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Sample records for adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

  1. Up-regulation of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer impairs adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, Takuya; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Yasui, Takaharu; Onimaru, Manabu; Toma, Hiroki; Sato, Norihiro; Tanaka, Masao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We previously reported that radiation enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene expression in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that adenoviral gene therapy might be more effective in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells. In the present study, we compared the transduction efficiency of adenovirus-delivered genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We used an adenovirus expressing the hepatocyte growth factor antagonist, NK4 (Ad-NK4), as a representative gene therapy. We established two radioresistant human pancreatic cancer cell lines using fractionated irradiation. Radiosensitive and radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells were infected with Ad-NK4, and NK4 levels in the cells were measured. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the differences in the transduction efficiency between these cells, we measured expression of the genes mediating adenovirus infection and endocytosis. The results revealed that NK4 levels in radioresistant cells were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those in radiosensitive cells, although there were no significant differences in adenovirus uptake between radiosensitive cells and radioresistant cells. Integrin β3 was up-regulated and the Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor was down-regulated in radioresistant cells, and inhibition of integrin β3 promoted adenovirus gene transfer. These results suggest that inhibition of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells could enhance adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. (author)

  2. Adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy for murine liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Daoyan; Dai Bingbing; Wang Zhonghe; Chen Shishu

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the synergistic antitumor effects of adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy in mice bearing liver cancer. Methods: Balb/c mice bearing liver cancer received the treatment at day 1 with tumor local irradiation (TLI) of 20 Gy or mask irradiation when tumor size reached 0.6-1.0 cm. Within 1 hour after irradiation, adenovirus containing IL-12 gene or PBS was intra-tumor injected once a week. Forty-eight hours after the second injection, IFN-γ levels in sera and the supernatant of cultured spleen cells were assayed by ELISA, CTL activity of spleen cells was measured by 3 H-TdR release assay, and phenotypes of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were analysed by immunohistochemical staining. Results: The growth of tumors in animals treated with a combination of IL-12 gene therapy and TLI was inhibited more significantly than those with either single treatment (P + and CD8 + lymphocyte infiltration and tumor-specific cytolytic activities, and the levels of IFN-γ in sera were higher in IL-12 gene therapy and IL-12 gene therapy combined with TLI groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that IL-12 gene therapy combined with radiotherapy is more effective than both single treatment modalities and can induce specific antitumor immuno-response greatly

  3. Cancer gene therapy with targeted adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtarzi, Houria; Stevenson, Mark; Fisher, Kerry

    2008-11-01

    Clinical experience with adenovirus vectors has highlighted the need for improved delivery and targeting. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the techniques currently under development for improving adenovirus delivery to malignant cells in vivo. Primary research articles reporting improvements in adenoviral gene delivery are described. Strategies include genetic modification of viral coat proteins, non-genetic modifications including polymer encapsulation approaches and pharmacological interventions. Reprogramming adenovirus tropism in vitro has been convincingly demonstrated using a range of genetic and physical strategies. These studies have provided new insights into our understanding of virology and the field is progressing. However, there are still some limitations that need special consideration before adenovirus-targeted cancer gene therapy emerges as a routine treatment in the clinical setting.

  4. A Rabbit Model for Testing Helper-Dependent Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy for Vein Graft Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lianxiang; Wacker, Bradley K; Bueren, Emma; Ham, Ervin; Dronadula, Nagadhara; Dichek, David A

    2017-12-15

    Coronary artery bypass vein grafts are a mainstay of therapy for human atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, the long-term patency of vein grafts is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Gene therapy, directed at the vein graft wall, is a promising approach for preventing vein graft atherosclerosis. Because helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) efficiently transduces grafted veins and confers long-term transgene expression, HDAd is an excellent candidate for delivery of vein graft-targeted gene therapy. We developed a model of vein graft atherosclerosis in fat-fed rabbits and demonstrated long-term (≥20 weeks) persistence of HDAd genomes after graft transduction. This model enables quantitation of vein graft hemodynamics, wall structure, lipid accumulation, cellularity, vector persistence, and inflammatory markers on a single graft. Time-course experiments identified 12 weeks after transduction as an optimal time to measure efficacy of gene therapy on the critical variables of lipid and macrophage accumulation. We also used chow-fed rabbits to test whether HDAd infusion in vein grafts promotes intimal growth and inflammation. HDAd did not increase intimal growth, but had moderate-yet significant-pro-inflammatory effects. The vein graft atherosclerosis model will be useful for testing HDAd-mediated gene therapy; however, pro-inflammatory effects of HdAd remain a concern in developing HDAd as a therapy for vein graft disease.

  5. Preliminary studies on gene therapy with TGF β1 antisense gene/liposome complexes and adenovirus transfer vector in RPF rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunjie; Wang Dewen; Zhang Zhaoshan; Gao Yabing; Xiong Chengqi; Long Jianyin; Wang Huixin; Peng Ruiyun; Cui Xuemei

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observed the efficiency of gene therapy with TGF β1 antisense gene/liposome complexes and adenovirus transfer vector in RPF rats. Methods: TGFβ1 sense and antisense gene expression vectors and adenovirus transfer vector were introduced into rat bronchus by way of intratracheal instillation. Results: At day 1.5 after TGFβ1 sense and antisense gene transfer, PCR amplification using neo gene-specific primer from lung tissue DNA was all positive. After day 5.5, 67% (2/3) of lung tissue DNA was positive. RNA dot blot hybridization indicated that TGFβ1 mRNA content of lung tissue transfected with pMAMneo-antiTGFβ1 gene decreased. Detection of lung hydroxyproline (Hyp) content after day 35 of gene transfer showed that even in lung of rats received pMAMneo-AntiTGFβ1 lipid complexes it raised remarkably (P 9 pfu/ml were instilled into bronchus at 0.5 ml per rat. After day 2 day 6, the lung tissues of all six rats (three per each group )expressed the transfected luciferase gene by luminometer. Conclusion: Cationic lipid-mediated TGFβ1 antisense gene therapy was a simple and easy method. It can slow down the course of pathogenesis of lung fibrosis. Replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene therapy of lung diseases is a good and efficient method

  6. Efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in combination with radiation therapy in an orthotopic mouse prostate cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, Svend O.; Paielli, Dell; Wing, Mark; Rogulski, Ken; Brown, Steve; Kolozsvary, Andy; Seely, John; Barton, Ken; Dragovic, Alek; Kim, Jae Ho

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in an adjuvant setting with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in an experimental prostate cancer model in preparation for a Phase I clinical study in humans. Methods: For efficacy studies, i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumors were established in immune-deficient mice. Tumors were injected with the lytic, replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus containing a cytosine deaminase (CD)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) fusion gene. Two days later, mice were administered 1 week of 5-fluorocytosine + ganciclovir (GCV) prodrug therapy and fractionated doses of EBRT (trimodal therapy). Tumor control rate of trimodal therapy was compared to that of EBRT alone. For toxicology studies, immune-competent male mice received a single intraprostatic injection (10 10 vp) of the replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus. Two days later, mice were administered 4 weeks of 5-fluorocytosine + GCV prodrug therapy and 56 Gy EBRT to the pelvic region. The toxicity of trimodal therapy was assessed by histopathologic analysis of major organs and clinical chemistries. Results: In both the i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumor models, trimodal therapy significantly improved primary tumor control beyond that of EBRT alone. In the DU145 model, trimodal therapy resulted in a tumor growth delay (70 days) that was more than twice that (32 days) of EBRT alone. Whereas EBRT failed to eradicate DU145 tumors, trimodal therapy resulted in 25% tumor cure. In the LNCaP C4-2 tumor model, EBRT slowed the growth of intraprostatic tumors, but resulted in no tumor cures, and 57% of the mice developed retroperitoneal lymph node metastases at 3 months. By contrast, trimodal therapy resulted in 44% tumor cure and reduced significantly the percentage (13%) of lymph node metastases relative to EBRT alone. Overall

  7. A Rabbit Model for Testing Helper-Dependent Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy for Vein Graft Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianxiang Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery bypass vein grafts are a mainstay of therapy for human atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, the long-term patency of vein grafts is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Gene therapy, directed at the vein graft wall, is a promising approach for preventing vein graft atherosclerosis. Because helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd efficiently transduces grafted veins and confers long-term transgene expression, HDAd is an excellent candidate for delivery of vein graft-targeted gene therapy. We developed a model of vein graft atherosclerosis in fat-fed rabbits and demonstrated long-term (≥20 weeks persistence of HDAd genomes after graft transduction. This model enables quantitation of vein graft hemodynamics, wall structure, lipid accumulation, cellularity, vector persistence, and inflammatory markers on a single graft. Time-course experiments identified 12 weeks after transduction as an optimal time to measure efficacy of gene therapy on the critical variables of lipid and macrophage accumulation. We also used chow-fed rabbits to test whether HDAd infusion in vein grafts promotes intimal growth and inflammation. HDAd did not increase intimal growth, but had moderate—yet significant—pro-inflammatory effects. The vein graft atherosclerosis model will be useful for testing HDAd-mediated gene therapy; however, pro-inflammatory effects of HdAd remain a concern in developing HDAd as a therapy for vein graft disease.

  8. Redirecting adenovirus tropism by genetic, chemical, and mechanical modification of the adenovirus surface for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2016-06-01

    Despite remarkable advancements, clinical evaluations of adenovirus (Ad)-mediated cancer gene therapies have highlighted the need for improved delivery and targeting. Genetic modification of Ad capsid proteins has been extensively attempted. Although genetic modification enhances the therapeutic potential of Ad, it is difficult to successfully incorporate extraneous moieties into the capsid and the engineering process is laborious. Recently, chemical modification of the Ad surface with nanomaterials and targeting moieties has been found to enhance Ad internalization into the target by both passive and active mechanisms. Alternatively, external stimulus-mediated targeting can result in selective accumulation of Ad in the tumor and prevent dissemination of Ad into surrounding nontarget tissues. In the present review, we discuss various genetic, chemical, and mechanical engineering strategies for overcoming the challenges that hinder the therapeutic efficacy of Ad-based approaches. Surface modification of Ad by genetic, chemical, or mechanical engineering strategies enables Ad to overcome the shortcomings of conventional Ad and enhances delivery efficiency through distinct and unique mechanisms that unmodified Ad cannot mimic. However, although the therapeutic potential of Ad-mediated gene therapy has been enhanced by various surface modification strategies, each strategy still possesses innate limitations that must be addressed, requiring innovative ideas and designs.

  9. Anti-tumor effect of adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy under control of tumor-specific and radio-inducible chimeric promoter in combination with γ-ray irradiation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenjie; Yu Haijun; Xiongjie; Xu Yu; Liao Zhengkai; Zhou Fuxiang; Xie Conghua; Zhou Yunfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To detect the selective inhibitory effects of irradiation plus adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) suicide gene system using tumor-specific and radio-inducible chimeric promoter on human hepatocellular carcinoma subcutaneously xenografted in nude mouse. Methods: Recombinant replicated-deficient adenovirus vector containing HRP gene and chimeric human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter carrying 6 radio-inducible CArG elements was constructed. A human subcutaneous transplanting hepatocellular carcinoma (MHCC97 cell line) model was treated with γ-ray irradiation plus intra-tumor injections of adenoviral vector and intra-peritoneal injections of prodrug IAA. The change of tumor volume and tumor growth inhibiting rate, the survival time of nude mice, as well as histopathology of xenograft tumor and normal tissues were evaluated. Results: Thirty one days after the treatment, the relative tumor volumes in the negative, adenovirus therapy, irradiation, and combination groups were 49.23±4.55, 27.71±7.74, 28.53±10.48 and 11.58±3.23, respectively.There was a significantly statistical difference among them (F=16.288, P<0.01).The inhibition effect in the combination group was strongest as compared with that in other groups, and its inhibition ratio was 76.5%. The survival period extended to 43 d in the combination group, which showed a significantly difference with that in the control group (χ 2 =18.307, P<0.01). The area of tumors necrosis in the combination group was larger than that in the other groups, and the normal tissues showed no treatment-related toxic effect in all groups. However, multiple hepatocellular carcinoma metastases were observed in the liver in the control group, there were a few metastases in the monotherapy groups and no metastasis in the combination group. Conclusions: Adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy plus radiotherapy dramatically could inhibit tumor growth and prolong

  10. Dual effects of adenovirus-mediated thrombopoietin gene transfer on hepatic oval cell proliferation and platelet counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiba, Miho; Shimomura, Takashi; Murai, Rie; Hashiguchi, Koichi; Saeki, Toshiya; Yoshida, Yoko; Kanbe, Takamasa; Tanabe, Naotada; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Miura, Norimasa; Tajima, Fumihito; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Shiota, Goshi

    2005-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the growth factor for megakaryocytes and platelets, however, it also acts as a potent regulator of stem cell proliferation. To examine the significance of TPO expression in proliferation of hepatic oval cells, the effect of adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer into livers of the Solt-Farber model, which mimics the condition where liver regeneration is impaired, was examined. Hepatic TPO mRNA peaked its expression at 2 days after gene transduction and then gradually decreased. The peripheral platelet number began to increase at 4 days (P < 0.05) and reached its plateau at 9 days (P < 0.01). Oval cells expressed c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO as well as immature hematopoietic and hepatocytic surface markers such as CD34 and AFP. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive oval cells in rats into which adenovirus-TPO gene was transferred at 7 and 9 days were significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each), and the total numbers of oval cells in the adenovirus-TPO gene transferred at 9 and 13 days were also significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each). Expression of SCF protein was increased at 4, 7, and 9 days by TPO gene administration and that of c-Kit was increased at 4 and 7 days. These data suggest that adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer stimulated oval cell proliferation in liver as well as increasing peripheral platelet counts, emphasizing the significance of the TPO/c-Mpl system in proliferation of hepatic oval cells

  11. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  12. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  13. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  14. Targeted adenovirus mediated inhibition of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory gene expression in endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułdo, J M; Ásgeirsdóttir, S A; Zwiers, P J; Bellu, A R; Rots, M G; Schalk, J A C; Ogawara, K I; Trautwein, C; Banas, B; Haisma, H J; Molema, G; Kamps, J A A M

    2013-02-28

    In chronic inflammatory diseases the endothelium expresses mediators responsible for harmful leukocyte infiltration. We investigated whether targeted delivery of a therapeutic transgene that inhibits nuclear factor κB signal transduction could silence the proinflammatory activation status of endothelial cells. For this, an adenovirus encoding dominant-negative IκB (dnIκB) as a therapeutic transgene was employed. Selectivity for the endothelial cells was achieved by introduction of antibodies specific for inflammatory endothelial adhesion molecules E-selectin or VCAM-1 chemically linked to the virus via polyethylene glycol. In vitro, the retargeted adenoviruses selectively infected cytokine-activated endothelial cells to express functional transgene. The comparison of transductional capacity of both retargeted viruses revealed that E-selectin based transgene delivery exerted superior pharmacological effects. Targeted delivery mediated dnIκB transgene expression in endothelial cells inhibited the induced expression of several inflammatory genes, including adhesion molecules, cytokines, and chemokines. In vivo, in mice suffering from glomerulonephritis, E-selectin-retargeted adenovirus selectively homed in the kidney to microvascular glomerular endothelium. Subsequent downregulation of endothelial adhesion molecule expression 2 days after induction of inflammation demonstrated the pharmacological potential of this gene therapy approach. The data justify further studies towards therapeutic virus design and optimization of treatment schedules to investigate their capacity to interfere with inflammatory disease progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Beta-Adrenergic gene therapy for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Walter J

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene therapy using in vivo recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer is an effective technique that offers great potential to improve existing drug treatments for the complex cardiovascular diseases of heart failure and vascular smooth muscle intimal hyperplasia. Cardiac-specific adenovirus-mediated transfer of the carboxyl-terminus of the β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARKct, acting as a Gβγ-β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARK1 inhibitor, improves basal and agonist-induced cardiac performance in both normal and failing rabbit hearts. In addition, βARKct adenovirus infection of vascular smooth muscle is capable of significantly diminishing neointimal proliferation after angioplasty. Therefore, further investigation is warranted to determine whether inhibition of βARK1 activity and sequestration of Gβγ via an adenovirus that encodes the βARKct transgene might be a useful clinical tool for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies.

  16. Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B by a Novel Adenovirus Vector Showing Reduced Leaky Expression of Viral Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Shunsuke; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Ohashi, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-15

    Gene therapy during neonatal and infant stages is a promising approach for hemophilia B, a congenital disorder caused by deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX (FIX). An adenovirus (Ad) vector has high potential for use in neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B due to its superior transduction properties; however, leaky expression of Ad genes often reduces the transduction efficiencies by Ad protein-mediated tissue damage. Here, we used a novel Ad vector, Ad-E4-122aT, which exhibits a reduction in the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver, in gene therapy studies for neonatal hemophilia B mice. Ad-E4-122aT exhibited significantly higher transduction efficiencies than a conventional Ad vector in neonatal mice. In neonatal hemophilia B mice, a single neonatal injection of Ad-E4-122aT expressing human FIX (hFIX) (Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX) maintained more than 6% of the normal plasma hFIX activity levels for approximately 100 days. Sequential administration of Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX resulted in more than 100% of the plasma hFIX activity levels for more than 100 days and rescued the bleeding phenotypes of hemophilia B mice. In addition, immunotolerance to hFIX was induced by Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX administration in neonatal hemophilia B mice. These results indicated that Ad-E4-122aT is a promising gene delivery vector for neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  17. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jianfeng; Zhao Dong; Zhong Zhirong; Zhang Zhirong; Gong Tao; Sun Xun

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  18. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yu; Liu, Zhengchun; Kong, Haiyan; Sun, Wenjie; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. → The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. → Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. → Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  19. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yu, E-mail: xuyu1001@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liu, Zhengchun, E-mail: l135027@126.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Kong, Haiyan, E-mail: suppleant@163.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Sun, Wenjie, E-mail: wendy11240325@163.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liao, Zhengkai, E-mail: fastbeta@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhou, Fuxiang, E-mail: happyzhoufx@sina.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xie, Conghua, E-mail: chxie_65@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); and others

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. {yields} The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. {yields} Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. {yields} Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  20. Production of Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Human Interlukin-4 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Mojarrad, Majid; Abdolazimi, Yassan; Hajati, Jamshid; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) Recombinant adenoviruses are currently used for a variety of purposes, including in vitro gene transfer, in vivo vaccination, and gene therapy. Ability to infect many cell types, high efficiency in gene transfer, entering both dividing and non dividing cells, and growing to high titers make this virus a good choice for using in various experiments. In the present experiment, a recombinant adenovirus containing human IL-4 coding sequence was made. IL-4 has several characteristics ...

  1. Evaluating the role of CRM1-mediated export for adenovirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Christoph C.; Izadpanah, Reza; Bridge, Eileen

    2003-01-01

    A complex of the Adenovirus (Ad) early region 1b 55-kDa (E1b-55kDa) and early region 4 ORF6 34-kDa (E4-34kDa) proteins promotes viral late gene expression. E1b-55kDa and E4-34kDa have leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) similar to that of HIV Rev. It was proposed that E1b-55kDa and/or E4-34kDa might promote the export of Ad late mRNA via their Rev-like NESs, and the transport receptor CRM1. We treated infected cells with the cytotoxin leptomycin B to inhibit CRM1-mediated export; treatment initially delays the onset of late gene expression, but this activity completely recovers as the late phase progresses. We find that the E1b-55kDa NES is not required to promote late gene expression. Previous results showed that E4-34kDa-mediated late gene expression does not require an intact NES (J. Virol. 74 (2000), 6684-6688). Our results indicate that these Ad regulatory proteins promote late gene expression without intact NESs or active CRM1

  2. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Vrij, J.; Willemsen, R. A.; Lindholm, L.; Hoeben, R. C.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; de Ridder, C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Essand, M.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Jennings, I.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nugent, R.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schenk, E.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Slade, M.; Szyjanowicz, P.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, L.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Zuber, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 795-805 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  3. Adenovirus-mediated truncated Bid overexpression induced by the Cre/LoxP system promotes the cell apoptosis of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Qifang; Yang, Ru; Lu, Weixian; Zhu, Weipei; Zhou, Jundong; Zheng, Cui; Zhou, Dongmei; Yu, Ling; Wu, Jinchang

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a small subset of cancer cells that contribute to cancer progression, metastasis, chemoresistance and recurrence. CD133-positive (CD133+) ovarian cancer cells have been identified as ovarian cancer stem cells. Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is an innovative therapeutic method for cancer treatment. In the present study, we aimed to develop a new gene therapy to specifically eliminate CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells by targeting CD133. We used the Cre/LoxP system to augment the selective expression of the truncated Bid (tBid) gene as suicide gene therapy in CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. The adenovirus (Ad)-CD133-Cre expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the CD133 promoter and Ad-CMV-LoxP-Neo-LoxP-tBid expressing tBid under the control of the CMV promoter were successfully constructed using the Cre/LoxP switching system. The co-infection of Ad-CMV-LoxP-Neo-LoxP-tBid and Ad-CD133-Cre selectively induced tBid overexpression, which inhibited cell growth and triggered the cell apoptosis of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. The Cre/LoxP system-mediated tBid overexpression activated the pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and augmented the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. Furthermore, in xenograft experiments, co-infection with the two recombinant adenoviruses markedly suppressed tumor growth in vivo and promoted cell apoptosis in tumor tissues. Taken together, the present study provides evidence that the adenovirus-mediated tBid overexpression induced by the Cre/LoxP system can effectively eliminate CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells, representing a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  4. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V Borovjagin

    Full Text Available To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI, a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3 fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(vβ3/α(vβ5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  5. [Effect of topical application of a recombinant adenovirus carrying promyelocytic leukemia gene in a psoriasis-like mouse model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongyu; Zhang, Aijun; Ma, Huiqun; Wang, Shijie; Ma, Yunyun; Zou, Xingwei; Li, Ruilian

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effects of topical treatment with adenovirus-mediated promyelocytic leukemia gene (PML) gene in a psoriasis-like mouse model. The effect of adenovirus-mediated PML gene on the granular layer of mouse tail scale epidermis and epithelial mitosis were observed on longitudinal histological sections prepared from the tail skin and vaginal epithelium of the mice. Adenovirus-mediated PML gene significantly inhibited mitosis of mouse vaginal epithelial cells and promoted the formation of granular layer in mouse tail scale epidermis. The therapeutic effect of PML gene in the psoriasis-like mouse model may be associated with increased granular cells and suppressed epidemic cell proliferation.

  6. [Adenovirus-mediated canine interferon-gamma expression and its antiviral activity against canine parvovirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kao; Jin, Huijun; Zhong, Fei; Li, Xiujin; Neng, Changai; Chen, Huihui; Li, Wenyan; Wen, Jiexia

    2012-11-04

    To construct recombinant adenovirus containing canine interferon-gamma (cIFN-gamma) gene and to investigate its antiviral activity against canine parvovirus in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK). [Methods] The cIFN-gamma gene was inserted into adenovirus shuttle plasmid to construct pShuttle3-cIFN-gamma expression vector, from which the cIFN-gamma expression cassette was transferred into the adenovirus genomic plasmid pAdeno-X by specific restriction sites to generate recombinant adenovirus genomic plasmid pAd-cIFN-gamma. The pAd-cIFN-gamma plasmid was linearized by digestion and transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells to generate the replication-defective cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus (Ad-cIFN-gamma). To analyze its anti-canine parvovirus activity, the MDCK cells were pre-infected by Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus, and then infected by canine parvovirus. The antiviral activity of the Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus against parvovirus was analyzed. The recombinant adenovirus containing cIFN-gamma gene was constructed by the ligation method. The recombinant adenovirus could mediates recombinant cIFN-gamma secretory expression in MDCK cells. The Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus could significantly inhibit canine parvovirus replication in MDCK cells pre-infected with the recombinant adenovirus. These results indicate that the Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus has the potent antiviral activity against canine parvovirus. The Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus was successfully constructed by the ligation method and possessed a powerful antiviral activity against canine parvovirus.

  7. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytag, Svend O., E-mail: sfreyta1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Stricker, Hans [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Lu, Mei [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Peabody, James [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli [Pathology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Rodriguez, Ron [Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  8. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer

  9. Radioiodine uptake of undifferentiated thyroid cancer cells by adenovirus-mediated Na+/ I- symporter gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Y.; Lee, Y. J.; Shin, J. H.; Oh, H. J.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C.; Cho, B. Y. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Seoul National, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. H. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    To increase radioiodine uptake on undifferentiated thyroid cancer cell (ARO cells) by adenovirus-mediated human Na+/I- symporter (hNIS) gene transfer. Recombinant adenovirus Ad-hNIS was manufactured successfully. After transfecting Ad-hNIS on ARO cells, in vitro I-125 uptake and efflux studies were performed. For in vivo studies, 1.510'8 p.f.u. (50 1) of Ad-hNIS was injected into xenograft ARO tumors on the R thigh of BALB/c nu/nu mice (n=12), and same amount of normal saline was injected into xenograft ARO tumors on the L thigh. Two, 3, 4 and 6 days after intratumoral injection of Ad-hNIS, I-131 images (3 mice per day) were taken and xenograft tumors on both thighs were all excised. Total RNA was extracted from each tumor tissue and RT-PCR was performed to confirm the hNIS expression of Ad-hNIS injected xenograft ARO tumors. I-125 uptake of Ad-hNIS transfected ARO cells was increased up to 233 folds at 120 minutes in vitro. I-125 efflux study revealed rapid washout of I-125 from Ad-hNIS transfected ARO cells. On dynamic image, I-131 uptake of Ad-hNIS injected ARO tumor was continuously increased until 60 minutes. Mean count ratios of xenograft ARO tumors (R/L) of 60 minutes I-131 images at 2, 3, 4 and 6 days after Ad-hNIS injection were 2.85, 2.54, 2.31, and 2.18, each. On RT-PCR, hNIS expression of Ad-hNIS transfected ARO xenograft tumors was confirmed. Radioiodine uptake was successfully increased in ARO cells by adenovirus-mediated hNIs gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. An oncolytic adenovirus regulated by a radiation-inducible promoter selectively mediates hSulf-1 gene expression and mutually reinforces antitumor activity of I131-metuximab in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Fang, Lin; Zhang, Quan'an; Zheng, Qin; Tong, Jinlong; Fu, Xiaohui; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Su, Changqing; Zheng, Junnian

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy and antibody approaches are crucial auxiliary strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previously, we established a survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus that has inhibitory effect on HCC growth. The human sulfatase-1 (hSulf-1) gene can suppress the growth factor signaling pathways, then inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and enhance cellular sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. I(131)-metuximab (I(131)-mab) is a monoclonal anti-HCC antibody that conjugated to I(131) and specifically recognizes the HAb18G/CD147 antigen on HCC cells. To integrate the oncolytic adenovirus-based gene therapy and the I(131)-mab-based radioimmunotherapy, this study combined the CArG element of early growth response-l (Egr-l) gene with the survivin promoter to construct a radiation-inducible enhanced promoter, which was used to recombine a radiation-inducible oncolytic adenovirus as hSulf-1 gene vector. When I(131)-mab was incorporated into the treatment regimen, not only could the antibody produce radioimmunotherapeutic effect, but the I(131) radiation was able to further boost adenoviral proliferation. We demonstrated that the CArG-enhanced survivin promoter markedly improved the proliferative activity of the oncolytic adenovirus in HCC cells, thereby augmenting hSulf-1 expression and inducing cancer cell apoptosis. This novel strategy that involved multiple, synergistic mechanisms, including oncolytic therapy, gene therapy and radioimmunotherapy, was demonstrated to exert an excellent anti-cancer outcome, which will be a promising approach in HCC treatment. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting.As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells.These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  12. Image-aided Suicide Gene Therapy Utilizing Multifunctional hTERT-targeting Adenovirus for Clinical Translation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Kyung Tae; Lee, Sang-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hee; Moon, Ju Young; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sukyoung; Kim, Eun Ok; Kang, Se Hun; Kim, Seok Ki; Choi, Sun Il; Goh, Sung Ho; Kim, Daehong; Lee, Seong-Wook; Ju, Mi Ha; Jeong, Jin Sook; Kim, In-Hoo

    2016-01-01

    Trans-splicing ribozyme enables to sense and reprogram target RNA into therapeutic transgene and thereby becomes a good sensing device for detection of cancer cells, judging from transgene expression. Previously we proposed PEPCK-Rz-HSVtk (PRT), hTERT targeting trans-splicing ribozyme (Rz) driven by liver-specific promoter phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) with downstream suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene therapy. Here, we describe success of a re-engineered adenoviral vector harboring PRT in obtaining greater antitumor activity with less off-target effect for clinical application as a theranostics. We introduced liver-selective apolipoprotein E (ApoE) enhancer to the distal region of PRT unit to augment activity and liver selectivity of PEPCK promoter, and achieved better transduction into liver cancer cells by replacement of serotype 35 fiber knob on additional E4orf1-4 deletion of E1&E3-deleted serotype 5 back bone. We demonstrated that our refined adenovirus harboring PEPCK/ApoE-Rz-HSVtk (Ad-PRT-E) achieved great anti-tumor efficacy and improved ability to specifically target HCC without damaging normal hepatocytes. We also showed noninvasive imaging modalities were successfully employed to monitor both how well a therapeutic gene (HSVtk) was expressed inside tumor and how effectively a gene therapy took an action in terms of tumor growth. Collectively, this study suggests that the advanced therapeutic adenoviruses Ad-PRT-E and its image-aided evaluation system may lead to the powerful strategy for successful clinical translation and the development of clinical protocols for HCC therapy.

  13. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer

  14. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Haixi [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Lili [Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute (Hong Kong); Ren, Guosheng [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Xu, Yongzhu [Chongqing Health Service Center, Chongqing 400020 (China); Zhou, Xiangyang [The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiang, Tingxiu, E-mail: xiangtx1@gmail.com [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  15. Innate Functions of Immunoglobulin M Lessen Liver Gene Transfer with Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzu, Carmen; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors. PMID:24465560

  16. Innate functions of immunoglobulin M lessen liver gene transfer with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Unzu

    Full Text Available The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of endostatin in vivo results in high level of transgene expression and inhibition of tumor growth and metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Bernhard V.; Martinet, Olivier; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Mandeli, John; Woo, Savio L. C.

    2000-04-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis has been shown to be an effective strategy in cancer therapy in mice. However, its widespread application has been hampered by difficulties in the large-scale production of the antiangiogenic proteins. This limitation may be resolved by in vivo delivery and expression of the antiangiogenic genes. We have constructed a recombinant adenovirus that expresses murine endostatin that is biologically active both in vitro, as determined in endothelial cell proliferation assays, and in vivo, by suppression of angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor 165. Persistent high serum levels of endostatin (605-1740 ng/ml; mean, 936 ng/ml) were achieved after systemic administration of the vector to nude mice, which resulted in significant reduction of the growth rates and the volumes of JC breast carcinoma and Lewis lung carcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). In addition, the endostatin vector treatment completely prevented the formation of pulmonary micrometastases in Lewis lung carcinoma (P = 0.0001). Immunohistochemical staining of the tumors demonstrated a decreased number of blood vessels in the treatment group versus the controls. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrates the potential of vector-mediated antiangiogenic gene therapy as a component in cancer therapy.

  18. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved

  19. Alternate adenovirus type-pairs for a possible circumvention of host immune response to recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nász, I; Adám, E; Lengyel, A

    2001-01-01

    With the help of monoclonal antibodies the existence of at least 18 different earlier not known intertype (IT) specific epitopes were demonstrated in different numbers and combinations on the hexons of different adenovirus serotypes. The IT specific epitopes play an important role in the experimental gene therapy and in the recombinant adenovirus vaccination because of the harmful immune response of the recipient organisms directed against the many different epitopes of the adenovirus vector. For the elimination of harmful effect the authors suggest the use of multiple vectors, each prepared from different adenovirus serotypes showing the loosest antigenic relationship to each other. The vectors would be used sequentially when second or multiple administration is needed. For this purpose the authors determined and described 31 such adenovirus type-pairs, which are probably the best alternates for sequential use in experimental gene therapy.

  20. PDGF-receptor beta-targeted adenovirus redirects gene transfer from hepatocytes to activated stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Marieke H.; Rots, Marianne G.; Beljaars, Leonie; Ypma, Arjen Y.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Poelstra, Klaas; Moshage, Albert; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic liver damage may lead to liver fibrosis. In this process, hepatic activated stellate cells are the key players. Thus, activated stellate cells are attractive targets for antifibrotic gene therapy. Recombinant, adenovirus is a promising vehicle for delivering therapeutic genes to liver cells.

  1. Hepatoma targeting peptide conjugated bio-reducible polymer complexed with oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Kim, Hyun Ah; Nam, Kihoon; Na, Youjin; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, SungWan

    2015-12-28

    Despite adenovirus (Ad) vector's numerous advantages for cancer gene therapy, such as high ability of endosomal escape, efficient nuclear entry mechanism, and high transduction, and therapeutic efficacy, tumor specific targeting and antiviral immune response still remain as a critical challenge in clinical setting. To overcome these obstacles and achieve cancer-specific targeting, we constructed tumor targeting bioreducible polymer, an arginine grafted bio-reducible polymer (ABP)-PEG-HCBP1, by conjugating PEGylated ABP with HCBP1 peptides which has high affinity and selectivity towards hepatoma. The ABP-PEG-HCBP1-conjugated replication incompetent GFP-expressing ad, (Ad/GFP)-ABP-PEG-HCBP1, showed a hepatoma cancer specific uptake and transduction compared to either naked Ad/GFP or Ad/GFP-ABP. Competition assays demonstrated that Ad/GFP-ABP-PEG-HCBP1-mediated transduction was specifically inhibited by HCBP1 peptide rather than coxsackie and adenovirus receptor specific antibody. In addition, ABP-PEG-HCBP1 can protect biological activity of Ad against serum, and considerably reduced both innate and adaptive immune response against Ad. shMet-expressing oncolytic Ad (oAd; RdB/shMet) complexed with ABP-PEG-HCBP1 delivered oAd efficiently into hepatoma cancer cells. The oAd/ABP-PEG-HCBP1 demonstrated enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy in comparison to oAd/ABP complex. Furthermore, Huh7 and HT1080 cancer cells treated with oAd/shMet-ABP-PEG-HCBP1 complex had significantly decreased Met and VEGF expression in hepatoma cancer, but not in non-hepatoma cancer. In sum, these results suggest that HCBP1-conjugated bioreducible polymer could be used to deliver oncolytic Ad safely and efficiently to treat hepatoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Viral vectors for cystic fibrosis gene therapy: What does the future hold?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Griesenbach

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Uta Griesenbach1, Makoto Inoue2, Mamoru Hasegawa2, Eric WFW Alton11Department of Gene Therapy, Imperial College London, UK; The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium; 2DNAVEC Corporation, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: Gene transfer to the airway epithelium has been more difficult than originally anticipated, largely because of significant extra- and intracellular barriers in the lung. In general, viral vectors are more adapted to overcoming these barriers than nonviral gene transfer agents and are, therefore, more efficient in transferring genes into recipient cells. Viral vectors derived from adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and Sendai virus, which all have a natural tropism for the airway epithelium, have been evaluated for cystic fibrosis (CF gene therapy. Although these vectors transduce airway epithelial cells efficiently, gene expression is transient and repeated administration is inefficient. They are, therefore, unlikely to be suitable for CF gene therapy. More recently, lentiviruses (LV have been assessed for lung gene transfer. In contrast to retroviruses, they transduce nondividing cells and randomly integrate into the genome. However, LVs do not have a natural tropism for the lung, and a significant amount of effort has been put into pseudotyping these vectors with proteins suitable for airway gene transfer. Several studies have shown that LV-mediated transduction leads to persistent gene expression (for the lifetime of the animal in the airways and, importantly, repeated administration is feasible. Thus, appropriately pseudotyped LV vectors are promising candidates for CF gene therapy. Here, we will review preclinical and clinical research related to viral CF gene therapy.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene therapy, adenovirus, AAV, lentivirus, Sendai virus

  3. Inhibitory effect of Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus carrying P53 gene against gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Sun, Bin; An, Ni; Tan, Weifeng; Cao, Lu; Luo, Xiangji; Yu, Yong; Feng, Feiling; Li, Bin; Wu, Mengchao; Su, Changqing; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy has become an important strategy for treatment of malignancies, but problems remains concerning the low gene transferring efficiency, poor transgene expression and limited targeting specific tumors, which have greatly hampered the clinical application of tumor gene therapy. Gallbladder cancer is characterized by rapid progress, poor prognosis, and aberrantly high expression of Survivin. In the present study, we used a human tumor-specific Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus vector carrying P53 gene, whose anti-cancer effect has been widely confirmed, to construct a wide spectrum, specific, safe, effective gene-viral therapy system, AdSurp-P53. Examining expression of enhanced green fluorecent protein (EGFP), E1A and the target gene P53 in the oncolytic adenovirus system validated that Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus had high proliferation activity and high P53 expression in Survivin-positive gallbladder cancer cells. Our in vitro cytotoxicity experiment demonstrated that AdSurp-P53 possessed a stronger cytotoxic effect against gallbladder cancer cells and hepatic cancer cells. The survival rate of EH-GB1 cells was lower than 40% after infection of AdSurp-P53 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) = 1 pfu/cell, while the rate was higher than 90% after infection of Ad-P53 at the same MOI, demonstrating that AdSurp-P53 has a potent cytotoxicity against EH-GB1 cells. The tumor growth was greatly inhibited in nude mice bearing EH-GB1 xenografts when the total dose of AdSurp-P53 was 1 × 10(9) pfu, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) revealed that the apoptotic rate of cancer cells was (33.4 ± 8.4)%. This oncolytic adenovirus system overcomes the long-standing shortcomings of gene therapy: poor transgene expression and targeting of only specific tumors, with its therapeutic effect better than the traditional Ad-P53 therapy regimen already on market; our system might be used for patients with advanced gallbladder cancer and

  4. Imaging of human sodium-iodide symporter gene expression mediated by recombinant adenovirus in skeletal muscle of living rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Park, Seong-Wook; Lee, Heuiran; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Yang, You-Jung; Moon, Dae Hyuk

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of recombinant adenovirus-mediated human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression by 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy in skeletal muscle of rats. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS gene [Rad-CMV-hNIS 5 x 10 7 , 2 x 10 8 or 1 x 10 9 plaque forming units (pfu)] or β-galactosidase gene (Rad-CMV-LacZ 1 x 10 9 pfu) was injected into the right biceps femoris muscle of rats (n=5-6 for each group). Three days after gene transfer, scintigraphy was performed using a gamma camera 30 min after injection of 99m TcO 4 - (1.85 MBq). An additional two rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS underwent 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy with sodium perchlorate. After the imaging studies, rats were sacrificed for assessment of the biodistribution of 99m TcO 4 - and measurement of hNIS mRNA expression. In all the rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS, hNIS expression was successfully imaged by 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy, while rats injected with Rad-CMV-LacZ or lower doses of Rad-CMV-hNIS failed to show uptake. The biodistribution studies indicated that a significantly different amount of 99m TcO 4 - was retained in the liver (p 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS. The muscular hNIS mRNA level quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was significantly higher in rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS (p 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS were specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. This study illustrated that 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy can monitor Rad-CMV-hNIS-mediated gene expression in skeletal muscle of rats, non-invasively and quantitatively. (orig.)

  5. Uptake of 131I-FIAU in BMSCs infected by adenovirus vector-mediated HSV1-TK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Binqing; Wu Tao; Sun Xun; An Rui

    2010-01-01

    Report gene HSV1-TK and therapy gene were connected by IRES, and recombinant adenovirus vector Ad5-TK-IRES-BDNF-EGFP was constructed and infected with BMSCs at MOI of 0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250, with the control recombinant adenovirus vector of Ad5-EGFP. Green fluorescence cell positive rate was observed under the microscopy. MTT assay was used to determine the cell proliferation. bFGF and EGF were used to induce the BMSCs, and RQ-PCR to determine target gene expression in infection BMSCs. Uptake of 131 I-FIAU was assessed by gamma counter. The data were processed by SPSS11.code. Recombinant adenovirus at MOI 150 had high infectionefficiency and low toxic in BMSCs. There was a strong relation between the mRNA expression of TK and BDNF in infection BMSCs. The significance between the infection BMSCs and control BMSCs for uptake of 131 I-FIAU at all the time points was t=23.06-173.83 and P 131 I-FIAU. This suggests a suitable gene vector for tracing genetically modified stem cells. (authors)

  6. Gene transfer strategies for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, B.E.; Buchsbaum, D.J.; Zinn, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Utilization of molecular biology techniques offers attractive options in nuclear medicine for improving cancer imaging and therapy with radiolabeled peptides. Two of these options include utilization of phage-panning to identify novel tumor specific peptides or single chain antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the number of antigen/receptor sites expressed on malignant cells. The group has focused on the latter approach for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy. The most widely used gene transfer vectors in clinical gene therapy trials include retrovirus, cationic lipids and adenovirus. It has been utilized adenovirus vectors for gene transfer because of their ability to accomplish efficient in vivo gene transfer. Adenovirus vectors encoding the genes for a variety of antigens/receptors (carcinoembryonic antigen, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2) have all shown that their expression is increased on cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo following adenovirus infection. Of particular interest has been the adenovirus encoding for SSTr2 (AdCMVSSTr2). Various radioisotopes have been attached to somatostatin analogues for imaging and therapy of SSTr2-positive tumors both clinically and in animal models. The use of these analogues in combination with AdCMVSSTr2 is a promising approach for improving the detection sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of these radiolabeled peptides against solid tumors. In addition, it has been proposed the use of SSTr2 as a marker for imaging the expression of another cancer therapeutic transgene (e.g. cytosine deaminase, thymidine kinase) encoded within the same vector. This would allow for non-invasive monitoring of gene delivery to tumor sites

  7. Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy with AFP driving Apoptin gene shows potent antitumor effect in hepatocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kang-Jian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy and viral therapy are used for cancer therapy for many years, but the results are less than satisfactory. Our aim was to construct a new recombinant adenovirus which is more efficient to kill hepatocarcinoma cells but more safe to normal cells. Methods By using the Cancer Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy strategy, Apoptin, a promising cancer therapeutic gene was inserted into the double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus AD55 in which E1A gene was driven by alpha fetoprotein promoter along with a 55 kDa deletion in E1B gene to form AD55-Apoptin. The anti-tumor effects and safety were examined by western blotting, virus yield assay, real time polymerase chain reaction, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Hoechst33342 staining, Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, xenograft tumor model, Immunohistochemical assay, liver function analysis and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay. Results The recombinant virus AD55-Apoptin has more significant antitumor effect for hepatocelluar carcinoma cell lines (in vitro than that of AD55 and even ONYX-015 but no or little impair on normal cell lines. Furthermore, it also shows an obvious in vivo antitumor effect on the Huh-7 liver carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with bigger beginning tumor volume till about 425 mm3 but has no any damage on the function of liver. The induction of apoptosis is involved in AD55-Apoptin induced antitumor effects. Conclusion The AD55-Apoptin can be a potential anti-hepatoma agent with remarkable antitumor efficacy as well as higher safety in cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy system.

  8. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  9. Cancer-Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses for Modulation of the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Capasso, Cristian; Vaha-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Otto; Hemminki, Akseli

    2018-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy and it is the first approved virus-derived drug for treatment of cancer. As an oncolytic agent, it can induce lysis of infected cells, but it can also engage the immune system, promoting activation and maturation of antigen- presenting cells (APCs). In essence, oncolysis combined with the associated immunostimulatory actions result in a "personalized in situ vaccine" for each patient. In order to take full advantage of these features, we should try to understand how adenovirus interacts with the immune system, what are the receptors involved in triggering subsequent signals and which kind of responses they elicit. Tackling these questions will give us further insight in how to manipulate adenovirus-mediated immune responses for enhancement of anti-tumor efficacy. In this review, we first highlight how oncolytic adenovirus interacts with the innate immune system and its receptors such as Toll-like receptors, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)- like receptors and other immune sensors. Then we describe the effect of these interactions on the adaptive immune system and its cells, especially B and T lymphocytes. Finally, we summarize the most significant preclinical and clinical results in the field of gene therapy where researchers have engineered adenovirus to manipulate the host immune system by expressing cytokines and signalingmediators. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PTEN and KRT10 improves cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Wang, K; Liu, W; Hao, Q

    2015-06-18

    Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in ovarian cancer patients, and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Overexpression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) has been shown to preserve the cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer cells, while cisplatin-induced keratin 10 (KRT10) overexpression mediates the resistance-reversing effect of PTEN. However, whether overexpression of PTEN or KRT10 can improve the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo has not been investigated. Therefore, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated PTEN or KRT10 overexpression on the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo. Recombinant adenoviruses carrying the gene for PTEN or KRT10 were constructed. The effects of overexpression of PTEN and KRT10 on cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells were examined using the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays in vitro. Subcutaneously transplanted nude mice, as a model of human ovarian cancer, were used to test the effects of PTEN and KRT10 on cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo. The MTT assay showed that recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN enhanced the proliferation inhibition effect of cisplatin on C13K cells. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN also increased the cisplatin-induced apoptosis rate of C13K cells. Furthermore, recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN enhanced the inhibitory effect of cisplatin on C13K xenograft tumor growth. Thus, recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN may improve the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Gene Therapy with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors: Current Advances and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Ng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant Adenoviral vectors represent one of the best gene transfer platforms due to their ability to efficiently transduce a wide range of quiescent and proliferating cell types from various tissues and species. The activation of an adaptive immune response against the transduced cells is one of the major drawbacks of first generation Adenovirus vectors and has been overcome by the latest generation of recombinant Adenovirus, the Helper-Dependent Adenoviral (HDAd vectors. HDAds have innovative features including the complete absence of viral coding sequences and the ability to mediate high level transgene expression with negligible chronic toxicity. This review summarizes the many aspects of HDAd biology and structure with a major focus on in vivo gene therapy application and with an emphasis on the unsolved issues that these vectors still presents toward clinical application.

  12. Oral Tolerance: A New Tool for the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Inflammatory Disorders and Liver-Directed Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Ilan

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is a method of downregulating an immune response by feeding antigens. The use of oral tolerance toward adenoviruses and colitis-extracted proteins for long term gene therapy and alleviation of experimental colitis, and the mechanisms of tolerance induction are presented. Adenoviruses are efficient vectors in liver-directed gene therapy; however, the antiviral immune response precludes the ability to achieve long term gene expression and prohibits the ability to reinject the recombinant virus. Oral tolerance induction via feeding of viral-extracted proteins prevented the antiadenoviral humoral and cellular immune responses, thus enabling long term gene therapy using these viruses. Moreover, pre-existing immune response to the virus was overcome by tolerance induction, enabling prolonged gene expression in a presensitized host. Inflammatory bowel diseases are immune-mediated disorders where an imbalance between proinflammatory (T helper cell type 1 and anti-inflammatory (T helper cell type 2 cytokines are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis. In the experimental colitis model, the feeding of colitis-extracted proteins downregulated the anticolon immune response. Tolerance induction toward colitis-extracted proteins ameliorated colonic inflammation as shown by decreased diarrhea and reduction of colonic ulcerations, intestinal and peritoneal adhesions, wall thickness and edema. Histological parameters for colitis were markedly improved in tolerized animals. In both models, tolerized animals developed an increase in transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin-4 and interleukin-10, and a decrease in the mRNA of interferon-gamma lymphocytes and serum levels. Adoptive transfer of tolerized lymphocytes enabled the transfer of tolerance toward adenoviruses and colon-extracted proteins. Thus, oral tolerance induces suppressor lymphocytes that mediate immune response downregulation by induction of a shift from a proinflammatory T

  13. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter.

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    Jianqing Pan

    Full Text Available Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373. Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement.

  14. Key Role of the Scavenger Receptor MARCO in Mediating Adenovirus Infection and Subsequent Innate Responses of Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, Mareike D; Nielsen, Peter J; Stichling, Nicole; Cohen, Idan; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Wood, Connor; Engelhard, Peggy; Suomalainen, Maarit; Gyory, Ildiko; Huber, Michael; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Gordon, Siamon; Jakob, Thilo; Martin, Stefan F; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Greber, Urs F; Freudenberg, Marina A; Fejer, György

    2017-08-01

    The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed in several subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages and has been shown to participate in the recognition of various bacterial pathogens. However, the role of MARCO in antiviral defense is largely unexplored. Here, we investigated whether MARCO might be involved in the innate sensing of infection with adenovirus and recombinant adenoviral vectors by macrophages, which elicit vigorous immune responses in vivo Using cells derived from mice, we show that adenovirus infection is significantly more efficient in MARCO-positive alveolar macrophages (AMs) and in AM-like primary macrophage lines (Max Planck Institute cells) than in MARCO-negative bone marrow-derived macrophages. Using antibodies blocking ligand binding to MARCO, as well as gene-deficient and MARCO-transfected cells, we show that MARCO mediates the rapid adenovirus transduction of macrophages. By enhancing adenovirus infection, MARCO contributes to efficient innate virus recognition through the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS. This leads to strong proinflammatory responses, including the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), alpha/beta interferon, and mature IL-1α. These findings contribute to the understanding of viral pathogenesis in macrophages and may open new possibilities for the development of tools to influence the outcome of infection with adenovirus or adenovirus vectors. IMPORTANCE Macrophages play crucial roles in inflammation and defense against infection. Several macrophage subtypes have been identified with differing abilities to respond to infection with both natural adenoviruses and recombinant adenoviral vectors. Adenoviruses are important respiratory pathogens that elicit vigorous innate responses in vitro and in vivo The cell surface receptors mediating macrophage type-specific adenovirus sensing are largely unknown. The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed on some subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages, including lung alveolar macrophages

  15. Intravascular local gene transfer mediated by protein-coated metallic stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J; Gao, R; Shi, R; Song, L; Tang, J; Li, Y; Tang, C; Meng, L; Yuan, W; Chen, Z

    2001-10-01

    To assess the feasibility, efficiency and selectivity of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to local arterial wall by protein-coated metallic stent. A replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the Lac Z reporter gene for nuclear-specific beta-galactosidase (Ad-beta gal) was used in this study. The coating for metallic stent was made by immersing it in a gelatin solution containing crosslinker. The coated stents were mounted on a 4.0 or 3.0 mm percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon and submersed into a high-titer Ad-beta gal viral stock (2 x 10(10) pfu/ml) for 3 min, and then implanted into the carotid arteries in 4 mini-swines and into the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery in 2 mini-swines via 8F large lumen guiding catheters. The animals were sacrificed 7 (n = 4), 14 (n = 1) and 21 (n = 1) days after implantation, respectively. The beta-galactosidase expression was assessed by X-gal staining. The results showed that the expression of transgene was detected in all animal. In 1 of carotid artery with an intact intima, the beta-gal expression was limited to endothelial cells. In vessels with denuded endothelium, gene expression was found in the sub-intima, media and adventitia. The transfection efficiency of medial smooth muscle cells was 38.6%. In 2 animals sacrificed 7 days after transfection, a microscopic examination of X-gal-stained samples did not show evidence of transfection in remote organs and arterial segments adjacent to the treated arterial site. Adenovirus-mediated arterial gene transfer to endothelial, smooth muscle cells and adventitia by protein-coated metallic stent is feasible. The transfection efficiency is higher. The coated stent may act as a good carrier of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and have a potential to prevent restenosis following PTCA.

  16. Imaging of human sodium-iodide symporter gene expression mediated by recombinant adenovirus in skeletal muscle of living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Park, Seong-Wook [Department of Internal Medicine (Cardiology), Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, 138-736, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Heuiran; Kim, Sung Jin [Department of Microbiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Won Woo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yang, You-Jung; Moon, Dae Hyuk [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2004-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of recombinant adenovirus-mediated human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression by {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy in skeletal muscle of rats. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS gene [Rad-CMV-hNIS 5 x 10{sup 7}, 2 x 10{sup 8} or 1 x 10{sup 9} plaque forming units (pfu)] or {beta}-galactosidase gene (Rad-CMV-LacZ 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu) was injected into the right biceps femoris muscle of rats (n=5-6 for each group). Three days after gene transfer, scintigraphy was performed using a gamma camera 30 min after injection of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} (1.85 MBq). An additional two rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS underwent {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy with sodium perchlorate. After the imaging studies, rats were sacrificed for assessment of the biodistribution of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} and measurement of hNIS mRNA expression. In all the rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS, hNIS expression was successfully imaged by {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy, while rats injected with Rad-CMV-LacZ or lower doses of Rad-CMV-hNIS failed to show uptake. The biodistribution studies indicated that a significantly different amount of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} was retained in the liver (p<0.001) and the right muscle (p<0.05), with the highest uptake in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS. The muscular hNIS mRNA level quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was significantly higher in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS (p<0.05), with a positive correlation with the imaging counts (r=0.810, p<0.05) and the biodistribution (r=0.847, p<0.001). Hot spots in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS were specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. This study illustrated that {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy can monitor Rad-CMV-hNIS-mediated gene expression in

  17. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene combined with radiation therapy on human lymphoma cells lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wan Jianmei; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Human lymphoma cell lines were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTF. The cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry, and the p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting. The results showed that extrinsic p53 gene have expressed to some degree, but not at high level. The role of inhibition and radiation sensitivity of rAd-p53 was not significant to human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  18. Preliminary study of MR diffusion weighted imaging in nude mice models of hepatic Bel7402 tumors after adenovirus-mediated cytosine diaminase-thymidine kinase gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xinqing; Chen Liang; Wu Hongzhen; Huang Jingjun; Wei Xinhua; Mo Lei; Yang Ruimeng; Xiao Xiangsheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristics of DWI in nude mice models of hepatic Bel7402 tumors after treatment with adenovirus-mediated cytosine diaminase-thymidine kinase (Ad. CD-TK) double suicide gene therapy, and then to identify whether DWI can be used for assessing curative effect of postoperative tumors. Methods: Thirty nude mice models of hepatic Bel7402 tumors were successfully created using cell suspension method, after the tumor grew to more than 1 cm in diameter, 20 tumor models were treated by intratumoral administration of Ad. CD-TK for 3 days plus intraperitonea (i.p.) treatment with 5-Fc and GCV for the duration of the study.Then they were randomly divided into three groups during 5-Fc and GCV treatment. The remaining 10 tumor models were used as controls. MR scanning were performed in 10 th day before and after tumor implantation in all models by using EPI-SE series and SENSE technology for treatment group. Tumor volumes and ADC values were calculated pretreatment and posttreatment. Cell apoptosis were determined by using TUNEL method. Analyze the change of ADC and apoptosis index (AI) in different times, t test was used for comparison the difference of AI and ADC values respectively. Results: After 10 days,the tumor volumes of the treatment groups and controls were respectively (724.16 ±57.45) mm 3 , (754.57 ± 66.84) mm 3 , with no significant difference (t=0.488, P >0.05). The ADC values of the treatment groups were (0.98 ±0.11) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s,the ones of the control groups were (0.68 ±0.04) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s; AI of the treatment groups were (23.25 ±6.57)%, the ones of the control groups were (2.57 ± 0.58)%. There were difference in both groups (t=4.473, 5.874; P<0.01). Conclusion: DWI can be effectively to monitor the early pathological changes of hepatic Bel7402 tumors after Ad. CD-TK double suicide gene therapy, and provide experimental evidences for clinical application. (authors)

  19. OFFICIAL MEDICATIONS FOR ANTI-TUMOR GENE THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Nemtsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of modern literature data of official medications for anti-tumor gene therapy as well as of medications that finished clinical trials.The article discusses the concept of gene therapy, the statistical analysis results of initiated clinical trials of gene products, the most actively developing directions of anticancer gene therapy, and the characteristics of anti-tumor gene medications.Various delivery systems for gene material are being examined, including viruses that are defective in  replication (Gendicine™ and Advexin and oncolytic (tumor specific conditionally replicating viruses (Oncorine™, ONYX-015, Imlygic®.By now three preparations for intra-tumor injection have been introduced into oncology clinical practice: two of them – Gendicine™ and Oncorine™ have been registered in China, and one of them – Imlygic® has been registered in the USA. Gendicine™ and Oncorine™ are based on the wild type p53 gene and are designed for treatment of patients with head and neck malignancies. Replicating adenovirus is the delivery system in Gendicine™, whereas oncolytic adenovirus is the vector for gene material in Oncorine™. Imlygic® is based on the  recombinant replicating HSV1 virus with an introduced GM–CSF gene and is designed for treatment of  melanoma patients. These medications are well tolerated and do not cause any serious adverse events. Gendicine™ and Oncorine™ are not effective in monotherapy but demonstrate pronounced synergism with chemoand radiation therapy. Imlygic® has just started the post marketing trials.

  20. Improved animal models for testing gene therapy for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike lesions that develop rapidly in vessels that are amenable to efficient gene delivery. Moreover, because human atherosclerosis develops in normal vessels, gene therapy that prevents atherosclerosis is most logically tested in relatively normal arteries. Similarly, gene therapy that causes atherosclerosis regression requires gene delivery to an existing lesion. Here we report development of three new rabbit models for testing vessel-wall-directed gene therapy that either prevents or reverses atherosclerosis. Carotid artery intimal lesions in these new models develop within 2-7 months after initiation of a high-fat diet and are 20-80 times larger than lesions in a model we described previously. Individual models allow generation of lesions that are relatively rich in either macrophages or smooth muscle cells, permitting testing of gene therapy strategies targeted at either cell type. Two of the models include gene delivery to essentially normal arteries and will be useful for identifying strategies that prevent lesion development. The third model generates lesions rapidly in vector-naïve animals and can be used for testing gene therapy that promotes lesion regression. These models are optimized for testing helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated gene therapy; however, they could be easily adapted for testing of other vectors or of different types of molecular therapies, delivered directly to the blood vessel wall. Our data also supports the promise of HDAd to deliver long

  1. Gene therapy and reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribley, John M; Rehman, Khurram S; Niu, Hairong; Christman, Gregory M

    2002-04-01

    To review the literature on the principles of gene therapy and its potential application in reproductive medicine. Literature review. Gene therapy involves transfer of genetic material to target cells using a delivery system, or vector. Attention has primarily focused on viral vectors. Significant problems remain to be overcome including low efficacy of gene transfer, the transient expression of some vectors, safety issues with modified adenoviruses and retroviruses, and ethical concerns. If these issues can be resolved, gene therapy will be applicable to an increasing spectrum of single and multiple gene disorders, as the Human Genome Project data are analyzed, and the genetic component of human disease becomes better understood. Gynecologic gene therapy has advanced to human clinical trials for ovarian carcinoma, and shows potential for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata. Obstetric applications of gene therapy, including fetal gene therapy, remain more distant goals. Concerns about the safety of human gene therapy research are being actively addressed, and remarkable progress in improving DNA transfer has been made. The first treatment success for a genetic disease (severe combined immunodeficiency disease) has been achieved, and ongoing research efforts will eventually yield clinical applications in many spheres of reproductive medicine.

  2. AAV2-mediated in vivo immune gene therapy of solid tumours

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Sara A

    2010-12-20

    Abstract Background Many strategies have been adopted to unleash the potential of gene therapy for cancer, involving a wide range of therapeutic genes delivered by various methods. Immune therapy has become one of the major strategies adopted for cancer gene therapy and seeks to stimulate the immune system to target tumour antigens. In this study, the feasibility of AAV2 mediated immunotherapy of growing tumours was examined, in isolation and combined with anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods Immune-competent Balb\\/C or C57 mice bearing subcutaneous JBS fibrosarcoma or Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumour xenografts respectively were treated by intra-tumoural administration of AAV2 vector encoding the immune up-regulating cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the co-stimulatory molecule B7-1 to subcutaneous tumours, either alone or in combination with intra-muscular (IM) delivery of AAV2 vector encoding Nk4 14 days prior to tumour induction. Tumour growth and survival was monitored for all animals. Cured animals were re-challenged with tumourigenic doses of the original tumour type. In vivo cytotoxicity assays were used to investigate establishment of cell-mediated responses in treated animals. Results AAV2-mediated GM-CSF, B7-1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth and an increase in survival in both tumour models. Cured animals were resistant to re-challenge, and induction of T cell mediated anti-tumour responses were demonstrated. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes to naïve animals prevented tumour establishment. Systemic production of Nk4 induced by intra-muscular (IM) delivery of Nk4 significantly reduced subcutaneous tumour growth. However, combination of Nk4 treatment with GM-CSF, B7-1 therapy reduced the efficacy of the immune therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrates the potential for in vivo AAV2 mediated immune gene therapy, and provides data on the inter-relationship between tumour

  3. Clinical infection control in gene therapy : A multidisciplinary conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, ME; Jordan, CT; Chang, SMW; Conrad, C; Gerberding, JL; Kaufman, HL; Mayhall, CG; Nolta, JA; Pilaro, AM; Sullivan, S; Weber, DJ; Wivel, NA

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy is being studied for the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited disorders. Retroviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, adeno-associated viruses, herpesviruses, and others are being engineered to transfer genes into humans. Treatment protocols using recombinant viruses are being

  4. BS69 : A novel adenovirus E1A-associated protein that inhibits E1A transactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Gennissen, A.M.C.; Ramos, Y.F.M.; Kerkhoven, R.; Sonntag-Buck, V.; Stunnenberg, H.G.; Bernards, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus ElA gene products are nuclear phosphoproteins that can transactivate the other adenovirus early genes as well as several cellular genes, and can transform primary rodent cells in culture. Transformation and transactivation by ElA proteins is most likely to be mediated through

  5. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 ± 9.01 vs. 41.94 ± 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 ± 1303 vs. 1667 ± 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 ± 1084 vs. 1566 ± 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  6. A novel technology to target adenovirus vectors : application in cells involved in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, Jan Cornelis Emile

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a novel technology is described to target adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors are powerful tools to modulate gene expression. The use of these vectors however, is hampered by the fact that many for gene therapy interesting cell types do not, or only at low levels express the CAR

  7. A rapid Q-PCR titration protocol for adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus vectors that produces biologically relevant results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaher, Sean D.; Berk, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses are employed in the study of cellular processes and as expression vectors used in gene therapy. The success and reproducibility of these studies is dependent in part on having accurate and meaningful titers of replication competent and helper-dependent adenovirus stocks, which is problematic due to the use of varied and divergent titration protocols. Physical titration methods, which quantify the total number of viral particles, are used by many, but are poor at estimating activity. Biological titration methods, such as plaque assays, are more biologically relevant, but are time consuming and not applicable to helper-dependent gene therapy vectors. To address this, a protocol was developed called “infectious genome titration” in which viral DNA is isolated from the nuclei of cells ~3 h post-infection, and then quantified by Q-PCR. This approach ensures that only biologically active virions are counted as part of the titer determination. This approach is rapid, robust, sensitive, reproducible, and applicable to all forms of adenovirus. Unlike other Q-PCR-based methods, titers determined by this protocol are well correlated with biological activity. PMID:23624118

  8. Fiber mediated receptor masking in non-infected bystander cells restricts adenovirus cell killing effect but promotes adenovirus host co-existence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Rebetz

    Full Text Available The basic concept of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAD as oncolytic agents is that progenies generated from each round of infection will disperse, infect and kill new cancer cells. However, CRAD has only inhibited, but not eradicated tumor growth in xenograft tumor therapy, and CRAD therapy has had only marginal clinical benefit to cancer patients. Here, we found that CRAD propagation and cancer cell survival co-existed for long periods of time when infection was initiated at low multiplicity of infection (MOI, and cancer cell killing was inefficient and slow compared to the assumed cell killing effect upon infection at high MOI. Excessive production of fiber molecules from initial CRAD infection of only 1 to 2% cancer cells and their release prior to the viral particle itself caused a tropism-specific receptor masking in both infected and non-infected bystander cells. Consequently, the non-infected bystander cells were inefficiently bound and infected by CRAD progenies. Further, fiber overproduction with concomitant restriction of adenovirus spread was observed in xenograft cancer therapy models. Besides the CAR-binding Ad4, Ad5, and Ad37, infection with CD46-binding Ad35 and Ad11 also caused receptor masking. Fiber overproduction and its resulting receptor masking thus play a key role in limiting CRAD functionality, but potentially promote adenovirus and host cell co-existence. These findings also give important clues for understanding mechanisms underlying the natural infection course of various adenoviruses.

  9. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  10. Tip60 degradation by adenovirus relieves transcriptional repression of viral transcriptional activator EIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Jha, S; Engel, D A; Ornelles, D A; Dutta, A

    2013-10-17

    Adenoviruses are linear double-stranded DNA viruses that infect human and rodent cell lines, occasionally transform them and cause tumors in animal models. The host cell challenges the virus in multifaceted ways to restrain viral gene expression and DNA replication, and sometimes even eliminates the infected cells by programmed cell death. To combat these challenges, adenoviruses abrogate the cellular DNA damage response pathway. Tip60 is a lysine acetyltransferase that acetylates histones and other proteins to regulate gene expression, DNA damage response, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation. Tip60 is a bona fide tumor suppressor as mice that are haploid for Tip60 are predisposed to tumors. We have discovered that Tip60 is degraded by adenovirus oncoproteins EIB55K and E4orf6 by a proteasome-mediated pathway. Tip60 binds to the immediate early adenovirus promoter and suppresses adenovirus EIA gene expression, which is a master regulator of adenovirus transcription, at least partly through retention of the virally encoded repressor pVII on this promoter. Thus, degradation of Tip60 by the adenoviral early proteins is important for efficient viral early gene transcription and for changes in expression of cellular genes.

  11. Circumvention of Immunity to the Adenovirus Major Coat Protein Hexon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumitra; Shirley, Pamela S.; McClelland, Alan; Kaleko, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Immunity to adenoviruses is an important hurdle to be overcome for successful gene therapy. The presence of antibodies to the capsid proteins prevents efficacious adenovirus vector administration in vivo. We tested whether immunity to a particular serotype of adenovirus (Ad5) may be overcome with a vector that encodes the hexon sequences from a different adenovirus serotype (Ad12). We successfully constructed an adenovirus vector with a chimeric Ad5-Ad12 hexon which was not neutralized by plasma from C57BL/6 mice immunized with Ad5. The vector was also capable of transducing the livers of C57BL/6 mice previously immunized with Ad5. PMID:9658137

  12. Crystal structure of the fibre head domain of the Atadenovirus Snake Adenovirus 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu K Singh

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are non-enveloped icosahedral viruses with trimeric fibre proteins protruding from their vertices. There are five known genera, from which only Mastadenoviruses have been widely studied. Apart from studying adenovirus as a biological model system and with a view to prevent or combat viral infection, there is a major interest in using adenovirus for vaccination, cancer therapy and gene therapy purposes. Adenoviruses from the Atadenovirus genus have been isolated from squamate reptile hosts, ruminants and birds and have a characteristic gene organization and capsid morphology. The carboxy-terminal virus-distal fibre head domains are likely responsible for primary receptor recognition. We determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the Snake Adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1 fibre head using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD method. Despite the absence of significant sequence homology, this Atadenovirus fibre head has the same beta-sandwich propeller topology as other adenovirus fibre heads. However, it is about half the size, mainly due to much shorter loops connecting the beta-strands. The detailed structure of the SnAdV-1 fibre head and other animal adenovirus fibre heads, together with the future identification of their natural receptors, may lead to the development of new strategies to target adenovirus vectors to cells of interest.

  13. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkko Ylösmäki

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5 in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  14. Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of Catalase to Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Protects Neighboring Photoreceptors from Photo-Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Rex, T.S.; Tsui, I.; Hahn, P.; Maguire, A.M.; Duan, D.; Bennett, J.; Dunaief, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Overexpression of antioxidant enzymes by gene therapy may protect tissues from oxidative damage. Because the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide can diffuse across cell membranes, we hypothesized that overexpression of the antioxidant catalase within certain cells might protect neighboring cells. To test this hypothesis, we transduced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in vivo with adenovirus carrying th...

  15. Targeted Adenoviral Vector Demonstrates Enhanced Efficacy for In Vivo Gene Therapy of Uterine Leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Mohamed; Sherif, Lotfy; ElKhiary, Mostafa; Nair, Sanjeeta; Shalaby, Shahinaz; Mohamed, Sara; Eziba, Noura; El-Lakany, Mohamed; Curiel, David; Ismail, Nahed; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-04-01

    Gene therapy is a potentially effective non-surgical approach for the treatment of uterine leiomyoma. We demonstrated that targeted adenovirus vector, Ad-SSTR-RGD-TK/GCV, was highly effective in selectively inducing apoptosis and inhibiting proliferation of human leiomyoma cells in vitro while sparing normal myometrial cells. An in-vivo study, to compare efficacy and safety of modified adenovirus vector Ad-SSTR-RGD-TK/GCV versus untargeted vector for treatment of leiomyoma. Female nude mice were implanted with rat leiomyoma cells subcutaneously. Then mice were randomized into three groups. Group 1 received Ad-LacZ (marker gene), Group 2 received untargeted Ad-TK, and Group 3 received the targeted Ad-SSTR-RGD-TK. Tumors were measured weekly for 4 weeks. Then mice were sacrificed and tissue samples were collected. Evaluation of markers of apoptosis, proliferation, extracellular matrix, and angiogenesis was performed using Western Blot & Immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA. Dissemination of adenovirus was assessed by PCR. In comparison with the untargeted vector, the targeted adenoviral vector significantly shrank leiomyoma size (P leiomyoma lesions with both targeted and untargeted adenovirus. Targeted adenovirus, effectively reduces tumor size in leiomyoma without dissemination to other organs. Further evaluation of this localized targeted strategy for gene therapy is needed in appropriate preclinical humanoid animal models in preparation for a future pilot human trial. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Cre/loxP-mediated adenovirus type 5 packaging signal excision demonstrates that core element VI is sufficient for virus packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yasushi; Kimura, En; Uchida, Yuji; Nishida, Yasuto; Yamashita, Satoshi; Arima, Toshiyuki; Uchino, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    Previous analyses have demonstrated that packaging of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) genome is dependent on at least seven cis-acting elements, called AI to AVII, which are located in the left-end region of the genome. These elements have different packaging efficiencies, and without AI through AV, viral DNA cannot be packaged. Here we report the identification of the cis-acting Ad5 packaging domain in vivo by using the Cre/loxP system. We found that an adenoviral DNA fragment (nt 192 to nt 358), which includes elements AI to AV, is excised by Cre recombinase and packaged into capsids. Furthermore, this mutant adenovirus replicated so efficiently by repetitive propagation that its purification by CsCI equilibrium gradient was possible. This study clarified that the region from nt 358 to nt 454 on the viral genome is sufficient for packaging. Recently, the helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) construction system has been developed for the purpose of gene therapy. This system uses a helper virus with two parallel loxP sites flanking the packaging signal. This region is eliminated by Cre-mediated excision, which prevents helper virus packaging. Our data provide useful information regarding factors affecting efficient elimination

  17. Recent advances in genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagasato, Masaki; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Aoki, Kazunori

    2017-05-01

    Adenoviruses are widely used to deliver genes to a variety of cell types and have been used in a number of clinical trials for gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. However, several concerns must be addressed for the clinical use of adenovirus vectors. Selective delivery of a therapeutic gene by adenovirus vectors to target cancer is precluded by the widespread distribution of the primary cellular receptors. The systemic administration of adenoviruses results in hepatic tropism independent of the primary receptors. Adenoviruses induce strong innate and acquired immunity in vivo. Furthermore, several modifications to these vectors are necessary to enhance their oncolytic activity and ensure patient safety. As such, the adenovirus genome has been engineered to overcome these problems. The first part of the present review outlines recent progress in the genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment. In addition, several groups have recently developed cancer-targeting adenovirus vectors by using libraries that display random peptides on a fiber knob. Pancreatic cancer-targeting sequences have been isolated, and these oncolytic vectors have been shown by our group to be associated with a higher gene transduction efficiency and more potent oncolytic activity in cell lines, murine models, and surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer. In the second part of this review, we explain that combining cancer-targeting strategies can be a promising approach to increase the clinical usefulness of oncolytic adenovirus vectors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. Enhanced transduction and replication of RGD-fiber modified adenovirus in primary T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhak Sengupta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are often used as vehicles to mediate gene delivery for therapeutic purposes, but their research scope in hematological cells remains limited due to a narrow choice of host cells that express the adenoviral receptor (CAR. T cells, which are attractive targets for gene therapy of numerous diseases, remain resistant to adenoviral infection because of the absence of CAR expression. Here, we demonstrate that this resistance can be overcome when murine or human T cells are transduced with an adenovirus incorporating the RGD-fiber modification (Ad-RGD.A luciferase-expressing replication-deficient Ad-RGD infected 3-fold higher number of activated primary T cells than an adenovirus lacking the RGD-fiber modification in vitro. Infection with replication-competent Ad-RGD virus also caused increased cell cycling, higher E1A copy number and enriched hexon antigen expression in both human and murine T cells. Transduction with oncolytic Ad-RGD also resulted in higher titers of progeny virus and enhanced the killing of T cells. In vivo, 35-45% of splenic T cells were transduced by Ad-RGD.Collectively, our results prove that a fiber modified Ad-RGD successfully transduces and replicates in primary T cells of both murine and human origin.

  19. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Wiseman, Gregory A.; Federspiel, Mark J.; Morris, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  20. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wilson, Torrence M. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wiseman, Gregory A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Federspiel, Mark J. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Morris, John C., E-mail: davis.brian@mayo.edu [Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-11-19

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  1. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June Key [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using {sup 125}I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of {sup 131}I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by {sup 125}I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to {sup 131}I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system.

  2. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, June Key

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using 125 I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of 131 I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by 125 I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to 131 I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system

  3. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin-12 gene transfer combined with cytosine deaminase followed by 5-fluorocytosine treatment exerts potent antitumor activity in Renca tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Won-Kyung; Yoo, Jinsang; Yun, Hwan-Jung; Kim, Samyong; Im, Dong-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Therapeutic gene transfer affords a clinically feasible and safe approach to cancer treatment but a more effective modality is needed to improve clinical outcomes. Combined transfer of therapeutic genes with different modes of actions may be a means to this end. Interleukin-12 (IL-12), a heterodimeric immunoregulatory cytokine composed of covalently linked p35 and p40 subunits, has antitumor activity in animal models. The enzyme/prodrug strategy using cytosine deaminase (CD) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) has been used for cancer gene therapy. We have evaluated the antitumor effect of combining IL-12 with CD gene transfer in mice bearing renal cell carcinoma (Renca) tumors. Adenoviral vectors were constructed encoding one or both subunits of murine IL-12 (Ad.p35, Ad.p40 and Ad.IL-12) or cytosine deaminase (Ad.CD). The functionality of the IL-12 or CD gene products expressed from these vectors was validated by splenic interferon (IFN)-γ production or viability assays in cultured cells. Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40, or Ad.IL-12, with or without Ad.CD, were administered (single-dose) intratumorally to Renca tumor-bearing mice. The animals injected with Ad.CD also received 5-FC intraperitoneally. The antitumor effects were then evaluated by measuring tumor regression, mean animal survival time, splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity and IFN-γ production. The inhibition of tumor growth in mice treated with Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40 and Ad.CD, followed by injection of 5-FC, was significantly greater than that in mice treated with Ad.CD/5-FC, a mixture of Ad.p35 plus Ad.p40, or Ad.GFP (control). The combined gene transfer increased splenic NK cell activity and IFN-γ production by splenocytes. Ad.CD/5-FC treatment significantly increased the antitumor effect of Ad.IL-12 in terms of tumor growth inhibition and mean animal survival time. The results suggest that adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene transfer combined with Ad.CD followed by 5-FC treatment may be useful for treating cancers

  4. Adenovirus-mediated heme oxygenase-1 gene transfer into rabbit ocular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, N G; da Silva, J L; Lavrovsky, Y; Stoltz, R A; Kappas, A; Dunn, M W; Schwartzman, M L

    1995-10-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress protein induced up to 100-fold within a few hours after exposure to oxidative stress, and it has been shown to counteract oxidative injury induced by ultraviolet light or free radicals. The current study was undertaken to determine whether the HO-1 gene can be introduced into adult rabbit ocular tissues by microinjection of a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus human HO-1 cDNA (Adv-HHO). Human HO-1 gene was used for transfection studies to differentiate endogenous from transfected HO. The purified Adv-HHO construct (10(8) pfu/ml) was mixed with lipofectamine and microinjected into the anterior chamber, vitreous cavity, and subretinal space of New Zealand rabbit eyes. After 2 weeks, total RNA was extracted from different ocular tissues, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed using specific human HO-1 primers, and amplification products were subjected to Southern hybridization. Transfection with the Adv-HHO construct into rabbit corneal epithelial cells in culture resulted in a functional expression of the human HO-1 gene; the human HO-1 mRNA was detected, and enzyme activity increased threefold. Human HO-1 mRNA was detected in the retina after microinjection of the Adv-HHO construct into the subretinal space. Microinjection into the vitreous resulted in HO-1 mRNA expression in the corneal endothelium, iris, lens, and retina; after intracameral injection of the Adv-HHO construct, human HO-1 mRNA was detected in corneal epithelium and endothelium, ciliary body, lens, and iris. Regardless of the injection site, transfected human HO-1 mRNA was undetectable in tissues outside the eye, that is, brain, liver, and kidney. These results demonstrated a tissue-selective functional transfer of the human HO-1 gene into rabbit ocular tissues in vivo. This technique may be a promising means for delivering HO-1 gene in vivo as a protective mechanism against oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of

  5. Ovarian cancer targeted adenoviral-mediated mda-7/IL-24 gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahasreshti, PJ; Kataram, M; Wu, HJ; Yalavarthy, LP; Carey, D; Dent, P; Chada, S; Alvarez, RD; Haisma, HJ; Fisher, PB; Curiel, DT

    Objective. We have previously shown that adenoviral-mediated melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (Ad.mda-7) therapy induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. However, the apoptosis induction was low and directly correlated with infectivity of Ad.mda-7. The objective of this study was to

  6. Radiosensitization of head/neck sqaumous cell carcinoma by adenovirus-mediated expression of the Nbs1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Juong G.; Li, Daqing; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Guo Chuanfa; O'Malley, Bert W.; Carney, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure and toxicity to adjacent critical structures is a significant problem in radiation therapy of cancers of the head and neck. We are developing a gene therapy based method of sensitizing head/neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to radiation treatment. As patients with the rare hereditary disorder, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, show radiation sensitivity we hypothesized that tumor-specific disruption of the function of the Nbs1 protein would lead to enhanced cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Experimental Procedures: We constructed two recombinant adenoviruses by cloning the full-length Nbs1 cDNA as well as the C-terminal 300 amino acids of Nbs1 into an adenovirus backbone under the control of a CMV promoter. The resulting adenoviruses were used to infect HNSCC cell line JHU011. These cells were evaluated for expression of the viral based constructs and assayed for clonogenic survival following radiation exposure. Results: Exposure of cells expressing Nbs1-300 to ionizing radiation resulted in a small reduction in survival relative to cells infected with control virus. Surprisingly, expression of full-length Nbs1 protein resulted in markedly enhanced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Furthermore, the use of a fractionated radiation scheme following virus infection demonstrates that expression of full-length Nbs1 protein results in significant reduction in cell survival. Conclusions: These results provide a proof of principle that disruption of Nbs1 function may provide a means of enhancing the radiosensitivity of head and neck tumors. Additionally, this work highlights the Mre11 complex as an attractive target for development of radiation sensitizers

  7. Suppression of Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Hepatotoxicity by Liver-Specific Inhibition of NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Machitani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase-specific replication-competent adenoviruses (Ads, i.e., TRADs, which possess an E1 gene expression cassette driven by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, are promising agents for cancer treatment. However, even though oncolytic Ads, including TRAD, are intratumorally administered, they are disseminated from the tumor to systemic circulation, causing concern about oncolytic Ad-mediated hepatotoxicity (due mainly to leaky expression of Ad genes in liver. We reported that inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB leads to the suppression of replication-incompetent Ad vector-mediated hepatotoxicity via reduction of the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver. Here, to develop a TRAD with an improved safety profile, we designed a TRAD that carries a liver-specific promoter-driven dominant-negative IκBα (DNIκBα expression cassette (TRAD-DNIκBα. Compared with a conventional TRAD, TRAD-DNIκBα showed hepatocyte-specific inhibition of NF-κB signaling and significantly reduced Ad gene expression and replication in the normal human hepatocyte cell line. TRAD-induced hepatotoxicity was largely suppressed in mice following intravenous administration of TRAD-DNIκBα. However, the replication profiles and oncolytic activities of TRAD-DNIκBα were comparable with those of the conventional TRAD in human non-hepatic tumor cells. These results indicate that oncolytic Ads containing the liver-specific DNIκBα expression cassette have improved safety profiles without inhibiting oncolytic activities.

  8. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  9. Insulated hsp70B' promoter: stringent heat-inducible activity in replication-deficient, but not replication-competent adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Stanimira; Mainka, Astrid; Knippertz, Ilka; Hesse, Andrea; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2008-04-01

    Key to the realization of gene therapy is the development of efficient and targeted gene transfer vectors. Therapeutic gene transfer by replication-deficient or more recently by conditionally replication-competent/oncolytic adenoviruses has shown much promise. For specific applications, however, it will be advantageous to provide vectors that allow for external control of gene expression. The efficient cellular heat shock system in combination with available technology for focused and controlled hyperthermia suggests heat-regulated transcription control as a promising tool for this purpose. We investigated the feasibility of a short fragment of the human hsp70B' promoter, with and without upstream insulator elements, for the regulation of transgene expression by replication-deficient or oncolytic adenoviruses. Two novel adenoviral vectors with an insulated hsp70B' promoter were developed and showed stringent heat-inducible gene expression with induction ratios up to 8000-fold. In contrast, regulation of gene expression from the hsp70B' promoter without insulation was suboptimal. In replication-competent/oncolytic adenoviruses regulation of the hsp70B' promoter was lost specifically during late replication in permissive cells and could not be restored by the insulators. We developed novel adenovirus gene transfer vectors that feature improved and stringent regulation of transgene expression from the hsp70B' promoter using promoter insulation. These vectors have potential for gene therapy applications that benefit from external modulation of therapeutic gene expression or for combination therapy with hyperthermia. Furthermore, our study reveals that vector replication can deregulate inserted cellular promoters, an observation which is of relevance for the development of replication-competent/oncolytic gene transfer vectors. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Killing Effect of Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA Recombinant Adenovirus in Combination with Hematoporphrphyrin Derivative-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy on Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is to investigate the killing effects and molecular mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT mediated by the Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus in combination with a hematoporphrphyrin derivative (HpD in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line in vitro to provide a theoretical reference for treating lung cancer by HpD-PDT. By using the technologies of MTT, flow cytometry, ELISA, and western blot, we observed that the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of the A549 cells were significantly higher than the control group ( after HpD-PDT was performed. The inhibitory efficiency is dependent on the HpD concentration and laser intensity dose. The inhibitory effect on the proliferation of A549 cells of Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA is more significant after combining with PDT, as indicated by a significant elevation of the intracellular ROS level and the expression of inflammatory factors (. The HpD-PDT-induced expression of the APE1 protein reached the peak after 24 h in A549 cells. The inhibition of APE1 expression in A549 cells was most significant after 48 hours of infection by Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus (10 MOI. In conclusion, the Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus could efficiently inhibit the HpD-PDT-induced APE1 expression hence could significantly enhance the killing effect of HpD-PDT in lung cancer cells.

  11. Oncolytic Group B Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Mediates Non-apoptotic Cell Death with Membrane Disruption and Release of Inflammatory Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Dyer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enadenotucirev (EnAd is a chimeric group B adenovirus isolated by bioselection from a library of adenovirus serotypes. It replicates selectively in and kills a diverse range of carcinoma cells, shows effective anticancer activity in preclinical systems, and is currently undergoing phase I/II clinical trials. EnAd kills cells more quickly than type 5 adenovirus, and speed of cytotoxicity is dose dependent. The EnAd death pathway does not involve p53, is predominantly caspase independent, and appears to involve a rapid fall in cellular ATP. Infected cells show early loss of membrane integrity; increased exposure of calreticulin; extracellular release of ATP, HSP70, and HMGB1; and influx of calcium. The virus also causes an obvious single membrane blister reminiscent of ischemic cell death by oncosis. In human tumor biopsies maintained in ex vivo culture, EnAd mediated release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB1. In accordance with this, EnAd-infected tumor cells showed potent stimulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells in a mixed tumor-leukocyte reaction in vitro. Whereas many viruses have evolved for efficient propagation with minimal inflammation, bioselection of EnAd for rapid killing has yielded a virus with a short life cycle that combines potent cytotoxicity with a proinflammatory mechanism of cell death.

  12. Gene therapy for C-26 colon cancer using heparin-polyethyleneimine nanoparticle-mediated survivin T34A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ling Zhang1,*, Xiang Gao1,2,*, Ke Men1, BiLan Wang1, Shuang Zhang1, Jinfeng Qiu1, Meijuan Huang1, MaLing Gou1, Ning Huang2, ZhiYong Qian1, Xia Zhao1, YuQuan Wei11State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, 2Department of Pathophysiology, College of Preclinical and Forensic Medical Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Gene therapy provides a novel method for the prevention and treatment of cancer, but the clinical application of gene therapy is restricted, mainly because of the absence of an efficient and safe gene delivery system. Recently, we developed a novel nonviral gene carrier, ie, heparin-polyethyleneimine (HPEI nanoparticles for this purpose.Methods and results: HPEI nanoparticles were used to deliver plasmid-expressing mouse survivin-T34A (ms-T34A to treat C-26 carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. According to the in vitro studies, HPEI nanoparticles could efficiently transfect the pGFP report gene into C-26 cells, with a transfection efficiency of 30.5% ± 2%. Moreover, HPEI nanoparticle-mediated ms-T34A could efficiently inhibit the proliferation of C-26 cells by induction of apoptosis in vitro. Based on the in vivo studies, HPEI nanoparticles could transfect the Lac-Z report gene into C-26 cells in vivo. Intratumoral injection of HPEI nanoparticle-mediated ms-T34A significantly inhibited growth of subcutaneous C-26 carcinoma in vivo by induction of apoptosis and inhibition of angiogenesis.Conclusion: This research suggests that HPEI nanoparticle-mediated ms-T34A may have a promising role in C-26 colon carcinoma therapy.Keywords: gene therapy, mouse survivin-T34A, colon cancer, polyethyleneimine, nanoparticles, cancer therapy

  13. Gene Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: Specificity, Issues and Hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouanet, Marie; Lebrin, Marine; Gross, Fabian; Bournet, Barbara; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2017-06-08

    A recent death projection has placed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as the second cause of death by cancer in 2030. The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is very poor and there is a great need for new treatments that can change this poor outcome. Developments of therapeutic innovations in combination with conventional chemotherapy are needed urgently. Among innovative treatments the gene therapy offers a promising avenue. The present review gives an overview of the general strategy of gene therapy as well as the limitations and stakes of the different experimental in vivo models, expression vectors (synthetic and viral), molecular tools (interference RNA, genome editing) and therapeutic genes (tumor suppressor genes, antiangiogenic and pro-apoptotic genes, suicide genes). The latest developments in pancreatic carcinoma gene therapy are described including gene-based tumor cell sensitization to chemotherapy, vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy (chimeric antigen receptor T-cells strategy). Nowadays, there is a specific development of oncolytic virus therapies including oncolytic adenoviruses, herpes virus, parvovirus or reovirus. A summary of all published and on-going phase-1 trials is given. Most of them associate gene therapy and chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. The first results are encouraging for most of the trials but remain to be confirmed in phase 2 trials.

  14. A dynamical systems model for combinatorial cancer therapy enhances oncolytic adenovirus efficacy by MEK-inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Neda; Shiina, Marisa; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Korn, W Michael

    2011-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses, such as ONYX-015, have been tested in clinical trials for currently untreatable tumors, but have yet to demonstrate adequate therapeutic efficacy. The extent to which viruses infect targeted cells determines the efficacy of this approach but many tumors down-regulate the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), rendering them less susceptible to infection. Disrupting MAPK pathway signaling by pharmacological inhibition of MEK up-regulates CAR expression, offering possible enhanced adenovirus infection. MEK inhibition, however, interferes with adenovirus replication due to resulting G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Therefore, enhanced efficacy will depend on treatment protocols that productively balance these competing effects. Predictive understanding of how to attain and enhance therapeutic efficacy of combinatorial treatment is difficult since the effects of MEK inhibitors, in conjunction with adenovirus/cell interactions, are complex nonlinear dynamic processes. We investigated combinatorial treatment strategies using a mathematical model that predicts the impact of MEK inhibition on tumor cell proliferation, ONYX-015 infection, and oncolysis. Specifically, we fit a nonlinear differential equation system to dedicated experimental data and analyzed the resulting simulations for favorable treatment strategies. Simulations predicted enhanced combinatorial therapy when both treatments were applied simultaneously; we successfully validated these predictions in an ensuing explicit test study. Further analysis revealed that a CAR-independent mechanism may be responsible for amplified virus production and cell death. We conclude that integrated computational and experimental analysis of combinatorial therapy provides a useful means to identify treatment/infection protocols that yield clinically significant oncolysis. Enhanced oncolytic therapy has the potential to dramatically improve non-surgical cancer treatment, especially in locally advanced

  15. Production and purification of non replicative canine adenovirus type 2 derived vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2013-12-03

    Adenovirus (Ad) derived vectors have been widely used for short or long-term gene transfer, both for gene therapy and vaccine applications. Because of the frequent pre-existing immunity against the classically used human adenovirus type 5, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2) has been proposed as an alternative vector for human gene transfer. The well-characterized biology of CAV2, together with its ease of genetic manipulation, offer major advantages, notably for gene transfer into the central nervous system, or for inducing a wide range of protective immune responses, from humoral to cellular immunity. Nowadays, CAV2 represents one of the most appealing nonhuman adenovirus for use as a vaccine vector. This protocol describes a simple method to construct, produce and titer recombinant CAV2 vectors. After cloning the expression cassette of the gene of interest into a shuttle plasmid, the recombinant genomic plasmid is obtained by homologous recombination in the E. coli BJ5183 bacterial strain. The resulting genomic plasmid is then transfected into canine kidney cells expressing the complementing CAV2-E1 genes (DK-E1). A viral amplification enables the production of a large viral stock, which is purified by ultracentrifugation through cesium chloride gradients and desalted by dialysis. The resulting viral suspension routinely has a titer of over 10(10) infectious particles per ml and can be directly administrated in vivo.

  16. Oncolytic adenovirus Ad657 for systemic virotherapy against prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen TV

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tien V Nguyen,1,* Catherine M Crosby,2,* Gregory J Heller,3 Zachary I Mendel,3 Mary E Barry,1 Michael A Barry1,4,5 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 2Virology and Gene Therapy Graduate Program, Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 3Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program, Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 4Department of Immunology, 5Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Human species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 is the archetype oncolytic adenovirus and has been used in the vast majority of preclinical and clinical tests. While Ad5 can be robust, species C Ad6 has lower seroprevalence, side effects, and appears to be more potent as a systemic therapy against a number of tumors than Ad5. Historically, there have only been four species C human adenoviruses: serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 6. More recently a new species C adenovirus, Ad57, was identified. Ad57 is most similar to Ad6 with virtually all variation in their capsid proteins occurring in the hypervariable regions (HVRs of their hexon proteins. Most adenovirus neutralizing antibodies target the HVRs on adenoviruses. This led us to replace the hexon HVRs in Ad6 with those from Ad57 to create a new virus called Ad657 and explore this novel species C platform’s utility as an oncolytic virus. Methods: The HVR region from Ad57 was synthesized and used to replace the Ad6 HVR region by homologous recombination in bacteria generating a new viral platform that we call Ad657. Replication-competent Ad5, Ad6, and Ad657 were compared in vitro and in vivo for liver damage and oncolytic efficacy against prostate cancers after single intravenous treatment in mice. Results: Ad5, Ad6, and Ad657 had similar in vitro oncolytic activity against human prostate cancer cells. Ad5 provoked the highest level of liver toxicity after intravenous injection and Ad657

  17. Improvement of oncolytic adenovirus vectors through genetic capsid modifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrij, Jeroen de

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant viral vectors hold great promise in the field of cancer gene therapy. While a plethora of viruses is being evaluated as oncolytic agents, human adenoviruses of serotype 5 (HAdV-5) are among the most popular of viruses to be developed. Although clinical studies have demonstrated safety of

  18. E1B-attenuated onco lytic adenovirus enhances antitumor effect of radionuclide therapy by P53-independent way: cellular basic for radionuclide-viral therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhenwei, Zhang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hua, Wu; Xuemei, Zhang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Xinyuan, Liu [Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: Chemotherapy or external radiation therapy can potentiate the therapeutic effect of E1 B-attenuated oncolytic adenovirus. In this study, the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic adenovirus combined with internal radionuclide therapy was evaluated. Methods: Firstly, viral replication was examined by plaque assay and Southern blotting, after oncolytic adenovirus, ZD55, was exposed to iodine-131. Cell viability was evaluated qualitatively by crystal violet staining and quantitatively by MTT assay. FACS analysis was performed to determine the synergic proapoptotic effect of iodine-131 combined with ZD55. Results: Irradiation of iodine-131 does not influence ZD55 viral DNA replication. In combination with ZD55, iodine-131 can efficiently kill tumor cells in a p53-independent model. ZD55 augments the proapoptotic effect of iodine-131. Conclusion: Radionuclide-viral therapy might be a novel tool for treatment of hepatocarcinoma. (authors)

  19. Detection of enteric Adenoviruses in South-African waters using gene probes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene probes developed locally for both enteric Adenoviruses 40 and 41 were used to determine whether these viruses were present in both raw and treated waters. Approximately sixty water samples were concentrated by ultra filtration and analysed...

  20. Comparison of Liver Detargeting Strategies for Systemic Therapy with Oncolytic Adenovirus Serotype 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien V. Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses would ideally be of use for systemic therapy to treat disseminated cancer. To do this safely, this may require multiple layers of cancer specificity. The pharmacology and specificity of oncolytic adenoviruses can be modified by (1 physical retargeting, (2 physical detargeting, (3 chemical shielding, or (4 by modifying the ability of viral early gene products to selectively activate in cancer versus normal cells. We explored the utility of these approaches with oncolytic adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 in immunocompetent Syrian hamsters bearing subcutaneous HaK tumors. After a single intravenous injection to reach the distant tumors, the physically hepatocyte-detargeted virus Ad5-hexon-BAP was more effective than conditionally replicating Ad5-dl1101/07 with mutations in its E1A protein. When these control or Ad5 treated animals were treated a second time by intratumoral injection, prior exposure to Ad5 did not affect tumor growth, suggesting that anti-Ad immunity neither prevented treatment nor amplified anti-tumor immune responses. Ad5-dl1101/07 was next chemically shielded with polyethylene glycol (PEG. While 5 kDa of PEG blunted pro-inflammatory IL-6 production induced by Ad5-dl1101/07, this shielding reduced Ad oncolytic activity.

  1. Adenovirus-assisted lipofection: efficient in vitro gene transfer of luciferase and cytosine deaminase to human smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, J; Denger, S; Reifers, F; Beisel, C; Haack, K; Gebert, J; Kübler, W

    1996-07-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) are a central cell type involved in multiple processes of coronary artery diseases including restenosis and therefore are major target cells for different aspects of gene transfer. Previous attempts to transfect primary arterial cells using different techniques like liposomes, CaPO4 and electroporation resulted in only low transfection efficiency. The development of recombinant adenoviruses dramatically improved the delivery of foreign genes into different cell types including SMC. However, cloning and identification of recombinants remain difficult and time-consuming techniques. The present study demonstrates that a complex consisting of reporter plasmid encoding firefly luciferase (pLUC), polycationic liposomes and replication-deficient adenovirus was able to yield very high in vitro transfection of primary human smooth muscle cells under optimized conditions. The technique of adenovirus-assisted lipofection (AAL) increases transfer and expression of plasmid DNA in human smooth muscle cells in vitro up to 1000-fold compared to lipofection. To verify the applicability of AAL for gene transfer into human smooth muscle cells we studied a gene therapy approach to suppress proliferation of SMC in vitro, using the prokaryotic cytosine deaminase gene (CD) which enables transfected mammalian cells to deaminate 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the highly toxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The effect of a transient CD expression on RNA synthesis was investigated by means of a cotransfection with a RSV-CD expression plasmid and the luciferase reporter plasmid. Western blot analysis demonstrated high expression of CD protein in transfected SMC. Cotransfected SMC demonstrated two-fold less luciferase activity in the presence of 5-FC (5 mmol/l) after 48 h compared to cells transfected with a non-CD coding plasmid. The data demonstrate that a transient expression of CD could be sufficient to reduce the capacity of protein synthesis in human SMC. This simple and

  2. Suppression of leaky expression of adenovirus genes by insertion of microRNA-targeted sequences in the replication-incompetent adenovirus vector genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahori Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaky expression of adenovirus (Ad genes occurs following transduction with a conventional replication-incompetent Ad vector, leading to an induction of cellular immunity against Ad proteins and Ad protein-induced toxicity, especially in the late phase following administration. To suppress the leaky expression of Ad genes, we developed novel Ad vectors by incorporating four tandem copies of sequences with perfect complementarity to miR-122a or miR-142-3p into the 3′-untranslated region (UTR of the E2A, E4, or pIX gene, which were mainly expressed from the Ad vector genome after transduction. These Ad vectors easily grew to high titers comparable to those of a conventional Ad vector in conventional 293 cells. The leaky expression of these Ad genes in mouse organs was significantly suppressed by 2- to 100-fold, compared with a conventional Ad vector, by insertion of the miRNA-targeted sequences. Notably, the Ad vector carrying the miR-122a–targeted sequences into the 3′-UTR of the E4 gene expressed higher and longer-term transgene expression and more than 20-fold lower levels of all the Ad early and late genes examined in the liver than a conventional Ad vector. miR-122a–mediated suppression of the E4 gene expression in the liver significantly reduced the hepatotoxicity which an Ad vector causes via both adaptive and non-adaptive immune responses.

  3. Regeneration of hyaline cartilage by cell-mediated gene therapy using transforming growth factor beta 1-producing fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Song, S U; Hwang, T S; Yi, Y; Oh, I S; Lee, J Y; Choi, K B; Choi, M S; Kim, S J

    2001-09-20

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) has been considered as a candidate for gene therapy of orthopedic diseases. The possible application of cell-mediated TGF-beta gene therapy as a new treatment regimen for degenerative arthritis was investigated. In this study, fibroblasts expressing active TGF-beta 1 were injected into the knee joints of rabbits with artificially made cartilage defects to evaluate the feasibility of this therapy for orthopedic diseases. Two to 3 weeks after the injection there was evidence of cartilage regeneration, and at 4 to 6 weeks the cartilage defect was completely filled with newly grown hyaline cartilage. Histological analyses of the regenerated cartilage suggested that it was well integrated with the adjacent normal cartilage at the sides of the defect and that the newly formed tissue was indeed hyaline cartilage. Our findings suggest that cell-mediated TGF-beta 1 gene therapy may be a novel treatment for orthopedic diseases in which hyaline cartilage damage has occurred.

  4. Metabolic flux profiling of MDCK cells during growth and canine adenovirus vector production

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Carinhas; Daniel A. M. Pais; Alexey Koshkin; Paulo Fernandes; Ana S. Coroadinha; Manuel J. T. Carrondo; Paula M. Alves; Ana P. Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Canine adenovirus vector type 2 (CAV2) represents an alternative to human adenovirus vectors for certain gene therapy applications, particularly neurodegenerative diseases. However, more efficient production processes, assisted by a greater understanding of the effect of infection on producer cells, are required. Combining [1,2-13C]glucose and [U-13C]glutamine, we apply for the first time 13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) to study E1-transformed Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells meta...

  5. Dual targeting of gene delivery by genetic modification of adenovirus serotype 5 fibers and cell-selective transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, L M; Ritchie, N; Nicklin, S A; Reynolds, P N; Baker, A H

    2004-08-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene delivery is a promising approach for genetic manipulation of the vasculature and is being used in both preclinical models and clinical trials. However, safety concerns relating to infection of nontarget tissue and the poor infectivity of vascular cells compared to other cell types necessitates Ad vector refinement. Here, we combine a transductional targeting approach to improve vascular cell infectivity through RGD peptide insertion into adenovirus fibers, combined with transcriptional targeting to endothelial cells using a approximately 1 kb fragment of the fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-1 (FLT-1) promoter. Single- and double-modified vectors were characterized in human cell lines that either support or have silenced FLT-1 expression. In rat hepatocytes and endothelial cells, the double modification substantially shifted transduction profiles toward vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, in intact aortae derived from spontaneously hypertensive rats that display enhanced alphav integrin expression on dysfunctional endothelium, enhanced levels of transduction were observed using the double-modified vector but not in aortae derived from normotensive control rats. Our data indicate that Ad-mediated transduction can be beneficially modified in vitro and in vivo by combining fiber modification and a cell-selective promoter within a single-component vector system.

  6. The human adenovirus E4-ORF1 protein subverts discs large 1 to mediate membrane recruitment and dysregulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

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    Kathleen Kong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses infect epithelial cells lining mucous membranes to cause acute diseases in people. They are also utilized as vectors for vaccination and for gene and cancer therapy, as well as tools to discover mechanisms of cancer due to their tumorigenic potential in experimental animals. The adenovirus E4-ORF1 gene encodes an oncoprotein that promotes viral replication, cell survival, and transformation by activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K. While the mechanism of activation is not understood, this function depends on a complex formed between E4-ORF1 and the membrane-associated cellular PDZ protein Discs Large 1 (Dlg1, a common viral target having both tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions. Here, we report that in human epithelial cells, E4-ORF1 interacts with the regulatory and catalytic subunits of PI3K and elevates their levels. Like PI3K activation, PI3K protein elevation by E4-ORF1 requires Dlg1. We further show that Dlg1, E4-ORF1, and PI3K form a ternary complex at the plasma membrane. At this site, Dlg1 also co-localizes with the activated PI3K effector protein Akt, indicating that the ternary complex mediates PI3K signaling. Signifying the functional importance of the ternary complex, the capacity of E4-ORF1 to induce soft agar growth and focus formation in cells is ablated either by a mutation that prevents E4-ORF1 binding to Dlg1 or by a PI3K inhibitor drug. These results demonstrate that E4-ORF1 interacts with Dlg1 and PI3K to assemble a ternary complex where E4-ORF1 hijacks the Dlg1 oncogenic function to relocate cytoplasmic PI3K to the membrane for constitutive activation. This novel mechanism of Dlg1 subversion by adenovirus to dysregulate PI3K could be used by other pathogenic viruses, such as human papillomavirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, and influenza A virus, which also target Dlg1 and activate PI3K in cells.

  7. Detection of a putative novel adenovirus by PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic characterisation of two gene fragments from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of a cat diagnosed with disseminated adenovirus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Béla; Hornyák, Ákos; Demeter, Zoltán; Forgách, Petra; Kennedy, Frances; Rusvai, Miklós

    2017-12-01

    Adenoviral nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of a cat that had suffered from disseminated adenovirus infection. The identity of the amplified products from the hexon and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase genes was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The sequences were clearly distinguishable from corresponding hexon and polymerase sequences of other mastadenoviruses, including human adenoviruses. These results suggest the possible existence of a distinct feline adenovirus.

  8. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

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    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  9. hTERT promoter mediating gene therapy in laryngeal squamous carcinomas cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Zhengkai; Zhou Yunfeng; Zhou Fuxiang; Luo Zhiguo; Xiong Jie; Bao Jie; Xie Conghua; Liu Shiquan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship among hTERT promoter activity, hTERT mRNA expression, and telomerase activity (TA) in laryngeal squamous carcinomas cell lines, and to evaluate the usefulness of hTERT promoter mediated gene therapy. Methods: After plasmids pGL3-hTERTp were transfected, hTEBT promoter activity, hTERT mRNA expression and TA were determined by luciferase assay, RT-PCR and TRAP-PCR-ELISA, respectively. Plasmid phTERTp-HRP was constructed and transfected, HRP expression was determined by RT-PCR and competent peroxidase activity was confirmed by enzyme activity assay. The cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity of phTERTp-HRP/IAA were determined by clonogenic assay. Results: The relative levels of hTERT promoter activity, hTERT mRNA expression and TA in Hep2R cells were 1.37-fold, 1.43-fold and 1.81-fold compared with Hep2R cells, hTERT promoter activity was closely associated with hTERT mRNA expression and TA levels (P SF 2 ) was 1.24 (Hep2R cells) and 1.20 (Hep 2cells), the parameter a of with or without IAA incubation were 0.090, 0.020 (Hep2R)and 0.099, 0.042 (Hep2). Conclusions: hTERT promoter is applicable in mediating gene therapy in different radiosensitive laryngeal squamous carcinomas cells. hTERTp-HRP/IAA gene therapy may be a promising supplementary method for radiotherapy of laryngeal squamous-cell carcinomas. (authors)

  10. Prolonged peritoneal gene expression using a helper-dependent adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Limin; Shi, Chang-Xin; Ghayur, Ayesha; Zhang, Claire; Su, Je Yen; Hoff, Catherine M; Margetts, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare complication of peritoneal dialysis. The causes of EPS are not well defined and are likely multifactorial. A suitable animal model would facilitate research into the pathophysiology and treatment of EPS. We developed a helper-dependent adenovirus that expresses both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and active transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta1; HDAdTGF-beta1). Mice were administered HDAdTGF-beta1 via intraperitoneal injection and the response was compared with mice administered either first-generation adenovirus expressing TGF-beta1 (AdTGF-beta1) or control adenovirus (AdGFP). HDAdTGF-beta1-treated mice continued to express the GFP reporter transgene to day 74, the end of the observation period. Transgene expression lasted less than 28 days in the animals treated with first-generation adenoviruses. Animals treated with first-generation AdTGF-beta1 demonstrated submesothelial thickening and angiogenesis at day 7, with almost complete resolution by day 28. The HDAdTGF-beta1-treated mice demonstrated progressive peritoneal fibrosis with adhesion formation and encapsulation of bowels. Weight gain was significantly reduced in animals treated with HDAdTGF-beta1 compared to both the control-treated animals and the AdTGF-beta1-treated animals. Inflammation was not a major component of the fibroproliferative response. Peritoneal administration of a first-generation AdTGF-beta1 leads to transient gene expression, resulting in a resolving fibrotic response and histology similar to that seen in simple peritoneal sclerosis. Prolonged TGF-beta1 expression induced by the helper-dependent HDAdTGF-beta1 led to changes in peritoneal morphology resembling EPS. This suggests that TGF-beta1 may be a contributing factor in both simple peritoneal sclerosis and EPS. This model will be useful for elucidation of the mechanism of EPS and evaluation of potential treatment.

  11. Combating oncogene activation associated with retrovirus-mediated gene therapy of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.E. Strauss

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A successful gene therapy clinical trial that also encountered serious adverse effects has sparked extensive study and debate about the future directions for retrovirus-mediated interventions. Treatment of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency with an oncoretrovirus harboring a normal copy of the gc gene was applied in two clinical trials, essentially curing 13 of 16 infants, restoring a normal immune system without the need for additional immune-related therapies. Approximately 3 years after their gene therapy, tragically, 3 of these children, all from the same trial, developed leukemia as a result of this experimental treatment. The current understanding of the mechanism behind this leukemogenesis involves three critical and cooperating factors, i.e., viral integration, oncogene activation, and the function of the therapeutic gene. In this review, we will explore the causes of this unwanted event and some of the possibilities for reducing the risk of its reoccurrence.

  12. Development of an immunotherapeutic adenovirus targeting hormone-independent prostate cancer

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    Kim JS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jae Sik Kim,1 Sang Don Lee,2 Sang Jin Lee,3 Moon Kee Chung21Department of Urology, The Catholic University of Korea Incheon St Mary's Hospital, Incheon, 2Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan, 3Genitourinary Cancer Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang, KoreaBackground: To develop a targeting therapy for hormone-independent prostate cancer, we constructed and characterized conditionally replicating oncolytic adenovirus (Ad equipped with mRFP(monomeric red fluorescence protein/ttk (modified herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase This construct was then further modified to express both mRFP/ttk and a soluble form of cytokine FLT3L (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand simultaneously.Methods: To construct the recombinant oncolytic adenovirus, E1a and E4 genes, which are necessary for adenovirus replication, were controlled by the prostate-specific enhancer sequence (PSES targeting prostate cancer cells expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA. Simultaneously, it expressed the mRFP/ttk fusion protein in order to be able to elicit the cytotoxic effect.Results: The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk chimeric recombinant adenovirus was generated successfully. When replication of Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk was evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines under fluorescence microscopy, red fluorescence intensity increased more in LNCaP cells, suggesting that the mRFP/ttk fusion protein was folded functionally. In addition, the replication assay including wild-type adenovirus as a positive control showed that PSES-positive cells (LNCaP and CWR22rv permitted virus replication but not PSES-negative cells (DU145 and PC3. Next, we evaluated the killing activity of this recombinant adenovirus. The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk killed LNCaP and CWR22rv more effectively. Unlike PSES-positive cells, DU145 and PC3 were resistant to killing by this recombinant

  13. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of hepatocyte growth factor gene to human dental pulp stem cells under good manufacturing practice improves their potential for periodontal regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Liu, Zhenhai; Xie, Yilin; Hu, Jingchao; Wang, Hua; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jingsong; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Songlin

    2015-12-15

    Periodontitis is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in humans. We previously promoted significant periodontal tissue regeneration in swine models with the transplantation of autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and PDLSC sheet. We also promoted periodontal tissue regeneration in a rat model with a local injection of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the roles of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in periodontal tissue regeneration in swine. In the present study, we transferred an adenovirus that carried HGF gene into human DPSCs (HGF-hDPSCs) under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. These cells were then transplanted into a swine model for periodontal regeneration. Twenty miniature pigs were used to generate periodontitis with bone defect of 5 mm in width, 7 mm in length, and 3 mm in depth. After 12 weeks, clinical, radiological, quantitative and histological assessment of regenerated periodontal tissues was performed to compare periodontal regeneration in swine treated with cell implantation. Our study showed that injecting HGF-hDPSCs into this large animal model could significantly improve periodontal bone regeneration and soft tissue healing. A hDPSC or HGF-hDPSC sheet showed superior periodontal tissue regeneration compared to the injection of dissociated cells. However, the sheets required surgical placement; thus, they were suitable for surgically-managed periodontitis treatments. The adenovirus-mediated transfer of the HGF gene markedly decreased hDPSC apoptosis in a hypoxic environment or in serum-free medium, and it increased blood vessel regeneration. This study indicated that HGF-hDPSCs produced under GMP conditions significantly improved periodontal bone regeneration in swine; thus, this method represents a potential clinical application for periodontal regeneration.

  14. Radiosensitization of head/neck squamous cell carcinoma by adenovirus-mediated expression of dominant negative constructs of the Nbs1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carney, J.P.; Rhee, J.G.; Li, D.; Chen, T.; Suntharalingam, M.; O'Malley, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure and toxicity to adjacent critical structures is a significant problem in radiation therapy of cancers of the head and neck. We are developing a gene therapy based method of sensitizing head/neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to radiation treatment. As patients with the rare hereditary disorder, Nijmegen breakage syndrome show radiation sensitivity we hypothesized that tumor-specific disruption of the function of the Nbs1 protein would lead to enhanced cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. In order to test this hypothesis we have devised recombinant adenoviruses expressing various portions of the Nbs1 protein and assessed the ability of these viruses to increase the radiation sensitivity of HNSCC cells. Materials and Methods: We constructed two recombinant adenoviruses by cloning the full-length Nbs1 cDNA as well as the C-terminal 300 amino acids of Nbs1(Nbs1-300, aa453 to aa754) into an adenovirus backbone under the control of a CMV promoter. The resulting adenoviruses were used to infect HNSCC cell line 011. These cells were evaluated for expression of the viral based constructs and assayed for growth rate and clonogenic survival following radiation exposure. Results: A constitutively expressed GFP gene in the viral backbone confirmed efficient uptake of the virus into the 011 cell line and Western blot confirmed the presence of the virally expressed Nbs1 and Nbs1-300. Following exposure to ionizing radiation cells infected with the Nbs1-300 virus showed a significant reduction in growth rate relative to cells infected with control virus. Surprisingly, this effect was even stronger with the full-length wild-type Nbs1 protein. Examination of clonogenic survival also demonstrated statistically significant sensitization, however the effects of the two constructs were distinct as Nbs1-300 expression resulted in reduction of the shoulder while expression of the full-length Nbs1 showed a change in the slope of the survival curve

  15. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaohua [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Fan, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zou, Xue [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Gao, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin, Haifeng [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Du, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Xia, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Fan, Daiming [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2007-06-29

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma.

  16. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Rui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Lin; Jin, Haifeng; Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Fan, Daiming

    2007-01-01

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma

  17. Nuclear Imaging for Assessment of Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    thymidine kinase transfected EL4 cells . Further exploration of Tc-99m conjugated potential HSV1-TK substrates is still undergoing in our laboratory...prostate cancer cells , has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy for prostate cancer[10, 11]. Therefore, an adenovirus...BJ5183 together with pAdeasy-1, the viral DNA plasmid. The pAdeasy-1 is E1 and E3 deleted, its E1 function can be complemented in 293A cells . The

  18. Enhanced protection against Ebola virus mediated by an improved adenovirus-based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jason S; Yao, Michel K; Tran, Kaylie N; Croyle, Maria A; Strong, James E; Feldmann, Heinz; Kobinger, Gary P

    2009-01-01

    molecular components of adenovirus-based vaccines can produce potent, optimized product, useful for vaccination and post-exposure therapy.

  19. Enhanced protection against Ebola virus mediated by an improved adenovirus-based vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Richardson

    previous generation adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine. Understanding and improving the molecular components of adenovirus-based vaccines can produce potent, optimized product, useful for vaccination and post-exposure therapy.

  20. The hTERT promoter enhances the antitumor activity of an oncolytic adenovirus under a hypoxic microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuri Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a microenvironmental factor that contributes to the invasion, progression and metastasis of tumor cells. Hypoxic tumor cells often show more resistance to conventional chemoradiotherapy than normoxic tumor cells, suggesting the requirement of novel antitumor therapies to efficiently eliminate the hypoxic tumor cells. We previously generated a tumor-specific replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus (OBP-301: Telomelysin, in which the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT promoter drives viral E1 expression. Since the promoter activity of the hTERT gene has been shown to be upregulated by hypoxia, we hypothesized that, under hypoxic conditions, the antitumor effect of OBP-301 with the hTERT promoter would be more efficient than that of the wild-type adenovirus 5 (Ad5. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of OBP-301 and Ad5 against human cancer cells under a normoxic (20% oxygen or a hypoxic (1% oxygen condition. Hypoxic condition induced nuclear accumulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and upregulation of hTERT promoter activity in human cancer cells. The cytopathic activity of OBP-301 was significantly higher than that of Ad5 under hypoxic condition. Consistent with their cytopathic activity, the replication of OBP-301 was significantly higher than that of Ad5 under the hypoxic condition. OBP-301-mediated E1A was expressed within hypoxic areas of human xenograft tumors in mice. These results suggest that the cytopathic activity of OBP-301 against hypoxic tumor cells is mediated through hypoxia-mediated activation of the hTERT promoter. Regulation of oncolytic adenoviruses by the hTERT promoter is a promising antitumor strategy, not only for induction of tumor-specific oncolysis, but also for efficient elimination of hypoxic tumor cells.

  1. Intraplacental gene therapy with Ad-IGF-1 corrects naturally occurring rabbit model of intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Balaji, Swathi; Katz, Anna B; King, Alice; Omar, Khaled; Habli, Mounira; Klanke, Charles; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2015-03-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency is a leading cause of perinatal complications for which there is no effective prenatal therapy. We have previously demonstrated that intraplacental injection of adenovirus-mediated insulin-like growth factor-1 (Ad-IGF-1) corrects fetal weight in a murine IUGR model induced by mesenteric uterine artery branch ligation. This study investigated the effect of intraplacental Ad-IGF-1 gene therapy in a rabbit model of naturally occurring IUGR (runt) due to placental insufficiency, which is similar to the human IUGR condition with onset in the early third trimester, brain sparing, and a reduction in liver weight. Laparotomy was performed on New Zealand White rabbits on day 21 of 30 days of gestation and litters were divided into five groups: Control (first position)+phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), control+Ad-IGF-1, runt (third position)+PBS, runt+Ad-IGF-1, and runt+Ad-LacZ. The effect of IGF-1 gene therapy on fetal, placental, liver, heart, lung, and musculoskeletal weights of the growth-restricted pups was examined. Protein expression after gene transfer was seen along the maternal-fetal placenta interface (n=12) 48 hr after gene therapy. There was minimal gene transfer detected in the pups or maternal organs. At term, compared with the normally grown first-position control, the runted third-position pups demonstrated significantly lower fetal, placental, liver, lung, and musculoskeletal weights. The fetal, liver, and musculoskeletal weights were restored to normal by intraplacental Ad-IGF-1 gene therapy (p<0.01), with no change in the placental weight. Intraplacental gene therapy is a novel strategy for the treatment of IUGR caused by placental insufficiency that takes advantage of an organ that will be discarded at birth. Development of nonviral IGF-1 gene delivery using placenta-specific promoters can potentially minimize toxicity to the mother and fetus and facilitate clinical translation of

  2. Neutralized adenovirus-immune complexes can mediate effective gene transfer via an Fc receptor-dependent infection pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Philip L; Wendland, Rebecca L; Vincent, Theresa; Crystal, Ronald G

    2006-10-01

    Neutralization of adenovirus (Ad) by anti-Ad neutralizing antibodies in serum involves formation of Ad-immune complexes that prevent the virus from interacting with target cells. We hypothesized that Ad-immune complexes likely contain viable Ad vectors which, although no longer capable of gaining access to receptors on target cells, may be able to express transgenes in cells bearing Fc receptors for immunoglobulins, i.e., that antibody-based "neutralization" of Ad vectors may be circumvented by the Fc receptor pathway. To test this hypothesis, we expressed the Fcgamma receptor IIA (FcgammaR) in A549 lung epithelial cells or human dermal fibroblasts and evaluated gene transfer in the presence of human neutralizing anti-Ad serum. FcgammaR-expressing cells bound and internalized copious amounts of Ad, with a distinct population of internalized Ad trafficking to the nucleus. The dose-response curves for inhibition of gene transfer revealed that FcgammaR-expressing cells required a more-than-10-fold higher concentration of anti-Ad serum to achieve 50% inhibition of Ad-encoded beta-galactosidase expression compared with non-FcgammaR-expressing cells. The discrepancy between neutralization of Ad during infection of FcgammaR-expressing cells and neutralization of Ad during infection of non-FcgammaR-expressing cells occurred with either heat-inactivated or non-heat-inactivated sera, was blocked by addition of purified Fc domain protein, and did not require the cytoplasmic domain of FcgammaR, suggesting that immune complex internalization proceeded via endocytosis rather than phagocytosis. FcgammaR-mediated infection by Ad-immune complexes did not require expression of the coxsackie virus-Ad receptor (CAR) since similar data were obtained when CAR-deficient human dermal fibroblasts were engineered to express FcgammaR. However, interaction of the Ad penton base with cell surface integrins contributed to the difference in neutralization between FcgammaR-expressing and non

  3. Gene therapy strategy for long-term myocardial protection using adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of heme oxygenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luis G; Agrawal, Reitu; Zhang, Lunan; Rezvani, Mojgan; Mangi, Abeel A; Ehsan, Afshin; Griese, Daniel P; Dell'Acqua, Giorgio; Mann, Michael J; Oyama, Junichi; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Layne, Matthew D; Perrella, Mark A; Dzau, Victor J

    2002-02-05

    Ischemia and oxidative stress are the leading mechanisms for tissue injury. An ideal strategy for preventive/protective therapy would be to develop an approach that could confer long-term transgene expression and, consequently, tissue protection from repeated ischemia/reperfusion injury with a single administration of a therapeutic gene. In the present study, we used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a vector for direct delivery of the cytoprotective gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) into the rat myocardium, with the purpose of evaluating this strategy as a therapeutic approach for long-term protection from ischemia-induced myocardial injury. Human HO-1 gene (hHO-1) was delivered to normal rat hearts by intramyocardial injection. AAV-mediated transfer of the hHO-1 gene 8 weeks before acute coronary artery ligation and release led to a dramatic reduction (>75%) in left ventricular myocardial infarction. The reduction in infarct size was accompanied by decreases in myocardial lipid peroxidation and in proapoptotic Bax and proinflammatory interleukin-1beta protein abundance, concomitant with an increase in antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein level. This suggested that the transgene exerts its cardioprotective effects in part by reducing oxidative stress and associated inflammation and apoptotic cell death. This study documents the beneficial therapeutic effect of rAAV-mediated transfer, before myocardial injury, of a cytoprotective gene that confers long-term myocardial protection from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Our data suggest that this novel "pre-event" gene transfer approach may provide sustained tissue protection from future repeated episodes of injury and may be beneficial as preventive therapy for patients with or at risk of developing coronary ischemic events.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated sphingomyelin synthase 2 increases atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE KO mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yarui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2 contributes to de novo sphingomyelin (SM biosynthesis. Its activity is related to SM levels in the plasma and the cell membrane. In this study, we investigated the possibility of a direct relationship between SMS and atherosclerosis. Methods The Adenovirus containing SMS2 gene was given into 10-week ApoE KO C57BL/6J mice by femoral intravenous injection. In the control group, the Adenovirus containing GFP was given. To confirm this model, we took both mRNA level examination (RT-PCR and protein level examination (SMS activity assay. Result We generated recombinant adenovirus vectors containing either human SMS2 cDNA (AdV-SMS2 or GFP cDNA (AdV-GFP. On day six after intravenous infusion of 2 × 1011 particle numbers into ten-week-old apoE KO mice, AdV-SMS2 treatment significantly increased liver SMS2 mRNA levels and SMS activity (by 2.7-fold, 2.3-fold, p Conclusions Our results present direct morphological evidence for the pro-atherogenic capabilities of SMS2. SMS2 could be a potential target for treating atherosclerosis.

  5. Genetic analysis of a novel human adenovirus with a serologically unique hexon and a recombinant fiber gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth B Liu

    Full Text Available In February of 1996 a human adenovirus (formerly known as Ad-Cor-96-487 was isolated from the stool of an AIDS patient who presented with severe chronic diarrhea. To characterize this apparently novel pathogen of potential public health significance, the complete genome of this adenovirus was sequenced to elucidate its origin. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses of this genome demonstrate that this virus, heretofore referred to as HAdV-D58, contains a novel hexon gene as well as a recombinant fiber gene. In addition, serological analysis demonstrated that HAdV-D58 has a different neutralization profile than all previously characterized HAdVs. Bootscan analysis of the HAdV-D58 fiber gene strongly suggests one recombination event.

  6. CT-guided intratumoral gene therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.; Schuler, M.; Huber, C.; Weymarn, A. von; Bongartz, G.; Rochlitz, C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prove the principle of CT-guided gene therapy by intratumoral injection of a tumor suppressor gene as an alternative treatment approach of incurable non-small-cell lung cancer. In a prospective clinical phase I trial six patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and a mutation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 were treated by CT-guided intratumoral gene therapy. Ten milliliters of a vector solution (replication-defective adenovirus with complete wild-type p53 cDNA) were injected under CT guidance. In four cases the vector solution was completely applied to the tumor center, whereas in two cases 2 ml aliquots were injected into different tumor areas. For the procedure the scan room had been approved as a biosafety cabinet. Gene transfer was assessed by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction in biopsy specimens obtained under CT guidance 24-48 h after therapy. Potential therapeutic efficacy was evaluated on day 28 after treatment using spiral CT. The CT-guided gene therapy was easily performed in all six patients without intervention-related complications. Besides flu-like symptoms, no significant adverse effects of gene therapy were noted. Three of the four patients with central injection exhibited gene transfer in the posttreatment biopsy. Gene transfer could not be proven in the two patients with multiple 2 ml injections. After 28 days, four of the six patients showed stable disease at the treated tumor site, whereas other tumor manifestations progressed. Computed tomography-guided injections are an adequate and easy-to-perform procedure for intratumoral gene therapy. (orig.)

  7. Gene therapy for ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Melissa M; Tuo, Jingsheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2011-05-01

    The eye is an easily accessible, highly compartmentalised and immune-privileged organ that offers unique advantages as a gene therapy target. Significant advancements have been made in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of ocular diseases, and gene replacement and gene silencing have been implicated as potentially efficacious therapies. Recent improvements have been made in the safety and specificity of vector-based ocular gene transfer methods. Proof-of-concept for vector-based gene therapies has also been established in several experimental models of human ocular diseases. After nearly two decades of ocular gene therapy research, preliminary successes are now being reported in phase 1 clinical trials for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis. This review describes current developments and future prospects for ocular gene therapy. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the performance and regulation of recombinant adeno-associated virus- and lentivirus-mediated ocular gene transfer. Gene therapy prospects have advanced for a variety of retinal disorders, including retinitis pigmentosa, retinoschisis, Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration. Advances have also been made using experimental models for non-retinal diseases, such as uveitis and glaucoma. These methodological advancements are critical for the implementation of additional gene-based therapies for human ocular diseases in the near future.

  8. A novel double-enhanced suicide gene therapy in a colon cancer cell line mediated by gef and apoptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulaiz, Houria; Aránega, Antonia; Cáceres, Blanca; Blanca, Cáceres; Alvarez, Pablo; Pablo, Alvarez; Serrano-Rodríguez, Fernando; Fernando, Rodríguez-Serrano; Carrillo, Esmeralda; Esmeralda, Carrillo; Melguizo, Consolación; Consolación, Melguizo; Prados, Jose; Jose, Prados

    2014-02-01

    Double-suicide gene therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of advanced cancer. It has become an important research line in the development of gene therapy to overcome the drawbacks of single-gene therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of double-suicide gene therapy with the two suicide genes, gef and apoptin, in colon carcinoma. gef and apoptin genes were cloned into a doxycycline-regulated retrovirus-mediated gene expression system. Expression of both genes in the DLD-1 cell line was confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cell viability was determined with the sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay, and the cell cycle was studied by propidium iodide (PI) staining. Annexin V-FITC and PI assays were used to evaluate apoptosis, and the results were confirmed by electron microscopy. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 assay. Our results showed that the combined expression of gef and apoptin genes was strikingly more effective than the expression of either gene alone. Co-expression of gef and apoptin synergistically enhanced the decrease in cell viability, increasing necrosis and inducing apoptosis in colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway, which can be deficient in advanced or metastatic colon cancer. Double-suicide gene therapy based on gef and apoptin genes may be a candidate for the development of new colon cancer strategies, and further studies are warranted to establish the usefulness of double-suicide gene therapy in vivo.

  9. Getting genetic access to natural adenovirus genomes to explore vector diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2017-10-01

    Recombinant vectors based on the human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) have been developed and extensively used in preclinical and clinical studies for over 30 years. However, certain restrictions of HAdV5-based vectors have limited their clinical applications because they are rather inefficient in specifically transducing cells of therapeutic interest that lack the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Moreover, enhanced vector-associated toxicity and widespread preexisting immunity have been shown to significantly hamper the effectiveness of HAdV-5-mediated gene transfer. However, evolution of adenoviruses in the natural host is driving the generation of novel types with altered virulence, enhanced transmission, and altered tissue tropism. As a consequence, an increasing number of alternative adenovirus types were identified, which may represent a valuable resource for the development of novel vector types. Thus, researchers are focusing on the other naturally occurring adenovirus types, which are structurally similar but functionally different from HAdV5. To this end, several strategies have been devised for getting genetic access to adenovirus genomes, resulting in a new panel of adenoviral vectors. Importantly, these vectors were shown to have a host range different from HAdV5 and to escape the anti-HAdV5 immune response, thus underlining the great potential of this approach. In summary, this review provides a state-of-the-art overview of one essential step in adenoviral vector development.

  10. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD is mediated by tumor-specific immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kleijn

    Full Text Available The oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD represents a new promising therapeutic agent for patients with a malignant glioma and is currently under investigation in clinical phase I/II trials. Earlier preclinical studies showed that Delta24-RGD is able to effectively lyse tumor cells, yielding promising results in various immune-deficient glioma models. However, the role of the immune response in oncolytic adenovirus therapy for glioma has never been explored. To this end, we assessed Delta24-RGD treatment in an immune-competent orthotopic mouse model for glioma and evaluated immune responses against tumor and virus. Delta24-RGD treatment led to long-term survival in 50% of mice and this effect was completely lost upon administration of the immunosuppressive agent dexamethasone. Delta24-RGD enhanced intra-tumoral infiltration of F4/80+ macrophages, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and increased the local production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In treated mice, T cell responses were directed to the virus as well as to the tumor cells, which was reflected in the presence of protective immunological memory in mice that underwent tumor rechallenge. Together, these data provide evidence that the immune system plays a vital role in the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic adenovirus therapy of glioma, and may provide angles to future improvements on Delta24-RGD therapy.

  11. Enhanced combined tumor-specific oncolysis and suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer using M6 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, M; Lee, S-J; Li, X; Jiménez, J A; Zhang, Y-P; Bae, K-H; Mohammadi, Y; Kao, C; Gardner, T A

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme pro-drug suicide gene therapy has been hindered by inefficient viral delivery and gene transduction. To further explore the potential of this approach, we have developed AdIU1, a prostate-restricted replicative adenovirus (PRRA) armed with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK). In our previous Ad-OC-TK/ACV phase I clinical trial, we demonstrated safety and proof of principle with a tissue-specific promoter-based TK/pro-drug therapy using a replication-defective adenovirus for the treatment of prostate cancer metastases. In this study, we aimed to inhibit the growth of androgen-independent (AI), PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells by AdIU1. In vitro the viability of an AI- PSA/PSMA-expressing prostate cancer cell line, CWR22rv, was significantly inhibited by treatment with AdIU1 plus GCV (10 microg ml(-1)), compared with AdIU1 treatment alone and also cytotoxicity was observed following treatment with AdIU1 plus GCV only in PSA/PSMA-positive CWR22rv and C4-2 cells, but not in the PSA/PSMA-negative cell line, DU-145. In vivo assessment of AdIU1 plus GCV treatment revealed a stronger therapeutic effect against CWR22rv tumors in nude mice than treatment with AdIU1 alone, AdE4PSESE1a alone or in combination with GCV. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of specific-oncolysis and suicide gene therapy for AI-PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer gene therapy.

  12. Adenoviral transfer of the heme oxygenase-1 gene protects striatal astrocytes from heme-mediated oxidative injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Jing; Chau, Lee-Young; Galunic, Nicholas; Regan, Raymond F

    2004-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in the CNS after hemorrhage, and may have an effect on injury to surrounding tissue. Hemin, the preferred substrate of HO, is a neurotoxin that is present in intracranial hematomas. In a prior study, we observed that HO inhibitors increased the vulnerability of cultured cortical astrocytes to heme-mediated oxidative injury. To investigate the effect of HO more specifically, we used an adenoviral vector encoding the human HO-1 gene to specifically increase HO-1 expression. Incubation with 100 MOI of the HO-1 adenovirus (Adv-HHO-1) for 24 h increased both HO-1 protein and HO activity; a control adenovirus lacking the HO-1 gene had no effect. Using a DNA probe that was specific for human HO-1, 80.5 +/- 7.2% of astrocytes were observed to be infected by in situ hybridization. The cell death produced by 30-60 microM hemin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with 100 MOI Adv-HHO-1, as assessed by LDH release, propidium iodide exclusion, and MTT reduction assay. The threefold increase in cell protein oxidation produced by hemin was also attenuated in cultures pretreated with Adv-HHO-1. These results support the hypothesis that HO-1 protects astrocytes from heme-mediated oxidative injury. Specifically increasing astrocytic HO-1 by gene transfer may have a beneficial effect on hemorrhagic CNS injury.

  13. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T.

    2006-01-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology

  14. Generation and characterization of a novel candidate gene therapy and vaccination vector based on human species D adenovirus type 56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Margaret R; Alonso-Padilla, Julio; John, Lijo; Chandra, Naresh; Khan, Selina; Ballmann, Monika Z; Lipiec, Agnieszka; Heemskerk, Evert; Custers, Jerome; Arnberg, Niklas; Havenga, Menzo; Baker, Andrew H; Lemckert, Angelique

    2018-01-01

    The vectorization of rare human adenovirus (HAdV) types will widen our knowledge of this family and their interaction with cells, tissues and organs. In this study we focus on HAdV-56, a member of human Ad species D, and create ease-of-use cloning systems to generate recombinant HAdV-56 vectors carrying foreign genes. We present in vitro transduction profiles for HAdV-56 in direct comparison to the most commonly used HAdV-5-based vector. In vivo characterizations demonstrate that when it is delivered intravenously (i.v.) HAdV-56 mainly targets the spleen and, to a lesser extent, the lungs, whilst largely bypassing liver transduction in mice. HAdV-56 triggered robust inflammatory and cellular immune responses, with higher induction of IFNγ, TNFα, IL5, IL6, IP10, MCP1 and MIG1 compared to HAdV-5 following i.v. administration. We also investigated its potential as a vaccine vector candidate by performing prime immunizations in mice with HAdV-56 encoding luciferase (HAdV-56-Luc). Direct comparisons were made to HAdV-26, a highly potent human vaccine vector currently in phase II clinical trials. HAdV-56-Luc induced luciferase 'antigen'-specific IFNγ-producing cells and anti-HAdV-56 neutralizing antibodies in Balb/c mice, demonstrating a near identical profile to that of HAdV-26. Taken together, the data presented provides further insight into human Ad receptor/co-receptor usage, and the first report on HAdV-56 vectors and their potential for gene therapy and vaccine applications.

  15. Widespread and highly persistent gene transfer to the CNS by retrovirus vector in utero: implication for gene therapy to Krabbe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin-Song; Meng, Xing-Li; Yokoo, Takashi; Sakurai, Ken; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Ohashi, Toya; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    2005-05-01

    Brain-directed prenatal gene therapy may benefit some lysosomal storage diseases that affect the central nervous system (CNS) before birth. Our previous study showed that intrauterine introduction of recombinant adenoviruses into cerebral ventricles results in efficient gene transfer to the CNS in the mouse. However, transgene expression decreased with time due to the non-integrative property of adenoviral vectors. In this study, in order to obtain permanent gene transduction, we investigated the feasibility of retrovirus-mediated in utero gene transduction. Concentrated retrovirus encoding the LacZ gene was injected into the cerebral ventricles of the embryos of normal and twitcher mice (a murine model of Krabbe disease) at embryonic day 12. The distribution and maintenance of the transgene expression in the recipient brain were analyzed histochemically, biochemically and by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction method pre- and postnatally. Efficient and highly persistent gene transduction to the brain was achieved both in normal and the twitcher mouse. Transduced neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes were distributed throughout the brain. The transduced LacZ gene, its transcript and protein expression in the brain were maintained for 14 months without decrement. In addition, gene transduction to multiple tissues other than the brain was also detected at low levels. This study suggests that brain-directed in utero gene transfer using retrovirus vector may be beneficial to the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases with severe brain damage early in life, such as Krabbe disease. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. [Construction and expression of a recombinant adenovirus with LZP3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bang-dang; Zhang, Fu-chun; Sun, Mei-yu; Li, Yi-jie; Ma, Zheng-hai

    2007-08-01

    To explore a new immunocontraceptive vaccine and construct an attenuated recombinant adenoviral vaccine against Lagurus lagurus zona pellucida 3(LZP3). LZP3 gene was subcloned into the shuttle vector pShuttle-CMV, and then a two-step transformation procedure was employed to construct a recombinant adenoviral plasmid with LZP3, which was digested with Pac I and transfected into HEK293 cells to package recombinant adenovirus particles. Finally, HeLa cells were infected by the recombinant adenovirus. LZP3 gene was detected from the recombinant virus by PCR, and its transcription and expression were analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blot. Recombinant adenovirus vector pAd-LZP3 with LZP3 gene was constructed by homologous recombination in E.coli, and a recombinant adenovirus was obtained by transfecting HEK293 cells with pAd-LZP3. PCR test indicated that LZP3 gene was successfully integrated into the adenoviral genome, and the titer of the recombinant adenovirus reached 1.2x10(10) pfu/L. The transcription and expression of LZP3 gene in the infected HeLa cells were confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot. The recombinant adenovirus RAd-LZP3 can be successfully expressed in the infected HeLa cells, which lays the foundation for further researches into immunizing animals with RAd-LZP3.

  17. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    2013-01-01

    The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC...... linked to Ii compared with vaccination with the unlinked vaccine. Studies using knockout mice demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells were largely responsible for this protection, which is mediated through perforin-dependent lysis of infected cells and IFN-γ production. Taking the concept a step further...

  18. The development of the conditionally replication-competent adenovirus: replacement of E4 orf1-4 region by exogenous gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jae-Kook; Lee, Mi-Hyang; Seo, Hae-Hyun; Kim, Seok-Ki; Lee, Kang-Huyn; Kim, In-Hoo; Lee, Sang-Jin

    2010-05-01

    Tumor or tissue specific replicative adenovirus armed with a therapeutic gene has shown a promising anti-cancer therapeutic modality. However, because the genomic packaging capacity is constrained, only a few places inside it are available for transgene insertion. In the present study, we introduce a novel strategy utilizing the early E4 region for the insertion of therapeutic gene(s). We constructed the conditionally replication-competent adenovirus (CRAd), Ad5E4(mRFP) by: (i) replacing the E4/E1a promoter by the prostate-specific enhancer element; (ii) inserting mRFP inside the E4orf1-4 deletion region; and (iii) sub-cloning enhanced green fluorescent protein controlled by cytomegalovirus promoter in the left end of the viral genome. Subsequently, we evaluated its replication abilities and killing activities in vitro, as well as its in vivo anti-tumor efficacy in CWR22rv xenografts. When infected with Ad5E4(mRFP), the number and intensity of the mRFP gene products increased in a prostate cancer cell-specific manner as designed, suggesting that the mRFP gene and E4orfs other than E4orf1-4 were well synthesized from one transcript via alternative splicing as the recombinant adenovirus replicated. As expected from the confirmed virus replication capability, Ad5E4(mRFP) induced cell lysis as potent as the wild-type adenovirus and effectively suppressed tumor growth when tested in the CWR22rv xenografts in nude mice. Furthermore, Ad5E4(endo/angio) harboring an endostatin-angiostatin gene in E4orf1-4 was able to enhance CRAd by replacing mRFP with a therapeutic gene. The approach employed in the present study for the insertion of a therapeutic transgene in CRAd should facilitate the construction of CRAd containing multiple therapeutic genes in the viral genome that may have the potential to serve as highly potent cancer therapeutic reagents. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John B; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J; Moore, Anne C

    2014-08-21

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP1₄₂, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP1₄₂ also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP1₄₂ using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies.

  20. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  1. Inhibition of corneal neovascularization by recombinant adenovirus-mediated sFlk-1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hui; Wu Jihong; Li Huiming; Wang Zhanli; Chen Xiafang; Tian Yuhua; Yi Miaoying; Ji Xunda; Ma Jialie; Huang Qian

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (Flt-1, Flk-1/KDR) is correlated with neovascularization in the eyes. Therefore, blocking the binding of VEGF and the corresponding receptor has become critical for inhibiting corneal neovascularization. In this study, we have expressed the cDNA for sFlk-1 under the control of cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (CMV) from an E1/partial E3 deleted replication defective recombinant adenovirus, and Ad.sflk-1 expression was determined by Western blotting. We have shown that conditioned media from Ad.sflk-1-infected ARPE-19 cells significantly reduced VEGF-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine endothelial cells (SVEC) proliferation in vitro compared with the control vector. In vivo, adenoviral vectors expressing green fluorescent protein alone (Ad.GFP) were utilized to monitor gene transfer to the cornea. Moreover, in the models of corneal neovascularization, the injection of Ad.sflk-1 (10 8 PFU) into the anterior chamber could significantly inhibit angiogenic changes compared with Ad.null-injected and vehicle-injected models. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that corneal endothelial cells and corneal stroma of cauterized rat eyes were efficiently transduced and expressed sFlk-1. These results not only support that adenoviral vectors are capable of high-level transgene expression but also demonstrate that Ad.sflk-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting the development of corneal neovascularization

  2. Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III Overexpression By Gene Therapy Exerts Antitumoral Activity In Mouse Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl González

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in cirrhotic liver. The nitric oxide (NO synthase type III (NOS-3 overexpression induces cell death in hepatoma cells. The study developed gene therapy designed to specifically overexpress NOS-3 in cultured hepatoma cells, and in tumors derived from orthotopically implanted tumor cells in fibrotic livers. Liver fibrosis was induced by CCl4 administration in mice. Hepa 1-6 cells were used for in vitro and in vivo experiments. The first generation adenovirus was designed to overexpress NOS-3 (or GFP and luciferase cDNA under the regulation of murine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP and Rous Sarcoma Virus (RSV promoters, respectively. Both adenoviruses were administered through the tail vein two weeks after orthotopic tumor cell implantation. AFP-NOS-3/RSV-Luciferase increased oxidative-related DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and caspase-8 activity in cultured Hepa 1-6 cells. The increased expression of CD95/CD95L and caspase-8 activity was abolished by l-NAME or p53 siRNA. The tail vein infusion of AFP-NOS- 3/RSV-Luciferase adenovirus increased cell death markers, and reduced cell proliferation of established tumors in fibrotic livers. The increase of oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by NOS-3 overexpression induced DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The effectiveness of the gene therapy has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo.

  3. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone...

  4. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy

  5. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S., E-mail: mviapiano@partners.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy.

  6. Adenovirus-mediated IL-24 expression enhances the chemosensitivity of multidrug-resistantgastric cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zonglei; Bian, Guochun; Sheng, Weihua; He, Songbin; Yang, Jicheng; Dong, Xiaoqiang

    2013-11-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the commonly used strategies in gastric cancer, especially for unresectable patients, but it becomes insensitive to repeated administration of even the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, such as cisplatin. Given this, there is an urgent need for developing chemosensitizers to overcome acquired resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Interleukin-24 (IL-24), a cytokine-tumor suppressor, shows broad-spectrum and tumor-specific antitumor properties, and studies have demonstrated that IL-24 could conspicuously restore the chemosensitivity of MDR cancer cells. Herein, we developed a human MDR gastric cancer cell subline, SGC7901/CDDP, by repeated selection of resistant clones of parental sensitive cells, and further investigated the chemosensitizing effects and the underlying mechanisms of adenovirus-mediated IL-24 (Ad-IL-24) gene therapy plus CDDP for the human MDR gastric cancer cells SGC7901/CDDP in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that the expression of IL-24 mRNA and protein was profoundly downregulated in SGC7901/CDDP cells by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. In addition, the cell viability assay showed that the IC50 of SGC7901/CDDP cells to CDDP, 5-FU, ADM and MTX was significantly enhanced compared to parental sensitive SGC7901 cells. Ad-IL-24-induced IL-24 overexpression decreased the IC50 of the above agents (not MTX), induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, and Ad-IL-24 plus CDDP elicited significant apoptosis and tumor suppression of SGC7901/CDDP cells in vitro and SGC7901/CDDP cell xenograft tumors in vivo, respectively. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the mechanisms of Ad-IL-24-elicited chemosensitizing effects were closely associated with a substantial upregulation of Bax and downregulation of P-gp and Bcl-2 in SGC7901/CDDP cells in vitro and SGC7901/CDDP xenograft tissues in vivo. Thus, this study indicates that overexpression of IL-24 gene can significantly promote chemosensitivity in MDR phenotype SGC7901

  7. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-01-01

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  8. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  9. Adenovirus DNA binding protein inhibits SrCap-activated CBP and CREB-mediated transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiequn; Tarakanova, Vera; Chrivia, John; Yaciuk, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The SNF2-related CBP activator protein (SrCap) is a potent activator of transcription mediated by CBP and CREB. We have previously demonstrated that the Adenovirus 2 DNA Binding Protein (DBP) binds to SrCap and inhibits the transcription mediated by the carboxyl-terminal region of SrCap (amino acids 1275-2971). We report here that DBP inhibits the ability of full-length SrCap (1-2971) to activate transcription mediated by Gal-CREB and Gal-CBP. In addition, DBP also inhibits the ability of SrCap to enhance Protein Kinase A (PKA) activated transcription of the enkaphalin promoter. DBP was found to dramatically inhibit transcription of a mammalian two-hybrid system that was dependent on the interaction of SrCap and CBP binding domains. We also found that DBP has no effect on transcription mediated by a transcriptional activator that is not related to SrCap, indicating that our reported transcriptional inhibition is specific for SrCap and not due to nonspecific effects of DBP's DNA binding activity on the CAT reporter plasmid. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which DBP inhibits cellular transcription mediated by the interaction between SrCap and CBP

  10. Adrenal gland infection by serotype 5 adenovirus requires coagulation factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Tran

    Full Text Available Recombinant, replication-deficient serotype 5 adenovirus infects the liver upon in vivo, systemic injection in rodents. This infection requires the binding of factor X to the capsid of this adenovirus. Another organ, the adrenal gland is also infected upon systemic administration of Ad, however, whether this infection is dependent on the cocksackie adenovirus receptor (CAR or depends on the binding of factor X to the viral capsid remained to be determined. In the present work, we have used a pharmacological agent (warfarin as well as recombinant adenoviruses lacking the binding site of Factor X to elucidate this mechanism in mice. We demonstrate that, as observed in the liver, adenovirus infection of the adrenal glands in vivo requires Factor X. Considering that the level of transduction of the adrenal glands is well-below that of the liver and that capsid-modified adenoviruses are unlikely to selectively infect the adrenal glands, we have used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT imaging of gene expression to determine whether local virus administration (direct injection in the kidney could increase gene transfer to the adrenal glands. We demonstrate that direct injection of the virus in the kidney increases gene transfer in the adrenal gland but liver transduction remains important. These observations strongly suggest that serotype 5 adenovirus uses a similar mechanism to infect liver and adrenal gland and that selective transgene expression in the latter is more likely to be achieved through transcriptional targeting.

  11. Antiviral T Cells for Adenovirus in the Pretransplant Period: A Bridge Therapy for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly K; Hanley, Patrick J; Lang, Haili; Lazarski, Christopher A; Chorvinsky, Elizabeth A; McCormack, Sarah; Roesch, Lauren; Albihani, Shuroug; Dean, Marcus; Hoq, Fahmida; Adams, Roberta H; Bollard, Catherine M; Keller, Michael D

    2018-05-09

    Viral infections can be life threatening in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other forms of profound primary immunodeficiency disorders both before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Adoptive immunotherapy with virus-specific T cells (VSTs) has been utilized in many patients in the setting of HSCT, but has very rarely been attempted for treatment of viral infections before HSCT. Here we describe the use of VSTs in an infant with RAG1 SCID who had developed disseminated adenovirus which failed to improve on cidofovir. Adenovirus cleared following 2 doses of VSTs and marrow infusion from a matched unrelated donor, without incidence of graft versus host disease. T cell receptor-b sequencing demonstrated expansion of adenovirus-specific T cell fraction of the VSTs, suggesting that infusion facilitated viral clearance. This report suggests that VSTs are likely safe in the pre-HSCT period, and may be a useful bridge therapy for infants with SCID and persistent viral infections. Copyright © 2018 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene therapy in the inner ear using adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseman, Jacob; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-01-01

    Therapies for the protection and regeneration of auditory hair cells are of great interest given the significant monetary and lifestyle impact of hearing loss. The past decade has seen tremendous advances in the use of adenoviral vectors to achieve these aims. Preliminary data demonstrated the functional capacity of this technique as adenoviral-induced expression of neurotrophic and growth factors protected hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons from ototoxic insults. Subsequent efforts confirmed the feasibility of adenoviral transfection of cells in the auditory neuroepithelium via cochleostomy into the scala media. Most recently, efforts have focused on regeneration of depleted hair cells. Mammalian hearing loss is generally considered a permanent insult as the auditory epithelium lacks a basal layer capable of producing new hair cells. Recently, the transcription factor Atoh1 has been found to play a critical role in hair cell differentiation. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of Atoh1 in culture and in vivo have shown the ability to regenerate auditory and vestibular hair cells by causing transdifferentiation of neighboring epithelial-supporting cells. Functional recovery of both the auditory and vestibular systems has been documented following adenoviral induced Atoh1 overexpression. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Therapy in Fanconi Anemia-A Mice Reveals Long-Term Engraftment and Continuous Turnover of Corrected HSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Estevez, F Javier; Nowrouzi, Ali; Lozano, M Luz; Galy, Anne; Charrier, Sabine; von Kalle, Christof; Guenechea, Guillermo; Bueren, Juan A; Schmidt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a DNA repair-deficiency syndrome mainly characterized by cancer predisposition and bone marrow failure. Trying to restore the hematopoietic function in these patients, lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy trials have recently been proposed. However, because no insertional oncogenesis studies have been conducted so far in DNA repair-deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia, we have carried out a genome-wide screening of lentiviral insertion sites after the gene correction of Fanca(-/-) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), using LAM-PCR and 454-pyrosequencing. Our studies first demonstrated that transduction of Fanca(-/-) HSCs with a lentiviral vector designed for clinical application efficiently corrects the phenotype of Fanconi anemia repopulating cells without any sign of toxicity. The identification of more than 6,500 insertion sites in primary and secondary recipients showed a polyclonal pattern of reconstitution, as well as a continuous turnover of corrected Fanca(-/-) HSC clones, without evidences of selection towards specific common integration sites. Taken together our data show, for the first time in a DNA repair-deficiency syndrome, that lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy efficiently corrects the phenotype of affected HSCs and promotes a healthy pattern of clonal turnover in vivo. These studies will have a particular impact in the development of new gene therapy trials in patients affected by DNA repair syndromes, particularly in Fanconi anemia.

  14. Two different serum-free media and osmolality effect upon human 293 cell growth and adenovirus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago B; Ferreira, Ana L; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M

    2005-11-01

    Adenoviruses are promising vectors for gene therapy and vaccination protocols. Consequently, the market demands for adenovirus are increasing, driving the search for new methodologies for large-scale production of concentrated vectors with warranted purity and efficacy, in a cost-effective way. Nevertheless, the production of adenovirus is currently limited by the so-called 'cell density effect', i.e. a drop in cell specific productivity concomitant with increased cell concentration at infection. Of two different serum-free culture media (CD293 and EX-Cell), evaluated for their effect on human 293 cells growth and adenovirus production at cell densities higher than 1x10(6) cells/ml, EX-Cell proved the better medium for cell growth. Although adenovirus production was equivalent in both media when the infection was performed at 1x10(6) cells/ml, at 3x10(6) cells/ml CD293 was the better. This result related to the high ammonia content in EX-Cell medium at the highest cell concentration at infection. Besides this, the large-scale production of these vectors at high cell densities often requires re-feed strategies, which increase medium osmolality. While a negative effect on cell growth was observed with increasing osmolalities, adenovirus productivity was only affected for osmolalities higher than 430 mOsm.

  15. Adenovirus-mediated E2-EPF UCP gene transfer prevents autoamputation in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung Hwa; Shin, Hyo Jung; Park, Kyeong-Su; Lee, Chan Hee; Jung, Cho-Rok; Im, Dong-Soo

    2012-04-01

    E2-EPF ubiquitin carrier protein (UCP) stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) inducing ischemic vascular responses. Here, we investigated the effect of UCP gene transfer on therapeutic angiogenesis. Adenovirus-encoded UCP (Ad-F-UCP) increased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) in cells and mice. Conditioned media from UCP-overexpressing cells promoted proliferation, tubule formation, and invasion of human umbilical-vascular-endothelial cells (HUVECs), and vascularization in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Ad-F-UCP increased the vessel density in the Martigel plug assay, and generated copious vessel-like structures in the explanted muscle. The UCP effect on angiogenesis was dependent on VEGF and FGF-2. In mouse hindlimb ischemia model (N = 30/group), autoamputation (limb loss) occurred in 87% and 68% of the mice with saline and Ad encoding β-galactosidase (Ad-LacZ), respectively, whereas only 23% of the mice injected with Ad-F-UCP showed autoamputation after 21 days of treatment. Ad-F-UCP increased protein levels of HIF-1α, platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), smooth muscle cell actin (SMA) in the ischemic muscle, and augmented blood vessels doubly positive for PECAM-1 and SMA. Consequently, UCP gene transfer prevented muscle degeneration and autoamputation of ischemic limb. The results suggest that E2-EPF UCP may be a target for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  16. Republished review: Gene therapy for ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Melissa M; Tuo, Jingsheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2011-07-01

    The eye is an easily accessible, highly compartmentalised and immune-privileged organ that offers unique advantages as a gene therapy target. Significant advancements have been made in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of ocular diseases, and gene replacement and gene silencing have been implicated as potentially efficacious therapies. Recent improvements have been made in the safety and specificity of vector-based ocular gene transfer methods. Proof-of-concept for vector-based gene therapies has also been established in several experimental models of human ocular diseases. After nearly two decades of ocular gene therapy research, preliminary successes are now being reported in phase 1 clinical trials for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis. This review describes current developments and future prospects for ocular gene therapy. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the performance and regulation of recombinant adeno-associated virus- and lentivirus-mediated ocular gene transfer. Gene therapy prospects have advanced for a variety of retinal disorders, including retinitis pigmentosa, retinoschisis, Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration. Advances have also been made using experimental models for non-retinal diseases, such as uveitis and glaucoma. These methodological advancements are critical for the implementation of additional gene-based therapies for human ocular diseases in the near future.

  17. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  18. Recent Trends of Polymer Mediated Liposomal Gene Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal Kumar Kundu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancement in the gene delivery system have resulted in clinical successes in gene therapy for patients with several genetic diseases, such as immunodeficiency diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD blindness, thalassemia, and many more. Among various delivery systems, liposomal mediated gene delivery route is offering great promises for gene therapy. This review is an attempt to depict a portrait about the polymer based liposomal gene delivery systems and their future applications. Herein, we have discussed in detail the characteristics of liposome, importance of polymer for liposome formulation, gene delivery, and future direction of liposome based gene delivery as a whole.

  19. DNA prime/Adenovirus boost malaria vaccine encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 induces sterile protection associated with cell-mediated immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin Chuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad. The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1. The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea, possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3, preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27% were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44-817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5-102 and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13-408; AMA1 348, range 88-1270 and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019. Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. SIGNIFICANCE: The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%. Protection

  20. Enhanced Differentiation of Three-Gene-Reprogrammed Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells into Adipocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated PGC-1α Overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jen Chen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells formed by the introduction of only three factors, Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (3-gene iPSCs, may provide a safer option for stem cell-based therapy than iPSCs conventionally introduced with four-gene iPSCs. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α plays an important role during brown fat development. However, the potential roles of PGC-1α in regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and the differentiation of iPSCs are still unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated PGC-1α overexpression in 3-gene iPSCs. PGC-1α overexpression resulted in increased mitochondrial mass, reactive oxygen species production, and oxygen consumption. Microarray-based bioinformatics showed that the gene expression pattern of PGC-1α-overexpressing 3-gene iPSCs resembled the expression pattern observed in adipocytes. Furthermore, PGC-1α overexpression enhanced adipogenic differentiation and the expression of several brown fat markers, including uncoupling protein-1, cytochrome C, and nuclear respiratory factor-1, whereas it inhibited the expression of the white fat marker uncoupling protein-2. Furthermore, PGC-1α overexpression significantly suppressed osteogenic differentiation. These data demonstrate that PGC-1α directs the differentiation of 3-gene iPSCs into adipocyte-like cells with features of brown fat cells. This may provide a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders and obesity.

  1. A guide to approaching regulatory considerations for lentiviral-mediated gene therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael; Whittaker, Roger; Stoll, Elizabeth Ann

    2017-06-12

    Lentiviral vectors are increasingly the gene transfer tool of choice for gene or cell therapies, with multiple clinical investigations showing promise for this viral vector in terms of both safety and efficacy. The third-generation vector system is well-characterized, effectively delivers genetic material and maintains long-term stable expression in target cells, delivers larger amounts of genetic material than other methods, is non-pathogenic and does not cause an inflammatory response in the recipient. This report aims to help academic scientists and regulatory managers negotiate the governance framework to achieve successful translation of a lentiviral vector-based gene therapy. The focus is on European regulations, and how they are administered in the United Kingdom, although many of the principles will be similar for other regions including the United States. The report justifies the rationale for using third-generation lentiviral vectors to achieve gene delivery for in vivo and ex vivo applications; briefly summarises the extant regulatory guidance for gene therapies, categorised as advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs); provides guidance on specific regulatory issues regarding gene therapies; presents an overview of the key stakeholders to be approached when pursuing clinical trials authorization for an ATMP; and includes a brief catalogue of the documentation required to submit an application for regulatory approval of a new gene therapy.

  2. Oral or parenteral administration of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing the measles virus haemagglutinin and fusion proteins: protective immune responses in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooks, A R; Jeevarajah, D; Lee, J; Warnes, A; Niewiesk, S; ter Meulen, V; Stephenson, J R; Clegg, J C

    1998-05-01

    The genes encoding the measles virus (MV) haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins were placed under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter in a replication-deficient adenovirus vector. Immunofluorescence and radioimmune precipitation demonstrated the synthesis of each protein and biological activity was confirmed by the detection of haemadsorption and fusion activities in infected cells. Oral as well as parenteral administration of the H-expressing recombinant adenovirus elicited a significant protective response in mice challenged with MV. While the F-expressing adenovirus failed to protect mice, cotton rats immunized with either the H- or F-expressing recombinant showed reduced MV replication in the lungs. Antibodies elicited in mice following immunization with either recombinant had no in vitro neutralizing activity, suggesting a protective mechanism involving a cell-mediated immune response. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using oral administration of adenovirus recombinants to induce protective responses to heterologous proteins.

  3. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, Katrina; Skerratt, Lee; Franson, J. Christian; Hollmen, Tuula E.

    2015-01-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  4. Gene therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, T R; Laube, B L

    2001-09-01

    Theoretically, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene replacement during the neonatal period can decrease morbidity and mortality from cystic fibrosis (CF). In vivo gene transfers have been accomplished in CF patients. Choice of vector, mode of delivery to airways, translocation of genetic information, and sufficient expression level of the normalized CFTR gene are issues that currently are being addressed in the field. The advantages and limitations of viral vectors are a function of the parent virus. Viral vectors used in this setting include adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Initial studies with Ad vectors resulted in a vector that was efficient for gene transfer with dose-limiting inflammatory effects due to the large amount of viral protein delivered. The next generation of Ad vectors, with more viral coding sequence deletions, has a longer duration of activity and elicits a lesser degree of cell-mediated immunity in mice. A more recent generation of Ad vectors has no viral genes remaining. Despite these changes, the problem of humoral immunity remains with Ad vectors. A variety of strategies such as vector systems requiring single, or widely spaced, administrations, pharmacologic immunosuppression at administration, creation of a stealth vector, modification of immunogenic epitopes, or tolerance induction are being considered to circumvent humoral immunity. AAV vectors have been studied in animal and human models. They do not appear to induce inflammatory changes over a wide range of doses. The level of CFTR messenger RNA expression is difficult to ascertain with AAV vectors since the small size of the vector relative to the CFTR gene leaves no space for vector-specific sequences on which to base assays to distinguish endogenous from vector-expressed messenger RNA. In general, AAV vectors appear to be safe and have superior duration profiles. Cationic liposomes are lipid-DNA complexes. These vectors generally have been

  5. Combined adenovirus-mediated artificial microRNAs targeting mfgl2, mFas, and mTNFR1 protect against fulminant hepatic failure in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xi

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF has a poor prognosis with high in-hospital mortality. Hepatic and circulating inflammatory cytokines, such as fibrinogen like protein 2 (fgl2, FasL/Fas, and TNFα/TNFR1, play a significant role in the pathophysiology of ACLF. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of recombinant adenoviral vectors carrying constructed DNA code for non-native microRNA (miRNA targeting mouse fgl2 (mfgl2 or both mFas and mTNFR1 on murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3-induced fulminant hepatitis in BALB/cJ mice. Artificial miRNA eukaryotic expression plasmids against mfgl2, mFas, and mTNFR1 were constructed, and their inhibitory effects on the target genes were confirmed in vitro. pcDNA6.2-mFas-mTNFR1- miRNA,which expresses miRNA against both mFas and mTNFR1 simultaneously,was constructed. To construct a miRNA adenovirus expression vector against mfgl2, pcDNA6.2-mfgl2-miRNA was cloned using Gateway technology. Ad-mFas-mTNFR1- miRNA was also constructed by the same procedure. Adenovirus vectors were delivered by tail-vein injection into MHV-3-infected BALB/cJ mice to evaluate the therapeutic effect. 8 of 18 (44.4% mice recovered from fulminant viral hepatitis in the combined interference group treated with Ad-mfgl2-miRNA and Ad-mFas-mTNFR1-miRNA. But only 4 of 18 (22.2% mice receiving Ad-mfgl2-miRNA and 3 of 18 (16.7% mice receiving Ad-mFas-mTNFR1- miRNA survived. These adenovirus vectors significantly ameliorated inflammatory infiltration, fibrin deposition, hepatocyte necrosis and apoptosis, and prolonged survival time. Our data illustrated that combined interference using adenovirus-mediated artificial miRNAs targeting mfgl2, mFas, and mTNFR1 might have significant therapeutic potential for the treatment of fulminant hepatitis.

  6. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schenk, E.; Essand, M.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Danielsson, A.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Hoeben, R.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Lindholm, L.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nilsson, B.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, J. L. M.; de Vrij, J.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Willemsen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 807-813 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  7. Determination of the transforming activities of adenovirus oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiseder, Thomas; Nevels, Michael; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The last 50 years of molecular biological investigations into human adenoviruses (Ads) have contributed enormously to our understanding of the basic principles of normal and malignant cell growth. Much of this knowledge stems from analyses of the Ad productive infection cycle in permissive host cells. Also, initial observations concerning the transforming potential of human Ads subsequently revealed decisive insights into the molecular mechanisms of the origins of cancer and established Ads as a model system for explaining virus-mediated transformation processes. Today it is well established that cell transformation by human Ads is a multistep process involving several gene products encoded in early transcription units 1A (E1A) and 1B (E1B). Moreover, a large body of evidence now indicates that alternative or additional mechanisms are engaged in Ad-mediated oncogenic transformation involving gene products encoded in early region 4 (E4) as well as epigenetic changes resulting from viral DNA integration. In particular, studies on the transforming potential of several E4 gene products have now revealed new pathways that point to novel general mechanisms of virus-mediated oncogenesis. In this chapter we describe in vitro and in vivo assays to determine the transforming and oncogenic activities of the E1A, E1B, and E4 oncoproteins in primary baby rat kidney cells, human amniotic fluid cells and athymic nude mice.

  8. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study of the safety and efficacy of BIOBYPASS (AdGVVEGF121.10NH) gene therapy in patients with refractory advanced coronary artery disease: the NOVA trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Jørgensen, Erik; Fuchs, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    Genes encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can potentially augment myocardial perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled gene therapy study with the adenovirus carrying VEGF121 (BIOBYPASS [AdGVVEGF121.10NH])....

  10. Effect of PTTG on endogenous gene expression in HEK 293 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panguluri Siva K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG, also known as securin, is highly expressed in various tumors including pituitary, thyroid, colon, ovary, testis, lung, and breast. An overexpression of PTTG enhances cell proliferation, induces cellular transformation in vitro, and promotes tumor development in nude mice. PTTG also inhibits separation of sister chromatids leading to aneuploidy and genetic instability. A great amount of work has been undertaken to understand the biology of PTTG and its expression in various tumors. However, mechanisms by which PTTG mediates its tumorigenic function are not fully understood. To utilize this gene for cancer therapy, identification of the downstream signaling genes regulated by PTTG in mediation of its tumorigenic function is necessary. For this purpose, we expressed PTTG in human embryonic kidney (HEK293 cells that do not express PTTG and analyzed the downstream genes using microarray analysis. Results A total of 22,277 genes printed on an Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 GeneChip™ array were screened with labeled cRNA prepared from HEK293 cells infected with adenovirus vector expressing PTTG cDNA (AdPTTG cDNA and compared with labeled cRNA prepared from HEK293 cells infected with control adenovirus (control Ad or adenovirus vector expressing GFP (AdGFP. Out of 22,277 genes, 71 genes were down-regulated and 35 genes were up-regulated with an FDR corrected p-value of ≤ 0.05 and a fold change of ≥2. Most of the altered genes identified are involved in the cell cycle and cell apoptosis; a few are involved in mRNA processing and nitrogen metabolism. Most of the up-regulated genes belong to the histone protein family. Conclusion PTTG is a well-studied oncogene for its role in tumorigenesis. In addition to its importance in regulation of the cell cycle, this gene has also been recently shown to play a role in the induction of cell apoptosis. The microarray analysis in the present study

  11. Potentiation of radiation therapy by the oncolytic adenovirus dl1520 (ONYX-015) in human malignant glioma xenografts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geoerger, B; Grill, J; Opolon, P; Morizet, J; Aubert, G; Lecluse, Y; Beusechem-Kaptein, van V.W.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Kirn, DH; Vassal, G

    2003-01-01

    In spite of aggressive surgery, irradiation and/or chemotherapy, treatment of malignant gliomas remains a major challenge in adults and children due to high treatment failure. We have demonstrated significant cell lysis and antitumour activity of the E1B-55 kDa-gene-deleted adenovirus ONYX-015

  12. Radiosensitization effect of recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene on pancreatic carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Dongming; Zhang Kejun; Li Dechun; Zhu Xuefeng; Yang Yong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of PUMA gene mediated by recombinant adenovirus vector combined with radiation on the pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: The PANC-1 cells were infected with Ad- PUMA (MOI=10, 50 and 100, respectively) for 48 h. The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. PANC-1 cells were divided into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. The cell growth inhibition rate and apoptotic rate of PANC-1 cells were assessed by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Human pancreatic carcinomas were transplanted subcutaneously in nude mice, which were randomized into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. Tumor growth rate and apoptotic index at different time points were recorded in 35 days. Results: The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was increased with the increase of MOI of Ad-PUMA, which was does-dependant (MOI=10, mRNA=0.46± 0.02, protein=0.75± 0.09; MOI=50, mRNA=1.12±0.09, protein=1.01±0.18; MOI=100, mRNA=1.50±0.08, protein= 1.80±0.15; P 3 , (39.5±9.23)mm 3 , (33.6±10.3)mm 3 and (52.0±11.43)mm 3 , respectively, P<0.05]. And the apoptotic index was increased in the same manner (AI=0.43±0.05, 0.29±0.10, 0.24±0.05 and 0.00±0.00, respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions: Recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene combined with irradiation could increase the cell-killing effect on pancreatic carcinoma. It is better than that of either one kind of therapy. (authors)

  13. Fas activity mediates airway inflammation during mouse adenovirus type 1 respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Laura J; Molloy, Caitlyn T; Weinberg, Jason B

    2018-06-13

    CD8 T cells play a key role in clearance of mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) from the lung and contribute to virus-induced airway inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that interactions between Fas ligand (FasL) and Fas mediate the antiviral and proinflammatory effects of CD8 T cells. FasL and Fas expression were increased in the lungs of C57BL/6 (B6) mice during MAV-1 respiratory infection. Viral replication and weight loss were similar in B6 and Fas-deficient (lpr) mice. Histological evidence of pulmonary inflammation was similar in B6 and lpr mice, but lung mRNA levels and airway proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were lower in MAV-1-infected lpr mice compared to infected B6 mice. Virus-induced apoptosis in lungs was not affected by Fas deficiency. Our results suggest that the proinflammatory effects of CD8 T cells during MAV-1 infection are mediated in part by Fas activation and are distinct from CD8 T cell antiviral functions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adenovirus vector infection of non-small-cell lung cancer cells is a trigger for multi-drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, Takumi; Kajita, Masahiro; Yano, Kentaro; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette protein involved in cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR). It has been reported that infection with some bacteria and viruses induces changes in the activities of various drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, including P-gp. Although human adenoviruses (Ad) cause the common cold, the effect of Ad infection on MDR in cancer has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether Ad infection is a cause of MDR in A549, H441 and HCC827 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, using an Ad vector system. We found that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cell lines induced P-gp mRNA expression, and the extent of induction was dependent on the number of Ad vector virus particles and the infection time. Heat-treated Ad vector, which is not infectious, did not alter P-gp mRNA expression. Uptake experiments with doxorubicin (DOX), a P-gp substrate, revealed that DOX accumulation was significantly decreased in Ad vector-infected A549 cells. The decrease of DOX uptake was blocked by verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. Our results indicated that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cells caused MDR mediated by P-gp overexpression. The Ad vector genome sequence is similar to that of human Ad, and therefore human Ad infection of lung cancer patients may lead to chemoresistance in the clinical environment. -- Highlights: •Adenovirus vector infection induced P-gp mRNA expression in three NSCLC cell lines. •Adenovirus vector infection enhanced P-gp-mediated doxorubicin efflux from the cells. •The increase of P-gp was not mediated by nuclear receptors (PXR, CAR) or COX-2.

  15. Adenovirus vector infection of non-small-cell lung cancer cells is a trigger for multi-drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomono, Takumi [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-0033 (Japan); Kajita, Masahiro [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-0033 (Japan); Yano, Kentaro [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-0033 (Japan); Ogihara, Takuo, E-mail: togihara@takasaki-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-0033 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette protein involved in cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR). It has been reported that infection with some bacteria and viruses induces changes in the activities of various drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, including P-gp. Although human adenoviruses (Ad) cause the common cold, the effect of Ad infection on MDR in cancer has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether Ad infection is a cause of MDR in A549, H441 and HCC827 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, using an Ad vector system. We found that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cell lines induced P-gp mRNA expression, and the extent of induction was dependent on the number of Ad vector virus particles and the infection time. Heat-treated Ad vector, which is not infectious, did not alter P-gp mRNA expression. Uptake experiments with doxorubicin (DOX), a P-gp substrate, revealed that DOX accumulation was significantly decreased in Ad vector-infected A549 cells. The decrease of DOX uptake was blocked by verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. Our results indicated that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cells caused MDR mediated by P-gp overexpression. The Ad vector genome sequence is similar to that of human Ad, and therefore human Ad infection of lung cancer patients may lead to chemoresistance in the clinical environment. -- Highlights: •Adenovirus vector infection induced P-gp mRNA expression in three NSCLC cell lines. •Adenovirus vector infection enhanced P-gp-mediated doxorubicin efflux from the cells. •The increase of P-gp was not mediated by nuclear receptors (PXR, CAR) or COX-2.

  16. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Eric A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Camacho, Zenaido T. [Department of Cell Biology, Department of Natural Sciences, Western New Mexico University, Silver City, NM 88062 (United States); Hillestad, Matthew L. [Nephrology Training Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J. [Virology and Gene Therapy Graduate Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Mercier, George T. [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Barry, Michael A., E-mail: mab@mayo.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Department of Immunology and Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  17. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5

  18. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  19. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoly Toth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as

  20. Transcellular targeting of fiber- and hexon-modified adenovirus vectors across the brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna P Laakkonen

    Full Text Available In central nervous system (CNS-directed gene therapy, efficient targeting of brain parenchyma through the vascular route is prevented by the endothelium and the epithelium of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, respectively. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of the combined genetic and chemical adenovirus capsid modification technology to enable transcellular delivery of targeted adenovirus (Ad vectors across the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro models. As a proof-of-principle ligand, maleimide-activated full-length human transferrin (hTf was covalently attached to cysteine-modified Ad serotype 5 vectors either to its fiber or hexon protein. In transcytosis experiments, hTf-coupled vectors were shown to be redirected across the BBB models, the transcytosis activity of the vectors being dependent on the location of the capsid modification and the in vitro model used. The transduction efficiency of hTf-targeted vectors decreased significantly in confluent, polarized cells, indicating that the intracellular route of the vectors differed between unpolarized and polarized cells. After transcellular delivery the majority of the hTf-modified vectors remained intact and partly capable of gene transfer. Altogether, our results demonstrate that i covalent attachment of a ligand to Ad capsid can mediate transcellular targeting across the cerebral endothelium in vitro, ii the attachment site of the ligand influences its transcytosis efficiency and iii combined genetic/chemical modification of Ad vector can be used as a versatile platform for the development of Ad vectors for transcellular targeting.

  1. Derivation of a triple mosaic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhe Tang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A safe and efficacious cancer medicine is necessary due to the increasing population of cancer patients whose particular diseases cannot be cured by the currently available treatment. Adenoviral (Ad vectors represent a promising therapeutic medicine for human cancer therapy. However, several improvements are needed in order for Ad vectors to be effective cancer therapeutics, which include, but are not limited to, improvement of cellular uptake, enhanced cancer cell killing activity, and the capability of vector visualization and tracking once injected into the patients. To this end, we attempted to develop an Ad as a multifunctional platform incorporating targeting, imaging, and therapeutic motifs. In this study, we explored the utility of this proposed platform by generating an Ad vector containing the poly-lysine (pK, the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK, and the monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1 as targeting, tumor cell killing, and imaging motifs, respectively. Our study herein demonstrates the generation of the triple mosaic Ad vector with pK, HSV-1 TK, and mRFP1 at the carboxyl termini of Ad minor capsid protein IX (pIX. In addition, the functionalities of pK, HSV-1 TK, and mRFP1 proteins on the Ad vector were retained as confirmed by corresponding functional assays, indicating the potential multifunctional application of this new Ad vector for cancer gene therapy. The validation of the triple mosaic Ad vectors also argues for the ability of pIX modification as a base for the development of multifunctional Ad vectors.

  2. Interspecies differences in virus uptake versus cardiac function of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freiberg, F.; Sauter, M.; Pinkert, S.; Govindarajan, T.; Kaldrack, J.; Thakkar, M.; Fechner, H.; Klingel, K.; Gotthardt, M.

    2014-01-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell contact protein with an important role in virus uptake. Its extracellular immunoglobulin domains mediate the binding to coxsackievirus and adenovirus as well as homophilic and heterophilic interactions between cells. The cytoplasmic tail

  3. Soluble TGF-β type II receptor gene therapy reduces TGF-β activity in irradiated lung tissue and protects lungs from radiation-induced injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Z.; Rabbani, Z.; Zhang, X.; Samulski, T.V.; Li, C.-Y.; Anscher, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The objective was to determine whether administration of recombinant human adenoviral vector carrying soluble TGF-β1 type II receptor (TβR-II) gene reduces availability of active TGFβ1 and protects lung from radiation-induced injury. Female Fisher-344 rats were randomized into four groups to receive: 1) Control 2) Adenoviral green fluorescent protein vector (AdGFP) alone 3) Radiation (RT) + Adenoviral vector with TGF-β1 type II receptor gene (AdexTβR-II-Fc) 4) RT alone. Animals were irradiated to right hemithorax using a single dose of 30 Gy. The packaging and production of a recombinant adenovirus carrying the fused human TβR-II-IgG1 Fc gene was achieved by use of the AdEasy system. The treatment vector AdexTbR-II-Fc (1.5*1010 PFU) and control vector AdGFP (1*109 PFU) were injected i.v. 24 hrs after RT. Respiratory rate was measured as an index of pulmonary function weekly for 5 weeks post RT. Structural damage was scored histologically. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify activated macrophages. ELISA was used to quantify active TGF-β1 in tissue homogenate. Western blot was used to determine TβR-II expression in plasma and lung tissue. Animals receiving treatment vector AdexTbR-II-Fc have elevated plasma levels of soluble TβR-II at 24 and 48 hours after injection. In the RT+AdexTbR-II-Fc group, there was a significant reduction in respiratory rate (p = 0.002) at four weeks after treatment compared to RT alone group. Histology revealed a significant reduction in lung structural damage in animals receiving gene therapy after RT vs RT alone (p=0.0013). There was also a decrease in the number of activated macrophage (p= 0.02) in RT+AdexTbR-II-Fc group vs RT alone. The tissue protein expression of active TGF-β1 was significantly reduced in rats receiving RT+AdexTbR-II-Fc treatment (p<0.05). This study shows the ability of adenovirus mediated soluble TβR-II gene therapy to reduce tissue levels of active TGF-β1 and ameliorate radiation

  4. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  5. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  6. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Willecke

    Full Text Available We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/- mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR. After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD, showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states.

  7. Cytotoxic effects of replication-competent adenoviruses on human esophageal carcinoma are enhanced by forced p53 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shan; Kawamura, Kiyoko; Okamoto, Shinya; Yamauchi, Suguru; Shingyoji, Masato; Sekine, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Tada, Yuji; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Shimada, Hideaki; Tagawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of transduction and augmentation of cytotoxicity are crucial for adenoviruses (Ad)-mediated gene therapy for cancer. Down-regulated expression of type 5 Ad (Ad5) receptors on human tumors hampered Ad-mediated transduction. Furthermore, a role of the p53 pathways in cytotoxicity mediated by replication-competent Ad remained uncharacterized. We constructed replication-competent Ad5 of which the E1 region genes were activated by a transcriptional regulatory region of the midkine or the survivin gene, which is expressed preferentially in human tumors. We also prepared replication-competent Ad5 which were regulated by the same region but had a fiber-knob region derived from serotype 35 (AdF35). We examined the cytotoxicity of these Ad and a possible combinatory use of the replication-competent AdF35 and Ad5 expressing the wild-type p53 gene (Ad5/p53) in esophageal carcinoma cells. Expression levels of molecules involved in cell death, anti-tumor effects in vivo and production of viral progenies were also investigated. Replication-competent AdF35 in general achieved greater cytotoxic effects to esophageal carcinoma cells than the corresponding replication-competent Ad5. Infection with the AdF35 induced cleavages of caspases and increased sub-G1 fractions, but did not activate the autophagy pathway. Transduction with Ad5/p53 in combination with the replication-competent AdF35 further enhanced the cytotoxicity in a synergistic manner. We also demonstrated the combinatory effects in an animal model. Transduction with Ad5/p53 however suppressed production of replication-competent AdF35 progenies, but the combination augmented Ad5/p53-mediated p53 expression levels and the downstream pathways. Combination of replication-competent AdF35 and Ad5/p53 achieved synergistic cytotoxicity due to enhanced p53-mediated apoptotic pathways. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1482-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized

  8. Intrahepatic injection of adenovirus reduces inflammation and increases gene transfer and therapeutic effect in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Crettaz, J. (Julien); Berraondo, P. (Pedro); Mauleon, I. (Itsaso); Ochoa, L. (Laura); Shankar, V. (Vijay); Barajas, M. (Miguel); Rooijen, N. (Nico) van; Kochanek, S. (Stefan); Qian, C. (Cheng); Prieto, J. (Jesús); Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, G. (Gloria)

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses (Ad) are among the most extensively used vectors for liver gene transfer. One of the major limitations for the clinical application of these vectors is the inflammatory immune response associated with systemic administration of high dose of virus. We evaluated the effect of Ad administration route on the inflammatory immune response and liver transgene expression. We compared direct intrahepatic injection (IH) with the systemic administration via tail vein (IV). IH in...

  9. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  10. [Gene therapy and cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2005-11-01

    Increasing enthusiasm in the field of stem cell research is raising the hope of novel cell replacement therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), but it also raises both scientific and ethical concerns. In most cases, dopaminergic cells are transplanted ectopically into the striatum instead of the substantia nigra. If the main mechanism underlying any observed functional recovery with these cell replacement therapies is restoration of dopaminergic neurotransmission, then viral vector-mediated gene delivery of dopamine-synthesizing enzymes is a more straight forward approach. The development of a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is making gene therapy for PD a feasible therapeutic option in the clinical arena. Efficient and long-term expression of genes for dopamine-synthesizing enzymes in the striatum restored local dopamine production and allowed behavioral recovery in animal models of PD. A clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, an enzyme that converts L-dopa to dopamine, is underway. With this strategy patients would still need to take L-dopa to control their PD symptoms, however, dopamine production could be regulated by altering the dose of L-dopa. Another AAV vector-based clinical trial is also ongoing in which the subthalamic nucleus is transduced to produce inhibitory transmitters.

  11. Gene transfection mediated by polyethyleneimine-polyethylene glycol nanocarrier prevents cisplatin-induced spiral ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-gui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethyleneimine-polyethylene glycol (PEI-PEG, a novel nanocarrier, has been used for transfection and gene therapy in a variety of cells. In our previous study, we successfully carried out PEI-PEG-mediated gene transfer in spiral ganglion cells. It remains unclear whether PEI-PEG could be used for gene therapy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP in the inner ear. In the present study, we performed PEI-PEG-mediated XIAP gene transfection in the cochlea of Sprague-Dawley rats, via scala tympani fenestration, before daily cisplatin injections. Auditory brainstem reflex tests demonstrated the protective effects of XIAP gene therapy on auditory function. Immunohistochemical staining revealed XIAP protein expression in the cytoplasm of cells in the spiral ganglion, the organ of Corti and the stria vascularis. Reverse transcription-PCR detected high levels of XIAP mRNA expression in the cochlea. The present findings suggest that PEI-PEG nanocarrier-mediated XIAP gene transfection results in XIAP expression in the cochlea, prevents damage to cochlear spiral ganglion cells, and protects hearing.

  12. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  13. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells are efficiently transduced with adenoviruses bearing type 35-derived fibers and the transduced cells with the IL-28A gene produces cytotoxicity to lung carcinoma cells co-cultured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Kawamura, Kiyoko; Li, Quanhai; Okamoto, Shinya; Tada, Yuji; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Shimada, Hideaki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Tagawa, Masatoshi

    2014-09-25

    Transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with type 5 adenoviruses (Ad5) is limited in the efficacy because of the poor expression level of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) molecules. We examined a possible improvement of Ad-mediated gene transfer in MSCs by substituting the fiber region of type 5 Ad with that of type 35 Ad. Expression levels of CAR and CD46 molecules, which are the major receptors for type 5 and type 35 Ad, respectively, were assayed with flow cytometry. We constructed vectors expressing the green fluorescent protein gene with Ad5 or modified Ad5 bearing the type 35 fiber region (AdF35), and examined the infectivity to MSCs with flow cytometry. We investigated anti-tumor effects of MSCs transduced with interleukin (IL)-28A gene on human lung carcinoma cells with a colorimetric assay. Expression of IL-28A receptors was tested with the polymerase chain reaction. A promoter activity of transcriptional regulatory regions in MSCs was determined with a luciferase assay and a tumor growth-promoting ability of MSCs was tested with co-injection of human tumor cells in nude mice. MSCs expressed CD46 but scarcely CAR molecules, and subsequently were transduced with AdF35 but not with Ad5. Growth of MSCs transduced with the IL-28A gene remained the same as that of untransduced cells since MSCs were negative for the IL-28A receptors. The IL-28A-transduced MSCs however suppressed growth of lung carcinoma cells co-cultured, whereas MSCs transduced with AdF35 expressing the β-galactosidase gene did not. A regulatory region of the cyclooygenase-2 gene possessed transcriptional activities greater than other tumor promoters but less than the cytomegalovirus promoter, and MSCs themselves did not support tumor growth in vivo. AdF35 is a suitable vector to transduce MSCs that are resistant to Ad5-mediated gene transfer. MSCs infected with AdF35 that activate an exogenous gene by the cytomegalovirus promoter can be a vehicle to deliver the gene product

  15. Adenovirus Vector-Derived VA-RNA-Mediated Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Mizuguchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The major limitation of the clinical use of replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad vectors is the interference by innate immune responses, including induction of inflammatory cytokines and interferons (IFN, following in vivo application of Ad vectors. Ad vector-induced production of inflammatory cytokines and IFNs also results in severe organ damage and efficient induction of acquired immune responses against Ad proteins and transgene products. Ad vector-induced innate immune responses are triggered by the recognition of Ad components by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. In order to reduce the side effects by Ad vector-induced innate immune responses and to develop safer Ad vectors, it is crucial to clarify which PRRs and which Ad components are involved in Ad vector-induced innate immune responses. Our group previously demonstrated that myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88 and toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 play crucial roles in the Ad vector-induced inflammatory cytokine production in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Furthermore, our group recently found that virus associated-RNAs (VA-RNAs, which are about 160 nucleotide-long non-coding small RNAs encoded in the Ad genome, are involved in IFN production through the IFN-β promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1-mediated signaling pathway following Ad vector transduction. The aim of this review is to highlight the Ad vector-induced innate immune responses following transduction, especially VA-RNA-mediated innate immune responses. Our findings on the mechanism of Ad vector-induced innate immune responses should make an important contribution to the development of safer Ad vectors, such as an Ad vector lacking expression of VA-RNAs.

  16. Advances in ultrasound-targeted microbubble-mediated gene therapy for liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cuiyuan; Zhang, Hong; Bai, Ruidan

    2017-07-01

    Hepatic fibrosis develops as a wound-healing scar in response to acute and chronic liver inflammation and can lead to cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. The condition arises due to increased synthesis and reduced degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and is a common pathological sequela of chronic liver disease. Excessive deposition of ECM in the liver causes liver dysfunction, ascites, and eventually upper gastrointestinal bleeding as well as a series of complications. However, fibrosis can be reversed before developing into cirrhosis and has thus been the subject of extensive researches particularly at the gene level. Currently, therapeutic genes are imported into the damaged liver to delay or prevent the development of liver fibrosis by regulating the expression of exogenous genes. One technique of gene delivery uses ultrasound targeting of microbubbles combined with therapeutic genes where the time and intensity of the ultrasound can control the release process. Ultrasound irradiation of microbubbles in the vicinity of cells changes the permeability of the cell membrane by its cavitation effect and enhances gene transfection. In this paper, recent progress in the field is reviewed with emphasis on the following aspects: the types of ultrasound microbubbles, the construction of an ultrasound-mediated gene delivery system, the mechanism of ultrasound microbubble-mediated gene transfer and the application of ultrasound microbubbles in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  17. Advances in ultrasound-targeted microbubble-mediated gene therapy for liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiyuan Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis develops as a wound-healing scar in response to acute and chronic liver inflammation and can lead to cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. The condition arises due to increased synthesis and reduced degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM and is a common pathological sequela of chronic liver disease. Excessive deposition of ECM in the liver causes liver dysfunction, ascites, and eventually upper gastrointestinal bleeding as well as a series of complications. However, fibrosis can be reversed before developing into cirrhosis and has thus been the subject of extensive researches particularly at the gene level. Currently, therapeutic genes are imported into the damaged liver to delay or prevent the development of liver fibrosis by regulating the expression of exogenous genes. One technique of gene delivery uses ultrasound targeting of microbubbles combined with therapeutic genes where the time and intensity of the ultrasound can control the release process. Ultrasound irradiation of microbubbles in the vicinity of cells changes the permeability of the cell membrane by its cavitation effect and enhances gene transfection. In this paper, recent progress in the field is reviewed with emphasis on the following aspects: the types of ultrasound microbubbles, the construction of an ultrasound-mediated gene delivery system, the mechanism of ultrasound microbubble–mediated gene transfer and the application of ultrasound microbubbles in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  18. HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Maura; Cavarelli, Mariangela; Gregori, Silvia; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LV) have the potential to mediate stable therapeutic gene transfer. However, similarly to other viral vectors, their benefit is compromised by the induction of an immune response toward transgene-expressing cells that closely mimics antiviral immunity. LV share with the parental HIV the ability to activate dendritic cells (DC), while lack the peculiar ability of subverting DC functions, which is responsible for HIV immune escape. Understanding the interaction between LV and DC, with plasmacytoid and myeloid DC playing fundamental and distinct roles, has paved the way to novel approaches aimed at regulating transgene-specific immune responses. Thanks to the ability to target either DC subsets LV might be a powerful tool to induce immunity (i.e., gene therapy of cancer), cell death (i.e., in HIV/AIDS infection), or tolerance (i.e., gene therapy strategies for monogenic diseases). In this chapter, similarities and differences between the LV-mediated and HIV-mediated induction of immune responses, with specific focus on their interactions with DC, are discussed.

  19. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  20. Efficacy of combining ING4 and TRAIL genes in cancer-targeting gene virotherapy strategy: first evidence in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal El-Shemi, A; Mohammed Ashshi, A; Oh, E; Jung, B-K; Basalamah, M; Alsaegh, A; Yun, C-O

    2018-01-01

    Current treatments of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are ineffective and unsatisfactory in many aspects. Cancer-targeting gene virotherapy using oncolytic adenoviruses (OAds) armed with anticancer genes has shown efficacy and safety in clinical trials. Nowadays, both inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), as a multimodal tumor suppressor gene, and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), as a potent apoptosis-inducing gene, are experiencing a renaissance in cancer gene therapy. Herein we investigated the antitumor activity and safety of mono- and combined therapy with OAds armed with ING4 (Ad-ΔB/ING4) and TRAIL (Ad-ΔB/TRAIL) gene, respectively, on preclinical models of human HCC. OAd-mediated expression of ING4 or TRAIL transgene was confirmed. Ad-ΔB/TRAIL and/or Ad-ΔB/ING4 exhibited potent killing effect on human HCC cells (HuH7 and Hep3B) but not on normal liver cells. Most importantly, systemic therapy with Ad-ΔB/ING4 plus Ad-ΔB/TRAIL elicited more eradicative effect on an orthotopic mouse model of human HCC than their monotherapy, without causing obvious overlapping toxicity. Mechanistically, Ad-ΔB/ING4 and Ad-ΔB/TRAIL were remarkably cooperated to induce antitumor apoptosis and immune response, and to repress tumor angiogenesis. This is the first study showing that concomitant therapy with Ad-ΔB/ING4 and Ad-ΔB/TRAIL may provide a potential strategy for HCC therapy and merits further investigations to realize its possible clinical translation.

  1. Immunogenicity and efficacy in mice of an adenovirus-based bicistronic rotavirus vaccine expressing NSP4 and VP7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li; Yan, Min; Wang, Xiaonan; Ye, Jing; Mi, Kai; Yan, Shanshan; Niu, Xianglian; Li, Hongjun; Sun, Maosheng

    2015-12-02

    NSP4 and VP7 are important functional proteins of rotavirus. Proper combination of viral gene expression is favorable to improving the protection effect of subunit vaccine. In the present study, We evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of the bicistronic recombinant adenovirus (rAd-NSP4-VP7) and two single-gene expressing adenoviruses (rAd-NSP4, rAd-VP7). The three adenovirus vaccines were used to immunize mice by intramuscular or intranasal administration. The data showed significant increases in serum antibodies, T lymphocyte subpopulations proliferation, and cytokine secretions of splenocyte in all immunized groups. However, the serum IgA and neutralizing antibody levels of the rAd-NSP4-VP7 or rAd-VP7 groups were significantly higher than those of the rAd-NSP4, while the splenocyte numbers of IFN-γ secretion in the rAd-NSP4-VP7 or rAd-NSP4 groups was greater than that of the rAd-VP7. Furthermore, the efficacy evaluation in a suckling mice model indicated that only rAd-NSP4-VP7 conferred significant protection against rotavirus shedding challenge. These results suggest that the co-expression of NSP4 and VP7 in an adenovirus vector induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses efficiently, and provide potential efficacy for protection against rotavirus disease. It is possible to represent an efficacious subunits vaccine strategy for control of rotavirus infection and transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Baculovirus-mediated gene transfer and recombinant protein expression do not interfere with insulin dependent phosphorylation of PKB/Akt in human SHSY-5Y and C3A cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selander Martin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant adenovirus vectors and transfection agents comprising cationic lipids are widely used as gene delivery vehicles for functional expression in cultured cells. Consequently, these tools are utilized to investigate the effects of functional over-expression of proteins on insulin mediated events. However, we have previously reported that cationic lipid reagents cause a state of insulin unresponsiveness in cell cultures. In addition, we have found that cultured cells often do not respond to insulin stimulation following adenovirus treatment. Infection with adenovirus compromises vital functions of the host cell leading to the activation of protein kinases central to insulin signalling, such as protein kinase B/Akt. Therefore, we investigated the effect of adenovirus infection on insulin unresponsiveness by means of Akt activation in cultured cells. Moreover, we investigated the use of baculovirus as a heterologous viral gene delivery vehicle to circumvent these phenomena. Since the finding that baculovirus can efficiently transduce mammalian cells, the applications of this viral system in gene delivery has greatly expanded and one advantage is the virtual absence of cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Results We show that infection of human neuroblastoma SHSY-5Y and liver C3A cells with recombinant adenovirus results in the activation of Akt in a dose dependent manner. In addition, this activation makes treated cells unresponsive to insulin stimulation as determined by an apparent lack of differential phosphorylation of Akt on serine-473. Our data further indicate that the use of recombinant baculovirus does not increase the phosphorylation of Akt in SHSY-5Y and C3A cells. Moreover, following infection with baculovirus, SHSY-5Y and C3A cells respond to insulin by means of phosphorylation of Akt on serine-473 in the same manner as uninfected cells. Conclusion Widely-used adenovirus vectors for gene delivery cause a state of

  3. Field distribution and DNA transport in solid tumors during electric field-mediated gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, Joshua W; Yuan, Fan

    2008-02-01

    Gene therapy has a great potential in cancer treatment. However, the efficacy of cancer gene therapy is currently limited by the lack of a safe and efficient means to deliver therapeutic genes into the nucleus of tumor cells. One method under investigation for improving local gene delivery is based on the use of pulsed electric field. Despite repeated demonstration of its effectiveness in vivo, the underlying mechanisms behind electric field-mediated gene delivery remain largely unknown. Without a thorough understanding of these mechanisms, it will be difficult to further advance the gene delivery. In this review, the electric field-mediated gene delivery in solid tumors will be examined by following individual transport processes that must occur in vivo for a successful gene transfer. The topics of examination include: (i) major barriers for gene delivery in the body, (ii) distribution of electric fields at both cell and tissue levels during the application of external fields, and (iii) electric field-induced transport of genes across each of the barriers. Through this approach, the review summarizes what is known about the mechanisms behind electric field-mediated gene delivery and what require further investigations in future studies.

  4. Detection and Analysis of Six Lizard Adenoviruses by Consensus Primer PCR Provides Further Evidence of a Reptilian Origin for the Atadenoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Wellehan, James F. X.; Johnson, April J.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Garner, Michael M.; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2004-01-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phyloge...

  5. Measurement of feline cytokines interleukin-12 and interferon- g produced by heat inducible gene therapy adenoviral vector using real time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, F.; Avery, P.R.; Ullrich, R.L.; LaRue, S.M.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Li, C.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    Biologic tumor therapy using Interleukin-12 (IL-12) has shown promise as an adjuvant to radiation therapy. The goals for cancer gene immunotherapy include effective eradication of established tumors and generation of a lasting systemic immune response. Among the cytokines, IL-12 has been found to be most effective gene in eradicating experimental tumors, preventing the development of metastases, and eliciting long-term antitumor immunity. Depending on the tumor model, IL-12 can exert antitumor activities via T cells, NK cells or NKT cells. It induces the production of IFN-g and IFN-inducible protein-10. It is also postulated to have antiangiogenic effects, thus inhibiting tumor formation and metastases. However, its use in clinical trials has been restricted largely owing to its systemic hematologic and hepatotoxicity. We tested the efficacy of adenovirus mediated expression of feline IL-12 gene placed under the control of an inducible promoter, the heat shock proteins (hsp70B). This places gene expression under the control of an external physical agent (hyperthermia), thus offering an 'on-off' switch and potentially reducing systemic toxicity by restricting its expression locally to the tumor. Crandell Feline Kidney (CrFK) cells were infected using the construct and the supernatant was then used to stimulate production of interferon g (IFN-g) in feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As there is no commercially available ELISA kit currently available to detect or measure feline cytokines, we used real time-PCR to measure cytokine mRNA. These results will be used to initiate a clinical trial in cats with soft tissue sarcomas examining hyperthermia Induced gene therapy in conjunction with radiation therapy. The real time- PCR techniques developed here will be used to quantitatively measure cytokine mRNA levels in the punch biopsy samples obtained from the cats during the clinical trial. Support for this study was in part by NCI grant CA72745

  6. Expression of PKA inhibitor (PKI) gene abolishes cAMP-mediated protection to endothelial barrier dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, H; Jaffe, H A; Schulz, I T; Masood, A; RayChaudhury, A; Green, R D

    1999-09-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) protects against endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to proinflammatory mediators. An E1-, E3-, replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vector was constructed containing the complete sequence of PKA inhibitor (PKI) gene (AdPKI). Infection of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) with AdPKI resulted in overexpression of PKI. Treatment with 0.5 microM thrombin increased transendothelial albumin clearance rate (0.012 +/- 0.003 and 0.035 +/- 0.005 microl/min for control and thrombin, respectively); the increase was prevented with forskolin + 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (F + I) treatment. Overexpression of PKI resulted in abrogation of the F + I-induced inhibition of the permeability increase. However, with HMEC infected with ultraviolet-inactivated AdPKI, the F + I-induced inhibition was present. Also, F + I treatment of HMEC transfected with reporter plasmid containing the cAMP response element-directed transcription of the luciferase gene resulted in an almost threefold increase in luciferase activity. Overexpression of PKI inhibited this induction of luciferase activity. The results show that Ad-mediated overexpression of PKI in endothelial cells abrogated the cAMP-mediated protection against increased endothelial permeability, providing direct evidence that cAMP-dependent protein kinase promotes endothelial barrier function.

  7. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A. [Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges [CHU Hotel Dieu, INSERM, Nantes (France); CHU de Nantes, Institut des Maladies de l' Appareil Digestif, Nantes (France); Martin-Duque, Pilar [Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza (Spain); Vieja, Antonio de la [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Madrid (Spain); Briat, Arnaud [INSERM U877, Grenoble (France); Harrington, Kevin J. [Chester Beatty Laboratories, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A.; Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges; Martin-Duque, Pilar; Vieja, Antonio de la; Briat, Arnaud; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  9. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2007-01-01

    ...) to achieve efficient and selective gene transfer to target tumor cells. Proposed herein is a strategy to modify one candidate vector, recombinant adenovirus, such that it embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity...

  10. A rapid generation of adenovirus vector with a genetic modification in hexon protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Bingyan; Mao, Qinwen; Zhao, Junli; Li, Xing; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin

    2012-02-10

    The generation of hexon-modified adenovirus vector has proven difficult. In this paper, we developed a novel method for rapid generation of hexon-modified adenoviral vector via one step ligation in vitro followed by quick white/blue color screening. The new system has the following features. First, eGFP expression driven by the CMV promoter in E1 region functions as a reporter to evaluate the tropism of hexon-modified adenovirus in vitro. Second, it has two unique restriction enzyme sites with sticky ends located in the hexon HVR5 region. Third, a lacZ expression cassette under the control of plac promoter is placed between the two restriction enzyme sites, which allows recombinants to be selected using blue/white screening. To prove the principle of the method, genetically modified adenoviruses were successfully produced by insertion of NGR, RGD or Tat PTD peptide into hexon HVR5. Furthermore, the transduction efficiency of the Tat PTD modified virus was shown to be a significant enhancement in A172 and CHO-K1 cells. In conclusion, the novel system makes the production of truly retargeted vectors more promising, which would be of substantial benefit for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adenovirus vector-mediated ex vivo gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) tohuman umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) promotescrush-injured rat sciatic nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Wei-Hong; Almansoori, Akram A; Sung, Mi-Ae; Ju, Kyung-Won; Seo, Nari; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Bong-Ju; Kim, Soung-Min; Jahng, Jeong Won; He, Hong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-03-16

    This study was designed toinvestigate the efficacy of adenovirus vector-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) ex vivo gene transfer to human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) in a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. BDNF protein and mRNA expression after infection was checked through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250g, 6 weeks old) were distributed into threegroups (n=20 each): the control group, UCB-MSC group, and BDNF-adenovirus infected UCB-MSC (BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC) group. UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat) or BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat)were transplantedinto the rats at the crush site immediately after sciatic nerve injury. Cell tracking was done with PKH26-labeled UCB-MSCs and BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat). The rats were monitored for 4 weeks post-surgery. Results showed that expression of BDNF at both the protein and mRNA levels was higher inthe BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC group compared to theUCB-MSC group in vitro.Moreover, BDNF mRNA expression was higher in both UCB-MSC group and BDNF-Ad+ UCB-MSC group compared tothe control group, and BDNF mRNA expression in theBDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC group was higher than inboth other groups 5days after surgeryin vivo. Labeled neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), axon counts, axon density, and sciatic function index were significantly increased in the UCB-MSC and BDNF-Ad+ UCB-MSCgroupscompared to the controlgroup four weeksaftercell transplantation. Importantly,the BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCgroup exhibited more peripheral nerve regeneration than the other two groups.Our results indicate thatboth UCB-MSCs and BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCscan improve rat sciatic nerve regeneration, with BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCsshowing a greater effectthan UCB-MSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E.; Leeuwen, M. van; Boheemen, S. van; Jong, A.A.W. de; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L.; Kuiken, T.

    2013-01-01

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls

  13. Evaluation of helper-dependent canine adenovirus vectors in a 3D human CNS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Daniel; Pinto, Catarina; Fernandes, Paulo; Peddie, Christopher J.; Piersanti, Stefania; Collinson, Lucy M.; Salinas, Sara; Saggio, Isabella; Schiavo, Giampietro; Kremer, Eric J.; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M.

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach with enormous potential for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Viral vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) present attractive features for gene delivery strategies in the human brain, by preferentially transducing neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent brain structures, have a 30-kb cloning capacity and have low innate and induced immunogenicity in pre-clinical tests. For clinical translation, in-depth pre-clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety in a human setting is primordial. Stem cell-derived human neural cells have a great potential as complementary tools by bridging the gap between animal models, which often diverge considerably from human phenotype, and clinical trials. Herein, we explore helper-dependent CAV-2 (hd-CAV-2) efficacy and safety for gene delivery in a human stem cell-derived 3D neural in vitro model. Assessment of hd-CAV-2 vector efficacy was performed at different multiplicities of infection, by evaluating transgene expression and impact on cell viability, ultrastructural cellular organization and neuronal gene expression. Under optimized conditions, hd-CAV-2 transduction led to stable long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity. hd-CAV-2 preferentially transduced neurons, while human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) showed increased tropism towards glial cells. This work demonstrates, in a physiologically relevant 3D model, that hd-CAV-2 vectors are efficient tools for gene delivery to human neurons, with stable long-term transgene expression and minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:26181626

  14. Eradication of melanoma in vitro and in vivo via targeting with a Killer-Red-containing telomerase-dependent adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Kiyoto; Yano, Shuya; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Narii, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-08-18

    Melanoma is a highly recalcitrant cancer and transformative therapy is necessary for the cure of this disease. We recently developed a telomerase-dependent adenovirus containing the fluorescent protein Killer-Red. In the present report, we first determined the efficacy of Killer-Red adenovirus combined with laser irradiation on human melanoma cell lines in vitro. Cell viability of human melanoma cells was reduced in a dose-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. We used an intradermal xenografted melanoma model in nude mice to determine efficacy of the Killer-Red adenovirus. Intratumoral injection of Killer-Red adenovirus, combined with laser irradiation, eradicated the melanoma indicating the potential of a new paradigm of cancer therapy.

  15. Analysis of the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruzynski, Anna; Glimm, Hanno; Schmidt, Manfred; Kalle, Christof von

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy-based clinical phase I/II studies using integrating retroviral vectors could successfully treat different monogenetic inherited diseases. However, with increased efficiency of this therapy, severe side effects occurred in various gene therapy trials. In all cases, integration of the vector close to or within a proto-oncogene contributed substantially to the development of the malignancies. Thus, the in-depth analysis of integration site patterns is of high importance to uncover potential clonal outgrowth and to assess the safety of gene transfer vectors and gene therapy protocols. The standard and nonrestrictive linear amplification-mediated PCR (nrLAM-PCR) in combination with high-throughput sequencing exhibits technologies that allow to comprehensively analyze the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells and to assess the safety of the used vector system at an early stage on the molecular level. It enables clarifying the biological consequences of the vector system on the fate of the transduced cell. Furthermore, the downstream performance of real-time PCR allows a quantitative estimation of the clonality of individual cells and their clonal progeny. Here, we present a guideline that should allow researchers to perform comprehensive integration site analysis in preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Plant thymidine kinase 1: a novel efficient suicide gene for malignant glioma therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Z.; Knecht, Wolfgang; Willer, Mette

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis for malignant gliomas remains poor, and new treatments are urgently needed. Targeted suicide gene therapy exploits the enzymatic conversion of a prodrug, such as a nucleoside analog, into a cytotoxic compound. Although this therapeutic strategy has been considered a promising regimen...... suicide gene therapy system in combination with stem cell mediated gene delivery promises new treatment of malignant gliomas....

  17. Detection and analysis of six lizard adenoviruses by consensus primer PCR provides further evidence of a reptilian origin for the atadenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P; Johnson, Calvin M; Garner, Michael M; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2004-12-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses.

  18. Adenoviral delivery of pan-caspase inhibitor p35 enhances bystander killing by P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy using cyclophosphamide+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doloff, Joshua C; Su, Ting; Waxman, David J

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrome P450-based suicide gene therapy for cancer using prodrugs such as cyclophosphamide (CPA) increases anti-tumor activity, both directly and via a bystander killing mechanism. Bystander cell killing is essential for the clinical success of this treatment strategy, given the difficulty of achieving 100% efficient gene delivery in vivo using current technologies. Previous studies have shown that the pan-caspase inhibitor p35 significantly increases CPA-induced bystander killing by tumor cells that stably express P450 enzyme CYP2B6 (Schwartz et al, (2002) Cancer Res. 62: 6928-37). To further develop this approach, we constructed and characterized a replication-defective adenovirus, Adeno-2B6/p35, which expresses p35 in combination with CYP2B6 and its electron transfer partner, P450 reductase. The expression of p35 in Adeno-2B6/p35-infected tumor cells inhibited caspase activation, delaying the death of the CYP2B6 'factory' cells that produce active CPA metabolites, and increased bystander tumor cell killing compared to that achieved in the absence of p35. Tumor cells infected with Adeno-2B6/p35 were readily killed by cisplatin and doxorubicin, indicating that p35 expression is not associated with acquisition of general drug resistance. Finally, p35 did not inhibit viral release when the replication-competent adenovirus ONYX-017 was used as a helper virus to facilitate co-replication and spread of Adeno-2B6/p35 and further increase CPA-induced bystander cell killing. The introduction of p35 into gene therapeutic regimens constitutes an effective approach to increase bystander killing by cytochrome P450 gene therapy. This strategy may also be used to enhance other bystander cytotoxic therapies, including those involving the production of tumor cell toxic protein products

  19. Infection with E1B-mutant adenovirus stabilizes p53 but blocks p53 acetylation and activity through E1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savelyeva, I.; Dobbelstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    to the suppression of p21 transcription. Depending on the E1A conserved region 3, E1B-defective adenovirus impaired the ability of the transcription factor Sp1 to bind the p21 promoter. Moreover, the amino terminal region of E1A, binding the acetyl transferases p300 and CREB-binding protein, blocked p53 K382...... accumulation of p53, without obvious defects in p53 localization, phosphorylation, conformation and oligomerization. Nonetheless, p53 completely failed to induce its target genes in this scenario, for example, p21/CDKN1A, Mdm2 and PUMA. Two regions of the E1A gene products independently contributed...... acetylation in infected cells. Mutating either of these E1A regions, in addition to E1B, partially restored p21 mRNA levels. Our findings argue that adenovirus attenuates p53-mediated p21 induction, through at least two E1B-independent mechanisms. Other virus species and cancer cells may employ analogous...

  20. Adenovirus serotype 5 vectors with Tat-PTD modified hexon and serotype 35 fiber show greatly enhanced transduction capacity of primary cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Yu

    Full Text Available Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 vectors represent one of the most efficient gene delivery vectors in life sciences. However, Ad5 is dependent on expression of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus-receptor (CAR on the surface of target cell for efficient transduction, which limits it's utility for certain cell types. Herein we present a new vector, Ad5PTDf35, which is an Ad5 vector having serotype 35 fiber-specificity and Tat-PTD hexon-modification. This vector shows dramatically increased transduction capacity of primary human cell cultures including T cells, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, pancreatic islets and exocrine cells, mesenchymal stem cells and tumor initiating cells. Biodistribution in mice following systemic administration (tail-vein injection show significantly reduced uptake in the liver and spleen of Ad5PTDf35 compared to unmodified Ad5. Therefore, replication-competent viruses with these modifications may be further developed as oncolytic agents for cancer therapy. User-friendly backbone plasmids containing these modifications were developed for compatibility to the AdEasy-system to facilitate the development of surface-modified adenoviruses for gene delivery to difficult-to-transduce cells in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research.

  1. Species D human adenovirus type 9 exhibits better virus-spread ability for antitumor efficacy among alternative serotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Uchino

    Full Text Available Species C human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-C5 is widely used as a vector for cancer gene therapy, because it efficiently transduces target cells. A variety of HAdV-C5 vectors have been developed and tested in vitro and in vivo for cancer gene therapy. While clinical trials with HAdV-C5 vectors resulted in effective responses in many cancer patients, administration of HAdV-C5 vectors to solid tumors showed responses in a limited area. A biological barrier in tumor mass is considered to hinder viral spread of HAdV-C5 vectors from infected cells. Therefore, efficient virus-spread from an infected tumor cell to surrounding tumor cells is required for successful cancer gene therapy. In this study, we compared HAdV-C5 to sixteen other HAdV serotypes selected from species A to G for virus-spread ability in vitro. HAdV-D9 showed better virus-spread ability than other serotypes, and its viral progeny were efficiently released from infected cells during viral replication. Although the HAdV-D9 fiber protein contains a binding site for coxsackie B virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, HAdV-D9 showed expanded tropism for infection due to human CAR (hCAR-independent attachment to target cells. HAdV-D9 infection effectively killed hCAR-negative cancer cells as well as hCAR-positive cancer cells. These results suggest that HADV-D9, with its better virus-spread ability, could have improved therapeutic efficacy in solid tumors compared to HAdV-C5.

  2. Experimental study on the effects of recombinant adenoviral-mediated mIκBα gene combined with irradiation on the treatment of hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kejun; Li Dechun; Zhu Dongming; Song Caixia

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of recombinant adenovirus vector mediated mutant IκBα (mIκBα) combined with radiation on the hepatocarcinoma. Methods: Limited dilution method was used to test the virus titer in 293 cells. The HCC9204 cells were infected with MOI 10,20,30 and 50 for 48 h, respectively. The expression of p65 and mIκBα protein was analyzed by Western blot. Transfected HCC9204 cells and controls were treated with 4 Gy γ rays. The inhibition rate of HCC9204 cells was examined by MTT. Rat models of HCC9204 was constructed. AdmIκBα plasmids were injected into tumor tissue and the tumors were administered with 6 Gy γ irradiation 48 hours later. Tumor growth at different time points was recorded during 28 days. Results: The titer of AdmIκBΑ is 1.252 x 10 9 pfu/ml. The expression of mIκBα protein was increased with titer of AdmIκBα, and p65 protein began to decrease when MOI was 10, and reached the lowest when MOI was 50, they were all dose-dependent. The proliferation of HCC9204 cell lines were suppressed, as was more significant combined with radiation, and the effect was in a viral dose-dependent manner. From days 7 to 28 after AdmIκBα gene and radiotherapy, the tumor growth was significantly slower than after irradiation or gene therapy alone. Conclusions: Recombinant adenoviral-mediated mIκBα gene, combined with irradiation, can increase the cell-killing effect. It is better than that of either one alone. (authors)

  3. Genetic incorporation of the protein transduction domain of Tat into Ad5 fiber enhances gene transfer efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegal Gene P

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 has been widely explored as a gene delivery vector for a variety of diseases. Many target cells, however, express low levels of Ad5 native receptor, the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR, and thus are resistant to Ad5 infection. The Protein Transduction Domain of the HIV Tat protein, namely PTDtat, has been shown to mediate protein transduction in a wide range of cells. We hypothesize that re-targeting Ad5 vector via the PTDtat motif would improve the efficacy of Ad5-mediated gene delivery. Results In this study, we genetically incorporated the PTDtat motif into the knob domain of Ad5 fiber, and rescued the resultant viral vector, Ad5.PTDtat. Our data showed the modification did not interfere with Ad5 binding to its native receptor CAR, suggesting Ad5 infection via the CAR pathway is retained. In addition, we found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy in all of the cell lines that we have tested, which included both low-CAR and high-CAR decorated cells. Competitive inhibition assays suggested the enhanced infectivity of Ad5.PTDtat was mediated by binding of the positively charged PTDtat peptide to the negatively charged epitopes on the cells' surface. Furthermore, we investigated in vivo gene delivery efficacy of Ad5.PTDtat using subcutaneous tumor models established with U118MG glioma cells, and found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy compared to unmodified Ad5 vector as analyzed by a non-invasive fluorescence imaging technique. Conclusion Genetic incorporation of the PTDtat motif into Ad5 fiber allowed Ad5 vectors to infect cells via an alternative PTDtat targeting motif while retaining the native CAR-mediated infection pathway. The enhanced infectivity was demonstrated in both cultured cells and in in vivo tumor models. Taken together, our study identifies a novel tropism expanded Ad5 vector that may be useful for clinical gene therapy

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells retrovirally transduced with prodrug-converting genes are suitable vehicles for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuriniková, E; Kučerová, L; Matúšková, M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) possess a set of several fairly unique properties which make them ideally suitable both for cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. These include: relative ease of isolation, the ability to differentiate along mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages in vitro and the ability to be extensively expanded in culture without a loss of differentiative capacity. MSC are not only hypoimmunogenic, but they mediate immunosuppression upon transplantation, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. They are able to home to damaged tissues, tumors, and metastases following systemic administration. The ability of homing holds big promise for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Viruses are naturally evolved vehicles efficiently transferring their genes into host cells. This ability made them suitable for engineering vector systems for the delivery of genes of interest. MSC can be retrovirally transduced with genes encoding prodrug-converting genes (suicide genes), which are not toxic per se, but catalyze the formation of highly toxic metabolites following the application of a nontoxic prodrug. The homing ability of MSC holds advantages compared to virus vehicles which display many shortcomings in effective delivery of the therapeutic agents. Gene therapies mediated by viruses are limited by their restricted ability to track cancer cells infiltrating into the surrounding tissue, and by their low migratory capacity towards tumor. Thus combination of cellular therapy and gene delivery is an attractive option - it protects the vector from immune surveillance, and supports targeted delivery of a therapeutic gene/protein to the tumor site.

  5. A novel alphavirus replicon-vectored vaccine delivered by adenovirus induces sterile immunity against classical swine fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Hong-Yu; Tian, Da-Yong; Han, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Xin; Li, Na; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2011-10-26

    Low efficacy of gene-based vaccines due to inefficient gene delivery and expression has been major bottleneck of their applications. Efforts have been made to improve the efficacy, such as gene gun and electroporation, but the strategies are difficult to put into practical use. In this study, we developed and evaluated an adenovirus-delivered, alphavirus replicon-vectored vaccine (chimeric vector-based vaccine) expressing the E2 gene of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) (rAdV-SFV-E2). Rabbits immunized with rAdV-SFV-E2 developed CSFV-specific antibodies as early as 9 days and as long as 189 days and completely protected from challenge with C-strain. Pigs immunized with rAdV-SFV-E2 (n=5) developed robust humoral and cell-mediated responses to CSFV and were completely protected from subsequent lethal CSFV infection clinically and virologically. The level of immunity and protection induced by rAdV-SFV-E2 was comparable to that provided by the currently used live attenuated vaccine, C-strain. In contrast, both the conventional alphavirus replicon-vectored vaccine pSFV1CS-E2 and conventional adenovirus-vectored vaccine rAdV-E2 provided incomplete protection. The chimeric vector-based vaccine represents the first gene-based vaccine that is able to confer sterile immunity and complete protection against CSFV. The new-concept vaccination strategy may also be valuable in vaccine development against other pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick, E-mail: lora.ellenson@med.cornell.edu

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  7. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-01-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten +/- mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten +/- mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ERα as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  8. Immune Response to Recombinant Adenovirus in Humans: Capsid Components from Viral Input Are Targets for Vector-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie; Gahery-Segard, Hanne; Mehtali, Majid; Le Boulaire, Christophe; Ribault, Sébastien; Boulanger, Pierre; Tursz, Thomas; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Farace, Françoise

    2000-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 109 PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218–2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CD8+ CTL lines were derived from two patients and maintained in long-term cultures. Target cell infections with E1-deleted and E1-plus E2-deleted adenoviruses, as well as transcription-blocking experiments with actinomycin D, revealed that host T-cell recognition did not require viral gene transcription. Target cells treated with brefeldin A were not lysed, indicating that viral input protein-derived peptides are associated with HLA class I molecules. Using recombinant capsid component-loaded targets, we observed that the three major proteins could be recognized. These results raise the question of the use of multideleted adenoviruses for gene therapy in the quest to diminish antivector CTL responses. PMID:10906225

  9. Follistatin allows efficient retroviral-mediated gene transfer into rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgnon, Josephine; Djamouri, Fatima; Lorand, Isabelle; Rico, Virginie Di; Loux, Nathalie; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Franco, Dominique; Capron, Frederique; Weber, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Retroviral vectors are widely used tools for gene therapy. However, in vivo gene transfer is only effective in dividing cells, which, in liver, requires a regenerative stimulus. Follistatin is effective in promoting liver regeneration after 90% and 70% hepatectomy in rats. We studied its efficacy on liver regeneration and retroviral-mediated gene delivery in 50% hepatectomized rats. When human recombinant follistatin was infused into the portal vein immediately after 50% hepatectomy, hepatocyte proliferation was significantly higher than in control 50% hepatectomized rats. A single injection of virus particles administered 23 h after follistatin infusion resulted in more than 20% gene transduction efficiency in hepatocytes compared to 3% in control rats. It is concluded that a single injection of follistatin induces onset of proliferation in 50% hepatectomized rats and allows efficient retroviral-mediated gene transfer to the liver

  10. Bifidobacterial recombinant thymidine kinase-ganciclovir gene therapy system induces FasL and TNFR2 mediated antitumor apoptosis in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changdong; Ma, Yongping; Hu, Qiongwen; Xie, Tingting; Wu, Jiayan; Zeng, Fan; Song, Fangzhou

    2016-01-01

    Directly targeting therapeutic suicide gene to a solid tumor is a hopeful approach for cancer gene therapy. Treatment of a solid tumor by an effective vector for a suicide gene remains a challenge. Given the lack of effective treatments, we constructed a bifidobacterial recombinant thymidine kinase (BF-rTK) -ganciclovir (GCV) targeting system (BKV) to meet this requirement and to explore antitumor mechanisms. Bifidobacterium (BF) or BF-rTK was injected intratumorally with or without ganciclovir in a human colo320 intestinal xenograft tumor model. The tumor tissues were analyzed using apoptosis antibody arrays, real time PCR and western blot. The colo320 cell was analyzed by the gene silencing method. Autophagy and necroptosis were also detected in colo320 cell. Meanwhile, three human digestive system xenograft tumor models (colorectal cancer colo320, gastric cancer MKN-45 and liver cancer SSMC-7721) and a breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) model were employed to validate the universality of BF-rTK + GCV in solid tumor gene therapy. The survival rate was evaluated in three human cancer models after the BF-rTK + GCV intratumor treatment. The analysis of inflammatory markers (TNF-α) in tumor indicated that BF-rTK + GCV significantly inhibited TNF-α expression. The results suggested that BF-rTK + GCV induced tumor apoptosis without autophagy and necroptosis occurrence. The apoptosis was transduced by multiple signaling pathways mediated by FasL and TNFR2 and mainly activated the mitochondrial control of apoptosis via Bid and Bim, which was rescued by silencing Bid or/and Bim. However, BF + GCV only induced apoptosis via Fas/FasL signal pathway accompanied with increased P53 expression. We further found that BF-rTK + GCV inhibited the expression of the inflammatory maker of TNF-α. However, BF-rTK + GCV did not result in necroptosis and autophagy. BF-rTK + GCV induced tumor apoptosis mediated by FasL and TNFR2 through the mitochondrial control of apoptosis via Bid and Bim

  11. The use of molecular imaging of gene expression by radiotracers in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard-Fiardo, P.; Franken, P.R.; Harrington, K.J.; Vassaux, G.; Cambien, B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Progress with gene-based therapies has been hampered by difficulties in monitoring the biodistribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. Recent developments in non-invasive imaging have allowed researchers and clinicians to assess the location, magnitude and persistence of gene expression in animals and humans. Such advances should eventually lead to improvement in the efficacy and safety of current clinical protocols for future treatments. Areas Covered: The molecular imaging techniques for monitoring gene therapy in the living subject, with a specific highlight on the key reporter gene approaches that have been developed and validated in preclinical models using the latest imaging modalities. The applications of molecular imaging to biotherapy, with a particular emphasis on monitoring of gene and vector biodistribution and on image-guided radiotherapy. Expert Opinion: Among the reporter gene/probe combinations that have been described so far, one stands out, in our view, as the most versatile and easy to implement: the Na/I symporter. This strategy, exploiting more than 50 years of experience in the treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinomas, has been validated in different types of experimental cancers and with different types of oncolytic viruses and is likely to become a key tool in the implementation of human gene therapy. (authors)

  12. HoxD10 gene delivery using adenovirus/adeno-associate hybrid virus inhibits the proliferation and tumorigenicity of GH4 pituitary lactotrope tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Mi Ae; Yashar, Parham; Kim, Suk Kyoung; Noh, Taewoong; Gillam, Mary P.; Lee, Eun Jig; Jameson, J. Larry

    2008-01-01

    Prolactinoma is one of the most common types of pituitary adenoma. It has been reported that a variety of growth factors and cytokines regulating cell growth and angiogenesis play an important role in the growth of prolactinoma. HoxD10 has been shown to impair endothelial cell migration, block angiogenesis, and maintain a differentiated phenotype of cells. We investigated whether HoxD10 gene delivery could inhibit the growth of prolactinoma. Rat GH4 lactotrope tumor cells were infected with adenovirus/adeno-associated virus (Ad/AAV) hybrid vectors carrying the mouse HoxD10 gene (Hyb-HoxD10) or the β-galactosidase gene (Hyb-Gal). Hyb-HoxD10 expression inhibited GH4 cell proliferation in vitro. The expression of FGF-2 and cyclin D2 was inhibited in GH4 cells infected with Hyb-HoxD10. GH4 cells transduced with Hyb-HoxD10 did not form tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that the delivery of HoxD10 could potentially inhibit the growth of PRL-secreting tumors. This approach may be a useful tool for targeted therapy of prolactinoma and other neoplasms

  13. Molecular MR imaging of cancer gene therapy. Ferritin transgene reporter takes the stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been actively investigated and made rapid progress in the past decade. Applied to cancer gene therapy, the technique's high spatial resolution allows evaluation of gene delivery into target tissues. Because noninvasive monitoring of the duration, location, and magnitude of transgene expression in tumor tissues or cells provides useful information for assessing therapeutic efficacy and optimizing protocols, molecular imaging is expected to become a critical step in the success of cancer gene therapy in the near future. We present a brief overview of the current status of molecular MR imaging, especially in vivo reporter gene imaging using ferritin and other reporters, discuss its application to cancer gene therapy, and present our research of MR imaging detection of electroporation-mediated cancer gene therapy using the ferritin reporter gene. (author)

  14. Interferon induction by adenoviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beladi, I; Bakay, M; Pusztai, R; Mucsi, I; Tarodi, B [University Medical School, Szeged (Hungary). Inst. of Microbiology

    1979-02-01

    All human, simian, bovine and avian adenovirus types tested so far and the canine hepatitis virus induce interferon production in chick cells. This finding indicated this property to be characteristic for viruses belonging to the adenovirus group. Trypsin treatment, which had no effect upon the infectivity, diminished or eliminated the interferon-inducing abilities of crude adenoviruses, and thus the need for a trypsin-sensitive protein in interferon induction was suggested. T antigen and interferon were formed simultaneously in chick embryo fibroblast cells infected with human adenovirus type 12, and there-fore the adenovirus-specific T antigen was resitant to the action of endogenous interferon synthetized by the same cells. In chicks inoculated with human types, the appearance of interferon was biphasic: an 'early' and a 'late' interferon could be demonstrated with maximum titre 4 and 10 hr, respectively, after virus infection. In chicks infected with adenoviruses, first interferon production and then a decreased primary immune response to sheep red blood cells was observed. It was assumed that in adenovirus-infected chicks the interferon produced by viral stimulus resulted in a transient immunosuppression.

  15. Selectivity and Efficiency of Late Transgene Expression by Transcriptionally Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses Are Dependent on the Transgene Insertion Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Quirin, Christina; Rohmer, Stanimira; Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Behr, Michael; Hesse, Andrea; Engelhardt, Sarah; Erbs, Philippe; Enk, Alexander H.; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.

    2010-01-01

    Key challenges facing cancer therapy are the development of tumor-specific drugs and potent multimodal regimens. Oncolytic adenoviruses possess the potential to realize both aims by restricting virus replication to tumors and inserting therapeutic genes into the virus genome, respectively. A major effort in this regard is to express transgenes in a tumor-specific manner without affecting virus replication. Using both luciferase as a sensitive reporter and genetic prodrug activation, we show t...

  16. Intratracheal injection of adenovirus containing the human MNSOD transgene protects athymic nude mice from irradiation-induced organizing alveolitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epperly, Michael W.; Bray, Jenifer A.; Krager, Stephen; Berry, Luann M.; Gooding, William; Engelhardt, John F.; Zwacka, Ralf; Travis, Elizabeth L.; Greenberger, Joel S.

    1999-01-01

    for LacZ protein in adenovirus LacZ (Ad-LacZ)-injected mice demonstrated expression of LacZ in both the upper and lower airway. Nested RT-PCR showed lung expression of MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD for at least 11 days following infection with each respective adenovirus construct. Nested RT-PCR using primers specific for human MnSOD demonstrated increased expression of the human MnSOD transgene in the trachea and alveolar type II cells 4 days after virus injection on the day of irradiation. At this time point, increased biochemical activity of MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD respectively, was detected in lungs from these two adenovirus groups, compared to each other or to control or adenovirus LacZ mice. Slot blot analysis of RNA from lungs of mice in each group following 850 cGy irradiation demonstrated decreased expression of mRNA for interleukin-I (IL-1), TNF-α, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in the MnSOD adenovirus-injected mice, compared to irradiated control, LacZ, or Cu/ZnSOD adenovirus-injected, irradiated mice. Mice receiving adenovirus MnSOD showed decreased organizing alveolitis at 132 days in all three dose groups, compared to irradiated control or Ad-LacZ, or Ad-Cu/ZnSOD mice. Conclusions: Overexpression of MnSOD in the lungs of mice prior to irradiation prevents irradiation-induced acute and chronic damage quantitated as decreased levels of mRNA for IL-1, TNF-α, and TGF-β in the days immediately following irradiation, and decrease in the percent of lung demonstrating fibrosis or organizing alveolitis at 132 days. These data provide a rational basis for development of gene therapy as a method of protection of the normal lung from acute and chronic sequellae of ionizing irradiation

  17. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  18. Adenoviruses using the cancer marker EphA2 as a receptor in vitro and in vivo by genetic ligand insertion into different capsid scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Behr

    Full Text Available Adenoviral gene therapy and oncolysis would critically benefit from targeted cell entry by genetically modified capsids. This requires both the ablation of native adenovirus tropism and the identification of ligands that remain functional in virus context. Here, we establish cell type-specific entry of HAdV-5-based vectors by genetic ligand insertion into a chimeric fiber with shaft and knob domains of the short HAdV-41 fiber (Ad5T/41sSK. This fiber format was reported to ablate transduction in vitro and biodistribution to the liver in vivo. We show that the YSA peptide, binding to the pan-cancer marker EphA2, can be inserted into three positions of the chimeric fiber, resulting in strong transduction of EphA2-positive but not EphA2-negative cells of human melanoma biopsies and of tumor xenografts after intratumoral injection. Transduction was blocked by soluble YSA peptide and restored for EphA2-negative cells after recombinant EphA2 expression. The YSA peptide could also be inserted into three positions of a CAR binding-ablated HAdV-5 fiber enabling specific transduction; however, the Ad5T/41sSK format was superior in vivo. In conclusion, we establish an adenovirus capsid facilitating functional insertion of targeting peptides and a novel adenovirus using the tumor marker EphA2 as receptor with high potential for cancer gene therapy and viral oncolysis.

  19. Adenoviruses Using the Cancer Marker EphA2 as a Receptor In Vitro and In Vivo by Genetic Ligand Insertion into Different Capsid Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Michael; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Ketzer, Patrick; Engelhardt, Sarah; Mück-Häusl, Martin; Okun, Pamela M.; Petersen, Gabriele; Neipel, Frank; Hassel, Jessica C.; Ehrhardt, Anja; Enk, Alexander H.; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral gene therapy and oncolysis would critically benefit from targeted cell entry by genetically modified capsids. This requires both the ablation of native adenovirus tropism and the identification of ligands that remain functional in virus context. Here, we establish cell type-specific entry of HAdV-5-based vectors by genetic ligand insertion into a chimeric fiber with shaft and knob domains of the short HAdV-41 fiber (Ad5T/41sSK). This fiber format was reported to ablate transduction in vitro and biodistribution to the liver in vivo. We show that the YSA peptide, binding to the pan-cancer marker EphA2, can be inserted into three positions of the chimeric fiber, resulting in strong transduction of EphA2-positive but not EphA2-negative cells of human melanoma biopsies and of tumor xenografts after intratumoral injection. Transduction was blocked by soluble YSA peptide and restored for EphA2-negative cells after recombinant EphA2 expression. The YSA peptide could also be inserted into three positions of a CAR binding-ablated HAdV-5 fiber enabling specific transduction; however, the Ad5T/41sSK format was superior in vivo. In conclusion, we establish an adenovirus capsid facilitating functional insertion of targeting peptides and a novel adenovirus using the tumor marker EphA2 as receptor with high potential for cancer gene therapy and viral oncolysis. PMID:24760010

  20. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua. The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9% in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3 in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%, and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%. Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population.

  1. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  2. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  3. Mode of transgene expression after fusion to early or late viral genes of a conditionally replicating adenovirus via an optimized internal ribosome entry site in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Angel A.; Wang Minghui; Suzuki, Kaori; Uil, Taco G.; Krasnykh, Victor; Curiel, David T.; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.

    2004-01-01

    The expression of therapeutic genes by oncolytic viruses is a promising strategy to improve viral oncolysis, to augment gene transfer compared with a nonreplicating adenoviral vector, or to combine virotherapy and gene therapy. Both the mode of transgene expression and the locale of transgene insertion into the virus genome critically determine the efficacy of this approach. We report here on the properties of oncolytic adenoviruses which contain the luciferase cDNA fused via an optimized internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to the immediate early adenoviral gene E1A (AdΔE1AIL), the early gene E2B (AdΔE2BIL), or the late fiber gene (AdΔfiberIL). These viruses showed distinct kinetics of transgene expression and luciferase activity. Early after infection, luciferase activities were lower for these viruses, especially for AdΔE2BIL, compared with nonreplicating AdTL, which contained the luciferase gene expressed from the strong CMV promoter. However, 6 days after infection, luciferase activities were approximately four (AdΔE1AIL) to six (AdΔfiberIL) orders of magnitude higher than for AdTL, reflecting virus replication and efficient transgene expression. Similar results were obtained in vivo after intratumoral injection of AdΔE2BIL, AdΔfiberIL, and AdTL. AdΔfiberIL and the parental virus, Ad5-Δ24, resulted in similar cytotoxicity, but AdΔE2BIL and AdΔE1AIL were slightly attenuated. Disruption of the expression of neighboring viral genes by insertion of the transgene was minimal for AdΔE2BIL and AdΔfiberIL, but substantial for AdΔE1AIL. Our observations suggest that insertion of IRES-transgene cassettes into viral transcription units is an attractive strategy for the development of armed oncolytic adenoviruses with defined kinetics and strength of transgene expression

  4. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2007-01-01

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  5. Virotherapy: cancer gene therapy at last? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E. Bilsland

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For decades, effective cancer gene therapy has been a tantalising prospect; for a therapeutic modality potentially able to elicit highly effective and selective responses, definitive efficacy outcomes have often seemed out of reach. However, steady progress in vector development and accumulated experience from previous clinical studies has finally led the field to its first licensed therapy. Following a pivotal phase III trial, Imlygic (talimogene laherparepvec/T-Vec received US approval as a treatment for cutaneous and subcutaneous melanoma in October 2015, followed several weeks later by its European authorisation. These represent the first approvals for an oncolytic virotherapy. Imlygic is an advanced-generation herpesvirus-based vector optimised for oncolytic and immunomodulatory activities. Many other oncolytic agents currently remain in development, providing hope that current success will be followed by other diverse vectors that may ultimately come to constitute a new class of clinical anti-cancer agents. In this review, we discuss some of the key oncolytic viral agents developed in the adenovirus and herpesvirus classes, and the prospects for further enhancing their efficacy by combining them with novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

  6. Control of human adenovirus type 5 gene expression by cellular Daxx/ATRX chromatin-associated complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Bürck, Carolin; Glass, Mandy

    2013-01-01

    to interact with ATRX. To ensure efficient viral replication, Ad5 E1B-55K protein inhibits Daxx and targets ATRX for proteasomal degradation in cooperation with early region 4 open reading frame protein 6 and cellular components of a cullin-dependent E3-ubiquitin ligase. Our studies illustrate the importance...... is the targeting factor, leading to histone deacetylase recruitment, H3.3 deposition and transcriptional repression of cellular promoters. Despite recent findings on the fundamental importance of chromatin modification in host-cell gene regulation, it remains unclear whether adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) transcription...

  7. 'Molecular switch' vectors for hypoxia- and radiation-mediated gene therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, O.; Marples, B.; Joiner, M.C.; Scott, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    Intratumoral areas of low oxygen concentration are known to be refractive to radiotherapy treatment. However, this physiological condition can be exploited for selective cancer gene therapy. We have developed a series of synthetic promoters selectively responsive to both hypoxia and ionizing radiation (IR). These promoters contain hypoxia regulatory elements (HREs) from the erythropoietin (Epo), the phosphoglycerate kinase1(PGK1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genes, and/or IR-responsive CArG elements from the Early Growth Response 1 (Egr1) gene. The HRE and CArG promoters were able to regulate expression of reporter and suicide genes in human tumor cells, following corresponding stimulation with hypoxia (0.1% O2) or X-irradiation (5Gy) [Greco et al, 2002, Gene Therapy 9:1403]. Furthermore, the chimeric HRE + CArG promoters could be activated by these stimuli independently or even more significantly when given in combination, with the Epo HRE/CArG promoter proving to be the most responsive and robust. In order to amplify and maintain transgene expression even following withdrawal of the triggering stimuli, we have developed a 'molecular switch' system [Scott et al, 2000, Gene Therapy 7:1121]. This 'switch' system has now been engineered as a single vector molecule, containing HRE and CArG promoters. This new series of HRE/CArG switch vectors have been tested in a herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) suicide gene assay. Results indicate that a) higher and more selective tumor cell kill is achieved with the switch when compared with the HRE and CArG promoters directly driving HSVtk expression and b) the Epo HRE/CArG switch vectors appear to function as efficiently as the strong constitutive cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter construct

  8. Enhanced therapeutic effect of multiple injections of HSV-TK + GCV gene therapy in combination with ionizing radiation in a mouse mammary tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachaki, Maria T.; Chhikara, Madhu; Aguilar, Laura; Zhu Xiaohong; Chiu, Kam J.; Woo, Shiao; Teh, Bin S.; Thompson, Timothy C.; Butler, E. Brian; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Standard therapies for breast cancer lack tumor specificity and have significant risk for recurrence and toxicities. Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene therapy combined with radiation therapy (XRT) may be effective because of complementary mechanisms and distinct toxicity profiles. HSV-tk gene therapy followed by systemic administration of ganciclovir (GCV) enhances radiation-induced DNA damage by generating high local concentrations of phosphorylated nucleotide analogs that increase radiation-induced DNA breaks and interfere with DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, radiation-induced membrane damage enhances the 'bystander effect' by facilitating transfer of nucleotide analogs to neighboring nontransduced cells and by promoting local and systemic immune responses. This study assesses the effect of single and multiple courses of HSV-tk gene therapy in combination with ionizing radiation in a mouse mammary cancer model. Methods and Materials: Mouse mammary TM40D tumors transplanted s.c. in syngeneic immunocompetent BALB-c mice were treated with either adenoviral-mediated HSV-tk gene therapy or local radiation or the combination of gene and radiation therapy. A vector consisting of a replication-deficient (E1-deleted) adenovirus type 5 was injected intratumorally to administer the HSV-tk gene, and GCV was initiated 24 h later for a total of 6 days. Radiation was given as a single dose of 5 Gy 48 h after the HSV-tk injection. A metastatic model was developed by tail vein injection of TM40D cells on the same day that the s.c. tumors were established. Systemic antitumor effect was evaluated by counting the number of lung nodules after treating only the primary tumors with gene therapy, radiation, or the combination of gene and radiation therapy. To assess the therapeutic efficacy of multiple courses of this combinatorial approach, one, two, and three courses of HSV-tk + GCV gene therapy, in combination with radiation, were compared to HSV-tk or

  9. Presence of adenovirus species C in infiltrating lymphocytes of human sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kosulin

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses are known to persist in T-lymphocytes of tonsils, adenoids and intestinal tract. The oncogenic potential of different adenovirus types has been widely studied in rodents, in which adenovirus inoculation can induce multiple tumors such as undifferentiated sarcomas, adenocarcinomas and neuroectodermal tumors. However, the oncogenic potential of this virus has never been proven in human subjects. Using a highly sensitive broad-spectrum qRT-PCR, we have screened a set of different human sarcomas including leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and gastro intestinal stroma tumors. Primers binding the viral oncogene E1A and the capsid-coding gene Hexon were used to detect the presence of adenovirus DNA in tumor samples. We found that 18% of the tested leiomyosarcomas and 35% of the liposarcomas were positive for the presence of adenovirus DNA, being species C types the most frequently detected adenoviruses. However, only in one sample of the gastro intestinal stroma tumors the virus DNA could be detected. The occurrence of adenovirus in the tumor sections was confirmed by subsequent fluorescence in-situ-hybridization analysis and co-staining with the transcription factor Bcl11b gives evidence for the presence of the virus in infiltrating T-lymphocytes within the tumors. Together these data underline, for the first time, the persistence of adenovirus in T-lymphocytes infiltrated in muscular and fatty tissue tumor samples. If an impaired immune system leads to the viral persistence and reactivation of the virus is involved in additional diseases needs further investigation.

  10. Activation of the human beta interferon gene by the adenovirus type 12 E1B gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiroki, K.; Toth, M.

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of endogenous beta interferon mRNA was activated in human embryo kidney (HEK) cells infected with adenovirus 12 (Ad12) but was activated only inefficiently or not at all in HEK cells infected with Ad5 and rc-1 (Ad5 dl312 containing the Ad12 E1A region). The analysis with Ad12 mutants showed that Ad12 E1B products, especially the 19K protein, were important for the expression of the endogenous beta interferon gene and Ad12 E1A products were not involved in the expression. The expression of exogeneously transfected pIFN-CAT (a hybrid plasmid having the human beta interferon promoter fused with the CAT gene) was activated in HEK and chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells infected with either Ad12 or Ad5. The analysis of cotransfection of CEF cells with pIFN-CAT and plasmids containing fragments of Ad12 or Ad5 DNA showed that Ad12 or Ad5 E1B (possibly the 19K protein) was and E1A was not involved in the expression of the exogenous pIFN-CAT

  11. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Betina; Jarlstad Olesen, Morten T; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug administra......Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug...

  12. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  13. Recent trends in the gene therapy of β-thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotti, Alessia; Breda, Laura; Lederer, Carsten W; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Zuccato, Cristina; Kleanthous, Marina; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The β-thalassemias are a group of hereditary hematological diseases caused by over 300 mutations of the adult β-globin gene. Together with sickle cell anemia, thalassemia syndromes are among the most impactful diseases in developing countries, in which the lack of genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis have contributed to the maintenance of a very high frequency of these genetic diseases in the population. Gene therapy for β-thalassemia has recently seen steadily accelerating progress and has reached a crossroads in its development. Presently, data from past and ongoing clinical trials guide the design of further clinical and preclinical studies based on gene augmentation, while fundamental insights into globin switching and new technology developments have inspired the investigation of novel gene-therapy approaches. Moreover, human erythropoietic stem cells from β-thalassemia patients have been the cellular targets of choice to date whereas future gene-therapy studies might increasingly draw on induced pluripotent stem cells. Herein, we summarize the most significant developments in β-thalassemia gene therapy over the last decade, with a strong emphasis on the most recent findings, for β-thalassemia model systems; for β-, γ-, and anti-sickling β-globin gene addition and combinatorial approaches including the latest results of clinical trials; and for novel approaches, such as transgene-mediated activation of γ-globin and genome editing using designer nucleases. PMID:25737641

  14. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Adenovirus small E1A employs the lysine acetylases p300/CBP and tumor suppressor Rb to repress select host genes and promote productive virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Gou, Dawei; Jawdekar, Gauri; Johnson, Sarah A; Nava, Miguel; Su, Trent; Yousef, Ahmed F; Zemke, Nathan R; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kurdistani, Siavash K; Berk, Arnold J

    2014-11-12

    Oncogenic transformation by adenovirus small e1a depends on simultaneous interactions with the host lysine acetylases p300/CBP and the tumor suppressor RB. How these interactions influence cellular gene expression remains unclear. We find that e1a displaces RBs from E2F transcription factors and promotes p300 acetylation of RB1 K873/K874 to lock it into a repressing conformation that interacts with repressive chromatin-modifying enzymes. These repressing p300-e1a-RB1 complexes specifically interact with host genes that have unusually high p300 association within the gene body. The TGF-β, TNF-, and interleukin-signaling pathway components are enriched among such p300-targeted genes. The p300-e1a-RB1 complex condenses chromatin in a manner dependent on HDAC activity, p300 lysine acetylase activity, the p300 bromodomain, and RB K873/K874 and e1a K239 acetylation to repress host genes that would otherwise inhibit productive virus infection. Thus, adenovirus employs e1a to repress host genes that interfere with viral replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel oncolytic adenovirus targeting Wnt signaling effectively inhibits cancer-stem like cell growth via metastasis, apoptosis and autophagy in HCC models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Lai, Weijie; Li, Qiang; Yu, Yang; Jin, Jin; Guo, Wan; Zhou, Xiumei; Liu, Xinyuan; Wang, Yigang

    2017-09-16

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are highly differentiated and self-renewing, play an important role in the occurrence, therapeutic resistant and metastasis of hepatacellular carcinoma (HCC). Oncolytic adenoviruses have targeted killing effect on tumor cells, and are invoked as candidate drugs for cancer treatment. We designed a dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus Ad.wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1 that targets Wnt and Rb signaling pathways respectively, and carries the tumor suppressor gene, TSLC1. Previous studies have demonstrated that oncolytic adenovirus mediated TSLC1can target liver cancer and exhibit significant cytotoxicity. However, whether Ad.wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1 can effectively eliminate liver CSCs remains to be explored. We first used the spheroid culture to enrich the liver CSCs-like cells, and detected the self-renewal capacity, differentiation, drug resistance and tumorigenicity. The results showed that Ad-wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1 could effectively lead to autophagic death. In addition, recombinant adenovirus effectively induced the apoptosis, inhibit metastasis of hepatic CSCs-like cells in vivo. Further animal experiments indicated that Ad-wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1could effectively inhibit the growth of transplanted tumor of hepatic CSCs and prolong the survival time of mice. Therefore, the novel oncolytic adenovirus Ad.wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1 has potential application as a therapeutic target for HCC stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene expression and gene therapy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, Claire; Couillaud, Franck; Moonen, Chrit T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The fast growing field of molecular imaging has achieved major advances in imaging gene expression, an important element of gene therapy. Gene expression imaging is based on specific probes or contrast agents that allow either direct or indirect spatio-temporal evaluation of gene expression. Direct evaluation is possible with, for example, contrast agents that bind directly to a specific target (e.g., receptor). Indirect evaluation may be achieved by using specific substrate probes for a target enzyme. The use of marker genes, also called reporter genes, is an essential element of MI approaches for gene expression in gene therapy. The marker gene may not have a therapeutic role itself, but by coupling the marker gene to a therapeutic gene, expression of the marker gene reports on the expression of the therapeutic gene. Nuclear medicine and optical approaches are highly sensitive (detection of probes in the picomolar range), whereas MRI and ultrasound imaging are less sensitive and require amplification techniques and/or accumulation of contrast agents in enlarged contrast particles. Recently developed MI techniques are particularly relevant for gene therapy. Amongst these are the possibility to track gene therapy vectors such as stem cells, and the techniques that allow spatiotemporal control of gene expression by non-invasive heating (with MRI guided focused ultrasound) and the use of temperature sensitive promoters. (orig.)

  18. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  19. Perspective on Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Modification for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Michael E; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a X-linked, progressive childhood myopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, one of the largest genes in the genome. It is characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration and dysfunction leading to cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a highly promising gene therapy vector. AAV gene therapy has resulted in unprecedented clinical success for treating several inherited diseases. However, AAV gene therapy for DMD remains a significant challenge. Hurdles for AAV-mediated DMD gene therapy include the difficulty to package the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in an AAV vector, the necessity for whole-body gene delivery, the immune response to dystrophin and AAV capsid, and the species-specific barriers to translate from animal models to human patients. Capsid engineering aims at improving viral vector properties by rational design and/or forced evolution. In this review, we discuss how to use the state-of-the-art AAV capsid engineering technologies to overcome hurdles in AAV-based DMD gene therapy.

  20. Double suicide genes selectively kill human umbilical vein endothelial cells

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    Liu Lunxu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To construct a recombinant adenovirus containing CDglyTK double suicide genes and evaluate the killing effect of the double suicide genes driven by kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods Human KDR promoter, Escherichia coli (E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD gene and the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK gene were cloned using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with the KDR promoter and CDglyTK genes. A recombinant adenoviral plasmid AdKDR-CDglyTK was then constructed and transfected into 293 packaging cells to grow and harvest adenoviruses. KDR-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304 and KDR-negative liver cancer cell line (HepG2 were infected with the recombinant adenoviruses at different multiplicity of infection (MOI. The infection rate was measured by green fluorescent protein (GFP expression. The infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of prodrugs ganciclovir (GCV and/or 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC. The killing effects were measured using two different methods, i.e. annexin V-FITC staining and terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed and they infected ECV304 and HepG2 cells efficiently. The infection rate was dependent on MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. ECV304 cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to GCV and 5-FC. The cell survival rate was dependent on both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, there were no killing effects in the HepG2 cells. The combination of two prodrugs was much more effective in killing ECV304 cells than GCV or 5-FC alone. The growth of transgenic ECV304 cells was suppressed in the presence of prodrugs. Conclusion AdKDR-CDglyTK/double prodrog system may be a useful

  1. Hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system enhances antitumor effects of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junye; Guo Yao; Guo Guozhen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system combined with radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer. Methods: The recombinant adenovirus Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD was constructed by DNA recombinant technique. Western blot was used to detect hypoxia-induced expression of bacterial cytosine deaminase (BCD). Cell growth inhibition assay was used to determine the sensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells MIA-PACA2 to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Tumor xenograft growth delay assays was used to evaluate the effects of Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC combined with radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer. Results: Western blot analysis demonstrated that hypoxia-induced BCD protein expression was achieved in MIA-PACA2 cells infected with Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD. With hypoxia treatment, the sensitivity of MIA-PACA2 cells infected with Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD to 5-FC significantly increased. Administration of either Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC or radiotherapy could inhibit the growth of MIA-PACA2 xenografts in nude mice. Moreover, combination of Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC could significantly enhance suppressing effects of radiotherapy on MIA-PACA2 xenografts. Conclusion: Hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC could enhance antitumor effects of radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer and can be used as a powerful adjunct to conventional radiotherapy. (authors)

  2. Gene expression of osteogenic factors following gene therapy in mandibular lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoping; Zhou, Bin; Hu, Chunbing; Li, Shaolan

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of gene therapy on the expression of osteogenic mediators in mandibular distraction osteogenesis rabbits. Bilateral mandibular osteotomies were performed in 45 New-Zealand rabbits. After a latency of 3 days, the mandibles were elongated using distractors with a rate of 0.8 mm/d for 7 days. After the completion of distraction, the rabbits were randomly divided into 5 groups: 2 μg (0.1 μg/μL) of recombinant plasmid pIRES-hVEGF165-hBMP-2, recombinant plasmid pIRES-hBMP2, recombinant plasmid pIRES-hVEGF165, pIRES, and the same volume of normal saline were injected into the distraction gap of groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively, followed by electroporation. Three animals were killed at the 7th, 14th, and 28th day after gene transfected in different groups, respectively. The lengthened mandibles were harvested and processed for immunohistochemical examinations; the mean optic densities (MODs) and integral optical density of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)-positive cells were measured by CMIAS-2001A computerized image analyzer. The data were analyzed with SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Bone morphogenetic protein 2 and TGF-β1 staining was mainly located in inflammatory cells, monocytes, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and chondrocytes in the distraction zones. Their strongest expression reached to the peak at the seventh day and decreased at the 14th day of consolidation stage; at the 28th day, they expressed weakly. Image analysis results show that, at the seventh day, the expression of BMP-2 in group B (0.26 ± 0.03, 0.36 ± 0.02) was the strongest; there was significant difference among them (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of TGF-β1 in group C (0.38 ± 0.06, 1.05 ± 0.19) is strongest followed by group A (0.34 ± 0.05, 0.95 ± 0.16) and B (0.33 ± 0.07, 0.90 ± 0.19). At every time point, the level of expression of BMP-2 and TGF-β1 in gene therapy groups (groups A, B, and

  3. The adenovirus oncoprotein E1a stimulates binding of transcription factor ETF to transcriptionally activate the p53 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, T K; Braithwaite, A W

    1999-08-20

    Expression of the tumor suppressor protein p53 plays an important role in regulating the cellular response to DNA damage. During adenovirus infection, levels of p53 protein also increase. It has been shown that this increase is due not only to increased stability of the p53 protein but to the transcriptional activation of the p53 gene during infection. We demonstrate here that the E1a proteins of adenovirus are responsible for activating the mouse p53 gene and that both major E1a proteins, 243R and 289R, are required for complete activation. E1a brings about the binding of two cellular transcription factors to the mouse p53 promoter. One of these, ETF, binds to three upstream sites in the p53 promoter and one downstream site, whereas E2F binds to one upstream site in the presence of E1a. Our studies indicate that E2F binding is not essential for activation of the p53 promoter but that ETF is. Our data indicate the ETF site located downstream of the start site of transcription is the key site in conferring E1a responsiveness on the p53 promoter.

  4. Integration profile and safety of an adenovirus hybrid-vector utilizing hyperactive sleeping beauty transposase for somatic integration.

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    Wenli Zhang

    Full Text Available We recently developed adenovirus/transposase hybrid-vectors utilizing the previously described hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB transposase HSB5 for somatic integration and we could show stabilized transgene expression in mice and a canine model for hemophilia B. However, the safety profile of these hybrid-vectors with respect to vector dose and genotoxicity remains to be investigated. Herein, we evaluated this hybrid-vector system in C57Bl/6 mice with escalating vector dose settings. We found that in all mice which received the hyperactive SB transposase, transgene expression levels were stabilized in a dose-dependent manner and that the highest vector dose was accompanied by fatalities in mice. To analyze potential genotoxic side-effects due to somatic integration into host chromosomes, we performed a genome-wide integration site analysis using linker-mediated PCR (LM-PCR and linear amplification-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR. Analysis of genomic DNA samples obtained from HSB5 treated female and male mice revealed a total of 1327 unique transposition events. Overall the chromosomal distribution pattern was close-to-random and we observed a random integration profile with respect to integration into gene and non-gene areas. Notably, when using the LM-PCR protocol, 27 extra-chromosomal integration events were identified, most likely caused by transposon excision and subsequent transposition into the delivered adenoviral vector genome. In total, this study provides a careful evaluation of the safety profile of adenovirus/Sleeping Beauty transposase hybrid-vectors. The obtained information will be useful when designing future preclinical studies utilizing hybrid-vectors in small and large animal models.

  5. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  6. Applications of the Preclinical Molecular Imaging in Biomedicine: Gene Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collantes, M.; Peñuelas, I.

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy constitutes a promising option for efficient and targeted treatment of several inherited disorders. Imaging techniques using ionizing radiation as PET or SPECT are used for non-invasive monitoring of the distribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. In this review the main reporter gene/reporter probe strategies are summarized, as well as the contribution of preclinical models to the development of this new imaging modality previously to its application in clinical arena. [es

  7. Ex-Vivo Gene Therapy Using Lentiviral Mediated Gene Transfer Into Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Stem Cells

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    Hanieh Jalali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Introduction of therapeutic genes into the injured site of nervous system can be achieved using transplantation of cellular vehicles containing desired gene. To transfer exogenous genes into the cellular vehicles, lentiviral vectors are one of interested vectors because of advantages such high transduction efficiency of dividing and non-dividing cells. Unrestricted somatic stem cells are subclasses of umbilical cord blood derived stem cells which are appreciate candidates to use as cellular vehicles for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system. Objectives In current study we investigated the effect of lentiviral vector transduction on the neuronal related features of unrestricted somatic stem cells to indicate the probable and unwanted changes related to transduction procedure. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, lentiviral vector containing green fluorescent protein (GFP were transduced into unrestricted somatic stem cells and its effect was investigated with using MTT assay, qPCR and immunohistochemistry techniques. For statistical comparison of real time PCR results, REST software (2009, Qiagen was used. Results Obtained results showed lentiviral vector transduction did not have cytotoxic effects on unrestricted somatic stem cells and did not change neuronal differentiation capacity of them as well the expression of some neuronal related genes and preserved them in multilineage situation. Conclusions In conclusion, we suggested that lentiviral vectors could be proper vectors to transfer therapeutic gene into unrestricted somatic stem cells to provide a cellular vehicle for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system disorders.

  8. A molecular epidemiology survey of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in children residing in Southern Palestine.

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    Lina Qurei

    Full Text Available A molecular epidemiology survey was performed in order to establish and document the respiratory adenovirus pathogen profiles among children in Southern Palestine. Three hundred and thirty-eight hospitalized pediatric cases with adenovirus-associated respiratory tract infections were analyzed. Forty four cases out of the 338 were evaluated in more detail for the adenoviruses types present. All of the children resided in Southern Palestine, that is, in city, village and refugee camp environments within the districts of Hebron and Bethlehem. Human adenoviruses circulated throughout 2005-2010, with major outbreaks occurring in the spring months. A larger percent of the children diagnosed with adenoviral infections were male infants. DNA sequence analysis of the hexon genes from 44 samples revealed that several distinct adenovirus types circulated in the region; these were HAdV-C1, HAdV-C2, HAdV-B3 and HAdV-C5. However, not all of these types were detected within each year. This is the first study ever conducted in Palestine of the genetic epidemiology of respiratory adenovirus infections.

  9. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  10. Building for Biology: A Gene Therapy Trial Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Taylor-Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we examine the construction of the infrastructure for a Phase II gene therapy trial for Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Tracing the development of the material technologies and physical spaces used in the trial, we show how the trial infrastructure took form at the uncertain intersection of scientific norms, built environments, regulatory negotiations, patienthood, and the biologies of both disease and therapy. We define infrastructures as material and immaterial (including symbols and affect composites that serve a selective distributive purpose and facilitate projects of making and doing. There is a politics to this distributive action, which is itself twofold, because whilst infrastructures enable and delimit the movement of matter, they also mediate the very activity for which they provide the grounds. An infrastructural focus allows us to show how purposeful connections are made in a context of epistemic and regulatory uncertainty. The gene therapy researchers were working in a context of multiple uncertainties, regarding not only how to do gene therapy, but also how to anticipate and enact ambiguous regulatory requirements in a context of limited resources (technical, spatial, and financial. At the same time, the trial infrastructure had to accommodate Cystic Fibrosis biology by bridging the gap between pathology and therapy. The consortium’s approach to treating CF required that they address concerns about contamination and safety while finding a way of getting a modified gene product into the lungs of the trial participants.

  11. Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of Decoy Hyper Binding Sites Targeting Oncogenic HMGA1 Reduces Pancreatic and Liver Cancer Cell Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Faizule; Ni, Shuisong; Arnett, Tyler C; McKell, Melanie C; Kennedy, Michael A

    2018-03-30

    High mobility group AT-hook 1 (HMGA1) protein is an oncogenic architectural transcription factor that plays an essential role in early development, but it is also implicated in many human cancers. Elevated levels of HMGA1 in cancer cells cause misregulation of gene expression and are associated with increased cancer cell proliferation and increased chemotherapy resistance. We have devised a strategy of using engineered viruses to deliver decoy hyper binding sites for HMGA1 to the nucleus of cancer cells with the goal of sequestering excess HMGA1 at the decoy hyper binding sites due to binding competition. Sequestration of excess HMGA1 at the decoy binding sites is intended to reduce HMGA1 binding at the naturally occurring genomic HMGA1 binding sites, which should result in normalized gene expression and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. As proof of principle, we engineered the replication defective adenovirus serotype 5 genome to contain hyper binding sites for HMGA1 composed of six copies of an individual HMGA1 binding site, referred to as HMGA-6. A 70%-80% reduction in cell viability and increased sensitivity to gemcitabine was observed in five different pancreatic and liver cancer cell lines 72 hr after infection with replication defective engineered adenovirus serotype 5 virus containing the HMGA-6 decoy hyper binding sites. The decoy hyper binding site strategy should be general for targeting overexpression of any double-stranded DNA-binding oncogenic transcription factor responsible for cancer cell proliferation.

  12. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

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    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  13. Metabolic flux profiling of MDCK cells during growth and canine adenovirus vector production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinhas, Nuno; Pais, Daniel A M; Koshkin, Alexey; Fernandes, Paulo; Coroadinha, Ana S; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2016-03-23

    Canine adenovirus vector type 2 (CAV2) represents an alternative to human adenovirus vectors for certain gene therapy applications, particularly neurodegenerative diseases. However, more efficient production processes, assisted by a greater understanding of the effect of infection on producer cells, are required. Combining [1,2-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]glutamine, we apply for the first time (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) to study E1-transformed Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells metabolism during growth and CAV2 production. MDCK cells displayed a marked glycolytic and ammoniagenic metabolism, and (13)C data revealed a large fraction of glutamine-derived labelling in TCA cycle intermediates, emphasizing the role of glutamine anaplerosis. (13)C-MFA demonstrated the importance of pyruvate cycling in balancing glycolytic and TCA cycle activities, as well as occurrence of reductive alphaketoglutarate (AKG) carboxylation. By turn, CAV2 infection significantly upregulated fluxes through most central metabolism, including glycolysis, pentose-phosphate pathway, glutamine anaplerosis and, more prominently, reductive AKG carboxylation and cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A formation, suggestive of increased lipogenesis. Based on these results, we suggest culture supplementation strategies to stimulate nucleic acid and lipid biosynthesis for improved canine adenoviral vector production.

  14. Adenovirus E4-ORF1 Dysregulates Epidermal Growth Factor and Insulin/Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors To Mediate Constitutive Myc Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Kathleen; Kumar, Manish; Taruishi, Midori; Javier, Ronald T.

    2015-01-01

    The E4-ORF1 protein encoded by human adenovirus stimulates viral replication in human epithelial cells by binding and activating cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) at the plasma membrane and cellular Myc in the nucleus. In this study, we showed that E4-ORF1 hijacks the tyrosine kinase activities of cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and insulin receptor (InsR)/insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R), as well as the lipid kinase activity of PI3K, to mediate const...

  15. Experimental study on the effects of recombinant adenoviral-mediated mI{kappa}B{alpha} gene combined with irradiation on the treatment of hepatocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kejun, Zhang; Dechun, Li; Dongming, Zhu [The First Affiliated Hospital to Suzhou Univ., Suzhou (China); Caixia, Song

    2007-10-15

    Objective: To explore the effect of recombinant adenovirus vector mediated mutant I{kappa}B{alpha} (mI{kappa}B{alpha}) combined with radiation on the hepatocarcinoma. Methods: Limited dilution method was used to test the virus titer in 293 cells. The HCC9204 cells were infected with MOI 10,20,30 and 50 for 48 h, respectively. The expression of p65 and mI{kappa}B{alpha} protein was analyzed by Western blot. Transfected HCC9204 cells and controls were treated with 4 Gy {gamma} rays. The inhibition rate of HCC9204 cells was examined by MTT. Rat models of HCC9204 was constructed. AdmI{kappa}B{alpha} plasmids were injected into tumor tissue and the tumors were administered with 6 Gy {gamma} irradiation 48 hours later. Tumor growth at different time points was recorded during 28 days. Results: The titer of AdmI{kappa}B{alpha} is 1.252 x 10{sup 9} pfu/ml. The expression of mI{kappa}B{alpha} protein was increased with titer of AdmI{kappa}B{alpha}, and p65 protein began to decrease when MOI was 10, and reached the lowest when MOI was 50, they were all dose-dependent. The proliferation of HCC9204 cell lines were suppressed, as was more significant combined with radiation, and the effect was in a viral dose-dependent manner. From days 7 to 28 after AdmI{kappa}B{alpha} gene and radiotherapy, the tumor growth was significantly slower than after irradiation or gene therapy alone. Conclusions: Recombinant adenoviral-mediated mI{kappa}B{alpha} gene, combined with irradiation, can increase the cell-killing effect. It is better than that of either one alone. (authors)

  16. Single-cycle adenovirus vectors in the current vaccine landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Traditional inactivated and protein vaccines generate strong antibodies, but struggle to generate T cell responses. Attenuated pathogen vaccines generate both, but risk causing the disease they aim to prevent. Newer gene-based vaccines drive both responses and avoid the risk of infection. While these replication-defective (RD) vaccines work well in small animals, they can be weak in humans because they do not replicate antigen genes like more potent replication-competent (RC) vaccines. RC vaccines generate substantially stronger immune responses, but also risk causing their own infections. To circumvent these problems, we developed single-cycle adenovirus (SC-Ad) vectors that amplify vaccine genes, but that avoid the risk of infection. This review will discuss these vectors and their prospects for use as vaccines. Areas covered: This review provides a background of different types of vaccines. The benefits of gene-based vaccines and their ability to replicate antigen genes are described. Adenovirus vectors are discussed and compared to other vaccine types. Replication-defective, single-cycle, and replication-competent Ad vaccines are compared. Expert commentary: The potential utility of these vaccines are discussed when used against infectious diseases and as cancer vaccines. We propose a move away from replication-defective vaccines towards more robust replication-competent or single-cycle vaccines.

  17. Biological Education of IVFRU and FIAU for HSV1-TK Reporter Gene Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Jong Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus Type1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) system is a useful gene therapy monitoring method. HSV1-TK is one of the most widely used effector gene systems used for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a reporter gene. It has resulted the development of a number of radiolabeled HSV1-TK substrates for the non-invasive detection of HSV1-TK expression. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Prodrug activation or sucide gene therapy has been shown to be successful in potentiating the therapeutic index by sensitizing genetically modified tumor cells to various prodrugs or enhancing the action of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. The most studied prodrug activation approaches involve transfection of tumors with HSV1-TK gene. (Z)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro- 2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) possesses a 2'-fluoro substituent in the ribose configuration, is considered to protect IVFRU from enzyme mediated degradation in vivo. It is obviously potential substrates for HSV1-TK imaging. 2'-Fiuoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl- 5-iodo-uridine (FIAU), an anticancer drug widely used in clinical practice, is an analogue of thymidine. In a series of studies using adenovirus vector for gene transfer described the appropriate combination of exogenously introduced HSV1-TK as a 'marker/reporter gene' and radiolabelled FIAU as a 'marker substrate/reporter probe' for monitoring gene therapy and gene expression.

  18. Biological Education of IVFRU and FIAU for HSV1-TK Reporter Gene Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Jong Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2006-01-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus Type1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) system is a useful gene therapy monitoring method. HSV1-TK is one of the most widely used effector gene systems used for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a reporter gene. It has resulted the development of a number of radiolabeled HSV1-TK substrates for the non-invasive detection of HSV1-TK expression. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Prodrug activation or sucide gene therapy has been shown to be successful in potentiating the therapeutic index by sensitizing genetically modified tumor cells to various prodrugs or enhancing the action of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. The most studied prodrug activation approaches involve transfection of tumors with HSV1-TK gene. (Z)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro- 2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) possesses a 2'-fluoro substituent in the ribose configuration, is considered to protect IVFRU from enzyme mediated degradation in vivo. It is obviously potential substrates for HSV1-TK imaging. 2'-Fiuoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl- 5-iodo-uridine (FIAU), an anticancer drug widely used in clinical practice, is an analogue of thymidine. In a series of studies using adenovirus vector for gene transfer described the appropriate combination of exogenously introduced HSV1-TK as a 'marker/reporter gene' and radiolabelled FIAU as a 'marker substrate/reporter probe' for monitoring gene therapy and gene expression

  19. Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, F D; McNamee, L M; Uzdil, V; Morgan, I W

    2014-02-01

    This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. We show that the field of gene therapy has matured steadily since the 1980s, with the congruent accumulation of >35 000 papers, >16 000 US patents, >1800 clinical trials and >$4.3 billion in capital investment in gene therapy companies. Gene therapy technologies comprise a series of dissimilar approaches for gene delivery, each of which has introduced a distinct product architecture. Using bibliometric methods, we quantify the maturation of each technology through a characteristic life cycle S-curve, from a Nascent stage, through a Growing stage of exponential advance, toward an Established stage and projected limit. Capital investment in gene therapy is shown to have occurred predominantly in Nascent stage technologies and to be negatively correlated with maturity. Gene therapy technologies are now achieving the level of maturity that innovation research and biotechnology experience suggest may be requisite for efficient product development. Asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and capital investment in development-focused business models may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy.

  20. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  1. Long-term safety and efficacy of AAV gene therapy in the canine model of glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mok; Conlon, Thomas J; Specht, Andrew; Coleman, Kirsten E; Brown, Laurie M; Estrella, Ana M; Dambska, Monika; Dahlberg, Kathryn R; Weinstein, David A

    2018-05-25

    Viral mediated gene therapy has progressed after overcoming early failures, and gene therapy has now been approved for several conditions in Europe and the USA. Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia, caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α, has been viewed as an outstanding candidate for gene therapy. This follow-up report describes the long-term outcome for the naturally occurring GSD-Ia dogs treated with rAAV-GPE-hG6PC-mediated gene therapy. A total of seven dogs were treated with rAAV-GPE-hG6PC-mediated gene therapy. The first four dogs were treated at birth, and three dogs were treated between 2 and 6 months of age to assess the efficacy and safety in animals with mature livers. Blood and urine samples, radiographic studies, histological evaluation, and biodistribution were assessed. Gene therapy improved survival in the GSD-Ia dogs. With treatment, the biochemical studies normalized for the duration of the study (up to 7 years). None of the rAAV-GPE-hG6PC-treated dogs had focal hepatic lesions or renal abnormalities. Dogs treated at birth required a second dose of rAAV after 2-4 months; gene therapy after hepatic maturation resulted in improved efficacy after a single dose. rAAV-GPE-hG6PC treatment in GSD-Ia dogs was found to be safe and efficacious. GSD-Ia is an attractive target for human gene therapy since it is a monogenic disorder with limited tissue involvement. Blood glucose and lactate monitoring can be used to assess effectiveness and as a biomarker of success. GSD-Ia can also serve as a model for other hepatic monogenic disorders.

  2. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  3. The ethics of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sarah; Harris, John

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments have progressed in areas of science that pertain to gene therapy and its ethical implications. This review discusses the current state of therapeutic gene technologies, including stem cell therapies and genetic modification, and identifies ethical issues of concern in relation to the science of gene therapy and its application, including the ethics of embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning, the risks associated with gene therapy, and the ethics of clinical research in developing new therapeutic technologies. Additionally, ethical issues relating to genetic modification itself are considered: the significance of the human genome, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, and concerns regarding gene therapy as a eugenic practice.

  4. E2F/Rb Family Proteins Mediate Interferon Induced Repression of Adenovirus Immediate Early Transcription to Promote Persistent Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueting Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are cytokines that have pleiotropic effects and play important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. IFNs have broad antiviral properties and function by different mechanisms. IFNs fail to inhibit wild-type Adenovirus (Ad replication in established cancer cell lines. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IFNs on Ad replication in normal human cells. Our data demonstrate that both IFNα and IFNγ blocked wild-type Ad5 replication in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEC and TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDF-TERT. IFNs inhibited the replication of divergent adenoviruses. The inhibition of Ad5 replication by IFNα and IFNγ is the consequence of repression of transcription of the E1A immediate early gene product. Both IFNα and IFNγ impede the association of the transactivator GABP with the E1A enhancer region during the early phase of infection. The repression of E1A expression by IFNs requires a conserved E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer, and IFNs increased the enrichment of the E2F-associated pocket proteins, Rb and p107, at the E1A enhancer in vivo. PD0332991 (Pabociclib, a specific CDK4/6 inhibitor, dephosphoryles pocket proteins to promote their interaction with E2Fs and inhibited wild-type Ad5 replication dependent on the conserved E2F binding site. Consistent with this result, expression of the small E1A oncoprotein, which abrogates E2F/pocket protein interactions, rescued Ad replication in the presence of IFNα or IFNγ. Finally, we established a persistent Ad infection model in vitro and demonstrated that IFNγ suppresses productive Ad replication in a manner dependent on the E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer. This is the first study that probes the molecular basis of persistent adenovirus infection and reveals a novel mechanism by which adenoviruses utilize IFN signaling to suppress lytic virus replication and to promote persistent infection.

  5. [In vitro differentiation of synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells infected by adenovirus vector mediated by bone morphogenetic protein 2/7 genes into fibrocartilage cells in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peiliang; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Haishan; Cong, Ruijun; Chen, Song; Ding, Zheru; Hu, Kaimen

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility of rabbit synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) differentiating into fibrocartilage cells by the recombinant adenovirus vector mediated by bone morphogenetic protein 2/7 (BMP-2/7) genes in vitro. SMSCs were isolated and purified from 3-month-old New Zealand white rabbits [male or female, weighing (2.1 +/- 0.3) kg]; the morphology was observed; the cells were identified with immunocytological fluorescent staining, flow cytometry, and cell cycles. The adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiations were detected. The recombinant plasmid of pAdTrack-BMP-2-internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-BMP-7 was constructed and then was used to infect SMSCs. The cell DNA content and the oncogenicity were tested to determine the safety. Then infected SMSCs were cultured in incomplete chondrogenic medium in vitro. Chondrogenic differentiation of infected SMSCs was detected by RT-PCR, immunofluorescent staining, and toluidine blue staining. SMSCs expressed surface markers of stem cells, and had multi-directional potential. The transfection efficiency of SMSCs infected by recombinant plasmid of pAdTrack-BMP-2-IRES-BMP-7 was about 70%. The safety results showed that infected SMSCs had normal double time, normal chromosome number, and normal DNA content and had no oncogenicity. At 21 days after cultured in incomplete chondrocyte medium, RT-PCR results showed SMSCs had increased expressions of collegan type I and collegan type II, particularly collegan type II; the expressions of RhoA and Sox-9 increased obviously. Immunofluorescent staining and toluidine blue staining showed differentiation of SMSCs into fibrocartilage cells. It is safe to use pAdTrack-BMP-2-IRES-BMP-7 for infecting SMSCs. SMSCs infected by pAdTrack-BMP-2-IRES-BMP-7 can differentiate into fibrocartilage cells spontaneously in vitro.

  6. The evolution of heart gene delivery vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasala, Nalinda B.; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for treating numerous heart diseases. A key premise for the success of cardiac gene therapy is the development of powerful gene transfer vehicles that can achieve highly efficient and persistent gene transfer specifically in the heart. Other features of an ideal vector include negligible toxicity, minimal immunogenicity and easy manufacturing. Rapid progress in the fields of molecular biology and virology has offered great opportunities to engineer various genetic materials for heart gene delivery. Several nonviral vectors (e.g. naked plasmids, plasmid lipid/polymer complexes and oligonucleotides) have been tested. Commonly used viral vectors include lentivirus, adenovirus and adeno-associated virus. Among these, adeno-associated virus has shown many attractive features for pre-clinical experimentation in animal models of heart diseases. We review the history and evolution of these vectors for heart gene transfer. PMID:21837689

  7. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers. PMID:25202710

  8. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Lan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo, including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers.

  9. E4orf1 limits the oncolytic potential of the E1B-55K deletion mutant adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael A; Broughton, Robin S; Goodrum, Felicia D; Ornelles, David A

    2009-03-01

    Clinical trials have shown oncolytic adenoviruses to be tumor selective with minimal toxicity toward normal tissue. The virus ONYX-015, in which the gene encoding the early region 1B 55-kDa (E1B-55K) protein is deleted, has been most effective when used in combination with either chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Therefore, improving the oncolytic nature of tumor-selective adenoviruses remains an important objective for improving this form of cancer therapy. Cells infected during the G(1) phase of the cell cycle with the E1B-55K deletion mutant virus exhibit a reduced rate of viral late protein synthesis, produce fewer viral progeny, and are less efficiently killed than cells infected during the S phase. Here we demonstrate that the G(1) restriction imposed on the E1B-55K deletion mutant virus is due to the viral oncogene encoded by open reading frame 1 of early region 4 (E4orf1). E4orf1 has been reported to signal through the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase pathway leading to the activation of Akt, mTOR, and p70 S6K. Evidence presented here shows that E4orf1 may also induce the phosphorylation of Akt and p70 S6K in a manner that depends on Rac1 and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1. Accordingly, agents that have been reported to disrupt the Tiam1-Rac1 interaction or to prevent phosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 kinase partially alleviated the E4orf1 restriction to late viral protein synthesis and enhanced tumor cell killing by the E1B-55K mutant virus. These results demonstrate that E4orf1 limits the oncolytic nature of a conditionally replicating adenovirus such as ONYX-015. The therapeutic value of similar oncolytic adenoviruses may be improved by abrogating E4orf1 function.

  10. Fowl adenovirus serotype 9 vectored vaccine for protection of avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fowl adenovirus serotype 9, a non-pathogenic large double stranded DNA virus, was developed as a viral vector to express influenza genes as a potential vaccine. Two separate constructs were developed that expressed either the hemagglutinin gene of A/Chicken/Jalisco/2012 (H7) or A/ Chicken/Iowa/20...

  11. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  12. Formation of a Multiple Protein Complex on the Adenovirus Packaging Sequence by the IVa2 Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler, Ryan E.; Ewing, Sean G.; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    During adenovirus virion assembly, the packaging sequence mediates the encapsidation of the viral genome. This sequence is composed of seven functional units, termed A repeats. Recent evidence suggests that the adenovirus IVa2 protein binds the packaging sequence and is involved in packaging of the genome. Study of the IVa2-packaging sequence interaction has been hindered by difficulty in purifying the protein produced in virus-infected cells or by recombinant techniques. We report the first ...

  13. Purification of infectious adenovirus in two hours by ultracentrifugation and tangential flow filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugai, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Takahito; Hirose, Megumi; Inabe, Kumiko; Kujime, Yukari; Terashima, Miho; Liu, Bingbing; Tang, Hong; Zhao, Mujun; Murata, Takehide; Kimura, Makoto; Pan, Jianzhi; Obata, Yuichi; Hamada, Hirofumi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2005-01-01

    Adenoviruses are excellent vectors for gene transfer and are used extensively for high-level expression of the products of transgenes in living cells. The development of simple and rapid methods for the purification of stable infectious recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) remains a challenge. We report here a method for the purification of infectious adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) that involves ultracentrifugation on a cesium chloride gradient at 604,000g for 15 min at 4 deg C and tangential flow filtration. The entire procedure requires less than two hours and infectious Ad5 can be recovered at levels higher than 64% of the number of plaque-forming units (pfu) in the initial crude preparation of viruses. We have obtained titers of infectious purified Ad5 of 1.35 x 10 10 pfu/ml and a ratio of particle titer to infectious titer of seven. The method described here allows the rapid purification of rAds for studies of gene function in vivo and in vitro, as well as the rapid purification of Ad5

  14. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingui Tian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55 is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152, A55R2 (residues 179 to 187, A55R4 (residues 247 to 259 and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443, were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and neutralization tests (NT. Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3 and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis.

  15. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xingui; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Zaixue; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaomei; Luo, Qingming; Zhou, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55) is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD) pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152), A55R2 (residues 179 to 187), A55R4 (residues 247 to 259) and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443), were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization tests (NT). Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3) and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis. PMID:26516903

  16. Canine adenovirus type 2 vector generation via I-Sce1-mediated intracellular genome release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Ibanes

    Full Text Available When canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2, or also commonly referred to as CAV-2 vectors are injected into the brain parenchyma they preferentially transduce neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent regions, and allow transgene expression for at last >1 yr. Yet, translating these data into a user-friendly vector platform has been limited because CAV-2 vector generation is challenging. Generation of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors often requires transfection of linear DNA fragments of >30 kb containing the vector genome into an E1-transcomplementing cell line. In contrast to human adenovirus type 5 vector generation, CAV-2 vector generation is less efficient due, in part, to a reduced ability to initiate replication and poor transfectibility of canine cells with large, linear DNA fragments. To improve CAV-2 vector generation, we generated an E1-transcomplementing cell line expressing the estrogen receptor (ER fused to I-SceI, a yeast meganuclease, and plasmids containing the I-SceI recognition sites flanking the CAV-2 vector genome. Using transfection of supercoiled plasmid and intracellular genome release via 4-OH-tamoxifen-induced nuclear translocation of I-SceI, we improved CAV-2 vector titers 1,000 fold, and in turn increased the efficacy of CAV-2 vector generation.

  17. Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vector Generation via I-Sce1-Mediated Intracellular Genome Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanes, Sandy; Kremer, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    When canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2, or also commonly referred to as CAV-2) vectors are injected into the brain parenchyma they preferentially transduce neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent regions, and allow transgene expression for at last >1 yr. Yet, translating these data into a user-friendly vector platform has been limited because CAV-2 vector generation is challenging. Generation of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors often requires transfection of linear DNA fragments of >30 kb containing the vector genome into an E1-transcomplementing cell line. In contrast to human adenovirus type 5 vector generation, CAV-2 vector generation is less efficient due, in part, to a reduced ability to initiate replication and poor transfectibility of canine cells with large, linear DNA fragments. To improve CAV-2 vector generation, we generated an E1-transcomplementing cell line expressing the estrogen receptor (ER) fused to I-SceI, a yeast meganuclease, and plasmids containing the I-SceI recognition sites flanking the CAV-2 vector genome. Using transfection of supercoiled plasmid and intracellular genome release via 4-OH-tamoxifen-induced nuclear translocation of I-SceI, we improved CAV-2 vector titers 1,000 fold, and in turn increased the efficacy of CAV-2 vector generation. PMID:23936483

  18. Gene therapy of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wei; Tan Jian

    2007-01-01

    Normally, differentiated thyroid carcinoma(DTC) is a disease of good prognosis, but about 30% of the tumors are dedifferentiate, which are inaccessible to standard therapeutic procedures such as 'operation, 131 I therapy and thyroid hormone'. Both internal and abroad experts are researching a new therapy of dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma--gene therapy. Many of them utilize methods of it, but follow different strategies: (1) transduction of the thyroid sodium/iodide transporter gene to make tissues that do not accumulate iodide treatable by 131 I therapy; (2) strengthening of the anti-tumor immune response; (3) suicide gene therapy; (4) depression the generation of tumor cells; (5) gene therapy of anti- vascularization. (authors)

  19. Large-scale adenovirus and poxvirus-vectored vaccine manufacturing to enable clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Héla; Kamen, Amine A

    2015-05-01

    Efforts to make vaccines against infectious diseases and immunotherapies for cancer have evolved to utilize a variety of heterologous expression systems such as viral vectors. These vectors are often attenuated or engineered to safely deliver genes encoding antigens of different pathogens. Adenovirus and poxvirus vectors are among the viral vectors that are most frequently used to develop prophylactic vaccines against infectious diseases as well as therapeutic cancer vaccines. This mini-review describes the trends and processes in large-scale production of adenovirus and poxvirus vectors to meet the needs of clinical applications. We briefly describe the general principles for the production and purification of adenovirus and poxvirus viral vectors. Currently, adenovirus and poxvirus vector manufacturing methods rely on well-established cell culture technologies. Several improvements have been evaluated to increase the yield and to reduce the overall manufacturing cost, such as cultivation at high cell densities and continuous downstream processing. Additionally, advancements in vector characterization will greatly facilitate the development of novel vectored vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

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    Hossein Mostafa Elbadawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis.

  1. Simian virus 40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppenheim Ariella

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. One of the primary organs affected by sepsis is the lung, presenting as the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. Organ damage in sepsis involves an alteration in gene expression, making gene transfer a potential therapeutic modality. This work examines the feasibility of applying simian virus 40 (SV40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy. Methods Sepsis-induced ARDS was established by cecal ligation double puncture (2CLP. SV40 vectors carrying the luciferase reporter gene (SV/luc were administered intratracheally immediately after sepsis induction. Sham operated (SO as well as 2CLP rats given intratracheal PBS or adenovirus expressing luciferase served as controls. Luc transduction was evaluated by in vivo light detection, immunoassay and luciferase mRNA detection by RT-PCR in tissue harvested from septic rats. Vector abundance and distribution into alveolar cells was evaluated using immunostaining for the SV40 VP1 capsid protein as well as by double staining for VP1 and for the surfactant protein C (proSP-C. Immunostaining for T-lymphocytes was used to evaluate the cellular immune response induced by the vector. Results Luc expression measured by in vivo light detection correlated with immunoassay from lung tissue harvested from the same rats. Moreover, our results showed vector presence in type II alveolar cells. The vector did not induce significant cellular immune response. Conclusion In the present study we have demonstrated efficient uptake and expression of an SV40 vector in the lungs of animals with sepsis-induced ARDS. These vectors appear to be capable of in vivo transduction of alveolar type II cells and may thus become a future therapeutic tool.

  2. Adiponectin gene therapy ameliorates high-fat, high-sucrose diet-induced metabolic perturbations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, A D; Sung, M M; Boisvenue, J J; Barr, A J; Dyck, J R B

    2012-09-10

    Adiponectin is an adipokine secreted primarily from adipose tissue that can influence circulating plasma glucose and lipid levels through multiple mechanisms involving a variety of organs. In humans, reduced plasma adiponectin levels induced by obesity are associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, suggesting that low adiponectin levels may contribute the pathogenesis of obesity-related insulin resistance. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether gene therapy designed to elevate circulating adiponectin levels is a viable strategy for ameliorating insulin resistance in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet. Electroporation-mediated gene transfer of mouse adiponectin plasmid DNA into gastrocnemius muscle resulted in elevated serum levels of globular and high-molecular weight adiponectin compared with control mice treated with empty plasmid. In comparison to HFHS-fed mice receiving empty plasmid, mice receiving adiponectin gene therapy displayed significantly decreased weight gain following 13 weeks of HFHS diet associated with reduced fat accumulation, and exhibited increased oxygen consumption and locomotor activity as measured by indirect calorimetry, suggesting increased energy expenditure in these mice. Consistent with improved whole-body metabolism, mice receiving adiponectin gene therapy also had lower blood glucose and insulin levels, improved glucose tolerance and reduced hepatic gluconeogenesis compared with control mice. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis of livers from mice receiving adiponectin gene therapy showed an increase in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin signaling proteins. Based on these data, we conclude that adiponectin gene therapy ameliorates the metabolic abnormalities caused by feeding mice a HFHS diet and may be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve obesity-mediated impairments in insulin sensitivity.

  3. Long-term preservation of retinal function in the RCS rat model of retinitis pigmentosa following lentivirus-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschernutter, M; Schlichtenbrede, F C; Howe, S; Balaggan, K S; Munro, P M; Bainbridge, J W B; Thrasher, A J; Smith, A J; Ali, R R

    2005-04-01

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is a well-characterized model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) due to a defect in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It is homozygous for a null mutation in the gene encoding , a receptor tyrosine kinase found in RPE cells, that is required for phagocytosis of shed photoreceptor outer segments. The absence of Mertk results in accumulation of outer segment debris. This subsequently leads to progressive loss of photoreceptor cells. In order to evaluate the efficacy of lentiviral-mediated gene replacement therapy in the RCS rat, we produced recombinant VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1-based lentiviruses containing a murine Mertk cDNA driven by a spleen focus forming virus (SFFV) promoter. The vector was subretinally injected into the right eye of 10-day-old RCS rats; the left eye was left untreated as an internal control. Here, we present a detailed assessment of the duration and extent of the morphological rescue and the resulting functional benefits. We examined animals at various time points over a period of 7 months by light and electron microscopy, and electroretinography. We observed correction of the phagocytic defect, slowing of photoreceptor cell loss and preservation of retinal function for up to 7 months. This study demonstrates the potential of gene therapy approaches for the treatment of retinal degenerations caused by defects specific to the RPE and supports the use of lentiviral vectors for the treatment of such disorders.

  4. Development of gene therapy: potential in severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia A Montiel-Equihua

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Claudia A Montiel-Equihua, Adrian J Thrasher, H Bobby GasparCentre for Immunodeficiency, Molecular Immunology Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UKAbstract: The history of stem cell gene therapy is strongly linked to the development of gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID and especially adenosine deaminase (ADA-deficient SCID. Here we discuss the developments achieved in over two decades of clinical and laboratory research that led to the establishment of a protocol for the autologous transplant of retroviral vector-mediated gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells, which has proved to be both successful and, to date, safe. Patients in trials in three different countries have shown long-term immunological and metabolic correction. Nevertheless, improvements to the safety profile of viral vectors are underway and will undoubtedly reinforce the position of stem cell gene therapy as a treatment option for ADA-SCID.Keywords: adenosine deaminase, severe combined immunodeficiency, gene therapy, hematopoietic stem cell, retrovirus, clinical trial

  5. Neogenesis and proliferation of β-cells induced by human betacellulin gene transduction via retrograde pancreatic duct injection of an adenovirus vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokui, Yae; Kozawa, Junji; Yamagata, Kazuya; Zhang, Jun; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Okita, Kohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Betacellulin (BTC) has been shown to have a role in the differentiation and proliferation of β-cells both in vitro and in vivo. We administered a human betacellulin (hBTC) adenovirus vector to male ICR mice via retrograde pancreatic duct injection. As a control, we administered a β-galactosidase adenovirus vector. In the mice, hBTC protein was mainly overexpressed by pancreatic duct cells. On immunohistochemical analysis, we observed features of β-cell neogenesis as newly formed insulin-positive cells in the duct cell lining or islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) closely associated with the ducts. The BrdU labeling index of β-cells was also increased by the betacellulin vector compared with that of control mice. These results indicate that hBTC gene transduction into adult pancreatic duct cells promoted β-cell differentiation (mainly from duct cells) and proliferation of pre-existing β-cells, resulting in an increase of the β-cell mass that improved glucose tolerance in diabetic mice

  6. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  7. A mosaic adenovirus possessing serotype Ad5 and serotype Ad3 knobs exhibits expanded tropism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Koichi; Reynolds, Paul N.; Short, Joshua J.; Kawakami, Yosuke; Adachi, Yasuo; Glasgow, Joel N.; Rots, Marianne G.; Krasnykh, Victor; Douglas, Joanne T.; Curiel, David T.

    2003-01-01

    The efficiency of cancer gene therapy with recombinant adenoviruses based on serotype 5 (Ad5) has been limited partly because of variable, and often low, expression by human primary cancer cells of the primary cellular-receptor which recognizes the knob domain of the fiber protein, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). As a means of circumventing CAR deficiency, Ad vectors have been retargeted by utilizing chimeric fibers possessing knob domains of alternate Ad serotypes. We have reported that ovarian cancer cells possess a primary receptor for Ad3 to which the Ad3 knob binds independently of the CAR-Ad5 knob interaction. Furthermore, an Ad5-based chimeric vector, designated Ad5/3, containing a chimeric fiber proteins possessing the Ad3 knob, demonstrates CAR-independent tropism by virtue of targeting the Ad3 receptor. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that a mosaic virus possessing both the Ad5 knob and the Ad3 knob on the same virion could utilize either primary receptor, resulting in expanded tropism. In this study, we generated a dual-knob mosaic virus by coinfection of 293 cells with Ad5-based and Ad5/3-based vectors. Characterization of the resultant virions confirmed the incorporation of both Ad5 and Ad3 knobs in the same particle. Furthermore, this mosaic virus was able to utilize either receptor, CAR and the Ad3 receptor, for virus attachment to cells. Enhanced Ad infectivity with the mosaic virus was shown in a panel of cell lines, with receptor profiles ranging from CAR-dominant to Ad3 receptor-dominant. Thus, this mosaic virus strategy may offer the potential to improve Ad-based gene therapy approaches by infectivity enhancement and tropism expansion

  8. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth / For Parents / Gene Therapy ... that don't respond to conventional therapies. About Genes Our genes help make us unique. Inherited from ...

  9. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gene & Cell Therapy Defined Gene therapy and cell therapy are overlapping fields of biomedical research that aim to repair the direct cause of genetic diseases. Read More Gene & Cell Therapy FAQ's Read the most common questions raised by ...

  10. Identification of the human ApoAV gene as a novel RORα target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Ulrika; Nilsson, Tina; McPheat, Jane; Stroemstedt, Per-Erik; Bamberg, Krister; Balendran, Clare; Kang, Daiwu

    2005-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) (NR1F1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a potential role in metabolism. Previous studies have shown that RORα regulates transcription of the murine Apolipoprotein AI gene and human Apolipoprotein CIII genes. In the present study, we present evidence that RORα also induces transcription of the human Apolipoprotein AV gene, a recently identified apolipoprotein associated with triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of RORα increased the endogenous expression of ApoAV in HepG2 cells and RORα also enhanced the activity of an ApoAV promoter construct in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Deletion and mutation studies identified three AGGTCA motifs in the ApoAV promoter that mediate RORα transactivation, one of which overlaps with a previously identified binding site for PPARα. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby RORα modulates lipid metabolism and implies RORα as a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis

  11. Phase I/II trial evaluating combined radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer--A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, Bin S.; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Kernen, Kenneth; Chou, C.-C.; Shalev, Moshe; Vlachaki, Maria T.; Miles, Brian; Kadmon, Dov; Mai, W.-Y.; Caillouet, James; Davis, Maria; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas; Brady, Jett; Carpenter, L. Steve; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Woo, Shiao Y.; Thompson, Timothy; Butler, E. Brian

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To report the preliminary results of a Phase I/II study combining radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy (adenovirus/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/valacyclovir) with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Arm A: low-risk patients (T1-T2a, Gleason score <7, pretreatment PSA <10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy. A mean dose of 76 Gy was delivered to the prostate with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Arm B: high-risk patients (T2b-T3, Gleason score ≥7, pretreatment PSA ≥10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy and hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy was comprised of a 4-month leuprolide injection and 2-week use of flutamide. Arm C: Stage D1 (positive pelvic lymph node) patients received the same regimen as Arm B, with the additional 45 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics. Treatment-related toxicity was assessed using Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program common toxicity score and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity score. Results: Thirty patients (13 in Arm A, 14 in Arm B, and 3 in Arm C) completed the trial. Median follow-up was 5.5 months. Eleven patients (37%) developed flu-like symptoms (Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Grade 1) of fatigue and chills/rigors after gene therapy injection but recovered within 24 h. Four patients (13%) and 2 patients (7%) developed Grade 1 and 2 fever, respectively. There was no patient with weight loss. One patient in Arm B developed Grade 3 elevation in liver enzyme, whereas 11 and 2 patients developed Grade 1 and 2 abnormal liver function tests. There was no Grade 2 or above hematologic toxicity. Three patients had transient rise in creatinine. There was no RTOG Grade 3 or above lower gastrointestinal toxicity. Toxicity levels were as follows: 4 patients (13%), Grade 2; 6 patients (20%), Grade 1; and 20 patients (67%), no toxicity. There was 1 patient with RTOG Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, 12 patients (40%) with Grade 2, 8 patients

  12. Comparison of human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression between lentiviral and adenoviral vectors in rat mesenchymal stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Heui Ran; Kim, Hyun Joo; Chung, June Key; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirus-mediated delivery systems has not been done. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated stably hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning the hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and Rad-hNIS transduced rMSC (adeno-hNIS-rMSC) was evaluated for the hNIS expression 48 hours post infection at MOI 1, 5, 20, 50, and 100. The hNIS expression in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC was assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry using mono-clonal anti-hNIS antibody revealed that intensity of hNIS immunoreactivity in lenti-hNIS-rMSC was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOl 20 but lower than that at MOl 50. Western blot analysis also showed that lenti-hNIS-rMSC was intermediate between adeno-hNIS-rMSCs at MOl 20 and 50 in hNIS expression. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (297046659 picomole/106 cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (61682134 picomole/106 cells). These results suggest that lentivirus mediated hNIS expression is greater in terms of hNIS function but lower in terms of hNIS protein amount than adenovirus mediated hNIS expression 48 hours post infection. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative viral efficiency of transgene expression

  13. Genotype differentiation of Agamid Adenovirus 1 in bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) in the USA by hexon gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Derek B; Archer, Linda L; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2009-07-01

    Bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) are popular pets in the United States. Agamid Adenovirus 1 (AgAdV1) is an important infectious agent of bearded dragons. The only AgAdV1 sequences available to date are from a highly conserved region of the DNA polymerase gene. Degenerate primers were designed to amplify a variable region of the AgAdV1 hexon gene for sequencing. Genetic differences were identified within the hexon gene of 17 bearded dragons from 4 collections. Much less diversity was present in the polymerase gene. Bayesian analysis of the hexon nucleotide alignment identified two larger groups and two isolates that did not tightly cluster with these two groups. Multiple genotypes were identified within collections, and individual genotypes were seen in different collections. Three bearded dragons appeared to be infected by multiple strains. These findings show that this hexon region is useful for AgAdV1 genotyping, which can be used epidemiologically as well as in future investigations of AgAdV1 evolution and clinical implications of strain differences.

  14. Evidence of molecular evolution driven by recombination events influencing tropism in a novel human adenovirus that causes epidemic keratoconjunctivitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Walsh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, a human adenovirus strain (formerly known as HAdV-D22/H8 but renamed here HAdV-D53 was isolated from an outbreak of epidemic keratoconjunctititis (EKC, a disease that is usually caused by HAdV-D8, -D19, or -D37, not HAdV-D22. To date, a complete change of tropism compared to the prototype has never been observed, although apparent recombinant strains of other viruses from species Human adenovirus D (HAdV-D have been described. The complete genome of HAdV-D53 was sequenced to elucidate recombination events that lead to the emergence of a viable and highly virulent virus with a modified tropism. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses of this genome demonstrate that this adenovirus is a recombinant of HAdV-D8 (including the fiber gene encoding the primary cellular receptor binding site, HAdV-D22, (the epsilon determinant of the hexon gene, HAdV-D37 (including the penton base gene encoding the secondary cellular receptor binding site, and at least one unknown or unsequenced HAdV-D strain. Bootscanning analysis of the complete genomic sequence of this novel adenovirus, which we have re-named HAdV-D53, indicated at least five recombination events between the aforementioned adenoviruses. Intrahexon recombination sites perfectly framed the epsilon neutralization determinant that was almost identical to the HAdV-D22 prototype. Additional bootscan analysis of all HAdV-D hexon genes revealed recombinations in identical locations in several other adenoviruses. In addition, HAdV-D53 but not HAdV-D22 induced corneal inflammation in a mouse model. Serological analysis confirmed previous results and demonstrated that HAdV-D53 has a neutralization profile representative of the epsilon determinant of its hexon (HAdV-D22 and the fiber (HAdV-D8 proteins. Our recombinant hexon sequence is almost identical to the hexon sequences of the HAdV-D strain causing EKC outbreaks in Japan, suggesting that HAdV-D53 is pandemic as an emerging EKC agent. This documents

  15. Adenovirus serotype 7 associated with a severe lower respiratory tract disease outbreak in infants in Shaanxi Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wenbo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia caused by adenovirus infection is usually severe especially with adenovirus serotype 7 commonly associated with lower respiratory tract disease outbreaks. We reported an outbreak of 70 cases of severe pneumonia with one death of infants in Shaanxi Province, China. Sampling showed adenovirus 7 (Ad7 as the primary pathogen with some co-infections. Results Two strains of adenovirus and two strains of enterovirus were isolated, the 21 pharynx swabs showed 14 positive amplifications for adenovirus; three co-infections with respiratory syncytial virus, two positive for rhinovirus, one positive for parainfluenza 3, and four negative. Adenovirus typing showed nine of the nine adenovirus positive samples were HAdV-7, three were HAdV-3 and two were too weak to perform sequencing. The entire hexon gene of adenovirus was sequenced and analyzed for the two adenovirus serotype 7 isolates, showing the nucleic acid homology was 99.8% between the two strains and 99.5% compared to the reference strain HAdV-7 (GenBank accession number AY769946. For the 21 acute phase serum samples from the 21 patients, six samples had positives results for ELISA detection of HAdV IgA, and the neutralization titers of the convalescent-phase samples were four times higher than those of the acute-phase samples in nine pairs. Conclusions We concluded adenovirus was the viral pathogen, primarily HAdV-7, with some co-infections responsible for the outbreak. This is the first report of an infant pneumonia outbreak caused by adenovirus serotype 7 in Shaanxi Province, China.

  16. Non-Replicating Adenovirus-Vectored Anthrax Vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Kampen, K. R.; Zhang, J.; Jex, E.; Tang, D. C.

    2007-01-01

    As bioterrorism is emerging as a national threat, it is urgent to develop a new generation of anthrax vaccines that can be rapidly produced and mass administered in an emergency setting. We have demonstrated that protective immunity against anthrax spores could be elicited in mice by intranasal administration of a non-replicating human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-derived vector encoding Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in a single-dose regimen. The potency of an Ad5 vector encoding PA was remarkably enhanced by codon optimization of the PA gene to match the tRNA pool found in human cells. This nasal vaccine can be mass-administered by non-medical personnel during a bioterrorist attack. In addition, replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free Ad5-vectored anthrax vaccines can be mass produced in PER.C6 cells in serum-free wave bioreactors and purified by column chromatography to meet a surge in demand. The non-replicating nature of this new generation of anthrax vaccine ensures an excellent safety profile for vaccines and the environment.(author)

  17. Gene therapy: theoretical and bioethical concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin R

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise. Somatic gene therapy has the potential to treat a wide range of disorders, including inherited conditions, cancers, and infectious diseases. Early progress has already been made in the treatment of a range of disorders. Ethical issues surrounding somatic gene therapy are primarily those concerned with safety. Germline gene therapy is theoretically possible but raises serious ethical concerns concerning future generations.

  18. Targeted decorin gene therapy delivered with adeno-associated virus effectively retards corneal neovascularization in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv R Mohan

    Full Text Available Decorin, small leucine-rich proteoglycan, has been shown to modulate angiogenesis in nonocular tissues. This study tested a hypothesis that tissue-selective targeted decorin gene therapy delivered to the rabbit stroma with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5 impedes corneal neovascularization (CNV in vivo without significant side effects. An established rabbit CNV model was used. Targeted decorin gene therapy in the rabbit stroma was delivered with a single topical AAV5 titer (100 µl; 5×10(12 vg/ml application onto the stroma for two minutes after removing corneal epithelium. The levels of CNV were examined with stereomicroscopy, H&E staining, lectin, collagen type IV, CD31 immunocytochemistry and CD31 immunoblotting. Real-time PCR quantified mRNA expression of pro- and anti-angiogenic genes. Corneal health in live animals was monitored with clinical, slit-lamp and optical coherence tomography biomicroscopic examinations. Selective decorin delivery into stroma showed significant 52% (p<0.05, 66% (p<0.001, and 63% (p<0.01 reduction at early (day 5, mid (day 10, and late (day 14 stages of CNV in decorin-delivered rabbit corneas compared to control (no decorin delivered corneas in morphometric analysis. The H&E staining, lectin, collagen type IV, CD31 immunostaining (57-65, p<0.5, and CD31 immunoblotting (62-67%, p<0.05 supported morphometric findings. Quantitative PCR studies demonstrated decorin gene therapy down-regulated expression of VEGF, MCP1 and angiopoietin (pro-angiogenic and up-regulated PEDF (anti-angiogenic genes. The clinical, biomicroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy is safe for the cornea. Tissue-targeted AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy decreases CNV with no major side effects, and could potentially be used for treating patients.

  19. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  20. Experimental research of radiogenic therapy on human melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Fengling; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong; Li Wenjiang; Liu Bing; Zhou Qingming; Duan Xin; Zhou Guangming; Gao Qingxiang

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the effect of low dose irradiation on gene transfer efficiency and the effect of adenoviral-mediated exogenous P53 overexpression on radiosensitivity of radioresistant human melanoma cell line A375 with wild type p53, control vector, a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing a CMV promoter and green fluorescent protein (AdCMV-GFP), was used to transfect the A375 cells preirradiated with or without 1 Gy X-ray radiation. The transduction efficiency of GFP gene was determined with fluorescence microscope directly. A375 cells radiated by 1 Gy X-ray were transfected with a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector carrying human wild p53 were detected using flow cytometry (FCM) at different time after transfection. The radiosensitivity of A375 cells after p53 transduction was assayed by clonoy formation. The authors found that 1 Gy exposure increased the gene transfer efficiency of A375 cells. The expression of exogenous P53 was found to be 60% to 80% of transfected cells during the first three days after transduction and then declined continuously down to the control level on the day 10. The G1 cell cycle arrest was also observed after p53 gene transfer. A375 cells that were transfected with p53 showed higher sensitivity of X-ray-induced cell killing than those cells that either were transfected with the viral vector carrying a green fluorescent protein gene or were not transfected at all. Low dose ionizing radiation can improve gene transfer efficiency of A375 cells mediated by adenovirus vector. Althrough the overexpresion of exogenous P53 may not inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of melanoma cell line A375 in vitro, it made the tumor cells much sensitive to death by irradiation. the data suggested that p53 gene might be a potential gene for melanoma therapy and provide the experimental evidences to clinically using the combination of radiation with gene therapy on melanoma. Namely, there may be a reduction of

  1. Recent trends in the gene therapy of β-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finotti A

    2015-02-01

    significant developments in β-thalassemia gene therapy over the last decade, with a strong emphasis on the most recent findings, for β-thalassemia model systems; for β-, γ-, and anti-sickling β-globin gene addition and combinatorial approaches including the latest results of clinical trials; and for novel approaches, such as transgene-mediated activation of γ-globin and genome editing using designer nucleases. Keywords: Thalassemia, gene therapy, HbF induction, transcription factors, induced pluripotent stem cells, genome editing, TALEN, CRISPR, ZFN

  2. Recovery of behavioral symptoms in hemi-parkinsonian rhesus monkeys through combined gene and stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Sun, Maosheng; Li, Hongjun; Yan, Min; He, Zhanlong; Wang, Wenju; Wang, Wanpu; Lu, Shuaiyao

    2013-04-01

    The use of adipose mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs) in cellular and genic therapy has attracted considerable attention as a possible treatment for neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease. However, the effects of gene therapy combined with intracerebral cell transplantation have not been well defined. Recent studies have demonstrated the respective roles of LIM homeobox transcription factor 1, alpha (LMX1A) and Neurturin (NTN) in the commitment of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to a midbrain dopaminergic neuronal fate and the commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells to cells supporting the nutrition and protection of neurons. We investigated a novel in vitro neuronal differentiation strategy with the use of LMX1A and Neurturin. We were able to elicit a neural phenotype regarding cell morphology, specific gene/protein expression and physiological function. Neuronal-primed ASCs derived from rhesus monkey (rASCs) combined with adenovirus containing NTN and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) (Ad-NTN-TH) were implanted into the striatum and substantia nigra of methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rhesus monkeys. Monkeys were monitored with the use of behavioral tests and health measures until the fourth month after implantation. The differentiated cells transcribed and expressed a variety of dopaminergic neuron-specific genes involved in the SHH/LMX1A pathway. Single-photon emission computed tomography analysis and postmortem analysis revealed that the grafting of rASCs combined with Ad-NTN-TH had neuroprotective effects compared with Ad-NTN-TH or rASCs alone. Behavioral measures demonstrated autograft survival and symptom amelioration. These findings may lead to cellular sources for autologous transplantation of Parkinson disease. Combined transplantation of Ad-NTN-TH and induced rASCs expressing LMX1A and NTN may be a better therapy candidate for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Copyright © 2013 International Society

  3. Targeting adenovirus gene delivery to activated tumour-associated vasculature via endothelial selectins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bachtarzi, H.; Stevenson, M.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Seymour, L. W.; Fisher, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 150, č. 2 (2011), s. 196-203 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : E-selectin * pHPMA * adenovirus Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 5.732, year: 2011

  4. The complete genome sequence of human adenovirus 84, a highly recombinant new Human mastadenovirus D type with a unique fiber gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaján, Győző L; Kajon, Adriana E; Pinto, Alexis Castillo; Bartha, Dániel; Arnberg, Niklas

    2017-10-15

    A novel human adenovirus was isolated from a pediatric case of acute respiratory disease in Panama City, Panama in 2011. The clinical isolate was initially identified as an intertypic recombinant based on hexon and fiber gene sequencing. Based on the analysis of its complete genome sequence, the novel complex recombinant Human mastadenovirus D (HAdV-D) strain was classified into a new HAdV type: HAdV-84, and it was designated Adenovirus D human/PAN/P309886/2011/84[P43H17F84]. HAdV-D types possess usually an ocular or gastrointestinal tropism, and respiratory association is scarcely reported. The virus has a novel fiber type, most closely related to, but still clearly distant from that of HAdV-36. The predicted fiber is hypothesised to bind sialic acid with lower affinity compared to HAdV-37. Bioinformatic analysis of the complete genomic sequence of HAdV-84 revealed multiple homologous recombination events and provided deeper insight into HAdV evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment Genes in Gene Therapy Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, John M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2013-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapy using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors is a promising approach to provide life-long correction for genetic defects. HSC gene therapy clinical studies have resulted in functional cures for several diseases, but in some studies clonal expansion or leukemia has occurred. This is due to the dyregulation of endogenous host gene expression from vector provirus insertional mutagenesis. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replicating retroviruses have been used extensively to identify genes that influence oncogenesis. However, retroviral mutagenesis screens can also be used to determine the role of genes in biological processes such as stem cell engraftment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential for vector insertion site data from gene therapy studies to provide novel insights into mechanisms of HSC engraftment. In HSC gene therapy studies dysregulation of host genes by replication-incompetent vector proviruses may lead to enrichment of repopulating clones with vector integrants near genes that influence engraftment. Thus, data from HSC gene therapy studies can be used to identify novel candidate engraftment genes. As HSC gene therapy use continues to expand, the vector insertion site data collected will be of great interest to help identify novel engraftment genes and may ultimately lead to new therapies to improve engraftment.

  6. Identification of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Hexon Regions That Interact with Scavenger Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, Reeti; Reddy, Vijay S.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Barry, Michael A. (Scripps); (Mayo)

    2012-05-04

    Most of an intravenous dose of species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is destroyed by liver Kupffer cells. In contrast, another species C virus, Ad6, evades these cells to mediate more efficient liver gene delivery. Given that this difference in Kupffer cell interaction is mediated by the hypervariable (HVR) loops of the virus hexon protein, we genetically modified each of the seven HVRs of Ad5 with a cysteine residue to enable conditional blocking of these sites with polyethylene glycol (PEG). We show that these modifications do not affect in vitro virus transduction. In contrast, after intravenous injection, targeted PEGylation at HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 increased viral liver transduction up to 20-fold. Elimination or saturation of liver Kupffer cells did not significantly affect this increase in the liver transduction. In vitro, PEGylation blocked uptake of viruses via the Kupffer cell scavenger receptor SRA-II. These data suggest that HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 of Ad5 may be involved in Kupffer cell recognition and subsequent destruction. These data also demonstrate that this conditional genetic-chemical mutation strategy is a useful tool for investigating the interactions of viruses with host tissues.

  7. Full genome analysis of a novel adenovirus from the South Polar skua (Catharacta maccormicki) in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yon Mi; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Gu, Se Hun; Lee, Sook Young; Lee, Min-Goo; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hak Jun; Song, Jin-Won

    2012-01-05

    Adenoviruses have been identified in humans and a wide range of vertebrate animals, but not previously from the polar region. Here, we report the entire 26,340-bp genome of a novel adenovirus, detected by PCR, in tissues of six of nine South Polar skuas (Catharacta maccormicki), collected in Lake King Sejong, King George Island, Antarctica, from 2007 to 2009. The DNA polymerase, penton base, hexon and fiber genes of the South Polar skua adenovirus (SPSAdV) exhibited 68.3%, 75.4%, 74.9% and 48.0% nucleotide sequence similarity with their counterparts in turkey hemorrhagic enteritis virus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the entire genome revealed that SPSAdV belonged to the genus Siadenovirus, family Adenoviridae. This is the first evidence of a novel adenovirus, SPSAdV, from a large polar seabird (family Stercorariidae) in Antarctica. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The organotypic multicellular spheroid is a relevant three-dimensional model to study adenovirus replication and penetration in human tumors in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L. M.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; Dirven, Clemens M.; Pherai, D. Shareen; Kater, Mathijs; van der Valk, Paul; Vogels, Ronald; Vandertop, W. Peter; Pinedo, Herbert M.; Curiel, David T.; Gerritsen, Winald R.

    2002-01-01

    The use of adenoviruses for gene transfer and as oncolytic agents is currently receiving widespread attention. As specific constraints to adenovirus distribution and spread cannot be studied in cell cultures, there is a need for an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) model mimicking the in vivo biology

  9. The Revolution in Viral Genomics as Exemplified by the Bioinformatic Analysis of Human Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Torres

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 30 years, genomic and bioinformatic analysis of human adenoviruses has been achieved using a variety of DNA sequencing methods; initially with the use of restriction enzymes and more currently with the use of the GS FLX pyrosequencing technology. Following the conception of DNA sequencing in the 1970s, analysis of adenoviruses has evolved from 100 base pair mRNA fragments to entire genomes. Comparative genomics of adenoviruses made its debut in 1984 when nucleotides and amino acids of coding sequences within the hexon genes of two human adenoviruses (HAdV, HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5, were compared and analyzed. It was determined that there were three different zones (1-393, 394-1410, 1411-2910 within the hexon gene, of which HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5 shared zones 1 and 3 with 95% and 89.5% nucleotide identity, respectively. In 1992, HAdV-C5 became the first adenovirus genome to be fully sequenced using the Sanger method. Over the next seven years, whole genome analysis and characterization was completed using bioinformatic tools such as blastn, tblastx, ClustalV and FASTA, in order to determine key proteins in species HAdV-A through HAdV-F. The bioinformatic revolution was initiated with the introduction of a novel species, HAdV-G, that was typed and named by the use of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetics as opposed to traditional serology. HAdV bioinformatics will continue to advance as the latest sequencing technology enables scientists to add to and expand the resource databases. As a result of these advancements, how novel HAdVs are typed has changed. Bioinformatic analysis has become the revolutionary tool that has significantly accelerated the in-depth study of HAdV microevolution through comparative genomics.

  10. Transformation and oncogenicity by Adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Eb, A.J. van der

    1984-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted considerable attention since it was discovered by TRENTIN et all. and HUEBNER et al. that certain species (formerly called serotypes) are oncogenic when injected into newborn hamsters. Since then, adenoviruses have been used extensively as a model for studies on tumor

  11. Gene transfer technology and genetic radioisotope targeting therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiaqiong; Wang Zizheng

    2004-01-01

    With deeper cognition about mechanisms of disease at the cellular and molecular level, gene therapy has become one of the most important research fields in medical molecular biology at present. Gene transfer technology plays an important role during the course of gene therapy, and further improvement should be made about vectors carrying target gene sequences. Also, gene survey is needed during gene therapy, and gene imaging is the most effective method. The combination of gene therapy and targeted radiotherapy, that is, 'Genetic Radioisotope Targeting Therapy', will be a novel approach to tumor gene therapy

  12. Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Amplicon Vector–Mediated Gene Expression in Human Glioma Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kaestle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector–mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP. After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector–mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application—injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  13. Evaluating Risks of Insertional Mutagenesis by DNA Transposons in Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Perry B.; Largaespada, David A.; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2013-01-01

    Investigational therapy can be successfully undertaken using viral- and non-viral-mediated ex vivo gene transfer. Indeed, recent clinical trials have established the potential for genetically modified T cells to improve and restore health. Recently the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system has been applied in clinical trials to stably insert a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to redirect T-cell specificity. We discuss the context in which the SB system can be harnessed for gene therapy and describe the human application of SB-modified CAR+ T cells. We have focused on theoretical issues relating to insertional mutagenesis in the context of human genomes that are naturally subjected to remobilization of transposons and the experimental evidence over the last decade of employing SB transposons for defining genes that induce cancer. These findings are put into the context of the use of SB transposons in the treatment of human disease. PMID:23313630

  14. Construction and evaluation of novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vaccine vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N; Iampietro, M Justin; Bricault, Christine A; Teigler, Jeffrey E; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-02-01

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. The phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. Here we describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors. Although there have been substantial efforts in the development of vaccine vectors from human and chimpanzee adenoviruses, far less is known about rhesus monkey adenoviruses. In this report, we describe the isolation and vectorization of three novel rhesus monkey adenoviruses. These vectors exhibit virologic and immunologic characteristics that make them attractive as potential candidate vaccine vectors for both HIV-1 and other pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. An Update on Canine Adenovirus Type 2 and Its Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru, Thierry; Salinas, Sara; Kremer, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors have significant potential for long- or short-term gene transfer. Preclinical and clinical studies using human derived adenoviruses (HAd) have demonstrated the feasibility of flexible hybrid vector designs, robust expression and induction of protective immunity. However, clinical use of HAd vectors can, under some conditions, be limited by pre-existing vector immunity. Pre-existing humoral and cellular anti-capsid immunity limits the efficacy and duration of transgene expression and is poorly circumvented by injections of larger doses and immuno-suppressing drugs. This review updates canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV-2, also known as CAdV-2) biology and gives an overview of the generation of early region 1 (E1)-deleted to helper-dependent (HD) CAV-2 vectors. We also summarize the essential characteristics concerning their interaction with the anti-HAd memory immune responses in humans, the preferential transduction of neurons, and its high level of retrograde axonal transport in the central and peripheral nervous system. CAV-2 vectors are particularly interesting tools to study the pathophysiology and potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as anti-tumoral and anti-viral vaccines, tracer of synaptic junctions, oncolytic virus and as a platform to generate chimeric vectors. PMID:21994722

  16. Gene Therapy Mediated Breast Cancer Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nesbit, Heike

    1999-01-01

    .... POE2 is produced by the cyclooxygenase (COX) mediated oxidation of arachidonic acid. The inhibition of COX activity in B7-1 expressing MDA-MB 231 cells restored the proliferative response of T cells...

  17. Intracellular delivery of potential therapeutic genes: prospects in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Athirah; Sayyad, Mustak; Rosli, Rozita; Maruyama, Atsushi; Chowdhury, Ezharul H

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with poor survival rates owing to the development of cellular resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of targetability, resulting in unwanted adverse effects on healthy cells and necessitating the lowering of therapeutic dose with consequential lower efficacy of the treatment. Gene therapy employing different types of viral and non-viral carriers to transport gene(s) of interest and facilitating production of the desirable therapeutic protein(s) has tremendous prospects in cancer treatments due to the high-level of specificity in therapeutic action of the expressed protein(s) with diminished off-target effects, although cancer cell-specific delivery of transgene(s) still poses some challenges to be addressed. Depending on the potential therapeutic target genes, cancer gene therapy could be categorized into tumor suppressor gene replacement therapy, immune gene therapy and enzyme- or prodrug-based therapy. This review would shed light on the current progress of delivery of potentially therapeutic genes into various cancer cells in vitro and animal models utilizing a variety of viral and non-viral vectors.

  18. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2004-01-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells

  19. Development of replication-deficient adenovirus malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Michael R; Sedegah, Martha; Limbach, Keith

    2017-03-01

    Malaria remains a major threat to endemic populations and travelers, including military personnel to these areas. A malaria vaccine is feasible, as radiation attenuated sporozoites induce nearly 100% efficacy. Areas covered: This review covers current malaria clinical trials using adenoviruses and pre-clinical research. Heterologous prime-boost regimens, including replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 (HuAd5) carrying malaria antigens, are efficacious. However, efficacy appears to be adversely affected by pre-existing anti-HuAd5 antibodies. Current strategies focus on replacing HuAd5 with rarer human adenoviruses or adenoviruses isolated from non-human primates (NHPs). The chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 is undergoing evaluation in clinical trials including infants in malaria-endemic areas. Key antigens have been identified and are being used alone, in combination, or with protein subunit vaccines. Gorilla adenoviruses carrying malaria antigens are also currently being evaluated in preclinical models. These replacement adenovirus vectors will be successfully used to develop vaccines against malaria, as well as other infectious diseases. Expert commentary: Simplified prime-boost single shot regimens, dry-coated live vector vaccines or silicon microneedle arrays could be developed for malaria or other vaccines. Replacement vectors with similar or superior immunogenicity have rapidly advanced, and several are now in extensive Phase 2 and beyond in malaria as well as other diseases, notably Ebola.

  20. Endocrine aspects of cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Boscaro, Marco; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-02-01

    The field of cancer gene therapy is in continuous expansion, and technology is quickly moving ahead as far as gene targeting and regulation of gene expression are concerned. This review focuses on the endocrine aspects of gene therapy, including the possibility to exploit hormone and hormone receptor functions for regulating therapeutic gene expression, the use of endocrine-specific genes as new therapeutic tools, the effects of viral vector delivery and transgene expression on the endocrine system, and the endocrine response to viral vector delivery. Present ethical concerns of gene therapy and the risk of germ cell transduction are also discussed, along with potential lines of innovation to improve cell and gene targeting.

  1. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer

  2. The retrograde delivery of adenovirus vector carrying the gene for brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects neurons and oligodendrocytes from apoptosis in the chronically compressed spinal cord of twy/twy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Hirai, Takayuki; Yayama, Takafumi; Chen, Kebing; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Johnson, William Eustace; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2012-12-15

    The twy/twy mouse undergoes spontaneous chronic mechanical compression of the spinal cord; this in vivo model system was used to examine the effects of retrograde adenovirus (adenoviral vector [AdV])-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene delivery to spinal neural cells. To investigate the targeting and potential neuroprotective effect of retrograde AdV-mediated BDNF gene transfection in the chronically compressed spinal cord in terms of prevention of apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes. Several studies have investigated the neuroprotective effects of neurotrophins, including BDNF, in spinal cord injury. However, no report has described the effects of retrograde neurotrophic factor gene delivery in compressed spinal cords, including gene targeting and the potential to prevent neural cell apoptosis. AdV-BDNF or AdV-LacZ (as a control gene) was injected into the bilateral sternomastoid muscles of 18-week old twy/twy mice for retrograde gene delivery via the spinal accessory motor neurons. Heterozygous Institute of Cancer Research mice (+/twy), which do not undergo spontaneous spinal compression, were used as a control for the effects of such compression on gene delivery. The localization and cell specificity of β-galactosidase expression (produced by LacZ gene transfection) and BDNF expression in the spinal cord were examined by coimmunofluorescence staining for neural cell markers (NeuN, neurons; reactive immunology protein, oligodendrocytes; glial fibrillary acidic protein, astrocytes; OX-42, microglia) 4 weeks after gene injection. The possible neuroprotection afforded by retrograde AdV-BDNF gene delivery versus AdV-LacZ-transfected control mice was assessed by scoring the prevalence of apoptotic cells (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling-positive cells) and immunoreactivity to active caspases -3, -8, and -9, p75, neurofilament 200 kD (NF), and for the oligodendroglial progenitor marker, NG2. RESULTS

  3. Changes in rat spinal cord gene expression after inflammatory hyperalgesia of the joint and manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlen, Rachel L; Singh, Vineet K; Pazdernik, Vanessa K; Towns, Lex C; Snider, Eric J; Sargentini, Neil J; Degenhardt, Brian F

    2014-10-01

    Mobilization of a joint affects local tissue directly but may also have other effects that are mediated through the central nervous system. To identify differential gene expression in the spinal cords of rats with or without inflammatory joint injury after manual therapy or no treatment. Rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups: no injury and no touch (NI/NT), injury and no touch (I/NT), no injury and manual therapy (NI/MT), and injury and manual therapy (I/MT). We induced acute inflammatory joint injury in the rats by injecting carrageenan into an ankle. Rats in the no-injury groups did not receive carrageenan injection. One day after injury, rats received manual therapy to the knee of the injured limb. Rats in the no-touch groups were anesthetized without receiving manual therapy. Spinal cords were harvested 30 minutes after therapy or no touch, and spinal cord gene expression was analyzed by microarray for 3 comparisons: NI/NT vs I/NT, I/MT vs I/NT, and NI/NT vs NI/MT. Three rats were assigned to each group. Of 38,875 expressed sequence tags, 755 were differentially expressed in the NI/NT vs I/NT comparison. For the other comparisons, no expressed sequence tags were differentially expressed. Cluster analysis revealed that the differentially expressed sequence tags were over-represented in several categories, including ion homeostasis (enrichment score, 2.29), transmembrane (enrichment score, 1.55), and disulfide bond (enrichment score, 2.04). An inflammatory injury to the ankle of rats caused differential expression of genes in the spinal cord. Consistent with other studies, genes involved in ion transport were among those affected. However, manual therapy to the knees of injured limbs or to rats without injury did not alter gene expression in the spinal cord. Thus, evidence for central nervous system mediation of manual therapy was not observed. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  4. Immunizing Patients With Metastatic Melanoma Using Recombinant Adenoviruses Encoding MART-1 or gp100 Melanoma Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Zhai, Yifan; Yang, James C.; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J.; Hwu, Patrick; Marincola, Francesco M.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Seipp, Claudia A.; Einhorn, Jan H.; Roberts, Bruce; White, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The characterization of the genes encoding melanoma-associated antigens MART-1 or gp100, recognized by T cells, has opened new possibilities for the development of immunization strategies for patients with metastatic melanoma. With the use of recombinant adenoviruses expressing either MART-1 or gp100 to immunize patients with metastatic melanoma, we evaluated the safety, immunologic, and potential therapeutic aspects of these immunizations. Methods: In phase I studies, 54 patients received escalating doses (between 107 and 1011 plaque-forming units) of recombinant adenovirus encoding either MART-1 or gp100 melanoma antigen administered either alone or followed by the administration of interleukin 2 (IL-2). The immunologic impact of these immunizations on the development of cellular and antibody reactivity was assayed. Results: Recombinant adenoviruses expressing MART-1 or gp100 were safely administered. One of 16 patients with metastatic melanoma receiving the recombinant adenovirus MART-1 alone experienced a complete response. Other patients achieved objective responses, but they had received IL-2 along with an adenovirus, and their responses could be attributed to the cytokine. Immunologic assays showed no consistent immunization to the MART-1 or gp100 transgenes expressed by the recombinant adenoviruses. High levels of neutralizing antibody were found in the pretreatment sera of the patients. Conclusions: High doses of recombinant adenoviruses could be safely administered to cancer patients. High levels of neutralizing antibody present in patients' sera prior to treatment may have impaired the ability of these viruses to immunize patients against melanoma antigens. PMID:9862627

  5. Identification of the human ApoAV gene as a novel ROR{alpha} target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Ulrika [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Nilsson, Tina [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); McPheat, Jane [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Stroemstedt, Per-Erik [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Bamberg, Krister [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Balendran, Clare [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Kang, Daiwu [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden)

    2005-04-29

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-{alpha} (ROR{alpha}) (NR1F1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a potential role in metabolism. Previous studies have shown that ROR{alpha} regulates transcription of the murine Apolipoprotein AI gene and human Apolipoprotein CIII genes. In the present study, we present evidence that ROR{alpha} also induces transcription of the human Apolipoprotein AV gene, a recently identified apolipoprotein associated with triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ROR{alpha} increased the endogenous expression of ApoAV in HepG2 cells and ROR{alpha} also enhanced the activity of an ApoAV promoter construct in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Deletion and mutation studies identified three AGGTCA motifs in the ApoAV promoter that mediate ROR{alpha} transactivation, one of which overlaps with a previously identified binding site for PPAR{alpha}. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby ROR{alpha} modulates lipid metabolism and implies ROR{alpha} as a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

  6. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumov, Inna [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Kazanov, Dina [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lisiansky, Victoria [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Starr, Alex [Lung and Allergy Institute, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Arber, Nadir, E-mail: narber@post.tau.ac.il [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  7. Adenovirus E4ORF1-induced MYC activation promotes host cell anabolic glucose metabolism and virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Minh; Graham, Nicholas A; Braas, Daniel; Nehil, Michael; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Kurdistani, Siavash K; McCormick, Frank; Graeber, Thomas G; Christofk, Heather R

    2014-04-01

    Virus infections trigger metabolic changes in host cells that support the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of viral replication. Although recent studies have characterized virus-induced changes in host cell metabolism (Munger et al., 2008; Terry et al., 2012), the molecular mechanisms by which viruses reprogram cellular metabolism have remained elusive. Here, we show that the gene product of adenovirus E4ORF1 is necessary for adenovirus-induced upregulation of host cell glucose metabolism and sufficient to promote enhanced glycolysis in cultured epithelial cells by activation of MYC. E4ORF1 localizes to the nucleus, binds to MYC, and enhances MYC binding to glycolytic target genes, resulting in elevated expression of specific glycolytic enzymes. E4ORF1 activation of MYC promotes increased nucleotide biosynthesis from glucose intermediates and enables optimal adenovirus replication in primary lung epithelial cells. Our findings show how a viral protein exploits host cell machinery to reprogram cellular metabolism and promote optimal progeny virion generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human gene therapy and imaging: cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Joseph C.; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses the basics of cardiovascular gene therapy, the results of recent human clinical trials, and the rapid progress in imaging techniques in cardiology. Improved understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of coronary heart disease has made gene therapy a potential new alternative for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Experimental studies have established the proof-of-principle that gene transfer to the cardiovascular system can achieve therapeutic effects. First human clinical trials provided initial evidence of feasibility and safety of cardiovascular gene therapy. However, phase II/III clinical trials have so far been rather disappointing and one of the major problems in cardiovascular gene therapy has been the inability to verify gene expression in the target tissue. New imaging techniques could significantly contribute to the development of better gene therapeutic approaches. Although the exact choice of imaging modality will depend on the biological question asked, further improvement in image resolution and detection sensitivity will be needed for all modalities as we move from imaging of organs and tissues to imaging of cells and genes. (orig.)

  9. Targeted Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Cancer Gene Therapy via Liposome-Templated Hydrogel Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zeming; Liu, Fuyao; Chen, Yanke; Liu, Jun; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Ann T; Deng, Gang; Zhang, Hongyi; Liu, Jie; Hong, Zhangyong; Zhou, Jiangbing

    2017-12-08

    Due to its simplicity, versatility, and high efficiency, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology has emerged as one of the most promising approaches for treatment of a variety of genetic diseases, including human cancers. However, further translation of CRISPR/Cas9 for cancer gene therapy requires development of safe approaches for efficient, highly specific delivery of both Cas9 and single guide RNA to tumors. Here, novel core-shell nanostructure, liposome-templated hydrogel nanoparticles (LHNPs) that are optimized for efficient codelivery of Cas9 protein and nucleic acids is reported. It is demonstrated that, when coupled with the minicircle DNA technology, LHNPs deliver CRISPR/Cas9 with efficiency greater than commercial agent Lipofectamine 2000 in cell culture and can be engineered for targeted inhibition of genes in tumors, including tumors the brain. When CRISPR/Cas9 targeting a model therapeutic gene, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), is delivered, LHNPs effectively inhibit tumor growth and improve tumor-bearing mouse survival. The results suggest LHNPs as versatile CRISPR/Cas9-delivery tool that can be adapted for experimentally studying the biology of cancer as well as for clinically translating cancer gene therapy.

  10. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020 Adenovirus... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease...

  11. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Swapna; Dani, Nitin; Ansari, Shumaila S.; Kale, Triveni

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense mechanism against infection by transfecting host cells with an antimicrobial peptide protein-encoding gene. -Periodontal vaccination. Gene therapy is one of the recent entrants and its applications in the field of periodontics are reviewed in general here. PMID:20376232

  12. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on the growth and radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Methods: Human lymphoma cell lines Raji and Daudi were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT. The p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting, and p53 mRNA was detected by BT-PCB. Results: The MTT results showed that the inhibitory effect and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 on human lymphoma cell lines were not obvious [Raji: (27.5±4.1)%; Daudi: (28.1±1.6)%]. The results of Western blotting and BT-PCB showed that extrinsic p53 protein and p53 mRNA were expressed to some degree, but not at high-level. In addition, the results didn't demonstrate obvious radiosensitivity enhancement. Conclusions: The role of inhibition and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 was not significant on human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  13. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  14. Inflammation and Immune Response of Intra-Articular Serotype 2 Adeno-Associated Virus or Adenovirus Vectors in a Large Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akikazu Ishihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-articular gene therapy has potential for the treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To quantify in vitro relative gene transduction, equine chondrocytes and synovial cells were treated with adenovirus vectors (Ad, serotype 2 adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAV2, or self-complementary (sc AAV2 vectors carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP. Using 6 horses, bilateral metacarpophalangeal joints were injected with Ad, rAAV2, or scAAV2 vectors carrying GFP genes to assess the in vivo joint inflammation and neutralizing antibody (NAb titer in serum and joint fluid. In vitro, the greater transduction efficiency and sustained gene expression were achieved by scAAV2 compared to rAAV2 in equine chondrocytes and synovial cells. In vivo, AAV2 demonstrated less joint inflammation than Ad, but similar NAb titer. The scAAV2 vectors can induce superior gene transduction than rAAV2 in articular cells, and both rAAV2 and scAAV2 vectors were showed to be safer for intra-articular use than Ad vectors.

  15. Adenovirus sequences required for replication in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, K; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo replication properties of plasmids carrying deletion mutations within cloned adenovirus terminal sequences. Deletion mapping located the adenovirus DNA replication origin entirely within the first 67 bp of the adenovirus inverted terminal repeat. This region could be further subdivided into two functional domains: a minimal replication origin and an adjacent auxillary region which boosted the efficiency of replication by more than 100-fold. The minimal origin occup...

  16. uPAR-controlled oncolytic adenoviruses eliminate cancer stem cells in human pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrevals, Luciano; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Urtasun, Nerea; Mazo, Adela; Fillat, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors contain cancer stem cells highly resistant to chemotherapy. The identification of therapies that can eliminate this population of cells might provide with more effective treatments. In the current work we evaluated the potential of oncolytic adenoviruses to act against pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSC). PCSC from two patient-derived xenograft models were isolated from orthotopic pancreatic tumors treated with saline, or with the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine. An enrichment in the number of PCSC expressing the cell surface marker CD133 and a marked enhancement on tumorsphere formation was observed in gemcitabine treated tumors. No significant increase in the CD44, CD24, and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA) positive cells was observed. Neoplastic sphere-forming cells were susceptible to adenoviral infection and exposure to oncolytic adenoviruses resulted in elevated cytotoxicity with both Adwt and the tumor specific AduPARE1A adenovirus. In vivo, intravenous administration of a single dose of AduPARE1A in human-derived pancreatic xenografts led to a remarkable anti-tumor effect. In contrast to gemcitabine AduPARE1A treatment did not result in PCSC enrichment. No enrichment on tumorspheres neither on the CD133(+) population was detected. Therefore our data provide evidences of the relevance of uPAR-controlled oncolytic adenoviruses for the elimination of pancreatic cancer stem cells. © 2013.

  17. Gene therapy for lipid disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rader Daniel J

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lipid disorders are associated with atherosclerotic vascular disease, and therapy is associated with a substantial reduction in cardiovascular events. Current approaches to the treatment of lipid disorders are ineffective in a substantial number of patients. New therapies for refractory hypercholesterolemia, severe hypertriglyceridemia, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are needed: somatic gene therapy is one viable approach. The molecular etiology and pathophysiology of most of the candidate diseases are well understood. Animal models exist for the diseases and in many cases preclinical proof-of-principle studies have already been performed. There has been progress in the development of vectors that provide long-term gene expression. New clinical gene therapy trials for lipid disorders are likely to be initiated within the next few years.

  18. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  19. Cryo-EM structure of human adenovirus D26 reveals the conservation of structural organization among human adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaodi; Veesler, David; Campbell, Melody G; Barry, Mary E; Asturias, Francisco J; Barry, Michael A; Reddy, Vijay S

    2017-05-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) cause acute respiratory, ocular, and gastroenteric diseases and are also frequently used as gene and vaccine delivery vectors. Unlike the archetype human adenovirus C5 (HAdV-C5), human adenovirus D26 (HAdV-D26) belongs to species-D HAdVs, which target different cellular receptors, and is differentially recognized by immune surveillance mechanisms. HAdV-D26 is being championed as a lower seroprevalent vaccine and oncolytic vector in preclinical and human clinical studies. To understand the molecular basis for their distinct biological properties and independently validate the structures of minor proteins, we determined the first structure of species-D HAdV at 3.7 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. All the hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs), including HVR1, have been identified and exhibit a distinct organization compared to those of HAdV-C5. Despite the differences in the arrangement of helices in the coiled-coil structures, protein IX molecules form a continuous hexagonal network on the capsid exterior. In addition to the structurally conserved region (3 to 300) of IIIa, we identified an extra helical domain comprising residues 314 to 390 that further stabilizes the vertex region. Multiple (two to three) copies of the cleaved amino-terminal fragment of protein VI (pVIn) are observed in each hexon cavity, suggesting that there could be ≥480 copies of VI present in HAdV-D26. In addition, a localized asymmetric reconstruction of the vertex region provides new details of the three-pronged "claw hold" of the trimeric fiber and its interactions with the penton base. These observations resolve the previous conflicting assignments of the minor proteins and suggest the likely conservation of their organization across different HAdVs.

  20. The complete nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and origin of human adenovirus type 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, Daniel; Furthmann, Anne; Sandig, Volker; Lieber, Andre

    2003-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence and transcription map of human adenovirus type 11 are reported here. This is the first published sequence for a subgenera B human adenovirus and demonstrates a genome organization highly similar to those of other human adenoviruses. All of the genes from the early, intermediate, and late regions are present in the expected locations of the genome for a human adenovirus. The genome size is 34,794 bp in length and has a GC content of 48.9%. Sequence alignment with genomes of groups A (Ad12), C (Ad5), D (Ad17), E (Simian adenovirus 25), and F (Ad40) revealed homologies of 64, 54, 68, 75, and 52%, respectively. Detailed genomic analysis demonstrated that Ads 11 and 35 are highly conserved in all areas except the hexon hypervariable regions and fiber. Similarly, comparison of Ad11 with subgroup E SAV25 revealed poor homology between fibers but high homology in proteins encoded by all other areas of the genome. We propose an evolutionary model in which functional viruses can be reconstituted following fiber substitution from one serotype to another. According to this model either the Ad11 genome is a derivative of Ad35, from which the fiber was substituted with Ad7, or the Ad35 genome is the product of a fiber substitution from Ad21 into the Ad11 genome. This model also provides a possible explanation for the origin of group E Ads, which are evolutionarily derived from a group C fiber substitution into a group B genome

  1. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  2. Intravenous Administration Is an Effective and Safe Route for Cancer Gene Therapy Using the Bifidobacterium-Mediated Recombinant HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Ganciclovir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huicong Zhou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV TK/GCV system is one of the best studied cancer suicide gene therapy systems. Our previous study showed that caspase 3 expression was upregulated and bladder tumor growth was significantly reduced in rats treated with a combination of Bifidobacterium (BF and HSV TK/GCV (BF-rTK/GCV. However, it was raised whether the BF-mediated recombinant thymidine kinase combined with ganciclovir (BF-rTK/GCV was safe to administer via venous for cancer gene therapy. To answer this question, the antitumor effects of BF-rTK/GCV were mainly evaluated in a xenograft nude mouse model bearing MKN-45 gastric tumor cells. The immune response, including analysis of cytokine profiles, was analyzed to evaluate the safety of intramuscular and intravenous injection of BF-rTK in BALB/c mice. The results suggested that gastric tumor growth was significantly inhibited in vivo by BF-rTK/GCV. However, the BF-rTK/GCV had no effect on mouse body weight, indicating that the treatment was safe for the host. The results of cytokine profile analysis indicated that intravenous injection of a low dose of BF-rTK resulted in a weaker cytokine response than that obtained with intramuscular injection. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed that intravenous administration did not affect the expression of immune-associated TLR2 and TLR4. Finally, the BF-rTK/GCV inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression in mouse model, which is helpful for inhibiting of tumor angiogenesis. That meant intravenous administration of BF-rTK/GCV was an effective and safe way for cancer gene therapy.

  3. Link of the unique oncogenic properties of adenovirus type 9 E4-ORF1 to a select interaction with the candidate tumor suppressor protein ZO-2

    OpenAIRE

    Glaunsinger, Britt A.; Weiss, Robert S.; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Javier, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Adenovirus type 9 (Ad9) is distinct among human adenoviruses because it elicits solely mammary tumors in animals and its primary oncogenic determinant is the E4 region-encoded ORF1 (E4-ORF1) protein. We report here that the PDZ domain-containing protein ZO-2, which is a candidate tumor suppressor protein, is a cellular target for tumorigenic Ad9 E4-ORF1 but not for non-tumorigenic wild-type E4-ORF1 proteins encoded by adenovirus types 5 and 12. Complex formation was mediated by the C-terminal...

  4. Inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and forced internalization of TRAIL receptor 1 by adenovirus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, A E; Toth, K; Doronin, K; Kuppuswamy, M; Doronina, O A; Lichtenstein, D L; Hermiston, T W; Smith, C A; Wold, W S

    2001-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through two receptors, TRAIL-R1 (also known as death receptor 4) and TRAIL-R2 (also known as death receptor 5), that are members of the TNF receptor superfamily of death domain-containing receptors. We show that human adenovirus type 5 encodes three proteins, named RID (previously named E3-10.4K/14.5K), E3-14.7K, and E1B-19K, that independently inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis of infected human cells. This conclusion was derived from studies using wild-type adenovirus, adenovirus replication-competent mutants that lack one or more of the RID, E3-14.7K, and E1B-19K genes, and adenovirus E1-minus replication-defective vectors that express all E3 genes, RID plus E3-14.7K only, RID only, or E3-14.7K only. RID inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis when cells are sensitized to TRAIL either by adenovirus infection or treatment with cycloheximide. RID induces the internalization of TRAIL-R1 from the cell surface, as shown by flow cytometry and indirect immunofluorescence for TRAIL-R1. TRAIL-R1 was internalized in distinct vesicles which are very likely to be endosomes and lysosomes. TRAIL-R1 is degraded, as indicated by the disappearance of the TRAIL-R1 immunofluorescence signal. Degradation was inhibited by bafilomycin A1, a drug that prevents acidification of vesicles and the sorting of receptors from late endosomes to lysosomes, implying that degradation occurs in lysosomes. RID was also shown previously to internalize and degrade another death domain receptor, Fas, and to prevent apoptosis through Fas and the TNF receptor. RID was shown previously to force the internalization and degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. E1B-19K was shown previously to block apoptosis through Fas, and both E1B-19K and E3-14.7K were found to prevent apoptosis through the TNF receptor. These findings suggest that the receptors for TRAIL, Fas ligand, and TNF play a role in limiting virus

  5. Selectivity and Efficiency of Late Transgene Expression by Transcriptionally Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses Are Dependent on the Transgene Insertion Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirin, Christina; Rohmer, Stanimira; Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Behr, Michael; Hesse, Andrea; Engelhardt, Sarah; Erbs, Philippe; Enk, Alexander H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Key challenges facing cancer therapy are the development of tumor-specific drugs and potent multimodal regimens. Oncolytic adenoviruses possess the potential to realize both aims by restricting virus replication to tumors and inserting therapeutic genes into the virus genome, respectively. A major effort in this regard is to express transgenes in a tumor-specific manner without affecting virus replication. Using both luciferase as a sensitive reporter and genetic prodrug activation, we show that promoter control of E1A facilitates highly selective expression of transgenes inserted into the late transcription unit. This, however, required multistep optimization of late transgene expression. Transgene insertion via internal ribosome entry site (IRES), splice acceptor (SA), or viral 2A sequences resulted in replication-dependent expression. Unexpectedly, analyses in appropriate substrates and with matching control viruses revealed that IRES and SA, but not 2A, facilitated indirect transgene targeting via tyrosinase promoter control of E1A. Transgene expression via SA was more selective (up to 1,500-fold) but less effective than via IRES. Notably, we also revealed transgene-dependent interference with splicing. Hence, the prodrug convertase FCU1 (a cytosine deaminase–uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fusion protein) was expressed only after optimizing the sequence surrounding the SA site and mutating a cryptic splice site within the transgene. The resulting tyrosinase promoter-regulated and FCU1-encoding adenovirus combined effective oncolysis with targeted prodrug activation therapy of melanoma. Thus, prodrug activation showed potent bystander killing and increased cytotoxicity of the virus up to 10-fold. We conclude that armed oncolytic viruses can be improved substantially by comparing and optimizing strategies for targeted transgene expression, thereby implementing selective and multimodal cancer therapies. PMID:20939692

  6. Accumulation of infectious mutants in stocks during the propagation of fiber-modified recombinant adenoviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugai, Hideyo; Inabe, Kumiko; Yamasaki, Takahito; Murata, Takehide; Obata, Yuichi; Hamada, Hirofumi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2005-01-01

    In infected cells, replication errors during viral proliferation generate mutations in adenoviruses (Ads), and the mutant Ads proliferate and evolve in the intracellular environment. Genetically fiber-modified recombinant Ads (rAd variants) were generated, by modification of the fiber gene, for therapeutic applications in host cells that lack or express reduced levels of the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor. To assess the genetic modifications of rAd variants that might induce the instability of Ad virions, we examined the frequencies of mutants that accumulated in propagated stocks. Seven of 41 lines of Ad variants generated mutants in the stocks and all mutants were infectious. Moreover, all the mutations occurred in the modified region that had been added at the 3' end of the fiber gene. Our results show that some genetic modifications at the carboxyl terminus of Ad fiber protein lead to the instability of Ad virions

  7. Increased suppression of oncolytic adenovirus carrying mutant k5 on colorectal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Junkai; Xiao Tian; Gu Jinfa; Wei Na; He Lingfeng; Ding Miao; Liu Xinyuan

    2008-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in the development of a wide variety of malignant tumors. The approach of targeting antiangiogenesis has become an important field of cancer gene therapy. In this study, the antiangiogenesis protein K5 (the kringle 5 of human plasminogen) has been mutated by changing leucine71 to arginine to form mK5. Then the ZD55-mK5, which is an oncolytic adenovirus expressing mK5, was constructed. It showed stronger inhibition on proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell. Moreover, in tube formation and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane assay, ZD55-mK5 exhibited more effective antiangiogenesis than ZD55-K5. In addition, ZD55-mK5 generated obvious suppression on the growth of colorectal tumor xenografts and prolonged the life span of nude mice. These results indicate that ZD55-mK5 is a potent agent for inhibiting the tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth

  8. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng

    2005-01-01

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10 9 PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases

  9. Functional inhibition of NF-kappa B signal transduction in alpha v alpha beta 3 integrin expressing endothelial cells by using RGD-PEG-modified adenovirus with a mutant I kappa B gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogawara, K; Kuldo, JM; Oosterhuis, K; Kroesen, BJ; Rots, MG; Trautwein, C; Kimura, T; Haisma, HJ; Molema, G

    2006-01-01

    In order to selectively block nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B)-dependent signal transduction in angiogenic endothelial cells, we constructed an alpha v beta 3 integrin specific adenovirus encoding dominant negative I kappa B (dnI kappa B) as a therapeutic gene. By virtue of RGD modification of

  10. Protective MCMV immunity by vaccination of the salivary gland via Wharton's duct: replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus expressing individual MCMV genes elicits protection similar to that of MCMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangliang; Zhang, Fangfang; Wang, Ruixue; London, Lucille; London, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    Salivary glands, a major component of the mucosal immune system, confer antigen-specific immunity to mucosally acquired pathogens. We investigated whether a physiological route of inoculation and a subunit vaccine approach elicited MCMV-specific and protective immunity. Mice were inoculated by retrograde perfusion of the submandibular salivary glands via Wharton's duct with tcMCMV or MCMV proteins focused to the salivary gland via replication-deficient adenovirus expressing individual MCMV genes (gB, gH, IE1; controls: saline and replication deficient adenovirus without MCMV inserts). Mice were evaluated for MCMV-specific antibodies, T-cell responses, germinal center formation, and protection against a lethal MCMV challenge. Retrograde perfusion with tcMCMV or adenovirus expressed MCMV proteins induced a 2- to 6-fold increase in systemic and mucosal MCMV-specific antibodies, a 3- to 6-fold increase in GC marker expression, and protection against a lethal systemic challenge, as evidenced by up to 80% increased survival, decreased splenic pathology, and decreased viral titers from 10(6) pfu to undetectable levels. Thus, a focused salivary gland immunization via a physiological route with a protein antigen induced systemic and mucosal protective immune responses. Therefore, salivary gland immunization can serve as an alternative mucosal route for administering vaccines, which is directly applicable for use in humans.

  11. In vitro and in vivo gene therapy with CMV vector-mediated presumed dog beta-nerve growth factor in pyridoxine-induced neuropathy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Shin, Il Seob; Choi, Eun Wha; Hwang, Cheol Yong; Lee, Sang Koo; Youn, Hwa Young

    2008-12-01

    Due to the therapeutic potential of gene therapy for neuronal injury, many studies of neurotrophic factors, vectors, and animal models have been performed. The presumed dog beta-nerve growth factor (pdbeta-NGF) was generated and cloned and its expression was confirmed in CHO cells. The recombinant pdbeta-NGF protein reacted with a human beta-NGF antibody and showed bioactivity in PC12 cells. The pdbeta-NGF was shown to have similar bioactivity to the dog beta-NGF. The recombinant pdbeta-NGF plasmid was administrated into the intrathecal space in the gene therapy group. Twenty-four hours after the vector inoculation, the gene therapy group and the positive control group were intoxicated with excess pyridoxine for seven days. Each morning throughout the test period, the dogs' body weight was taken and postural reaction assessments were made. Electrophysiological recordings were performed twice, once before the experiment and once after the test period. After the experimental period, histological analysis was performed. Dogs in the gene therapy group had no weight change and were normal in postural reaction assessments. Electrophysiological recordings were also normal for the gene therapy group. Histological analysis showed that neither the axons nor the myelin of the dorsal funiculus of L4 were severely damaged in the gene therapy group. In addition, the dorsal root ganglia of L4 and the peripheral nerves (sciatic nerve) did not experience severe degenerative changes in the gene therapy group. This study is the first to show the protective effect of NGF gene therapy in a dog model.

  12. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  13. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  14. Targeted retrograde transfection of adenovirus vector carrying brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene prevents loss of mouse (twy/twy) anterior horn neurons in vivo sustaining mechanical compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kan; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2006-08-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis after adenovirus (AdV)-mediated BDNF gene transfer in and around the area of mechanical compression in the cervical spinal cord of the hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy). To investigate the neuroprotective effect of targeted AdV-BDNF gene transfection in the twy mouse with spontaneous chronic compression of the spinal cord motoneurons. Several studies reported the neuroprotective effects of neurotrophins on injured spinal cord. However, no report has described the effect of targeted retrograde neurotrophic gene delivery on motoneuron survival in chronic compression lesions of the cervical spinal cord resembling lesions of myelopathy. LacZ marker gene using adenoviral vector (AdV-LacZ) was used to evaluate retrograde delivery from the sternomastoid muscle in adult twy mice (16-week-old) and (control). Four weeks after the AdV-LacZ or AdV-BDNF injection, the compressed cervical spinal cord was removed en bloc for immunohistologic investigation of b-galactosidase activity and immunoreactivity and immunoblot analyses of BDNF. The number of anterior horn neurons was counted using Nissl, ChAT and AChE staining. Spinal accessory motoneurons between C1 and C3 segments were successfully transfected by AdV-LacZ in both twy and ICR mice after targeted intramuscular injection. Immunoreactivity to BDNF was significantly stronger in AdV-BDNF-gene transfected twy mice than in AdV-LacZ-gene transfected mice. At the cord level showing the maximum compression in AdV-BDNF-transfected twy mice, the number of anterior horn neurons was sinificantly higher in the topographic neuronal cell counting of Nissl-, ChAT-, and AChE-stained samples than in AdV-LacZ-injected twy mice. Targeted AdV-BDNF-gene delivery significantly increased Nissl-stained anterior horn neurons and enhanced cholinergic enzyme activities in the twy. Our results suggest that targeted retrograde AdV-BDNF-gene in vivo delivery may enhance neuronal survival even under chronic mechanical compression.

  15. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Timme, Terry L.; Mai, W.-Y.; Satoh, Takefumi; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR + CD8 + T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR + CD4 + T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer

  16. The experimental study of reporter probe 131I-FIAU in neonatal cardiac myocytes after transfer of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter gene by different vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xiaohua; Lan Xiaoli; Wang Ruihua; Liu Ying; Zhang Yongxue

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Reporter gene imaging is a promising approach for noninvasive monitoring of cardiac gene therapy. In the present study, the recombinant plasmid and adenoviral vector carrying reporter gene. herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk), were constructed and transferred into nee-natal cardiac myocytes, and a series of in vitro studies were carried out on the cells transferred to evaluate the uptake of radiolabeled reporter probe and to compare both vectors for cardiac reporter gene imaging. Methods: Neonatal cardiac myocytes were obtained from rat heart by single collagenase digestion. HSVI-tk. chosen as the reporter gene.was inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and plasmid (pDC316-tk), thus it could be transferred into neonatal cardiac myocytes. Recombinant adenovirus containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad5-EGFP) was used as control. Recombinant plasmid was coated with lipofectamine TM 2000 (pDC316-tk/lipoplex). The specific reporter probe of HSV1-tk, 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-l-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil (FAU), was labeled with 131 I by solid phase oxidation with lodogen. Product wag purified on a reverse. phase Sep-Pak C18 column and the radiochemical purity wag then assessed. The accumulation of it in the transferred cardiac myocytes wag detected as uptake rate. Furthermore, mRNA expression of HSV1-tk was detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), while its protein expression wag located by immunocytochemistry. Results: FAU could be labeled with 131 I and the labeling efficiency was (53.82 ±2.05)%. The radiochemical purity was (94.85 ± 1.76)% after purification, and it kept stable in vitro for at least 24h. Time-dependent increase of the ac- cumulation of 131 I-FIAU was observed in both Ad5-tk group and pDC316-tk/lipoplex group. and the highest uptake rate occurred at 5h, with peak values of (12.55 ± 0.37)% and (2.09 ± 0.34)% respectively. However, it also indicated that greater

  17. Cancer suicide gene therapy: a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Saúl Abenhamar; Carrillo, Esmeralda; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Martín, Ana; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan Antonio; Boulaiz, Houria

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is considered the second leading cause of death worldwide despite the progress made in early detection and advances in classical therapies. Advancing in the fight against cancer requires the development of novel strategies, and the suicide gene transfer to tumor cells is providing new possibilities for cancer therapy. In this manuscript, authors present an overview of suicide gene systems and the latest innovations done to enhance cancer suicide gene therapy strategies by i) improving vectors for targeted gene delivery using tissue specific promoter and receptors; ii) modification of the tropism; and iii) combining suicide genes and/or classical therapies for cancer. Finally, the authors highlight the main challenges to be addressed in the future. Even if many efforts are needed for suicide gene therapy to be a real alternative for cancer treatment, we believe that the significant progress made in the knowledge of cancer biology and characterization of cancer stem cells accompanied by the development of novel targeted vectors will enhance the effectiveness of this type of therapeutic strategy. Moreover, combined with current treatments, suicide gene therapy will improve the clinical outcome of patients with cancer in the future.

  18. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Libo, E-mail: libochen888@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Guo Guoying [Xinyuan Institute of Medicine and Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe [Division of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zhu Ruisen [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated {sup 125}I{sup -} up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T{sub 1/2eff} of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or {sup 131}I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%{+-}2.5%, 43.4%{+-}2.8% and 8.6%{+-}1.2% after exposure to {sup 131}I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  19. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Libo; Guo Guoying; Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe; Zhu Ruisen

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated 125 I - up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T 1/2eff of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or 131 I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%±2.5%, 43.4%±2.8% and 8.6%±1.2% after exposure to 131 I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  20. PLGA-Chitosan nanoparticle-mediated gene delivery for oral cancer treatment: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, L. M.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Doolaanea, A. A.; Ichwan, S. J. A.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer becomes a serious issue on society with increasing of their growth and proliferation, either in well economic developed countries or not. Recent years, oral cancer is one of the most threatening diseases impairing the quality of life of the patient. Scientists have emphasised on application of gene therapy for oral cancer by using nanoparticle as transportation vectors as a new alternative platform in order to overcome the limitations of conventional approaches. In modern medicine, nanotechnologies’ application, such as nanoparticles-mediated gene delivery, is one of promising tool for therapeutic devices. The objective of this article is to present a brief review summarizes on the current progress of nanotechnology-based gene delivery treatment system targeted for oral cancer.

  1. Gene Therapy for Color Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassall, Mark M; Barnard, Alun R; MacLaren, Robert E

    2017-12-01

    Achromatopsia is a rare congenital cause of vision loss due to isolated cone photoreceptor dysfunction. The most common underlying genetic mutations are autosomal recessive changes in CNGA3 , CNGB3 , GNAT2 , PDE6H , PDE6C , or ATF6 . Animal models of Cnga3 , Cngb3 , and Gnat2 have been rescued using AAV gene therapy; showing partial restoration of cone electrophysiology and integration of this new photopic vision in reflexive and behavioral visual tests. Three gene therapy phase I/II trials are currently being conducted in human patients in the USA, the UK, and Germany. This review details the AAV gene therapy treatments of achromatopsia to date. We also present novel data showing rescue of a Cnga3 -/- mouse model using an rAAV.CBA.CNGA3 vector. We conclude by synthesizing the implications of this animal work for ongoing human trials, particularly, the challenge of restoring integrated cone retinofugal pathways in an adult visual system. The evidence to date suggests that gene therapy for achromatopsia will need to be applied early in childhood to be effective.

  2. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Prostate-Restricted Replication Competent Adenovirus-Ad-IU-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas A

    2005-01-01

    .... The goal of this research is to develop a novel therapeutic agent, Ad-IU-1, using PSES to control the replication of adenovirus and the expression of a therapeutic gene, herpes simplex thymidine kinase (TK...

  3. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L.; Tamgac, G.

    2002-01-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  4. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  5. Systemic RNAi-mediated Gene Silencing in Nonhuman Primate and Rodent Myeloid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I Novobrantseva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytes are central regulators of inflammation and the target cells of therapies for key diseases, including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and malignant disorders. Efficient in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA to immune cells could thus enable novel treatment strategies with broad applicability. In this report, we develop systemic delivery methods of siRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNP for durable and potent in vivo RNA interference (RNAi-mediated silencing in myeloid cells. This work provides the first demonstration of siRNA-mediated silencing in myeloid cell types of nonhuman primates (NHPs and establishes the feasibility of targeting multiple gene targets in rodent myeloid cells. The therapeutic potential of these formulations was demonstrated using siRNA targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα which induced substantial attenuation of disease progression comparable to a potent antibody treatment in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In summary, we demonstrate a broadly applicable and therapeutically relevant platform for silencing disease genes in immune cells.

  6. Construction of a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing truncated human prostate-specific membrane antigen and mouse 4-1BBL genes and its effect on dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Weng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to construct a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing truncated human prostate-specific membrane antigen (tPSMA and mouse 4-1BBL genes and to determine its effect on dendritic cells (DCs generated from bone marrow suspensions harvested from C57BL/6 mice for which the effect of 4-1BBL on DCs is not clear, especially during DCs processing tumor-associated antigen. Replication deficient adenovirus AdMaxTM Expression System was used to construct recombinant adenovirus Ad-tPSMA-internal ribosome entry site-mouse 4-1BBL (Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL and Ad-enhanced green fluorescent protein. Day 7 proliferating DC aggregates generated from C57BL/6 mice were collected as immature DCs and further mature DCs were obtained by lipopolysaccharide activated immature DCs. After DCs were exposed to the recombinant adenovirus with 250 multiplicity of infection, the expression of tPSMA and m4-1BBL proteins were detected by Western blot, and the apoptosis and phenotype of DCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokines (IL-6 and IL-12 in the supernatant were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Proliferation of T cells was detected by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions. The tPSMA and m4-1BBL proteins were expressed correctly. The apoptosis rate of DCs transfected with Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL was 14.6%, lower than that of control DCs. The expression of co-stimulatory molecules [CD80 (81.6 ± 5.4% and CD86 (80.13 ± 2.81%] up-regulated in Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL-pulsed DCs, and the level of IL-6 (3960.2 ± 50.54 pg/mL and IL-12 (249.57 ± 12.51 pg/mL production in Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL-transduced DCs were significantly higher (P < 0.05 than those in control DCs. Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL induced higher T-cell proliferation (OD450 = 0.614 ± 0.018, indicating that this recombinant adenovirus can effectively enhance the activity of DCs.

  7. Retroviral-mediated gene therapy for the differentiation of primary cells into a mineralizing osteoblastic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer E; García, Andrés J

    2008-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering has emerged as a promising strategy for the repair of critical-sized skeletal fractures. However, the clinical application of this approach has been limited by the availability of a robust mineralizing cell source. Non-osteogenic cells, such as skin fibroblasts, are an attractive cell-source alternative because they are easy to harvest from autologous donor skin biopsies and display a high capacity for in vitro expansion. We have recently demonstrated that retroviral gene delivery of the osteoblastic transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1 promotes osteogenic differentiation in primary dermal fibroblasts cultured in monolayer. Notably, sustained expression of Runx2 was not sufficient to promote functional osteogenesis in these cells, and co-treatment with the steroid hormone dexamethasone was required to induce deposition of biologically-equivalent matrix mineralization. On the basis of these results, we then investigated the osteogenic capacity of these genetically engineered fibroblasts when seeded on polymeric scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. These experiments demonstrated that Runx2-expressing fibroblasts seeded on collagen scaffolds produce significant levels of matrix mineralization after 28 days in vivo implantation in a subcutaneous, heterotopic site. Overall, these results offer evidence that transcription factor-based gene therapy may be a powerful strategy for the conversion of a non-osteogenic cellular phenotype into a mineralizing cell source for bone repair applications. This concept may also be applied to control functional differentiation in a broad range of cell types and tissue engineering applications. The chapter below outlines detailed methods for the isolation and ex vivo genetic modification of primary dermal fibroblasts using retroviral-mediated delivery of the Runx2 transgene in both monolayer culture and three-dimensional scaffolds.

  8. [Hybrids of human and monkey adenoviruses (adeno-adeno hybrids) that can reproduce in monkey cells: biological and molecular genetic peculiarities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenko, N F; Savitskaia, N V; Pashvykina, G V; Al'tshteĭn, A D

    2003-06-01

    A highly oncogenic monkey adenovirus SA7(C8) facilitates the reproduction of human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) in monkey cells. Upon mixed infection of monkey cells with both viruses, these viruses recombine producing defective adeno-adeno hybrids Ad2C8 serologically identical to Ad2 and capable of assisting Ad2 to reproduce in monkey cells. Ad2C8 and Ad2 form an intercomplementary pair inseparable in monkey cells. Unlike oncogenic SA7(C8), Ad2C8 is a nononcogenic virus for hamsters but is able to induce tumor antigens of this virus (T and TSTA). Molecular genetic analysis of 68 clones of adeno-adeno hybrids revealed that the left part of their genome consists of Ad2 DNA, and the right part contains no less than 40% of the viral SA7(C8) genome where E2A, E3, and E4 genes are located. Apparently, the products of these genes contribute to the composition of adenoviral tumor antigens, while the E4 gene is involved in complementation of monkey and human adenoviruses and makes a contribution to host range determination of these viruses.

  9. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  10. Molecular targeting of gene therapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.; Advani, S.J.; Roizman, B.

    2001-01-01

    The full promise of gene therapy has been limited by the lack of specificity of vectors for tumor tissue as well as the lack of antitumor efficacy of transgenes encoded by gene delivery systems. In this paper we review our studies investigating two modifications of gene therapy combined with radiotherapy. The first investigations described include studies of radiation inducible gene therapy. In this paradigm, radio-inducible DNA sequences from the CarG elements of the Egr-1 promoter are cloned upstream of a cDNA encoding TNFa. The therapeutic gene (TNFa) is induced by radiation within the tumor microenvironment. In the second paradigm, genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is induced by ionizing radiation to proliferate within the tumor volume. These modifications of radiotherapy and gene therapy may enhance the efficacy of both treatments

  11. Imaging after vascular gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Yang, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    Targets for cardiovascular gene therapy currently include limiting restenosis after balloon angioplasty and stent placement, inhibiting vein bypass graft intimal hyperplasia/stenosis, therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiac and lower-limb ischemia, and prevention of thrombus formation. While catheter angiography is still standard method to follow-up vascular gene transfer, other modern imaging techniques, especially intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging provide complementary information about the therapeutic effect of vascular gene transfer in humans. Although molecular imaging of therapeutic gene expression in the vasculatures is still in its technical development phase, it has already offered basic medical science an extremely useful in vivo evaluation tool for non- or minimally invasive imaging of vascular gene therapy

  12. Adenovirus Detection by the cGAS/STING/TBK1 DNA Sensing Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Eric; Stein, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) infection triggers a cell-specific antiviral response following exposure of viral DNA to the intracellular compartment. A variety of DNA sensors (DAI, AIM2, DDx41, RNA polymerase [Pol] III, and IFI16 [p204]) have been identified in recent years; however, the DNA sensor involved in detection of adenovirus has not been established. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), a DNA sensor that produces a cyclic guanine-adenine dinucleotide (cGAMP) inducer of STING, has been examined to determine its role in generating an antiadenoviral response. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviral vectors targeting TBK1, STING, and cGAS were established in murine MS1 endothelial and RAW 264.7 macrophage cell lines. Knockdown of TBK1, STING, and cGAS results in a dramatic reduction in the activation of the primary antiviral response marker phosphorylated interferon (IFN) response factor 3 (IRF3) following exposure to adenovirus. Furthermore, activation of secondary type I IFN signaling targets (ptyrSTAT1 and ptyrSTAT2 [ptyrSTAT1/2]) was also compromised. Consistent with compromised activation of primary and secondary response markers, transcriptional activation of IRF3-responsive genes (beta IFN [IFN-β], ISG15, ISG54) and secondary response transcripts were diminished in cells knocked down in cGAS, STING, or TBK1. These data establish cGAS as the dominant cytosolic DNA sensor responsible for detection of internalized adenovirus leading to induction of the type I interferon antiviral cascade. PMID:24198409

  13. Enfermedad neurologica por adenovirus Neurologic disease due to adenovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L. Lema

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de adenovirus (ADV en las infecciones del sistema nervioso central (SNC. Se analizaron 108 muestras de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR provenientes de 79 casos de encefalitis, 7 meningitis y 22 de otras patologías neurológicas, recibidas en el período 2000-2002. Cuarenta y nueve (47.35% se obtuvieron de pacientes inmunocomprometidos. La presencia de ADV se investigó mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa en formato anidado (Nested-PCR. La identificación del genogrupo se realizó mediante análisis filogenético de la secuencia nucleotídica parcial de la región que codifica para la proteína del hexón. Se detectó la presencia de ADV en 6 de 108 (5.5% muestras de LCR analizadas. Todos los casos positivos pertenecieron a pacientes con encefalitis que fueron 79, (6/79, 7.6%. No se observó diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los casos de infección por ADV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos e inmunocompetentes (p>0.05. Las cepas de ADV detectadas se agruparon en los genogrupos B1 y C. En conclusión, nuestros resultados describen el rol de los ADV en las infecciones neurológicas en Argentina. La información presentada contribuye al conocimiento de su epidemiología, en particular en casos de encefalitis.The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of adenovirusm (ADV infections in neurological disorders. A total of 108 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 79 encephalitis cases, 7 meningitis and 22 other neurological diseases analysed in our laboratory between 2000 and 2002 were studied. Forty nine (47.4% belonged to immunocompromised patients. Viral genome was detected using nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR and ADV genotypes were identified using partial gene sequence analysis of hexon gene. Adenovirus were detected in 6 of 108 (5.5% CSF samples tested. All of these were from encephalitis cases, 6/79, representing 7.6% of them. No statistically

  14. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Prostate-Restricted Replication Competent Adenovirus-AD-IU-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    ... independent prostate cancers. The goal of this research is to develop a novel therapeutic agent, Ad-lu-1, using PSES to control the replication of adenovirus and the expression of a therapeutic gene, herpes simplex thymidine kinase...

  15. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  16. Weather conditions and daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S R; Fabricius, S; Heydenreich, J

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive therapy for nonmelanoma skin cancers and actinic keratoses (AKs). Daylight-mediated methyl aminolaevulinate PDT (daylight-PDT) is a simple and painless treatment procedure for PDT. All daylight-PDT studies have been performed in the Nordic countries...

  17. Mediator and Cohesin Connect Gene Expression and Chromatin Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagey, Michael H.; Newman, Jamie J.; Bilodeau, Steve; Zhan, Ye; Orlando, David A.; van Berkum, Nynke L.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Goossens, Jesse; Rahl, Peter B.; Levine, Stuart S.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Transcription factors control cell specific gene expression programs through interactions with diverse coactivators and the transcription apparatus. Gene activation may involve DNA loop formation between enhancer-bound transcription factors and the transcription apparatus at the core promoter, but this process is not well understood. We report here that Mediator and Cohesin physically and functionally connect the enhancers and core promoters of active genes in embryonic stem cells. Mediator, a transcriptional coactivator, forms a complex with Cohesin, which can form rings that connect two DNA segments. The Cohesin loading factor Nipbl is associated with Mediator/Cohesin complexes, providing a means to load Cohesin at promoters. DNA looping is observed between the enhancers and promoters occupied by Mediator and Cohesin. Mediator and Cohesin occupy different promoters in different cells, thus generating cell-type specific DNA loops linked to the gene expression program of each cell. PMID:20720539

  18. [Outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis caused by adenovirus in a geriatric centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artieda, Juncal; Montes, Milagrosa; Vicente, Diego; Martínez, Consuelo; Piñeiro, Luis; Mendiola, Josune

    2010-12-01

    Adenovirus serotype 4a is a respiratory virus that occasionally causes conjunctivitis. This paper describes an outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis that occurred in a geriatric centre. Outbreak description and epidemiological research through a survey. For the microbiological study conjunctival swabs were collected using viral and bacterial transport media. Adenovirus was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The serotype was determined by sequencing of a fragment of the hexon and E1 genes. In autumn 2008 an outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis caused by adenovirus serotype 4a was detected. Twenty three percent 23% (69/300) of residents and 5% (9/180) of workers in a geriatric centre in Gipuzkoa were affected. The clinical symptoms were of prolonged duration (11±5 days). The temporal association of the cases suggested transmission from person to person. The sanitary measures established (asepsis and frequent hand washing, cleaning and disinfection of objects and surfaces) were effective, interrupting the transmission of the disease within a short period of time. Rapid detection, identification of the causative agent and implementing appropriate control measures can significantly reduce the impact on both health and economic costs of these outbreaks. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Prostate-Restricted Replication Competent Adenovirus-AD-IU-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas A

    2006-01-01

    ... independent prostate cancers. The goal of this research is to develop a novel therapeutic agent, Ad-IU-1, using PSES to control the replication of adenovirus and the expression of a therapeutic gene, herpes simplex thymidine kinase (TK...

  20. Stable replication of the EBNA1/OriP-mediated baculovirus vector and its application to anti-HCV gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Myint OO

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the main causes of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Although combined interferon-α-ribavirin therapy is effective for about 50% of the patients with HCV, better therapies are needed and preventative vaccines have yet to be developed. Short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs inhibit gene expression by RNA interference. The application of transient shRNA expression is limited, however, due to the inability of the shRNA to replicate in mammalian cells and its inefficient transduction. The duration of transgene (shRNA expression in mammalian cells can be significantly extended using baculovirus-based shRNA-expressing vectors that contain the latent viral protein Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1 and the origin of latent viral DNA replication (OriP sequences. These recombinant vectors contain compatible promoters and are highly effective for infecting primary hepatocyte and hepatoma cell lines, making them very useful tools for studies of hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. Here, we report the use of these baculovirus-based vector-derived shRNAs to inhibit core-protein expression in full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV replicon cells. Results We constructed a long-term transgene shRNA expression vector that contains the EBV EBNA1 and OriP sequences. We also designed baculovirus vector-mediated shRNAs against the highly conserved core-protein region of HCV. HCV core protein expression was inhibited by the EBNA1/OriP baculovirus vector for at least 14 days, which was considerably longer than the 3 days of inhibition produced by the wild-type baculovirus vector. Conclusion These findings indicate that we successfully constructed a long-term transgene (shRNA expression vector (Ac-EP-shRNA452 using the EBNA1/OriP system, which was propagated in Escherichia coli and converted into mammalian cells. The potential anti-HCV activity of the long-term transgene (shRNA expression vector was evaluated with the view

  1. Antisense pre-treatment increases gene therapy efficacy in dystrophic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccate, Cécile; Mollard, Amédée; Le Hir, Maëva; Julien, Laura; McClorey, Graham; Jarmin, Susan; Le Heron, Anita; Dickson, George; Benkhelifa-Ziyyat, Sofia; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Wood, Matthew J; Voit, Thomas; Lorain, Stéphanie

    2016-08-15

    In preclinical models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, dystrophin restoration during adeno-associated virus (AAV)-U7-mediated exon-skipping therapy was shown to decrease drastically after six months in treated muscles. This decline in efficacy is strongly correlated with the loss of the therapeutic AAV genomes, probably due to alterations of the dystrophic myofiber membranes. To improve the membrane integrity of the dystrophic myofibers at the time of AAV-U7 injection, mdx muscles were pre-treated with a single dose of the peptide-phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO) antisense oligonucleotides that induced temporary dystrophin expression at the sarcolemma. The PPMO pre-treatment allowed efficient maintenance of AAV genomes in mdx muscles and enhanced the AAV-U7 therapy effect with a ten-fold increase of the protein level after 6 months. PPMO pre-treatment was also beneficial to AAV-mediated gene therapy with transfer of micro-dystrophin cDNA into muscles. Therefore, avoiding vector genome loss after AAV injection by PPMO pre-treatment would allow efficient long-term restoration of dystrophin and the use of lower and thus safer vector doses for Duchenne patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Usefulness of intra-arterial embolization method using gelfoam particles in effective gene transduction of adenoviral vector for liver-directed gene therapy: an preliminary animal study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Park, Byeong Ho; Kim, Chan Sung

    2003-01-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being actively pursued and developed as a method of treating various liver diseases. A number of aspects, including gene intervention, an efficient gene delivery system, and stable transgene expression are key to the success of the chosen strategy, and to overcome problems in these areas, several tactics can be used. In this study, we assess the utility of transarterial embolization using gelfoam particles soaked in an adenovirus vector as a gene-delivery method. Using the angiographic approach, three dogs each weighing 9.5-11kg were superselectively catheterized at the left hepatic artery using a 3-F microcatheter and the coaxial method. Two of the dogs were embolized at the left hepatic artery using 3x2x2-mm and 2x1x1-mm gelfoam particles soaked in 2x10 11 particles/kg of recombinant adv. CMV.LacZ(LacZ-adv). The left hepatic artery of the remaining animal, used as a control, was infused with the same dose of lacZ-adv in the same way as before but without embolization of the left hepatic artery. Three days after embolization or the infusion of LacZ-adv, the dogs were sacrificed prior to harvest of the entire liver for the evaluation of gene transduction. X-gal staining of the liver tissue obtained was positive for hepatocytes, but the pattern and degree of gene transduction differed according to gelfoam particle size. Where this was 3x2x2 mm, gene transduction along the liver hilum varied, but where 2x1x1-mm particles were used, transduction was more even. No pathologic hepatic tissue injury or inflammation was apparent, and control liver tissue was not stained by X-gal. Serum SGOT and SGPT levels were slightly higher one day after the procedure, but had normalized by day 3. Intrahepatic transarterial embolization using gelfoam particles soaked in LacZ-adv appears to be a good method for effective liver-targed gene therapy

  3. Usefulness of intra-arterial embolization method using gelfoam particles in effective gene transduction of adenoviral vector for liver-directed gene therapy: an preliminary animal study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Park, Byeong Ho; Kim, Chan Sung [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being actively pursued and developed as a method of treating various liver diseases. A number of aspects, including gene intervention, an efficient gene delivery system, and stable transgene expression are key to the success of the chosen strategy, and to overcome problems in these areas, several tactics can be used. In this study, we assess the utility of transarterial embolization using gelfoam particles soaked in an adenovirus vector as a gene-delivery method. Using the angiographic approach, three dogs each weighing 9.5-11kg were superselectively catheterized at the left hepatic artery using a 3-F microcatheter and the coaxial method. Two of the dogs were embolized at the left hepatic artery using 3x2x2-mm and 2x1x1-mm gelfoam particles soaked in 2x10{sup 11} particles/kg of recombinant adv. CMV.LacZ(LacZ-adv). The left hepatic artery of the remaining animal, used as a control, was infused with the same dose of lacZ-adv in the same way as before but without embolization of the left hepatic artery. Three days after embolization or the infusion of LacZ-adv, the dogs were sacrificed prior to harvest of the entire liver for the evaluation of gene transduction. X-gal staining of the liver tissue obtained was positive for hepatocytes, but the pattern and degree of gene transduction differed according to gelfoam particle size. Where this was 3x2x2 mm, gene transduction along the liver hilum varied, but where 2x1x1-mm particles were used, transduction was more even. No pathologic hepatic tissue injury or inflammation was apparent, and control liver tissue was not stained by X-gal. Serum SGOT and SGPT levels were slightly higher one day after the procedure, but had normalized by day 3. Intrahepatic transarterial embolization using gelfoam particles soaked in LacZ-adv appears to be a good method for effective liver-targed gene therapy.

  4. Synergistic gene and drug tumor therapy using a chimeric peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Chen, Si; Chen, Wei-Hai; Lei, Qi; Liu, Yun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-06-01

    Co-delivery of gene and drug for synergistic therapy has provided a promising strategy to cure devastating diseases. Here, an amphiphilic chimeric peptide (Fmoc)2KH7-TAT with pH-responsibility for gene and drug delivery was designed and fabricated. As a drug carrier, the micelles self-assembled from the peptide exhibited a much faster doxorubicin (DOX) release rate at pH 5.0 than that at pH 7.4. As a non-viral gene vector, (Fmoc)(2)KH(7)-TAT peptide could satisfactorily mediate transfection of pGL-3 reporter plasmid with or without the existence of serum in both 293T and HeLa cell-lines. Besides, the endosome escape capability of peptide/DNA complexes was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To evaluate the co-delivery efficiency and the synergistic anti-tumor effect of gene and drug, p53 plasmid and DOX were simultaneously loaded in the peptide micelles to form micelleplexes during the self-assembly of the peptide. Cellular uptake and intracellular delivery of gene and drug were studied by CLSM and flow cytometry respectively. And p53 protein expression was determined via Western blot analysis. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor inhibition effect were also studied. Results suggest that the co-delivery of gene and drug from peptide micelles resulted in effective cell growth inhibition in vitro and significant tumor growth restraining in vivo. The chimeric peptide-based gene and drug co-delivery system will find great potential for tumor therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of 'biologicals', in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L I [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-10-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  7. Reporter gene imaging: potential impact on therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)-based molecular-genetic imaging in living organisms has enjoyed exceptional growth over the past 5 years; this is particularly striking since it has been identified as a new discipline only within the past decade. Positron emission tomography is one of three imaging technologies (nuclear, magnetic resonance and optical) that has begun to incorporate methods that are established in molecular and cell biology research. The convergence of these disciplines and the wider application of multi-modality imaging are at the heart of this success story. Most current molecular-genetic imaging strategies are 'indirect,' coupling a 'reporter gene' with a complimentary 'reporter probe.' Reporter gene constructs can be driven by constitutive promoter elements and used to monitor gene therapy vectors and the efficacy of trans gene targeting and transduction, as well as to monitor adoptive cell-based therapies. Inducible promoters can be used as 'sensors' to regulate the magnitude of reporter gene expression and can be used to provide information about endogenous cell processes. Reporter systems can also be constructed to monitor mRNA stabilization and specific protein-protein interactions. Promoters can be cell specific and restrict transgene expression to certain tissue and organs. The translation of reporter gene imaging to specific clinical applications is discussed. Several examples that have potential for patient imaging studies in the near future include monitoring adenoviral-based gene therapy, oncolytic herpes virus therapy, adoptive cell-based therapies and Salmonella-based tumor-targeted cancer therapy and imaging. The primary translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to be (a) quantitative monitoring of the gene therapy vector and the efficacy of transduction in clinical protocols, by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring cell trafficking, targeting

  8. NF-κB targeting by way of IKK inhibition sensitizes lung cancer cells to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karacay Bahri

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer causes the highest rate of cancer-related deaths both in men and women. As many current treatment modalities are inadequate in increasing patient survival, new therapeutic strategies are required. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL selectively induces apoptosis in tumor cells but not in normal cells, prompting its current evaluation in a number of clinical trials. The successful therapeutic employment of TRAIL is restricted by the fact that many tumor cells are resistant to TRAIL. The goal of the present study was to test a novel combinatorial gene therapy modality involving adenoviral delivery of TRAIL (Ad5hTRAIL and IKK inhibition (AdIKKβKA to overcome TRAIL resistance in lung cancer cells. Methods Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry were used to detect optimum doses of adenovirus vectors to transduce lung cancer cells. Cell viability was assessed via a live/dead cell viability assay. Luciferase assays were employed to monitor cellular NF-κB activity. Apoptosis was confirmed using Annexin V binding. Results Neither Ad5hTRAIL nor AdIKKβKA infection alone induced apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells, but the combined use of Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA significantly increased the amount of A549 apoptosis. Luciferase assays demonstrated that both endogenous and TRAIL-induced NF-κB activity was down-regulated by AdIKKβKA expression. Conclusions Combination treatment with Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA induced significant apoptosis of TRAIL-resistant A549 cells, suggesting that dual gene therapy strategy involving exogenous TRAIL gene expression with concurrent IKK inhibition may be a promising novel gene therapy modality to treat lung cancer.

  9. NF-κB targeting by way of IKK inhibition sensitizes lung cancer cells to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Cigdem; Sanlioglu, Ahter D; Bisgin, Atil; Yoldas, Burcak; Dertsiz, Levent; Karacay, Bahri; Griffith, Thomas S; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer causes the highest rate of cancer-related deaths both in men and women. As many current treatment modalities are inadequate in increasing patient survival, new therapeutic strategies are required. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in tumor cells but not in normal cells, prompting its current evaluation in a number of clinical trials. The successful therapeutic employment of TRAIL is restricted by the fact that many tumor cells are resistant to TRAIL. The goal of the present study was to test a novel combinatorial gene therapy modality involving adenoviral delivery of TRAIL (Ad5hTRAIL) and IKK inhibition (AdIKKβKA) to overcome TRAIL resistance in lung cancer cells. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry were used to detect optimum doses of adenovirus vectors to transduce lung cancer cells. Cell viability was assessed via a live/dead cell viability assay. Luciferase assays were employed to monitor cellular NF-κB activity. Apoptosis was confirmed using Annexin V binding. Neither Ad5hTRAIL nor AdIKKβKA infection alone induced apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells, but the combined use of Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA significantly increased the amount of A549 apoptosis. Luciferase assays demonstrated that both endogenous and TRAIL-induced NF-κB activity was down-regulated by AdIKKβKA expression. Combination treatment with Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA induced significant apoptosis of TRAIL-resistant A549 cells, suggesting that dual gene therapy strategy involving exogenous TRAIL gene expression with concurrent IKK inhibition may be a promising novel gene therapy modality to treat lung cancer

  10. Terapia gênica Gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nance Beyer Nardi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Terapia gênica é um procedimento médico que envolve a modificação genética de células como forma de tratar doenças. Os genes influenciam praticamente todas as doenças humanas, seja pela codificação de proteínas anormais diretamente responsáveis pela doença, seja por determinar suscetibilidade a agentes ambientais que a induzem. A terapia gênica é ainda experimental, e está sendo estudada em protocolos clínicos para diferentes tipos de doenças. O desenvolvimento de métodos seguros e eficientes de transferência gênica para células humanas é um dos pontos mais importantes na terapia gênica. Apesar do grande esforço dirigido na última década para o aperfeiçoamento dos protocolos de terapia gênica humana, e dos avanços importantes na pesquisa básica, as aplicações terapêuticas da tecnologia de transferência gênica continuam ainda em grande parte teóricas. O potencial da terapia gênica é muito grande, devendo ainda causar grande impacto em todos os aspectos da medicina.Gene therapy is a medical intervention that involves modifying the genetic material of living cells to fight disease. Genes influence virtually every human disease, either by encoding for abnormal proteins, which are directly responsible for the disease, or by causing a susceptibility to environmental agents which induce it. Gene therapy is still experimental, and is being studied in clinical trials for many different types of diseases. The development of safe and effective methods of implanting normal genes into the human cell is one of the most important technical issues in gene therapy. Although much effort has been directed in the last decade toward improvement of protocols in human gene therapy, and in spite of many considerable achievements in basic research, the therapeutic applications of gene transfer technology still remain mostly theoretical. The potential for gene therapy is huge and likely to impact on all aspects of medicine.

  11. Manipulating adenovirus hexon hypervariable loops dictates immune neutralisation and coagulation factor X-dependent cell interaction in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Ma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are common pathogens, mostly targeting ocular, gastrointestinal and respiratory cells, but in some cases infection disseminates, presenting in severe clinical outcomes. Upon dissemination and contact with blood, coagulation factor X (FX interacts directly with the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 hexon. FX can act as a bridge to bind heparan sulphate proteoglycans, leading to substantial Ad5 hepatocyte uptake. FX "coating" also protects the virus from host IgM and complement-mediated neutralisation. However, the contribution of FX in determining Ad liver transduction whilst simultaneously shielding the virus from immune attack remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the FX protection mechanism is not conserved amongst Ad types, and identify the hexon hypervariable regions (HVR of Ad5 as the capsid proteins targeted by this host defense pathway. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we manipulate Ad5 HVR interactions to interrogate the interplay between viral cell transduction and immune neutralisation. We show that FX and inhibitory serum components can co-compete and virus neutralisation is influenced by both the location and extent of modifications to the Ad5 HVRs. We engineered Ad5-derived HVRs into the rare, native non FX-binding Ad26 to create Ad26.HVR5C. This enabled the virus to interact with FX at high affinity, as quantified by surface plasmon resonance, FX-mediated cell binding and transduction assays. Concomitantly, Ad26.HVR5C was also sensitised to immune attack in the absence of FX, a direct consequence of the engineered HVRs from Ad5. In both immune competent and deficient animals, Ad26.HVR5C hepatic gene transfer was mediated by FX following intravenous delivery. This study gives mechanistic insight into the pivotal role of the Ad5 HVRs in conferring sensitivity to virus neutralisation by IgM and classical complement-mediated attack. Furthermore, through this gain-of-function approach we demonstrate the dual

  12. Comparison of Human Sodium/Iodide Symporter (hNIS) Gene Expressions between Lentiviral and Adenoviral Vectors in Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Hyun Joo; Chung, June Key; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Heui Ran [Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirusmediated delivery systems has not been reported. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and transduction efficiency of Rad-hNIS into rMSC evaluated by Rad-GFP was 19.1{+-}4.7%, 54.0{+-}6.4%, 85.7{+-}8.7%, and 98.4{+-}1.3% at MOI 1, 5, 20, and 100, respectively. The hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC were assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analyses revealed that hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC were greater than those in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 20 but lower than at MOI 50. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (29,704{+-}6,659 picomole/10{sup 6} cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (6,168{+-}2,134 picomole/10{sup 6} cells). Despite lower amount of expressed protein, hNIS function in rMSC was greater by lentivirus than by adenovirus mediated expression. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative vector efficiency for transgene expression.

  13. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Herrera-Carrillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described.

  14. Role of PET in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Han

    2002-01-01

    In addition to the well-established use of positron emission tomography (PET) in clinical oncology, novel roles for PET are rapidly emerging in the field of gene therapy. Methods for controlled gene delivery to living bodies, made available through advances in molecular biology, are currently being employed in animals for reasearch purposes and in humans to treat diseases such as cancer. Although gene therapy is still in its early developmental stage, it is perceived that many serious illnesses could be treated successfully by the use of therapeutic gene delivery. A major challenge for the widespread use of human gene therapy is to achieve a controlled and effective delivery of foreign genes to target cells and subsequently, adequate levels of expression. As such, the availability of noninvasive imaging methods to accurately assess the location, duration, and level of transgene expression is critical for optimizing gene therapy strategies. Current endeavors to achieve this goal include methods that utilize magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging, and nuclear imaging techniques. As for PET, reporter systems that utilize gene encoding enzymes that accumulate postion labeled substrates and those transcribing surface receptors that bind specific positron labeled ligands have been successfully developed. More recent advances in this area include improved reporter gene constructs and radiotracers, introduction of potential strategies to monitor endogenous gene expression, and human pilot studies evaluating the distribution and safety of reporter PET tracers. The remarkably rapid progress occuring in gene imaging technology indicates its importance and wide range of application. As such, gene imaging is likely to become a major and exciting new area for future application of PET technology

  15. Role of PET in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Han [School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-02-01

    In addition to the well-established use of positron emission tomography (PET) in clinical oncology, novel roles for PET are rapidly emerging in the field of gene therapy. Methods for controlled gene delivery to living bodies, made available through advances in molecular biology, are currently being employed in animals for reasearch purposes and in humans to treat diseases such as cancer. Although gene therapy is still in its early developmental stage, it is perceived that many serious illnesses could be treated successfully by the use of therapeutic gene delivery. A major challenge for the widespread use of human gene therapy is to achieve a controlled and effective delivery of foreign genes to target cells and subsequently, adequate levels of expression. As such, the availability of noninvasive imaging methods to accurately assess the location, duration, and level of transgene expression is critical for optimizing gene therapy strategies. Current endeavors to achieve this goal include methods that utilize magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging, and nuclear imaging techniques. As for PET, reporter systems that utilize gene encoding enzymes that accumulate postion labeled substrates and those transcribing surface receptors that bind specific positron labeled ligands have been successfully developed. More recent advances in this area include improved reporter gene constructs and radiotracers, introduction of potential strategies to monitor endogenous gene expression, and human pilot studies evaluating the distribution and safety of reporter PET tracers. The remarkably rapid progress occuring in gene imaging technology indicates its importance and wide range of application. As such, gene imaging is likely to become a major and exciting new area for future application of PET technology.

  16. The effect of aloe emodin–encapsulated nanoliposome-mediated r-caspase-3 gene transfection and photodynamic therapy on human gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kai-Ting; Duan, Qin-Qin; Chen, Qing; He, Juan-Wen; Tian, Si; Lin, Hai-Dan; Gao, Qing; Bai, Ding-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) has high incidence and mortality rates in China. Surgery and chemotherapy are the main treatments. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become a new treatment modality, appearing in recent experimental studies and clinical trials in various tumors. This study explores the combined effect of gene transfection with PDT on GC cells using aloe emodin (AE)–encapsulated nanoliposomes, which acted as gene carrier as well as one photosensitizer (PS). AE-encapsulated nanoliposomes (nano-AE) were prepared by reverse evaporation method. Electron microscopy and nano-ZS90 analyzer were used to detect its morphology, size, and wavelength. Western blot was used to detect the expression of the caspase-3 after transfection. MTT assay and flow cytometry were employed to determine the cytotoxic and apoptotic rates, respectively. Hoechst 33342 staining was adopted to detect the morphological changes in death gastric cancer cells. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents were measured by DCFH-DA staining. Outcomes demonstrated that the nano-AE has good properties as gene delivery carriers as well as a PS. The group in which the recombinant plasmid of r-caspase-3 was transfected had higher protein expression of the caspase-3 than controls, meanwhile the proliferation rates of the transfected cells were inhibited by the nano-AE-mediated PDT in an energy-dependent manner. In addition, in the transfected cells, the death rate increased to 77.3% as assessed 12 h after PDT (6.4 J/cm 2 ). Hochest 33342 staining also revealed that the death rate increased significantly in the transfected group compared with other groups. Compared to control groups, the production of ROS in nano-AE PDT group had quadrupled in SGC-7901 cells as early as 1 h after PDT, while it is similar to the group of nano-AE transfection and PDT. Nano-AE-mediated r-caspase-3 gene transfection coupled with PDT could inhibit the proliferation rate and increase the apoptotic rate remarkably in human

  17. Advances in study of reporter gene imaging for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Chuanjie; Zhou Jiwen

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of gene therapy, it is requisite to monitor localization and expression of the therapeutic gene in vivo. Monitoring expression of reporter gene using radionuclide reporter gene technique is the best method. Adenoviral vectors expressing reporter gene are constructed using gene fusion, bicistronic, double promoter or bidirectional transcriptional recombination techniques, and transferred into target cells and tissues, then injected radiolabeled reporter probes which couple to the reporter genes. The reporter genes can be imaged invasively, repeatedly, quantitatively with γ-camera, PET and SPECT. Recently, several reporter gene and reporter probe systems have been used in studies of gene therapy. The part of them has been used for clinic trials

  18. Bacterial Toxins for Oncoleaking Suicidal Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahle, Jessica; Walther, Wolfgang

    For suicide gene therapy, initially prodrug-converting enzymes (gene-directed enzyme-producing therapy, GDEPT) were employed to intracellularly metabolize non-toxic prodrugs into toxic compounds, leading to the effective suicidal killing of the transfected tumor cells. In this regard, the suicide gene therapy has demonstrated its potential for efficient tumor eradication. Numerous suicide genes of viral or bacterial origin were isolated, characterized, and extensively tested in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating their therapeutic potential even in clinical trials to treat cancers of different entities. Apart from this, growing efforts are made to generate more targeted and more effective suicide gene systems for cancer gene therapy. In this regard, bacterial toxins are an alternative to the classical GDEPT strategy, which add to the broad spectrum of different suicide approaches. In this context, lytic bacterial toxins, such as streptolysin O (SLO) or the claudin-targeted Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) represent attractive new types of suicide oncoleaking genes. They permit as pore-forming proteins rapid and also selective toxicity toward a broad range of cancers. In this chapter, we describe the generation and use of SLO as well as of CPE-based gene therapies for the effective tumor cell eradication as promising, novel suicide gene approach particularly for treatment of therapy refractory tumors.

  19. Assessment of human pregnane X receptor involvement in pesticide-mediated activation of CYP3A4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Tsutomu; Noracharttiyapot, Wachiraporn; Toriyabe, Takayoshi; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Nagata, Kiyoshi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2007-05-01

    Assessment of foreign chemical inducibility on CYP3A4 is necessary to optimize drug therapies. The properties of chemicals such as pesticides, however, are not well investigated. In the present study, properties of various pesticides on human CYP3A4 induction have been tested using HepG2-derived cells stably expressing the CYP3A4 promoter/enhancer (3-1-10 cells) and the human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)-small interfering RNA (siRNA) system. Among the examined pesticides, 13 pesticides were observed to activate the CYP3A4 gene. Surprisingly, pyributicarb was found to increase the CYP3A4 reporter activity at 0.1 to 1 microM more strongly than typical CYP3A4 inducer rifampicin. Expression of hPXR-siRNA clearly diminished the pyributicarb-stimulated CYP3A4 reporter activity in 3-1-10 cells and decreased the endogenous CYP3A4 mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. Pyributicarb caused enhancement of CYP3A4-derived reporter activity in mouse livers introduced with hPXR by adenovirus. These results indicate pyributicarb as a potent activator of CYP3A4 gene, suggesting the existence of pesticides leading to CYP3A4 induction in our environment.

  20. Progresses towards safe and efficient gene therapy vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chira, Sergiu; Jackson, Carlo S; Oprea, Iulian; Ozturk, Ferhat; Pepper, Michael S; Diaconu, Iulia; Braicu, Cornelia; Raduly, Lajos-Zsolt; Calin, George A; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-10-13

    The emergence of genetic engineering at the beginning of the 1970's opened the era of biomedical technologies, which aims to improve human health using genetic manipulation techniques in a clinical context. Gene therapy represents an innovating and appealing strategy for treatment of human diseases, which utilizes vehicles or vectors for delivering therapeutic genes into the patients' body. However, a few past unsuccessful events that negatively marked the beginning of gene therapy resulted in the need for further studies regarding the design and biology of gene therapy vectors, so that this innovating treatment approach can successfully move from bench to bedside. In this paper, we review the major gene delivery vectors and recent improvements made in their design meant to overcome the issues that commonly arise with the use of gene therapy vectors. At the end of the manuscript, we summarized the main advantages and disadvantages of common gene therapy vectors and we discuss possible future directions for potential therapeutic vectors.

  1. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Jill Williams

    Full Text Available Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells. To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ. Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Gene therapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, Eric M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-09-01

    Lung cancer patients suffer a 15% overall survival despite advances in chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. This unacceptably low survival rate is due to the usual finding of advanced disease at diagnosis. However, multimodality strategies using conventional therapies only minimally improve survival rates even in early stages of lung cancer. Attempts to improve survival in advanced disease using various combinations of platinum-based chemotherapy have demonstrated that no regimen is superior, suggesting a therapeutic plateau and the need for novel, more specific, and less toxic therapeutic strategies. Over the past three decades, the genetic etiology of cancer has been gradually delineated, albeit not yet completely. Understanding the molecular events that occur during the multistep process of bronchogenic carcinogenesis may make these tasks more surmountable. During these same three decades, techniques have been developed which allow transfer of functional genes into mammalian cells. For example, blockade of activated tumor-promoting oncogenes or replacement of inactivated tumor-suppressing or apoptosis-promoting genes can be achieved by gene therapy. This article will discuss the therapeutic implications of these molecular changes associated with bronchogenic carcinomas and will then review the status of gene therapies for treatment of lung cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Preclinical and clinical experience in vascular gene therapy: advantages over conservative/standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol, S; Huehns, T Y

    2001-04-01

    No systemic pharmacological treatment has been shown to convincingly reduce the incidence of restenosis after angioplasty or increase the formation of collaterals in ischemic tissue in patients. The lack of success of many pharmaceutical agents in reducing restenosis rates or in inducing angiogenesis post-angioplasty and following stent implantation has encouraged the development of new technological treatment approaches. Gene therapy is a novel strategy with the potential to prevent some of the sequelae after arterial injury, particularly cell proliferation, and to induce growth of new vessels or remodeling of pre-existing vessel branches, which may help patients with critical ischemia. Gene therapy strategies have the advantage of minimizing systemic side effects and may have a long-term effect as the encoded protein is released. Most clinical trials investigating gene therapy for vascular disease have been uncontrolled phase I and IIa trials. Gene therapy into vessels with the genes for growth factors has been demonstrated to be feasible and efficient. Local drug delivery devices have been used in combination with gene therapy in several trials to maximize safety and efficiency. Data from experimental animal work indicates that gene therapy may modify intimal hyperplasia after arterial injury, but there are few clinical trials on restenosis in patients. Preliminary clinical results show only limited success in altering restenosis rates. In vitro and experimental in vivo investigations into gene therapy for angiogenesis demonstrate increased formation of collaterals and functional improvement of limb ischemia. There is some evidence of increased collateral formation and clinical improvement in patients with critical limb ischemia. Results of placebo-controlled and double-blind trials of gene therapy for vascular disease are awaited.

  4. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kelvin K W; Tse, Herman; Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K Y; Zhang, Anna J X; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Chan, Andy S F; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lo, Janice Y C; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should be

  5. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin K W To

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention

  6. Mediators and treatment matching in behavior therapy, cognitive therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Allison G; Dong, Lu; Bélanger, Lynda; Morin, Charles M

    2017-10-01

    To examine the mediators and the potential of treatment matching to improve outcome for cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for insomnia. Participants were 188 adults (117 women; Mage = 47.4 years, SD = 12.6) meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000) diagnostic criteria for chronic insomnia (Mduration: 14.5 years, SD: 12.8). Participants were randomized to behavior therapy (BT; n = 63), cognitive therapy (CT; n = 65), or CBT (n = 60). The outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Hypothesized BT mediators were sleep-incompatible behaviors, bedtime variability (BTv), risetime variability (RTv) and time in bed (TIB). Hypothesized CT mediators were worry, unhelpful beliefs, and monitoring for sleep-related threat. The behavioral processes mediated outcome for BT but not CT. The cognitive processes mediated outcome in both BT and CT. The subgroup scoring high on both behavioral and cognitive processes had a marginally significant better outcome if they received CBT relative to BT or CT. The subgroup scoring relatively high on behavioral but low on cognitive processes and received BT or CBT did not differ from those who received CT. The subgroup scoring relatively high on cognitive but low on behavioral processes and received CT or CBT did not differ from those who received BT. The behavioral mediators were specific to BT relative to CT. The cognitive mediators were significant for both BT and CT outcomes. Patients exhibiting high levels of both behavioral and cognitive processes achieve better outcome if they receive CBT relative to BT or CT alone. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Ethical issues of perinatal human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J C; Richter, G

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines some key ethical issues raised by trials of human gene therapy in the perinatal period--i.e., in infants, young children, and the human fetus. It describes five resources in ethics for researchers' considerations prior to such trials: (1) the history of ethical debate about gene therapy, (2) a literature on the relevance of major ethical principles for clinical research, (3) a body of widely accepted norms and practices, (4) knowledge of paradigm cases, and (5) researchers' own professional integrity. The paper also examines ethical concerns that must be met prior to any trial: benefits to and safety of subjects, informed assent of children and informed parental permission, informed consent of pregnant women in fetal gene therapy, protection of privacy, and concerns about fairness in the selection of subjects. The paper criticizes the position that cases of fetal gene therapy should be restricted only to those where the pregnant woman has explicitly refused abortion. Additional topics include concerns about genetic enhancement and germ-line gene therapy.

  8. Comparative inactivation of enteric adenoviruses, poliovirus and coliphages by ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Q.S.; Gerba, C.P.

    1996-01-01

    The inactivation of enteric adenoviruses 40 and 41 by ultraviolet (UV) radiation was investigated and compared with poliovirus type 1 (strain LSc-2ab) and coliphages MS-2 and PRD-1. Purified stocks of the viruses were exposed to collimated ultraviolet radiation in a stirred reactor for a total dose of up to 140 mW s/cm 2 . The doses of UV to achieve a 90% inactivation of adenovirus 40, adenovirus 41, coliphages MS-2 and PRD-1 and poliovirus type 1 were 30, 23.6, 14, 8.7 and 4.1 mW s/cm 2 , respectively. Adenovirus 40 was significantly more resistant than coliphage MS-2 to UV irradiation (P < 0.01). Adenovirus 41 appeared slightly more sensitive than adenovirus 40, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). The resistance of PRD-1 was less than MS-2 (P < 0.01), but greater than poliovirus type 1 (P < 0.01). Adenoviruses 40 and 41 were more resistant than Bacillus subtilis spores, often suggested as an indicator of UV light performance. The double-stranded DNA adenoviruses appear to be the most resistant of all potentially water-borne enteric viruses to UV light disinfection. (author)

  9. Gene therapy, early promises, subsequent problems, and recent breakthroughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razi Soofiyani, Saeideh; Baradaran, Behzad; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Kazemi, Tohid; Mohammadnejad, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in medicine. The concept of gene delivery to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed around half a century, but scientist's ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology made this purpose to reality. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. While gene