, this novel dual GC receptor activator may represent an innovative anti-fibrotic therapeutic agent.

  17. Clathrin-dependent internalization, signaling, and metabolic processing of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somanna, Naveen K; Mani, Indra; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2018-04-01

    Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP), have pivotal roles in renal hemodynamics, neuroendocrine signaling, blood pressure regulation, and cardiovascular homeostasis. Binding of ANP and BNP to the guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) induces rapid internalization and trafficking of the receptor via endolysosomal compartments, with concurrent generation of cGMP. However, the mechanisms of the endocytotic processes of NPRA are not well understood. The present study, using 125 I-ANP binding assay and confocal microscopy, examined the function of dynamin in the internalization of NPRA in stably transfected human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cells. Treatment of recombinant HEK-293 cells with ANP time-dependently accelerated the internalization of receptor from the cell surface to the cell interior. However, the internalization of ligand-receptor complexes of NPRA was drastically decreased by the specific inhibitors of clathrin- and dynamin-dependent receptor internalization, almost 85% by monodansylcadaverine, 80% by chlorpromazine, and 90% by mutant dynamin, which are specific blockers of endocytic vesicle formation. Visualizing the internalization of NPRA and enhanced GFP-tagged NPRA in HEK-293 cells by confocal microscopy demonstrated the formation of endocytic vesicles after 5 min of ANP treatment; this effect was blocked by the inhibitors of clathrin and by mutant dynamin construct. Our results suggest that NPRA undergoes internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis as part of its normal itinerary, including trafficking, signaling, and metabolic degradation.

  18. Kynurenic Acid Inhibits the Electrical Stimulation Induced Elevated Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Expression in the TNC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Körtési

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMigraine is a primary headache of imprecisely known mechanism, but activation of the trigeminovascular system (TS appears to be essential during the attack. Intensive research has recently focused on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and the kynurenine systems as potential pathogenic factors.AimWe investigated the link between these important mediators and the effects of kynurenic acid (KYNA and its synthetic analog (KYNA-a on PACAP expression in the rat trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC in a TS stimulation model related to migraine mechanisms.MethodsAdult male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with KYNA, KYNA-a, the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, or saline (vehicle. Next, the trigeminal ganglion (TRG was electrically stimulated, the animals were transcardially perfused following 180 min, and the TNC was removed. In the TNC samples, 38 amino acid form of PACAP (PACAP1–38-like radioimmunoactivity was measured by radioimmunoassay, the relative optical density of preproPACAP was assessed by Western blot analysis, and PACAP1–38 mRNA was detected by real-time PCR.Results and conclusionElectrical TRG stimulation resulted in significant increases of PACAP1–38-LI, preproPACAP, and PACAP1–38 mRNA in the TNC. These increases were prevented by the pretreatments with KYNA, KYNA-a, and MK-801. This is the first study to provide evidence for a direct link between PACAP and the kynurenine system during TS activation.

  19. Cloning of the Lycopene β-cyclase Gene in Nicotiana tabacum and Its Overexpression Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Shi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are important pigments in plants that play crucial roles in plant growth and in plant responses to environmental stress. Lycopene β cyclase (β-LCY functions at the branch point of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, catalyzing the cyclization of lycopene. Here, a β-LCY gene from Nicotiana tabacum, designated as Ntβ-LCY1, was cloned and functionally characterized. Robust expression of Ntβ-LCY1 was found in leaves, and Ntβ-LCY1 expression was obviously induced by salt, drought, and exogenous abscisic acid treatments. Strong accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes resulted from Ntβ-LCY1 overexpression. Additionally, compared to wild-type plants, transgenic plants with overexpression showed enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stress with higher abscisic acid levels and lower levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species. Conversely, transgenic RNA interference plants had a clear albino phenotype in leaves, and some plants did not survive beyond the early developmental stages. The suppression of Ntβ-LCY1 expression led to lower expression levels of genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and to reduced accumulation of carotenoids, chlorophyll, and abscisic acid. These results indicate that Ntβ-LCY1 is not only a likely cyclization enzyme involved in carotenoid accumulation but also confers salt and drought stress tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum.

  20. The soluble guanylate cyclase CYG12 is required for the acclimation to hypoxia and trophic regimes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düner, Melis; Lambertz, Jan; Mügge, Carolin; Hemschemeier, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Oxygenic phototrophs frequently encounter environmental conditions that result in intracellular energy crises. Growth of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in hypoxia in the light depends on acclimatory responses of which the induction of photosynthetic cyclic electron flow is essential. The microalga cannot grow in the absence of molecular oxygen (O 2 ) in the dark, although it possesses an elaborate fermentation metabolism. Not much is known about how the microalga senses and signals the lack of O 2 or about its survival strategies during energy crises. Recently, nitric oxide (NO) has emerged to be required for the acclimation of C. reinhardtii to hypoxia. In this study, we show that the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) CYG12, a homologue of animal NO sensors, is also involved in this response. CYG12 is an active sGC, and post-transcriptional down-regulation of the CYG12 gene impairs hypoxic growth and gene expression in C. reinhardtii. However, it also results in a disturbed photosynthetic apparatus under standard growth conditions and the inability to grow heterotrophically. Transcriptome profiles indicate that the mis-expression of CYG12 results in a perturbation of responses that, in the wild-type, maintain the cellular energy budget. We suggest that CYG12 is required for the proper operation of the photosynthetic apparatus which, in turn, is essential for survival in hypoxia and darkness. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  2. Structural and functional analysis of two di-domain aromatase/cyclases from type II polyketide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara-Festin, Grace; Jackson, David R; Barajas, Jesus F; Valentic, Timothy R; Patel, Avinash B; Aguilar, Stephanie; Nguyen, MyChi; Vo, Michael; Khanna, Avinash; Sasaki, Eita; Liu, Hung-Wen; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2015-12-15

    Aromatic polyketides make up a large class of natural products with diverse bioactivity. During biosynthesis, linear poly-β-ketone intermediates are regiospecifically cyclized, yielding molecules with defined cyclization patterns that are crucial for polyketide bioactivity. The aromatase/cyclases (ARO/CYCs) are responsible for regiospecific cyclization of bacterial polyketides. The two most common cyclization patterns are C7-C12 and C9-C14 cyclizations. We have previously characterized three monodomain ARO/CYCs: ZhuI, TcmN, and WhiE. The last remaining uncharacterized class of ARO/CYCs is the di-domain ARO/CYCs, which catalyze C7-C12 cyclization and/or aromatization. Di-domain ARO/CYCs can further be separated into two subclasses: "nonreducing" ARO/CYCs, which act on nonreduced poly-β-ketones, and "reducing" ARO/CYCs, which act on cyclized C9 reduced poly-β-ketones. For years, the functional role of each domain in cyclization and aromatization for di-domain ARO/CYCs has remained a mystery. Here we present what is to our knowledge the first structural and functional analysis, along with an in-depth comparison, of the nonreducing (StfQ) and reducing (BexL) di-domain ARO/CYCs. This work completes the structural and functional characterization of mono- and di-domain ARO/CYCs in bacterial type II polyketide synthases and lays the groundwork for engineered biosynthesis of new bioactive polyketides.

  3. Synthesis of Triazole-Linked Analogues of c-di-GMP and Their Interactions with Diguanylate Cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernicola, Silvia; Torquati, Ilaria; Paiardini, Alessandro; Giardina, Giorgio; Rampioni, Giordano; Messina, Marco; Leoni, Livia; Del Bello, Fabio; Petrelli, Riccardo; Rinaldo, Serena; Cappellacci, Loredana; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2015-10-22

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widespread second messenger that plays a key role in bacterial biofilm formation. The compound's ability to assume multiple conformations allows it to interact with a diverse set of target macromolecules. Here, we analyzed the binding mode of c-di-GMP to the allosteric inhibitory site (I-site) of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and compared it to the conformation adopted in the catalytic site of the EAL phosphodiesterases (PDEs). An array of novel molecules has been designed and synthesized by simplifying the native c-di-GMP structure and replacing the charged phosphodiester backbone with an isosteric nonhydrolyzable 1,2,3-triazole moiety. We developed the first neutral small molecule able to selectively target DGCs discriminating between the I-site of DGCs and the active site of PDEs; this molecule represents a novel tool for mechanistic studies, particularly on those proteins bearing both DGC and PDE modules, and for future optimization studies to target DGCs in vivo.

  4. Insights into the role of RD3 in guanylate cyclase trafficking, photoreceptor degeneration and Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Molday

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RD3 is an evolutionarily conserved 23 kDa protein expressed in rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Mutations in the gene encoding RD3 resulting in unstable non-functional C-terminal truncated proteins are responsible for early onset photoreceptor degeneration in Leber Congenital Amaurosis 12 (LCA12 patients, the rd3 mice, and the rcd2 collies. Recent studies have shown that RD3 interacts with guanylate cyclases GC1 and GC2 in retinal cell extracts and HEK293 cells co-expressing GC and RD3. This interaction inhibits GC catalytic activity and promotes the exit of GC1 and GC2 from the endoplasmic reticulum and their trafficking to photoreceptor outer segments. Adeno-associated viral vector delivery of the normal RD3 gene to photoreceptors of the Rd3 mouse restores GC1 and GC2 expression and outer segment localization and leads to the long-term recovery of visual function and photoreceptor cell survival. This review focuses on the genetic and biochemical studies that have provided insight into the role of RD3 in photoreceptor function and survival.

  5. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 ..mu..M and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 ..mu..M and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 ..mu..M respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D/sub 2/-dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 ..mu..M. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, /sup 3/H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D/sup 1/- and D/sup 2/-dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 μM and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 μM and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 μM respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D 2 -dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 μM. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, 3 H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D 1 - and D 2 -dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  7. The phytosulfokine (PSK) receptor is capable of guanylate cyclase activity and enabling cyclic GMP-dependent signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe

    2011-04-19

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are sulfated pentapeptides that stimulate plant growth and differentiation mediated by the PSK receptor (PSKR1), which is a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase. We identified a putative guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in PSKR1 that is embedded within the kinase domain and hypothesized that the GC works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream PSK signaling. We expressed the recombinant complete kinase (cytoplasmic) domain of AtPSKR1 and show that it has serine/threonine kinase activity using the Ser/Thr peptide 1 as a substrate with an approximate Km of 7.5 μM and Vmax of 1800 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein. This same recombinant protein also has GC activity in vitro that is dependent on the presence of either Mg2+ or Mn2+. Overexpression of the full-length AtPSKR1 receptor in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts raised the endogenous basal cGMP levels over 20-fold, indicating that the receptor has GC activity in vivo. In addition, PSK-α itself, but not the non-sulfated backbone, induces rapid increases in cGMP levels in protoplasts. Together these results indicate that the PSKR1 contains dual GC and kinase catalytic activities that operate in vivo and that this receptor constitutes a novel class of enzymes with overlapping catalytic domains. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. The receptor guanylyl cyclase type D (GC-D) ligand uroguanylin promotes the acquisition of food preferences in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kelliher, Kevin R; Zufall, Frank; Munger, Steven D

    2013-06-01

    Rodents rely on olfactory stimuli to communicate information between conspecifics that is critical for health and survival. For example, rodents that detect a food odor simultaneously with the social odor carbon disulfide (CS(2)) will acquire a preference for that food. Disruption of the chemosensory transduction cascade in CS(2-)sensitive olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that express the receptor guanylyl cyclase type D (GC-D; GC-D+ OSNs) will prevent mice from acquiring these preferences. GC-D+ OSNs also respond to the natriuretic peptide uroguanylin, which is excreted into urine and feces. We analyzed if uroguanylin could also act as a social stimulus to promote the acquisition of food preferences. We found that feces of mice that had eaten odored food, but not unodored food, promoted a strong preference for that food in mice exposed to the feces. Olfactory exploration of uroguanylin presented with a food odor similarly produced a preference that was absent when mice were exposed to the food odor alone. Finally, the acquisition of this preference was dependent on GC-D+ OSNs, as mice lacking GC-D (Gucy2d(-)(/-) mice) showed no preference for the demonstrated food. Together with our previous findings, these results demonstrate that the diverse activators of GC-D+ OSNs elicit a common behavioral result and suggest that this specialized olfactory subsystem acts as a labeled line for a type of associative olfactory learning.

  9. Mechanism of control of the turkey erythrocyte beta-adrenoceptor dependent adenylate cyclase by guanyl nucleotides: a minimum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S; Tolkovsky, A M; Levitzki, A

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of native turkey erythrocyte membranes with GMP and epinephrine produces a highly active but metastable form of adenylate cyclase which decays slowly to basal native state. The decay process is greatly facilitated by GTP and GDP beta S1, and is further enhanced by 1-epinephrine. This decay process is prevented reversibly by GMP. GppNHp, like GMP, prevents the decay process first reversibly, but with time stabilizes the highly active state in a persistently active state. The expression of the catalytic activity of the enzyme in the metastable state can also be inhibited reversibly by GTP, GDP beta S and GMP at all times during the decay process. The GppNHp stabilized form is not susceptible to nucleotide inhibition. Thus, two forms of the guanyl nucleotide unit are postulated to exist: an "open" and a "closed" form. In the presence of hormone and GTP, the enzyme shuttles between these two forms continuously. GMP and GppNHp favor the complete conversion to the "open" form in the presence of beta-agonist. Evidence is also presented for the existence of two GTP dependent processes which exhibit different apparent affinities towards the nucleotide: A high affinity GTP binding process is essential for the fruitful coupling between receptor and enzyme, and a low affinity GTPase site which is responsible for the termination of the hormonal signal.

  10. Kinetics of interaction between beta-receptors, GTP protein, and the catalytic unit of turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkovsky, A M; Braun, S; Levitzki, A

    1982-01-01

    The kinetics of turkey erythrocyte membrane adenylate cyclase activation by beta-agonists and guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate is explored as a function of the concentration of the GTP regulatory protein and of the catalytic unit. It was found that the overall kinetics of activation is first order and is independent of the concentration of the GTP regulatory unit N, the catalytic unit C, and of hormone over a very wide concentration range. It was established that the rate-limiting step does not involve GDP dissociation from the inactive N unit or the association between activated N' and C. Also, it was found that guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate binding occurs in a random fashion and is not hormone dependent. These results enable us to exclude models of the sequential type in which N in its inactive form is bound to receptor R, is released in an active form N' upon hormone activation, and then binds to C, activating the latter. An acceptable model that accounts for all of the data conforms to the original formulation of "collision coupling" in which N is tightly associated to C at all times.

  11. The effects of isatin (indole-2, 3-dione on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-induced hyperthermia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Gábor

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that centrally administered natriuretic peptides and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP-38 have hyperthermic properties. Isatin (indole-2, 3-dione is an endogenous indole that has previously been found to inhibit hyperthermic effects of natriuretic peptides. In this study the aim was to investigate the effects of isatin on thermoregulatory actions of PACAP-38, in rats. Results One μg intracerebroventricular (icv. injection of PACAP-38 had hyperthermic effect in male, Wistar rats, with an onset of the effect at 2 h and a decline by the 6th h after administration. Intraperitoneal (ip. injection of different doses of isatin (25-50 mg/kg significantly decreased the hyperthermic effect of 1 μg PACAP-38 (icv., whereas 12.5 mg/kg isatin (ip. had no inhibiting effect. Isatin alone did not modify the body temperature of the animals. Conclusion The mechanisms that participate in the mediation of the PACAP-38-induced hyperthermia may be modified by isatin. The capability of isatin to antagonize the hyperthermia induced by all members of the natriuretic peptide family and by PACAP-38 makes it unlikely to be acting directly on receptors for natriuretic peptides or on those for PACAP in these hyperthermic processes.

  12. Natural Products from Microalgae with Potential against Alzheimer’s Disease: Sulfolipids Are Potent Glutaminyl Cyclase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Hielscher-Michael

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many new enzymes, like glutaminyl cyclase (QC, could be associated with pathophysiological processes and represent targets for many diseases, so that enzyme-inhibiting properties of natural substances are becoming increasingly important. In different studies, the pathophysiology connection of QC to various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD was described. Algae are known for the ability to synthesize complex and highly-diverse compounds with specific enzyme inhibition properties. Therefore, we screened different algae species for the presence of QC inhibiting metabolites using a new “Reverse Metabolomics” technique including an Activity-correlation Analysis (AcorA, which is based on the correlation of bioactivities to mass spectral data with the aid of mathematic informatics deconvolution. Thus, three QC inhibiting compounds from microalgae belonging to the family of sulfolipids were identified. The compounds showed a QC inhibition of 81% and 76% at concentrations of 0.25 mg/mL and 0.025 mg/mL, respectively. Thus, for the first time, sulfolipids are identified as QC inhibiting compounds and possess substructures with the required pharmacophore qualities. They represent a new lead structure for QC inhibitors.

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of squalene synthase and 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase genes in persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunhua; Zhao, Daqiu; Sheng, Yanle; Liang, Guohua; Tao, Jun

    2012-02-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA) are the main triterpene acids in persimmon fruit, and squalene synthase and 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclases are important enzymes in pentacyclic triterpene biosynthesis. In order to study their relationship, DkSQS and DkOSC were cloned from persimmon fruits in the present study. The full-length cDNA of DkSQS was 1647 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1245 bp that encoded a peptide of 415 amino acids (AA). The 3'-end of DkOSC cDNA fragment contained 522 bp, including a partial ORF of 298 bp, a full poly A tail that encoded 98 AA. Two cultivars of persimmon, i.e. cv. Nishimurawase and cv. Niuxinshi, were used to study the content of OA and UA and the related gene expression. Results showed that OA and UA contents changed in both cultivars during fruit development, the difference in cv. Nishimurawase was greater than that in cv. Niuxinshi. The expression of DkSQS and DkOSC had no obvious correlation with the biosynthesis of OA and UA in the flesh. There may be two main reasons. Firstly, different enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of triterpenes and mutual adjustment were existed in different gene expressions. Secondly, it was not clear that the DkOSC cloned in this research belonged to which subfamily. Therefore, the real relationship between triterpenes and DkSQS and DkOSC in persimmon fruits is still to be revealed.

  14. Comparison between dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase and 3H-SCH 23390 binding in rat striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, P.H.; Groenvald, F.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for measuring 3 H-SCH 23990 binding and dopamine (DA) stimulated adenylate cyclase (AC) were established in identical tissue preparations and under similar experimental conditions. Pharmacological characterization revealed that both assays involved interaction with the D1 receptor or closely associated sites. In order to investigate whether the binding sites for 3 H-SCH 23390 and DA in fact are identical, the antagonistic effects of a variety of pharmacologically active compounds were examined. Surprisingly, the K/sub i/-values obtained from Schild-plot analysis of the antagonism of DA-stimulated AC, were 80-240 times higher than the K/sub i/-values obtained from competition curves of 3 H-SCH 23390 binding. Since both assays were performed under identical conditions, the differences in K/sub i/-values indicate the possibility of different binding sites for DA and 3 H-SCH 23390 or, that DA and 3 -SCH 23390 label different states of the same receptor. 19 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  15. Single amino acid variation in barley 14-3-3 proteins leads to functional isoform specificity in the regulation of nitrate reductase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinnige, M.P.; Roobeek, I.; Bunney, T.D.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Mol, J.N.M.; Boer, de A.H.

    2005-01-01

    The highly conserved family of 14-3-3 proteins function in the regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. The presence of multiple 14-3-3 isoforms and the diversity of cellular processes regulated by 14-3-3 q3suggest functional isoform specificity of 14-3-3 isoforms in the regulation of

  16. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Chaponnier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1 sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA and α-cardiac (α-CAA, 2 smooth muscle actins (SMAs, α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3 cytoplasmic actins (CYAs, β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb against an actin isoform (α-SMA was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986 . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS. In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes.

  17. Crystal structures of human HMG-CoA synthase isoforms provide insights into inherited ketogenesis disorders and inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafqat, Naeem; Turnbull, Andrew; Zschocke, Johannes; Oppermann, Udo; Yue, Wyatt W

    2010-05-14

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (CoA) synthase (HMGCS) catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA and acetoacetyl-CoA into 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA. It is ubiquitous across the phylogenetic tree and is broadly classified into three classes. The prokaryotic isoform is essential in Gram-positive bacteria for isoprenoid synthesis via the mevalonate pathway. The eukaryotic cytosolic isoform also participates in the mevalonate pathway but its end product is cholesterol. Mammals also contain a mitochondrial isoform; its deficiency results in an inherited disorder of ketone body formation. Here, we report high-resolution crystal structures of the human cytosolic (hHMGCS1) and mitochondrial (hHMGCS2) isoforms in binary product complexes. Our data represent the first structures solved for human HMGCS and the mitochondrial isoform, allowing for the first time structural comparison among the three isoforms. This serves as a starting point for the development of isoform-specific inhibitors that have potential cholesterol-reducing and antibiotic applications. In addition, missense mutations that cause mitochondrial HMGCS deficiency have been mapped onto the hHMGCS2 structure to rationalize the structural basis for the disease pathology. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Conditional expression of CD44 isoforms in lymphoma cells: influence on hyaluronate binding and tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, J.

    2002-03-01

    CD44 describes a family of surface proteins consisting of many isoforms due to alternative splice of ten 'variant' exons. Members of this family are involved in various processes including hematopoiesis, lymphocyte activation and homing, limb development, wound healing and tumor progression. Clinically, CD44 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for several human cancers. To answer the question which isoform might be relevant for tumor progression and to gain an insight into the mechanism of its function, I established transfectants of the LB lymphoma cell line in which the expression of four CD44 isoforms, namely CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10, CD44v8-10 and CD44s, was controlled by the Tet-off promoter. In the presence of Doxycycline, the expression was repressed. Removal of Doxycycline switched on expression and the maximal CD44 amount was obtained within two days. The transfectants were characterized regarding their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronate (HA). Overexpression of all four CD44 isoforms conferred the ability to bind HA on LB cells. Other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were bound in an isotype-specific fashion. CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10 and CD44v8-10 showed high binding affinity to chondroitin A, B and C, and low affinity to heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate. CD44s could not bind to these GAGs. Among these three variants, the binding ability of CD44v3-10 was the strongest. CD44 clustering seemed to play a crucial role for HA binding. Both CD44s and CD44v8-10 formed reduction-sensitive complexes in LB cells. The complexes are homooligomers or heterooligomers composed of different isoforms. Cys286 in CD44 transmember domain was not responsible for the formation of reduction-sensitive oligomer or for the enhanced HA binding in LB cell line. Using a conditional dimerization system the requirement of CD44 oligomerization for HA binding was directly demonstrated. The induction of oligomerization increased HA binding

  19. Conditional expression of CD44 isoforms in lymphoma cells: influence on hyaluronate binding and tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, J.

    2002-03-01

    CD44 describes a family of surface proteins consisting of many isoforms due to alternative splice of ten 'variant' exons. Members of this family are involved in various processes including hematopoiesis, lymphocyte activation and homing, limb development, wound healing and tumor progression. Clinically, CD44 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for several human cancers. To answer the question which isoform might be relevant for tumor progression and to gain an insight into the mechanism of its function, I established transfectants of the LB lymphoma cell line in which the expression of four CD44 isoforms, namely CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10, CD44v8-10 and CD44s, was controlled by the Tet-off promoter. In the presence of Doxycycline, the expression was repressed. Removal of Doxycycline switched on expression and the maximal CD44 amount was obtained within two days. The transfectants were characterized regarding their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronate (HA). Overexpression of all four CD44 isoforms conferred the ability to bind HA on LB cells. Other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were bound in an isotype-specific fashion. CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10 and CD44v8-10 showed high binding affinity to chondroitin A, B and C, and low affinity to heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate. CD44s could not bind to these GAGs. Among these three variants, the binding ability of CD44v3-10 was the strongest. CD44 clustering seemed to play a crucial role for HA binding. Both CD44s and CD44v8-10 formed reduction-sensitive complexes in LB cells. The complexes are homooligomers or heterooligomers composed of different isoforms. Cys286 in CD44 transmember domain was not responsible for the formation of reduction-sensitive oligomer or for the enhanced HA binding in LB cell line. Using a conditional dimerization system the requirement of CD44 oligomerization for HA binding was directly demonstrated. The induction of oligomerization increased HA binding. Finally, I

  20. Novel human ZAKI-4 isoforms: hormonal and tissue-specific regulation and function as calcineurin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xia; Kambe, Fukushi; Miyazaki, Tak