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Sample records for adenovirus receptor car

  1. The mechanism of the growth-inhibitory effect of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on human bladder cancer: a functional analysis of car protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okegawa, T; Pong, R C; Li, Y; Bergelson, J M; Sagalowsky, A I; Hsieh, J T

    2001-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is identified as a high-affinity receptor for adenovirus type 5. We observed that invasive bladder cancer specimens had significantly reduced CAR mRNA levels compared with superficial bladder cancer specimens, which suggests that CAR may play a role in the progression of bladder cancer. Elevated CAR expression in the T24 cell line (CAR-negative cells) increased its sensitivity to adenovirus infection and significantly inhibited its in vitro growth, accompanied by p21 and hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma accumulation. Conversely, decreased CAR levels in both RT4 and 253J cell lines (CAR-positive cells) promoted their in vitro growth. To unveil the mechanism of action of CAR, we showed that the extracellular domain of CAR facilitated intercellular adhesion. Furthermore, interrupting intercellular adhesion of CAR by a specific antibody alleviates the growth-inhibitory effect of CAR. We also demonstrated that both the transmembrane and intracellular domains of CAR were critical for its growth-inhibitory activity. These data indicate that the cell-cell contact initiated by membrane-bound CAR can elicit a negative signal cascade to modulate cell cycle regulators inside the nucleus of bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the presence of CAR cannot only facilitate viral uptake of adenovirus but also inhibit cell growth. These results can be integrated to formulate a new strategy for bladder cancer therapy.

  2. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  3. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

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    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  4. Interspecies differences in virus uptake versus cardiac function of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freiberg, F.; Sauter, M.; Pinkert, S.; Govindarajan, T.; Kaldrack, J.; Thakkar, M.; Fechner, H.; Klingel, K.; Gotthardt, M.

    2014-01-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell contact protein with an important role in virus uptake. Its extracellular immunoglobulin domains mediate the binding to coxsackievirus and adenovirus as well as homophilic and heterophilic interactions between cells. The cytoplasmic tail

  5. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael; Halin, Cornelia

    2009-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity

  6. Fiber mediated receptor masking in non-infected bystander cells restricts adenovirus cell killing effect but promotes adenovirus host co-existence.

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    Johan Rebetz

    Full Text Available The basic concept of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAD as oncolytic agents is that progenies generated from each round of infection will disperse, infect and kill new cancer cells. However, CRAD has only inhibited, but not eradicated tumor growth in xenograft tumor therapy, and CRAD therapy has had only marginal clinical benefit to cancer patients. Here, we found that CRAD propagation and cancer cell survival co-existed for long periods of time when infection was initiated at low multiplicity of infection (MOI, and cancer cell killing was inefficient and slow compared to the assumed cell killing effect upon infection at high MOI. Excessive production of fiber molecules from initial CRAD infection of only 1 to 2% cancer cells and their release prior to the viral particle itself caused a tropism-specific receptor masking in both infected and non-infected bystander cells. Consequently, the non-infected bystander cells were inefficiently bound and infected by CRAD progenies. Further, fiber overproduction with concomitant restriction of adenovirus spread was observed in xenograft cancer therapy models. Besides the CAR-binding Ad4, Ad5, and Ad37, infection with CD46-binding Ad35 and Ad11 also caused receptor masking. Fiber overproduction and its resulting receptor masking thus play a key role in limiting CRAD functionality, but potentially promote adenovirus and host cell co-existence. These findings also give important clues for understanding mechanisms underlying the natural infection course of various adenoviruses.

  7. The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor: a new adhesion protein in cochlear development.

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    Excoffon, Katherine J D A; Avenarius, Matthew R; Hansen, Marlan R; Kimberling, William J; Najmabadi, Hossein; Smith, Richard J H; Zabner, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) is an essential regulator of cell growth and adhesion during development. The gene for CAR, CXADR, is located within the genomic locus for Usher syndrome type 1E (USH1E). Based on this and a physical interaction with harmonin, the protein responsible for USH1C, we hypothesized that CAR may be involved in cochlear development and that mutations in CXADR may be responsible for USH1E. The expression of CAR in the cochlea was determined by PCR and immunofluorescence microscopy. We found that CAR expression is highly regulated during development. In neonatal mice, CAR is localized to the junctions of most cochlear cell types but is restricted to the supporting and strial cells in adult cochlea. A screen of two populations consisting of non-syndromic deaf and Usher 1 patients for mutations in CXADR revealed one haploid mutation (P356S). Cell surface expression, viral receptor activity, and localization of the mutant form of CAR were indistinguishable from wild-type CAR. Although we were unable to confirm a role for CAR in autosomal recessive, non-syndromic deafness, or Usher syndrome type 1, based on its regulation, localization, and molecular interactions, CAR remains an attractive candidate for genetic deafness.

  8. ZEB1 limits adenoviral infectability by transcriptionally repressing the Coxsackie virus and Adenovirus Receptor

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    Lacher Markus D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that RAS-MEK (Cancer Res. 2003 May 1;63(9:2088-95 and TGF-β (Cancer Res. 2006 Feb 1;66(3:1648-57 signaling negatively regulate coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR cell-surface expression and adenovirus uptake. In the case of TGF-β, down-regulation of CAR occurred in context of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process associated with transcriptional repression of E-cadherin by, for instance, the E2 box-binding factors Snail, Slug, SIP1 or ZEB1. While EMT is crucial in embryonic development, it has been proposed to contribute to the formation of invasive and metastatic carcinomas by reducing cell-cell contacts and increasing cell migration. Results Here, we show that ZEB1 represses CAR expression in both PANC-1 (pancreatic and MDA-MB-231 (breast human cancer cells. We demonstrate that ZEB1 physically associates with at least one of two closely spaced and conserved E2 boxes within the minimal CAR promoter here defined as genomic region -291 to -1 relative to the translational start ATG. In agreement with ZEB1's established role as a negative regulator of the epithelial phenotype, silencing its expression in MDA-MB-231 cells induced a partial Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition (MET characterized by increased levels of E-cadherin and CAR, and decreased expression of fibronectin. Conversely, knockdown of ZEB1 in PANC-1 cells antagonized both the TGF-β-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and CAR and the reduction of adenovirus uptake. Interestingly, even though ZEB1 clearly contributes to the TGF-β-induced mesenchymal phenotype of PANC-1 cells, TGF-β did not seem to affect ZEB1's protein levels or subcellular localization. These findings suggest that TGF-β may inhibit CAR expression by regulating factor(s that cooperate with ZEB1 to repress the CAR promoter, rather than by regulating ZEB1 expression levels. In addition to the negative E2 box-mediated regulation the minimal

  9. 5-Fluorouracil-related enhancement of adenoviral infection is Coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor independent and associated with morphological changes in lipid membranes

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    Cabrele, Chiara; Vogel, Mandy; Piso, Pompiliu; Rentsch, Markus; Schröder, Josef; Jauch, Karl W; Schlitt, Hans J; Beham, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the mechanism underlying the effects of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) on adenoviral infection. METHODS: Low and high Coxsackievirus-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) expressing human colon carcinoma cell lines were treated with 5-FU and two E1-deleted adenoviral constructs, one transferring GFP (Ad/CMV-GFP) the other bax (Ad/CEA-bax). The number of infected cells were monitored by GFP expression. To evaluate the effects of 5-FU in a receptor free system, Ad/GFP were encapsulated in liposomes and treated with 5-FU. Ad/GFP release was estimated with PCR and infection of 293 cells with the supernatant. Electron microscopy of the Ad5-GFP-liposome complex was made to investigate morphological changes of the liposomes after 5-FU. RESULTS: Infection rates of all cell lines increased from 50% to 98% with emerging 5-FU concentrations. The enhanced viral uptake was independent of the CAR expression. Additionally, 5-FU treated liposomes released 2-2.5 times more adenoviruses. Furthermore, 5-FU-treated liposomes appeared irregular and porous-like. CONCLUSION: adenoviral uptake is enhanced in the presence of 5-FU irrespective of CAR and is associated with morphological changes in membranes making the combination of both a promising option in gene therapy. PMID:16937527

  10. The Molecular Interaction of CAR and JAML Recruits the Central Cell Signal Transducer PI3K

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    Verdino, Petra; Witherden, Deborah A.; Havran, Wendy L.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2010-11-15

    Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is the primary cellular receptor for group B coxsackieviruses and most adenovirus serotypes and plays a crucial role in adenoviral gene therapy. Recent discovery of the interaction between junctional adhesion molecule-like protein (JAML) and CAR uncovered important functional roles in immunity, inflammation, and tissue homeostasis. Crystal structures of JAML ectodomain (2.2 angstroms) and its complex with CAR (2.8 angstroms) reveal an unusual immunoglobulin-domain assembly for JAML and a charged interface that confers high specificity. Biochemical and mutagenesis studies illustrate how CAR-mediated clustering of JAML recruits phosphoinositide 3-kinase (P13K) to a JAML intracellular sequence motif as delineated for the {alpha}{beta} T cell costimulatory receptor CD28. Thus, CAR and JAML are cell signaling receptors of the immune system with implications for asthma, cancer, and chronic nonhealing wounds.

  11. Human erythrocytes bind and inactivate type 5 adenovirus by presenting Coxsackie virus-adenovirus receptor and complement receptor 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carlisle, R. C.; Di, Y.; Cerny, A. M.; Sonnen, A. F. P.; Sim, R. B.; Green, N. K.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Gilbert, R. J. C.; Fisher, K. D.; Finberg, R. W.; Seymour, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 9 (2009), s. 1909-1918 ISSN 0006-4971 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : adenovirus * erythrocyte * complement receptor 1 Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 10.555, year: 2009

  12. A mosaic adenovirus possessing serotype Ad5 and serotype Ad3 knobs exhibits expanded tropism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Koichi; Reynolds, Paul N.; Short, Joshua J.; Kawakami, Yosuke; Adachi, Yasuo; Glasgow, Joel N.; Rots, Marianne G.; Krasnykh, Victor; Douglas, Joanne T.; Curiel, David T.

    2003-01-01

    The efficiency of cancer gene therapy with recombinant adenoviruses based on serotype 5 (Ad5) has been limited partly because of variable, and often low, expression by human primary cancer cells of the primary cellular-receptor which recognizes the knob domain of the fiber protein, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). As a means of circumventing CAR deficiency, Ad vectors have been retargeted by utilizing chimeric fibers possessing knob domains of alternate Ad serotypes. We have reported that ovarian cancer cells possess a primary receptor for Ad3 to which the Ad3 knob binds independently of the CAR-Ad5 knob interaction. Furthermore, an Ad5-based chimeric vector, designated Ad5/3, containing a chimeric fiber proteins possessing the Ad3 knob, demonstrates CAR-independent tropism by virtue of targeting the Ad3 receptor. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that a mosaic virus possessing both the Ad5 knob and the Ad3 knob on the same virion could utilize either primary receptor, resulting in expanded tropism. In this study, we generated a dual-knob mosaic virus by coinfection of 293 cells with Ad5-based and Ad5/3-based vectors. Characterization of the resultant virions confirmed the incorporation of both Ad5 and Ad3 knobs in the same particle. Furthermore, this mosaic virus was able to utilize either receptor, CAR and the Ad3 receptor, for virus attachment to cells. Enhanced Ad infectivity with the mosaic virus was shown in a panel of cell lines, with receptor profiles ranging from CAR-dominant to Ad3 receptor-dominant. Thus, this mosaic virus strategy may offer the potential to improve Ad-based gene therapy approaches by infectivity enhancement and tropism expansion

  13. Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor as a novel marker of stem cells in treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Fang, Bingliang; Mohan, Radhe; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Treatment resistance resulting from the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains a challenge in cancer treatment. Little is known about possible markers of CSCs in treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) as one such marker of CSCs in models of treatment-resistant NSCLC. Materials and methods: Resistant H460 and A549 cell lines were established by repeated exposure to paclitaxel or fractionated radiation. CSC markers were measured by Western blotting and flow cytometry. We also established stable CAR-overexpressing and stable shRNA-CAR-knockdown cell lines and assessed their survival, invasiveness, and tumorigenic capabilities with clonogenic, telomerase, Matrigel, and tumor formation assays. Results: CAR expression was associated with CSC phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. CAR-overexpressing cells were more treatment-resistant, self-renewing, and tumorigenic than were parental cells, and shRNA-mediated knockdown of CAR expression was sufficient to inhibit these functions. CAR expression also correlated with the epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Conclusions: We showed for the first time that CAR is a marker of CSCs and may affect the activities of CSCs in treatment-resistant NSCLC. CAR may prove to be a target for CSC treatment and a predictor of treatment response in patients with NSCLC.

  14. Adenovirus entry from the apical surface of polarized epithelia is facilitated by the host innate immune response.

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    Poornima L N Kotha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of viral-induced respiratory disease begins with an understanding of the factors that increase or decrease susceptibility to viral infection. The primary receptor for most adenoviruses is the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, a cell-cell adhesion protein normally localized at the basolateral surface of polarized epithelia and involved in neutrophil transepithelial migration. Recently, an alternate isoform of CAR, CAREx8, has been identified at the apical surface of polarized airway epithelia and is implicated in viral infection from the apical surface. We hypothesized that the endogenous role of CAREx8 may be to facilitate host innate immunity. We show that IL-8, a proinflammatory cytokine and a neutrophil chemoattractant, stimulates the protein expression and apical localization of CAREx8 via activation of AKT/S6K and inhibition of GSK3β. Apical CAREx8 tethers infiltrating neutrophils at the apical surface of a polarized epithelium. Moreover, neutrophils present on the apical-epithelial surface enhance adenovirus entry into the epithelium. These findings suggest that adenovirus evolved to co-opt an innate immune response pathway that stimulates the expression of its primary receptor, apical CAREx8, to allow the initial infection the intact epithelium. In addition, CAREx8 is a new target for the development of novel therapeutics for both respiratory inflammatory disease and adenoviral infection.

  15. Inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and forced internalization of TRAIL receptor 1 by adenovirus proteins.

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    Tollefson, A E; Toth, K; Doronin, K; Kuppuswamy, M; Doronina, O A; Lichtenstein, D L; Hermiston, T W; Smith, C A; Wold, W S

    2001-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through two receptors, TRAIL-R1 (also known as death receptor 4) and TRAIL-R2 (also known as death receptor 5), that are members of the TNF receptor superfamily of death domain-containing receptors. We show that human adenovirus type 5 encodes three proteins, named RID (previously named E3-10.4K/14.5K), E3-14.7K, and E1B-19K, that independently inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis of infected human cells. This conclusion was derived from studies using wild-type adenovirus, adenovirus replication-competent mutants that lack one or more of the RID, E3-14.7K, and E1B-19K genes, and adenovirus E1-minus replication-defective vectors that express all E3 genes, RID plus E3-14.7K only, RID only, or E3-14.7K only. RID inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis when cells are sensitized to TRAIL either by adenovirus infection or treatment with cycloheximide. RID induces the internalization of TRAIL-R1 from the cell surface, as shown by flow cytometry and indirect immunofluorescence for TRAIL-R1. TRAIL-R1 was internalized in distinct vesicles which are very likely to be endosomes and lysosomes. TRAIL-R1 is degraded, as indicated by the disappearance of the TRAIL-R1 immunofluorescence signal. Degradation was inhibited by bafilomycin A1, a drug that prevents acidification of vesicles and the sorting of receptors from late endosomes to lysosomes, implying that degradation occurs in lysosomes. RID was also shown previously to internalize and degrade another death domain receptor, Fas, and to prevent apoptosis through Fas and the TNF receptor. RID was shown previously to force the internalization and degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. E1B-19K was shown previously to block apoptosis through Fas, and both E1B-19K and E3-14.7K were found to prevent apoptosis through the TNF receptor. These findings suggest that the receptors for TRAIL, Fas ligand, and TNF play a role in limiting virus

  16. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jianfeng; Zhao Dong; Zhong Zhirong; Zhang Zhirong; Gong Tao; Sun Xun

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  17. TNFα promotes CAR-dependent migration of leukocytes across epithelial monolayers

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    Morton, Penny E.; Hicks, Alexander; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Raghavan, Swetavalli; Pike, Rosemary; Noble, Alistair; Woodfin, Abigail; Jenkins, Gisli; Rayner, Emma; Santis, George; Parsons, Maddy

    2016-01-01

    Trans-epithelial migration (TEpM) of leukocytes during inflammation requires engagement with receptors expressed on the basolateral surface of the epithelium. One such receptor is Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) that binds to Junctional Adhesion Molecule-like (JAM-L) expressed on leukocytes. Here we provide the first evidence that efficient TEpM of monocyte-derived THP-1 cells requires and is controlled by phosphorylation of CAR. We show that TNFα acts in a paracrine manner on epithelial cells via a TNFR1-PI3K-PKCδ pathway leading to CAR phosphorylation and subsequent transmigration across cell junctions. Moreover, we show that CAR is hyper-phosphorylated in vivo in acute and chronic lung inflammation models and this response is required to facilitate immune cell recruitment. This represents a novel mechanism of feedback between leukocytes and epithelial cells during TEpM and may be important in controlling responses to pro-inflammatory cytokines in pathological settings. PMID:27193388

  18. Key Role of the Scavenger Receptor MARCO in Mediating Adenovirus Infection and Subsequent Innate Responses of Macrophages.

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    Maler, Mareike D; Nielsen, Peter J; Stichling, Nicole; Cohen, Idan; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Wood, Connor; Engelhard, Peggy; Suomalainen, Maarit; Gyory, Ildiko; Huber, Michael; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Gordon, Siamon; Jakob, Thilo; Martin, Stefan F; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Greber, Urs F; Freudenberg, Marina A; Fejer, György

    2017-08-01

    The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed in several subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages and has been shown to participate in the recognition of various bacterial pathogens. However, the role of MARCO in antiviral defense is largely unexplored. Here, we investigated whether MARCO might be involved in the innate sensing of infection with adenovirus and recombinant adenoviral vectors by macrophages, which elicit vigorous immune responses in vivo Using cells derived from mice, we show that adenovirus infection is significantly more efficient in MARCO-positive alveolar macrophages (AMs) and in AM-like primary macrophage lines (Max Planck Institute cells) than in MARCO-negative bone marrow-derived macrophages. Using antibodies blocking ligand binding to MARCO, as well as gene-deficient and MARCO-transfected cells, we show that MARCO mediates the rapid adenovirus transduction of macrophages. By enhancing adenovirus infection, MARCO contributes to efficient innate virus recognition through the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS. This leads to strong proinflammatory responses, including the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), alpha/beta interferon, and mature IL-1α. These findings contribute to the understanding of viral pathogenesis in macrophages and may open new possibilities for the development of tools to influence the outcome of infection with adenovirus or adenovirus vectors. IMPORTANCE Macrophages play crucial roles in inflammation and defense against infection. Several macrophage subtypes have been identified with differing abilities to respond to infection with both natural adenoviruses and recombinant adenoviral vectors. Adenoviruses are important respiratory pathogens that elicit vigorous innate responses in vitro and in vivo The cell surface receptors mediating macrophage type-specific adenovirus sensing are largely unknown. The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed on some subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages, including lung alveolar macrophages

  19. A dynamical systems model for combinatorial cancer therapy enhances oncolytic adenovirus efficacy by MEK-inhibition.

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    Bagheri, Neda; Shiina, Marisa; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Korn, W Michael

    2011-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses, such as ONYX-015, have been tested in clinical trials for currently untreatable tumors, but have yet to demonstrate adequate therapeutic efficacy. The extent to which viruses infect targeted cells determines the efficacy of this approach but many tumors down-regulate the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), rendering them less susceptible to infection. Disrupting MAPK pathway signaling by pharmacological inhibition of MEK up-regulates CAR expression, offering possible enhanced adenovirus infection. MEK inhibition, however, interferes with adenovirus replication due to resulting G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Therefore, enhanced efficacy will depend on treatment protocols that productively balance these competing effects. Predictive understanding of how to attain and enhance therapeutic efficacy of combinatorial treatment is difficult since the effects of MEK inhibitors, in conjunction with adenovirus/cell interactions, are complex nonlinear dynamic processes. We investigated combinatorial treatment strategies using a mathematical model that predicts the impact of MEK inhibition on tumor cell proliferation, ONYX-015 infection, and oncolysis. Specifically, we fit a nonlinear differential equation system to dedicated experimental data and analyzed the resulting simulations for favorable treatment strategies. Simulations predicted enhanced combinatorial therapy when both treatments were applied simultaneously; we successfully validated these predictions in an ensuing explicit test study. Further analysis revealed that a CAR-independent mechanism may be responsible for amplified virus production and cell death. We conclude that integrated computational and experimental analysis of combinatorial therapy provides a useful means to identify treatment/infection protocols that yield clinically significant oncolysis. Enhanced oncolytic therapy has the potential to dramatically improve non-surgical cancer treatment, especially in locally advanced

  20. Adrenal gland infection by serotype 5 adenovirus requires coagulation factors.

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    Lucile Tran

    Full Text Available Recombinant, replication-deficient serotype 5 adenovirus infects the liver upon in vivo, systemic injection in rodents. This infection requires the binding of factor X to the capsid of this adenovirus. Another organ, the adrenal gland is also infected upon systemic administration of Ad, however, whether this infection is dependent on the cocksackie adenovirus receptor (CAR or depends on the binding of factor X to the viral capsid remained to be determined. In the present work, we have used a pharmacological agent (warfarin as well as recombinant adenoviruses lacking the binding site of Factor X to elucidate this mechanism in mice. We demonstrate that, as observed in the liver, adenovirus infection of the adrenal glands in vivo requires Factor X. Considering that the level of transduction of the adrenal glands is well-below that of the liver and that capsid-modified adenoviruses are unlikely to selectively infect the adrenal glands, we have used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT imaging of gene expression to determine whether local virus administration (direct injection in the kidney could increase gene transfer to the adrenal glands. We demonstrate that direct injection of the virus in the kidney increases gene transfer in the adrenal gland but liver transduction remains important. These observations strongly suggest that serotype 5 adenovirus uses a similar mechanism to infect liver and adrenal gland and that selective transgene expression in the latter is more likely to be achieved through transcriptional targeting.

  1. Enhanced transduction and replication of RGD-fiber modified adenovirus in primary T cells.

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    Sadhak Sengupta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are often used as vehicles to mediate gene delivery for therapeutic purposes, but their research scope in hematological cells remains limited due to a narrow choice of host cells that express the adenoviral receptor (CAR. T cells, which are attractive targets for gene therapy of numerous diseases, remain resistant to adenoviral infection because of the absence of CAR expression. Here, we demonstrate that this resistance can be overcome when murine or human T cells are transduced with an adenovirus incorporating the RGD-fiber modification (Ad-RGD.A luciferase-expressing replication-deficient Ad-RGD infected 3-fold higher number of activated primary T cells than an adenovirus lacking the RGD-fiber modification in vitro. Infection with replication-competent Ad-RGD virus also caused increased cell cycling, higher E1A copy number and enriched hexon antigen expression in both human and murine T cells. Transduction with oncolytic Ad-RGD also resulted in higher titers of progeny virus and enhanced the killing of T cells. In vivo, 35-45% of splenic T cells were transduced by Ad-RGD.Collectively, our results prove that a fiber modified Ad-RGD successfully transduces and replicates in primary T cells of both murine and human origin.

  2. The human membrane cofactor CD46 is a receptor for species B adenovirus serotype 3.

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    Sirena, Dominique; Lilienfeld, Benjamin; Eisenhut, Markus; Kälin, Stefan; Boucke, Karin; Beerli, Roger R; Vogt, Lorenz; Ruedl, Christiane; Bachmann, Martin F; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2004-05-01

    Many human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes use the coxsackie B virus-Ad receptor (CAR). Recently, CD46 was suggested to be a receptor of species B Ad serotype 11 (Ad11), Ad14, Ad16, Ad21, Ad35, and Ad50. Using Sindbis virus-mediated cDNA library expression, we identify here the membrane cofactor protein CD46 as a surface receptor of species B Ad3. All four major CD46 transcripts and one minor CD46 transcript expressed in nucleated human cells were isolated. Rodent BHK cells stably expressing the BC1 form of CD46 bound radiolabeled Ad3 with a dissociation constant of 0.3 nM, identical to that of CD46-positive HeLa cells expressing twice as many Ad3 binding sites. Pull-down experiments with recombinant Ad3 fibers and a soluble form of the CD46 extracellular domain linked to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (CD46ex-Fc) indicated direct interactions of the Ad3 fiber knob with CD46ex-Fc but not CARex-Fc (Fc-linked extracellular domain of CAR). Ad3 colocalized with cell surface CD46 in both rodent and human cells at the light and electron microscopy levels. Anti-CD46 antibodies and CD46ex-Fc inhibited Ad3 binding to CD46-expressing BHK cells more than 10-fold and to human cells 2-fold. In CD46-expressing BHK cells, wild-type Ad3 and a chimeric Ad consisting of the Ad5 capsid and the Ad3 fiber elicited dose-dependent cytopathic effects and transgene expression, albeit less efficiently than in human cells. Together, our results show that all of the major splice forms of CD46 are predominant and functional binding sites of Ad3 on CD46-expressing rodent and human cells but may not be the sole receptor of species B Ads on human cells. These results have implications for understanding viral pathogenesis and therapeutic gene delivery.

  3. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

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    Anton V Borovjagin

    Full Text Available To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI, a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3 fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(vβ3/α(vβ5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  4. Getting genetic access to natural adenovirus genomes to explore vector diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2017-10-01

    Recombinant vectors based on the human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) have been developed and extensively used in preclinical and clinical studies for over 30 years. However, certain restrictions of HAdV5-based vectors have limited their clinical applications because they are rather inefficient in specifically transducing cells of therapeutic interest that lack the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Moreover, enhanced vector-associated toxicity and widespread preexisting immunity have been shown to significantly hamper the effectiveness of HAdV-5-mediated gene transfer. However, evolution of adenoviruses in the natural host is driving the generation of novel types with altered virulence, enhanced transmission, and altered tissue tropism. As a consequence, an increasing number of alternative adenovirus types were identified, which may represent a valuable resource for the development of novel vector types. Thus, researchers are focusing on the other naturally occurring adenovirus types, which are structurally similar but functionally different from HAdV5. To this end, several strategies have been devised for getting genetic access to adenovirus genomes, resulting in a new panel of adenoviral vectors. Importantly, these vectors were shown to have a host range different from HAdV5 and to escape the anti-HAdV5 immune response, thus underlining the great potential of this approach. In summary, this review provides a state-of-the-art overview of one essential step in adenoviral vector development.

  5. Microparticle-mediated transfer of the viral receptors CAR and CD46, and the CFTR channel in a CHO cell model confers new functions to target cells.

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    Gaëlle Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Cell microparticles (MPs released in the extracellular milieu can embark plasma membrane and intracellular components which are specific of their cellular origin, and transfer them to target cells. The MP-mediated, cell-to-cell transfer of three human membrane glycoproteins of different degrees of complexity was investigated in the present study, using a CHO cell model system. We first tested the delivery of CAR and CD46, two monospanins which act as adenovirus receptors, to target CHO cells. CHO cells lack CAR and CD46, high affinity receptors for human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5, and serotype 35 (HAdV35, respectively. We found that MPs derived from CHO cells (MP-donor cells constitutively expressing CAR (MP-CAR or CD46 (MP-CD46 were able to transfer CAR and CD46 to target CHO cells, and conferred selective permissiveness to HAdV5 and HAdV35. In addition, target CHO cells incubated with MP-CD46 acquired the CD46-associated function in complement regulation. We also explored the MP-mediated delivery of a dodecaspanin membrane glycoprotein, the CFTR to target CHO cells. CFTR functions as a chloride channel in human cells and is implicated in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Target CHO cells incubated with MPs produced by CHO cells constitutively expressing GFP-tagged CFTR (MP-GFP-CFTR were found to gain a new cellular function, the chloride channel activity associated to CFTR. Time-course analysis of the appearance of GFP-CFTR in target cells suggested that MPs could achieve the delivery of CFTR to target cells via two mechanisms: the transfer of mature, membrane-inserted CFTR glycoprotein, and the transfer of CFTR-encoding mRNA. These results confirmed that cell-derived MPs represent a new class of promising therapeutic vehicles for the delivery of bioactive macromolecules, proteins or mRNAs, the latter exerting the desired therapeutic effect in target cells via de novo synthesis of their encoded proteins.

  6. Foreign or Domestic CARs: Receptor Ligands as Antigen-Binding Domains

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    Donald R. Shaffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are increasingly being used in clinical trials to treat a variety of malignant conditions and recent results with CD19-specific CARs showing complete tumor regressions has sparked the interest of researchers and the public alike. Traditional CARs have been generated using single-chain variable fragments (scFv, often derived from murine monoclonal antibodies, for antigen specificity. As the clinical experience with CAR T cells grows, so does the potential for unwanted immune responses against the foreign transgene. Strategies that may reduce the immunogenicity of CAR T cells are humanization of the scFv and the use of naturally occurring receptor ligands as antigen-binding domains. Herein, we review the experience with alternatively designed CARs that contain receptor ligands rather than scFv. While most of the experiences have been in the pre-clinical setting, clinical data is also emerging.

  7. A Viral Receptor Complementation Strategy to Overcome CAV-2 Tropism for Efficient Retrograde Targeting of Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Jing; Vaughan, Alexander; Sturgill, James Fitzhugh; Kepecs, Adam

    2018-06-06

    Retrogradely transported neurotropic viruses enable genetic access to neurons based on their long-range projections and have become indispensable tools for linking neural connectivity with function. A major limitation of viral techniques is that they rely on cell-type-specific molecules for uptake and transport. Consequently, viruses fail to infect variable subsets of neurons depending on the complement of surface receptors expressed (viral tropism). We report a receptor complementation strategy to overcome this by potentiating neurons for the infection of the virus of interest-in this case, canine adenovirus type-2 (CAV-2). We designed AAV vectors for expressing the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) throughout candidate projection neurons. CAR expression greatly increased retrograde-labeling rates, which we demonstrate for several long-range projections, including some resistant to other retrograde-labeling techniques. Our results demonstrate a receptor complementation strategy to abrogate endogenous viral tropism and thereby facilitate efficient retrograde targeting for functional analysis of neural circuits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetanina, Mariya A.; Pakharukova, Mariya Y.; Kurinna, Svitlana M.; Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2011-01-01

    2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car -/- ) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car -/- livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. - Highlights: → The azo dye and mouse carcinogen OAT is a very effective mCAR activator. → OAT increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. → OAT CAR-dependently increases the expression of a specific subset of CAR target genes. → OAT induces an unexpectedly deferred, but CAR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation.

  9. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a tissue-specific target for adenoviral transduction of prostate cancer in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, R; van Rijswijk, ALCT; Haisma, HJ; Bangma, CH

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Adenovirus binds to the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) as a first step in the process of cellular infection. This dependence on CAR potentially limits the use of adenovirus in gene therapy, since CAR is expressed in many tissues of the body, and, expression of CAR may be

  10. Phenobarbital indirectly activates the constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR) by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoh, Shingo; Sobhany, Mack; Moore, Rick; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Negishi, Masahiko

    2013-05-07

    Phenobarbital is a central nervous system depressant that also indirectly activates nuclear receptor constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR), which promotes drug and energy metabolism, as well as cell growth (and death), in the liver. We found that phenobarbital activated CAR by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Phenobarbital bound to EGFR and potently inhibited the binding of EGF, which prevented the activation of EGFR. This abrogation of EGFR signaling induced the dephosphorylation of receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) at Tyr(52), which then promoted the dephosphorylation of CAR at Thr(38) by the catalytic core subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. The findings demonstrated that the phenobarbital-induced mechanism of CAR dephosphorylation and activation is mediated through its direct interaction with and inhibition of EGFR.

  11. Adenoviruses using the cancer marker EphA2 as a receptor in vitro and in vivo by genetic ligand insertion into different capsid scaffolds.

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    Michael Behr

    Full Text Available Adenoviral gene therapy and oncolysis would critically benefit from targeted cell entry by genetically modified capsids. This requires both the ablation of native adenovirus tropism and the identification of ligands that remain functional in virus context. Here, we establish cell type-specific entry of HAdV-5-based vectors by genetic ligand insertion into a chimeric fiber with shaft and knob domains of the short HAdV-41 fiber (Ad5T/41sSK. This fiber format was reported to ablate transduction in vitro and biodistribution to the liver in vivo. We show that the YSA peptide, binding to the pan-cancer marker EphA2, can be inserted into three positions of the chimeric fiber, resulting in strong transduction of EphA2-positive but not EphA2-negative cells of human melanoma biopsies and of tumor xenografts after intratumoral injection. Transduction was blocked by soluble YSA peptide and restored for EphA2-negative cells after recombinant EphA2 expression. The YSA peptide could also be inserted into three positions of a CAR binding-ablated HAdV-5 fiber enabling specific transduction; however, the Ad5T/41sSK format was superior in vivo. In conclusion, we establish an adenovirus capsid facilitating functional insertion of targeting peptides and a novel adenovirus using the tumor marker EphA2 as receptor with high potential for cancer gene therapy and viral oncolysis.

  12. Adenoviruses Using the Cancer Marker EphA2 as a Receptor In Vitro and In Vivo by Genetic Ligand Insertion into Different Capsid Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Michael; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Ketzer, Patrick; Engelhardt, Sarah; Mück-Häusl, Martin; Okun, Pamela M.; Petersen, Gabriele; Neipel, Frank; Hassel, Jessica C.; Ehrhardt, Anja; Enk, Alexander H.; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral gene therapy and oncolysis would critically benefit from targeted cell entry by genetically modified capsids. This requires both the ablation of native adenovirus tropism and the identification of ligands that remain functional in virus context. Here, we establish cell type-specific entry of HAdV-5-based vectors by genetic ligand insertion into a chimeric fiber with shaft and knob domains of the short HAdV-41 fiber (Ad5T/41sSK). This fiber format was reported to ablate transduction in vitro and biodistribution to the liver in vivo. We show that the YSA peptide, binding to the pan-cancer marker EphA2, can be inserted into three positions of the chimeric fiber, resulting in strong transduction of EphA2-positive but not EphA2-negative cells of human melanoma biopsies and of tumor xenografts after intratumoral injection. Transduction was blocked by soluble YSA peptide and restored for EphA2-negative cells after recombinant EphA2 expression. The YSA peptide could also be inserted into three positions of a CAR binding-ablated HAdV-5 fiber enabling specific transduction; however, the Ad5T/41sSK format was superior in vivo. In conclusion, we establish an adenovirus capsid facilitating functional insertion of targeting peptides and a novel adenovirus using the tumor marker EphA2 as receptor with high potential for cancer gene therapy and viral oncolysis. PMID:24760010

  13. Neutralized adenovirus-immune complexes can mediate effective gene transfer via an Fc receptor-dependent infection pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Philip L; Wendland, Rebecca L; Vincent, Theresa; Crystal, Ronald G

    2006-10-01

    Neutralization of adenovirus (Ad) by anti-Ad neutralizing antibodies in serum involves formation of Ad-immune complexes that prevent the virus from interacting with target cells. We hypothesized that Ad-immune complexes likely contain viable Ad vectors which, although no longer capable of gaining access to receptors on target cells, may be able to express transgenes in cells bearing Fc receptors for immunoglobulins, i.e., that antibody-based "neutralization" of Ad vectors may be circumvented by the Fc receptor pathway. To test this hypothesis, we expressed the Fcgamma receptor IIA (FcgammaR) in A549 lung epithelial cells or human dermal fibroblasts and evaluated gene transfer in the presence of human neutralizing anti-Ad serum. FcgammaR-expressing cells bound and internalized copious amounts of Ad, with a distinct population of internalized Ad trafficking to the nucleus. The dose-response curves for inhibition of gene transfer revealed that FcgammaR-expressing cells required a more-than-10-fold higher concentration of anti-Ad serum to achieve 50% inhibition of Ad-encoded beta-galactosidase expression compared with non-FcgammaR-expressing cells. The discrepancy between neutralization of Ad during infection of FcgammaR-expressing cells and neutralization of Ad during infection of non-FcgammaR-expressing cells occurred with either heat-inactivated or non-heat-inactivated sera, was blocked by addition of purified Fc domain protein, and did not require the cytoplasmic domain of FcgammaR, suggesting that immune complex internalization proceeded via endocytosis rather than phagocytosis. FcgammaR-mediated infection by Ad-immune complexes did not require expression of the coxsackie virus-Ad receptor (CAR) since similar data were obtained when CAR-deficient human dermal fibroblasts were engineered to express FcgammaR. However, interaction of the Ad penton base with cell surface integrins contributed to the difference in neutralization between FcgammaR-expressing and non

  14. Interaction of the phosphorylated DNA-binding domain in nuclear receptor CAR with its ligand-binding domain regulates CAR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Min, Jungki; Sobhany, Mack; Pedersen, Lars C; Mutoh, Shingo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2018-01-05

    The nuclear protein constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR or NR1I3) regulates several liver functions such as drug and energy metabolism and cell growth or death, which are often involved in the development of diseases such as diabetes and hepatocellular carcinoma. CAR undergoes a conversion from inactive homodimers to active heterodimers with retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), and phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) at Thr-38 in CAR regulates this conversion. Here, we uncovered the molecular mechanism by which this phosphorylation regulates the intramolecular interaction between CAR's DBD and ligand-binding domain (LBD), enabling the homodimer-heterodimer conversion. Phosphomimetic substitution of Thr-38 with Asp increased co-immunoprecipitation of the CAR DBD with CAR LBD in Huh-7 cells. Isothermal titration calorimetry assays also revealed that recombinant CAR DBD-T38D, but not nonphosphorylated CAR DBD, bound the CAR LBD peptide. This DBD-LBD interaction masked CAR's dimer interface, preventing CAR homodimer formation. Of note, EGF signaling weakened the interaction of CAR DBD T38D with CAR LBD, converting CAR to the homodimer form. The DBD-T38D-LBD interaction also prevented CAR from forming a heterodimer with RXRα. However, this interaction opened up a CAR surface, allowing interaction with protein phosphatase 2A. Thr-38 dephosphorylation then dissociated the DBD-LBD interaction, allowing CAR heterodimer formation with RXRα. We conclude that the intramolecular interaction of phosphorylated DBD with the LBD enables CAR to adapt a transient monomer configuration that can be converted to either the inactive homodimer or the active heterodimer.

  15. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism

  16. A novel technology to target adenovirus vectors : application in cells involved in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, Jan Cornelis Emile

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a novel technology is described to target adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors are powerful tools to modulate gene expression. The use of these vectors however, is hampered by the fact that many for gene therapy interesting cell types do not, or only at low levels express the CAR

  17. Exploiting natural killer group 2D receptors for CAR T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, Benjamin; Cook, W James; Murad, Joana; Graber, David J; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Lonez, Caroline; Gilham, David E; Sentman, Charles L; Agaugue, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are genetically engineered proteins that combine an extracellular antigen-specific recognition domain with one or several intracellular T-cell signaling domains. When expressed in T cells, these CARs specifically trigger T-cell activation upon antigen recognition. While the clinical proof of principle of CAR T-cell therapy has been established in hematological cancers, CAR T cells are only at the early stages of being explored to tackle solid cancers. This special report discusses the concept of exploiting natural killer cell receptors as an approach that could broaden the specificity of CAR T cells and potentially enhance the efficacy of this therapy against solid tumors. New data demonstrating feasibility of this approach in humans and supporting the ongoing clinical trial are also presented.

  18. Species D human adenovirus type 9 exhibits better virus-spread ability for antitumor efficacy among alternative serotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Uchino

    Full Text Available Species C human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-C5 is widely used as a vector for cancer gene therapy, because it efficiently transduces target cells. A variety of HAdV-C5 vectors have been developed and tested in vitro and in vivo for cancer gene therapy. While clinical trials with HAdV-C5 vectors resulted in effective responses in many cancer patients, administration of HAdV-C5 vectors to solid tumors showed responses in a limited area. A biological barrier in tumor mass is considered to hinder viral spread of HAdV-C5 vectors from infected cells. Therefore, efficient virus-spread from an infected tumor cell to surrounding tumor cells is required for successful cancer gene therapy. In this study, we compared HAdV-C5 to sixteen other HAdV serotypes selected from species A to G for virus-spread ability in vitro. HAdV-D9 showed better virus-spread ability than other serotypes, and its viral progeny were efficiently released from infected cells during viral replication. Although the HAdV-D9 fiber protein contains a binding site for coxsackie B virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, HAdV-D9 showed expanded tropism for infection due to human CAR (hCAR-independent attachment to target cells. HAdV-D9 infection effectively killed hCAR-negative cancer cells as well as hCAR-positive cancer cells. These results suggest that HADV-D9, with its better virus-spread ability, could have improved therapeutic efficacy in solid tumors compared to HAdV-C5.

  19. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus

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    Fuminori Sakurai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP–expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad (rAd-GFP was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus–adenovirus receptor (CAR cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell–specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3′-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells.

  20. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel coactivator of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Inajima, Jun; Kato, Sayaka; Matsumoto, Maika; Tokumoto, Chikako; Kure, Yuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Furthermore, the PRMT-dependent induction of a CAR reporter gene, which was independent of methyltransferase activity, was enhanced in the presence of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) or DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase DP97. Using tetracycline inducible-hCAR system in HepG2 cells, we showed that knockdown of PRMT5 with small interfering RNA suppressed tetracycline -induced mRNA expression of CYP2B6 but not of CYP2C9 or CYP3A4. PRMT5 enhanced phenobarbital-mediated transactivation of a phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM)-driven reporter gene in co-operation with PGC-1α in rat primary hepatocytes. Based on these findings, we suggest PRMT5 to be a gene (or promoter)-selective coactivator of CAR by mediating the formation of complexes between hCAR and appropriate coactivators. - Highlights: • Nuclear receptor CAR interact with PRMT5. • PRMT5 enhances transcriptional activity of CAR. • PRMT5 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1, DP97 or PGC1α. • PRMT5 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR

  1. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel coactivator of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Yuichiro, E-mail: ykanno@phar.toho-u.ac.jp; Inajima, Jun; Kato, Sayaka; Matsumoto, Maika; Tokumoto, Chikako; Kure, Yuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2015-03-27

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Furthermore, the PRMT-dependent induction of a CAR reporter gene, which was independent of methyltransferase activity, was enhanced in the presence of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) or DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase DP97. Using tetracycline inducible-hCAR system in HepG2 cells, we showed that knockdown of PRMT5 with small interfering RNA suppressed tetracycline -induced mRNA expression of CYP2B6 but not of CYP2C9 or CYP3A4. PRMT5 enhanced phenobarbital-mediated transactivation of a phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM)-driven reporter gene in co-operation with PGC-1α in rat primary hepatocytes. Based on these findings, we suggest PRMT5 to be a gene (or promoter)-selective coactivator of CAR by mediating the formation of complexes between hCAR and appropriate coactivators. - Highlights: • Nuclear receptor CAR interact with PRMT5. • PRMT5 enhances transcriptional activity of CAR. • PRMT5 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1, DP97 or PGC1α. • PRMT5 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR.

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (Car T Cell Therapy In Hematology

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    Pinar Ataca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well demonstrated that immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and cause less off-target toxicities. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR modified T cells. On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the beneficiaries of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical-clinical studies, effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  3. Cancer-Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses for Modulation of the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Capasso, Cristian; Vaha-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Otto; Hemminki, Akseli

    2018-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy and it is the first approved virus-derived drug for treatment of cancer. As an oncolytic agent, it can induce lysis of infected cells, but it can also engage the immune system, promoting activation and maturation of antigen- presenting cells (APCs). In essence, oncolysis combined with the associated immunostimulatory actions result in a "personalized in situ vaccine" for each patient. In order to take full advantage of these features, we should try to understand how adenovirus interacts with the immune system, what are the receptors involved in triggering subsequent signals and which kind of responses they elicit. Tackling these questions will give us further insight in how to manipulate adenovirus-mediated immune responses for enhancement of anti-tumor efficacy. In this review, we first highlight how oncolytic adenovirus interacts with the innate immune system and its receptors such as Toll-like receptors, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)- like receptors and other immune sensors. Then we describe the effect of these interactions on the adaptive immune system and its cells, especially B and T lymphocytes. Finally, we summarize the most significant preclinical and clinical results in the field of gene therapy where researchers have engineered adenovirus to manipulate the host immune system by expressing cytokines and signalingmediators. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Praveen; Petrocca, Fabio

    2017-07-18

    Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  5. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Sridhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  6. Recent advances in genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagasato, Masaki; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Aoki, Kazunori

    2017-05-01

    Adenoviruses are widely used to deliver genes to a variety of cell types and have been used in a number of clinical trials for gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. However, several concerns must be addressed for the clinical use of adenovirus vectors. Selective delivery of a therapeutic gene by adenovirus vectors to target cancer is precluded by the widespread distribution of the primary cellular receptors. The systemic administration of adenoviruses results in hepatic tropism independent of the primary receptors. Adenoviruses induce strong innate and acquired immunity in vivo. Furthermore, several modifications to these vectors are necessary to enhance their oncolytic activity and ensure patient safety. As such, the adenovirus genome has been engineered to overcome these problems. The first part of the present review outlines recent progress in the genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment. In addition, several groups have recently developed cancer-targeting adenovirus vectors by using libraries that display random peptides on a fiber knob. Pancreatic cancer-targeting sequences have been isolated, and these oncolytic vectors have been shown by our group to be associated with a higher gene transduction efficiency and more potent oncolytic activity in cell lines, murine models, and surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer. In the second part of this review, we explain that combining cancer-targeting strategies can be a promising approach to increase the clinical usefulness of oncolytic adenovirus vectors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Regulatory T cells protect mice against coxsackievirus-induced myocarditis through the transforming growth factor beta-coxsackie-adenovirus receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Li, Guohua; Liu, Youan; Chen, Manyin; Konviser, Michael; Chen, Xin; Opavsky, Mary Anne; Liu, Peter P

    2010-06-22

    Coxsackievirus B3 infection is an excellent model of human myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac injury is caused either by a direct cytopathic effect of the virus or through immune-mediated mechanisms. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the negative modulation of host immune responses and set the threshold of autoimmune activation. This study was designed to test the protective effects of Tregs and to determine the underlying mechanisms. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled Tregs or naïve CD4(+) T cells were injected intravenously once every 2 weeks 3 times into mice. The mice were then challenged with intraperitoneal coxsackievirus B3 immediately after the last cell transfer. Transfer of Tregs showed higher survival rates than transfer of CD4(+) T cells (P=0.0136) but not compared with the PBS injection group (P=0.0589). Interestingly, Tregs also significantly decreased virus titers and inflammatory scores in the heart. Transforming growth factor-beta and phosphorylated AKT were upregulated in Tregs-transferred mice and coxsackie-adenovirus receptor expression was decreased in the heart compared with control groups. Transforming growth factor-beta decreased coxsackie-adenovirus receptor expression and inhibited coxsackievirus B3 infection in HL-1 cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes. Splenocytes collected from Treg-, CD4(+) T-cell-, and PBS-treated mice proliferated equally when stimulated with heat-inactivated virus, whereas in the Treg group, the proliferation rate was reduced significantly when stimulated with noninfected heart tissue homogenate. Adoptive transfer of Tregs protected mice from coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis through the transforming growth factor beta-coxsackie-adenovirus receptor pathway and thus suppresses the immune response to cardiac tissue, maintaining the antiviral immune response.

  8. Crystal structure of the fibre head domain of the Atadenovirus Snake Adenovirus 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu K Singh

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are non-enveloped icosahedral viruses with trimeric fibre proteins protruding from their vertices. There are five known genera, from which only Mastadenoviruses have been widely studied. Apart from studying adenovirus as a biological model system and with a view to prevent or combat viral infection, there is a major interest in using adenovirus for vaccination, cancer therapy and gene therapy purposes. Adenoviruses from the Atadenovirus genus have been isolated from squamate reptile hosts, ruminants and birds and have a characteristic gene organization and capsid morphology. The carboxy-terminal virus-distal fibre head domains are likely responsible for primary receptor recognition. We determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the Snake Adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1 fibre head using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD method. Despite the absence of significant sequence homology, this Atadenovirus fibre head has the same beta-sandwich propeller topology as other adenovirus fibre heads. However, it is about half the size, mainly due to much shorter loops connecting the beta-strands. The detailed structure of the SnAdV-1 fibre head and other animal adenovirus fibre heads, together with the future identification of their natural receptors, may lead to the development of new strategies to target adenovirus vectors to cells of interest.

  9. Incorporation of Immune Checkpoint Blockade into Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells (CAR-Ts): Combination or Built-In CAR-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Osborn, Mark J; Tolar, Jakub; Kim, Chong Jai

    2018-01-24

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy represents the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved gene therapy and these engineered cells function with unprecedented efficacy in the treatment of refractory CD19 positive hematologic malignancies. CAR translation to solid tumors is also being actively investigated; however, efficacy to date has been variable due to tumor-evolved mechanisms that inhibit local immune cell activity. To bolster the potency of CAR-T cells, modulation of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment with immune-checkpoint blockade is a promising strategy. The impact of this approach on hematological malignancies is in its infancy, and in this review we discuss CAR-T cells and their synergy with immune-checkpoint blockade.

  10. Incorporation of Immune Checkpoint Blockade into Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells (CAR-Ts: Combination or Built-In CAR-T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dok Hyun Yoon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy represents the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved gene therapy and these engineered cells function with unprecedented efficacy in the treatment of refractory CD19 positive hematologic malignancies. CAR translation to solid tumors is also being actively investigated; however, efficacy to date has been variable due to tumor-evolved mechanisms that inhibit local immune cell activity. To bolster the potency of CAR-T cells, modulation of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment with immune-checkpoint blockade is a promising strategy. The impact of this approach on hematological malignancies is in its infancy, and in this review we discuss CAR-T cells and their synergy with immune-checkpoint blockade.

  11. Adenovirus serotype 5 vectors with Tat-PTD modified hexon and serotype 35 fiber show greatly enhanced transduction capacity of primary cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Yu

    Full Text Available Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 vectors represent one of the most efficient gene delivery vectors in life sciences. However, Ad5 is dependent on expression of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus-receptor (CAR on the surface of target cell for efficient transduction, which limits it's utility for certain cell types. Herein we present a new vector, Ad5PTDf35, which is an Ad5 vector having serotype 35 fiber-specificity and Tat-PTD hexon-modification. This vector shows dramatically increased transduction capacity of primary human cell cultures including T cells, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, pancreatic islets and exocrine cells, mesenchymal stem cells and tumor initiating cells. Biodistribution in mice following systemic administration (tail-vein injection show significantly reduced uptake in the liver and spleen of Ad5PTDf35 compared to unmodified Ad5. Therefore, replication-competent viruses with these modifications may be further developed as oncolytic agents for cancer therapy. User-friendly backbone plasmids containing these modifications were developed for compatibility to the AdEasy-system to facilitate the development of surface-modified adenoviruses for gene delivery to difficult-to-transduce cells in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research.

  12. Adenovirus E4-ORF1 Dysregulates Epidermal Growth Factor and Insulin/Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors To Mediate Constitutive Myc Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Kathleen; Kumar, Manish; Taruishi, Midori; Javier, Ronald T.

    2015-01-01

    The E4-ORF1 protein encoded by human adenovirus stimulates viral replication in human epithelial cells by binding and activating cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) at the plasma membrane and cellular Myc in the nucleus. In this study, we showed that E4-ORF1 hijacks the tyrosine kinase activities of cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and insulin receptor (InsR)/insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R), as well as the lipid kinase activity of PI3K, to mediate const...

  13. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy for malignant cancers: Summary and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Smith

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper will summarize the data obtained primarily from the last decade of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell immunotherapy. It will do so in a manner that provides an overview needed to set the foundation for perspective on the state of research associated with CAR T cell therapy. The topics covered will include the construction of engineered CAR T cells from the standpoint of the different generations, the mode in which autologous T cells are transfected, the various biomarkers that have been used in CAR T cell immunotherapy, and setbacks associated with engineered T cells. Perspective on priorities of CAR T cell immunotherapy will also be addressed as they are related to safety and efficacy.

  14. The development of CAR design for tumor CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dandan; Jin, Guoliang; Chai, Dafei; Zhou, Xiaowan; Gu, Weiyu; Chong, Yanyun; Song, Jingyuan; Zheng, Junnian

    2018-03-02

    In recent years, the chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells (Chimeric antigen receptor T cells, CAR-T) immunotherapy has developed rapidly, which has been considered the most promising therapy. Efforts to enhance the efficacy of CAR-based anti-tumor therapy have been made, such as the improvement of structures of CAR-T cells, including the development of extracellular antigen recognition receptors, intracellular co-stimulatory molecules and the combination application of CARs and synthetic small molecules. In addition, effects on the function of the CAR-T cells that the space distance between the antigen binding domains and tumor targets and the length of the spacer domains have are also being investigated. Given the fast-moving nature of this field, it is necessary to make a summary of the development of CAR-T cells. In this review, we mainly focus on the present design strategies of CAR-T cells with the hope that they can provide insights to increase the anti-tumor efficacy and safety.

  15. Chimeric-antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy for solid tumors: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, An-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Lu, Yi-Jun; Lu, Xiao-Jie; Sun, Beicheng

    2017-10-27

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells) have been shown to have unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most notably in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate using anti-CD19 CAR-T cells. However, CAR T-cell therapy for solid tumors currently is faced with numerous challenges such as physical barriers, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and the specificity and safety. The clinical results in solid tumors have been much less encouraging, with multiple cases of toxicity and a lack of therapeutic response. In this review, we will discuss the current stats and challenges of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors, and propose possibl e solutions and future perspectives.

  16. Polyvalent cation receptor proteins (CaRs) are salinity sensors in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, J; Betka, M; Quinn, S; Hentschel, H; Elger, M; Baum, M; Bai, M; Chattopadyhay, N; Brown, E M; Hebert, S C; Harris, H W

    2002-07-09

    To determine whether calcium polyvalent cation-sensing receptors (CaRs) are salinity sensors in fish, we used a homology-based cloning strategy to isolate a 4.1-kb cDNA encoding a 1,027-aa dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) kidney CaR. Expression studies in human embryonic kidney cells reveal that shark kidney senses combinations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Na(+) ions at concentrations present in seawater and kidney tubules. Shark kidney is expressed in multiple shark osmoregulatory organs, including specific tubules of the kidney, rectal gland, stomach, intestine, olfactory lamellae, gill, and brain. Reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification using specific primers in two teleost fish, winter flounder (Pleuronectes americanus) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), reveals a similar pattern of CaR tissue expression. Exposure of the lumen of winter flounder urinary bladder to the CaR agonists, Gd(3+) and neomycin, reversibly inhibit volume transport, which is important for euryhaline teleost survival in seawater. Within 24-72 hr after transfer of freshwater-adapted Atlantic salmon to seawater, there are increases in their plasma Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Na(+) that likely serve as a signal for internal CaRs, i.e., brain, to sense alterations in salinity in the surrounding water. We conclude that CaRs act as salinity sensors in both teleost and elasmobranch fish. Their tissue expression patterns in fish provide insights into CaR functions in terrestrial animals including humans.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells are efficiently transduced with adenoviruses bearing type 35-derived fibers and the transduced cells with the IL-28A gene produces cytotoxicity to lung carcinoma cells co-cultured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Kawamura, Kiyoko; Li, Quanhai; Okamoto, Shinya; Tada, Yuji; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Shimada, Hideaki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Tagawa, Masatoshi

    2014-09-25

    Transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with type 5 adenoviruses (Ad5) is limited in the efficacy because of the poor expression level of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) molecules. We examined a possible improvement of Ad-mediated gene transfer in MSCs by substituting the fiber region of type 5 Ad with that of type 35 Ad. Expression levels of CAR and CD46 molecules, which are the major receptors for type 5 and type 35 Ad, respectively, were assayed with flow cytometry. We constructed vectors expressing the green fluorescent protein gene with Ad5 or modified Ad5 bearing the type 35 fiber region (AdF35), and examined the infectivity to MSCs with flow cytometry. We investigated anti-tumor effects of MSCs transduced with interleukin (IL)-28A gene on human lung carcinoma cells with a colorimetric assay. Expression of IL-28A receptors was tested with the polymerase chain reaction. A promoter activity of transcriptional regulatory regions in MSCs was determined with a luciferase assay and a tumor growth-promoting ability of MSCs was tested with co-injection of human tumor cells in nude mice. MSCs expressed CD46 but scarcely CAR molecules, and subsequently were transduced with AdF35 but not with Ad5. Growth of MSCs transduced with the IL-28A gene remained the same as that of untransduced cells since MSCs were negative for the IL-28A receptors. The IL-28A-transduced MSCs however suppressed growth of lung carcinoma cells co-cultured, whereas MSCs transduced with AdF35 expressing the β-galactosidase gene did not. A regulatory region of the cyclooygenase-2 gene possessed transcriptional activities greater than other tumor promoters but less than the cytomegalovirus promoter, and MSCs themselves did not support tumor growth in vivo. AdF35 is a suitable vector to transduce MSCs that are resistant to Ad5-mediated gene transfer. MSCs infected with AdF35 that activate an exogenous gene by the cytomegalovirus promoter can be a vehicle to deliver the gene product

  18. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  19. Sexually dimorphic regulation and induction of P450s by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.P.; Mota, L.C.; Huang, W.; Moore, D.D.; Baldwin, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a xenosensing nuclear receptor and regulator of cytochrome P450s (CYPs). However, the role of CAR as a basal regulator of CYP expression nor its role in sexually dimorphic responses have been thoroughly studied. We investigated basal regulation and sexually dimorphic regulation and induction by the potent CAR activator TCPOBOP and the moderate CAR activator Nonylphenol (NP). NP is an environmental estrogen and one of the most commonly found environmental toxicants in Europe and the United States. Previous studies have demonstrated that NP induces several CYPs in a sexually dimorphic manner, however the role of CAR in regulating NP-mediated sexually dimorphic P450 expression and induction has not been elucidated. Therefore, wild-type and CAR-null male and female mice were treated with honey as a carrier, NP, or TCPOBOP and CYP expression monitored by QPCR and Western blotting. CAR basally regulates the expression of Cyp2c29, Cyp2b13, and potentially Cyp2b10 as demonstrated by QPCR. Furthermore, we observed a shift in the testosterone 6α/15α-hydroxylase ratio in untreated CAR-null female mice to the male pattern, which indicates an alteration in androgen status and suggests a role for androgens as CAR inverse agonists. Xenobiotic-treatments with NP and TCPOBOP induced Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, and Cyp3a11 in a CAR-mediated fashion; however NP only induced these CYPs in females and TCPOBOP induced these CYPs in both males and females. Interestingly, Cyp2a4, was only induced in wild-type male mice by TCPOBOP suggesting Cyp2a4 induction is not sensitive to CAR-mediated induction in females. Overall, TCPOBOP and NP show similar CYP induction profiles in females, but widely different profiles in males potentially related to lower sensitivity of males to either indirect or moderate CAR activators such as NP. In summary, CAR regulates the basal and chemically inducible expression of several sexually dimorphic xenobiotic metabolizing P

  20. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved

  1. Transduction of skin-migrating dendritic cells by human adenovirus 5 occurs via an actin-dependent phagocytic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Efrain; Taylor, Geraldine; Hope, Jayne; Herbert, Rebecca; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Charleston, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are central to the initiation of immune responses, and various approaches have been used to target vaccines to DC in order to improve immunogenicity. Cannulation of lymphatic vessels allows for the collection of DC that migrate from the skin. These migrating DC are involved in antigen uptake and presentation following vaccination. Human replication-deficient adenovirus (AdV) 5 is a promising vaccine vector for delivery of recombinant antigens. Although the mechanism of AdV attachment and penetration has been extensively studied in permissive cell lines, few studies have addressed the interaction of AdV with DC. In this study, we investigated the interaction of bovine skin-migrating DC and replication-deficient AdV-based vaccine vectors. We found that, despite lack of expression of Coxsackie B-Adenovirus Receptor and other known adenovirus receptors, AdV readily enters skin-draining DC via an actin-dependent endocytosis. Virus exit from endosomes was pH independent, and neutralizing antibodies did not prevent virus entry but did prevent virus translocation to the nucleus. We also show that combining adenovirus with adjuvant increases the absolute number of intracellular virus particles per DC but not the number of DC containing intracellular virus. This results in increased trans-gene expression and antigen presentation. We propose that, in the absence of Coxsackie B-Adenovirus Receptor and other known receptors, AdV5-based vectors enter skin-migrating DC using actin-dependent endocytosis which occurs in skin-migrating DC, and its relevance to vaccination strategies and vaccine vector targeting is discussed.

  2. Mode of Action and Human Relevance Analysis for Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Liver Toxicity: A Case Study with Phenobarbital as a Model Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Activator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are key nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of cellular responses. to exposure to many xenobiotics and various physiological processes. Phenobarbital (PB) is a non­ genotoxic i...

  3. Interaction of Human Enterochromaffin Cells with Human Enteric Adenovirus 41 Leads to Serotonin Release and Subsequent Activation of Enteric Glia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Sonja; Hagbom, Marie; Rajan, Anandi; Loitto, Vesa; Persson, B David; Allard, Annika; Nordgren, Johan; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Arnberg, Niklas; Svensson, Lennart

    2018-04-01

    Human adenovirus 41 (HAdV-41) causes acute gastroenteritis in young children. The main characteristics of HAdV-41 infection are diarrhea and vomiting. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism of HAdV-41-induced diarrhea is unknown, as a suitable small-animal model has not been described. In this study, we used the human midgut carcinoid cell line GOT1 to investigate the effect of HAdV-41 infection and the individual HAdV-41 capsid proteins on serotonin release by enterochromaffin cells and on enteric glia cell (EGC) activation. We first determined that HAdV-41 could infect the enterochromaffin cells. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the cells expressed HAdV-41-specific coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR); flow cytometry analysis supported these findings. HAdV-41 infection of the enterochromaffin cells induced serotonin secretion dose dependently. In contrast, control infection with HAdV-5 did not induce serotonin secretion in the cells. Confocal microscopy studies of enterochromaffin cells infected with HAdV-41 revealed decreased serotonin immunofluorescence compared to that in uninfected cells. Incubation of the enterochromaffin cells with purified HAdV-41 short fiber knob and hexon proteins increased the serotonin levels in the harvested cell supernatant significantly. HAdV-41 infection could also activate EGCs, as shown in the significantly altered expression of glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in EGCs incubated with HAdV-41. The EGCs were also activated by serotonin alone, as shown in the significantly increased GFAP staining intensity. Likewise, EGCs were activated by the cell supernatant of HAdV-41-infected enterochromaffin cells. IMPORTANCE The nonenveloped human adenovirus 41 causes diarrhea, vomiting, dehydration, and low-grade fever mainly in children under 2 years of age. Even though acute gastroenteritis is well described, how human adenovirus 41 causes diarrhea is unknown. In our study, we analyzed the effect of human adenovirus 41

  4. CAR-T cells are serial killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Alexander J; Jenkins, Misty R; Ritchie, David S; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Neeson, Paul J

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have enjoyed unprecedented clinical success against haematological malignancies in recent years. However, several aspects of CAR T cell biology remain unknown. We recently compared CAR and T cell receptor (TCR)-based killing in the same effector cell and showed that CAR T cells can not only efficiently kill single tumor targets, they can also kill multiple tumor targets in a sequential manner. Single and serial killing events were not sustained long term due to CAR down-regulation after 20 hours.

  5. Genetic blockade of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor via recombinant adenovirus in lung cancer can be enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Dal Rae; Eo, Eun Young; Lim, Hyo Jeong; Park, Jong Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Ho-Il; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek

    2013-01-01

    Many approaches have been suggested as anti-tumor therapy for targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), such as monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We introduced recombinant adenoviruses expressing antisense, dominant negative or short hairpin RNA to IGF-1R. Moreover, we demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (vorinostat) can increase the transduction efficiency of adenoviruses by increasing CAR-induced transduction and by enhancing the transcription of the adenoviral transgene. In the present study, we showed that the combination of ad-sh (short hairpin) IGF-1R with vorinostat leads to a synergistic enhancement of IGF-1R blockade. We measured the change in IGF-1R upon cotreatment with vorinostat and ad-shIGF-1R. Changes in transduction efficiency of ad-shIGF-1R were measured by fluorescent microscopy. Changes in apoptotic proportion and cell survival after the cotreatment were measured by the sub-G1 assay and cell counts. The effect of nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation was also measured by NF-κB p65 activation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Drug interactions were analyzed upon cotreatment with ad-shIGF-1R, vorinostat and cisplatin. Combined treatment of ad-shIGF-1R and vorinostat synergistically suppressed the IGF-1R expression in lung cancer cell lines and also increased the transduction efficiency of ad-shIGF-1R. Ad-shIGF-1R and vorinostat cotreatment increased apoptotic cell death and synergistically suppressed cell growth compared to ad-shIGF-1R or vorinostat treatment alone. Vorinostat suppressed NF-κB activation, which was activated by ad-shIGF-1R. Moreover, triple combination of ad-shIGF-1R, vorinostat and cisplatin demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity on lung cancer cells. Vorinostat enhanced the blocking capability of ad-shIGF-1R. The combined treatment of vorinostat and ad-sh-IGF-1R appears to have promising potential as a new therapeutic approach for lung cancer. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Enhanced thyroid hormone breakdown in hepatocytes by mutual induction of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and arylhydrocarbon receptor by benzo[a]pyrene and phenobarbital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraplau, Anne; Schewe, Bettina; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Ringel, Sebastian; Neuber, Corinna; Kleuser, Burkhard; Püschel, Gerhard P.

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotics may interfere with the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid endocrine axis by inducing enzymes that inactivate thyroid hormones and thereby reduce the metabolic rate. This induction results from an activation of xeno-sensing nuclear receptors. The current study shows that benzo[a]pyrene, a frequent contaminant of processed food and activator of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activated the promoter and induced the transcription of the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) in rat hepatocytes. Likewise, phenobarbital induced the AhR transcription. This mutual induction of the nuclear receptors enhanced the phenobarbital-dependent induction of the prototypic CAR target gene Cyp2b1 as well as the AhR-dependent induction of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. In both cases, the induction by the combination of both xenobiotics was more than the sum of the induction by either substance alone. By inducing the AhR, phenobarbital enhanced the benzo[a]pyrene-dependent reduction of thyroid hormone half-life and the benzo[a]pyrene-dependent increase in the rate of thyroid hormone glucuronide formation in hepatocyte cultures. CAR ligands might thus augment the endocrine disrupting potential of AhR activators by an induction of the AhR

  7. Up-regulation of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer impairs adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, Takuya; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Yasui, Takaharu; Onimaru, Manabu; Toma, Hiroki; Sato, Norihiro; Tanaka, Masao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We previously reported that radiation enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene expression in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that adenoviral gene therapy might be more effective in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells. In the present study, we compared the transduction efficiency of adenovirus-delivered genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We used an adenovirus expressing the hepatocyte growth factor antagonist, NK4 (Ad-NK4), as a representative gene therapy. We established two radioresistant human pancreatic cancer cell lines using fractionated irradiation. Radiosensitive and radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells were infected with Ad-NK4, and NK4 levels in the cells were measured. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the differences in the transduction efficiency between these cells, we measured expression of the genes mediating adenovirus infection and endocytosis. The results revealed that NK4 levels in radioresistant cells were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those in radiosensitive cells, although there were no significant differences in adenovirus uptake between radiosensitive cells and radioresistant cells. Integrin β3 was up-regulated and the Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor was down-regulated in radioresistant cells, and inhibition of integrin β3 promoted adenovirus gene transfer. These results suggest that inhibition of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells could enhance adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. (author)

  8. Engineering CAR-T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Jun; Zhong, Jiang F; Zhang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor redirected T cells (CAR-T cells) have achieved inspiring outcomes in patients with B cell malignancies, and are now being investigated in other hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. CAR-T cells are generated by the T cells from patients' or donors' blood. After the T cells are expanded and genetically modified, they are reinfused into the patients. However, many challenges still need to be resolved in order for this technology to gain widespread adoption. In this review, we first discuss the structure and evolution of chimeric antigen receptors. We then report on the tools used for production of CAR-T cells. Finally, we address the challenges posed by CAR-T cells.

  9. Interferon induction by adenoviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beladi, I; Bakay, M; Pusztai, R; Mucsi, I; Tarodi, B [University Medical School, Szeged (Hungary). Inst. of Microbiology

    1979-02-01

    All human, simian, bovine and avian adenovirus types tested so far and the canine hepatitis virus induce interferon production in chick cells. This finding indicated this property to be characteristic for viruses belonging to the adenovirus group. Trypsin treatment, which had no effect upon the infectivity, diminished or eliminated the interferon-inducing abilities of crude adenoviruses, and thus the need for a trypsin-sensitive protein in interferon induction was suggested. T antigen and interferon were formed simultaneously in chick embryo fibroblast cells infected with human adenovirus type 12, and there-fore the adenovirus-specific T antigen was resitant to the action of endogenous interferon synthetized by the same cells. In chicks inoculated with human types, the appearance of interferon was biphasic: an 'early' and a 'late' interferon could be demonstrated with maximum titre 4 and 10 hr, respectively, after virus infection. In chicks infected with adenoviruses, first interferon production and then a decreased primary immune response to sheep red blood cells was observed. It was assumed that in adenovirus-infected chicks the interferon produced by viral stimulus resulted in a transient immunosuppression.

  10. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells: Lessons Learned from Targeting of CD19 in B-Cell Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Kevin A; Turtle, Cameron J

    2017-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR)-T cells is a rapidly growing therapeutic approach to treating patients with refractory cancer, with over 100 clinical trials in various malignancies in progress. The enthusiasm for CAR-T cells has been driven by the clinical success of CD19-targeted CAR-T cell therapy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and the promising data in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Despite the success of targeting CD19 with CAR-T cells in early clinical studies, many challenges remain to improve outcomes, reduce toxicity, and determine the appropriate settings for CAR-T cell immunotherapy. Reviewing the lessons learned thus far in CD19 CAR-T cell trials and how some of these challenges may be overcome will help guide the development of CAR-T cell therapy for malignancies of B-cell origin, as well as for other hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cancers.

  11. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells: Lessons Learned from Targeting of CD19 in B cell malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Kevin A; Turtle, Cameron J

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T) cells is a rapidly growing therapeutic approach to treating patients with refractory cancer, with over 100 clinical trials in various malignancies in progress. The enthusiasm for CAR-T cells has been driven by the clinical success of CD19-targeted CAR-T therapy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and the promising data in B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Despite the success of targeting CD19 with CAR-T cells in early clinical studies, many challenges remain to improve outcomes, reduce toxicity, and determine the appropriate settings for CAR-T cell immunotherapy. Reviewing the lessons learned thus far in CD19 CAR-T cell trials and how some of these challenges may be overcome will help guide the development of CAR-T cell therapy for malignancies of B-cell origin, as well as for other hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cancers. PMID:28110394

  12. Enhanced thyroid hormone breakdown in hepatocytes by mutual induction of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and arylhydrocarbon receptor by benzo[a]pyrene and phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraplau, Anne; Schewe, Bettina; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Ringel, Sebastian; Neuber, Corinna; Kleuser, Burkhard; Püschel, Gerhard P

    2015-02-03

    Xenobiotics may interfere with the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid endocrine axis by inducing enzymes that inactivate thyroid hormones and thereby reduce the metabolic rate. This induction results from an activation of xeno-sensing nuclear receptors. The current study shows that benzo[a]pyrene, a frequent contaminant of processed food and activator of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activated the promoter and induced the transcription of the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) in rat hepatocytes. Likewise, phenobarbital induced the AhR transcription. This mutual induction of the nuclear receptors enhanced the phenobarbital-dependent induction of the prototypic CAR target gene Cyp2b1 as well as the AhR-dependent induction of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. In both cases, the induction by the combination of both xenobiotics was more than the sum of the induction by either substance alone. By inducing the AhR, phenobarbital enhanced the benzo[a]pyrene-dependent reduction of thyroid hormone half-life and the benzo[a]pyrene-dependent increase in the rate of thyroid hormone glucuronide formation in hepatocyte cultures. CAR ligands might thus augment the endocrine disrupting potential of AhR activators by an induction of the AhR. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  14. Identification of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Hexon Regions That Interact with Scavenger Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, Reeti; Reddy, Vijay S.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Barry, Michael A. (Scripps); (Mayo)

    2012-05-04

    Most of an intravenous dose of species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is destroyed by liver Kupffer cells. In contrast, another species C virus, Ad6, evades these cells to mediate more efficient liver gene delivery. Given that this difference in Kupffer cell interaction is mediated by the hypervariable (HVR) loops of the virus hexon protein, we genetically modified each of the seven HVRs of Ad5 with a cysteine residue to enable conditional blocking of these sites with polyethylene glycol (PEG). We show that these modifications do not affect in vitro virus transduction. In contrast, after intravenous injection, targeted PEGylation at HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 increased viral liver transduction up to 20-fold. Elimination or saturation of liver Kupffer cells did not significantly affect this increase in the liver transduction. In vitro, PEGylation blocked uptake of viruses via the Kupffer cell scavenger receptor SRA-II. These data suggest that HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 of Ad5 may be involved in Kupffer cell recognition and subsequent destruction. These data also demonstrate that this conditional genetic-chemical mutation strategy is a useful tool for investigating the interactions of viruses with host tissues.

  15. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting.As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells.These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  16. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) immunotherapy for solid tumors: lessons learned and strategies for moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Li, Wenwen; Huang, Kejia; Zhang, Yang; Kupfer, Gary; Zhao, Qi

    2018-02-13

    Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy for the treatment CD19-positive B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. While CAR-T has achieved remarkable success in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies, whether it can benefit solid tumor patients to the same extent is still uncertain. Even though hundreds of clinical trials are undergoing exploring a variety of tumor-associated antigens (TAA), no such antigen with comparable properties like CD19 has yet been identified regarding solid tumors CAR-T immunotherapy. Inefficient T cell trafficking, immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, suboptimal antigen recognition specificity, and lack of safety control are currently considered as the main obstacles in solid tumor CAR-T therapy. Here, we reviewed the solid tumor CAR-T clinical trials, emphasizing the studies with published results. We further discussed the challenges that CAR-T is facing for solid tumor treatment and proposed potential strategies to improve the efficacy of CAR-T as promising immunotherapy.

  17. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingshan; Song, Yongping; Liu, Delong

    2017-10-23

    Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  18. What is CAR doing in the middle of the adult neurogenic road?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junyent, Felix; Coré, Nathalie; Cremer, Harold

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular and cellular basis of adult neurogenesis has attracted considerable attention for fundamental and clinical applications because neural stem cells and newborn neurons may, one day, be harnessed to replace neurons and allow cognitive improvement in the diseased brain. In rodents, neural progenitors are located in the dentate gyrus and the sub/periventricular zone. In the dentate gyrus the generation of newborn neurons is associated with plasticity, including regulation of memory. The role of subventricular zone neural precursors that migrate to the olfactory bulb is less characterized. Identifying factors that impact neural stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation is therefore sine qua non before we can harness their potential. Here, we expand upon our recent results showing that CAR, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, is among the developing list of key players when it comes to the complex process of integrating newborn neurons into existing circuits in the mature brain. PMID:28516108

  19. Adenovirus vector infection of non-small-cell lung cancer cells is a trigger for multi-drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, Takumi; Kajita, Masahiro; Yano, Kentaro; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette protein involved in cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR). It has been reported that infection with some bacteria and viruses induces changes in the activities of various drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, including P-gp. Although human adenoviruses (Ad) cause the common cold, the effect of Ad infection on MDR in cancer has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether Ad infection is a cause of MDR in A549, H441 and HCC827 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, using an Ad vector system. We found that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cell lines induced P-gp mRNA expression, and the extent of induction was dependent on the number of Ad vector virus particles and the infection time. Heat-treated Ad vector, which is not infectious, did not alter P-gp mRNA expression. Uptake experiments with doxorubicin (DOX), a P-gp substrate, revealed that DOX accumulation was significantly decreased in Ad vector-infected A549 cells. The decrease of DOX uptake was blocked by verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. Our results indicated that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cells caused MDR mediated by P-gp overexpression. The Ad vector genome sequence is similar to that of human Ad, and therefore human Ad infection of lung cancer patients may lead to chemoresistance in the clinical environment. -- Highlights: •Adenovirus vector infection induced P-gp mRNA expression in three NSCLC cell lines. •Adenovirus vector infection enhanced P-gp-mediated doxorubicin efflux from the cells. •The increase of P-gp was not mediated by nuclear receptors (PXR, CAR) or COX-2.

  20. Adenovirus vector infection of non-small-cell lung cancer cells is a trigger for multi-drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomono, Takumi [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-0033 (Japan); Kajita, Masahiro [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-0033 (Japan); Yano, Kentaro [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-0033 (Japan); Ogihara, Takuo, E-mail: togihara@takasaki-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-0033 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette protein involved in cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR). It has been reported that infection with some bacteria and viruses induces changes in the activities of various drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, including P-gp. Although human adenoviruses (Ad) cause the common cold, the effect of Ad infection on MDR in cancer has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether Ad infection is a cause of MDR in A549, H441 and HCC827 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, using an Ad vector system. We found that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cell lines induced P-gp mRNA expression, and the extent of induction was dependent on the number of Ad vector virus particles and the infection time. Heat-treated Ad vector, which is not infectious, did not alter P-gp mRNA expression. Uptake experiments with doxorubicin (DOX), a P-gp substrate, revealed that DOX accumulation was significantly decreased in Ad vector-infected A549 cells. The decrease of DOX uptake was blocked by verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. Our results indicated that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cells caused MDR mediated by P-gp overexpression. The Ad vector genome sequence is similar to that of human Ad, and therefore human Ad infection of lung cancer patients may lead to chemoresistance in the clinical environment. -- Highlights: •Adenovirus vector infection induced P-gp mRNA expression in three NSCLC cell lines. •Adenovirus vector infection enhanced P-gp-mediated doxorubicin efflux from the cells. •The increase of P-gp was not mediated by nuclear receptors (PXR, CAR) or COX-2.

  1. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingshan Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  2. Nuclear receptor CAR (NR1I3) is essential for DDC-induced liver injury and oval cell proliferation in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yuichi; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2011-11-01

    The liver is endowed with the ability to regenerate hepatocytes in response to injury. When this regeneration ability is impaired during liver injury, oval cells, which are considered to be postnatal hepatic progenitors, proliferate and differentiate into hepatocytes. Here we have demonstrated that 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) activates the nuclear receptor constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR), resulting in proliferation of oval cells in mouse liver. Activation of CAR by DDC was shown by hepatic nuclear CAR accumulation and cytochrome P450 (CYP)2B10 mRNA induction after feeding a 0.1% DDC-containing diet to Car(+/+) mice. After being fed the DDC diet, Car(+/+), but not Car(-/-) mice, developed severe liver injury and an A6 antibody-stained ductular reaction in an area around the portal tract. Oval cell proliferation was confirmed by laser capture microdissection and real-time PCR; mRNAs for the two oval cell markers epithelial cell adhesion molecule and TROP2 were specifically induced in the periportal region of DDC diet-fed Car(+/+), but not Car(-/-) mice. Although rates of both hepatocyte growth and death were initially enhanced only in DDC diet-fed Car(+/+) mice, growth was attenuated when oval cells proliferated, whereas death continued unabated. DDC-induced liver injury, which differs from other CAR activators such as phenobarbital, occurred in the periportal region where cells developed hypertrophy, accumulated porphyrin crystals and inflammation developed, all in association with the proliferation of oval cells. Thus, CAR provides an excellent experimental model for further investigations into its roles in liver regeneration, as well as the development of diseases such as hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. CAR models: next-generation CAR modifications for enhanced T-cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Abate-Daga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available T cells genetically targeted with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR to B-cell malignancies have demonstrated tremendous clinical outcomes. With the proof in principle for CAR T cells as a therapy for B-cell malignancies being established, current and future research is being focused on adapting CAR technology to other cancers, as well as enhancing its efficacy and/or safety. The modular nature of the CAR, extracellular antigen-binding domain fused to a transmembrane domain and intracellular T-cell signaling domains, allows for optimization by replacement of the various components. These modifications are creating a whole new class of therapeutic CARs. In this review, we discuss the recent major advances in CAR design and how these modifications will impact its clinical application.

  4. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-01-01

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  5. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  6. Expression of Human CAR Splicing Variants in BAC-Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key regulator for drug metabolism in liver. Human CAR (hCAR) transcripts are subjected to alternative splicing. Some hCAR splicing variants (SVs) have been shown to encode functional proteins by reporter assays. However, in vivo research on the activity of these hCAR SVs has been impeded by the absence of a valid model. This study engineered an hCAR-BAC-transgenic (hCAR-TG) mouse model by integrating the 8.5-kbp hCAR gene as wel...

  7. Performance-enhancing drugs: design and production of redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B L

    2015-03-01

    Performance enhancement of the immune system can now be generated through ex vivo gene modification of T cells in order to redirect native specificity to target tumor antigens. This approach combines the specificity of antibody therapy, the expanded response of cellular therapy and the memory activity of vaccine therapy. Recent clinical trials of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed toward CD19 as a stand-alone therapy have shown sustained complete responses in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As these drug products are individually derived from a patient's own cells, a different manufacturing approach is required for this kind of personalized therapy compared with conventional drugs. Key steps in the CAR T-cell manufacturing process include the selection and activation of isolated T cells, transduction of T cells to express CARs, ex vivo expansion of modified T cells and cryopreservation in infusible media. In this review, the steps involved in isolating, genetically modifying and scaling-out the CAR T cells for use in a clinical setting are described in the context of in-process and release testing and regulatory standards.

  8. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  9. Development of a Systems Computational Model to Investigate Early Biological Events in Hepatic Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) by Phenobarbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation of the nuclear receptor CAR (constitutive active/androstane receptor) is implicated in the control several key biological events such as metabolic pathways. Here, we combined data from literature with information obtained from in vitro assays in the US EPA ToxCast dat...

  10. Armored CAR T-cells: utilizing cytokines and pro-inflammatory ligands to enhance CAR T-cell anti-tumour efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Yeku, Oladapo O.; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2016-01-01

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells are T-cells that have been genetically modified to express an artificial construct consisting of a synthetic T-cell receptor (TCR) targeted to a predetermined antigen expressed on a tumour. Coupling the T-cell receptor to a CD3ζ signalling domain paved the way for first generation CAR T-cells that were efficacious against cluster of differentiation (CD)19-expressing B-cell malignancies. Optimization with additional signalling domains such as CD28 or 4-...

  11. Oncolytic Adenovirus: Strategies and Insights for Vector Design and Immuno-Oncolytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanni Uusi-Kerttula

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ad are commonly used both experimentally and clinically, including oncolytic virotherapy applications. In the clinical area, efficacy is frequently hampered by the high rates of neutralizing immunity, estimated as high as 90% in some populations that promote vector clearance and limit bioavailability for tumor targeting following systemic delivery. Active tumor targeting is also hampered by the ubiquitous nature of the Ad5 receptor, hCAR, as well as the lack of highly tumor-selective targeting ligands and suitable targeting strategies. Furthermore, significant off-target interactions between the viral vector and cellular and proteinaceous components of the bloodstream have been documented that promote uptake into non-target cells and determine dose-limiting toxicities. Novel strategies are therefore needed to overcome the obstacles that prevent efficacious Ad deployment for wider clinical applications. The use of less seroprevalent Ad serotypes, non-human serotypes, capsid pseudotyping, chemical shielding and genetic masking by heterologous peptide incorporation are all potential strategies to achieve efficient vector escape from humoral immune recognition. Conversely, selective vector arming with immunostimulatory agents can be utilized to enhance their oncolytic potential by activation of cancer-specific immune responses against the malignant tissues. This review presents recent advantages and pitfalls occurring in the field of adenoviral oncolytic therapies.

  12. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified natural killer cell-based immunotherapy and immunological synapse formation in cancer and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongfang; Tian, Shuo; Zhang, Kai; Xiong, Wei; Lubaki, Ndongala Michel; Chen, Zhiying; Han, Weidong

    2017-12-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the body's immune defenses. Current chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cell immunotherapy shows strong promise for treating various cancers and infectious diseases. Although CAR-modified NK cell immunotherapy is rapidly gaining attention, its clinical applications are mainly focused on preclinical investigations using the NK92 cell line. Despite recent advances in CAR-modified T cell immunotherapy, cost and severe toxicity have hindered its widespread use. To alleviate these disadvantages of CAR-modified T cell immunotherapy, additional cytotoxic cell-mediated immunotherapies are urgently needed. The unique biology of NK cells allows them to serve as a safe, effective, alternative immunotherapeutic strategy to CAR-modified T cells in the clinic. While the fundamental mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity and side effects of CAR-modified T and NK cell immunotherapies remain poorly understood, the formation of the immunological synapse (IS) between CAR-modified T or NK cells and their susceptible target cells is known to be essential. The role of the IS in CAR T and NK cell immunotherapies will allow scientists to harness the power of CAR-modified T and NK cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases. In this review, we highlight the potential applications of CAR-modified NK cells to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and discuss the challenges and possible future directions of CAR-modified NK cell immunotherapy, as well as the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of CAR-modified T cell- or NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and side effects, with a focus on the CAR-modified NK cell IS.

  13. Crystallization of the C-terminal head domain of the avian adenovirus CELO long fibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardado Calvo, Pablo [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L. [Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Langlois, Patrick [Agence Francaise de Securité Sanitaire des Aliments, Unité Génétique Virale et Biosecurité, Site Les Croix, BP 53, F-22440 Ploufragan (France); Raaij, Mark J. van, E-mail: vanraaij@usc.es [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-05-01

    Avian adenovirus long-fibre head trimers were expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°). A complete highly redundant data set was collected to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source. Avian adenovirus CELO contains two different fibres: fibre 1, the long fibre, and fibre 2, the short fibre. The short fibre is responsible for binding to an unknown avian receptor and is essential for infection of birds. The long fibre is not essential, but is known to bind the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor protein. Both trimeric fibres are attached to the same penton base, of which each icosahedral virus contains 12 copies. The short fibre extends straight outwards, while the long fibre emerges at an angle. The carboxy-terminal amino acids 579–793 of the avian adenovirus long fibre have been expressed with an amino-terminal hexahistidine tag and the expressed trimeric protein has been purified by nickel-affinity chromatography and crystallized. Crystals were grown at low pH using PEG 10 000 as precipitant and belonged to space group C2. The crystals diffracted rotating-anode Cu Kα radiation to at least 1.9 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected from a single crystal to 2.2 Å resolution. Unit-cell parameters were a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°, suggesting one trimer per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of 46%. The long fibre head does not have significant sequence homology to any other protein of known structure and molecular-replacement attempts with known fibre-head structures were unsuccessful. However, a map calculated using SIRAS phasing shows a clear trimer with a shape similar to known adenovirus fibre-head structures. Structure solution is in progress.

  14. Alternate adenovirus type-pairs for a possible circumvention of host immune response to recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nász, I; Adám, E; Lengyel, A

    2001-01-01

    With the help of monoclonal antibodies the existence of at least 18 different earlier not known intertype (IT) specific epitopes were demonstrated in different numbers and combinations on the hexons of different adenovirus serotypes. The IT specific epitopes play an important role in the experimental gene therapy and in the recombinant adenovirus vaccination because of the harmful immune response of the recipient organisms directed against the many different epitopes of the adenovirus vector. For the elimination of harmful effect the authors suggest the use of multiple vectors, each prepared from different adenovirus serotypes showing the loosest antigenic relationship to each other. The vectors would be used sequentially when second or multiple administration is needed. For this purpose the authors determined and described 31 such adenovirus type-pairs, which are probably the best alternates for sequential use in experimental gene therapy.

  15. GLYCAN-DIRECTED CAR-T CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Migliorini, Denis; King, Tiffany R; Mandel, Ulla; June, Carl H; Posey, Avery D

    2018-01-23

    Cancer immunotherapy is rapidly advancing in the treatment of a variety of hematopoietic cancers, including pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B cell lymphoma, with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells. CARs are genetically encoded artificial T cell receptors that combine the antigen specificity of an antibody with the machinery of T cell activation. However, implementation of CAR technology in the treatment of solid tumors has been progressing much slower. Solid tumors are characterized by a number of challenges that need to be overcome, including cellular heterogeneity, immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), and, in particular, few known cancer-specific targets. Post-translational modifications that differentially occur in malignant cells generate valid cell surface, cancer-specific targets for CAR-T cells. We previously demonstrated that CAR-T cells targeting an aberrant O-glycosylation of MUC1, a common cancer marker associated with changes in cell adhesion, tumor growth, and poor prognosis, could control malignant growth in mouse models. Here, we discuss the field of glycan-directed CAR-T cells and review the different classes of antibodies specific for glycan-targeting, including the generation of high affinity O-glycopeptide antibodies. Finally, we discuss historic and recently investigated glycan targets for CAR-T cells and provide our perspective on how targeting the tumor glycoproteome and/or glycome will improve CAR-T immunotherapy. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Transcriptional activation of PPARalpha by phenobarbital in the absence of CAR and PXR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamasi, Viola; Juvan, Peter; Beer, Markus; Rozman, Damjana; Meyer, Urs A

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear receptors CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) and PXR (pregnane X receptor) mediate the effects of phenobarbital on gene transcription. To investigate the relative contribution of these nuclear receptors to the expression of specific genes we studied the effect of phenobarbital in livers of wild type, CAR(-/-), PXR(-/-) and CAR/PXR(-/-) knockout mice. Spotted Steroltalk v1 cDNA arrays were applied containing probes for genes involved in drug metabolism, sterol biosynthesis, steroid synthesis/transport and heme synthesis. In the absence of CAR and PXR, phenobarbital unexpectedly induced mRNAs of several nuclear receptors, including PPARalpha and its target genes Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14. Interestingly, in primary cultures of hepatocytes isolated from CAR/PXR(-/-) knockout mice, phenobarbital increased HNF-4alpha levels. In further experiments in these hepatocyte cultures we provide evidence that phenobarbital directly induces transcription of the PPARalpha gene via its HNF-4alpha response element, and indirectly by lack of inhibitory crosstalk of AMPK, CAR and PXR with HNF-4alpha. Our results provide further insight into CAR and PXR-independent effects of phenobarbital and the crosstalk between different nuclear receptor signaling pathways.

  17. Cryo-EM structure of human adenovirus D26 reveals the conservation of structural organization among human adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaodi; Veesler, David; Campbell, Melody G; Barry, Mary E; Asturias, Francisco J; Barry, Michael A; Reddy, Vijay S

    2017-05-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) cause acute respiratory, ocular, and gastroenteric diseases and are also frequently used as gene and vaccine delivery vectors. Unlike the archetype human adenovirus C5 (HAdV-C5), human adenovirus D26 (HAdV-D26) belongs to species-D HAdVs, which target different cellular receptors, and is differentially recognized by immune surveillance mechanisms. HAdV-D26 is being championed as a lower seroprevalent vaccine and oncolytic vector in preclinical and human clinical studies. To understand the molecular basis for their distinct biological properties and independently validate the structures of minor proteins, we determined the first structure of species-D HAdV at 3.7 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. All the hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs), including HVR1, have been identified and exhibit a distinct organization compared to those of HAdV-C5. Despite the differences in the arrangement of helices in the coiled-coil structures, protein IX molecules form a continuous hexagonal network on the capsid exterior. In addition to the structurally conserved region (3 to 300) of IIIa, we identified an extra helical domain comprising residues 314 to 390 that further stabilizes the vertex region. Multiple (two to three) copies of the cleaved amino-terminal fragment of protein VI (pVIn) are observed in each hexon cavity, suggesting that there could be ≥480 copies of VI present in HAdV-D26. In addition, a localized asymmetric reconstruction of the vertex region provides new details of the three-pronged "claw hold" of the trimeric fiber and its interactions with the penton base. These observations resolve the previous conflicting assignments of the minor proteins and suggest the likely conservation of their organization across different HAdVs.

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Intratumoral Injections of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchou, Julia; Zhao, Yangbing; Levine, Bruce L; Zhang, Paul J; Davis, Megan M; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Brennan, Andrea L; Liu, Xiaojun; Lacey, Simon F; Posey, Avery D; Williams, Austin D; So, Alycia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Plesa, Gabriela; Young, Regina M; McGettigan, Shannon; Campbell, Jean; Pierce, Robert H; Matro, Jennifer M; DeMichele, Angela M; Clark, Amy S; Cooper, Laurence J; Schuchter, Lynn M; Vonderheide, Robert H; June, Carl H

    2017-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) are synthetic molecules that provide new specificities to T cells. Although successful in treatment of hematologic malignancies, CAR T cells are ineffective for solid tumors to date. We found that the cell-surface molecule c-Met was expressed in ∼50% of breast tumors, prompting the construction of a CAR T cell specific for c-Met, which halted tumor growth in immune-incompetent mice with tumor xenografts. We then evaluated the safety and feasibility of treating metastatic breast cancer with intratumoral administration of mRNA-transfected c-Met-CAR T cells in a phase 0 clinical trial (NCT01837602). Introducing the CAR construct via mRNA ensured safety by limiting the nontumor cell effects (on-target/off-tumor) of targeting c-Met. Patients with metastatic breast cancer with accessible cutaneous or lymph node metastases received a single intratumoral injection of 3 × 10 7 or 3 × 10 8 cells. CAR T mRNA was detectable in peripheral blood and in the injected tumor tissues after intratumoral injection in 2 and 4 patients, respectively. mRNA c-Met-CAR T cell injections were well tolerated, as none of the patients had study drug-related adverse effects greater than grade 1. Tumors treated with intratumoral injected mRNA c-Met-CAR T cells were excised and analyzed by immunohistochemistry, revealing extensive tumor necrosis at the injection site, cellular debris, loss of c-Met immunoreactivity, all surrounded by macrophages at the leading edges and within necrotic zones. We conclude that intratumoral injections of mRNA c-Met-CAR T cells are well tolerated and evoke an inflammatory response within tumors. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(12); 1152-61. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. An oncolytic adenovirus regulated by a radiation-inducible promoter selectively mediates hSulf-1 gene expression and mutually reinforces antitumor activity of I131-metuximab in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Fang, Lin; Zhang, Quan'an; Zheng, Qin; Tong, Jinlong; Fu, Xiaohui; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Su, Changqing; Zheng, Junnian

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy and antibody approaches are crucial auxiliary strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previously, we established a survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus that has inhibitory effect on HCC growth. The human sulfatase-1 (hSulf-1) gene can suppress the growth factor signaling pathways, then inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and enhance cellular sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. I(131)-metuximab (I(131)-mab) is a monoclonal anti-HCC antibody that conjugated to I(131) and specifically recognizes the HAb18G/CD147 antigen on HCC cells. To integrate the oncolytic adenovirus-based gene therapy and the I(131)-mab-based radioimmunotherapy, this study combined the CArG element of early growth response-l (Egr-l) gene with the survivin promoter to construct a radiation-inducible enhanced promoter, which was used to recombine a radiation-inducible oncolytic adenovirus as hSulf-1 gene vector. When I(131)-mab was incorporated into the treatment regimen, not only could the antibody produce radioimmunotherapeutic effect, but the I(131) radiation was able to further boost adenoviral proliferation. We demonstrated that the CArG-enhanced survivin promoter markedly improved the proliferative activity of the oncolytic adenovirus in HCC cells, thereby augmenting hSulf-1 expression and inducing cancer cell apoptosis. This novel strategy that involved multiple, synergistic mechanisms, including oncolytic therapy, gene therapy and radioimmunotherapy, was demonstrated to exert an excellent anti-cancer outcome, which will be a promising approach in HCC treatment. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sidestream smoke exposure increases the susceptibility of airway epithelia to adenoviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    Full Text Available Although significant epidemiological evidence indicates that cigarette smoke exposure increases the incidence and severity of viral infection, the molecular mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility of the respiratory tract to viral pathogens are unclear. Adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses and important causative agents of acute respiratory disease. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR is the primary receptor for many adenoviruses. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure increases epithelial susceptibility to adenovirus infection by increasing the abundance of apical CAR.Cultured human airway epithelial cells (CaLu-3 were used as a model to investigate the effect of sidestream cigarette smoke (SSS, mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS, or control air exposure on the susceptibility of polarized respiratory epithelia to adenoviral infection. Using a Cultex air-liquid interface exposure system, we have discovered novel differences in epithelial susceptibility between SSS and MSS exposures. SSS exposure upregulates an eight-exon isoform of CAR and increases adenoviral entry from the apical surface whilst MSS exposure is similar to control air exposure. Additionally, the level of cellular glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β is downregulated by SSS exposure and treatment with a specific GSK3β inhibitor recapitulates the effects of SSS exposure on CAR expression and viral infection.This is the first time that SSS exposure has been shown to directly enhance the susceptibility of a polarized epithelium to infection by a common respiratory viral pathogen. This work provides a novel understanding of the impact of SSS on the burden of respiratory viral infections and may lead to new strategies to alter viral infections. Moreover, since GSK3β inhibitors are under intense clinical investigation as therapeutics for a diverse range of diseases, studies such as these might provide insight to extend the use of clinically relevant

  1. A mollusk VDR/PXR/CAR-like (NR1J) nuclear receptor provides insight into ancient detoxification mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzeiro, Catarina, E-mail: catarinarcruzeiro@hotmail.com [ICBAS - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U. Porto - University of Porto (Portugal); CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research, U. Porto (Portugal); Lopes-Marques, Mónica, E-mail: monicaslm@hotmail.com [ICBAS - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U. Porto - University of Porto (Portugal); CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research, U. Porto (Portugal); Ruivo, Raquel, E-mail: ruivo.raquel@gmail.com [CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research, U. Porto (Portugal); Rodrigues-Oliveira, Nádia, E-mail: nadia.oliveira@ciimar.up.pt [CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research, U. Porto (Portugal); Santos, Miguel M., E-mail: santos@ciimar.up.pt [CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research, U. Porto (Portugal); FCUP - Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology, U. Porto (Portugal); Rocha, Maria João, E-mail: mjsrocha@netcabo.pt [ICBAS - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U. Porto - University of Porto (Portugal); CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research, U. Porto (Portugal); Rocha, Eduardo, E-mail: erocha@icbas.up.pt [ICBAS - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U. Porto - University of Porto (Portugal); CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research, U. Porto (Portugal); Castro, L. Filipe C., E-mail: filipe.castro@ciimar.up.pt [CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research, U. Porto (Portugal); FCUP - Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology, U. Porto (Portugal)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A nuclear receptor orthologue of the NR1J group is isolated from a mollusc. • The molluscan NR1J transactivates gene expression upon exposure to okadaic acid but not a pesticide, esfenvarelate and triclosan. • Lineage specific gene duplications and gene loss have occurred in the NR1J of protostomes with likely impacts on detoxification mechanisms. - Abstract: The origin and diversification of the metazoan endocrine systems represents a fundamental research issue in biology. Nuclear receptors are critical components of these systems. A particular group named VDR/PXR/CAR (NR1I/J) is central in the mediation of detoxification responses. While orthologues have been thoroughly characterized in vertebrates, a sparse representation is currently available for invertebrates. Here, we provide the first isolation and characterization of a lophotrochozoan protostome VDR/PXR/CAR nuclear receptor (NR1J), in the estuarine bivalve the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana). Using a reporter gene assay, we evaluated the xenobiotic receptor plasticity comparing the human PXR with the S. plana NR1Jβ. Our results show that the molluscan receptor responds to a natural toxin (okadaic acid) in a similar fashion to that reported for other invertebrates. In contrast, the pesticide esfenvalerate displayed a unique response, since it down regulated transactivation at higher concentrations, while for triclosan no response was observed. Additionally, we uncovered lineage specific gene duplications and gene loss in the gene group encoding NRs in protostomes with likely impacts on the complexity of detoxification mechanisms across different phyla. Our findings pave the way for the development of multi-specific sensor tools to screen xenobiotic compounds acting via the NR1I/J group.

  2. A mollusk VDR/PXR/CAR-like (NR1J) nuclear receptor provides insight into ancient detoxification mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruzeiro, Catarina; Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Ruivo, Raquel; Rodrigues-Oliveira, Nádia; Santos, Miguel M.; Rocha, Maria João; Rocha, Eduardo; Castro, L. Filipe C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A nuclear receptor orthologue of the NR1J group is isolated from a mollusc. • The molluscan NR1J transactivates gene expression upon exposure to okadaic acid but not a pesticide, esfenvarelate and triclosan. • Lineage specific gene duplications and gene loss have occurred in the NR1J of protostomes with likely impacts on detoxification mechanisms. - Abstract: The origin and diversification of the metazoan endocrine systems represents a fundamental research issue in biology. Nuclear receptors are critical components of these systems. A particular group named VDR/PXR/CAR (NR1I/J) is central in the mediation of detoxification responses. While orthologues have been thoroughly characterized in vertebrates, a sparse representation is currently available for invertebrates. Here, we provide the first isolation and characterization of a lophotrochozoan protostome VDR/PXR/CAR nuclear receptor (NR1J), in the estuarine bivalve the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana). Using a reporter gene assay, we evaluated the xenobiotic receptor plasticity comparing the human PXR with the S. plana NR1Jβ. Our results show that the molluscan receptor responds to a natural toxin (okadaic acid) in a similar fashion to that reported for other invertebrates. In contrast, the pesticide esfenvalerate displayed a unique response, since it down regulated transactivation at higher concentrations, while for triclosan no response was observed. Additionally, we uncovered lineage specific gene duplications and gene loss in the gene group encoding NRs in protostomes with likely impacts on the complexity of detoxification mechanisms across different phyla. Our findings pave the way for the development of multi-specific sensor tools to screen xenobiotic compounds acting via the NR1I/J group.

  3. Role of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in infection of human adenovirus serotype 3 and 35.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Tuve

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Species B human adenoviruses (Ads are increasingly associated with outbreaks of acute respiratory disease in U.S. military personnel and civil population. The initial interaction of Ads with cellular attachment receptors on host cells is via Ad fiber knob protein. Our previous studies showed that one species B Ad receptor is the complement receptor CD46 that is used by serotypes 11, 16, 21, 35, and 50 but not by serotypes 3, 7, and 14. In this study, we attempted to identify yet-unknown species B cellular receptors. For this purpose we used recombinant Ad3 and Ad35 fiber knobs in high-throughput receptor screening methods including mass spectrometry analysis and glycan arrays. Surprisingly, we found that the main interacting surface molecules of Ad3 fiber knob are cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. We subsequently found that HSPGs acted as low-affinity co-receptors for Ad3 but did not represent the main receptor of this serotype. Our study also revealed a new CD46-independent infection pathway of Ad35. This Ad35 infection mechanism is mediated by cellular HSPGs. The interaction of Ad35 with HSPGs is not via fiber knob, whereas Ad3 interacts with HSPGs via fiber knob. Both Ad3 and Ad35 interacted specifically with the sulfated regions within HSPGs that have also been implicated in binding physiologic ligands. In conclusion, our findings show that Ad3 and Ad35 directly utilize HSPGs as co-receptors for infection. Our data suggest that adenoviruses evolved to simulate the presence of physiologic HSPG ligands in order to increase infection.

  4. PDGF-receptor beta-targeted adenovirus redirects gene transfer from hepatocytes to activated stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Marieke H.; Rots, Marianne G.; Beljaars, Leonie; Ypma, Arjen Y.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Poelstra, Klaas; Moshage, Albert; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic liver damage may lead to liver fibrosis. In this process, hepatic activated stellate cells are the key players. Thus, activated stellate cells are attractive targets for antifibrotic gene therapy. Recombinant, adenovirus is a promising vehicle for delivering therapeutic genes to liver cells.

  5. Transformation and oncogenicity by Adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Eb, A.J. van der

    1984-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted considerable attention since it was discovered by TRENTIN et all. and HUEBNER et al. that certain species (formerly called serotypes) are oncogenic when injected into newborn hamsters. Since then, adenoviruses have been used extensively as a model for studies on tumor

  6. Dual effects of adenovirus-mediated thrombopoietin gene transfer on hepatic oval cell proliferation and platelet counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiba, Miho; Shimomura, Takashi; Murai, Rie; Hashiguchi, Koichi; Saeki, Toshiya; Yoshida, Yoko; Kanbe, Takamasa; Tanabe, Naotada; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Miura, Norimasa; Tajima, Fumihito; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Shiota, Goshi

    2005-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the growth factor for megakaryocytes and platelets, however, it also acts as a potent regulator of stem cell proliferation. To examine the significance of TPO expression in proliferation of hepatic oval cells, the effect of adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer into livers of the Solt-Farber model, which mimics the condition where liver regeneration is impaired, was examined. Hepatic TPO mRNA peaked its expression at 2 days after gene transduction and then gradually decreased. The peripheral platelet number began to increase at 4 days (P < 0.05) and reached its plateau at 9 days (P < 0.01). Oval cells expressed c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO as well as immature hematopoietic and hepatocytic surface markers such as CD34 and AFP. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive oval cells in rats into which adenovirus-TPO gene was transferred at 7 and 9 days were significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each), and the total numbers of oval cells in the adenovirus-TPO gene transferred at 9 and 13 days were also significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each). Expression of SCF protein was increased at 4, 7, and 9 days by TPO gene administration and that of c-Kit was increased at 4 and 7 days. These data suggest that adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer stimulated oval cell proliferation in liver as well as increasing peripheral platelet counts, emphasizing the significance of the TPO/c-Mpl system in proliferation of hepatic oval cells

  7. Seatbelts in CAR therapy: How Safe Are CARS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Minagawa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available T-cells genetically redirected with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR to recognize tumor antigens and kill tumor cells have been infused in several phase 1 clinical trials with success. Due to safety concerns related to on-target/off-tumor effects or cytokine release syndrome, however, strategies to prevent or abate serious adverse events are required. Pharmacologic therapies; suicide genes; or novel strategies to limit the cytotoxic effect only to malignant cells are under active investigations. In this review, we summarize results and toxicities of investigations employing CAR redirected T-cells, with a focus on published strategies to grant safety of this promising cellular application.

  8. Evidence of molecular evolution driven by recombination events influencing tropism in a novel human adenovirus that causes epidemic keratoconjunctivitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Walsh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, a human adenovirus strain (formerly known as HAdV-D22/H8 but renamed here HAdV-D53 was isolated from an outbreak of epidemic keratoconjunctititis (EKC, a disease that is usually caused by HAdV-D8, -D19, or -D37, not HAdV-D22. To date, a complete change of tropism compared to the prototype has never been observed, although apparent recombinant strains of other viruses from species Human adenovirus D (HAdV-D have been described. The complete genome of HAdV-D53 was sequenced to elucidate recombination events that lead to the emergence of a viable and highly virulent virus with a modified tropism. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses of this genome demonstrate that this adenovirus is a recombinant of HAdV-D8 (including the fiber gene encoding the primary cellular receptor binding site, HAdV-D22, (the epsilon determinant of the hexon gene, HAdV-D37 (including the penton base gene encoding the secondary cellular receptor binding site, and at least one unknown or unsequenced HAdV-D strain. Bootscanning analysis of the complete genomic sequence of this novel adenovirus, which we have re-named HAdV-D53, indicated at least five recombination events between the aforementioned adenoviruses. Intrahexon recombination sites perfectly framed the epsilon neutralization determinant that was almost identical to the HAdV-D22 prototype. Additional bootscan analysis of all HAdV-D hexon genes revealed recombinations in identical locations in several other adenoviruses. In addition, HAdV-D53 but not HAdV-D22 induced corneal inflammation in a mouse model. Serological analysis confirmed previous results and demonstrated that HAdV-D53 has a neutralization profile representative of the epsilon determinant of its hexon (HAdV-D22 and the fiber (HAdV-D8 proteins. Our recombinant hexon sequence is almost identical to the hexon sequences of the HAdV-D strain causing EKC outbreaks in Japan, suggesting that HAdV-D53 is pandemic as an emerging EKC agent. This documents

  9. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China

    OpenAIRE

    Bingshan Liu; Yongping Song; Delong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous...

  10. Construction and evaluation of novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vaccine vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N; Iampietro, M Justin; Bricault, Christine A; Teigler, Jeffrey E; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-02-01

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. The phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. Here we describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors. Although there have been substantial efforts in the development of vaccine vectors from human and chimpanzee adenoviruses, far less is known about rhesus monkey adenoviruses. In this report, we describe the isolation and vectorization of three novel rhesus monkey adenoviruses. These vectors exhibit virologic and immunologic characteristics that make them attractive as potential candidate vaccine vectors for both HIV-1 and other pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Cancer gene therapy with targeted adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtarzi, Houria; Stevenson, Mark; Fisher, Kerry

    2008-11-01

    Clinical experience with adenovirus vectors has highlighted the need for improved delivery and targeting. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the techniques currently under development for improving adenovirus delivery to malignant cells in vivo. Primary research articles reporting improvements in adenoviral gene delivery are described. Strategies include genetic modification of viral coat proteins, non-genetic modifications including polymer encapsulation approaches and pharmacological interventions. Reprogramming adenovirus tropism in vitro has been convincingly demonstrated using a range of genetic and physical strategies. These studies have provided new insights into our understanding of virology and the field is progressing. However, there are still some limitations that need special consideration before adenovirus-targeted cancer gene therapy emerges as a routine treatment in the clinical setting.

  12. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T.

    2006-01-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeting of replication competent adenovirus enhances cytotoxicity in bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, HG; Molenaar, B; van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Rodriguez, R; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR

    Purpose: We evaluated the delivery and oncolytic potential of targeted replication competent adenoviruses in bladder cancer lines. Materials and Methods: Seven established human bladder cancer tumor lines (5637, SW800, TCCsup, J82, Scaber, T24 and 253J) were studied for the expression of integrins

  14. Development of replication-deficient adenovirus malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Michael R; Sedegah, Martha; Limbach, Keith

    2017-03-01

    Malaria remains a major threat to endemic populations and travelers, including military personnel to these areas. A malaria vaccine is feasible, as radiation attenuated sporozoites induce nearly 100% efficacy. Areas covered: This review covers current malaria clinical trials using adenoviruses and pre-clinical research. Heterologous prime-boost regimens, including replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 (HuAd5) carrying malaria antigens, are efficacious. However, efficacy appears to be adversely affected by pre-existing anti-HuAd5 antibodies. Current strategies focus on replacing HuAd5 with rarer human adenoviruses or adenoviruses isolated from non-human primates (NHPs). The chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 is undergoing evaluation in clinical trials including infants in malaria-endemic areas. Key antigens have been identified and are being used alone, in combination, or with protein subunit vaccines. Gorilla adenoviruses carrying malaria antigens are also currently being evaluated in preclinical models. These replacement adenovirus vectors will be successfully used to develop vaccines against malaria, as well as other infectious diseases. Expert commentary: Simplified prime-boost single shot regimens, dry-coated live vector vaccines or silicon microneedle arrays could be developed for malaria or other vaccines. Replacement vectors with similar or superior immunogenicity have rapidly advanced, and several are now in extensive Phase 2 and beyond in malaria as well as other diseases, notably Ebola.

  15. Small-molecule modulators of PXR and CAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Sergio C.; Cherian, Milu T.; Wang, Yue-Ming; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-01

    Two nuclear receptors, the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), participate in the xenobiotic detoxification system by regulating the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in order to degrade and excrete foreign chemicals or endogenous metabolites. This review aims to expand the perceived relevance of PXR and CAR beyond their established role as master xenosensors to disease-oriented areas, emphasizing their modulation by small molecules. Structural studies of these receptors have provided much-needed insight into the nature of their binding promiscuity and the important elements that lead to ligand binding. Reports of species- and isoform-selective activation highlight the need for further scrutiny when extrapolating from animal data to humans, as animal models are at the forefront of early drug discovery. PMID:26921498

  16. Viral capsid is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern in adenovirus keratitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish V Chintakuntlawar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Human adenovirus (HAdV infection of the human eye, in particular serotypes 8, 19 and 37, induces the formation of corneal subepithelial leukocytic infiltrates. Using a unique mouse model of adenovirus keratitis, we studied the role of various virus-associated molecular patterns in subsequent innate immune responses of resident corneal cells to HAdV-37 infection. We found that neither viral DNA, viral gene expression, or viral replication was necessary for the development of keratitis. In contrast, empty viral capsid induced keratitis and a chemokine profile similar to intact virus. Transfected viral DNA did not induce leukocyte infiltration despite CCL2 expression similar to levels in virus infected corneas. Mice without toll-like receptor 9 (Tlr9 signaling developed clinical keratitis upon HAdV-37 infection similar to wild type mice, although the absolute numbers of activated monocytes in the cornea were less in Tlr9(-/- mice. Virus induced leukocytic infiltrates and chemokine expression in mouse cornea could be blocked by treatment with a peptide containing arginine glycine aspartic acid (RGD. These results demonstrate that adenovirus infection of the cornea induces chemokine expression and subsequent infiltration by leukocytes principally through RGD contact between viral capsid and the host cell, possibly through direct interaction between the viral capsid penton base and host cell integrins.

  17. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020 Adenovirus... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease...

  18. Driving CAR T-cells forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Hollie J.; Rafiq, Sarwish; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2017-01-01

    The engineered expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on the surface of T cells enables the redirection of T-cell specificity. Early clinical trials using CAR T cells for the treatment of patients with cancer showed modest results, but the impressive outcomes of several trials of CD19-targeted CAR T cells in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies have generated an increased enthusiasm for this approach. Important lessons have been derived from clinical trials of CD19-specific CAR T cells, and ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in haematological and solid malignancies. In this Review, we discuss these trials and present strategies that can increase the antitumour efficacy and safety of CAR T-cell therapy. Given the fast-moving nature of this field, we only discuss studies with direct translational application currently or soon-to-be tested in the clinical setting. PMID:27000958

  19. T-cells fighting B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies: the emerging field of CD19 CAR T-cell therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, D. M.; Kater, A. P.; Hazenberg, M. D.; Hagenbeek, A.; Kersten, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous T-cells transduced with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The CAR contains an antigen recognition part (originating from an antibody), a T-cell receptor transmembrane and cytoplasmic signalling part, and one or more co-stimulatory domains. While CAR T-cells can be

  20. Adenovirus sequences required for replication in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, K; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo replication properties of plasmids carrying deletion mutations within cloned adenovirus terminal sequences. Deletion mapping located the adenovirus DNA replication origin entirely within the first 67 bp of the adenovirus inverted terminal repeat. This region could be further subdivided into two functional domains: a minimal replication origin and an adjacent auxillary region which boosted the efficiency of replication by more than 100-fold. The minimal origin occup...

  1. Nanobody Based Dual Specific CARs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn De Munter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical trials have shown that adoptive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy is a very potent and possibly curative option in the treatment of B cell leukemias and lymphomas. However, targeting a single antigen may not be sufficient, and relapse due to the emergence of antigen negative leukemic cells may occur. A potential strategy to counter the outgrowth of antigen escape variants is to broaden the specificity of the CAR by incorporation of multiple antigen recognition domains in tandem. As a proof of concept, we here describe a bispecific CAR in which the single chain variable fragment (scFv is replaced by a tandem of two single-antibody domains or nanobodies (nanoCAR. High membrane nanoCAR expression levels are observed in retrovirally transduced T cells. NanoCARs specific for CD20 and HER2 induce T cell activation, cytokine production and tumor lysis upon incubation with transgenic Jurkat cells expressing either antigen or both antigens simultaneously. The use of nanobody technology allows for the production of compact CARs with dual specificity and predefined affinity.

  2. Nanobody Based Dual Specific CARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munter, Stijn; Ingels, Joline; Goetgeluk, Glenn; Bonte, Sarah; Pille, Melissa; Weening, Karin; Kerre, Tessa; Abken, Hinrich; Vandekerckhove, Bart

    2018-01-30

    Recent clinical trials have shown that adoptive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy is a very potent and possibly curative option in the treatment of B cell leukemias and lymphomas. However, targeting a single antigen may not be sufficient, and relapse due to the emergence of antigen negative leukemic cells may occur. A potential strategy to counter the outgrowth of antigen escape variants is to broaden the specificity of the CAR by incorporation of multiple antigen recognition domains in tandem. As a proof of concept, we here describe a bispecific CAR in which the single chain variable fragment (scFv) is replaced by a tandem of two single-antibody domains or nanobodies (nanoCAR). High membrane nanoCAR expression levels are observed in retrovirally transduced T cells. NanoCARs specific for CD20 and HER2 induce T cell activation, cytokine production and tumor lysis upon incubation with transgenic Jurkat cells expressing either antigen or both antigens simultaneously. The use of nanobody technology allows for the production of compact CARs with dual specificity and predefined affinity.

  3. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  4. Rethinking Molecular Mimicry in Rheumatic Heart Disease andAutoimmune Myocarditis: Laminin, Collagen IV, CAR and B1AR as Initial Targets of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eRoot-Bernstein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Molecular mimicry theory (MMT suggests that epitope mimicry between pathogens and human proteins can activate autoimmune disease. Group A streptococci (GAS mimics human cardiac myosin in rheumatic heart disease (RHD and coxsackie viruses (CX mimic actin in autoimmune myocarditis (AM. But myosin and actin are immunologically inaccessible and unlikely initial targets. Extracellular cardiac proteins that mimic GAS and CX would be more likely.Objectives: To determine whether extracellular cardiac proteins such as coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR, beta 1 adrenergic receptor (B1AR, CD55/DAF, laminin, and collagen IV mimic GAS, CX and/or cardiac myosin or actin. Methods: BLAST 2.0 and LALIGN searches of the UniProt protein database were employed to identify potential molecular mimics. Quantitative ELISA was used to measure antibody cross-reactivity. Measurements: Similarities were considered to be significant if a sequence contained at least 5 identical amino acids in 10. Antibodies were considered to be cross-reactive if the binding constant had a Kd less than 10-9 M. Main Results: GAS mimics laminin, CAR and myosin. CX mimics actin and collagen IV and B1AR. The similarity search results are mirrored by antibody cross-reactivities. Additionally, antibodies against laminin recognize antibodies against collagen IV; antibodies against actin recognize antibodies against myosin, and antibodies against GAS recognize antibodies against CX. Thus, there is both mimicry of extracellular proteins and antigenic complementarity between GAS-CX in RHD/AM.Conclusions: RHD/AM may be due to combined infections of GAS with CX localize at cardiomyocytes may produce a synergistic, hyperinflammatory response that cross-reacts with laminin, collagen IV, CAR and/or B1AR. Epitope drift shifts the immune response to myosin and actin after cardiomyocytes become damaged.

  5. Characterization of human adenovirus serotypes 5, 6, 11, and 35 as anticancer agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shashkova, Elena V.; May, Shannon M.; Barry, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) has been the most popular platform for the development of oncolytic Ads. Alternative Ad serotypes with low seroprevalence might allow for improved anticancer efficacy in Ad5-immune patients. We studied the safety and efficacy of rare serotypes Ad6, Ad11 and Ad35. In vitro cytotoxicity of the Ads correlated with expression of CAR and CD46 in most but not all cell lines. Among CAR-binding viruses, Ad5 was often more active than Ad6, among CD46-binding viruses Ad35 was generally more cytotoxic than Ad11 in cell culture studies. Ad5, Ad6, and Ad11 demonstrated similar anticancer activity in vivo, whereas Ad35 was not efficacious. Hepatotoxicity developed only in Ad5-injected mice. Predosing with Ad11 and Ad35 did not increase infection of hepatocytes with Ad5-based vector demonstrating different interaction of these Ads with Kupffer cells. Data obtained in this study suggest developing Ad6 and Ad11 as alternative Ads for anticancer treatment.

  6. Antiviral T Cells for Adenovirus in the Pretransplant Period: A Bridge Therapy for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly K; Hanley, Patrick J; Lang, Haili; Lazarski, Christopher A; Chorvinsky, Elizabeth A; McCormack, Sarah; Roesch, Lauren; Albihani, Shuroug; Dean, Marcus; Hoq, Fahmida; Adams, Roberta H; Bollard, Catherine M; Keller, Michael D

    2018-05-09

    Viral infections can be life threatening in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other forms of profound primary immunodeficiency disorders both before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Adoptive immunotherapy with virus-specific T cells (VSTs) has been utilized in many patients in the setting of HSCT, but has very rarely been attempted for treatment of viral infections before HSCT. Here we describe the use of VSTs in an infant with RAG1 SCID who had developed disseminated adenovirus which failed to improve on cidofovir. Adenovirus cleared following 2 doses of VSTs and marrow infusion from a matched unrelated donor, without incidence of graft versus host disease. T cell receptor-b sequencing demonstrated expansion of adenovirus-specific T cell fraction of the VSTs, suggesting that infusion facilitated viral clearance. This report suggests that VSTs are likely safe in the pre-HSCT period, and may be a useful bridge therapy for infants with SCID and persistent viral infections. Copyright © 2018 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. PMID:25762023

  8. Advantages and Applications of CAR-Expressing Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eGlienke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/ on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy.

  9. Glioblastoma-targeted CD4+ CAR T cells mediate superior antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongrui; Aguilar, Brenda; Starr, Renate; Alizadeh, Darya; Brito, Alfonso; Sarkissian, Aniee; Ostberg, Julie R; Forman, Stephen J; Brown, Christine E

    2018-05-17

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR-modified) T cells have shown promising therapeutic effects for hematological malignancies, yet limited and inconsistent efficacy against solid tumors. The refinement of CAR therapy requires an understanding of the optimal characteristics of the cellular products, including the appropriate composition of CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. Here, we investigated the differential antitumor effect of CD4+ and CD8+ CAR T cells targeting glioblastoma-associated (GBM-associated) antigen IL-13 receptor α2 (IL13Rα2). Upon stimulation with IL13Rα2+ GBM cells, the CD8+ CAR T cells exhibited robust short-term effector function but became rapidly exhausted. By comparison, the CD4+ CAR T cells persisted after tumor challenge and sustained their effector potency. Mixing with CD4+ CAR T cells failed to ameliorate the effector dysfunction of CD8+ CAR T cells, while surprisingly, CD4+ CAR T cell effector potency was impaired when coapplied with CD8+ T cells. In orthotopic GBM models, CD4+ outperformed CD8+ CAR T cells, especially for long-term antitumor response. Further, maintenance of the CD4+ subset was positively correlated with the recursive killing ability of CAR T cell products derived from GBM patients. These findings identify CD4+ CAR T cells as a highly potent and clinically important T cell subset for effective CAR therapy.

  10. Role of the nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR and PXR in induction of cytochromes P450 by non-dioxinlike polychlorinated biphenyls in cultured rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gährs, Maike; Roos, Robert; Andersson, Patrik L.; Schrenk, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are among the most ubiquitously detectable ‘persistent organic pollutants’. In contrast to ‘dioxinlike’ (DL) PCBs, less is known about the molecular mode of action of the larger group of the ‘non-dioxinlike’ (NDL) PCBs. Owing to the life-long exposure of the human population, a carcinogenic, i.e., tumor-promoting potency of NDL-PCBs has to be considered in human risk assessment. A major problem in risk assessment of NDL-PCBs is dioxin-like impurities that can occur in commercially available NDL-PCB standards. In the present study, we analyzed the induction of CYP2B1 and CYP3A1 in primary rat hepatocytes using a number of highly purified NDL-PCBs with various degrees of chlorination and substitution patterns. Induction of these enzymes is mediated by the nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR (Constitutive androstane receptor) and PXR (Pregnane X receptor). For CYP2B1 induction, concentration–response analysis revealed a very narrow window of EC 50 estimates, being in the range of 1–4 μM for PCBs 28 and 52, and between 0.4 and 1 μM for PCBs 101, 138, 153 and 180. CYP3A1 induction was less sensitive to NDL-PCBs, the most pronounced induction being achieved at 100 μM with the higher chlorinated congeners. Using okadaic acid and small interfering RNAs targeting CAR and PXR, we could demonstrate that CAR plays a major role and PXR a minor role in NDL-PCB-driven induction of CYPs, both effects showing no stringent structure–activity relationship. As the only obvious relevant determinant, the degree of chlorination was found to be positively correlated with the inducing potency of the congeners. - Highlights: • We analyzed six highly purified NDL-PCBs for CYP2B1 and CYP3A1 expression. • CAR plays a major, PXR a minor role in NDL-PCB-driven induction of CYPs. • The degree of chlorination seems to be the major parameter for the inducing potency. • There exists a competition between CAR and PXR. • Activated PXR may

  11. Role of the nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR and PXR in induction of cytochromes P450 by non-dioxinlike polychlorinated biphenyls in cultured rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gährs, Maike; Roos, Robert [University of Kaiserslautern, Food Chemistry and Toxicology, Erwin-Schroedinger-Str. 52, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Andersson, Patrik L. [Umeå University, Department of Chemistry, Linnaeus väg 6, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Schrenk, Dieter, E-mail: schrenk@rhrk.uni-kl.de [University of Kaiserslautern, Food Chemistry and Toxicology, Erwin-Schroedinger-Str. 52, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are among the most ubiquitously detectable ‘persistent organic pollutants’. In contrast to ‘dioxinlike’ (DL) PCBs, less is known about the molecular mode of action of the larger group of the ‘non-dioxinlike’ (NDL) PCBs. Owing to the life-long exposure of the human population, a carcinogenic, i.e., tumor-promoting potency of NDL-PCBs has to be considered in human risk assessment. A major problem in risk assessment of NDL-PCBs is dioxin-like impurities that can occur in commercially available NDL-PCB standards. In the present study, we analyzed the induction of CYP2B1 and CYP3A1 in primary rat hepatocytes using a number of highly purified NDL-PCBs with various degrees of chlorination and substitution patterns. Induction of these enzymes is mediated by the nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR (Constitutive androstane receptor) and PXR (Pregnane X receptor). For CYP2B1 induction, concentration–response analysis revealed a very narrow window of EC{sub 50} estimates, being in the range of 1–4 μM for PCBs 28 and 52, and between 0.4 and 1 μM for PCBs 101, 138, 153 and 180. CYP3A1 induction was less sensitive to NDL-PCBs, the most pronounced induction being achieved at 100 μM with the higher chlorinated congeners. Using okadaic acid and small interfering RNAs targeting CAR and PXR, we could demonstrate that CAR plays a major role and PXR a minor role in NDL-PCB-driven induction of CYPs, both effects showing no stringent structure–activity relationship. As the only obvious relevant determinant, the degree of chlorination was found to be positively correlated with the inducing potency of the congeners. - Highlights: • We analyzed six highly purified NDL-PCBs for CYP2B1 and CYP3A1 expression. • CAR plays a major, PXR a minor role in NDL-PCB-driven induction of CYPs. • The degree of chlorination seems to be the major parameter for the inducing potency. • There exists a competition between CAR and PXR. • Activated PXR

  12. Circumvention of Immunity to the Adenovirus Major Coat Protein Hexon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumitra; Shirley, Pamela S.; McClelland, Alan; Kaleko, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Immunity to adenoviruses is an important hurdle to be overcome for successful gene therapy. The presence of antibodies to the capsid proteins prevents efficacious adenovirus vector administration in vivo. We tested whether immunity to a particular serotype of adenovirus (Ad5) may be overcome with a vector that encodes the hexon sequences from a different adenovirus serotype (Ad12). We successfully constructed an adenovirus vector with a chimeric Ad5-Ad12 hexon which was not neutralized by plasma from C57BL/6 mice immunized with Ad5. The vector was also capable of transducing the livers of C57BL/6 mice previously immunized with Ad5. PMID:9658137

  13. Canine adenovirus type 2 vector generation via I-Sce1-mediated intracellular genome release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Ibanes

    Full Text Available When canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2, or also commonly referred to as CAV-2 vectors are injected into the brain parenchyma they preferentially transduce neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent regions, and allow transgene expression for at last >1 yr. Yet, translating these data into a user-friendly vector platform has been limited because CAV-2 vector generation is challenging. Generation of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors often requires transfection of linear DNA fragments of >30 kb containing the vector genome into an E1-transcomplementing cell line. In contrast to human adenovirus type 5 vector generation, CAV-2 vector generation is less efficient due, in part, to a reduced ability to initiate replication and poor transfectibility of canine cells with large, linear DNA fragments. To improve CAV-2 vector generation, we generated an E1-transcomplementing cell line expressing the estrogen receptor (ER fused to I-SceI, a yeast meganuclease, and plasmids containing the I-SceI recognition sites flanking the CAV-2 vector genome. Using transfection of supercoiled plasmid and intracellular genome release via 4-OH-tamoxifen-induced nuclear translocation of I-SceI, we improved CAV-2 vector titers 1,000 fold, and in turn increased the efficacy of CAV-2 vector generation.

  14. Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vector Generation via I-Sce1-Mediated Intracellular Genome Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanes, Sandy; Kremer, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    When canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2, or also commonly referred to as CAV-2) vectors are injected into the brain parenchyma they preferentially transduce neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent regions, and allow transgene expression for at last >1 yr. Yet, translating these data into a user-friendly vector platform has been limited because CAV-2 vector generation is challenging. Generation of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors often requires transfection of linear DNA fragments of >30 kb containing the vector genome into an E1-transcomplementing cell line. In contrast to human adenovirus type 5 vector generation, CAV-2 vector generation is less efficient due, in part, to a reduced ability to initiate replication and poor transfectibility of canine cells with large, linear DNA fragments. To improve CAV-2 vector generation, we generated an E1-transcomplementing cell line expressing the estrogen receptor (ER) fused to I-SceI, a yeast meganuclease, and plasmids containing the I-SceI recognition sites flanking the CAV-2 vector genome. Using transfection of supercoiled plasmid and intracellular genome release via 4-OH-tamoxifen-induced nuclear translocation of I-SceI, we improved CAV-2 vector titers 1,000 fold, and in turn increased the efficacy of CAV-2 vector generation. PMID:23936483

  15. Accumulation of infectious mutants in stocks during the propagation of fiber-modified recombinant adenoviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugai, Hideyo; Inabe, Kumiko; Yamasaki, Takahito; Murata, Takehide; Obata, Yuichi; Hamada, Hirofumi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2005-01-01

    In infected cells, replication errors during viral proliferation generate mutations in adenoviruses (Ads), and the mutant Ads proliferate and evolve in the intracellular environment. Genetically fiber-modified recombinant Ads (rAd variants) were generated, by modification of the fiber gene, for therapeutic applications in host cells that lack or express reduced levels of the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor. To assess the genetic modifications of rAd variants that might induce the instability of Ad virions, we examined the frequencies of mutants that accumulated in propagated stocks. Seven of 41 lines of Ad variants generated mutants in the stocks and all mutants were infectious. Moreover, all the mutations occurred in the modified region that had been added at the 3' end of the fiber gene. Our results show that some genetic modifications at the carboxyl terminus of Ad fiber protein lead to the instability of Ad virions

  16. CINPA1 is an inhibitor of constitutive androstane receptor that does not activate pregnane X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Taosheng

    2015-05-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Cars, Cars, Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Cars are the focus of this feature article, which explores such topics as the history of cars in the United States, the national highway system, safety and pollution concerns, mobility and freedom for women, classic car shows, and the road trip in American literature and film. Also included are links to the websites of Automobile in American Life…

  18. CARs in the Lead Against Multiple Myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormhøj, Maria; Bedoya, Felipe; Frigault, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    The recent clinical success of CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy in chronic and acute leukemia has led to increased interest in broadening this technology to other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Now, advances are being made using CAR T cell technology...... to target myeloma antigens such as B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), CD138, and kappa-light chain as well as CD19 on putative myeloma stem cells. To date, only a limited number of multiple myeloma patients have received CAR T cell therapy but preliminary results have been encouraging. In this review, we...... summarize the recently reported results of clinical trials conducted utilizing CAR T cell therapy in multiple myeloma (MM)....

  19. Comparative inactivation of enteric adenoviruses, poliovirus and coliphages by ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Q.S.; Gerba, C.P.

    1996-01-01

    The inactivation of enteric adenoviruses 40 and 41 by ultraviolet (UV) radiation was investigated and compared with poliovirus type 1 (strain LSc-2ab) and coliphages MS-2 and PRD-1. Purified stocks of the viruses were exposed to collimated ultraviolet radiation in a stirred reactor for a total dose of up to 140 mW s/cm 2 . The doses of UV to achieve a 90% inactivation of adenovirus 40, adenovirus 41, coliphages MS-2 and PRD-1 and poliovirus type 1 were 30, 23.6, 14, 8.7 and 4.1 mW s/cm 2 , respectively. Adenovirus 40 was significantly more resistant than coliphage MS-2 to UV irradiation (P < 0.01). Adenovirus 41 appeared slightly more sensitive than adenovirus 40, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). The resistance of PRD-1 was less than MS-2 (P < 0.01), but greater than poliovirus type 1 (P < 0.01). Adenoviruses 40 and 41 were more resistant than Bacillus subtilis spores, often suggested as an indicator of UV light performance. The double-stranded DNA adenoviruses appear to be the most resistant of all potentially water-borne enteric viruses to UV light disinfection. (author)

  20. IL-7 and CCL19 expression in CAR-T cells improves immune cell infiltration and CAR-T cell survival in the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Keishi; Kano, Yosuke; Nagai, Tomohiko; Okuyama, Namiko; Sakoda, Yukimi; Tamada, Koji

    2018-04-01

    Infiltration, accumulation, and survival of chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells in solid tumors is crucial for tumor clearance. We engineered CAR-T cells to express interleukin (IL)-7 and CCL19 (7 × 19 CAR-T cells), as these factors are essential for the maintenance of T-cell zones in lymphoid organs. In mice, 7 × 19 CAR-T cells achieved complete regression of pre-established solid tumors and prolonged mouse survival, with superior anti-tumor activity compared to conventional CAR-T cells. Histopathological analyses showed increased infiltration of dendritic cells (DC) and T cells into tumor tissues following 7 × 19 CAR-T cell therapy. Depletion of recipient T cells before 7 × 19 CAR-T cell administration dampened the therapeutic effects of 7 × 19 CAR-T cell treatment, suggesting that CAR-T cells and recipient immune cells collaborated to exert anti-tumor activity. Following treatment of mice with 7 × 19 CAR-T cells, both recipient conventional T cells and administered CAR-T cells generated memory responses against tumors.

  1. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E.; Leeuwen, M. van; Boheemen, S. van; Jong, A.A.W. de; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L.; Kuiken, T.

    2013-01-01

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls

  2. [Adenovirus-mediated canine interferon-gamma expression and its antiviral activity against canine parvovirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kao; Jin, Huijun; Zhong, Fei; Li, Xiujin; Neng, Changai; Chen, Huihui; Li, Wenyan; Wen, Jiexia

    2012-11-04

    To construct recombinant adenovirus containing canine interferon-gamma (cIFN-gamma) gene and to investigate its antiviral activity against canine parvovirus in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK). [Methods] The cIFN-gamma gene was inserted into adenovirus shuttle plasmid to construct pShuttle3-cIFN-gamma expression vector, from which the cIFN-gamma expression cassette was transferred into the adenovirus genomic plasmid pAdeno-X by specific restriction sites to generate recombinant adenovirus genomic plasmid pAd-cIFN-gamma. The pAd-cIFN-gamma plasmid was linearized by digestion and transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells to generate the replication-defective cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus (Ad-cIFN-gamma). To analyze its anti-canine parvovirus activity, the MDCK cells were pre-infected by Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus, and then infected by canine parvovirus. The antiviral activity of the Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus against parvovirus was analyzed. The recombinant adenovirus containing cIFN-gamma gene was constructed by the ligation method. The recombinant adenovirus could mediates recombinant cIFN-gamma secretory expression in MDCK cells. The Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus could significantly inhibit canine parvovirus replication in MDCK cells pre-infected with the recombinant adenovirus. These results indicate that the Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus has the potent antiviral activity against canine parvovirus. The Ad-cIFN-gamma recombinant adenovirus was successfully constructed by the ligation method and possessed a powerful antiviral activity against canine parvovirus.

  3. Building a CAR Garage: Preparing for the Delivery of Commercial CAR T Cell Products at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Karlo; Curran, Kevin J; Brentjens, Renier J; Giralt, Sergio A

    2018-03-01

    Two commercial chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies for CD19-expressing B cell malignancies, Kymriah and Yescarta, have recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The administration of CAR T cells is a complex endeavor involving cell manufacture, tracking and shipping of apheresis products, and management of novel and severe toxicities. At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, we have identified 8 essential tasks that define the CAR T cell workflow. In this review, we discuss practical aspects of CAR T cell program development, including clinical, administrative, and regulatory challenges for successful implementation. Copyright © 2018 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Young T cells age during a redirected anti-tumour attack: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-provided dual costimulation is half the battle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas A Hombach

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells showed spectacular efficacy in the treatment of leukaemia in recent early phase trials. Patient's T cells were ex vivo genetically engineered with a CAR, amplified and re-administered to the patient. While T cells mediating the primary response were predominantly of young effector and central memory phenotype, repetitive antigen engagement irreversible triggers T cell maturation leaving late memory cells with the KLRG-1+ CD57+ CD7- CCR7- phenotype in the long-term. These cells preferentially accumulate in the periphery, are hypo-responsive upon TCR engagement and prone to activation-induced cell death. A recent report indicates that those T cells can be rescued by CAR provided CD28 and OX40 (CD134 stimulation. We discuss the strategy with respect to prolong the anti-tumour response and to improve the over-all efficacy of adoptive cell therapy.

  5. Establishing guidelines for CAR-T cells: challenges and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Di-Yuan; Zhang, Bing-Lan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-04-01

    T cells, genetically modified by chimeric antigen receptors (CAR-T), are endowed with specificity to a desired antigen and are cytotoxic to cells expressing the targeted antigen. CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapy for curing hematological malignancy, such as acute lymphoid leukemia, and is promising for extending their efficacy to defeat solid tumors. To date, dozens of different CAR-T cells have been evaluated in clinical trials to treat tumors; this necessitates the establishment of guidelines for the production and application of CAR-T cells. However, it is challenging to standardize CAR-T cancer therapy because it involves a combination of gene therapy and cell therapy. In this review, we compare the existing guidelines for CAR-T cells and discuss the challenges and considerations for establishing guidance for CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy.

  6. ErbB-targeted CAR T-cell immunotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Maher, John

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) based immunotherapy has been under development for the last 25 years and is now a promising new treatment modality in the field of cancer immunotherapy. The approach involves genetically engineering T cells to target malignant cells through expression of a bespoke fusion receptor that couples an HLA-independent antigen recognition domain to one or more intracellular T-cell activating modules. Multiple clinical trials are now underway in several centers to investigate CAR T-cell immunotherapy of diverse hematologic and solid tumor types. The most successful results have been achieved in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, in whom several complete and durable responses have been achieved. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of CAR T-cell immunotherapy of solid cancers, targeted against members of the ErbB family.

  7. New development in CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenguang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Han, Weidong

    2017-02-21

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells) have yielded unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most remarkably in anti-CD19 CAR-T cells for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate. However, tumor antigen escape has emerged as a main challenge for the long-term disease control of this promising immunotherapy in B cell malignancies. In addition, this success has encountered significant hurdles in translation to solid tumors, and the safety of the on-target/off-tumor recognition of normal tissues is one of the main reasons. In this mini-review, we characterize some of the mechanisms for antigen loss relapse and new strategies to address this issue. In addition, we discuss some novel CAR designs that are being considered to enhance the safety of CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors.

  8. New development in CAR-T cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenguang Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells have yielded unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most remarkably in anti-CD19 CAR-T cells for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL with up to a 90% complete remission rate. However, tumor antigen escape has emerged as a main challenge for the long-term disease control of this promising immunotherapy in B cell malignancies. In addition, this success has encountered significant hurdles in translation to solid tumors, and the safety of the on-target/off-tumor recognition of normal tissues is one of the main reasons. In this mini-review, we characterize some of the mechanisms for antigen loss relapse and new strategies to address this issue. In addition, we discuss some novel CAR designs that are being considered to enhance the safety of CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors.

  9. Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Alemany

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic use of viruses against cancer has been revived during the last two decades. Oncolytic viruses replicate and spread inside tumors, amplifying their cytotoxicity and simultaneously reversing the tumor immune suppression. Among different viruses, recombinant adenoviruses designed to replicate selectively in tumor cells have been clinically tested by intratumoral or systemic administration. Limited efficacy has been associated to poor tumor targeting, intratumoral spread, and virocentric immune responses. A deeper understanding of these three barriers will be required to design more effective oncolytic adenoviruses that, alone or combined with chemotherapy or immunotherapy, may become tools for oncologists.

  10. Mechanism of ad5 vaccine immunity and toxicity: fiber shaft targeting of dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Cheng

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant adenoviral (rAd vectors elicit potent cellular and humoral immune responses and show promise as vaccines for HIV-1, Ebola virus, tuberculosis, malaria, and other infections. These vectors are now widely used and have been generally well tolerated in vaccine and gene therapy clinical trials, with many thousands of people exposed. At the same time, dose-limiting adverse responses have been observed, including transient low-grade fevers and a prior human gene therapy fatality, after systemic high-dose recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5 vector administration in a human gene therapy trial. The mechanism responsible for these effects is poorly understood. Here, we define the mechanism by which Ad5 targets immune cells that stimulate adaptive immunity. rAd5 tropism for dendritic cells (DCs was independent of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, its primary receptor or the secondary integrin RGD receptor, and was mediated instead by a heparin-sensitive receptor recognized by a distinct segment of the Ad5 fiber, the shaft. rAd vectors with CAR and RGD mutations did not infect a variety of epithelial and fibroblast cell types but retained their ability to transfect several DC types and stimulated adaptive immune responses in mice. Notably, the pyrogenic response to the administration of rAd5 also localized to the shaft region, suggesting that this interaction elicits both protective immunity and vector-induced fevers. The ability of replication-defective rAd5 viruses to elicit potent immune responses is mediated by a heparin-sensitive receptor that interacts with the Ad5 fiber shaft. Mutant CAR and RGD rAd vectors target several DC and mononuclear subsets and induce both adaptive immunity and toxicity. Understanding of these interactions facilitates the development of vectors that target DCs through alternative receptors that can improve safety while retaining the immunogenicity of rAd vaccines.

  11. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Jones, David R.; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1–mediated (PD-1–mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB–based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  12. Helix 11 Dynamics is Critical for Constitutive Androstane Receptor Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Edward; Busby, Scott A.; Wisecarver, Sarah; Vincent, Jeremy; Griffin, Patrick R.; Fernandez, Elias J.

    2011-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) transactivation can occur in the absence of exogenous ligand and this activity is enhanced by agonists TCPOBOP and meclizine. We use biophysical and cell-based assays to show that increased activity of CAR(TCPOBOP) relative to CAR(meclizine) corresponds to a higher affinity of CAR(TCPOBOP) for the steroid receptor coactivator-1. Additionally, steady-state fluorescence spectra suggest conformational differences between CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR and CAR(meclizi...

  13. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magno, Aaron L.; Ingley, Evan; Brown, Suzanne J.; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Ratajczak, Thomas; Ward, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. → The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. → Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. → Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. → Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  14. Dynamic imaging for CAR-T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Shahri, Nia; Papa, Sophie

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy is entering the mainstream for the treatment of CD19(+)cancers. As is does we learn more about resistance to therapy and the role, risks and management of toxicity. In solid tumour CAR therapy research the route to the clinic is less smooth with a wealth of challenges facing translating this, potentially hugely valuable, therapeutic option for patients. As we strive to understand our successes, and navigate the challenges, having a clear understanding of how adoptively transferred CAR-T-cells behavein vivoand in human trials is invaluable. Harnessing reporter gene imaging to enable detection and tracking of small numbers of CAR-T-cells after adoptive transfer is one way by which we can accomplish this. The compatibility of certain reporter gene systems with tracers available routinely in the clinic makes this approach highly useful for future appraisal of CAR-T-cell success in humans. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  15. Development of an immunotherapeutic adenovirus targeting hormone-independent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jae Sik Kim,1 Sang Don Lee,2 Sang Jin Lee,3 Moon Kee Chung21Department of Urology, The Catholic University of Korea Incheon St Mary's Hospital, Incheon, 2Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan, 3Genitourinary Cancer Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang, KoreaBackground: To develop a targeting therapy for hormone-independent prostate cancer, we constructed and characterized conditionally replicating oncolytic adenovirus (Ad equipped with mRFP(monomeric red fluorescence protein/ttk (modified herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase This construct was then further modified to express both mRFP/ttk and a soluble form of cytokine FLT3L (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand simultaneously.Methods: To construct the recombinant oncolytic adenovirus, E1a and E4 genes, which are necessary for adenovirus replication, were controlled by the prostate-specific enhancer sequence (PSES targeting prostate cancer cells expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA. Simultaneously, it expressed the mRFP/ttk fusion protein in order to be able to elicit the cytotoxic effect.Results: The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk chimeric recombinant adenovirus was generated successfully. When replication of Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk was evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines under fluorescence microscopy, red fluorescence intensity increased more in LNCaP cells, suggesting that the mRFP/ttk fusion protein was folded functionally. In addition, the replication assay including wild-type adenovirus as a positive control showed that PSES-positive cells (LNCaP and CWR22rv permitted virus replication but not PSES-negative cells (DU145 and PC3. Next, we evaluated the killing activity of this recombinant adenovirus. The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk killed LNCaP and CWR22rv more effectively. Unlike PSES-positive cells, DU145 and PC3 were resistant to killing by this recombinant

  16. Adenovirus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by sharing contaminated objects (such as towels or toys), or by touch. Once a child is exposed to adenovirus, symptoms usually develop from ... washing, keep shared surfaces (such as countertops and toys) clean, and remove kids ... a week your child has breathing problems your child is under 3 ...

  17. ENTERIC ADENOVIRUS INFECTION IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jam-Afzon S. Modarres

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are one of the most important etiological agents of serious gastroenteritis among infants and young children. Fecal specimens from patients with an acute gastroenteritis were evaluated for the presence of adenovirus (Ad40, 41 from April 2002 to February 2004. During the study, 1052 samples were collected from children under the age of 5 years in six educational and therapeutic pediatric centers. The specimens were tested for adenovirus (Ad40, 41 by EIA technique in the Virology Department of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Adenoviruses (Ad40, 41 were detected from 27(2.6% samples, but were not detected in 150 samples of healthy control group. In this study the highest rate of adenovirus was found in children aged 6 to 12 months (40.7%, but the male to female ratio inpatients was approximately equal. Adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infections peaked in the winter as 48.1% was detected from December to March. There were a statistically significant difference between age and infection (P < 0.001, also between season with adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection (P = 0.005. Breast-feeding had a protective action against adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection. This study revealed that enteric adenovirus (Ad40, 41 is an etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis among children in Tehran.

  18. CAR-T cell therapy in gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma: From bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zimu; Peng, Meiyu; Fu, Shuyu; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically engineered receptor that combines a scFv domain, which specifically recognizes the tumor-specific antigen, with T cell activation domains. CAR-T cell therapies have demonstrated tremendous efficacy against hematologic malignancies in many clinical trials. Recent studies have extended these efforts to the treatment of solid tumors. However, the outcomes of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors are not as remarkable as the outcomes have been for hematologic malignancies. A series of hurdles has arisen with respect to CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy, which needs to be overcome to target solid tumors. The major challenge for CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors is the selection of the appropriate specific antigen to demarcate the tumor from normal tissue. In this review, we discuss the application of CAR-T cells to gastrointestinal and hepatic carcinomas in preclinical and clinical research. Furthermore, we analyze the usefulness of several specific markers in the study of gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma.

  19. Toxicity and management in CAR T-cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Challice L Bonifant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available T cells can be genetically modified to target tumors through the expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR. Most notably, CAR T cells have demonstrated clinical efficacy in hematologic malignancies with more modest responses when targeting solid tumors. However, CAR T cells also have the capacity to elicit expected and unexpected toxicities including: cytokine release syndrome, neurologic toxicity, “on target/off tumor” recognition, and anaphylaxis. Theoretical toxicities including clonal expansion secondary to insertional oncogenesis, graft versus host disease, and off-target antigen recognition have not been clinically evident. Abrogating toxicity has become a critical step in the successful application of this emerging technology. To this end, we review the reported and theoretical toxicities of CAR T cells and their management.

  20. Presence of adenovirus species C in infiltrating lymphocytes of human sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kosulin

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses are known to persist in T-lymphocytes of tonsils, adenoids and intestinal tract. The oncogenic potential of different adenovirus types has been widely studied in rodents, in which adenovirus inoculation can induce multiple tumors such as undifferentiated sarcomas, adenocarcinomas and neuroectodermal tumors. However, the oncogenic potential of this virus has never been proven in human subjects. Using a highly sensitive broad-spectrum qRT-PCR, we have screened a set of different human sarcomas including leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and gastro intestinal stroma tumors. Primers binding the viral oncogene E1A and the capsid-coding gene Hexon were used to detect the presence of adenovirus DNA in tumor samples. We found that 18% of the tested leiomyosarcomas and 35% of the liposarcomas were positive for the presence of adenovirus DNA, being species C types the most frequently detected adenoviruses. However, only in one sample of the gastro intestinal stroma tumors the virus DNA could be detected. The occurrence of adenovirus in the tumor sections was confirmed by subsequent fluorescence in-situ-hybridization analysis and co-staining with the transcription factor Bcl11b gives evidence for the presence of the virus in infiltrating T-lymphocytes within the tumors. Together these data underline, for the first time, the persistence of adenovirus in T-lymphocytes infiltrated in muscular and fatty tissue tumor samples. If an impaired immune system leads to the viral persistence and reactivation of the virus is involved in additional diseases needs further investigation.

  1. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B. Luz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100 Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, Katrina; Skerratt, Lee; Franson, J. Christian; Hollmen, Tuula E.

    2015-01-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  3. CAR Suppresses Hepatic Gluconeogenesis by Facilitating the Ubiquitination and Degradation of PGC1α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Yan, Jiong; Xu, Meishu; Ren, Songrong

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC1α) are master regulators of drug metabolism and gluconeogenesis, respectively. In supporting the cross talk between drug metabolism and energy metabolism, activation of CAR has been shown to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis and ameliorate hyperglycemia in vivo, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that CAR suppressed hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression through posttranslational regulation of the subcellular localization and degradation of PGC1α. Activated CAR translocated into the nucleus and served as an adaptor protein to recruit PGC1α to the Cullin1 E3 ligase complex for ubiquitination. The interaction between CAR and PGC1α also led to their sequestration within the promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies, where PGC1α and CAR subsequently underwent proteasomal degradation. Taken together, our findings revealed an unexpected function of CAR in recruiting an E3 ligase and targeting the gluconeogenic activity of PGC1α. Both drug metabolism and gluconeogenesis are energy-demanding processes. The negative regulation of PGC1α by CAR may represent a cellular adaptive mechanism to accommodate energy-restricted conditions. PMID:26407237

  4. Fine-tuning the CAR spacer improves T-cell potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Norihiro; Bajgain, Pradip; Sukumaran, Sujita; Ansari, Salma; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Leen, Ann M.; Vera, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has emerged as a transformative cancer therapy with curative potential, precipitating a wave of preclinical and clinical studies in academic centers and the private sector. Indeed, significant effort has been devoted to improving clinical benefit by incorporating accessory genes/CAR endodomains designed to enhance cellular migration, promote in vivo expansion/persistence or enhance safety by genetic programming to enable the recognition of a tumor signature. However, our efforts centered on exploring whether CAR T-cell potency could be enhanced by modifying pre-existing CAR components. We now demonstrate how molecular refinements to the CAR spacer can impact multiple biological processes including tonic signaling, cell aging, tumor localization, and antigen recognition, culminating in superior in vivo antitumor activity. PMID:28180032

  5. Genetic incorporation of the protein transduction domain of Tat into Ad5 fiber enhances gene transfer efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegal Gene P

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 has been widely explored as a gene delivery vector for a variety of diseases. Many target cells, however, express low levels of Ad5 native receptor, the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR, and thus are resistant to Ad5 infection. The Protein Transduction Domain of the HIV Tat protein, namely PTDtat, has been shown to mediate protein transduction in a wide range of cells. We hypothesize that re-targeting Ad5 vector via the PTDtat motif would improve the efficacy of Ad5-mediated gene delivery. Results In this study, we genetically incorporated the PTDtat motif into the knob domain of Ad5 fiber, and rescued the resultant viral vector, Ad5.PTDtat. Our data showed the modification did not interfere with Ad5 binding to its native receptor CAR, suggesting Ad5 infection via the CAR pathway is retained. In addition, we found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy in all of the cell lines that we have tested, which included both low-CAR and high-CAR decorated cells. Competitive inhibition assays suggested the enhanced infectivity of Ad5.PTDtat was mediated by binding of the positively charged PTDtat peptide to the negatively charged epitopes on the cells' surface. Furthermore, we investigated in vivo gene delivery efficacy of Ad5.PTDtat using subcutaneous tumor models established with U118MG glioma cells, and found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy compared to unmodified Ad5 vector as analyzed by a non-invasive fluorescence imaging technique. Conclusion Genetic incorporation of the PTDtat motif into Ad5 fiber allowed Ad5 vectors to infect cells via an alternative PTDtat targeting motif while retaining the native CAR-mediated infection pathway. The enhanced infectivity was demonstrated in both cultured cells and in in vivo tumor models. Taken together, our study identifies a novel tropism expanded Ad5 vector that may be useful for clinical gene therapy

  6. [Construction and expression of a recombinant adenovirus with LZP3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bang-dang; Zhang, Fu-chun; Sun, Mei-yu; Li, Yi-jie; Ma, Zheng-hai

    2007-08-01

    To explore a new immunocontraceptive vaccine and construct an attenuated recombinant adenoviral vaccine against Lagurus lagurus zona pellucida 3(LZP3). LZP3 gene was subcloned into the shuttle vector pShuttle-CMV, and then a two-step transformation procedure was employed to construct a recombinant adenoviral plasmid with LZP3, which was digested with Pac I and transfected into HEK293 cells to package recombinant adenovirus particles. Finally, HeLa cells were infected by the recombinant adenovirus. LZP3 gene was detected from the recombinant virus by PCR, and its transcription and expression were analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blot. Recombinant adenovirus vector pAd-LZP3 with LZP3 gene was constructed by homologous recombination in E.coli, and a recombinant adenovirus was obtained by transfecting HEK293 cells with pAd-LZP3. PCR test indicated that LZP3 gene was successfully integrated into the adenoviral genome, and the titer of the recombinant adenovirus reached 1.2x10(10) pfu/L. The transcription and expression of LZP3 gene in the infected HeLa cells were confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot. The recombinant adenovirus RAd-LZP3 can be successfully expressed in the infected HeLa cells, which lays the foundation for further researches into immunizing animals with RAd-LZP3.

  7. Genetic engineering of chimeric antigen receptors using lamprey derived variable lymphocyte receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are used to redirect effector cell specificity to selected cell surface antigens. Using CARs, antitumor activity can be initiated in patients with no prior tumor specific immunity. Although CARs have shown promising clinical results, the technology remains limited by the availability of specific cognate cell target antigens. To increase the repertoire of targetable tumor cell antigens we utilized the immune system of the sea lamprey to generate directed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs. VLRs serve as membrane bound and soluble immune effectors analogous but not homologous to immunoglobulins. They have a fundamentally different structure than immunoglobulin (Ig-based antibodies while still demonstrating high degrees of specificity and affinity. To test the functionality of VLRs as the antigen recognition domain of CARs, two VLR-CARs were created. One contained a VLR specific for a murine B cell leukemia and the other contained a VLR specific for the human T cell surface antigen, CD5. The CAR design consisted of the VLR sequence, myc-epitope tag, CD28 transmembrane domain, and intracellular CD3ζ signaling domain. We demonstrate proof of concept, including gene transfer, biosynthesis, cell surface localization, and effector cell activation for multiple VLR-CAR designs. Therefore, VLRs provide an alternative means of CAR-based cancer recognition.

  8. Efficacy and safety of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy in patients with haematological and solid malignancies: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor, Emma J M; Fergusson, Dean A; Haggar, Fatima; Kekre, Natasha; Atkins, Harold; Shorr, Risa; Holt, Robert A; Hutton, Brian; Ramsay, Tim; Seftel, Matthew; Jonker, Derek; Daugaard, Mads; Thavorn, Kednapa; Presseau, Justin; Lalu, Manoj M

    2017-12-29

    Patients with relapsed or refractory malignancies have a poor prognosis. Immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells redirects a patient's immune cells against the tumour antigen. CAR-T cell therapy has demonstrated promise in treating patients with several haematological malignancies, including acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia and B-cell lymphomas. CAR-T cell therapy for patients with other solid tumours is also being tested. Safety is an important consideration in CAR-T cell therapy given the potential for serious adverse events, including death. Previous reviews on CAR-T cell therapy have been limited in scope and methodology. Herein, we present a protocol for a systematic review to identify CAR-T cell interventional studies and examine the safety and efficacy of this therapy in patients with haematology malignancies and solid tumours. We will search MEDLINE, including In-Process and Epub Ahead of Print, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1946 to 22 February 2017. Studies will be screened by title, abstract and full text independently and in duplicate. Studies that report administering CAR-T cells of any chimeric antigen receptor construct targeting antigens in patients with haematological malignancies and solid tumours will be eligible for inclusion. Outcomes to be extracted will include complete response rate (primary outcome), overall response rate, overall survival, relapse and adverse events. A meta-analysis will be performed to synthesise the prevalence of outcomes reported as proportions with 95% CIs. The potential for bias within included studies will be assessed using a modified Institute of Health Economics tool. Heterogeneity of effect sizes will be determined using the Cochrane I 2 statistic. The review findings will be submitted for peer-reviewed journal publication and presented at relevant conferences and scientific meetings to promote knowledge transfer. CRD42017075331. © Article author(s) (or

  9. A Global Genomic Screening Strategy Reveals Diverse Activators of Constitutive Activated Receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive survey of conditions that activate CAR in the mouse liver has not been carried out but would be useful in understanding their impact on CAR-dependent liver tumor induction. A gene signature dependent on CAR activation was identified by comparing the transcript pr...

  10. Covalent decoration of adenovirus vector capsids with the carbohydrate epitope αGal does not improve vector immunogenicity, but allows to study the in vivo fate of adenovirus immunocomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, Ramona F; Espenlaub, Sigrid; Hoffmeister, Andrea; Kron, Matthias W; Kreppel, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Adenovirus-based vectors are promising tools for genetic vaccination. However, several obstacles have to be overcome prior to a routine clinical application of adenovirus-based vectors as efficacious vectored vaccines. The linear trisaccharide epitope αGal (alpha-Gal) with the carbohydrate sequence galactose-α-1,3-galactosyl-β-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine has been described as a potent adjuvant for recombinant or attenuated vaccines. Humans and α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice do not express this epitope. Upon exposure of α-1,3-galactosyltransferase-deficient organisms to αGal in the environment, large amounts of circulating anti-Gal antibodies are produced consistently. Immunocomplexes formed between recombinant αGal-decorated vaccines and anti-Gal antibodies exhibit superior immunogenicity. We studied the effects of the trisaccharide epitope on CD8 T cell responses that are directed specifically to vector-encoded transgenic antigens. For that, covalently αGal-decorated adenovirus vectors were delivered to anti-Gal α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice. We generated replication-defective, E1-deleted adenovirus type 5 vectors that were decorated with αGal at the hexon hypervariable regions 1 or 5, at fiber knob, or at penton base. Surprisingly, none of the adenovirus immunocomplexes being formed from αGal-decorated adenovirus vectors and anti-Gal immunoglobulins improved the frequencies of CD8 T cell responses against the transgenic antigen ovalbumin. Humoral immunity directed to the adenovirus vector was neither increased. However, our data indicated that decoration of Ad vectors with the αGal epitope is a powerful tool to analyze the fate of adenovirus immunocomplexes in vivo.

  11. Opposing regulation of cytochrome P450 expression by CAR and PXR in hypothyroid mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Joo; Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Park, Do Joon; Jang, Hak Chul; Moore, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical hypothyroidism affects various metabolic processes including drug metabolism. CYP2B and CYP3A are important cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzymes that are regulated by the xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2). We evaluated the regulation of the hepatic expression of CYPs by CAR and PXR in the hypothyroid state induced by a low-iodine diet containing 0.15% propylthiouracil. Expression of Cyp3a11 was suppressed in hypothyroid C57BL/6 wild type (WT) mice and a further decrement was observed in hypothyroid CAR −/− mice, but not in hypothyroid PXR −/− mice. In contrast, expression of Cyp2b10 was induced in both WT and PXR −/− hypothyroid mice, and this induction was abolished in CAR −/− mice and in and CAR −/− PXR −/− double knockouts. CAR mRNA expression was increased by hypothyroidism, while PXR expression remained unchanged. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a commonly used antiepileptic that is metabolized by CYP3A isoforms. After CBZ treatment of normal chow fed mice, serum CBZ levels were highest in CAR −/− mice and lowest in WT and PXR −/− mice. Hypothyroid WT or PXR −/− mice survived chronic CBZ treatment, but all hypothyroid CAR −/− and CAR −/− PXR −/− mice died, with CAR −/− PXR −/− mice surviving longer than CAR −/− mice (12.3 ± 3.3 days vs. 6.3 ± 2.1 days, p = 0.04). All these findings suggest that hypothyroid status affects xenobiotic metabolism, with opposing responses of CAR and PXR and their CYP targets that can cancel each other out, decreasing serious metabolic derangement in response to a xenobiotic challenge. -- Highlights: ► Hypothyroid status activates CAR in mice and induces Cyp2b10 expression. ► Hypothyroid status suppresses PXR activity in mice and represses Cyp3a11 expression. ► These responses balance each other out in normal mice. ► Hypothyroidism sensitizes CAR null mice to toxic effects of carbamazepine.

  12. Opposing regulation of cytochrome P450 expression by CAR and PXR in hypothyroid mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Joo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Kyung [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon Kwang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Do Joon; Jang, Hak Chul [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Moore, David D., E-mail: moore@bcm.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Clinical hypothyroidism affects various metabolic processes including drug metabolism. CYP2B and CYP3A are important cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzymes that are regulated by the xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2). We evaluated the regulation of the hepatic expression of CYPs by CAR and PXR in the hypothyroid state induced by a low-iodine diet containing 0.15% propylthiouracil. Expression of Cyp3a11 was suppressed in hypothyroid C57BL/6 wild type (WT) mice and a further decrement was observed in hypothyroid CAR{sup −/−} mice, but not in hypothyroid PXR{sup −/−} mice. In contrast, expression of Cyp2b10 was induced in both WT and PXR{sup −/−} hypothyroid mice, and this induction was abolished in CAR{sup −/−} mice and in and CAR{sup −/−} PXR{sup −/−} double knockouts. CAR mRNA expression was increased by hypothyroidism, while PXR expression remained unchanged. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a commonly used antiepileptic that is metabolized by CYP3A isoforms. After CBZ treatment of normal chow fed mice, serum CBZ levels were highest in CAR{sup −/−} mice and lowest in WT and PXR{sup −/−} mice. Hypothyroid WT or PXR{sup −/−} mice survived chronic CBZ treatment, but all hypothyroid CAR{sup −/−} and CAR{sup −/−} PXR{sup −/−} mice died, with CAR{sup −/−}PXR{sup −/−} mice surviving longer than CAR{sup −/−} mice (12.3 ± 3.3 days vs. 6.3 ± 2.1 days, p = 0.04). All these findings suggest that hypothyroid status affects xenobiotic metabolism, with opposing responses of CAR and PXR and their CYP targets that can cancel each other out, decreasing serious metabolic derangement in response to a xenobiotic challenge. -- Highlights: ► Hypothyroid status activates CAR in mice and induces Cyp2b10 expression. ► Hypothyroid status suppresses PXR activity in mice and represses Cyp3a11 expression. ► These responses balance each other out in normal mice.

  13. CAR-T therapy for leukemia: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Xiao, Qing; Wang, Zhe; Feng, Wen-Li

    2017-04-01

    Despite the rapid development of therapeutic strategies, leukemia remains a type of difficult-to-treat hematopoietic malignancy that necessitates introduction of more effective treatment options to improve life expectancy and quality of patients. Genetic engineering in adoptively transferred T cells to express antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has proved highly powerful and efficacious in inducing sustained responses in patients with refractory malignancies, as exemplified by the success of CD19-targeting CAR-T treatment in patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Recent strategies, including manipulating intracellular activating domains and transducing viral vectors, have resulted in better designed and optimized CAR-T cells. This is further facilitated by the rapid identification of an accumulating number of potential leukemic antigens that may serve as therapeutic targets for CAR-T cells. This review will provide a comprehensive background and scrutinize recent important breakthrough studies on anti-leukemia CAR-T cells, with focus on recently identified antigens for CAR-T therapy design and approaches to overcome critical challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An extrahepatic receptor-associated protein-sensitive mechanism is involved in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Rohlmann, A.; Page, S.T.; Bensadoun, A.; Bos, I.S.T.; Berkel, T.J.C. van; Havekes, L.M.; Herz, J.

    1999-01-01

    We have used adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in mice to investigate low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and LDLR-related protein (LRP)- independent mechanisms that control the metabolism of chylomicron and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants in vivo. Overexpression of receptor-

  15. A chimeric antigen receptor for TRAIL-receptor 1 induces apoptosis in various types of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Jin, Aishun; Lin, Zhezhu; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-10-31

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its associated receptors (TRAIL-R/TR) are attractive targets for cancer therapy because TRAIL induces apoptosis in tumor cells through TR while having little cytotoxicity on normal cells. Therefore, many agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for TR have been produced, and these induce apoptosis in multiple tumor cell types. However, some TR-expressing tumor cells are resistant to TR-specific mAb-induced apoptosis. In this study, we constructed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) of a TRAIL-receptor 1 (TR1)-specific single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody (TR1-scFv-CAR) and expressed it on a Jurkat T cell line, the KHYG-1 NK cell line, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). We found that the TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells killed target cells via TR1-mediated apoptosis, whereas TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing KHYG-1 cells and PBLs killed target cells not only via TR1-mediated apoptosis but also via CAR signal-induced cytolysis, resulting in cytotoxicity on a broader range if target cells than with TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells. The results suggest that TR1-scFv-CAR could be a new candidate for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Triclocarban mediates induction of xenobiotic metabolism through activation of the constitutive androstane receptor and the estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Fei Yueh

    Full Text Available Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC is used as a broad-based antimicrobial agent that is commonly added to personal hygiene products. Because of its extensive use in the health care industry and resistance to degradation in sewage treatment processes, TCC has become a significant waste product that is found in numerous environmental compartments where humans and wildlife can be exposed. While TCC has been linked to a range of health and environmental effects, few studies have been conducted linking exposure to TCC and induction of xenobiotic metabolism through regulation by environmental sensors such as the nuclear xenobiotic receptors (XenoRs. To identify the ability of TCC to activate xenobiotic sensors, we monitored XenoR activities in response to TCC treatment using luciferase-based reporter assays. Among the XenoRs in the reporter screening assay, TCC promotes both constitutive androstane receptor (CAR and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα activities. TCC treatment to hUGT1 mice resulted in induction of the UGT1A genes in liver. This induction was dependent upon the constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR because no induction occurred in hUGT1Car(-/- mice. Induction of the UGT1A genes by TCC corresponded with induction of Cyp2b10, another CAR target gene. TCC was demonstrated to be a phenobarbital-like activator of CAR in receptor-based assays. While it has been suggested that TCC be classified as an endocrine disruptor, it activates ERα leading to induction of Cyp1b1 in female ovaries as well as in promoter activity. Activation of ERα by TCC in receptor-based assays also promotes induction of human CYP2B6. These observations demonstrate that TCC activates nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR and ERα both in vivo and in vitro and might have the potential to alter normal physiological homeostasis. Activation of these xenobiotic-sensing receptors amplifies gene expression profiles that might represent a mechanistic base for

  17. Towards safe and effective CD38-CAR T cell therapy for myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, Esther

    2018-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising field within cancer therapy. The recent progresses resulted in 'Immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer' as break-through of the year in 2013. This was partly due to the great successes with Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell therapy. With CAR T cells, recognition

  18. Development of CAR T cells designed to improve antitumor efficacy and safety

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Janneke E.; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has shown promising efficacy against hematologic malignancies. Antitumor activity of CAR T cells, however, needs to be improved to increase therapeutic efficacy in both hematologic and solid cancers. Limitations to overcome are ‘on-target, off-tumor’ toxicity, antigen escape, short CAR T cell persistence, little expansion, trafficking to the tumor and inhibition of T cell activity by an inhibitory tumor microenvironment. Here we will discuss how ...

  19. New Approaches in CAR-T Cell Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghua; Zhou, Penghui

    2017-01-01

    Despite significant advances in surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and molecular-targeted therapy, breast cancer remains the leading cause of death from malignant tumors among women. Immunotherapy has recently become a critical component of breast cancer treatment with encouraging activity and mild safety profiles. CAR-T therapy using genetically modifying T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) is the most commonly used approach to generate tumor-specific T cells. It has shown good curative effect for a variety of malignant diseases, especially for hematological malignancies. In this review, we briefly introduce the history and the present state of CAR research. Then we discuss the barriers of solid tumors for CARs application and possible strategies to improve therapeutic response with a focus on breast cancer. At last, we outlook the future directions of CAR-T therapy including managing toxicities and developing universal CAR-T cells.

  20. A rapid Q-PCR titration protocol for adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus vectors that produces biologically relevant results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaher, Sean D.; Berk, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses are employed in the study of cellular processes and as expression vectors used in gene therapy. The success and reproducibility of these studies is dependent in part on having accurate and meaningful titers of replication competent and helper-dependent adenovirus stocks, which is problematic due to the use of varied and divergent titration protocols. Physical titration methods, which quantify the total number of viral particles, are used by many, but are poor at estimating activity. Biological titration methods, such as plaque assays, are more biologically relevant, but are time consuming and not applicable to helper-dependent gene therapy vectors. To address this, a protocol was developed called “infectious genome titration” in which viral DNA is isolated from the nuclei of cells ~3 h post-infection, and then quantified by Q-PCR. This approach ensures that only biologically active virions are counted as part of the titer determination. This approach is rapid, robust, sensitive, reproducible, and applicable to all forms of adenovirus. Unlike other Q-PCR-based methods, titers determined by this protocol are well correlated with biological activity. PMID:23624118

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells: a novel therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T cell therapy is a newly developed adoptive antitumor treatment. Theoretically, CAR-T cells can specifically localize and eliminate tumor cells by interacting with the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs expressing on tumor cell surface. Current studies demonstrated that various TAAs could act as target antigens for CAR-T cells, for instance, the type III variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII was considered as an ideal target for its aberrant expression on the cell surface of several tumor types. CAR-T cell therapy has achieved gratifying breakthrough in hematological malignancies and promising outcome in solid tumor as showed in various clinical trials. The third generation of CAR-T demonstrates increased antitumor cytotoxicity and persistence through modification of CAR structure. In this review, we summarized the preclinical and clinical progress of CAR-T cells targeting EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, and mesothelin (MSLN, as well as the challenges for CAR-T cell therapy.

  2. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Newick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias. This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment.

  3. Early RNA of adenovirus type 3 in permissive and abortive infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Groff, D E; Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    Early adenovirus type 3 cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNAs from HeLa and BHK-21 cells were detected and mapped on the viral genome by gel blotting and hybridization techniques. The sizes and locations of the 16 adenovirus type 3 RNAs were identical in the two cell types, although relative molarities of the various RNA species differed. Each of the early adenovirus type 3 RNAs was associated with polysomes in both cell types, suggesting that the abortive infection of hamster cells does not result...

  4. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug ...

  5. [Current Status and Challenges of CAR-T Immunotherapy in Hematologic Malignancies -Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xin; Wang, Ya-Jie; Feng, Shuai; Wu, Ya-Yun; Yang, Tong-Hua; Lai, Xun

    2018-04-01

    The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has gradually became a new trend in the treatment of refractory and relapsed hematologic malignancies by developing for 30 years. With the exciting development of genetic engineering, CAR-T technology has subjected to 4 generations of innovation. Structure of CAR-T started from a single signal molecule to 2 or more than 2 co-stimulatory molecules, and then coding the CAR gene or promoter. CAR-T can specifically recognize tumor antigens, and does not be restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC), thus making a breakthrough in clinical treatment. In this review, the history, structure and mechanism of action of CAR-T, as well as the current status and challenges of CAR-T immunotherapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma are summarized.

  6. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells form nonclassical and potent immune synapses driving rapid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, A J; Cross, R S; Watson, K A; Liao, Y; Shi, W; Prince, H M; Beavis, P A; Trapani, J A; Kershaw, M H; Ritchie, D S; Darcy, P K; Neeson, P J; Jenkins, M R

    2018-02-27

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells are effective serial killers with a faster off-rate from dying tumor cells than CAR-T cells binding target cells through their T cell receptor (TCR). Here we explored the functional consequences of CAR-mediated signaling using a dual-specific CAR-T cell, where the same cell was triggered via TCR (tcrCTL) or CAR (carCTL). The carCTL immune synapse lacked distinct LFA-1 adhesion rings and was less reliant on LFA to form stable conjugates with target cells. carCTL receptors associated with the synapse were found to be disrupted and formed a convoluted multifocal pattern of Lck microclusters. Both proximal and distal receptor signaling pathways were induced more rapidly and subsequently decreased more rapidly in carCTL than in tcrCTL. The functional consequence of this rapid signaling in carCTL cells included faster lytic granule recruitment to the immune synapse, correlating with faster detachment of the CTL from the target cell. This study provides a mechanism for how CAR-T cells can debulk large tumor burden quickly and may contribute to further refinement of CAR design for enhancing the quality of signaling and programming of the T cell. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. Myeloid Conditioning with c-kit-Targeted CAR-T Cells Enables Donor Stem Cell Engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Choi, Uimook; Corsino, Cristina I; Koontz, Sherry M; Tajima, Masaki; Sweeney, Colin L; Black, Mary A; Feldman, Steven A; Dinauer, Mary C; Malech, Harry L

    2018-05-02

    We report a novel approach to bone marrow (BM) conditioning using c-kit-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T (c-kit CAR-T) cells in mice. Previous reports using anti-c-kit or anti-CD45 antibody linked to a toxin such as saporin have been promising. We developed a distinctly different approach using c-kit CAR-T cells. Initial studies demonstrated in vitro killing of hematopoietic stem cells by c-kit CAR-T cells but poor expansion in vivo and poor migration of CAR-T cells into BM. Pre-treatment of recipient mice with low-dose cyclophosphamide (125 mg/kg) together with CXCR4 transduction in the CAR-T cells enhanced trafficking to and expansion in BM (c-kit + population (9.0%-0.1%). Because congenic Thy1.1 CAR-T cells were used in the Thy1.2-recipient mice, anti-Thy1.1 antibody could be used to deplete CAR-T cells in vivo before donor BM transplant. This achieved 20%-40% multilineage engraftment. We applied this conditioning to achieve an average of 28% correction of chronic granulomatous disease mice by wild-type BM transplant. Our findings provide a proof of concept that c-kit CAR-T cells can achieve effective BM conditioning without chemo-/radiotherapy. Our work also demonstrates that co-expression of a trafficking receptor can enhance targeting of CAR-T cells to a designated tissue. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. An analytical biomarker for treatment of patients with recurrent B-ALL after remission induced by infusion of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajing; Zhang, Wenying; Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Shi, Fengxia; Wang, Chunmeng; Guo, Yelei; Liu, Yang; Chen, Meixia; Feng, Kaichao; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Chuanjie; Yang, Qingming; Li, Suxia; Han, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T-19) cells have emerged as a powerful targeted immunotherapy for B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a remarkable clinical response in recent trials. Nonetheless, few data are available on the subsequent clinical monitoring and treatment of the patients, especially those with disease recurrence after CAR-T-19 cell infusion. Here, we analyzed three patients who survived after our phase I clinical trial and who were studied by means of biomarkers reflecting persistence of CAR-T-19 cells in vivo and predictive factors directing further treatment. One patient achieved 9-week sustained complete remission and subsequently received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Another patient who showed relapse after 20 weeks without detectable leukemia in the cerebrospinal fluid after CAR-T-19 cell treatment was able to achieve a morphological remission under the influence of stand-alone low-dose chemotherapeutic agents. The third patient gradually developed extensive extramedullary involvement in tissues with scarce immune- cell infiltration during a long period of hematopoietic remission after CAR-T-19 cell therapy. Long-term and discontinuous increases in serum cytokines (mainly interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein) were identified in two patients (Nos. 1 and 6) even though only a low copy number of CAR molecules could be detected in their peripheral blood. This finding was suggestive of persistent functional activity of CAR-T-19 cells. Combined analyses of laboratory biomarkers with their clinical manifestations before and after salvage treatment showed that the persistent immunosurveillance mediated by CAR-T-19 cells would inevitably potentiate the leukemia-killing effectiveness of subsequent chemotherapy in patients who showed relapse after CAR-T-19-induced remission.

  9. CCR research lays foundation for FDA approval of CAR T cell therapy Yescarta | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decades ago, the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells as an effective form of immunotherapy was a speculative idea. In 2010, a breakthrough clinical trial conducted by Steven Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., and his clinical team showed that CAR T cells recognizing the CD19 receptor were useful in the treatment of some types of B-cell malignancies. Read more...

  10. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated LAG-3 disruption in CAR-T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Xingying; Cheng, Chen; Mu, Wei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Na; Wei, Xiaofei; Liu, Xiang; Xia, Changqing; Wang, Haoyi

    2017-12-01

    T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have been successfully applied to treat advanced refractory B cell malignancy. However, many challenges remain in extending its application toward the treatment of solid tumors. The immunosuppressive nature of tumor microenvironment is considered one of the key factors limiting CAR-T efficacy. One negative regulator of Tcell activity is lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3). We successfully generated LAG-3 knockout Tand CAR-T cells with high efficiency using CRISPR-Cas9 mediated gene editing and found that the viability and immune phenotype were not dramatically changed during in vitro culture. LAG-3 knockout CAR-T cells displayed robust antigen-specific antitumor activity in cell culture and in murine xenograft model, which is comparable to standard CAR-T cells. Our study demonstrates an efficient approach to silence immune checkpoint in CAR-T cells via gene editing.

  11. Efficient delivery and stable gene expression in a hematopoietic cell line using a chimeric serotype 35 fiber pseudotyped helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balamotis, Michael Andrew; Huang, Katie; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2004-01-01

    Certain human cell populations have remained difficult to infect with human adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 because of their lack of coxsackievirus B-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Native adenovirus fiber compositions, although diverse, cannot infect all tissue types. Recently, a chimeric Ad5/35 fiber was created, which displays an altered tropism from Ad5. We incorporated this chimeric fiber into a helper-dependent (HD) adenovirus vector system and compared HD to E1-deleted (E1Δ) vectors by transgene expression, cell transduction efficiency, and cytotoxicity. K562 cells were infected ∼50 times more efficiently with the chimeric Ad5/35 fiber compared with the Ad5 fiber. Short-term transgene expression was sustained longer from HD Ad5/35 than E1Δ Ad5/35 vector after in vitro infection of actively dividing K562 cells. Rapid loss of transgene expression from E1Δ Ad5/35 infection was not due to the loss of vector genomes, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), or cytotoxicity, but rather through a putative silencing mechanism

  12. Tip60 degradation by adenovirus relieves transcriptional repression of viral transcriptional activator EIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Jha, S; Engel, D A; Ornelles, D A; Dutta, A

    2013-10-17

    Adenoviruses are linear double-stranded DNA viruses that infect human and rodent cell lines, occasionally transform them and cause tumors in animal models. The host cell challenges the virus in multifaceted ways to restrain viral gene expression and DNA replication, and sometimes even eliminates the infected cells by programmed cell death. To combat these challenges, adenoviruses abrogate the cellular DNA damage response pathway. Tip60 is a lysine acetyltransferase that acetylates histones and other proteins to regulate gene expression, DNA damage response, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation. Tip60 is a bona fide tumor suppressor as mice that are haploid for Tip60 are predisposed to tumors. We have discovered that Tip60 is degraded by adenovirus oncoproteins EIB55K and E4orf6 by a proteasome-mediated pathway. Tip60 binds to the immediate early adenovirus promoter and suppresses adenovirus EIA gene expression, which is a master regulator of adenovirus transcription, at least partly through retention of the virally encoded repressor pVII on this promoter. Thus, degradation of Tip60 by the adenoviral early proteins is important for efficient viral early gene transcription and for changes in expression of cellular genes.

  13. Phase I trials using Sleeping Beauty to generate CD19-specific CAR T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kebriaei, Partow; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, M. Helen; Figliola, Matthew J.; Bassett, Roland; Olivares, Simon; Jena, Bipulendu; Dawson, Margaret J.; Kumaresan, Pappanaicken R.; Su, Shihuang; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Moriarity, Branden; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Senyukov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells expressing antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) improve outcomes for CD19-expressing B cell malignancies. We evaluated a human application of T cells that were genetically modified using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express a CD19-specific CAR.

  14. [Rapid expression and preparation of the recombinant fusion protein sTNFRII-gAD by adenovirus vector system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoren; Liu, Xuerong; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Gang; Liu, Yunfan; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiaobing; Gao, Jimin

    2011-08-01

    We expressed and prepared the recombinant fusion protein sTNFRII-gAD consisted of soluble TNF receptor II and the globular domain of adiponectin by Adenovirus Vector System in mammalian BHK21c022 cells. First we used the adenovirus vector containing EGFP gene (rAd5-EGFP) to infect BHK21c022 cells at different MOI (from 0 to 1 000), and then evaluated their transduction efficiency and cytotoxicity. Similarly, we constructed the replication-deficient adenovirus type 5-sTNFRII-gAD (rAd5-sTNFRII-gAD). We collected the supernatants for Western blotting to determine the optimal MOI by comparing the expression levels of sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein, 48 h after the BHK21c022 cells were infected by rAd5-sTNFRII-gAD at different MOIs (from 0 to 1 000). Then, we chose rAd5-sTNFRII-gAD at MOI 100 to infect five bottles of BHK21c022 cells in 100 mL of serum-free chemically defined media 100 mL, harvested the supernatant every 48 h for 6 times, and condense and purify sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein by ammonium sulfate salt-out and size-exclusion chromatography, respectively. Finally, we analyzed anti-TNFalpha activity of sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein on L929 cells in vitro. The results showed that the number of BHK21c022 cells expressing EGFP protein was increased significantly with the increase of MOI. However, some cells died at MOI of 1 000 while there was no significant cytotoxicity at MOI from 0 to 100. Western blotting analysis showed that the more adenoviruses, the higher expression of sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein in the supernatant with the highest expression at MOI 1 000. We successfully obtained about 11 mg bioactive and purified sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein at last. The in vitro assay demonstrated that the sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein was potent to antagonize TNFalpha's cytotoxicity to L929 cells. Put together, we established a recombinant adenovirus vector/BHK21 cell expression system, characteristic of the efficient serum-free culture and easy scaling-up.

  15. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. CuseCar--community car-sharing program : car sharing lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    CuseCar of Syracuse launched services in December 2008 with 3 Toyota Prius Hybrids. CuseCar initially, due to : concerns about availability, limited membership to Origination Sponsor Locations, which in turn developed few : members. In 2009 CuseCar o...

  17. Safety, tumor trafficking and immunogenicity of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells specific for TAG-72 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hege, Kristen M; Bergsland, Emily K; Fisher, George A; Nemunaitis, John J; Warren, Robert S; McArthur, James G; Lin, Andy A; Schlom, Jeffrey; June, Carl H; Sherwin, Stephen A

    2017-01-01

    T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have established efficacy in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, but their relevance in solid tumors remains undefined. Here we report results of the first human trials of CAR-T cells in the treatment of solid tumors performed in the 1990s. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) were treated in two phase 1 trials with first-generation retroviral transduced CAR-T cells targeting tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 and including a CD3-zeta intracellular signaling domain (CART72 cells). In trial C-9701 and C-9702, CART72 cells were administered in escalating doses up to 10 10 total cells; in trial C-9701 CART72 cells were administered by intravenous infusion. In trial C-9702, CART72 cells were administered via direct hepatic artery infusion in patients with colorectal liver metastases. In both trials, a brief course of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) was given with each CART72 infusion to upregulate expression of TAG-72. Fourteen patients were enrolled in C-9701 and nine in C-9702. CART72 manufacturing success rate was 100% with an average transduction efficiency of 38%. Ten patients were treated in CC-9701 and 6 in CC-9702. Symptoms consistent with low-grade, cytokine release syndrome were observed in both trials without clear evidence of on target/off tumor toxicity. Detectable, but mostly short-term (≤14 weeks), persistence of CART72 cells was observed in blood; one patient had CART72 cells detectable at 48 weeks. Trafficking to tumor tissues was confirmed in a tumor biopsy from one of three patients. A subset of patients had 111 Indium-labeled CART72 cells injected, and trafficking could be detected to liver, but T cells appeared largely excluded from large metastatic deposits. Tumor biomarkers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and TAG-72 were measured in serum; there was a precipitous decline of TAG-72, but not CEA, in some patients due to induction of an interfering antibody to the TAG-72

  18. A molecular epidemiology survey of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in children residing in Southern Palestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Qurei

    Full Text Available A molecular epidemiology survey was performed in order to establish and document the respiratory adenovirus pathogen profiles among children in Southern Palestine. Three hundred and thirty-eight hospitalized pediatric cases with adenovirus-associated respiratory tract infections were analyzed. Forty four cases out of the 338 were evaluated in more detail for the adenoviruses types present. All of the children resided in Southern Palestine, that is, in city, village and refugee camp environments within the districts of Hebron and Bethlehem. Human adenoviruses circulated throughout 2005-2010, with major outbreaks occurring in the spring months. A larger percent of the children diagnosed with adenoviral infections were male infants. DNA sequence analysis of the hexon genes from 44 samples revealed that several distinct adenovirus types circulated in the region; these were HAdV-C1, HAdV-C2, HAdV-B3 and HAdV-C5. However, not all of these types were detected within each year. This is the first study ever conducted in Palestine of the genetic epidemiology of respiratory adenovirus infections.

  19. Biology and clinical application of CAR T cells for B cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Marco L; Sadelain, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have generated broad interest in oncology following a series of dramatic clinical successes in patients with chemorefractory B cell malignancies. CAR therapy now appears to be on the cusp of regulatory approval as a cell-based immunotherapy. We review here the T cell biology and cell engineering research that led to the development of second generation CARs, the selection of CD19 as a CAR target, and the preclinical studies in animal models that laid the foundation for clinical trials targeting CD19+ malignancies. We further summarize the status of CD19 CAR clinical therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, including their efficacy, toxicities (cytokine release syndrome, neurotoxicity and B cell aplasia) and current management in humans. We conclude with an overview of recent pre-clinical advances in CAR design that argues favorably for the advancement of CAR therapy to tackle other hematological malignancies as well as solid tumors.

  20. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Matoq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection.

  1. CAR-T Cell Therapies From the Transfusion Medicine Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesnak, Andrew; Lin, ChieYu; Siegel, Don L; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-07-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies has generated significant excitement over the last several years. From a transfusion medicine perspective, the implementation of CAR-T therapy as a potential mainstay treatment for not only hematologic but also solid-organ malignancies represents a significant opportunity for growth and expansion. In this review, we will describe the rationale for the development of genetically redirected T cells as a cancer therapeutic, the different elements that are required to engineer these cells, as well as an overview of the process by which patient cells are harvested and processed to create and subsequently validate CAR-T cells. Finally, we will briefly describe some of the toxicities and clinical efficacy of CAR-T cells in the setting of patients with advanced malignancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of severe acute respiratory syndrome vaccine based on a nonhuman primate adenovirus in the presence of immunity against human adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yan; Figueredo, Joanita; Kobinger, Gary P; Hagan, Heather; Calcedo, Roberto; Miller, James R; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M

    2006-05-01

    Replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 (AdH5) vectors can induce strong transgene product-specific cellular and humoral responses. However, many adult humans have neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against AdH5 as a result of natural infection with this virus. Therefore, a chimpanzee adenovirus C7 (AdC7) vector was developed to circumvent interference by preexisting immunity to AdH5. This study evaluated the impact of preexisting immunity to human adenovirus on the efficacy of adenovirus-based vaccines against the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). Efficacy was assessed after intramuscular injection of the vector into mice and was measured as the frequency of SARS-CoV-specific T cells and NAbs against SARS-CoV. Immunogenicity of the AdH5-based vaccine was significantly attenuated or completely abolished when the preexisting anti-AdH5 NAb titer was higher than 40. Because 27% of human serum samples from the United States tested so far have an anti-AdH5 NAb titer higher than 40, our results suggested that a significant percentage of humans with preexisting anti-AdH5 immunity would not be candidates for vaccination with an AdH5-based genetic vaccine. In contrast, preexisting anti-AdH5 NAbs have a minimal effect on the potency of the AdC7-based genetic vaccine. Taken together, our studies warrant the further development of AdC7 as a vaccine carrier for human trials.

  3. Adenovirus type 5 induces progression of quiescent rat cells into S phase without polyamine accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, B F; Shaw, D C; Bellett, A J

    1982-01-01

    Adenovirus type 5 induces cellular DNA synthesis and thymidine kinase in quiescent rat cells but does not induce ornithine decarboxylase. We now show that unlike serum, adenovirus type 5 fails to induce S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase or polyamine accumulation. The inhibition by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) of the induction of thymidine kinase by adenovirus type 5 is probably unrelated to its effects on polyamine biosynthesis. Thus, induction of cellular thymidine kinase and DNA replication by adenovirus type 5 is uncoupled from polyamine accumulation. PMID:7177112

  4. CAR T Cell Therapy for Glioblastoma: Recent Clinical Advances and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Stephen J; Desai, Arati S; Linette, Gerald P; June, Carl H; O'Rourke, Donald M

    2018-03-02

    In patients with certain hematologic malignancies, the use of autologous T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has led to unprecedented clinical responses. Although progress in solid tumors has been elusive, recent clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of CAR T cell therapy for glioblastoma. In addition, despite formidable barriers to T cell localization and effector function in glioblastoma, signs of efficacy have been observed in select patients. In this review, we begin with a discussion of established obstacles to systemic therapy in glioblastoma and how these may be overcome by CAR T cells. We continue with a summary of previously published CAR T cell trials in GBM, and end by outlining the key therapeutic challenges associated with the use of CAR T cells in this disease.

  5. Production of Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Human Interlukin-4 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Mojarrad, Majid; Abdolazimi, Yassan; Hajati, Jamshid; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) Recombinant adenoviruses are currently used for a variety of purposes, including in vitro gene transfer, in vivo vaccination, and gene therapy. Ability to infect many cell types, high efficiency in gene transfer, entering both dividing and non dividing cells, and growing to high titers make this virus a good choice for using in various experiments. In the present experiment, a recombinant adenovirus containing human IL-4 coding sequence was made. IL-4 has several characteristics ...

  6. Human pregnane X receptor is activated by dibenzazepine carbamate-based inhibitors of constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Judith; Windshügel, Björn; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Unintentional activation of xenosensing nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) by clinical drug use is known to produce severe side effects in patients, which may be overcome by co-administering antagonists. However, especially antagonizing CAR is hampered by the lack of specific inhibitors, which do not activate PXR. Recently, compounds based on a dibenzazepine carbamate scaffold were identified as potent CAR inhibitors. However, their potential to activate PXR was not thoroughly investigated, even if the lead compound was named "CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1" (CINPA1). Thus, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the interaction of CINPA1 and four analogs with PXR. Cellular assays were used to investigate intra- and intermolecular interactions and transactivation activity of PXR as a function of the compounds. Modulation of PXR target gene expression was analyzed in primary human hepatocytes. Ligand binding to PXR was investigated by molecular docking and limited proteolytic digestion. We show here that CINPA1 induced the assembly of the PXR ligand-binding domain, released co-repressors from and recruited co-activators to the receptor. CINPA1 and its analogs induced the PXR-dependent activation of a CYP3A4 reporter gene and CINPA1 induced the expression of endogenous cytochrome P450 genes in primary hepatocytes, while not consistently inhibiting CAR-mediated induction. Molecular docking revealed favorable binding of CINPA1 and analogs to the PXR ligand-binding pocket, which was confirmed in vitro. Altogether, our data provide consistent evidence that compounds with a dibenzazepine carbamate scaffold, such as CINPA1 and its four analogs, bind to and activate PXR.

  7. Detection of a putative novel adenovirus by PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic characterisation of two gene fragments from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of a cat diagnosed with disseminated adenovirus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Béla; Hornyák, Ákos; Demeter, Zoltán; Forgách, Petra; Kennedy, Frances; Rusvai, Miklós

    2017-12-01

    Adenoviral nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of a cat that had suffered from disseminated adenovirus infection. The identity of the amplified products from the hexon and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase genes was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The sequences were clearly distinguishable from corresponding hexon and polymerase sequences of other mastadenoviruses, including human adenoviruses. These results suggest the possible existence of a distinct feline adenovirus.

  8. A simple negative selection method to identify adenovirus recombinants using colony PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The negative selection method to identify AdEasy adenovirus recombinants by colony PCR can identify the recombined colony within a short time-period, and maximally avoid damage to the recombinant plasmid by limiting recombination time, resulting in improved adenovirus packaging.

  9. A new insight in chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells for cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells has emerged as a very promising approach to combating cancer. Despite its ability to eliminate tumors shown in some clinical trials, CAR-T cell therapy involves some significant safety challenges, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS and “on-target, off-tumor” toxicity, which is related to poor control of the dose, location, and timing of T cell activity. In the past few years, some strategies to avoid the side effects of CAR-T cell therapy have been reported, including suicide gene, inhibitory CAR, dual-antigen receptor, and the use of exogenous molecules as switches to control the CAR-T cell functions. Because of the advances of the CAR paradigm and other forms of cancer immunotherapy, the most effective means of defeating the cancer has become the integration therapy with the combinatorial control system of switchable dual-receptor CAR-T cell and immune checkpoint blockade.

  10. Effect of CAR activation on selected metabolic pathways in normal and hyperlipidemic mouse livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezen, Tadeja; Tamasi, Viola; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Björkhem, Ingemar; Meyer, Urs A; Rozman, Damjana

    2009-08-19

    Detoxification in the liver involves activation of nuclear receptors, such as the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), which regulate downstream genes of xenobiotic metabolism. Frequently, the metabolism of endobiotics is also modulated, resulting in potentially harmful effects. We therefore used 1,4-Bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) to study the effect of CAR activation on mouse hepatic transcriptome and lipid metabolome under conditions of diet-induced hyperlipidemia. Using gene expression profiling with a dedicated microarray, we show that xenobiotic metabolism, PPARalpha and adipocytokine signaling, and steroid synthesis are the pathways most affected by TCPOBOP in normal and hyperlipidemic mice. TCPOBOP-induced CAR activation prevented the increased hepatic and serum cholesterol caused by feeding mice a diet containing 1% cholesterol. We show that this is due to increased bile acid metabolism and up-regulated removal of LDL, even though TCPOBOP increased cholesterol synthesis under conditions of hyperlipidemia. Up-regulation of cholesterol synthesis was not accompanied by an increase in mature SREBP2 protein. As determined by studies in CAR -/- mice, up-regulation of cholesterol synthesis is however CAR-dependent; and no obvious CAR binding sites were detected in promoters of cholesterogenic genes. TCPOBOP also affected serum glucose and triglyceride levels and other metabolic processes in the liver, irrespective of the diet. Our data show that CAR activation modulates hepatic metabolism by lowering cholesterol and glucose levels, through effects on PPARalpha and adiponectin signaling pathways, and by compromising liver adaptations to hyperlipidemia.

  11. The search for adenovirus 14 in children in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laham, Federico R; Jewell, Alan M; Schoonover, Shauna L; Demmler, Gail J; Piedra, Pedro A

    2008-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)14 has recently emerged in the United States causing outbreaks of severe respiratory disease. To determine if Ad14 circulated in Houston, Texas, during the same time as an outbreak in military recruits in nearby San Antonio, 215 pediatric adenovirus isolates were serotyped using microneutralization. None were Ad14; Ad1, Ad2, and Ad3 were the most common identified serotypes.

  12. Clofibric acid induces hepatic CYP 2B1/2 via constitutive androstane receptor not via peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Zein Shaban; Ahmed, Mohamed Mohamed; El-Shazly, Samir Ahmed; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Fujita, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) ligands, fibrates used to control hyperlipidemia. We demonstrated CYP2B induction by clofibric acid (CFA) however, the mechanism was not clear. In this study, HepG2 cells transfected with expression plasmid of mouse constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) or PPARα were treated with CFA, phenobarbital (PB) or TCPOBOP. Luciferase assays showed that CFA increased CYP2B1 transcription to the same level as PB, or TCPOBOP in HepG2 transfected with mouse CAR But failed to induce it in PPARα transfected cells. CYP2B expressions were increased with PB or CFA in Wistar female rats (having normal levels of CAR) but not in Wistar Kyoto female rats (having low levels of CAR). The induction of CYP2B by PB or CFA was comparable to nuclear CAR levels. CAR nuclear translocation was induced by CFA in both rat strains. This indicates that fibrates can activate CAR and that fibrates-insulin sensitization effect may occur through CAR, while hypolipidemic effect may operate through PPARα.

  13. Respiratory adenovirus-like infection in a rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmidt, M; Ducatelle, R; Uyttebroek, E; Charlier, G; Hoorens, J

    1991-01-01

    Intranuclear inclusions were observed under light microscopy in the bronchial epithelial cells of a recently purchased female rose-ringed parakeet that died of chlamydiosis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous particles of adenovirus morphology. A latent adenovirus infection may have become more severe following chlamydiosis and the stress of handling.

  14. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua. The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9% in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3 in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%, and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%. Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population.

  15. Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) in Mice Results in Maintained Biliary Excretion of Bile Acids Despite a Marked Decrease of Bile Acids in Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lickteig, Andrew J; Csanaky, Iván L; Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2016-06-01

    Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) protects against bile acid (BA)-induced liver injury. This study was performed to determine the effect of CAR activation on bile flow, BA profile, as well as expression of BA synthesis and transport genes. Synthetic CAR ligand 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) was administered to mice for 4 days. BAs were quantified by UPLC-MS/MS (ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry). CAR activation decreases total BAs in livers of male (49%) and female mice (26%), largely attributable to decreases of the 12α-hydroxylated BA taurocholic acid (T-CA) (males (M) 65%, females (F) 45%). Bile flow in both sexes was increased by CAR activation, and the increases were BA-independent. CAR activation did not alter biliary excretion of total BAs, but overall BA composition changed. Excretion of muricholic (6-hydroxylated) BAs was increased in males (101%), and the 12α-OH proportion of biliary BAs was decreased in both males (37%) and females (28%). The decrease of T-CA in livers of males and females correlates with the decreased mRNA of the sterol 12α-hydroxylase Cyp8b1 in males (71%) and females (54%). As a response to restore BAs to physiologic concentrations in liver, mRNA of Cyp7a1 is upregulated following TCPOBOP (males 185%, females 132%). In ilea, mRNA of the negative feedback regulator Fgf15 was unaltered by CAR activation, indicating biliary BA excretion was sufficient to maintain concentrations of total BAs in the small intestine. In summary, the effects of CAR activation on BAs in male and female mice are quite similar, with a marked decrease in the major BA T-CA in the liver. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. An "off-the-shelf" fratricide-resistant CAR-T for the treatment of T cell hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Matthew L; Choi, Jaebok; Staser, Karl; Ritchey, Julie K; Devenport, Jessica M; Eckardt, Kayla; Rettig, Michael P; Wang, Bing; Eissenberg, Linda G; Ghobadi, Armin; Gehrs, Leah N; Prior, Julie L; Achilefu, Samuel; Miller, Christopher A; Fronick, Catrina C; O'Neal, Julie; Gao, Feng; Weinstock, David M; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fulton, Robert S; DiPersio, John F

    2018-02-20

    T cell malignancies represent a group of hematologic cancers with high rates of relapse and mortality in patients for whom no effective targeted therapies exist. The shared expression of target antigens between chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells and malignant T cells has limited the development of CAR-T because of unintended CAR-T fratricide and an inability to harvest sufficient autologous T cells. Here, we describe a fratricide-resistant "off-the-shelf" CAR-T (or UCART7) that targets CD7+ T cell malignancies and, through CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, lacks both CD7 and T cell receptor alpha chain (TRAC) expression. UCART7 demonstrates efficacy against human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines and primary T-ALL in vitro and in vivo without the induction of xenogeneic GvHD. Fratricide-resistant, allo-tolerant "off-the-shelf" CAR-T represents a strategy for treatment of relapsed and refractory T-ALL and non-Hodgkin's T cell lymphoma without a requirement for autologous T cells.

  17. Emerging immunotherapeutics in adenocarcinomas: A focus on CAR-T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanifar, Mahboubeh; Zhou, Ru; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2016-01-01

    More than 80% of all cancers arise from epithelial cells referred to as carcinomas. Adenocarcinomas are the most common type of carcinomas arising from the specialized epithelial cells that line the ducts of our major organs. Despite many advances in cancer therapies, metastatic and treatment-refractory cancers remain the 2 nd leading cause of death. Immunotherapy has offered potential opportunities with specific targeting of tumor cells and inducing remission in many cancer patients. Numerous therapies using antibodies as antagonists or checkpoint inhibitors/immune modulators, peptide or cell vaccines, cytokines, and adoptive T cell therapies have been developed. The most innovative immunotherapy approach so far has been the use of engineered T cell, also referred to as chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T cells). CAR-T cells are genetically modified naïve T cells that express a chimeric molecule which comprises of the antigen-recognition domains (scFv) of an anti-tumor antibody and one, two, or three intracellular signaling domains of the T cell receptor (TCR). When these engineered T cells recognize and bind to the tumor antigen target via the scFv fragment, a signal is sent to the intracellular TCR domains of the CAR, leading to activation of the T cells to become cytolytic against the tumor cells. CAR-T cell therapy has shown tremendous success for certain hematopoietic malignancies, but this success has not been extrapolated to adenocarcinomas. This is due to multiple factors associated with adenocarcinoma that are different from hematopoietic tumors. Although many advances have been made in targeting multiple cancers by CAR-T cells, clinical trials have shown adverse effects and toxicity related to this treatment. New strategies are yet to be devised to manage side effects associated with CAR-T cell therapies. In this review, we report some of the promising immunotherapeutic strategies being developed for treatment of most common adenocarcinomas with

  18. Quarter Century of Anti-HIV CAR T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thor A

    2018-04-01

    A therapy that might cure HIV is a very important goal for the 30-40 million people living with HIV. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells have recently had remarkable success against certain leukemias, and there are reasons to believe they could be successful for HIV. This manuscript summarizes the published research on HIV CAR T cells and reviews the current anti-HIV chimeric antigen receptor strategies. Research on anti-HIV chimeric antigen receptor T cells has been going on for at least the last 25 years. First- and second-generation anti-HIV chimeric antigen receptors have been developed. First-generation anti-HIV chimeric antigen receptors were studied in clinical trials more than 15 years ago, but did not have meaningful clinical efficacy. There are some reasons to be optimistic about second-generation anti-HIV chimeric antigen receptor T cells, but they have not yet been tested in vivo.

  19. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  20. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  1. IGF1R- and ROR1-Specific CAR T Cells as a Potential Therapy for High Risk Sarcomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Huang

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic or recurrent and refractory sarcomas have a dismal prognosis. Therefore, new targeted therapies are urgently needed. This study was designed to evaluate chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R or tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1 molecules for their therapeutic potential against sarcomas. Here, we report that IGF1R (15/15 and ROR1 (11/15 were highly expressed in sarcoma cell lines including Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, alveolar or embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from eight healthy donors using the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system were cytotoxic against sarcoma cells and produced high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-13 in an antigen-specific manner. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells generated from three sarcoma patients released significant amounts of IFN-γ in response to sarcoma stimulation. The adoptive transfer of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from a sarcoma patient significantly reduced tumor growth in pre-established, systemically disseminated and localized osteosarcoma xenograft models in NSG mice. Infusion of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells also prolonged animal survival in a localized sarcoma model using NOD/scid mice. Our data indicate that both IGF1R and ROR1 can be effectively targeted by SB modified CAR T cells and that such CAR T cells may be useful in the treatment of high risk sarcoma patients.

  2. Adenovirus serotype 7 associated with a severe lower respiratory tract disease outbreak in infants in Shaanxi Province, China

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    Xu Wenbo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia caused by adenovirus infection is usually severe especially with adenovirus serotype 7 commonly associated with lower respiratory tract disease outbreaks. We reported an outbreak of 70 cases of severe pneumonia with one death of infants in Shaanxi Province, China. Sampling showed adenovirus 7 (Ad7 as the primary pathogen with some co-infections. Results Two strains of adenovirus and two strains of enterovirus were isolated, the 21 pharynx swabs showed 14 positive amplifications for adenovirus; three co-infections with respiratory syncytial virus, two positive for rhinovirus, one positive for parainfluenza 3, and four negative. Adenovirus typing showed nine of the nine adenovirus positive samples were HAdV-7, three were HAdV-3 and two were too weak to perform sequencing. The entire hexon gene of adenovirus was sequenced and analyzed for the two adenovirus serotype 7 isolates, showing the nucleic acid homology was 99.8% between the two strains and 99.5% compared to the reference strain HAdV-7 (GenBank accession number AY769946. For the 21 acute phase serum samples from the 21 patients, six samples had positives results for ELISA detection of HAdV IgA, and the neutralization titers of the convalescent-phase samples were four times higher than those of the acute-phase samples in nine pairs. Conclusions We concluded adenovirus was the viral pathogen, primarily HAdV-7, with some co-infections responsible for the outbreak. This is the first report of an infant pneumonia outbreak caused by adenovirus serotype 7 in Shaanxi Province, China.

  3. Paralleled comparison of vectors for the generation of CAR-T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Di-Yuan; Huang, Yong; Li, Dan; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-09-01

    T-lymphocytes genetically engineered with the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-T) have shown great therapeutic potential in cancer treatment. A variety of preclinical researches and clinical trials of CAR-T therapy have been carried out to lay the foundation for future clinical application. In these researches, several gene-transfer methods were used to deliver CARs or other genes into T-lymphocytes, equipping CAR-modified T cells with a property of recognizing and attacking antigen-expressing tumor cells in a major histocompatibility complex-independent manner. Here, we summarize the gene-transfer vectors commonly used in the generation of CAR-T cell, including retrovirus vectors, lentivirus vectors, the transposon/transposase system, the plasmid-based system, and the messenger RNA electroporation system. The following aspects were compared in parallel: efficiency of gene transfer, the integration methods in the modified T cells, foreground of scale-up production, and application and development in clinical trials. These aspects should be taken into account to generate the optimal CAR-gene vector that may be suitable for future clinical application.

  4. CAR T-cell therapy for glioblastoma: ready for the next round of clinical testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzing, Brooke L; Gottschalk, Stephen M; Krenciute, Giedre

    2018-05-01

    The outcome for patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains poor, and there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic approaches. T cells genetically modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) hold the promise to improve outcomes since they recognize and kill cells through different mechanisms than conventional therapeutics. Areas covered: This article reviews CAR design, tumor associated antigens expressed by GBMs that can be targeted with CAR T cells, preclinical and clinical studies conducted with CAR T cells, and genetic approaches to enhance their effector function. Expert commentary: While preclinical studies have highlighted the potent anti-GBM activity of CAR T cells, the initial foray of CAR T-cell therapies into the clinic resulted only in limited benefits for GBM patients. Additional genetic modification of CAR T cells has resulted in a significant increase in their anti-GBM activity in preclinical models. We are optimistic that clinical testing of these enhanced CAR T cells will be safe and result in improved anti-glioma activity in GBM patients.

  5. A guide to manufacturing CAR T cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormittag, Philipp; Gunn, Rebecca; Ghorashian, Sara; Veraitch, Farlan S

    2018-02-17

    In recent years, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells have been used as a treatment for haematological malignancies in several phase I and II trials and with Kymriah of Novartis and Yescarta of KITE Pharma, the first CAR T cell therapy products have been approved. Promising clinical outcomes have yet been tempered by the fact that many therapies may be prohibitively expensive to manufacture. The process is not yet defined, far from being standardised and often requires extensive manual handling steps. For academia, big pharma and contract manufacturers it is difficult to obtain an overview over the process strategies and their respective advantages and disadvantages. This review details current production processes being used for CAR T cells with a particular focus on efficacy, reproducibility, manufacturing costs and release testing. By undertaking a systematic analysis of the manufacture of CAR T cells from reported clinical trial data to date, we have been able to quantify recent trends and track the uptake of new process technology. Delivering new processing options will be key to the success of the CAR-T cells ensuring that excessive manufacturing costs do not disrupt the delivery of exciting new therapies to the wide possible patient cohort. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1 into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations.

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    Drew C Deniger

    Full Text Available T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1 is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28 or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137 and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC, which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire.

  7. Non-coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are direct agonists for the human pregnane-X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, and activate target gene expression in a tissue-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salman, Fadheela; Plant, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The polychlorinated biphenyl group possesses high environmental persistence, leading to bioaccumulation and a number of adverse effects in mammals. Whilst coplanar PCBs elicit their toxic effects through agonism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor; however, non-coplanar PCBs are not ligands for AhR, but may be ligands for members of the nuclear receptor family of proteins. To better understand the biological actions of non-coplanar PCBs, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of their ability to activate PXR and CAR-mediated effects. Cells were exposed to a range of non-coplanar PCBs (99, 138, 153, 180 and 194), or the coplanar PCB77: Direct activation of PXR and CAR was measured using a mammalian receptor activation assay in human liver cells, with rifampicin and CITCO used as positive controls ligands for PXR and CAR, respectively; activation of target gene expression was examined using reporter gene plasmids for CYP3A4 and MDR1 transfected into liver, intestine and lung cell lines. Several of the non-coplanar PCBs directly activated PXR and CAR, whilst the coplanar PCB77 did not. Non-coplanar PCBs were also able to activate PXR/CAR target gene expression in a substitution- and tissue-specific manner. Non-coplanar PCBs act as direct activators for the nuclear receptors PXR and CAR, and are able to elicit transcriptional activation of target genes in a substitution- and tissue-dependent manner. Chronic activation of PXR/CAR is linked to adverse effects and must be included in any risk assessment of PCBs. -- Highlights: ► Several Non-coplanar PCBs are able to directly activate both PXR and CAR in vitro. ► PCB153 is the most potent direct activator of PXR and CAR nuclear receptors. ► Non-coplanar PCB activation of CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes is structure-dependent. ► Non-coplanar PCB activate CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes in a tissue-dependent. ► PCB153 is the most potent activator of PXR/CAR target gene in all tissues.

  8. Targeting Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP)-MHC Complex with CAR T-Cell Therapy for Liver Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Xu, Yiyang; Xiang, Jingyi; Long, Li; Green, Shon; Yang, Zhiyuan; Zimdahl, Bryan; Lu, Jingwei; Cheng, Neal; Horan, Lucas H; Liu, Bin; Yan, Su; Wang, Pei; Diaz, Juan; Jin, Lu; Nakano, Yoko; Morales, Javier F; Zhang, Pengbo; Liu, Lian-Xing; Staley, Binnaz K; Priceman, Saul J; Brown, Christine E; Forman, Stephen J; Chan, Vivien W; Liu, Cheng

    2017-01-15

    The majority of tumor-specific antigens are intracellular and/or secreted and therefore inaccessible by conventional chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Given that all intracellular/secreted proteins are processed into peptides and presented by class I MHC on the surface of tumor cells, we used alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a specific liver cancer marker, as an example to determine whether peptide-MHC complexes can be targets for CAR T-cell therapy against solid tumors. We generated a fully human chimeric antigen receptor, ET1402L1-CAR (AFP-CAR), with exquisite selectivity and specificity for the AFP 158-166 peptide complexed with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*02:01. We report that T cells expressing AFP-CAR selectively degranulated, released cytokines, and lysed liver cancer cells that were HLA-A*02:01 + /AFP + while sparing cells from multiple tissue types that were negative for either expressed proteins. In vivo, intratumoral injection of AFP-CAR T cells significantly regressed both Hep G2 and AFP 158 -expressing SK-HEP-1 tumors in SCID-Beige mice (n = 8 for each). Moreover, intravenous administration of AFP-CAR T cells in Hep G2 tumor-bearing NSG mice lead to rapid and profound tumor growth inhibition (n = 6). Finally, in an established intraperitoneal liver cancer xenograft model, AFP-CAR T cells showed robust antitumor activity (n = 6). This study demonstrates that CAR T-cell immunotherapy targeting intracellular/secreted solid tumor antigens can elicit a potent antitumor response. Our approach expands the spectrum of antigens available for redirected T-cell therapy against solid malignancies and offers a promising new avenue for liver cancer immunotherapy. Clin Cancer Res; 23(2); 478-88. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Optimizing EphA2-CAR T Cells for the Adoptive Immunotherapy of Glioma

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    Zhongzhen Yi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in humans and is virtually incurable with conventional therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy targeting the glioblastoma antigen EphA2 is an attractive approach to improve outcomes because EphA2 is expressed highly in glioblastoma but only at low levels in normal brain tissue. Building upon our previous findings in this area, we generated and evaluated a panel of EphA2-specific CARs. We demonstrate here that T cells expressing CD28.ζ and 41BB.ζ CARs with short spacers had similar effector function, resulting in potent antitumor activity. In addition, incorporating the 41BB signaling domain into CD28.ζ CARs did not improve CAR T cell function. While we could not determine functional differences between CD28.ζ, 41BB.ζ, and CD28.41BB.ζ CAR T cells, we selected CD28.ζ CAR T cells for further clinical development based on safety consideration. Keywords: GBM, CAR T cells, EphA2, brain tumor

  10. Overexpression of the cAMP Receptor 1 in Growing Dictyostelium Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Caterina, Michael J.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1991-01-01

    cAR1, the cAMP receptor expressed normally during the early aggregation stage of the Dictyostelium developmental program, has been expressed during the growth stage, when only low amounts of endogenous receptors are present. Transformants expressing cAR1 have 7-40 times over growth stage and

  11. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

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    Xingui Tian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55 is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152, A55R2 (residues 179 to 187, A55R4 (residues 247 to 259 and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443, were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and neutralization tests (NT. Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3 and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis.

  12. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xingui; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Zaixue; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaomei; Luo, Qingming; Zhou, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55) is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD) pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152), A55R2 (residues 179 to 187), A55R4 (residues 247 to 259) and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443), were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization tests (NT). Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3) and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis. PMID:26516903

  13. Human adenovirus serotype 12 virion precursors pMu and pVI are cleaved at amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal sites that conform to the adenovirus 2 endoproteinase cleavage consensus sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, P; Anderson, C W

    1993-03-01

    The sequence of a 1158-base pair fragment of the human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12) genome was determined. This segment encodes the precursors for virion components Mu and VI. Both Ad12 precursors contain two sequences that conform to a consensus sequence motif for cleavage by the endoproteinase of adenovirus 2 (Ad2). Analysis of the amino terminus of VI and of the peptide fragments found in Ad12 virions demonstrated that these sites are cleaved during Ad12 maturation. This observation suggests that the recognition motif for adenovirus endoproteinases is highly conserved among human serotypes. The adenovirus 2 endoproteinase polypeptide requires additional co-factors for activity (C. W. Anderson, Protein Expression Purif., 1993, 4, 8-15). Synthetic Ad12 or Ad2 pVI carboxy-terminal peptides each permitted efficient cleavage of an artificial endoproteinase substrate by recombinant Ad2 endoproteinase polypeptide.

  14. Adenovirus urethritis and concurrent conjunctivitis: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Olivia Louise; Samuel, Mannampallil Itty; Sudhanva, Malur; Ellis, Joanna; Taylor, Chris

    2015-03-01

    We present eight cases and review the literature of concurrent urethritis and conjunctivitis where adenovirus was identified as the causative pathogen. The focus of this review concerns the identification of specific sexual practices, symptoms, signs and any serotypes that seem more commonly associated with such adenovirus infections. We discuss the seasonality of adenovirus infection and provide practical advice for clinicians to give to the patient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Crystallographic analysis of murine constitutive androstane receptor ligand-binding domain complexed with 5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, Jeremy; Shan, Li; Fan, Ming; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Forman, Barry M.; Fernandez, Elias J.

    2004-01-01

    The purification and structure determination of the murine constitutive androstane receptor bound to its inverse agonist/antagonist androstenol is described. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In contrast to classical nuclear receptors, which possess small-molecule ligand-inducible activity, CAR exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity in the apparent absence of ligand. CAR is among the most important transcription factors; it coordinately regulates the expression of microsomal cytochrome P450 genes and other drug-metabolizing enzymes. The murine CAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) was coexpressed with the steroid receptor coactivator protein (SRC-1) receptor-interacting domain (RID) in Escherichia coli. The mCAR LBD subunit was purified away from SRC-1 by affinity, anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography, crystallized with androstenol and the structure of the complex determined by molecular replacement

  16. Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPARα in mouse liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Pamela K.; Woods, Courtney G.; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPARα will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR α. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPARα in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens

  17. Hurdles of CAR-T cell-based cancer immunotherapy directed against solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing-Lan; Qin, Di-Yuan; Mo, Ze-Ming; Li, Yi; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Recent reports on the impressive efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells against hematologic malignancies have inspired oncologists to extend these efforts for the treatment of solid tumors. Clinical trials of CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy for solid tumors showed that the efficacies are not as remarkable as in the case of hematologic malignancies. There are several challenges that researchers must face when treating solid cancers with CAR-T cells, these include choosing an ideal target, promoting efficient trafficking and infiltration, overcoming the immunosuppressive microenvironment, and avoiding associated toxicity. In this review, we discuss the obstacles imposed by solid tumors on CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy and strategies adopted to improve the therapeutic potential of this approach. Continued investigations are necessary to improve therapeutic outcomes and decrease the adverse effects of CAR-T cell therapy in patients with solid malignancies in the future.

  18. Screening for adenoviruses in haematological neoplasia: High prevalence in mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosulin, Karin; Rauch, Margit; Ambros, Peter F; Pötschger, Ulrike; Chott, Andreas; Jäger, Ulrich; Drach, Johannes; Nader, Alexander; Lion, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Human adenoviruses possess oncogenic capacity which is well documented in mammalian animal models, but their possible implication in human malignancy has remained enigmatic. Following primary infection, adenoviruses can persist in a latent state in lymphocytes where the virus is apparently able to evade immune surveillance. In the present study, we have employed a broad-spectrum adenovirus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to systematically screen more than 200 diagnostic specimens of different lymphoid malignancies including acute lymphocytic leukaemia (n=50), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (n=50), various types of malignant lymphoma (n=100) and multiple myeloma (n=11) for the presence of adenoviral sequences. While most entities analysed revealed negative findings in virtually all specimens tested, adenoviral DNA was detected in 15/36 (42%) mantle cell lymphomas investigated. The most prevalent adenoviral species detected was C, and less commonly B. Adenovirus-positive findings in patients with mantle cell lymphoma were made at different sites including bone marrow (n=7), intestine (n=5), lymph nodes (n=2) and tonsillar tissue (n=1). The presence of adenoviral sequences identified by PCR was confirmed in individual cells by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). The frequent observation of adenoviruses in mantle cell lymphoma is intriguings, and raises questions about their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of this lymphoid malignancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CINPA1 binds directly to constitutive androstane receptor and inhibits its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Chai, Sergio C; Wright, William C; Singh, Aman; Alexandra Casal, Morgan; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Jing; Lee, Richard E; Griffin, Patrick R; Chen, Taosheng

    2018-03-31

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that regulate the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters. CAR activation promotes drug elimination, thereby reducing therapeutic effectiveness, or causes adverse drug effects via toxic metabolites. CAR inhibitors could be used to attenuate these adverse drug effects. CAR and PXR share ligands and target genes, confounding the understanding of the regulation of receptor-specific activity. We previously identified a small-molecule inhibitor, CINPA1, that inhibits CAR (without activating PXR at lower concentrations) by altering CAR-coregulator interactions and reducing CAR recruitment to DNA response elements of regulated genes. However, solid evidence was not presented for the direct binding of CINPA1 to CAR. In this study, we demonstrate direct interaction of CINPA1 with the CAR ligand-binding domain (CAR-LBD) and identify key residues involved in such interactions through a combination of biophysical and computational methods. We found that CINPA1 resides in the ligand-binding pocket to stabilize the CAR-LBD in a more rigid, less fluid state. Molecular dynamics simulations, together with our previously reported docking model, enabled us to predict which CAR residues were critical for interactions with CINPA1. The importance of these residues for CINPA1 binding were then validated by directed mutations and testing the mutant CAR proteins in transcription reporter and coregulatory interaction assays. We demonstrated strong hydrogen bonding of CINPA1 with N165 and H203 and identified other residues involved in hydrophobic contacts with CINPA1. Overall, our data confirm that CINPA1 directly binds to CAR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Long Terminal Repeat CRISPR-CAR-Coupled "Universal" T Cells Mediate Potent Anti-leukemic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Christos; Preece, Roland; Nickolay, Lauren; Etuk, Aniekan; Petrova, Anastasia; Ladon, Dariusz; Danyi, Alexandra; Humphryes-Kirilov, Neil; Ajetunmobi, Ayokunmi; Kim, Daesik; Kim, Jin-Soo; Qasim, Waseem

    2018-03-06

    Gene editing can be used to overcome allo-recognition, which otherwise limits allogeneic T cell therapies. Initial proof-of-concept applications have included generation of such "universal" T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) against CD19 target antigens combined with transient expression of DNA-targeting nucleases to disrupt the T cell receptor alpha constant chain (TRAC). Although relatively efficient, transgene expression and editing effects were unlinked, yields variable, and resulting T cell populations heterogeneous, complicating dosing strategies. We describe a self-inactivating lentiviral "terminal" vector platform coupling CAR expression with CRISPR/Cas9 effects through incorporation of an sgRNA element into the ΔU3 3' long terminal repeat (LTR). Following reverse transcription and duplication of the hybrid ΔU3-sgRNA, delivery of Cas9 mRNA resulted in targeted TRAC locus cleavage and allowed the enrichment of highly homogeneous (>96%) CAR + (>99%) TCR - populations by automated magnetic separation. Molecular analyses, including NGS, WGS, and Digenome-seq, verified on-target specificity with no evidence of predicted off-target events. Robust anti-leukemic effects were demonstrated in humanized immunodeficient mice and were sustained longer than by conventional CAR + TCR + T cells. Terminal-TRAC (TT) CAR T cells offer the possibility of a pre-manufactured, non-HLA-matched CAR cell therapy and will be evaluated in phase 1 trials against B cell malignancies shortly. Copyright © 2018 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental cross-species infection of common marmosets by titi monkey adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixia Yu

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV, as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus. Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses.

  2. CAR-T cell therapy in ovarian cancer: from the bench to the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cai, Han; Zhao, Ling; Ning, Li; Lang, Jinghe

    2017-09-08

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and is responsible for most gynecological cancer deaths. Apart from conventional surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T) cells as a representative of adoptive cellular immunotherapy have received considerable attention in the research field of cancer treatment. CARs combine antigen specificity and T-cell-activating properties in a single fusion molecule. Several preclinical experiments and clinical trials have confirmed that adoptive cell immunotherapy using typical CAR-engineered T cells for OC is a promising treatment approach with striking clinical efficacy; moreover, the emerging CAR-Ts targeting various antigens also exert great potential. However, such therapies have side effects and toxicities, such as cytokine-associated and "on-target, off-tumor" toxicities. In this review, we systematically detail and highlight the present knowledge of CAR-Ts including the constructions, vectors, clinical applications, development challenges, and solutions of CAR-T-cell therapy for OC. We hope to provide new insight into OC treatment for the future.

  3. Deaths from Adenovirus in the US Military

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Joel Gaydos, science advisor for the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, and Dr. Robert Potter, a research associate for the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, discuss deaths from adenovirus in the US military.

  4. Nucleotide sequence analysis of regions of adenovirus 5 DNA containing the origins of DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbergh, P.H.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the investigations described is the determination of nucleotide sequences at the molecular ends of the linear adenovirus type 5 DNA. Knowledge of the primary structure at the termini of this DNA molecule is of particular interest in the study of the mechanism of replication of adenovirus DNA. The initiation- and termination sites of adenovirus DNA replication are located at the ends of the DNA molecule. (Auth.)

  5. A compound chimeric antigen receptor strategy for targeting multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K H; Wada, M; Pinz, K G; Liu, H; Shuai, X; Chen, X; Yan, L E; Petrov, J C; Salman, H; Senzel, L; Leung, E L H; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2018-02-01

    Current clinical outcomes using chimeric-antigen receptors (CARs) against multiple myeloma show promise in the eradication of bulk disease. However, these anti-BCMA (CD269) CARs observe relapse as a common phenomenon after treatment due to the reemergence of either antigen-positive or -negative cells. Hence, the development of improvements in CAR design to target antigen loss and increase effector cell persistency represents a critical need. Here, we report on the anti-tumor activity of a CAR T-cell possessing two complete and independent CAR receptors against the multiple myeloma antigens BCMA and CS1. We determined that the resulting compound CAR (cCAR) T-cell possesses consistent, potent and directed cytotoxicity against each target antigen population. Using multiple mouse models of myeloma and mixed cell populations, we are further able to show superior in vivo survival by directed cytotoxicity against multiple populations compared to a single-expressing CAR T-cell. These findings indicate that compound targeting of BCMA and CS1 on myeloma cells can potentially be an effective strategy for augmenting the response against myeloma bulk disease and for initiation of broader coverage CAR therapy.

  6. Large-scale adenovirus and poxvirus-vectored vaccine manufacturing to enable clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Héla; Kamen, Amine A

    2015-05-01

    Efforts to make vaccines against infectious diseases and immunotherapies for cancer have evolved to utilize a variety of heterologous expression systems such as viral vectors. These vectors are often attenuated or engineered to safely deliver genes encoding antigens of different pathogens. Adenovirus and poxvirus vectors are among the viral vectors that are most frequently used to develop prophylactic vaccines against infectious diseases as well as therapeutic cancer vaccines. This mini-review describes the trends and processes in large-scale production of adenovirus and poxvirus vectors to meet the needs of clinical applications. We briefly describe the general principles for the production and purification of adenovirus and poxvirus viral vectors. Currently, adenovirus and poxvirus vector manufacturing methods rely on well-established cell culture technologies. Several improvements have been evaluated to increase the yield and to reduce the overall manufacturing cost, such as cultivation at high cell densities and continuous downstream processing. Additionally, advancements in vector characterization will greatly facilitate the development of novel vectored vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  8. An MHC-restricted antibody-based chimeric antigen receptor requires TCR-like affinity to maintain antigen specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela V Maus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are synthetic receptors that usually redirect T cells to surface antigens independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Here, we investigated a T cell receptor-like CAR based on an antibody that recognizes HLA-A*0201 presenting a peptide epitope derived from the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. We hypothesized that this CAR would efficiently redirect transduced T cells in an HLA-restricted, antigen-specific manner. However, we found that despite the specificity of the soluble Fab, the same antibody in the form of a CAR caused moderate lysis of HLA-A2 expressing targets independent of antigen owing to T cell avidity. We hypothesized that lowering the affinity of the CAR for HLA-A2 would improve its specificity. We undertook a rational approach of mutating residues that, in the crystal structure, were predicted to stabilize binding to HLA-A2. We found that one mutation (DN lowered the affinity of the Fab to T cell receptor-range and restored the epitope specificity of the CAR. DN CAR T cells lysed native tumor targets in vitro, and, in a xenogeneic mouse model implanted with two human melanoma lines (A2+/NYESO+ and A2+/NYESO−, DN CAR T cells specifically migrated to, and delayed progression of, only the HLA-A2+/NY-ESO-1+ melanoma. Thus, although maintaining MHC-restricted antigen specificity required T cell receptor-like affinity that decreased potency, there is exciting potential for CARs to expand their repertoire to include a broad range of intracellular antigens.

  9. Development of CINPA1 analogs as novel and potent inverse agonists of constitutive androstane receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Wenwei; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C.; Lu, Yan; Chen, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) are master regulators of endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism and disposition. Because CAR is constitutively active in certain cellular contexts, inhibiting CAR might reduce drug-induced hepatotoxicity and resensitize drug-resistant cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. We recently reported a novel CAR inhibitor/inverse agonist CINPA1 (11). Here, we have obtained or designed 54 analogs of CINPA1 and used a ti...

  10. New Strategies for the Treatment of Solid Tumors with CAR-T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Ye, Zhen-Long; Yuan, Zhen-Gang; Luo, Zheng-Qiang; Jin, Hua-Jun; Qian, Qi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent years, we have witnessed significant progresses in both basic and clinical studies regarding novel therapeutic strategies with genetically engineered T cells. Modification with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) endows T cells with tumor specific cytotoxicity and thus induce anti-tumor immunity against malignancies. However, targeting solid tumors is more challenging than targeting B-cell malignancies with CAR-T cells because of the histopathological structure features, specific antigens shortage and strong immunosuppressive environment of solid tumors. Meanwhile, the on-target/off-tumor toxicity caused by relative expression of target on normal tissues is another issue that should be reckoned. Optimization of the design of CAR vectors, exploration of new targets, addition of safe switches and combination with other treatments bring new vitality to the CAR-T cell based immunotherapy against solid tumors. In this review, we focus on the major obstacles limiting the application of CAR-T cell therapy toward solid tumors and summarize the measures to refine this new cancer therapeutic modality.

  11. CD19-Targeted CAR T Cells as Novel Cancer Immunotherapy for Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Davila, Marco L.; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has demonstrated significant potential for the treatment of patients with chemotherapy-resistant hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. One type of immunotherapy involves the adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to target a tumor. These hybrid proteins are composed of the antigen-binding domains of an antibody fused to T-cell receptor signaling machinery. CAR T cells that target CD19 recently have made the ju...

  12. Insights into cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity after CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Jordan; Turtle, Cameron J

    2018-04-03

    T-cells engineered to express CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CD19 CAR-T cells) can achieve high response rates in patients with refractory/relapsed (R/R) CD19+ hematologic malignancies. Nonetheless, the efficacy of CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy can be offset by significant toxicities, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity. In this report of our presentation at the 2018 Second French International Symposium on CAR-T cells (CAR-T day), we describe the clinical presentations of CRS and neurotoxicity in a cohort of 133 adults treated with CD19 CAR-T cells at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and provide insights into the mechanisms contributing to these toxicities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Adenovirus Particles that Display the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein NANP Repeat Induce Sporozoite-Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Christopher; Overstreet, Michael G.; Guedon, Jean-Marc; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Ward, Cameron; Karen, Kasey A.; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus particles can be engineered to display exogenous peptides on their surfaces by modification of viral capsid proteins, and particles that display pathogen-derived peptides can induce protective immunity. We constructed viable recombinant adenoviruses that display B-cell epitopes from the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) in the major adenovirus capsid protein, hexon. Recombinants induced high-titer antibodies against CSP when injected intraperitoneally into mice. Serum obtained from immunized mice recognized both recombinant PfCSP protein and P. falciparum sporozoites, and neutralized P. falciparum sporozoites in vitro. Replicating adenovirus vaccines have provided economical protection against adenovirus disease for over three decades. The recombinants described here may provide a path to an affordable malaria vaccine in the developing world. PMID:21199707

  14. Loss of the HVEM Tumor Suppressor in Lymphoma and Restoration by Modified CAR-T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Michael; Salloum, Darin; Mourcin, Frederic; Sanghvi, Viraj; Amin, Rada; Oricchio, Elisa; Jiang, Man; Mottok, Anja; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Ciriello, Giovanni; Tam, Wayne; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; de Stanchina, Elisa; Chan, Wing C; Malek, Sami N; Ennishi, Daisuke; Brentjens, Renier J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Cogné, Michel; Tarte, Karin; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2016-10-06

    The HVEM (TNFRSF14) receptor gene is among the most frequently mutated genes in germinal center lymphomas. We report that loss of HVEM leads to cell-autonomous activation of B cell proliferation and drives the development of GC lymphomas in vivo. HVEM-deficient lymphoma B cells also induce a tumor-supportive microenvironment marked by exacerbated lymphoid stroma activation and increased recruitment of T follicular helper (T FH ) cells. These changes result from the disruption of inhibitory cell-cell interactions between the HVEM and BTLA (B and T lymphocyte attenuator) receptors. Accordingly, administration of the HVEM ectodomain protein (solHVEM (P37-V202) ) binds BTLA and restores tumor suppression. To deliver solHVEM to lymphomas in vivo, we engineered CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells that produce solHVEM locally and continuously. These modified CAR-T cells show enhanced therapeutic activity against xenografted lymphomas. Hence, the HVEM-BTLA axis opposes lymphoma development, and our study illustrates the use of CAR-T cells as "micro-pharmacies" able to deliver an anti-cancer protein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Adenovirus-dependent changes in cell membrane permeability: role of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, P.; Pastan, I.; Willingham, M.C.

    1987-03-01

    Adenovirus-dependent release of choline phosphate from KB cells at pH 6.0 was partially blocked by ouabain. In K/sup +/-containing medium, maximum inhibition of release was obtained by 10/sup -5/ M ouabain and half-maximal inhibition was achieved by about 0.5 x 10/sup -6/ M ouabain. Ouabain did not block either the binding or the uptake of adenovirus by KB cells. Without K/sup +/, about 25% of cell-associated choline phosphate was released by adenovirus, whereas with 1 mM K/sup +/ about 50% was released. This activation by K/sup +/ was blocked by 0.1 mM ouabain. HeLa cells behaved like KB cells, but a mutant of HeLa cells resistant to ouabain (D98-OR) released much lower amounts of choline phosphate in response to human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2). Wild-type D98-OR cells bound nearly the same amount of adenovirus as did normal HeLa cells. Ad2 also increased the activity of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase in KB cells, with maximum activation at 50..mu..g of Ad2 per ml. In D98-OR cells, Ad2 failed to activate Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, ATPase activity. Ad2-dependent lysis of endocytic vesicles (receptosomes) was assayed by measuring Ad2-dependent enhancement of epidermal growth factor-Pseudomonas exotoxin toxicity. This action of adenovirus was increased when K/sup +/ was present in the medium. Under the conditions used, K/sup +/ had no effect on the amount of Ad2 or epidermal growth factor taken up by the cells. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that Ad2-dependent cellular efflux of choline phosphate and adenovirus-dependent lysis of receptosomes may require Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase activity.

  16. In vivo effects of chronic contamination with depleted uranium on CYP3A and associated nuclear receptors PXR and CAR in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, M.; Gueguen, Y.; Linard, C.; Dudoignon, N.; Grison, S.; Baudelin, C.; Marquette, C.; Gourmelon, P.; Aigueperse, J.; Dublineau, I.

    2005-01-01

    In addition to its natural presence at high concentrations in some areas, uranium has several civilian and military applications that could cause contamination of human populations, mainly through chronic ingestion. Reports describe the accumulation of this radionuclide in some organs (including the bone, kidney, and liver) after acute or chronic contamination and show that it produces chemical or radiological toxicity or both. The literature is essentially devoid of information about uranium-related cellular and molecular effects on metabolic functions such as xenobiotic detoxification. The present study thus evaluated rats chronically exposed to depleted uranium in their drinking water (1 mg/(rat day)) for 9 months. Our specific aim was to evaluate the hepatic and extrahepatic mRNA expression of CYP3A1/A2, CYP2B1, and CYP1A1 as well as of the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR, and RXR in these rats. CYP3A1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in the brain (200%), liver (300%), and kidneys (900%) of exposed rats compared with control rats, while CYP3A2 mRNA levels were higher in the lungs (300%) and liver (200%), and CYP2B1 mRNA expression in the kidneys (300%). Expression of CYP1A1 mRNA did not change significantly during this study. PXR mRNA levels increased in the brain (200%), liver (150%), and kidneys (200%). Uranium caused CAR mRNA expression in the lungs to double. Expression of RXR mRNA did not change significantly in the course of this study, nor did the hepatic activity of CYP2C, CYP3A, CYP2A, or CYP2B. Uranium probably affects the expression of drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes through the PXR and CAR nuclear receptors. These results suggest that the stimulating effect of uranium on these enzymes might lead to hepatic or extrahepatic toxicity (or both) during drug treatment and then affect the entire organism

  17. Sequential and Simultaneous Applications of UV and Chlorine for Adenovirus Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanakul, Surapong; Oguma, Kumiko; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Adenoviruses are water-borne human pathogens with high resistance to UV disinfection. Combination of UV treatment and chlorination could be an effective approach to deal with adenoviruses. In this study, human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) was challenged in a bench-scale experiment by separate applications of UV or chlorine and by combined applications of UV and chlorine in either a sequential or simultaneous manner. The treated samples were then propagated in human lung carcinoma epithelial cells to quantify the log inactivation of HAdV-5. When the processes were separate, a fluence of 100 mJ/cm(2) and a CT value of 0.02 mg min/L were required to achieve 2 log inactivation of HAdV-5 by UV disinfection and chlorination, respectively. Interestingly, synergistic effects on the HAdV-5 inactivation rates were found in the sequential process of chlorine followed by UV (Cl2-UV) (p simultaneous application of UV/Cl2. This implies that a pretreatment with chlorine may increase the sensitivity of the virus to the subsequent UV disinfection. In conclusion, this study suggests that the combined application of UV and chlorine could be an effective measure against adenoviruses as a multi-barrier approach in water disinfection.

  18. Synergistic Effects of Cabozantinib and EGFR-Specific CAR-NK-92 Cells in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chimeric antigen receptor-modified immune effector cell (CAR-T and CAR-NK therapies are newly developed adoptive treatments of cancers. However, their therapeutic efficacy against solid tumors is limited. Combining CAR-T or CAR-NK cells with chemotherapeutic drugs to treat solid tumor may be a promising strategy. We developed an epidermal growth factor- (EGFR- specific third-generation CAR. NK-92 cells were modified with the CAR by lentivirus infection. The specific killing ability of the CAR-modified NK-92 cells (CAR-NK-92 against renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines was confirmed in vitro. The synergistic effects of cabozantinib and EGFR-specific CAR-NK-92 cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the CAR-NK-92 cells lyse RCC cells in an EGFR-specific manner. Treatment with cabozantinib could increase EGFR and decrease PD-L1 membrane surface expression in RCC cells and enhance the killing ability of CAR-NK-92 cells against the RCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, the CAR-NK-92 cells show synergistic therapeutic efficacy with cabozantinib against human RCC xenograft models. Our results provided the basis for combination with chemotherapy as a novel strategy for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of CAR-modified immune effector cells for solid tumors.

  19. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  20. A novel method to generate T-cell receptor-deficient chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Wong, Desmond; Png, Yi Tian; Campana, Dario

    2018-03-13

    Practical methods are needed to increase the applicability and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies. Using donor-derived CAR-T cells is attractive, but expression of endogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) carries the risk for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). To remove surface TCRαβ, we combined an antibody-derived single-chain variable fragment specific for CD3ε with 21 different amino acid sequences predicted to retain it intracellularly. After transduction in T cells, several of these protein expression blockers (PEBLs) colocalized intracellularly with CD3ε, blocking surface CD3 and TCRαβ expression. In 25 experiments, median TCRαβ expression in T lymphocytes was reduced from 95.7% to 25.0%; CD3/TCRαβ cell depletion yielded virtually pure TCRαβ-negative T cells. Anti-CD3ε PEBLs abrogated TCRαβ-mediated signaling, without affecting immunophenotype or proliferation. In anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells, expression of an anti-CD19-41BB-CD3ζ CAR induced cytokine secretion, long-term proliferation, and CD19 + leukemia cell killing, at rates meeting or exceeding those of CAR-T cells with normal CD3/TCRαβ expression. In immunodeficient mice, anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells had markedly reduced GVHD potential; when transduced with anti-CD19 CAR, these T cells killed engrafted leukemic cells. PEBL blockade of surface CD3/TCRαβ expression is an effective tool to prepare allogeneic CAR-T cells. Combined PEBL and CAR expression can be achieved in a single-step procedure, is easily adaptable to current cell manufacturing protocols, and can be used to target other T-cell molecules to further enhance CAR-T-cell therapies. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Bipartite structure and functional independence of adenovirus type 5 packaging elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, S I; Hearing, P

    1997-01-01

    Selectivity and polarity of adenovirus type 5 DNA packaging are believed to be directed by an interaction of putative packaging factors with the cis-acting adenovirus packaging domain located within the genomic left end (nucleotides 194 to 380). In previous studies, this packaging domain was mutationally dissected into at least seven functional elements called A repeats. These elements, albeit redundant in function, exhibit differences in the ability to support viral packaging, with elements ...

  2. CD19 CAR T Cells Expressing IL-12 Eradicate Lymphoma in Fully Lymphoreplete Mice through Induction of Host Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Kueberuwa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy represents a significant advancement in cancer therapy. Larger studies have shown ∼90% complete remission rates against chemoresistant and/or refractory CD19+ leukemia or lymphoma. Effective CAR T cell therapy is highly dependent on lymphodepleting preconditioning, which is achieved through chemotherapy or radiotherapy that carries with it significant toxicities. These can exclude patients of low performance status. In order to overcome the need for preconditioning, we constructed fully mouse first and second generation anti-murine CD19 CARs with or without interleukin-12 (IL-12 secretion. To test these CARs, we established a mouse model to reflect the human situation without preconditioning. Murine second generation CAR T cells expressing IL-12 were capable of eradicating established B cell lymphoma with a long-term survival rate of ∼25%. We believe this to be the first study in a truly lymphoreplete model. We provide evidence that IL-12-expressing CAR T cells not only directly kill target CD19+ cells, but also recruit host immune cells to an anti-cancer immune response. This finding is critical because lymphodepletion regimens required for the success of current CAR T cell technology eliminate host immune cells whose anti-cancer activity could otherwise be harnessed by strategies such as IL-12-secreting CAR T cells. Keywords: CD19 CAR T cells, IL-12, immunotherapy, chimeric antigen receptor, adoptive cellular therapy, lymphoma, B cell malignancies, TRUCKs, pre-conditioning

  3. Immunological quality and performance of tumor vessel-targeting CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoo, Kanako; Inagaki, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kento; Sasawatari, Shigemi; Kamigaki, Takashi; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that tumor vessel-redirected T cells, which were genetically engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), demonstrated significant antitumor effects in various murine solid tumor models. In the present study, we prepared anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells by CAR-coding mRNA electroporation (mRNA-EP) and analyzed their immunological characteristics and functions for use in clinical research. The expression of anti-VEGFR2 CAR on murine and human T cells was detected with approximately 100% efficiency for a few days, after peaking 6-12 hours after mRNA-EP. Triple transfer of murine anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells into B16BL6 tumor-bearing mice demonstrated an antitumor effect comparable to that for the single transfer of CAR-T cells engineered with retroviral vector. The mRNA-EP did not cause any damage or defects to human T-cell characteristics, as determined by viability, growth, and phenotypic parameters. Additionally, two kinds of human anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells, which expressed different CAR construction, differentiated to effector phase with cytokine secretion and cytotoxic activity in antigen-specific manner. These results indicate that our anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP have the potential in terms of quality and performance to offer the prospect of safety and efficacy in clinical research as cellular medicine.

  4. Immunological quality and performance of tumor vessel-targeting CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP for clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Inoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that tumor vessel-redirected T cells, which were genetically engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, demonstrated significant antitumor effects in various murine solid tumor models. In the present study, we prepared anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells by CAR-coding mRNA electroporation (mRNA-EP and analyzed their immunological characteristics and functions for use in clinical research. The expression of anti-VEGFR2 CAR on murine and human T cells was detected with approximately 100% efficiency for a few days, after peaking 6–12 hours after mRNA-EP. Triple transfer of murine anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells into B16BL6 tumor-bearing mice demonstrated an antitumor effect comparable to that for the single transfer of CAR-T cells engineered with retroviral vector. The mRNA-EP did not cause any damage or defects to human T-cell characteristics, as determined by viability, growth, and phenotypic parameters. Additionally, two kinds of human anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells, which expressed different CAR construction, differentiated to effector phase with cytokine secretion and cytotoxic activity in antigen-specific manner. These results indicate that our anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP have the potential in terms of quality and performance to offer the prospect of safety and efficacy in clinical research as cellular medicine.

  5. HER2-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified Virus-Specific T Cells for Progressive Glioblastoma: A Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nabil; Brawley, Vita; Hegde, Meenakshi; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Kalra, Mamta; Landi, Daniel; Robertson, Catherine; Gray, Tara L; Diouf, Oumar; Wakefield, Amanda; Ghazi, Alexia; Gerken, Claudia; Yi, Zhongzhen; Ashoori, Aidin; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Rooney, Cliona; Dotti, Gianpietro; Gee, Adrian; Su, Jack; Kew, Yvonne; Baskin, David; Zhang, Yi Jonathan; New, Pamela; Grilley, Bambi; Stojakovic, Milica; Hicks, John; Powell, Suzanne Z; Brenner, Malcolm K; Heslop, Helen E; Grossman, Robert; Wels, Winfried S; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an incurable tumor, and the therapeutic options for patients are limited. To determine whether the systemic administration of HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified virus-specific T cells (VSTs) is safe and whether these cells have antiglioblastoma activity. In this open-label phase 1 dose-escalation study conducted at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, and Texas Children's Hospital, patients with progressive HER2-positive glioblastoma were enrolled between July 25, 2011, and April 21, 2014. The duration of follow-up was 10 weeks to 29 months (median, 8 months). Monotherapy with autologous VSTs specific for cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, or adenovirus and genetically modified to express HER2-CARs with a CD28.ζ-signaling endodomain (HER2-CAR VSTs). Primary end points were feasibility and safety. The key secondary end points were T-cell persistence and their antiglioblastoma activity. A total of 17 patients (8 females and 9 males; 10 patients ≥18 years [median age, 60 years; range, 30-69 years] and 7 patients VSTs (1 × 106/m2 to 1 × 108/m2) without prior lymphodepletion. Infusions were well tolerated, with no dose-limiting toxic effects. HER2-CAR VSTs were detected in the peripheral blood for up to 12 months after the infusion by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Of 16 evaluable patients (9 adults and 7 children), 1 had a partial response for more than 9 months, 7 had stable disease for 8 weeks to 29 months, and 8 progressed after T-cell infusion. Three patients with stable disease are alive without any evidence of progression during 24 to 29 months of follow-up. For the entire study cohort, median overall survival was 11.1 months (95% CI, 4.1-27.2 months) from the first T-cell infusion and 24.5 months (95% CI, 17.2-34.6 months) from diagnosis. Infusion of autologous HER2-CAR VSTs is safe and can be associated with clinical benefit for patients with progressive glioblastoma

  6. Innate Functions of Immunoglobulin M Lessen Liver Gene Transfer with Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzu, Carmen; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors. PMID:24465560

  7. Innate functions of immunoglobulin M lessen liver gene transfer with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Unzu

    Full Text Available The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors.

  8. Functional importance of the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region in the calcium-sensing receptor. Constitutive activity and inverse agonism in a family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, T A; Burstein, E S

    2000-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. To date 14 activating mutations in CaR showing increased sensitivity to Ca(2+) have been identified in humans with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia. Four of these activating mutations are found......, suppressed the elevated basal response of the constitutively activated Ca/1a mutants demonstrating inverse agonist activity of CPCCOEt. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region is of key importance for the maintenance of the inactive conformation of CaR....

  9. Regional CAR-T cell infusions for peritoneal carcinomatosis are superior to systemic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, S C; Point, G R; Cunetta, M; Thorn, M; Guha, P; Espat, N J; Boutros, C; Hanna, N; Junghans, R P

    2016-05-01

    Metastatic spread of colorectal cancer (CRC) to the peritoneal cavity is common and difficult to treat, with many patients dying from malignant bowel obstruction. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) immunotherapy has shown great promise, and we previously reported murine and phase I clinical studies on regional intrahepatic CAR-T infusion for CRC liver metastases. We are now studying intraperitoneal (IP) delivery of CAR-Ts for peritoneal carcinomatosis. Regional IP infusion of CAR-T resulted in superior protection against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA+) peritoneal tumors, when compared with systemically infused CAR-Ts. IP CAR-Ts also provided prolonged protection against IP tumor re-challenges and demonstrated an increase in effector memory phenotype over time. IP CAR-Ts provided protection against tumor growth at distant subcutaneous (SC) sites in association with increases in serum IFNγ levels. Given the challenges posed by immunoinhibitory pathways in solid tumors, we combined IP CAR-T treatment with suppressor cell targeting. High frequencies of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells (Treg) were found within the IP tumors, with MDSC expressing high levels of immunosuppressive PD-L1. Combinatorial IP CAR-T treatment with depleting antibodies against MDSC and Treg further improved efficacy against peritoneal metastases. Our data support further development of combinatorial IP CAR-T immunotherapy for peritoneal malignancies.

  10. Future prospects for the development of cost-effective Adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fougeroux, Cyrielle; Holst, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    -vectored vaccine technology with a focus on adenoviral-based vaccines. Adenovirus (Ad) vaccines have proven to be efficient in military vaccinations against Ad4 and Ad7 and as highly efficient vectored vaccines against rabies. The question of how other adenovirus-based vaccines can become as efficient...... as the rabies vaccine is the underlying theme in this review. Here, we will first give an overview of the basic properties of vectored vaccines, followed by an introduction to the characteristics of adenoviral vectors and previously tested modifications of the vector backbone and expression cassettes...

  11. CAR T cell therapy for breast cancer: harnessing the tumor milieu to drive T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajgain, Pradip; Tawinwung, Supannikar; D'Elia, Lindsey; Sukumaran, Sujita; Watanabe, Norihiro; Hoyos, Valentina; Lulla, Premal; Brenner, Malcolm K; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F

    2018-05-10

    The adoptive transfer of T cells redirected to tumor via chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has produced clinical benefits for the treatment of hematologic diseases. To extend this approach to breast cancer, we generated CAR T cells directed against mucin1 (MUC1), an aberrantly glycosylated neoantigen that is overexpressed by malignant cells and whose expression has been correlated with poor prognosis. Furthermore, to protect our tumor-targeted cells from the elevated levels of immune-inhibitory cytokines present in the tumor milieu, we co-expressed an inverted cytokine receptor linking the IL4 receptor exodomain with the IL7 receptor endodomain (4/7ICR) in order to transform the suppressive IL4 signal into one that would enhance the anti-tumor effects of our CAR T cells at the tumor site. First (1G - CD3ζ) and second generation (2G - 41BB.CD3ζ) MUC1-specific CARs were constructed using the HMFG2 scFv. Following retroviral transduction transgenic expression of the CAR±ICR was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro CAR/ICR T cell function was measured by assessing cell proliferation and short- and long-term cytotoxic activity using MUC1+ MDA MB 468 cells as targets. In vivo anti-tumor activity was assessed using IL4-producing MDA MB 468 tumor-bearing mice using calipers to assess tumor volume and bioluminescence imaging to track T cells. In the IL4-rich tumor milieu, 1G CAR.MUC1 T cells failed to expand or kill MUC1+ tumors and while co-expression of the 4/7ICR promoted T cell expansion, in the absence of co-stimulatory signals the outgrowing cells exhibited an exhausted phenotype characterized by PD-1 and TIM3 upregulation and failed to control tumor growth. However, by co-expressing 2G CAR.MUC1 (signal 1 - activation + signal 2 - co-stimulation) and 4/7ICR (signal 3 - cytokine), transgenic T cells selectively expanded at the tumor site and produced potent and durable tumor control in vitro and in vivo. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of targeting breast

  12. Efficacy and toxicity management of CAR-T-cell immunotherapy: a matter of responsiveness control or tumour-specificity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Álvarez-Méndez, Ana; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T-cells have demonstrated potent clinical efficacy in patients with haematological malignancies. However, the use of CAR-T-cells targeting solid tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) has been limited by organ toxicities related to activation of T-cell effector functions through the CAR. Most existing CARs recognize TAAs, which are also found in normal tissues. CAR-T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissues constitutes a major roadblock to CAR-T-cell therapy, and must be avoided or mitigated. There is a broad range of strategies for modulating antigen responsiveness of CAR-T-cells, with varying degrees of complexity. Some of them might ameliorate the acute and chronic toxicities associated with current CAR constructs. However, further embellishments to CAR therapy may complicate clinical implementation and possibly create new immunogenicity issues. In contrast, the development of CARs targeting truly tumour-specific antigens might circumvent on-target/off-tumour toxicities without adding additional complexity to CAR-T-cell therapies, but these antigens have been elusive and may require novel selection strategies for their discovery. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  13. Different Subsets of T Cells, Memory, Effector Functions, and CAR-T Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Wu, Lijun

    2016-03-15

    This review is focused on different subsets of T cells: CD4 and CD8, memory and effector functions, and their role in CAR-T therapy--a cellular adoptive immunotherapy with T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor. The CAR-T cells recognize tumor antigens and induce cytotoxic activities against tumor cells. Recently, differences in T cell functions and the role of memory and effector T cells were shown to be important in CAR-T cell immunotherapy. The CD4⁺ subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Treg, and Tfh) and CD8⁺ memory and effector subsets differ in extra-cellular (CD25, CD45RO, CD45RA, CCR-7, L-Selectin [CD62L], etc.); intracellular markers (FOXP3); epigenetic and genetic programs; and metabolic pathways (catabolic or anabolic); and these differences can be modulated to improve CAR-T therapy. In addition, CD4⁺ Treg cells suppress the efficacy of CAR-T cell therapy, and different approaches to overcome this suppression are discussed in this review. Thus, next-generation CAR-T immunotherapy can be improved, based on our knowledge of T cell subsets functions, differentiation, proliferation, and signaling pathways to generate more active CAR-T cells against tumors.

  14. Different Subsets of T Cells, Memory, Effector Functions, and CAR-T Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita Golubovskaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on different subsets of T cells: CD4 and CD8, memory and effector functions, and their role in CAR-T therapy––a cellular adoptive immunotherapy with T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor. The CAR-T cells recognize tumor antigens and induce cytotoxic activities against tumor cells. Recently, differences in T cell functions and the role of memory and effector T cells were shown to be important in CAR-T cell immunotherapy. The CD4+ subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Treg, and Tfh and CD8+ memory and effector subsets differ in extra-cellular (CD25, CD45RO, CD45RA, CCR-7, L-Selectin [CD62L], etc.; intracellular markers (FOXP3; epigenetic and genetic programs; and metabolic pathways (catabolic or anabolic; and these differences can be modulated to improve CAR-T therapy. In addition, CD4+ Treg cells suppress the efficacy of CAR-T cell therapy, and different approaches to overcome this suppression are discussed in this review. Thus, next-generation CAR-T immunotherapy can be improved, based on our knowledge of T cell subsets functions, differentiation, proliferation, and signaling pathways to generate more active CAR-T cells against tumors.

  15. Two different serum-free media and osmolality effect upon human 293 cell growth and adenovirus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago B; Ferreira, Ana L; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M

    2005-11-01

    Adenoviruses are promising vectors for gene therapy and vaccination protocols. Consequently, the market demands for adenovirus are increasing, driving the search for new methodologies for large-scale production of concentrated vectors with warranted purity and efficacy, in a cost-effective way. Nevertheless, the production of adenovirus is currently limited by the so-called 'cell density effect', i.e. a drop in cell specific productivity concomitant with increased cell concentration at infection. Of two different serum-free culture media (CD293 and EX-Cell), evaluated for their effect on human 293 cells growth and adenovirus production at cell densities higher than 1x10(6) cells/ml, EX-Cell proved the better medium for cell growth. Although adenovirus production was equivalent in both media when the infection was performed at 1x10(6) cells/ml, at 3x10(6) cells/ml CD293 was the better. This result related to the high ammonia content in EX-Cell medium at the highest cell concentration at infection. Besides this, the large-scale production of these vectors at high cell densities often requires re-feed strategies, which increase medium osmolality. While a negative effect on cell growth was observed with increasing osmolalities, adenovirus productivity was only affected for osmolalities higher than 430 mOsm.

  16. Anti-tumor effect of adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy under control of tumor-specific and radio-inducible chimeric promoter in combination with γ-ray irradiation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenjie; Yu Haijun; Xiongjie; Xu Yu; Liao Zhengkai; Zhou Fuxiang; Xie Conghua; Zhou Yunfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To detect the selective inhibitory effects of irradiation plus adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) suicide gene system using tumor-specific and radio-inducible chimeric promoter on human hepatocellular carcinoma subcutaneously xenografted in nude mouse. Methods: Recombinant replicated-deficient adenovirus vector containing HRP gene and chimeric human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter carrying 6 radio-inducible CArG elements was constructed. A human subcutaneous transplanting hepatocellular carcinoma (MHCC97 cell line) model was treated with γ-ray irradiation plus intra-tumor injections of adenoviral vector and intra-peritoneal injections of prodrug IAA. The change of tumor volume and tumor growth inhibiting rate, the survival time of nude mice, as well as histopathology of xenograft tumor and normal tissues were evaluated. Results: Thirty one days after the treatment, the relative tumor volumes in the negative, adenovirus therapy, irradiation, and combination groups were 49.23±4.55, 27.71±7.74, 28.53±10.48 and 11.58±3.23, respectively.There was a significantly statistical difference among them (F=16.288, P<0.01).The inhibition effect in the combination group was strongest as compared with that in other groups, and its inhibition ratio was 76.5%. The survival period extended to 43 d in the combination group, which showed a significantly difference with that in the control group (χ 2 =18.307, P<0.01). The area of tumors necrosis in the combination group was larger than that in the other groups, and the normal tissues showed no treatment-related toxic effect in all groups. However, multiple hepatocellular carcinoma metastases were observed in the liver in the control group, there were a few metastases in the monotherapy groups and no metastasis in the combination group. Conclusions: Adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy plus radiotherapy dramatically could inhibit tumor growth and prolong

  17. Cancer Immunotherapy Using CAR-T Cells: From the Research Bench to the Assembly Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Silva, Diogo; Ramos, Carlos A

    2018-02-01

    The focus of cancer treatment has recently shifted toward targeted therapies, including immunotherapy, which allow better individualization of care and are hoped to increase the probability of success for patients. Specifically, T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs; CAR-T cells) have generated exciting results. Recent clinical successes with this cutting-edge therapy have helped to push CAR-T cells toward approval for wider use. However, several limitations need to be addressed before the widespread use of CAR-T cells as a standard treatment. Here, a succinct background on adoptive T-cell therapy (ATCT)is given. A brief overview of the structure of CARs, how they are introduced into T cells, and how CAR-T cell expansion and selection is achieved in vitro is then presented. Some of the challenges in CAR design are discussed, as well as the difficulties that arise in large-scale CAR-T cell manufacture that will need to be addressed to achieve successful commercialization of this type of cell therapy. Finally, developments already on the horizon are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. CAR T Cells Targeting Podoplanin Reduce Orthotopic Glioblastomas in Mouse Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Satoshi; Ohno, Masasuke; Ohka, Fumiharu; Kuramitsu, Shunichiro; Yamamichi, Akane; Kato, Akira; Motomura, Kazuya; Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Reiko; Ito, Ichiro; Senga, Takeshi; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari; Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Bigner, Darell D; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a 5-year overall survival rate of less than 10%. Podoplanin (PDPN) is a type I transmembrane mucin-like glycoprotein, expressed in the lymphatic endothelium. Several solid tumors overexpress PDPN, including the mesenchymal type of GBM, which has been reported to present the worst prognosis among GBM subtypes. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells can recognize predefined tumor surface antigens independent of MHC restriction, which is often downregulated in gliomas. We constructed a lentiviral vector expressing a third-generation CAR comprising a PDPN-specific antibody (NZ-1-based single-chain variable fragment) with CD28, 4-1BB, and CD3ζ intracellular domains. CAR-transduced peripheral blood monocytes were immunologically evaluated by calcein-mediated cytotoxic assay, ELISA, tumor size, and overall survival. The generated CAR T cells were specific and effective against PDPN-positive GBM cells in vitro. Systemic injection of the CAR T cells into an immunodeficient mouse model inhibited the growth of intracranial glioma xenografts in vivo. CAR T-cell therapy that targets PDPN would be a promising adoptive immunotherapy to treat mesenchymal GBM. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Clinical manufacturing of CAR T cells: foundation of a promising therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Rivière, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of cancer patients with autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is one of the most promising adoptive cellular therapy approaches. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade CAR-T cell products is a prerequisite for the wide application of this technology. Product quality needs to be built-in within every step of the manufacturing process. We summarize herein the requirements and logistics to be considered, as well as the state of the art manufacturing platforms available. CAR-T cell therapy may be on the verge of becoming standard of care for a few clinical indications. Yet, many challenges pertaining to manufacturing standardization and product characterization remain to be overcome in order to achieve broad usage and eventual commercialization of this therapeutic modality. PMID:27347557

  20. Clinical manufacturing of CAR T cells: foundation of a promising therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of cancer patients with autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is one of the most promising adoptive cellular therapy approaches. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade CAR-T cell products is a prerequisite for the wide application of this technology. Product quality needs to be built-in within every step of the manufacturing process. We summarize herein the requirements and logistics to be considered, as well as the state of the art manufacturing platforms available. CAR-T cell therapy may be on the verge of becoming standard of care for a few clinical indications. Yet, many challenges pertaining to manufacturing standardization and product characterization remain to be overcome in order to achieve broad usage and eventual commercialization of this therapeutic modality.

  1. Non-Replicating Adenovirus-Vectored Anthrax Vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Kampen, K. R.; Zhang, J.; Jex, E.; Tang, D. C.

    2007-01-01

    As bioterrorism is emerging as a national threat, it is urgent to develop a new generation of anthrax vaccines that can be rapidly produced and mass administered in an emergency setting. We have demonstrated that protective immunity against anthrax spores could be elicited in mice by intranasal administration of a non-replicating human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-derived vector encoding Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in a single-dose regimen. The potency of an Ad5 vector encoding PA was remarkably enhanced by codon optimization of the PA gene to match the tRNA pool found in human cells. This nasal vaccine can be mass-administered by non-medical personnel during a bioterrorist attack. In addition, replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free Ad5-vectored anthrax vaccines can be mass produced in PER.C6 cells in serum-free wave bioreactors and purified by column chromatography to meet a surge in demand. The non-replicating nature of this new generation of anthrax vaccine ensures an excellent safety profile for vaccines and the environment.(author)

  2. Nuclear receptor CAR specifically activates the two-pore K+ channel Kcnk1 gene in male mouse livers, which attenuates phenobarbital-induced hepatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2013-03-01

    KCNK1, a member of the family of two-pore K(+) ion channels, is specifically induced in the livers of male mice after phenobarbital treatment. Here, we have determined the molecular mechanism of this male-specific activation of the Kcnk1 gene and characterized KCNK1 as a phenobarbital-inducible antihyperplasia factor. Upon activation by phenobarbital, nuclear receptor CAR binds the 97-bp response element (-2441/-2345) within the Kcnk1 promoter. This binding is observed in the livers of male mice, but not in the livers of female mice and requires the pituitary gland, because hypophysectomy abrogates it. Hyperplasia further progressed in the livers of Kcnk1 ( -/- ) male mice compared with those of Kcnk1 ( +/+ ) males after phenobarbital treatment. Thus, KCNK1 suppresses phenobarbital-induced hyperplasia. These results indicate that phenobarbital treatment induces KCNK1 to elicit a male-specific and growth-suppressing signal. Thus, KCNK1 and Kcnk1 ( -/- ) mice provide an experimental tool for further investigation into the molecular mechanism of CAR-mediated promotion of the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in mice.

  3. Immunizing Patients With Metastatic Melanoma Using Recombinant Adenoviruses Encoding MART-1 or gp100 Melanoma Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Zhai, Yifan; Yang, James C.; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J.; Hwu, Patrick; Marincola, Francesco M.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Seipp, Claudia A.; Einhorn, Jan H.; Roberts, Bruce; White, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The characterization of the genes encoding melanoma-associated antigens MART-1 or gp100, recognized by T cells, has opened new possibilities for the development of immunization strategies for patients with metastatic melanoma. With the use of recombinant adenoviruses expressing either MART-1 or gp100 to immunize patients with metastatic melanoma, we evaluated the safety, immunologic, and potential therapeutic aspects of these immunizations. Methods: In phase I studies, 54 patients received escalating doses (between 107 and 1011 plaque-forming units) of recombinant adenovirus encoding either MART-1 or gp100 melanoma antigen administered either alone or followed by the administration of interleukin 2 (IL-2). The immunologic impact of these immunizations on the development of cellular and antibody reactivity was assayed. Results: Recombinant adenoviruses expressing MART-1 or gp100 were safely administered. One of 16 patients with metastatic melanoma receiving the recombinant adenovirus MART-1 alone experienced a complete response. Other patients achieved objective responses, but they had received IL-2 along with an adenovirus, and their responses could be attributed to the cytokine. Immunologic assays showed no consistent immunization to the MART-1 or gp100 transgenes expressed by the recombinant adenoviruses. High levels of neutralizing antibody were found in the pretreatment sera of the patients. Conclusions: High doses of recombinant adenoviruses could be safely administered to cancer patients. High levels of neutralizing antibody present in patients' sera prior to treatment may have impaired the ability of these viruses to immunize patients against melanoma antigens. PMID:9862627

  4. Oncolytic adenovirus Ad657 for systemic virotherapy against prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen TV

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tien V Nguyen,1,* Catherine M Crosby,2,* Gregory J Heller,3 Zachary I Mendel,3 Mary E Barry,1 Michael A Barry1,4,5 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 2Virology and Gene Therapy Graduate Program, Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 3Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program, Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 4Department of Immunology, 5Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Human species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 is the archetype oncolytic adenovirus and has been used in the vast majority of preclinical and clinical tests. While Ad5 can be robust, species C Ad6 has lower seroprevalence, side effects, and appears to be more potent as a systemic therapy against a number of tumors than Ad5. Historically, there have only been four species C human adenoviruses: serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 6. More recently a new species C adenovirus, Ad57, was identified. Ad57 is most similar to Ad6 with virtually all variation in their capsid proteins occurring in the hypervariable regions (HVRs of their hexon proteins. Most adenovirus neutralizing antibodies target the HVRs on adenoviruses. This led us to replace the hexon HVRs in Ad6 with those from Ad57 to create a new virus called Ad657 and explore this novel species C platform’s utility as an oncolytic virus. Methods: The HVR region from Ad57 was synthesized and used to replace the Ad6 HVR region by homologous recombination in bacteria generating a new viral platform that we call Ad657. Replication-competent Ad5, Ad6, and Ad657 were compared in vitro and in vivo for liver damage and oncolytic efficacy against prostate cancers after single intravenous treatment in mice. Results: Ad5, Ad6, and Ad657 had similar in vitro oncolytic activity against human prostate cancer cells. Ad5 provoked the highest level of liver toxicity after intravenous injection and Ad657

  5. CAR-T cells and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed/refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xi; Zhong, Jiang F; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has a low remission rate after chemotherapy, a high relapse rate and poor long-term survival even when allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is performed. Chimeric antigen receptors redirected T cells (CAR-T cells) can enhance disease remission with a favorable outcome for relapsed/refractory ALL, though some cases quickly relapsed after CAR-T cell treatment. Thus, treatment with CAR-T cells followed by allo-HSCT may be the best way to treat relapsed/refractory ALL. In this review, we first discuss the different types of CAR-T cells. We then discuss the treatment of relapsed/refractory ALL using only CAR-T cells. Finally, we discuss the use of CAR-T cells, followed by allo-HSCT, for the treatment of relapsed/refractory ALL.

  6. The market for gasoline cars and diesel cars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboven, F.

    1999-01-01

    In Europe the tax tariff is much lower for diesel fuel than for gasoline. This benefit is used by manufacturers to increase the price of diesel-fueled cars, which limits the possibility to control the use of diesel cars by means of a fiscal policy (tax incidence). Attention is paid to the impact of fiscal advantages for diesel cars on the purchasing behavior of the consumer and the pricing policy (price discrimination) of the car manufacturers. 1 ref

  7. characterisation of gastro- enteritis-associated adenoviruses in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To analyse adenovirus (Ad) numbers and types associated with paediatric gastro-enteritis in South Africa. Setting. Gauteng, 1994-1996. Metfwds. A total of 234 paediatric diarrhoeal stool samples were screened for Ad using commercial enzyme-linked. iInmunosorbent assays (EUSAs). Adenoviral isolates were.

  8. Adaptation Model for Corporate Car Sharing in the Car Rental Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Matthes, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this thesis was on developing an adaption model for implementing a corporate car sharing service within the existing infrastructure of a car rental company. The investigated case companies were a leading Finnish car rental franchisee and an international car sharing subsidiary, largely owned by the car rental franchisor, which offers corporate car sharing solutions in major European countries. Adapting this new service in Finland will help the car rental franchisee to assert its ...

  9. Prolonged peritoneal gene expression using a helper-dependent adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Limin; Shi, Chang-Xin; Ghayur, Ayesha; Zhang, Claire; Su, Je Yen; Hoff, Catherine M; Margetts, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare complication of peritoneal dialysis. The causes of EPS are not well defined and are likely multifactorial. A suitable animal model would facilitate research into the pathophysiology and treatment of EPS. We developed a helper-dependent adenovirus that expresses both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and active transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta1; HDAdTGF-beta1). Mice were administered HDAdTGF-beta1 via intraperitoneal injection and the response was compared with mice administered either first-generation adenovirus expressing TGF-beta1 (AdTGF-beta1) or control adenovirus (AdGFP). HDAdTGF-beta1-treated mice continued to express the GFP reporter transgene to day 74, the end of the observation period. Transgene expression lasted less than 28 days in the animals treated with first-generation adenoviruses. Animals treated with first-generation AdTGF-beta1 demonstrated submesothelial thickening and angiogenesis at day 7, with almost complete resolution by day 28. The HDAdTGF-beta1-treated mice demonstrated progressive peritoneal fibrosis with adhesion formation and encapsulation of bowels. Weight gain was significantly reduced in animals treated with HDAdTGF-beta1 compared to both the control-treated animals and the AdTGF-beta1-treated animals. Inflammation was not a major component of the fibroproliferative response. Peritoneal administration of a first-generation AdTGF-beta1 leads to transient gene expression, resulting in a resolving fibrotic response and histology similar to that seen in simple peritoneal sclerosis. Prolonged TGF-beta1 expression induced by the helper-dependent HDAdTGF-beta1 led to changes in peritoneal morphology resembling EPS. This suggests that TGF-beta1 may be a contributing factor in both simple peritoneal sclerosis and EPS. This model will be useful for elucidation of the mechanism of EPS and evaluation of potential treatment.

  10. Adenovirus Particles that Display the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein NANP Repeat Induce Sporozoite-Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Christopher; Overstreet, Michael G.; Guedon, Jean-Marc; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Ward, Cameron; Karen, Kasey A.; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus particles can be engineered to display exogenous peptides on their surfaces by modification of viral capsid proteins, and particles that display pathogen-derived peptides can induce protective immunity. We constructed viable recombinant adenoviruses that display B-cell epitopes from the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) in the major adenovirus capsid protein, hexon. Recombinants induced high-titer antibodies against CSP when injected intraperitoneally into mice...

  11. Enhancement of PSMA-Directed CAR Adoptive Immunotherapy by PD-1/PD-L1 Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Serganova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy in hematologic malignancies has shown remarkable responses, but the same level of success has not been observed in solid tumors. A new prostate cancer model (Myc-CaP:PSMA(+ and a second-generation anti-hPSMA human CAR T cells expressing a Click Beetle Red luciferase reporter were used to study hPSMA targeting and assess CAR T cell trafficking and persistence by bioluminescence imaging (BLI. We investigated the antitumor efficacy of human CAR T cells targeting human prostate-specific membrane antigen (hPSMA, in the presence and absence of the target antigen; first alone and then combined with a monoclonal antibody targeting the human programmed death receptor 1 (anti-hPD1 mAb. PDL-1 expression was detected in Myc-CaP murine prostate tumors growing in immune competent FVB/N and immune-deficient SCID mice. Endogenous CD3+ T cells were restricted from the centers of Myc-CaP tumor nodules growing in FVB/N mice. Following anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1 treatment, the restriction of CD3+ T cells was reversed, and a tumor-treatment response was observed. Adoptive hPSMA-CAR T cell immunotherapy was enhanced when combined with PD-1 blockade, but the treatment response was of comparatively short duration, suggesting other immune modulation mechanisms exist and restrict CAR T cell targeting, function, and persistence in hPSMA expressing Myc-CaP tumors. Interestingly, an “inverse pattern” of CAR T cell BLI intensity was observed in control and test tumors, which suggests CAR T cells undergo changes leading to a loss of signal and/or number following hPSMA-specific activation. The lower BLI signal intensity in the hPSMA test tumors (compared with controls is due in part to a decrease in T cell mitochondrial function following T cell activation, which may limit the intensity of the ATP-dependent Luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence signal.

  12. Radiolabeled adenoviral sub-unit proteins for molecular imaging and therapeutic applications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Suresh C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Our group has initiated investigations on the use of radiolabeled adenoviral (Ad) sub-unit proteins for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging as well as for combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer. A number of issues involved in developing combined gene/radionuclide delivery into tumors mediated by Ad vectors have been identified and are being addressed. Whereas current clinical trials of gene therapy using Ad vectors involve non-systemic delivery of therapeutic genes, the delivery of radionuclides preferably would involve systemic (i.v.) administration. The distribution and delivery of Ad sub-unit proteins following i.v. administration is not understood and must be studied and optimized. In addition, retention of the selective binding and internalization into tumor cells of the radiolabeled viral vectors remains an unmet challenge. We used the intact adenovirus (Ad, ∼80 nm diameter), native adenoviral fiber protein (AdFP, 180 kD trimer, purified from infected human cultured cells) and the adenoviral fiber 'knob' protein (recombinant AdFKP, 60 kD, synthesized in E. Coli), all of which interact with the in-vivo cellular receptor, coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) through the knob domain of the adenovirus fiber protein. Our initial studies were aimed at optimizing the labeling conditions using I-131 and In-111 to maintain CAR binding activity of the radiolabeled preparations. The CAR-binding was retained as determined using reaction with biotinylated CAR followed by chemiluminescence detection. The biodistribution results in mice and rats following i.v. administration (autoradiography, tissue counting) showed that all three vectors localized preferentially in CAR-expressing organs (liver, lung, heart, kidney), as expected. The CAR-binding of Ad-2 wild serotype was better (∼8 x stronger) than Ad-12, in particular following radiolabeling. Based on the above results, we further focused on the recombinant knob

  13. CD19-Targeted CAR T cells as novel cancer immunotherapy for relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Marco L; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-10-01

    Immunotherapy has demonstrated significant potential for the treatment of patients with chemotherapy-resistant hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. One type of immunotherapy involves the adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to target a tumor. These hybrid proteins are composed of the antigen-binding domains of an antibody fused to T-cell receptor signaling machinery. CAR T cells that target CD19 recently have made the jump from the laboratory to the clinic, and the results have been remarkable. CD19-targeted CAR T cells have induced complete remissions of disease in up to 90% of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), who have an expected complete response rate of 30% in response to chemotherapy. The high efficacy of CAR T cells in B-ALL suggests that regulatory approval of this therapy for this routinely fatal leukemia is on the horizon. We review the preclinical development of CAR T cells and their early clinical application for lymphoma. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of the use of CAR T cells in patients with B-ALL. In addition, we discuss the unique toxicities associated with this therapy and the management schemes that have been developed.

  14. Thin-section computed tomography findings in 104 immunocompetent patients with adenovirus pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Kue; Kwon, Hoon; Park, Ji Young

    2017-08-01

    Background To date, there has been no computed tomography (CT) evaluation of adenovirus pneumonia in a large number of immunocompetent patients. Purpose To describe the thin-section CT findings of immunocompetent patients with adenovirus pneumonia. Material and Methods We prospectively enrolled 104 patients with adenovirus pneumonia from a military hospital. CT scans of each patient were retrospectively and independently assessed by two radiologists for the presence of abnormalities, laterality and zonal predominance of the parenchymal abnormalities, and dominant imaging patterns and their anatomic distributions. Results CT findings included consolidation (n = 92), ground-glass opacity (GGO; n = 82), septal thickening (n = 34), nodules (n = 46), bronchial wall thickening (n = 32), pleural effusion (n = 16), and lymphadenopathy (n = 3). Eighty-four patients (81%) exhibited unilateral parenchymal abnormalities and 57 (57%) exhibited lower lung zone abnormalities. The most frequently dominant CT pattern was consolidation with surrounding GGO (n = 50), with subpleural (70%) and peribronchovascular (94%) distributions. Consolidation-the second-most common pattern (n = 33)-also exhibited subpleural (79%) and peribronchovascular (97%) distributions. The dominant nodule pattern (n = 14) exhibited mixed (64%) and peribronchovascular (100%) distributions. A dominant GGO pattern was only observed in four patients; none had central distribution. Conclusion Although the manifestations of adenovirus pneumonia on CT are varied, we found the most frequent pattern was consolidation with or without surrounding GGO, with subpleural and peribronchovascular distributions. Parenchymal abnormalities were predominantly unilateral and located in the lower lung zone. If dominant consolidation findings are present in immunocompetent patients during the early stages, adenovirus pneumonia should be considered.

  15. Distortionary company car taxation: deadweight losses through increased car ownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommeren, J.N.; Gutierrez Puigarnau, E.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the effects of distortionary company car taxation through increased household car consumption for the Netherlands. We use several identification strategies and demonstrate that for about 20 % of households company car possession increases car ownership. The annual welfare loss of

  16. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus

  17. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Z.Q. [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ertl, H.C., E-mail: ertl@wistar.upenn.edu [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rupprecht, C.E. [The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  18. Detection of adenovirus in nasopharyngeal specimens by radioactive and nonradioactive DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyypiae, T.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of adenovirus DNA in clinical specimens was analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization assays by both radioactive and enzymatic detection systems. The sensitivity of the hybridization tests was in the range of 10 to 100 pg of homologous adenovirus DNA. Minimal background was noticed with unrelated viral and nonviral DNA. Twenty-four nasopharyngeal mucus aspirate specimens, collected from children with acute respiratory infection, were assayed in the hybridization tests and also by an enzyme immunoassay for adenovirus hexon antigen which was used as a reference test. Sixteen specimens positive by the enzyme immunoassay also were positive in the two nucleic acid hybridization tests, and the remaining eight specimens were negative in all of the tests. The results indicate that nucleid acid hybridization tests with both radioactive and nonradioactive probes can be used for diagnosis of microbial infections

  19. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Vrij, J.; Willemsen, R. A.; Lindholm, L.; Hoeben, R. C.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; de Ridder, C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Essand, M.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Jennings, I.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nugent, R.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schenk, E.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Slade, M.; Szyjanowicz, P.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, L.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Zuber, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 795-805 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  20. Adenovirus Infection in Children with Diarrhea Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ad40) and type 41(Ad41), can cause acute and severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. This study was conducted to delineate the epidemiological features of adenoviruses identified in children with gastroenteritis in Northwestern Nigeria.

  1. Augmentation of Antitumor Immunity by Human and Mouse CAR T Cells Secreting IL-18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biliang Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of transgenically encoded human and mouse IL-18 on T cell proliferation and its application in boosting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells are presented. Robust enhancement of proliferation of IL-18-secreting human T cells occurred in a xenograft model, and this was dependent on TCR and IL-18R signaling. IL-18 augmented IFN-γ secretion and proliferation of T cells activated by the endogenous TCR. TCR-deficient, human IL-18-expressing CD19 CAR T cells exhibited enhanced proliferation and antitumor activity in the xenograft model. Antigen-propelled activation of cytokine helper ensemble (APACHE CAR T cells displayed inducible expression of IL-18 and enhanced antitumor immunity. In an intact mouse tumor model, CD19-IL-18 CAR T cells induced deeper B cell aplasia, significantly enhanced CAR T cell proliferation, and effectively augmented antitumor effects in mice with B16F10 melanoma. These findings point to a strategy to develop universal CAR T cells for patients with solid tumors.

  2. Dual targeting of gene delivery by genetic modification of adenovirus serotype 5 fibers and cell-selective transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, L M; Ritchie, N; Nicklin, S A; Reynolds, P N; Baker, A H

    2004-08-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene delivery is a promising approach for genetic manipulation of the vasculature and is being used in both preclinical models and clinical trials. However, safety concerns relating to infection of nontarget tissue and the poor infectivity of vascular cells compared to other cell types necessitates Ad vector refinement. Here, we combine a transductional targeting approach to improve vascular cell infectivity through RGD peptide insertion into adenovirus fibers, combined with transcriptional targeting to endothelial cells using a approximately 1 kb fragment of the fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-1 (FLT-1) promoter. Single- and double-modified vectors were characterized in human cell lines that either support or have silenced FLT-1 expression. In rat hepatocytes and endothelial cells, the double modification substantially shifted transduction profiles toward vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, in intact aortae derived from spontaneously hypertensive rats that display enhanced alphav integrin expression on dysfunctional endothelium, enhanced levels of transduction were observed using the double-modified vector but not in aortae derived from normotensive control rats. Our data indicate that Ad-mediated transduction can be beneficially modified in vitro and in vivo by combining fiber modification and a cell-selective promoter within a single-component vector system.

  3. Suppression of CHRN endocytosis by carbonic anhydrase CAR3 in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ailian; Huang, Shiqian; Zhao, Xiaonan; Feng, Kuan; Zhang, Shuangyan; Huang, Jiefang; Miao, Xiang; Baggi, Fulvio; Ostrom, Rennolds S; Zhang, Yanyun; Chen, Xiangjun; Xu, Congfeng

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction manifested as fatigable muscle weakness, which is typically caused by pathogenic autoantibodies against postsynaptic CHRN/AChR (cholinergic receptor nicotinic) in the endplate of skeletal muscle. Our previous studies have identified CA3 (carbonic anhydrase 3) as a specific protein insufficient in skeletal muscle from myasthenia gravis patients. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of how CA3 insufficiency might contribute to myasthenia gravis. Using an experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis animal model and the skeletal muscle cell C2C12, we find that inhibition of CAR3 (the mouse homolog of CA3) promotes CHRN internalization via a lipid raft-mediated pathway, leading to accelerated degradation of postsynaptic CHRN. Activation of CAR3 reduces CHRN degradation by suppressing receptor endocytosis. CAR3 exerts this effect by suppressing chaperone-assisted selective autophagy via interaction with BAG3 (BCL2-associated athanogene 3) and by dampening endoplasmic reticulum stress. Collectively, our study illustrates that skeletal muscle cell CAR3 is critical for CHRN homeostasis in the neuromuscular junction, and its deficiency leads to accelerated degradation of CHRN and development of myasthenia gravis, potentially revealing a novel therapeutic approach for this disorder.

  4. Phase I Escalating-Dose Trial of CAR-T Therapy Targeting CEA+ Metastatic Colorectal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengcheng; Wang, Zhe; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Meiling; Li, Shiqi; Li, Yunyan; Zhang, Rui; Xiong, Zhouxing; Wei, Zhihao; Shen, Junjie; Luo, Yongli; Zhang, Qianzhen; Liu, Limei; Qin, Hong; Liu, Wei; Wu, Feng; Chen, Wei; Pan, Feng; Zhang, Xianquan; Bie, Ping; Liang, Houjie; Pecher, Gabriele; Qian, Cheng

    2017-05-03

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells have shown promising efficacy in treatment of hematological malignancies, but its applications in solid tumors need further exploration. In this study, we investigated CAR-T therapy targeting carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA)-positive colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with metastases to evaluate its safety and efficacy. Five escalating dose levels (DLs) (1 × 10 5 to 1 × 10 8 /CAR + /kg cells) of CAR-T were applied in 10 CRC patients. Our data showed that severe adverse events related to CAR-T therapy were not observed. Of the 10 patients, 7 patients who experienced progressive disease (PD) in previous treatments had stable disease after CAR-T therapy. Two patients remained with stable disease for more than 30 weeks, and two patients showed tumor shrinkage by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and MRI analysis, respectively. Decline of serum CEA level was apparent in most patients even in long-term observation. Furthermore, we observed persistence of CAR-T cells in peripheral blood of patients receiving high doses of CAR-T therapy. Importantly, we observed CAR-T cell proliferation especially in patients after a second CAR-T therapy. Taken together, we demonstrated that CEA CAR-T cell therapy was well tolerated in CEA + CRC patients even in high doses, and some efficacy was observed in most of the treated patients. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Shuang; Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Xia; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Bin; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Chunni; Ba, Yi

    2017-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha plays a crucial role in regulating the biosynthesis of mitochondria, which is closely linked to the energy metabolism in various tumors. This study investigated the regulatory role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, the changes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha messenger RNA levels between normal human liver and hepatocellular carcinoma tissue were examined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha was conducted by RNA interference in the human liver cell line L02, while overexpression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha was conducted by adenovirus encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha complementary DNA in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2. Cellular morphological changes were observed via optical and electron microscopy. Cellular apoptosis was determined by Hoechst 33258 staining. In addition, the expression levels of 21,400 genes in tissues and cells were detected by microarray. It was shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha expression was significantly downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma compared with normal liver tissues. After knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha expression in L02 cells, cells reverted to immature and dedifferentiated morphology exhibiting cancerous tendency. Apoptosis occurred in the HepG2 cells after transfection by adenovirus encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha. Microarray analysis showed consistent results. The results suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha acts as a tumor

  7. An improved car-following model accounting for the preceding car's taillight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Tang, Tie-Qiao; Yu, Shao-Wei

    2018-02-01

    During the deceleration process, the preceding car's taillight may have influences on its following car's driving behavior. In this paper, we propose an extended car-following model with consideration of the preceding car's taillight. Two typical situations are used to simulate each car's movement and study the effects of the preceding car's taillight on the driving behavior. Meanwhile, sensitivity analysis of the model parameter is in detail discussed. The numerical results show that the proposed model can improve the stability of traffic flow and the traffic safety can be enhanced without a decrease of efficiency especially when cars pass through a signalized intersection.

  8. 49 CFR 1247.1 - Annual Report of Cars Loaded and Cars Terminated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Annual Report of Cars Loaded and Cars Terminated... TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ACCOUNTS, RECORDS AND REPORTS REPORT OF CARS LOADED AND CARS TERMINATED § 1247.1 Annual Report of Cars Loaded and Cars Terminated. Beginning with the...

  9. The complete nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and origin of human adenovirus type 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, Daniel; Furthmann, Anne; Sandig, Volker; Lieber, Andre

    2003-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence and transcription map of human adenovirus type 11 are reported here. This is the first published sequence for a subgenera B human adenovirus and demonstrates a genome organization highly similar to those of other human adenoviruses. All of the genes from the early, intermediate, and late regions are present in the expected locations of the genome for a human adenovirus. The genome size is 34,794 bp in length and has a GC content of 48.9%. Sequence alignment with genomes of groups A (Ad12), C (Ad5), D (Ad17), E (Simian adenovirus 25), and F (Ad40) revealed homologies of 64, 54, 68, 75, and 52%, respectively. Detailed genomic analysis demonstrated that Ads 11 and 35 are highly conserved in all areas except the hexon hypervariable regions and fiber. Similarly, comparison of Ad11 with subgroup E SAV25 revealed poor homology between fibers but high homology in proteins encoded by all other areas of the genome. We propose an evolutionary model in which functional viruses can be reconstituted following fiber substitution from one serotype to another. According to this model either the Ad11 genome is a derivative of Ad35, from which the fiber was substituted with Ad7, or the Ad35 genome is the product of a fiber substitution from Ad21 into the Ad11 genome. This model also provides a possible explanation for the origin of group E Ads, which are evolutionarily derived from a group C fiber substitution into a group B genome

  10. Detection and analysis of six lizard adenoviruses by consensus primer PCR provides further evidence of a reptilian origin for the atadenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P; Johnson, Calvin M; Garner, Michael M; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2004-12-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses.

  11. An Update on Canine Adenovirus Type 2 and Its Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru, Thierry; Salinas, Sara; Kremer, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors have significant potential for long- or short-term gene transfer. Preclinical and clinical studies using human derived adenoviruses (HAd) have demonstrated the feasibility of flexible hybrid vector designs, robust expression and induction of protective immunity. However, clinical use of HAd vectors can, under some conditions, be limited by pre-existing vector immunity. Pre-existing humoral and cellular anti-capsid immunity limits the efficacy and duration of transgene expression and is poorly circumvented by injections of larger doses and immuno-suppressing drugs. This review updates canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV-2, also known as CAdV-2) biology and gives an overview of the generation of early region 1 (E1)-deleted to helper-dependent (HD) CAV-2 vectors. We also summarize the essential characteristics concerning their interaction with the anti-HAd memory immune responses in humans, the preferential transduction of neurons, and its high level of retrograde axonal transport in the central and peripheral nervous system. CAV-2 vectors are particularly interesting tools to study the pathophysiology and potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as anti-tumoral and anti-viral vaccines, tracer of synaptic junctions, oncolytic virus and as a platform to generate chimeric vectors. PMID:21994722

  12. Phenobarbital induces cell cycle transcriptional responses in mouse liver humanized for constitutive androstane and pregnane x receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Lempiäinen, Harri; Scherbichler, Nina; Braeuning, Albert; Geissler, Miriam; Dubost, Valerie; Müller, Arne; Scheer, Nico; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Hara, Hisanori; Picard, Frank; Theil, Diethilde; Couttet, Philippe; Vitobello, Antonio; Grenet, Olivier; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Thomson, John P; Meehan, Richard R; Elcombe, Clifford R; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Schwarz, Michael; Moulin, Pierre; Terranova, Rémi; Moggs, Jonathan G

    2014-06-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism and play important roles in the mechanism of phenobarbital (PB)-induced rodent nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenesis. Here, we have used a humanized CAR/PXR mouse model to examine potential species differences in receptor-dependent mechanisms underlying liver tissue molecular responses to PB. Early and late transcriptomic responses to sustained PB exposure were investigated in liver tissue from double knock-out CAR and PXR (CAR(KO)-PXR(KO)), double humanized CAR and PXR (CAR(h)-PXR(h)), and wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers exhibited temporally and quantitatively similar transcriptional responses during 91 days of PB exposure including the sustained induction of the xenobiotic response gene Cyp2b10, the Wnt signaling inhibitor Wisp1, and noncoding RNA biomarkers from the Dlk1-Dio3 locus. Transient induction of DNA replication (Hells, Mcm6, and Esco2) and mitotic genes (Ccnb2, Cdc20, and Cdk1) and the proliferation-related nuclear antigen Mki67 were observed with peak expression occurring between 1 and 7 days PB exposure. All these transcriptional responses were absent in CAR(KO)-PXR(KO) mouse livers and largely reversible in wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers following 91 days of PB exposure and a subsequent 4-week recovery period. Furthermore, PB-mediated upregulation of the noncoding RNA Meg3, which has recently been associated with cellular pluripotency, exhibited a similar dose response and perivenous hepatocyte-specific localization in both wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mice. Thus, mouse livers coexpressing human CAR and PXR support both the xenobiotic metabolizing and the proliferative transcriptional responses following exposure to PB.

  13. Detection and Analysis of Six Lizard Adenoviruses by Consensus Primer PCR Provides Further Evidence of a Reptilian Origin for the Atadenoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Wellehan, James F. X.; Johnson, April J.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Garner, Michael M.; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2004-01-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phyloge...

  14. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.330 Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a... material— (1) In a tank car unless the following conditions are met: (i) The tank car must be marked on...

  15. Production and purification of non replicative canine adenovirus type 2 derived vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2013-12-03

    Adenovirus (Ad) derived vectors have been widely used for short or long-term gene transfer, both for gene therapy and vaccine applications. Because of the frequent pre-existing immunity against the classically used human adenovirus type 5, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2) has been proposed as an alternative vector for human gene transfer. The well-characterized biology of CAV2, together with its ease of genetic manipulation, offer major advantages, notably for gene transfer into the central nervous system, or for inducing a wide range of protective immune responses, from humoral to cellular immunity. Nowadays, CAV2 represents one of the most appealing nonhuman adenovirus for use as a vaccine vector. This protocol describes a simple method to construct, produce and titer recombinant CAV2 vectors. After cloning the expression cassette of the gene of interest into a shuttle plasmid, the recombinant genomic plasmid is obtained by homologous recombination in the E. coli BJ5183 bacterial strain. The resulting genomic plasmid is then transfected into canine kidney cells expressing the complementing CAV2-E1 genes (DK-E1). A viral amplification enables the production of a large viral stock, which is purified by ultracentrifugation through cesium chloride gradients and desalted by dialysis. The resulting viral suspension routinely has a titer of over 10(10) infectious particles per ml and can be directly administrated in vivo.

  16. Species B adenovirus serotypes 3, 7, 11 and 35 share similar binding sites on the membrane cofactor protein CD46 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischli, Christoph; Sirena, Dominique; Lesage, Guillaume; Havenga, Menzo J E; Cattaneo, Roberto; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2007-11-01

    We recently characterized the domains of the human cofactor protein CD46 involved in binding species B2 adenovirus (Ad) serotype 35. Here, the CD46 binding determinants are mapped for the species B1 Ad serotypes 3 and 7 and for the species B2 Ad11. Ad3, 7 and 11 bound and transduced CD46-positive rodent BHK cells at levels similar to Ad35. By using antibody-blocking experiments, hybrid CD46-CD4 receptor constructs and CD46 single point mutants, it is shown that Ad3, 7 and 11 share many of the Ad35-binding features on CD46. Both CD46 short consensus repeat domains SCR I and SCR II were necessary and sufficient for optimal binding and transgene expression, provided that they were positioned at an appropriate distance from the cell membrane. Similar to Ad35, most of the putative binding residues of Ad3, 7 and 11 were located on the same glycan-free, solvent-exposed face of the SCR I or SCR II domains, largely overlapping with the binding surface of the recently solved fiber knob Ad11-SCR I-II three-dimensional structure. Differences between species B1 and B2 Ads were documented with competition experiments based on anti-CD46 antibodies directed against epitopes flanking the putative Ad-binding sites, and with competition experiments based on soluble CD46 protein. It is concluded that the B1 and B2 species of Ad engage CD46 through similar binding surfaces.

  17. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  18. Distinct Signaling of Coreceptors Regulates Specific Metabolism Pathways and Impacts Memory Development in CAR T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalekar, Omkar U; O'Connor, Roddy S; Fraietta, Joseph A; Guo, Lili; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Patel, Prachi R; Guedan, Sonia; Scholler, John; Keith, Brian; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Snyder, Nathaniel; Blair, Ian A; Blair, Ian; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2016-02-16

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) redirect T cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, providing a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. Despite extensive clinical use, the attributes of CAR co-stimulatory domains that impact persistence and resistance to exhaustion of CAR-T cells remain largely undefined. Here, we report the influence of signaling domains of coreceptors CD28 and 4-1BB on the metabolic characteristics of human CAR T cells. Inclusion of 4-1BB in the CAR architecture promoted the outgrowth of CD8(+) central memory T cells that had significantly enhanced respiratory capacity, increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, CAR T cells with CD28 domains yielded effector memory cells with a genetic signature consistent with enhanced glycolysis. These results provide, at least in part, a mechanistic insight into the differential persistence of CAR-T cells expressing 4-1BB or CD28 signaling domains in clinical trials and inform the design of future CAR T cell therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Eradication of melanoma in vitro and in vivo via targeting with a Killer-Red-containing telomerase-dependent adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Kiyoto; Yano, Shuya; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Narii, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-08-18

    Melanoma is a highly recalcitrant cancer and transformative therapy is necessary for the cure of this disease. We recently developed a telomerase-dependent adenovirus containing the fluorescent protein Killer-Red. In the present report, we first determined the efficacy of Killer-Red adenovirus combined with laser irradiation on human melanoma cell lines in vitro. Cell viability of human melanoma cells was reduced in a dose-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. We used an intradermal xenografted melanoma model in nude mice to determine efficacy of the Killer-Red adenovirus. Intratumoral injection of Killer-Red adenovirus, combined with laser irradiation, eradicated the melanoma indicating the potential of a new paradigm of cancer therapy.

  20. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kelvin K W; Tse, Herman; Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K Y; Zhang, Anna J X; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Chan, Andy S F; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lo, Janice Y C; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should be

  1. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin K W To

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention

  2. Enhanced CAR T cell therapy: A novel approach for head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songlin; Zhu, Zhao

    2018-05-05

    Head and neck cancer that presents in locally advanced stages often results in a bad prognosis with an increased recurrence rate even after curative resections. Radiation therapy is then applied, with multiple side effects, as adjuvant regional therapy. Because of the high rate of recurrence and mortality, new therapies are needed for patients suffering from head and neck malignant tumors.CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T cell therapy, which was first devised about 25 years ago, causes the killing or apoptosis of target tumor cells through inducing the secretion of cytokines and granzymes by T cells (Cheadle et al., 2014). CARs are comprised of three canonical domains for antigen recognition, T cell activation, and co-stimulation, and are synthetic receptors that reprogram immune cells for therapeutic treatment of multiple tumors (Sadelain, 2017). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Full genome analysis of a novel adenovirus from the South Polar skua (Catharacta maccormicki) in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yon Mi; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Gu, Se Hun; Lee, Sook Young; Lee, Min-Goo; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hak Jun; Song, Jin-Won

    2012-01-05

    Adenoviruses have been identified in humans and a wide range of vertebrate animals, but not previously from the polar region. Here, we report the entire 26,340-bp genome of a novel adenovirus, detected by PCR, in tissues of six of nine South Polar skuas (Catharacta maccormicki), collected in Lake King Sejong, King George Island, Antarctica, from 2007 to 2009. The DNA polymerase, penton base, hexon and fiber genes of the South Polar skua adenovirus (SPSAdV) exhibited 68.3%, 75.4%, 74.9% and 48.0% nucleotide sequence similarity with their counterparts in turkey hemorrhagic enteritis virus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the entire genome revealed that SPSAdV belonged to the genus Siadenovirus, family Adenoviridae. This is the first evidence of a novel adenovirus, SPSAdV, from a large polar seabird (family Stercorariidae) in Antarctica. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Challenges and prospects of chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Vishal; Arora, Ena; Gupta, Sorab

    2018-05-05

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy is a novel and innovative immunotherapy. CAR-T cells are genetically engineered T cells, carrying MHC independent specific antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecule which can activate an immune response to a cancer specific antigen. This therapy showed great results in hematological malignancies but were unable to prove their worth in solid tumors. Likely reasons for their failure are lack of antigens, poor trafficking, and hostile tumor microenvironment. Excessive amount of research is going on to improve the efficacy of CAR T cell therapy in solid tumors. In this article, we will discuss the challenges faced in improving the outcome of CAR T cell therapy in solid tumors and various strategies adopted to curb them.

  5. Frontline Science: Functionally impaired geriatric CAR-T cells rescued by increased α5β1 integrin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Prajna; Cunetta, Marissa; Somasundar, Ponnandai; Espat, N Joseph; Junghans, Richard P; Katz, Steven C

    2017-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor expressing T cells (CAR-T) are a promising form of immunotherapy, but the influence of age-related immune changes on CAR-T production remains poorly understood. We showed that CAR-T cells from geriatric donors (gCAR-T) are functionally impaired relative to CAR-T from younger donors (yCAR-T). Higher transduction efficiencies and improved cell expansion were observed in yCAR-T cells compared with gCAR-T. yCAR-T demonstrated significantly increased levels of proliferation and signaling activation of phosphorylated (p)Erk, pAkt, pStat3, and pStat5. Furthermore, yCAR-T contained higher proportions of CD4 and CD8 effector memory (EM) cells, which are known to have enhanced cytolytic capabilities. Accordingly, yCAR-T demonstrated higher levels of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxicity compared with gCAR-T. Enhanced tumor killing by yCAR-T correlated with increased levels of perforin and granzyme B. yCAR-T had increased α5β1 integrin expression, a known mediator of retroviral transduction. We found that treatment with M-CSF or TGF-β1 rescued the impaired transduction efficiency of the gCAR-T by increasing the α5β1 integrin expression. Neutralization of α5β1 confirmed that this integrin was indispensable for CAR expression. Our study suggests that the increase of α5β1 integrin expression levels enhances CAR expression and thereby improves tumor killing by gCAR-T. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  6. Early transduction produces highly functional chimeric antigen receptor-modified virus-specific T-cells with central memory markers: a Production Assistant for Cell Therapy (PACT) translational application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiali; Huye, Leslie E; Lapteva, Natalia; Mamonkin, Maksim; Hiregange, Manasa; Ballard, Brandon; Dakhova, Olga; Raghavan, Darshana; Durett, April G; Perna, Serena K; Omer, Bilal; Rollins, Lisa A; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F; Dotti, Gianpietro; Gee, Adrian P; Brenner, Malcolm K; Myers, Douglas G; Rooney, Cliona M

    2015-01-01

    Virus-specific T-cells (VSTs) proliferate exponentially after adoptive transfer into hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, eliminate virus infections, then persist and provide long-term protection from viral disease. If VSTs behaved similarly when modified with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), they should have potent anti-tumor activity. This theory was evaluated by Cruz et al. in a previous clinical trial with CD19.CAR-modified VSTs, but there was little apparent expansion of these cells in patients. In that study, VSTs were gene-modified on day 19 of culture and we hypothesized that by this time, sufficient T-cell differentiation may have occurred to limit the subsequent proliferative capacity of the transduced T-cells. To facilitate the clinical testing of this hypothesis in a project supported by the NHLBI-PACT mechanism, we developed and optimized a good manufacturing practices (GMP) compliant method for the early transduction of VSTs directed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Adenovirus (AdV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) using a CAR directed to the tumor-associated antigen disialoganglioside (GD2). Ad-CMVpp65-transduced EBV-LCLs effectively stimulated VSTs directed to all three viruses (triVSTs). Transduction efficiency on day three was increased in the presence of cytokines and high-speed centrifugation of retroviral supernatant onto retronectin-coated plates, so that under optimal conditions up to 88% of tetramer-positive VSTs expressed the GD2.CAR. The average transduction efficiency of early-and late transduced VSTs was 55 ± 4% and 22 ± 5% respectively, and early-transduced VSTs maintained higher frequencies of T cells with central memory or intermediate memory phenotypes. Early-transduced VSTs also had higher proliferative capacity and produced higher levels of TH1 cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β and other cytokines in vitro. We developed a rapid and GMP compliant method for the early transduction of

  7. Functional Interaction of the Adenovirus IVa2 Protein with Adenovirus Type 5 Packaging Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ostapchuk, Philomena; Yang, Jihong; Auffarth, Ece; Hearing, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) DNA packaging is initiated in a polar fashion from the left end of the genome. The packaging process is dependent on the cis-acting packaging domain located between nucleotides 230 and 380. Seven AT-rich repeats that direct packaging have been identified within this domain. A1, A2, A5, and A6 are the most important repeats functionally and share a bipartite sequence motif. Several lines of evidence suggest that there is a limiting trans-acting factor(s) that plays a ro...

  8. BS69 : A novel adenovirus E1A-associated protein that inhibits E1A transactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Gennissen, A.M.C.; Ramos, Y.F.M.; Kerkhoven, R.; Sonntag-Buck, V.; Stunnenberg, H.G.; Bernards, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus ElA gene products are nuclear phosphoproteins that can transactivate the other adenovirus early genes as well as several cellular genes, and can transform primary rodent cells in culture. Transformation and transactivation by ElA proteins is most likely to be mediated through

  9. Diagnosis of eight groups of xeroderma pigmentosum by genetic complementation using recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Toshiharu; Okura, Masae; Ishii-Osai, Yasue; Hida, Tokimasa

    2016-10-01

    Because patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) must avoid ultraviolet (UV) light from an early age, an early diagnosis of this disorder is essential. XP is composed of seven genetic complementation groups, XP-A to -G, and a variant type (XP-V). To establish an easy and accurate diagnosis of the eight disease groups, we constructed recombinant adenoviruses that expressed one of the XP cDNA. When fibroblasts derived from patients with XP-A, -B, -C, -D, -F or -G were infected with the adenovirus expressing XPA, XPB, XPC, XPD, XPF or XPG, respectively, and UV-C at 5-20 J/m 2 was irradiated, cell viability was clearly recovered by the corresponding recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, XP-E and XP-V cells were not significantly sensitive to UV irradiation and were barely complemented by the matched recombinant adenoviruses. However, co-infection of Ad-XPA with Ad-XPE increased survival rate of XP-E cells after UV-C exposure. When XP-V cell strains, including one derived from a Japanese patient, were infected with Ad-XPV, exposed to UV-B and cultured with 1 mmol/L of caffeine, flow cytometry detected a characteristic decrease in the S phase in all the XP-V cell strains. From these results, the eight groups of XP could be differentiated by utilizing a set of recombinant adenoviruses, indicating that our procedure provides a convenient and correct diagnostic method for all the XP groups including XP-E and XP-V. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Deaths from Adenovirus in the US Military

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-26

    Dr. Joel Gaydos, science advisor for the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, and Dr. Robert Potter, a research associate for the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, discuss deaths from adenovirus in the US military.  Created: 3/26/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/29/2012.

  11. Development of a nasal adenovirus-based vaccine: Effect of concentration and formulation on adenovirus stability and infectious titer during actuation from two delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, Sandra S; Clemens, Courtney C; Croyle, Maria A

    2010-02-25

    A nasal adenovirus-based vaccine is under development. To determine if aggregation occurs during vaccination, infectious titer (limiting dilution) and capsid integrity (dynamic light scattering) were assessed after extrusion of a model vector from two intranasal delivery devices. Preparations of 2.5x10(12) and 1.25x10(11) virus particles (vp)/ml were studied. Virus aggregated ( approximately 10%) in the multi-dose vessel. Virus titer dropped by one log. Virus in the unit-dose device aggregated ( approximately 1%). Titer remained unchanged. Aggregation was concentration dependent. Formulations prevented aggregation during actuation, freeze-thaw and long-term storage. The device, formulation and dose may significantly influence aggregation and potency of any nasal adenovirus 5-based vaccine. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adenovirus Detection by the cGAS/STING/TBK1 DNA Sensing Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Eric; Stein, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) infection triggers a cell-specific antiviral response following exposure of viral DNA to the intracellular compartment. A variety of DNA sensors (DAI, AIM2, DDx41, RNA polymerase [Pol] III, and IFI16 [p204]) have been identified in recent years; however, the DNA sensor involved in detection of adenovirus has not been established. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), a DNA sensor that produces a cyclic guanine-adenine dinucleotide (cGAMP) inducer of STING, has been examined to determine its role in generating an antiadenoviral response. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviral vectors targeting TBK1, STING, and cGAS were established in murine MS1 endothelial and RAW 264.7 macrophage cell lines. Knockdown of TBK1, STING, and cGAS results in a dramatic reduction in the activation of the primary antiviral response marker phosphorylated interferon (IFN) response factor 3 (IRF3) following exposure to adenovirus. Furthermore, activation of secondary type I IFN signaling targets (ptyrSTAT1 and ptyrSTAT2 [ptyrSTAT1/2]) was also compromised. Consistent with compromised activation of primary and secondary response markers, transcriptional activation of IRF3-responsive genes (beta IFN [IFN-β], ISG15, ISG54) and secondary response transcripts were diminished in cells knocked down in cGAS, STING, or TBK1. These data establish cGAS as the dominant cytosolic DNA sensor responsible for detection of internalized adenovirus leading to induction of the type I interferon antiviral cascade. PMID:24198409

  13. Positive and negative spillover effects from electric car purchase to car use

    OpenAIRE

    Kløckner, Christian; Nayum, Alim; Mehmetoglu, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the results of two online surveys conducted on buyers of conventional combustion engine cars compared to those of electric vehicles in Norway. The results show that electric cars are generally purchased as additional cars, do not contribute to a decrease in annual mileage if the old car is not substituted, and that electric car buyers use the car more often for their everyday mobility. Psychological determinants derived from the theory of planned behavior and the norm-activ...

  14. Immunogenicity of heterologous recombinant adenovirus prime-boost vaccine regimens is enhanced by circumventing vector cross-reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorner, Anna R.; Lemckert, Angelique A. C.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Lynch, Diana M.; Ewald, Bonnie A.; Denholtz, Matthew; Havenga, Menzo J. E.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of preexisting immunity to adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) in human populations has led to the development of recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vectors derived from rare Ad serotypes as vaccine candidates for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and other pathogens. Vaccine vectors have

  15. Metabolic flux profiling of MDCK cells during growth and canine adenovirus vector production

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Carinhas; Daniel A. M. Pais; Alexey Koshkin; Paulo Fernandes; Ana S. Coroadinha; Manuel J. T. Carrondo; Paula M. Alves; Ana P. Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Canine adenovirus vector type 2 (CAV2) represents an alternative to human adenovirus vectors for certain gene therapy applications, particularly neurodegenerative diseases. However, more efficient production processes, assisted by a greater understanding of the effect of infection on producer cells, are required. Combining [1,2-13C]glucose and [U-13C]glutamine, we apply for the first time 13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) to study E1-transformed Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells meta...

  16. T cell receptor-engineered T cells to treat solid tumors: T cell processing toward optimal T cell fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Lamers (Cor); S. van Steenbergen-Langeveld (Sabine); M. van Brakel (Mandy); C.M. Groot-van Ruijven (Corrien); P.M.M.L. van Elzakker (Pascal); B.A. van Krimpen (Brigitte); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTherapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T

  17. EGFRvIII mCAR-modified T-cell therapy cures mice with established intracerebral glioma and generates host immunity against tumor-antigen loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, John H; Choi, Bryan D; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Suryadevara, Carter M; Snyder, David J; Flores, Catherine T; Schmittling, Robert J; Nair, Smita K; Reap, Elizabeth A; Norberg, Pamela K; Herndon, James E; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Morgan, Richard A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Johnson, Laura A

    2014-02-15

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) transduced T cells represent a promising immune therapy that has been shown to successfully treat cancers in mice and humans. However, CARs targeting antigens expressed in both tumors and normal tissues have led to significant toxicity. Preclinical studies have been limited by the use of xenograft models that do not adequately recapitulate the immune system of a clinically relevant host. A constitutively activated mutant of the naturally occurring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) is antigenically identical in both human and mouse glioma, but is also completely absent from any normal tissues. We developed a third-generation, EGFRvIII-specific murine CAR (mCAR), and performed tests to determine its efficacy in a fully immunocompetent mouse model of malignant glioma. At elevated doses, infusion with EGFRvIII mCAR T cells led to cures in all mice with brain tumors. In addition, antitumor efficacy was found to be dependent on lymphodepletive host conditioning. Selective blockade with EGFRvIII soluble peptide significantly abrogated the activity of EGFRvIII mCAR T cells in vitro and in vivo, and may offer a novel strategy to enhance the safety profile for CAR-based therapy. Finally, mCAR-treated, cured mice were resistant to rechallenge with EGFRvIII(NEG) tumors, suggesting generation of host immunity against additional tumor antigens. All together, these data support that third-generation, EGFRvIII-specific mCARs are effective against gliomas in the brain and highlight the importance of syngeneic, immunocompetent models in the preclinical evaluation of tumor immunotherapies. ©2013 AACR

  18. Electric Car Special

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoethout, T.; Belin, H.; Verwijs, H.; Nicola, S.; De Saint Jacob, Y.; Gatermann, R.

    2009-09-15

    In six articles, two columns and two interviews a part of this issue is dedicated to electric car developments: about winners and losers in the electric car race; a unique business model to rolling out the electric car by the electric battery company Better Place and the automobile industry Renault Nissan; interview with entrepreneur Shai Agassi of the Indian company Better Place; the development of electric cars in Germany; interview with Jean-Jacques Chanaron, an economist specialising in innovation management and a firm believer in electric cars; start of mass production of electric vehicles at the Japanese Nissan automobile industry; the constraints in Sweden in developing fuel-efficient automobiles; plans for 1 million electric or hybrid cars by 2025 in the Netherlands.

  19. Adenovirus Vector-Derived VA-RNA-Mediated Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Mizuguchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The major limitation of the clinical use of replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad vectors is the interference by innate immune responses, including induction of inflammatory cytokines and interferons (IFN, following in vivo application of Ad vectors. Ad vector-induced production of inflammatory cytokines and IFNs also results in severe organ damage and efficient induction of acquired immune responses against Ad proteins and transgene products. Ad vector-induced innate immune responses are triggered by the recognition of Ad components by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. In order to reduce the side effects by Ad vector-induced innate immune responses and to develop safer Ad vectors, it is crucial to clarify which PRRs and which Ad components are involved in Ad vector-induced innate immune responses. Our group previously demonstrated that myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88 and toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 play crucial roles in the Ad vector-induced inflammatory cytokine production in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Furthermore, our group recently found that virus associated-RNAs (VA-RNAs, which are about 160 nucleotide-long non-coding small RNAs encoded in the Ad genome, are involved in IFN production through the IFN-β promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1-mediated signaling pathway following Ad vector transduction. The aim of this review is to highlight the Ad vector-induced innate immune responses following transduction, especially VA-RNA-mediated innate immune responses. Our findings on the mechanism of Ad vector-induced innate immune responses should make an important contribution to the development of safer Ad vectors, such as an Ad vector lacking expression of VA-RNAs.

  20. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkko Ylösmäki

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5 in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  1. Enhanced protection against Ebola virus mediated by an improved adenovirus-based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jason S; Yao, Michel K; Tran, Kaylie N; Croyle, Maria A; Strong, James E; Feldmann, Heinz; Kobinger, Gary P

    2009-01-01

    The Ebola virus is transmitted by direct contact with bodily fluids of infected individuals, eliciting death rates as high as 90% among infected humans. Currently, replication defective adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine is being studied in a phase I clinical trial. Another Ebola vaccine, based on an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus has shown efficacy in post-exposure treatment of nonhuman primates to Ebola infection. In this report, we modified the common recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based Ebola vaccine expressing the wild-type ZEBOV glycoprotein sequence from a CMV promoter (Ad-CMVZGP). The immune response elicited by this improved expression cassette vector (Ad-CAGoptZGP) and its ability to afford protection against lethal ZEBOV challenge in mice was compared to the standard Ad-CMVZGP vector. Ad-CMVZGP was previously shown to protect mice, guinea pigs and nonhuman primates from an otherwise lethal challenge of Zaire ebolavirus. The antigenic expression cassette of this vector was improved through codon optimization, inclusion of a consensus Kozak sequence and reconfiguration of a CAG promoter (Ad-CAGoptZGP). Expression of GP from Ad-CAGoptZGP was substantially higher than from Ad-CMVZGP. Ad-CAGoptZGP significantly improved T and B cell responses at doses 10 to 100-fold lower than that needed with Ad-CMVZGP. Additionally, Ad-CAGoptZGP afforded full protections in mice against lethal challenge at a dose 100 times lower than the dose required for Ad-CMVZGP. Finally, Ad-CAGoptZGP induced full protection to mice when given 30 minutes post-challenge. We describe an improved adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine capable of affording post-exposure protection against lethal challenge in mice. The molecular modifications of the new improved vaccine also translated in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses and complete protection at a dose 100 times lower than with the previous generation adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine. Understanding and improving the

  2. Enhanced protection against Ebola virus mediated by an improved adenovirus-based vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Richardson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ebola virus is transmitted by direct contact with bodily fluids of infected individuals, eliciting death rates as high as 90% among infected humans. Currently, replication defective adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine is being studied in a phase I clinical trial. Another Ebola vaccine, based on an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus has shown efficacy in post-exposure treatment of nonhuman primates to Ebola infection. In this report, we modified the common recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based Ebola vaccine expressing the wild-type ZEBOV glycoprotein sequence from a CMV promoter (Ad-CMVZGP. The immune response elicited by this improved expression cassette vector (Ad-CAGoptZGP and its ability to afford protection against lethal ZEBOV challenge in mice was compared to the standard Ad-CMVZGP vector. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ad-CMVZGP was previously shown to protect mice, guinea pigs and nonhuman primates from an otherwise lethal challenge of Zaire ebolavirus. The antigenic expression cassette of this vector was improved through codon optimization, inclusion of a consensus Kozak sequence and reconfiguration of a CAG promoter (Ad-CAGoptZGP. Expression of GP from Ad-CAGoptZGP was substantially higher than from Ad-CMVZGP. Ad-CAGoptZGP significantly improved T and B cell responses at doses 10 to 100-fold lower than that needed with Ad-CMVZGP. Additionally, Ad-CAGoptZGP afforded full protections in mice against lethal challenge at a dose 100 times lower than the dose required for Ad-CMVZGP. Finally, Ad-CAGoptZGP induced full protection to mice when given 30 minutes post-challenge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We describe an improved adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine capable of affording post-exposure protection against lethal challenge in mice. The molecular modifications of the new improved vaccine also translated in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses and complete protection at a dose 100 times lower than with the

  3. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaohua [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Fan, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zou, Xue [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Gao, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin, Haifeng [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Du, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Xia, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Fan, Daiming [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 17 Changle Western Road, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2007-06-29

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma.

  4. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Rui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Lin; Jin, Haifeng; Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Fan, Daiming

    2007-01-01

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma

  5. uPAR-controlled oncolytic adenoviruses eliminate cancer stem cells in human pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrevals, Luciano; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Urtasun, Nerea; Mazo, Adela; Fillat, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors contain cancer stem cells highly resistant to chemotherapy. The identification of therapies that can eliminate this population of cells might provide with more effective treatments. In the current work we evaluated the potential of oncolytic adenoviruses to act against pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSC). PCSC from two patient-derived xenograft models were isolated from orthotopic pancreatic tumors treated with saline, or with the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine. An enrichment in the number of PCSC expressing the cell surface marker CD133 and a marked enhancement on tumorsphere formation was observed in gemcitabine treated tumors. No significant increase in the CD44, CD24, and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA) positive cells was observed. Neoplastic sphere-forming cells were susceptible to adenoviral infection and exposure to oncolytic adenoviruses resulted in elevated cytotoxicity with both Adwt and the tumor specific AduPARE1A adenovirus. In vivo, intravenous administration of a single dose of AduPARE1A in human-derived pancreatic xenografts led to a remarkable anti-tumor effect. In contrast to gemcitabine AduPARE1A treatment did not result in PCSC enrichment. No enrichment on tumorspheres neither on the CD133(+) population was detected. Therefore our data provide evidences of the relevance of uPAR-controlled oncolytic adenoviruses for the elimination of pancreatic cancer stem cells. © 2013.

  6. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  7. Transit Car Performance Comparison, State-of-the-Art Car vs. PATCO Transit Car, NYCTA R-46, MBTA Silverbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-02-01

    The first phase of this contract authorized the design, development, and demonstration of two State-Of-The-Art Cars (SOAC). This document reports on the gathering of comparative test data on existing in-service transit cars. The three transit cars se...

  8. cis and trans requirements for the selective packaging of adenovirus type 5 DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Gräble, M; Hearing, P

    1992-01-01

    Polar packaging of adenovirus DNA into virions is dependent on the presence of cis-acting sequences at the left end of the viral genome. Our previous analyses demonstrated that the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) packaging domain (nucleotides 194 to 358) is composed of at least five elements that are functionally redundant. A repeated sequence, termed the A repeat, was associated with packaging function. Here we report a more detailed analysis of the requirements for the selective packaging of Ad5 DN...

  9. Car Seat Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Car Seat Safety KidsHealth / For Parents / Car Seat Safety ... certified child passenger safety technician.) Guidelines for Choosing Car Seats Choose a seat with a label that ...

  10. Surface TRAIL decoy receptor-4 expression is correlated with TRAIL resistance in MCF7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D; Dirice, Ercument; Aydin, Cigdem; Erin, Nuray; Koksoy, Sadi; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2005-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal cells. Despite this promising feature, TRAIL resistance observed in cancer cells seriously challenged the use of TRAIL as a death ligand in gene therapy. The current dispute concerns whether or not TRAIL receptor expression pattern is the primary determinant of TRAIL sensitivity in cancer cells. This study investigates TRAIL receptor expression pattern and its connection to TRAIL resistance in breast cancer cells. In addition, a DcR2 siRNA approach and a complementary gene therapy modality involving IKK inhibition (AdIKKβKA) were also tested to verify if these approaches could sensitize MCF7 breast cancer cells to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL (Ad5hTRAIL). TRAIL sensitivity assays were conducted using Molecular Probe's Live/Dead Cellular Viability/Cytotoxicity Kit following the infection of breast cancer cells with Ad5hTRAIL. The molecular mechanism of TRAIL induced cell death under the setting of IKK inhibition was revealed by Annexin V binding. Novel quantitative Real Time RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis were performed to disclose TRAIL receptor composition in breast cancer cells. MCF7 but not MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells displayed strong resistance to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL. Only the combinatorial use of Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA infection sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to TRAIL induced cell death. Moreover, novel quantitative Real Time RT-PCR assays suggested that while the level of TRAIL Decoy Receptor-4 (TRAIL-R4) expression was the highest in MCF7 cells, it was the lowest TRAIL receptor expressed in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, conventional flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that TRAIL resistant MCF7 cells exhibited substantial levels of TRAIL-R4 expression but not TRAIL decoy receptor-3 (TRAIL-R3) on surface. On the contrary, TRAIL sensitive MDA-MB-231 cells displayed very low levels of surface TRAIL-R4

  11. CD47-CAR-T Cells Effectively Kill Target Cancer Cells and Block Pancreatic Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Berahovich, Robert; Zhou, Hua; Xu, Shirley; Harto, Hizkia; Li, Le; Chao, Cheng-Chi; Mao, Mike Ming; Wu, Lijun

    2017-10-21

    CD47 is a glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is often overexpressed in different types of hematological and solid cancer tumors and plays important role in blocking phagocytosis, increased tumor survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. In the present report, we designed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor)-T cells that bind CD47 antigen. We used ScFv (single chain variable fragment) from mouse CD47 antibody to generate CD47-CAR-T cells for targeting different cancer cell lines. CD47-CAR-T cells effectively killed ovarian, pancreatic and other cancer cells and produced high level of cytokines that correlated with expression of CD47 antigen. In addition, CD47-CAR-T cells significantly blocked BxPC3 pancreatic xenograft tumor growth after intratumoral injection into NSG mice. Moreover, we humanized mouse CD47 ScFv and showed that it effectively bound CD47 antigen. The humanized CD47-CAR-T cells also specifically killed ovarian, pancreatic, and cervical cancer cell lines and produced IL-2 that correlated with expression of CD47. Thus, CD47-CAR-T cells can be used as a novel cellular therapeutic agent for treating different types of cancer.

  12. Car Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Head Neck & Nervous System > Car Sickness Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Car Sickness Page Content ...

  13. Minimum datasets to establish a CAR-mediated mode of action for rodent liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffer, Richard C; LeBaron, Matthew J; Battalora, Michael; Bomann, Werner H; Werner, Christoph; Aggarwal, Manoj; Rowe, Rocky R; Tinwell, Helen

    2018-07-01

    Methods for investigating the Mode of Action (MoA) for rodent liver tumors via constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation are outlined here, based on current scientific knowledge about CAR and feedback from regulatory agencies globally. The key events (i.e., CAR activation, altered gene expression, cell proliferation, altered foci and increased adenomas/carcinomas) can be demonstrated by measuring a combination of key events and associative events that are markers for the key events. For crop protection products, a primary dataset typically should include a short-term study in the species/strain that showed the tumor response at dose levels that bracket the tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic dose levels. The dataset may vary depending on the species and the test compound. As examples, Case Studies with nitrapyrin (in mice) and metofluthrin (in rats) are described. Based on qualitative differences between the species, the key events leading to tumors in mice or rats by this MoA are not operative in humans. In the future, newer approaches such as a CAR biomarker signature approach and/or in vitro CAR3 reporter assays for mouse, rat and human CAR may eventually be used to demonstrate a CAR MoA is operative, without the need for extensive additional studies in laboratory animals. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of CAR in SW480 and HepG2 cells during G1 is associated with cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osabe, Makoto; Sugatani, Junko; Takemura, Akiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Ikari, Akira; Kitamura, Naomi; Negishi, Masahiko; Miwa, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a transcription factor to regulate the expression of several genes related to drug-metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that CAR protein accumulates during G1 in human SW480 and HepG2 cells. After the G1/S phase transition, CAR protein levels decreased, and CAR was hardly detected in cells by the late M phase. CAR expression in both cell lines was suppressed by RNA interference-mediated suppression of CDK4. Depletion of CAR by RNA interference in both cells and by hepatocyte growth factor treatment in HepG2 cells resulted in decreased MDM2 expression that led to p21 upregulation and repression of HepG2 cell growth. Thus, our results demonstrate that CAR expression is an early G1 event regulated by CDK4 that contributes to MDM2 expression; these findings suggest that CAR may influence the expression of genes involved in not only the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous substances but also in the cell proliferation

  15. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Cherian, Milu T.; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C.; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the...

  16. Perancangan dan Implementasi Kontroler PID untuk Pengaturan Autonomous Car-Following Car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Parluhutan Bonor Sinaga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pengiriman logistik ke daerah-daerah rawan bencana merupakan hal yang sangat sulit dilakukan, tentunya diperlukan pengetahuan mengenai kondisi medan jalan. Salah satu dampak yang utama adalah sulitnya melakukan manuver dalam pengendalian performansi  truk logistik yang pada umumnya berupa truk-truk gandeng. Untuk membantu pengemudi truk dalam berkendara pada kondisi tersebut, dirancang sebuah prototype mobil mandiri (Autonomous Car yang mampu melakukan manuver-manuver pergerakan secara sendirinya, salah satu manuver tersebut ialah Following Car.  Dalam Tugas Akhir ini perancangan sistem yang akan dilakukan dengan  memodelkan  dua buah kendaraan mobil RC (remote control yang bertindak sebagai  follower dan leader car. Pengoperasian dari  following car dilakukan dengan memodifikasi dari kendaraan RC-1, sedangkan RC-2 bertindak sebagai leader car yang dikondisikan secara manual. Dengan penerapan kontroler PID pada implementasi sistem didapatkan penurunan time settling menjadi 2,7 Detik dan peningkatan error steady state sebesar 2,44%. Pada implementasi diberikan kecepatan leader secara acak, dengan implementasi kontroler PID, kondisi jarak antara autonomous car dengan leader car masih dalam range keadaan ideal pada set point.

  17. Distinguishing Truncated and Normal MUC1 Glycoform Targeting from Tn-MUC1-Specific CAR T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posey, Avery D; Clausen, Henrik; June, Carl H

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) demonstrate potent clinical antitumor effects in a variety of blood cancers. However, clinical activity in solid tumors has been disappointing and toxicity has been a serious concern (Lamers et al., 2013; Morgan et al., 2010......). We recently found that a CAR composed of a scFv antibody fragment specific for the Tn-glycoform of MUC1 had potent activity in preclinical models of blood cancer and adenocarcinoma (Posey et al., 2016)....

  18. Biomarkers of cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity related to CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenguang; Han, Weidong

    2018-01-01

    Severe cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity following chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy can be life-threatening in some cases, and management of those toxicities is still a great challenge for physicians. Researchers hope to understand the pathophysiology of CRS and neurotoxicity, and identify predictive biomarkers that can forecast those toxicities in advance. Some risk factors for severe CRS and/or neurotoxicity including patient and treatment characteristics have been identified in multiple clinical trials of CAR-T cell therapy. Moreover, several groups have identified some predictive biomarkers that are able to determine beforehand which patients may suffer severe CRS and/or neurotoxicity during CAR-T cell therapy, facilitating testing of early intervention strategies for those toxicities. However, further studies are needed to better understand the biology and related risk factors for CRS and/or neurotoxicity, and determine if those identified predictors can be extrapolated to other series. Herein, we review the pathophysiology of CRS and neurotoxicity, and summarize the progress of predictive biomarkers to improve CAR-T cell therapy in cancer.

  19. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; Bonin, M von; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide ‘proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo

  20. Showing the Way: Oncolytic Adenoviruses as Chaperones of Immunostimulatory Adjuncts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviruses (OAds are increasingly recognized as vectors for immunotherapy in the treatment of various solid tumors. The myriads of advantages of using adenovirus include targeted specificity upon infection and selective replication, which lead to localized viral burst, exponential spread of OAds, and antitumor effect. OAds can also induce a strong immune reaction due to the massive release of tumor antigens upon cytolysis and the presence of viral antigens. This review will highlight recent advances in adenoviral vectors expressing immunostimulatory effectors, such as GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon-α, interleukin-12, and CD40L. We will also discuss the combination of OAds with other immunotherapeutic strategies and describe the current understanding of how adenoviral vectors interact with the immune system to eliminate cancer cells.

  1. Showing the Way: Oncolytic Adenoviruses as Chaperones of Immunostimulatory Adjuncts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing Li; LaRocca, Christopher J; Yamamoto, Masato

    2016-09-19

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (OAds) are increasingly recognized as vectors for immunotherapy in the treatment of various solid tumors. The myriads of advantages of using adenovirus include targeted specificity upon infection and selective replication, which lead to localized viral burst, exponential spread of OAds, and antitumor effect. OAds can also induce a strong immune reaction due to the massive release of tumor antigens upon cytolysis and the presence of viral antigens. This review will highlight recent advances in adenoviral vectors expressing immunostimulatory effectors, such as GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor), interferon-α, interleukin-12, and CD40L. We will also discuss the combination of OAds with other immunotherapeutic strategies and describe the current understanding of how adenoviral vectors interact with the immune system to eliminate cancer cells.

  2. Adenovirus-vectored Ebola vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sarah C

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa has highlighted the need for the availability of effective vaccines against outbreak pathogens that are suitable for use in frontline workers who risk their own health in the course of caring for those with the disease, and also for members of the community in the affected area. Along with effective contact tracing and quarantine, use of a vaccine as soon as an outbreak is identified could greatly facilitate rapid control and prevent the outbreak from spreading. This review describes the progress that has been made in producing and testing adenovirus-based Ebola vaccines in both pre-clinical and clinical studies, and considers the likely future use of these vaccines.

  3. Allogeneic CD19-CAR-T cell infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in B cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhong, Jiang F; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-01-31

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered the cornerstone in treatment of hematological malignancies. However, relapse of the hematological disease after allo-HSCT remains a challenge and is associated with poor long-term survival. Chimeric antigen receptor redirected T cells (CAR-T cells) can lead to disease remission in patients with relapsed/refractory hematological malignancies. However, the therapeutic window for infusion of CAR-T cells post allo-HSCT and its efficacy are debatable. In this review, we first discuss the use of CAR-T cells for relapsed cases after allo-HSCT. We then review the toxicities and the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease in relapsed patients who received CAR-T cells post allo-HSCT. Finally, we review clinical trial registrations and the therapeutic time window for infusion of CAR-T cells post allo-HSCT. The treatment of allogeneic CAR-T cells is beneficial for patients with relapsed B cell malignancies after allo-HSCT with low toxicities and complications. However, multicenter clinical trials with larger sample sizes should be performed to select the optimal therapeutic window and confirm its efficacy.

  4. [Outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis caused by adenovirus in a geriatric centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artieda, Juncal; Montes, Milagrosa; Vicente, Diego; Martínez, Consuelo; Piñeiro, Luis; Mendiola, Josune

    2010-12-01

    Adenovirus serotype 4a is a respiratory virus that occasionally causes conjunctivitis. This paper describes an outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis that occurred in a geriatric centre. Outbreak description and epidemiological research through a survey. For the microbiological study conjunctival swabs were collected using viral and bacterial transport media. Adenovirus was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The serotype was determined by sequencing of a fragment of the hexon and E1 genes. In autumn 2008 an outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis caused by adenovirus serotype 4a was detected. Twenty three percent 23% (69/300) of residents and 5% (9/180) of workers in a geriatric centre in Gipuzkoa were affected. The clinical symptoms were of prolonged duration (11±5 days). The temporal association of the cases suggested transmission from person to person. The sanitary measures established (asepsis and frequent hand washing, cleaning and disinfection of objects and surfaces) were effective, interrupting the transmission of the disease within a short period of time. Rapid detection, identification of the causative agent and implementing appropriate control measures can significantly reduce the impact on both health and economic costs of these outbreaks. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient tumor regression by adoptively transferred CEA-specific CAR-T cells associated with symptoms of mild cytokine release syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linan; Ma, Ning; Okamoto, Sachiko; Amaishi, Yasunori; Sato, Eiichi; Seo, Naohiro; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen. The adoptive transfer in conjunction with lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning mediated significant tumor regression but caused weight loss in CEA-Tg, but not in wild-type mice. The weight loss was not associated with overt inflammation in the CEA-expressing gastrointestinal tract but was associated with malnutrition, reflected in elevated systemic levels of cytokines linked to anorexia, which could be controlled by the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody without compromising efficacy. The apparent relationship between lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning, efficacy, and off-tumor toxicity of CAR-T cells would necessitate the development of CEA-specific CAR-T cells with improved signaling domains that require less stringent preconditioning for their efficacy. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA-specific CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy may be effective for patients with CEA + solid tumors. Distinguishing the fine line between therapeutic efficacy and off-tumor toxicity would involve further modifications of CAR-T cells and preconditioning regimens.

  6. The Revolution in Viral Genomics as Exemplified by the Bioinformatic Analysis of Human Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Torres

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 30 years, genomic and bioinformatic analysis of human adenoviruses has been achieved using a variety of DNA sequencing methods; initially with the use of restriction enzymes and more currently with the use of the GS FLX pyrosequencing technology. Following the conception of DNA sequencing in the 1970s, analysis of adenoviruses has evolved from 100 base pair mRNA fragments to entire genomes. Comparative genomics of adenoviruses made its debut in 1984 when nucleotides and amino acids of coding sequences within the hexon genes of two human adenoviruses (HAdV, HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5, were compared and analyzed. It was determined that there were three different zones (1-393, 394-1410, 1411-2910 within the hexon gene, of which HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5 shared zones 1 and 3 with 95% and 89.5% nucleotide identity, respectively. In 1992, HAdV-C5 became the first adenovirus genome to be fully sequenced using the Sanger method. Over the next seven years, whole genome analysis and characterization was completed using bioinformatic tools such as blastn, tblastx, ClustalV and FASTA, in order to determine key proteins in species HAdV-A through HAdV-F. The bioinformatic revolution was initiated with the introduction of a novel species, HAdV-G, that was typed and named by the use of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetics as opposed to traditional serology. HAdV bioinformatics will continue to advance as the latest sequencing technology enables scientists to add to and expand the resource databases. As a result of these advancements, how novel HAdVs are typed has changed. Bioinformatic analysis has become the revolutionary tool that has significantly accelerated the in-depth study of HAdV microevolution through comparative genomics.

  7. Targeting human breast cancer cells by an oncolytic adenovirus using microRNA-targeting strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayestehpour, Mohammad; Moghim, Sharareh; Salimi, Vahid; Jalilvand, Somayeh; Yavarian, Jila; Romani, Bizhan; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2017-08-15

    MicroRNA-targeting strategy is a promising approach that enables oncolytic viruses to replicate in tumor cells but not in normal cells. In this study, we targeted adenoviral replication toward breast cancer cells by inserting ten complementary binding sites for miR-145-5p downstream of E1A gene. In addition, we evaluated the effect of increasing miR-145 binding sites on inhibition of virus replication. Ad5-control and adenoviruses carrying five or ten copies of miR145-5p target sites (Ad5-5miR145T, Ad5-10miR145T) were generated and inoculated into MDA-MB-453, BT-20, MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines and human mammary epithelial cells (HMEpC). Titer of Ad5-10miR145T in HMEpC was significantly lower than Ad5-control titer. Difference between the titer of these two viruses at 12, 24, 36, and 48h after infection was 1.25, 2.96, 3.06, and 3.77 log TCID 50 . No significant difference was observed between the titer of both adenoviruses in MDA-MB-453, BT-20 and MCF-7 cells. The infectious titer of adenovirus containing 10 miR-145 binding sites in HMEpC cells at 24, 36, and 48h post-infection was 1.7, 2.08, and 4-fold, respectively, lower than the titer of adenovirus carrying 5 miR-145 targets. Our results suggest that miR-145-targeting strategy provides selectivity for adenovirus replication in breast cancer cells. Increasing the number of miRNA binding sites within the adenoviral genome confers more selectivity for viral replication in cancer cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Constitutive androstane receptor upregulates Abcb1 and Abcg2 at the blood-brain barrier after CITCO activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmen, Julia; Tozakidis, Iasson E P; Bele, Prachee; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2013-03-21

    ATP-driven efflux transporters are considered to be the major hurdle in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Abcb1 (P-glycoprotein) and Abcg2 (breast cancer resistance protein/brain multidrug resistance protein) belong to the best known ABC-transporters. These ABC-transporters limit the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and protect the brain against toxic compounds in the blood but on the other hand they also reduce the efficacy of CNS pharmacotherapy. Even after 40 years of extensive research, the regulatory mechanisms of these efflux transporters are still not completely understood. To unravel the efflux transporter regulation, we analyzed the effect of the nuclear receptor CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) on the expression of Abcb1 and Abcg2 in primary cultures of porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCEC). CAR is a xenobiotic-activated transcription factor, which is, like the other important nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR), highly expressed in barrier tissue and known to be a positive regulator of ABC-transporters. We demonstrate that activation of porcine CAR by the human CAR (hCAR) ligand CITCO (6-(4-chlorophenyl)-imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde) leads to an up-regulation of both transporters, whereas the mouse-specific CAR ligand TCPOBOP (1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene) had no effect on transporter expression. The stimulation of PBCEC with CITCO caused a significant up-regulation of both efflux-transporters on RNA-level, protein level and transport level. Furthermore the additional application of a CAR inhibitor significantly decreased the transporter expression to control niveau. In conclusion our data prove CAR activation only by the human ligand CITCO leading to an increased ABC-transporter expression and transport activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Internalization and trafficking mechanisms of coxsackievirus B3 in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Sun-Ku; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, In-Beom; Park, Sang-Ick; Paek, Kyung-Hee; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2005-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is nonenveloped and has a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome. CVB3 induces myocarditis and ultimately dilated cardiomyopathy. Although there are mounting evidences of an interaction between CVB3 particles and the cellular receptors, coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF), very little is known about the mechanisms of internalization and trafficking. In the present study, we used the CVB3 H3 strain, which is CAR-dependent but DAF-independent Woodruff variant and found that during entry, CVB3 particles were colocalized in clathrin, after interacting primarily with CAR, which was not recycled to the plasma membrane. We also found that CVB3 internalization was dependent on the function of dynamin, a large GTPase that has an essential role in endocytosis. Heat-shock cognate protein, Hsc70, which acts as a chaperone in the release of coat proteins from clathrin-coated vesicles (CCV), played a role in CVB3 trafficking processes. Moreover, endosomal acidification was crucial for CVB3 endocytosis. Finally, CVB3 was colocalized in early endosome autoantigen 1 (EEA1) molecules, which are involved in endosome-endosome tethering and fusion. In conclusion, these data together indicate that CVB3 uses clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is transcytosed to early endosomes

  10. The Adenovirus Type 3 Dodecahedron's RGD Loop Comprises an HSPG Binding Site That Influences Integrin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gout

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human type 3 adenovirus dodecahedron (a virus like particle made of twelve penton bases features the ability to enter cells through Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans (HSPGs and integrins interaction and is used as a versatile vector to deliver DNA or proteins. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the pseudoviral particle with Heparan Sulphate (HS oligosaccharide shows an extradensity on the RGD loop. A set of mutants was designed to study the respective roles of the RGD sequence (RGE mutant and of a basic sequence located just downstream. Results showed that the RGE mutant binding to the HS deficient CHO-2241 cells was abolished and unexpectedly, mutation of the basic sequence (KQKR to AQAS dramatically decreased integrin recognition by the viral pseudoparticle. This basic sequence is thus involved in integrin docking, showing a close interplay between HSPGs and integrin receptors.

  11. Inhibition of corneal neovascularization by recombinant adenovirus-mediated sFlk-1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hui; Wu Jihong; Li Huiming; Wang Zhanli; Chen Xiafang; Tian Yuhua; Yi Miaoying; Ji Xunda; Ma Jialie; Huang Qian

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (Flt-1, Flk-1/KDR) is correlated with neovascularization in the eyes. Therefore, blocking the binding of VEGF and the corresponding receptor has become critical for inhibiting corneal neovascularization. In this study, we have expressed the cDNA for sFlk-1 under the control of cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (CMV) from an E1/partial E3 deleted replication defective recombinant adenovirus, and Ad.sflk-1 expression was determined by Western blotting. We have shown that conditioned media from Ad.sflk-1-infected ARPE-19 cells significantly reduced VEGF-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine endothelial cells (SVEC) proliferation in vitro compared with the control vector. In vivo, adenoviral vectors expressing green fluorescent protein alone (Ad.GFP) were utilized to monitor gene transfer to the cornea. Moreover, in the models of corneal neovascularization, the injection of Ad.sflk-1 (10 8 PFU) into the anterior chamber could significantly inhibit angiogenic changes compared with Ad.null-injected and vehicle-injected models. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that corneal endothelial cells and corneal stroma of cauterized rat eyes were efficiently transduced and expressed sFlk-1. These results not only support that adenoviral vectors are capable of high-level transgene expression but also demonstrate that Ad.sflk-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting the development of corneal neovascularization

  12. Pandemic Influenza Virus 2009 H1N1 and Adenovirus in a High Risk Population of Young Adults: Epidemiology, Comparison of Clinical Presentations, and Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-08

    a variety of pathogens. With the exception of the prior adenovirus vaccine era from 1980– 1996, adenoviruses have historically been the most common...administration of both live attenuated influenza and adenovirus vaccines , which could affect current trainee vaccine policies. In the meantime, concerns...change since the late 2011 reintroduction of adenovirus serotypes 4 and 7 vaccines in military trainees, or whether issues arise with concurrent

  13. Adenovirus Infection in Children with Diarrhea Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANNALS

    Adenovirus Infection in Children with Diarrhea Disease in Northwestern. Nigeria. M. Aminu1, A. A. Ahmad1, J. U. Umoh2, M. C. de Beer3, M. D. Esona3, A. D. Steele3. 1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria Nigeria. 2Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, ...

  14. Targeting Multiple Tumors Using T-Cells Engineered to Express a Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor 2-Based Chimeric Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Eisenberg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in cancer treatment are demonstrating the increasing and powerful potential of immunotherapeutic strategies. In this regard, the adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T-lymphocytes approaches can lead to tumor regression in cancer patients. More recently, the use of T-cells genetically engineered to express cancer-specific receptors such as the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR continues to show promise for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Still, there is a crucial need to develop efficient CAR-T cell approaches for the treatment of solid tumors. It has been shown that other lymphocytes such as natural killer (NK cells can demonstrate potent antitumor function—nonetheless, their use in immunotherapy is rather limited due to difficulties in expanding these cells to therapeutically relevant numbers and to suppression by endogenous inhibitory mechanisms. Cancer recognition by NK cells is partly mediated by molecules termed natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs. In the present study, we hypothesize that it is possible to endow T-cells with an NK recognition pattern, providing them with a mean to recognize tumor cells, in a non-MHC restricted way. To test this, we genetically modified human T-cells with different chimeric receptors based on the human NCR2 molecule and then assessed their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that expression in primary lymphocytes of an NCR2-derived CAR, termed s4428z, confers T-cells with the ability to specifically recognize heterogeneous tumors and to mediate tumor cytotoxicity in a mouse model. This study demonstrates the benefit of combining tumor recognition capability of NK cells with T cell effectiveness to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Transgenic Expression of IL15 Improves Antiglioma Activity of IL13Rα2-CAR T Cells but Results in Antigen Loss Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenciute, Giedre; Prinzing, Brooke L; Yi, Zhongzhen; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Dotti, Gianpietro; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in adults and is virtually incurable with conventional therapies. Immunotherapy with T cells expressing GBM-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) is an attractive approach to improve outcomes. Although CAR T cells targeting GBM antigens, such as IL13 receptor subunit α2 (IL13Rα2), HER2, and EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII), have had antitumor activity in preclinical models, early-phase clinical testing has demonstrated limited antiglioma activity. Transgenic expression of IL15 is an appealing strategy to enhance CAR T-cell effector function. We tested this approach in our IL13Rα2-positive glioma model in which limited IL13Rα2-CAR T-cell persistence results in recurrence of antigen-positive gliomas. T cells were genetically modified with retroviral vectors encoding IL13Rα2-CARs or IL15 (IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells). IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells recognized glioma cells in an antigen-dependent fashion, had greater proliferative capacity, and produced more cytokines after repeated stimulations in comparison with IL13Rα2-CAR T cells. No autonomous IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T-cell proliferation was observed; however, IL15 expression increased IL13Rα2-CAR T-cell viability in the absence of exogenous cytokines or antigen. In vivo , IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells persisted longer and had greater antiglioma activity than IL13Rα2-CAR T cells, resulting in a survival advantage. Gliomas recurring after 40 days after T-cell injection had downregulated IL13Rα2 expression, indicating that antigen loss variants occur in the setting of improved T-cell persistence. Thus, CAR T cells for GBM should not only be genetically modified to improve their proliferation and persistence, but also to target multiple antigens. Summary: Glioblastoma responds imperfectly to immunotherapy. Transgenic expression of IL15 in T cells expressing CARs improved their proliferative capacity, persistence, and cytokine production. The emergence of antigen

  16. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J; Gerdts, Ethan A; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T; Murad, John P; Park, Anthony K; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Yang, Xin; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E; Wu, Anna M; Brown, Christine E; Forman, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with "on-target off-tumor" activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies.

  17. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J.; Gerdts, Ethan A.; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T.; Murad, John P.; Park, Anthony K.; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E.; Brown, Christine E.; Forman, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with “on-target off-tumor” activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies. PMID:29308300

  18. Purification of infectious adenovirus in two hours by ultracentrifugation and tangential flow filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugai, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Takahito; Hirose, Megumi; Inabe, Kumiko; Kujime, Yukari; Terashima, Miho; Liu, Bingbing; Tang, Hong; Zhao, Mujun; Murata, Takehide; Kimura, Makoto; Pan, Jianzhi; Obata, Yuichi; Hamada, Hirofumi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2005-01-01

    Adenoviruses are excellent vectors for gene transfer and are used extensively for high-level expression of the products of transgenes in living cells. The development of simple and rapid methods for the purification of stable infectious recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) remains a challenge. We report here a method for the purification of infectious adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) that involves ultracentrifugation on a cesium chloride gradient at 604,000g for 15 min at 4 deg C and tangential flow filtration. The entire procedure requires less than two hours and infectious Ad5 can be recovered at levels higher than 64% of the number of plaque-forming units (pfu) in the initial crude preparation of viruses. We have obtained titers of infectious purified Ad5 of 1.35 x 10 10 pfu/ml and a ratio of particle titer to infectious titer of seven. The method described here allows the rapid purification of rAds for studies of gene function in vivo and in vitro, as well as the rapid purification of Ad5

  19. Evodia alkaloids suppress gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis by activating the constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lushan; Wang, Zhangting; Huang, Minmin; Li, Yingying; Zeng, Kui; Lei, Jinxiu; Hu, Haihong; Chen, Baian; Lu, Jing; Xie, Wen; Zeng, Su

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key sensor in xenobiotic detoxification and endobiotic metabolism. Increasing evidence suggests that CAR also plays a role in energy metabolism by suppressing the hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of two evodia alkaloids, rutaecarpine (Rut) and evodiamine (Evo), on gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis through their activation of the human CAR (hCAR). We found that both Rut and Evo exhibited anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects in the hyperlipidemic HepG2 cells. Both compounds can potently activate hCAR, and treatment of cells with hCAR antagonists reversed the anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects of Rut and Evo. The anti-gluconeogenic effect of Rut and Evo was due to the CAR-mediated inhibition of the recruitment of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) onto the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) gene promoters. In vivo, we showed that treatment of mice with Rut improved glucose tolerance in a CAR-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the evodia alkaloids Rut and Evo may have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracellular NGFR Spacers Allow Efficient Tracking and Enrichment of Fully Functional CAR-T Cells Co-Expressing a Suicide Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casucci, Monica; Falcone, Laura; Camisa, Barbara; Norelli, Margherita; Porcellini, Simona; Stornaiuolo, Anna; Ciceri, Fabio; Traversari, Catia; Bordignon, Claudio; Bonini, Chiara; Bondanza, Attilio

    2018-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell immunotherapy is at the forefront of innovative cancer therapeutics. However, lack of standardization of cellular products within the same clinical trial and lack of harmonization between different trials have hindered the clear identification of efficacy and safety determinants that should be unveiled in order to advance the field. With the aim of facilitating the isolation and in vivo tracking of CAR-T cells, we here propose the inclusion within the CAR molecule of a novel extracellular spacer based on the low-affinity nerve-growth-factor receptor (NGFR). We screened four different spacer designs using as target antigen the CD44 isoform variant 6 (CD44v6). We successfully generated NGFR-spaced CD44v6 CAR-T cells that could be efficiently enriched with clinical-grade immuno-magnetic beads without negative consequences on subsequent expansion, immuno-phenotype, in vitro antitumor reactivity, and conditional ablation when co-expressing a suicide gene. Most importantly, these cells could be tracked with anti-NGFR monoclonal antibodies in NSG mice, where they expanded, persisted, and exerted potent antitumor effects against both high leukemia and myeloma burdens. Similar results were obtained with NGFR-enriched CAR-T cells specific for CD19 or CEA, suggesting the universality of this strategy. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the incorporation of the NGFR marker gene within the CAR sequence allows for a single molecule to simultaneously work as a therapeutic and selection/tracking gene. Looking ahead, NGFR spacer enrichment might allow good manufacturing procedures-manufacturing of standardized CAR-T cell products with high therapeutic potential, which could be harmonized in different clinical trials and used in combination with a suicide gene for future application in the allogeneic setting.

  1. Extracellular NGFR Spacers Allow Efficient Tracking and Enrichment of Fully Functional CAR-T Cells Co-Expressing a Suicide Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casucci, Monica; Falcone, Laura; Camisa, Barbara; Norelli, Margherita; Porcellini, Simona; Stornaiuolo, Anna; Ciceri, Fabio; Traversari, Catia; Bordignon, Claudio; Bonini, Chiara; Bondanza, Attilio

    2018-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell immunotherapy is at the forefront of innovative cancer therapeutics. However, lack of standardization of cellular products within the same clinical trial and lack of harmonization between different trials have hindered the clear identification of efficacy and safety determinants that should be unveiled in order to advance the field. With the aim of facilitating the isolation and in vivo tracking of CAR-T cells, we here propose the inclusion within the CAR molecule of a novel extracellular spacer based on the low-affinity nerve-growth-factor receptor (NGFR). We screened four different spacer designs using as target antigen the CD44 isoform variant 6 (CD44v6). We successfully generated NGFR-spaced CD44v6 CAR-T cells that could be efficiently enriched with clinical-grade immuno-magnetic beads without negative consequences on subsequent expansion, immuno-phenotype, in vitro antitumor reactivity, and conditional ablation when co-expressing a suicide gene. Most importantly, these cells could be tracked with anti-NGFR monoclonal antibodies in NSG mice, where they expanded, persisted, and exerted potent antitumor effects against both high leukemia and myeloma burdens. Similar results were obtained with NGFR-enriched CAR-T cells specific for CD19 or CEA, suggesting the universality of this strategy. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the incorporation of the NGFR marker gene within the CAR sequence allows for a single molecule to simultaneously work as a therapeutic and selection/tracking gene. Looking ahead, NGFR spacer enrichment might allow good manufacturing procedures-manufacturing of standardized CAR-T cell products with high therapeutic potential, which could be harmonized in different clinical trials and used in combination with a suicide gene for future application in the allogeneic setting. PMID:29619024

  2. Extracellular NGFR Spacers Allow Efficient Tracking and Enrichment of Fully Functional CAR-T Cells Co-Expressing a Suicide Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-T cell immunotherapy is at the forefront of innovative cancer therapeutics. However, lack of standardization of cellular products within the same clinical trial and lack of harmonization between different trials have hindered the clear identification of efficacy and safety determinants that should be unveiled in order to advance the field. With the aim of facilitating the isolation and in vivo tracking of CAR-T cells, we here propose the inclusion within the CAR molecule of a novel extracellular spacer based on the low-affinity nerve-growth-factor receptor (NGFR. We screened four different spacer designs using as target antigen the CD44 isoform variant 6 (CD44v6. We successfully generated NGFR-spaced CD44v6 CAR-T cells that could be efficiently enriched with clinical-grade immuno-magnetic beads without negative consequences on subsequent expansion, immuno-phenotype, in vitro antitumor reactivity, and conditional ablation when co-expressing a suicide gene. Most importantly, these cells could be tracked with anti-NGFR monoclonal antibodies in NSG mice, where they expanded, persisted, and exerted potent antitumor effects against both high leukemia and myeloma burdens. Similar results were obtained with NGFR-enriched CAR-T cells specific for CD19 or CEA, suggesting the universality of this strategy. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the incorporation of the NGFR marker gene within the CAR sequence allows for a single molecule to simultaneously work as a therapeutic and selection/tracking gene. Looking ahead, NGFR spacer enrichment might allow good manufacturing procedures-manufacturing of standardized CAR-T cell products with high therapeutic potential, which could be harmonized in different clinical trials and used in combination with a suicide gene for future application in the allogeneic setting.

  3. Therapeutic potential of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes: a cell-free modality for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiang-Jun; Sun, Xu-Yong; Huang, Kuan-Ming; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhuo-Shun; Zou, Dan-Dan; Wang, Bin; Warnock, Garth L; Dai, Long-Jun; Luo, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a distinctively promising therapy for cancer. The engineering of CARs into T cells provides T cells with tumor-targeting capabilities and intensifies their cytotoxic activity through stimulated cell expansion and enhanced cytokine production. As a novel and potent therapeutic modality, there exists some uncontrollable processes which are the potential sources of adverse events. As an extension of this impactful modality, CAR-T cell-derived exosomes may substitute CAR-T cells to act as ultimate attackers, thereby overcoming some limitations. Exosomes retain most characteristics of parent cells and play an essential role in intercellular communications via transmitting their cargo to recipient cells. The application of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes will make this cell-based therapy more clinically controllable as it also provides a cell-free platform to diversify anticancer mediators, which responds effectively to the complexity and volatility of cancer. It is believed that the appropriate application of both cellular and exosomal platforms will make this effective treatment more practicable.

  4. CAR2 - Czech Database of Car Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sovka

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new Czech language two-channel (stereo speech database recorded in car environment. The created database was designed for experiments with speech enhancement for communication purposes and for the study and the design of a robust speech recognition systems. Tools for automated phoneme labelling based on Baum-Welch re-estimation were realised. The noise analysis of the car background environment was done.

  5. CAR2 - Czech Database of Car Speech

    OpenAIRE

    Pollak, P.; Vopicka, J.; Hanzl, V.; Sovka, Pavel

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents new Czech language two-channel (stereo) speech database recorded in car environment. The created database was designed for experiments with speech enhancement for communication purposes and for the study and the design of a robust speech recognition systems. Tools for automated phoneme labelling based on Baum-Welch re-estimation were realised. The noise analysis of the car background environment was done.

  6. The presence of enterovirus, adenovirus, and parvovirus B19 in myocardial tissue samples from autopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Hansen, Jakob; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-01-01

    of adenovirus, enterovirus, and parvovirus B19 (PVB) in myocardial autopsy samples from myocarditis related deaths and in non-inflamed control hearts in an effort to clarify their significance as the causes of myocarditis in a forensic material. METHODS: We collected all autopsy cases diagnosed with myocarditis...... from 1992 to 2010. Eighty-four suicidal deaths with morphologically normal hearts served as controls. Polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection of the viral genomes (adenovirus, enterovirus, and PVB) in myocardial tissue specimens. The distinction between acute and persistent PVB infection...... was made by the serological determination of PVB-specific immunoglobulins M and G. RESULTS: PVB was detected in 33 of 112 (29 %) myocarditis cases and 37 of 84 (44 %) control cases. All of the samples were negative for the presence of adenovirus and enterovirus. Serological evidence of an acute PVB...

  7. Mapping of nuclear import signal and importin α3 binding regions of 52K protein of bovine adenovirus-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, Carolyn P.; Ayalew, Lisanework E.; Tikoo, Suresh K.

    2012-01-01

    The L1 region of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3 encodes a non-structural protein designated 52K. Anti-52K serum detected a protein of 40 kDa, which localized to the nucleus but not to the nucleolus in BAdV-3-infected or transfected cells. Analysis of mutant 52K proteins suggested that three basic residues ( 105 RKR 107 ) of the identified domain (amino acids 102 GMPRKRVLT 110 ) are essential for nuclear localization of 52K. The nuclear import of a GST-52K fusion protein utilizes the classical importin α/β-dependent nuclear transport pathway. The 52K protein is preferentially bound to the cellular nuclear import receptor importin α3. Although deletion of amino acid 102–110 is sufficient to abrogate the nuclear localization of 52K, amino acid 90–133 are required for interaction with importin-α3 and localizing a cytoplasmic protein to the nucleus. These results suggest that 52K contains a bipartite NLS, which preferentially utilize an importin α3 nuclear import receptor-mediated pathway to transport 52K to the nucleus.

  8. The Green City Car. A holistic approach for NVH abatement of city cars

    OpenAIRE

    Bein, Thilo; Mayer, Dirk; Elliott, Steve; Ferrali, Leonardo; Casella, Mauro; Saemann, Ernst-Ulrich; Kropp, Wolfgang; Nielsen, Finn Kryger; Meschke, Jens; Pisano, Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    Pursuing the different passive and active concepts in a holistic approach, the FP7 project Green City Car demonstrates the feasibility of applying active systems to NVH-related problems light city cars from a system point-of view. During the project, a city car equipped with a small engine has been considered equipped with the latest technology in terms of safety aspects related to pedestrian’s impact and car-to-car compatibility, which are of major importance in an urban environment. The noi...

  9. DHA down-regulates phenobarbital-induced cytochrome P450 2B1 gene expression in rat primary hepatocytes by attenuating CAR translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.-C.; Lii, C.-K.; Liu, K.-L.; Yang, J.-J.; Chen, H.-W.

    2007-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays an important role in regulating the expression of detoxifying enzymes, including cytochrome P450 2B (CYP 2B). Phenobarbital (PB) induction of human CYP 2B6 and mouse CYP 2b10 has been shown to be mediated by CAR. Our previous study showed that PB-induced CYP 2B1 expression in rat primary hepatocytes is down-regulated by both n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); however, the mechanism for this down-regulation by DHA was previously unknown. The objective of the present study was to determine whether change in CAR translocation is involved in the down-regulation by n-6 and n-3 PUFAs of PB-induced CYP 2B1 expression in rat primary hepatocytes. We used 100 μM arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and DHA to test this hypothesis. PB triggered the translocation of CAR from the cytosol into the nucleus in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner in our hepatocyte system, and the CAR distribution in rat primary hepatocytes was significantly affected by DHA. DHA treatment decreased PB-inducible accumulation of CAR in the nuclear fraction and increased it in the cytosolic fraction in a dose-dependent manner. The down-regulation of CYP 2B1 expression by DHA occurred in a dose-dependent manner, and a similar pattern was found for the nuclear accumulation of CAR. The results of immunoprecipitation showed a CAR/RXR heterodimer bound to nuclear receptor binding site 1 (NR-1) of the PB-responsive enhancer module (PBREM) of the CYP 2B1gene. The EMSA results showed that PB-induced CAR binding to NR-1 was attenuated by DHA. Taken together, these results suggest that attenuation of CAR translocation and decreased subsequent binding to NR-1 are involved in DHA's down-regulation of PB-induced CYP 2B1 expression

  10. Improvement of oncolytic adenovirus vectors through genetic capsid modifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrij, Jeroen de

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant viral vectors hold great promise in the field of cancer gene therapy. While a plethora of viruses is being evaluated as oncolytic agents, human adenoviruses of serotype 5 (HAdV-5) are among the most popular of viruses to be developed. Although clinical studies have demonstrated safety of

  11. UV exposure in cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Matthias; Soballa, Martin; Korn, Manfred

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing knowledge about the hazards of solar and ultraviolet (UV) radiation to humans. Although people spend a significant time in cars, data on UV exposure during traveling are lacking. The aim of this study was to obtain basic information on personal UV exposure in cars. UV transmission of car glass samples, windscreen, side and back windows and sunroof, was determined. UV exposure of passengers was evaluated in seven German middle-class cars, fitted with three different types of car windows. UV doses were measured with open or closed windows/sunroof of Mercedes-Benz E 220 T, E 320, and S 500, and in an open convertible car (Mercedes-Benz CLK). Bacillus subtilis spore film dosimeters (Viospor) were attached to the front, vertex, cheeks, upper arms, forearms and thighs of 'adult' and 'child' dummies. UV wavelengths longer than >335 nm were transmitted through car windows, and UV irradiation >380 nm was transmitted through compound glass windscreens. There was some variation in the spectral transmission of side windows according to the type of glass. On the arms, UV exposure was 3-4% of ambient radiation when the car windows were shut, and 25-31% of ambient radiation when the windows were open. In the open convertible car, the relative personal doses reached 62% of ambient radiation. The car glass types examined offer substantial protection against short-wave UV radiation. Professional drivers should keep car windows closed on sunny days to reduce occupational UV exposure. In individuals with polymorphic light eruption, produced by long-wave UVA, additional protection by plastic films, clothes or sunscreens appears necessary.

  12. Calcium-Induced Activation of a Mutant G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Causes In Vitro Transformation of NIH/3T3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana O. Hoff

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR is a G-proteincoupled receptor that is widely expressed, has tissuespecific functions, regulates cell growth. Activating mutations of this receptor cause autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, a syndrome characterized by hypocalcemia and hypercalciuria. The identification of a family with an activating mutation of the CaR (Thr151 Met in which hypocalcemia cosegregates with several unusual neoplasms led us to examine the transforming effects of this mutant receptor. Transfection of NIH/3T3 cells with the mutant but not the normal receptor supported colony formation in soft agar at subphysiologic calcium concentrations. The mutant CaR causes a calcium-dependent activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK 1/2 and Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress-activated (JNK/ SAPK pathways, but not P38 MAP kinase. These findings contribute to a growing body of information suggesting that this receptor plays a role in the regulation of cellular proliferation, that aberrant activation of the mutant receptor in this family may play a role in the unusual neoplastic manifestations.

  13. Car use within the household

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Borger, Bruno; Mulalic, Ismir; Rouwendal, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the demand for car kilometres in two-car households, focusing on the substitution between cars in response to fuel price changes. We use a large sample of detailed Danish data on two-car households to estimate—for each car owned by the household—own and cross-price effects...... of increases in fuel costs per kilometre. The empirical results show that failure to capture substitution between cars within the household can result in substantial misspecification biases. Ignoring substitution, we estimate fuel price elasticities of –0.81 and -0.65 for the primary and secondary cars...... efficient car, finding partial support for the underlying hypothesis. More importantly, the results of this extended model emphasize the importance of behavioural differences related to the position of the most fuel efficient car in the household, suggesting that households’ fuel efficiency choices...

  14. Activation of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor induces hepatic lipogenesis and regulates Pnpla3 gene expression in a LXR-independent way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmugi, Alice; Lukowicz, Céline; Lasserre, Frederic; Montagner, Alexandra; Polizzi, Arnaud; Ducheix, Simon; Goron, Adeline; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine; Pascussi, Jean Marc; Moldes, Marthe; Pineau, Thierry; Guillou, Hervé; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila

    2016-01-01

    The Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) has been newly described as a regulator of energy metabolism. A relevant number of studies using animal models of obesity suggest that CAR activation could be beneficial on the metabolic balance. However, this remains controversial and the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This work aimed to investigate the effect of CAR activation on hepatic energy metabolism during physiological conditions, i.e. in mouse models not subjected to metabolic/nutritional stress. Gene expression profiling in the liver of CAR knockout and control mice on chow diet and treated with a CAR agonist highlighted CAR-mediated up-regulations of lipogenic genes, concomitant with neutral lipid accumulation. A strong CAR-mediated up-regulation of the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (Pnpla3) was demonstrated. Pnpla3 is a gene whose polymorphism is associated with the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) development. This observation was confirmed in human hepatocytes treated with the antiepileptic drug and CAR activator, phenobarbital and in immortalized human hepatocytes treated with CITCO. Studying the molecular mechanisms controlling Pnpla3 gene expression, we demonstrated that CAR does not act by a direct regulation of Pnpla3 transcription or via the Liver X Receptor but may rather involve the transcription factor Carbohydrate Responsive Element-binding protein. These data provide new insights into the regulation by CAR of glycolytic and lipogenic genes and on pathogenesis of steatosis. This also raises the question concerning the impact of drugs and environmental contaminants in lipid-associated metabolic diseases. - Highlights: • Induction of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes upon CAR activation by TCPOBOP. • These effects are not mediated by the nuclear receptor LXR. • CAR activation resulted in hepatic lipid accumulation. • Pnpla3 expression is regulated by CAR in mouse liver and

  15. Activation of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor induces hepatic lipogenesis and regulates Pnpla3 gene expression in a LXR-independent way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmugi, Alice; Lukowicz, Céline; Lasserre, Frederic; Montagner, Alexandra; Polizzi, Arnaud; Ducheix, Simon; Goron, Adeline; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence [INRA, TOXALIM (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, UPS, TOXALIM, Toulouse (France); Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine [Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Biotherapy, INSERM, U1183 Montpellier (France); Pascussi, Jean Marc [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR5203, Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, Montpellier (France); Moldes, Marthe [Centre de Recherche Saint-Antoine, INSERM, UMR 938, Sorbonne Universités, Université Paris 6, Paris (France); Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire ICAN, Paris (France); Pineau, Thierry; Guillou, Hervé [INRA, TOXALIM (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, UPS, TOXALIM, Toulouse (France); Mselli-Lakhal, Laila, E-mail: laila.lakhal@toulouse.inra.fr [INRA, TOXALIM (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, UPS, TOXALIM, Toulouse (France)

    2016-07-15

    The Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) has been newly described as a regulator of energy metabolism. A relevant number of studies using animal models of obesity suggest that CAR activation could be beneficial on the metabolic balance. However, this remains controversial and the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This work aimed to investigate the effect of CAR activation on hepatic energy metabolism during physiological conditions, i.e. in mouse models not subjected to metabolic/nutritional stress. Gene expression profiling in the liver of CAR knockout and control mice on chow diet and treated with a CAR agonist highlighted CAR-mediated up-regulations of lipogenic genes, concomitant with neutral lipid accumulation. A strong CAR-mediated up-regulation of the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (Pnpla3) was demonstrated. Pnpla3 is a gene whose polymorphism is associated with the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) development. This observation was confirmed in human hepatocytes treated with the antiepileptic drug and CAR activator, phenobarbital and in immortalized human hepatocytes treated with CITCO. Studying the molecular mechanisms controlling Pnpla3 gene expression, we demonstrated that CAR does not act by a direct regulation of Pnpla3 transcription or via the Liver X Receptor but may rather involve the transcription factor Carbohydrate Responsive Element-binding protein. These data provide new insights into the regulation by CAR of glycolytic and lipogenic genes and on pathogenesis of steatosis. This also raises the question concerning the impact of drugs and environmental contaminants in lipid-associated metabolic diseases. - Highlights: • Induction of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes upon CAR activation by TCPOBOP. • These effects are not mediated by the nuclear receptor LXR. • CAR activation resulted in hepatic lipid accumulation. • Pnpla3 expression is regulated by CAR in mouse liver and

  16. Tank car leaks gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    On January 27, 1994, a Canadian National (CN) tank car loaded with gasoline began to leak from a crack in the tank shell on the end of the car near the stub sill. The tank car had been damaged from impact switching. A part of the tank car was sent for laboratory analysis which concluded that: (1) the fracture originated in two locations in welds, (2) the cracks propagated in a symmetrical manner and progressed into the tank plate, (3) the fracture surface revealed inadequate weld fusion. A stress analysis of the tank car was conducted to determine the coupling force necessary to cause the crack. It was noted that over the last decade several problems have occurred pertaining to stub sill areas of tank cars that have resulted in hazardous material spills. An advisory was sent to Transport Canada outlining many examples where tank cars containing serious defects had passed CN inspections that were specifically designed to identify such defects. 4 figs

  17. Assessment of the Incidence of Enteric Adenovirus Species and Serotypes in Surface Waters in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa: Tyume River as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Sibanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TaqMan real-time PCR was used for the detection and quantitation of adenoviruses in Tyume River water samples over a 12-month period. A total of 72 samples were analysed, and 22 samples were positive for adenovirus. Of the positive samples, 18 were collected from downstream sampling points. Among the downstream sampling points, adenovirus detection rate increased with distance downstream, being 28%, 33%, and 39% for Alice, Drayini, and Manqulweni, respectively. The Alice sampling site had the highest concentrations of adenovirus ranging between 6.54×103 genome copies/L and 8.49×104 genome copies/L. The observed trend could have been expected considering the level of anthropogenic activities in areas along the lower stretch of Tyume River, with the major one being the effluent of treated and semi treated sewage from wastewater treatment facilities. Adenovirus detection was sporadic at most sampling sites. Multiplex conventional PCR was used for the detection of clinically important adenovirus species B, C, and F and their serotypes. Species C and F adenoviruses were detected in 77% and 18% of the samples, respectively. Most adenovirus positive samples were obtained from areas of increased population densities. The presence of adenoviruses may confirm the risk of its transmission to the human population.

  18. Prevalence of rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus infection in young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of three enteric viruses, namely rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus, as agents of diarrhoea in and around Gaborone, Botswana. Design: The sample were categorised into four groups according to the age of the patient: 0-3 months, 4-6 months, 7-12 months and 25-60 months.

  19. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored Rift Valley fever vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warimwe, George M; Lorenzo, Gema; Lopez-Gil, Elena; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Cottingham, Matthew G; Spencer, Alexandra J; Collins, Katharine A; Dicks, Matthew D J; Milicic, Anita; Lall, Amar; Furze, Julie; Turner, Alison V; Hill, Adrian V S; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2013-12-05

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that historically affects livestock production and human health in sub-Saharan Africa, though epizootics have also occurred in the Arabian Peninsula. Whilst an effective live-attenuated vaccine is available for livestock, there is currently no licensed human RVF vaccine. Replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus (ChAd) vectors are an ideal platform for development of a human RVF vaccine, given the low prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against them in the human population, and their excellent safety and immunogenicity profile in human clinical trials of vaccines against a wide range of pathogens. Here, in BALB/c mice, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAdOx1, encoding the RVF virus envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, which are targets of virus neutralizing antibodies. The ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine was assessed in comparison to a replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector encoding Gn and Gc (HAdV5-GnGc), a strategy previously shown to confer protective immunity against RVF in mice. A single immunization with either of the vaccines conferred protection against RVF virus challenge eight weeks post-immunization. Both vaccines elicited RVF virus neutralizing antibody and a robust CD8+ T cell response. Together the results support further development of RVF vaccines based on replication-deficient adenovirus vectors, with ChAdOx1-GnGc being a potential candidate for use in future human clinical trials.

  20. Car allocation between household heads in car deficient households : A decision model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anggraini, Renni; Arentze, Theo A.; Timmermans, Harry J P

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers car allocation choice behaviour in car-deficient households explicitly in the context of an activity-scheduling process, focusing on work activities. A decision tree induction method is applied to derive a decision tree for the car allocation decision in automobile deficient

  1. First results from car-to-car and car-to-infrastructure radio channel measurements at 5.2GHZ

    OpenAIRE

    Paier, Alexander; Kåredal, Johan; Czink, Nicolai; Hofstetter, Helmut; Dumard, Charlotte; Zemen, Thomas; Tufvesson, Fredrik; Mecklenbräuker, Christoph; Molisch, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Car-to-car and car-to-infrastructure (henceforth called C2X) communications are constantly gaining importance for road-safety and other applications. In order to design efficient C2X systems, an understanding of realistic C2X propagation channels is required, but currently, only few measurements have been published. This paper presents a description of an extensive measurement campaign recently conducted in an urban scenario, a rural scenario, and on a highway. We focused on 4 ÿ 4 multiple-in...

  2. [Effect of topical application of a recombinant adenovirus carrying promyelocytic leukemia gene in a psoriasis-like mouse model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongyu; Zhang, Aijun; Ma, Huiqun; Wang, Shijie; Ma, Yunyun; Zou, Xingwei; Li, Ruilian

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effects of topical treatment with adenovirus-mediated promyelocytic leukemia gene (PML) gene in a psoriasis-like mouse model. The effect of adenovirus-mediated PML gene on the granular layer of mouse tail scale epidermis and epithelial mitosis were observed on longitudinal histological sections prepared from the tail skin and vaginal epithelium of the mice. Adenovirus-mediated PML gene significantly inhibited mitosis of mouse vaginal epithelial cells and promoted the formation of granular layer in mouse tail scale epidermis. The therapeutic effect of PML gene in the psoriasis-like mouse model may be associated with increased granular cells and suppressed epidemic cell proliferation.

  3. CAR-mediated repression of Foxo1 transcriptional activity regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21 in mouse livers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A.; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CAR activation decreased the level of Foxo1 in mouse livers. • CAR activation decreased the level of p21 in mouse livers. • CAR activation inhibited Foxo1 transcriptional activity in mouse livers. - Abstract: 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), an agonist of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), is a well-known strong primary chemical mitogen for the mouse liver. Despite extensive investigation of the role of CAR in the regulation of cell proliferation, our knowledge of the intricate mediating mechanism is incomplete. In this study, we demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increased liver-to-body weight ratio and decreased tumour suppressor Foxo1 expression and transcriptional activity, which were correlated with reduced expression of genes regulated by Foxo1, including the cell-cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a(p21), and upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator Cyclin D1. Moreover, we demonstrated the negative regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on the association of Foxo1 with the target Foxo1 itself and Cdkn1a(p21) promoters. Thus, we identified CAR-mediated repression of cell cycle inhibitor p21, as mediated by repression of FOXO1 expression and transcriptional activity. CAR-FOXO1 cross-talk may provide new opportunities for understanding liver diseases and developing more effective therapeutic approaches to better drug treatments

  4. Enhanced Expression of Anti-CD19 Chimeric Antigen Receptor in piggyBac Transposon-Engineered T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Morita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-modified T cells is a promising cancer immunotherapy. We previously developed a non-viral method of gene transfer into T cells using a piggyBac transposon system to improve the cost-effectiveness of CAR-T cell therapy. Here, we have further improved our technology by a novel culture strategy to increase the transfection efficiency and to reduce the time of T cell manufacturing. Using a CH2CH3-free CD19-specific CAR transposon vector and combining irradiated activated T cells (ATCs as feeder cells and virus-specific T cell receptor (TCR stimulation, we achieved 51.4% ± 14% CAR+ T cells and 2.8-fold expansion after 14 culture days. Expanded CD19.CAR-T cells maintained a significant fraction of CD45RA+CCR7+ T cells and demonstrated potent antitumor activity against CD19+ leukemic cells both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, piggyBac-based gene transfer may provide an alternative to viral gene transfer for CAR-T cell therapy.

  5. DP97, a DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase, is a target gene-selective co-regulator of the constitutive androstane receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Serikawa, Takafumi; Inajima, Jun; Inouye, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► DP97 interacts with nuclear receptor CAR. ► DP97 enhances CAR-mediated transcriptional activation. ► DP97 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1 or PGC1α. ► DP97 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR. -- Abstract: The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that DP97, a member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase protein family, is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Using HepG2 cells expressing human CAR in the presence of tetracycline, we showed that knockdown of DP97 with small interfering RNAs suppressed tetracycline-inducible mRNA expression of CYP2B6 and UGT1A1 but not CYP3A4. Thus, DP97 was found to be a gene (or promoter)-selective co-activator for hCAR. DP97-mediated CAR transactivation was synergistically enhanced by the co-expression of SRC-1 or PGC1α, therefore it might act as mediator between hCAR and appropriate co-activators.

  6. Enfermedad neurologica por adenovirus Neurologic disease due to adenovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L. Lema

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de adenovirus (ADV en las infecciones del sistema nervioso central (SNC. Se analizaron 108 muestras de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR provenientes de 79 casos de encefalitis, 7 meningitis y 22 de otras patologías neurológicas, recibidas en el período 2000-2002. Cuarenta y nueve (47.35% se obtuvieron de pacientes inmunocomprometidos. La presencia de ADV se investigó mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa en formato anidado (Nested-PCR. La identificación del genogrupo se realizó mediante análisis filogenético de la secuencia nucleotídica parcial de la región que codifica para la proteína del hexón. Se detectó la presencia de ADV en 6 de 108 (5.5% muestras de LCR analizadas. Todos los casos positivos pertenecieron a pacientes con encefalitis que fueron 79, (6/79, 7.6%. No se observó diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los casos de infección por ADV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos e inmunocompetentes (p>0.05. Las cepas de ADV detectadas se agruparon en los genogrupos B1 y C. En conclusión, nuestros resultados describen el rol de los ADV en las infecciones neurológicas en Argentina. La información presentada contribuye al conocimiento de su epidemiología, en particular en casos de encefalitis.The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of adenovirusm (ADV infections in neurological disorders. A total of 108 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 79 encephalitis cases, 7 meningitis and 22 other neurological diseases analysed in our laboratory between 2000 and 2002 were studied. Forty nine (47.4% belonged to immunocompromised patients. Viral genome was detected using nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR and ADV genotypes were identified using partial gene sequence analysis of hexon gene. Adenovirus were detected in 6 of 108 (5.5% CSF samples tested. All of these were from encephalitis cases, 6/79, representing 7.6% of them. No statistically

  7. Intratracheal injection of adenovirus containing the human MNSOD transgene protects athymic nude mice from irradiation-induced organizing alveolitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epperly, Michael W.; Bray, Jenifer A.; Krager, Stephen; Berry, Luann M.; Gooding, William; Engelhardt, John F.; Zwacka, Ralf; Travis, Elizabeth L.; Greenberger, Joel S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A dose and volume limiting factor in radiation treatment of thoracic cancer is the development of fibrosis in normal lung. The goal of the present study was to determine whether expression prior to irradiation of a transgene for human manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) or human copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) protects against irradiation-induced lung damage in mice. Methods and Materials: Athymic Nude (Nu/J) mice were intratracheally injected with 10 9 plaque-forming units (PFU) of a replication-incompetent mutant adenovirus construct containing the gene for either human MnSOD, human copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) or LacZ. Four days later the mice were irradiated to the pulmonary cavity to doses of 850, 900, or 950 cGy. To demonstrate adenoviral infection, nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out with primers specific for either human MnSOD or Cu/ZnSOD transgene on freshly explanted lung, trachea, or alveolar type II cells, and immunohistochemistry was used to measure LacZ expression. RNA was extracted on day 0, 1, 4, or 7 after 850 cGy of irradiation from lungs of mice that had previously received adenovirus or had no treatment. Slot blot analysis was performed to quantitate RNA expression for IL-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TGF-β, MnSOD, or Cu/ZnSOD. Lung tissue was explanted and tested for biochemical activity of MnSOD or Cu/ZnSOD after adenovirus injection. Other mice were sacrificed 132 days after irradiation, lungs excised, frozen in OCT, (polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol mixture) sectioned, H and E stained, and evaluated for percent of the lung demonstrating organizing alveolitis. Results: Mice injected intratracheally with adenovirus containing the gene for human MnSOD had significantly reduced chronic lung irradiation damage following 950 cGy, compared to control mice or mice injected with adenovirus containing the gene for human Cu/ZnSOD or LacZ. Immunohistochemistry

  8. Optimization and evaluation of a method to detect adenoviruses in river water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes the recoveries of spiked adenovirus through various stages of experimental optimization procedures. This dataset is associated with the...

  9. CAR-T cells and combination therapies: What's next in the immunotherapy revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramello, Maria C; Haura, Eric B; Abate-Daga, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Cancer immunotherapies are dramatically reshaping the clinical management of oncologic patients. For many of these therapies, the guidelines for administration, monitoring, and management of associated toxicities are still being established. This is especially relevant for adoptively transferred, genetically-modified T cells, which have unique pharmacokinetic properties, due to their ability to replicate and persist long-term, following a single administration. Furthermore, in the case of CAR-T cells, the use of synthetic immune receptors may impact signaling pathways involved in T cell function and survival in unexpected ways. We, herein, comment on the most salient aspects of CAR-T cell design and clinical experience in the treatment of solid tumors. In addition, we discuss different possible scenarios for combinations of CAR-T cells and other treatment modalities, with a special emphasis on kinase inhibitors, elaborating on the strategies to maximize synergism. Finally, we discuss some of the technologies that are available to explore the molecular events governing the success of these therapies. The young fields of synthetic and systems biology are likely to be major players in the advancement of CAR-T cell therapies, providing the tools and the knowledge to engineer patients' T lymphocytes into intelligent cancer-fighting micromachines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The urethral smear as a tool in diagnosing adenovirus-induced urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønsberg, E; Hartgill, U

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus is a recognised cause of non-gonococcal urethritis, and is not uncommonly associated with extragenital signs and symptoms. This case report describes a patient with symptoms of conjunctivitis, meatitis and urethritis. The urethral smear revealed almost exclusively monocytes microscopically, raising the suspicion of a viral aetiology. Results confirmed the presence of adenovirus in both the eyes and urethra. Despite waning reliance on the urethral smear in sexual health clinics, it can still be an important diagnostic tool in assessing the aetiology of non-specific urethritis. Finding an obvious monocytic cell response in the urethral smear can indicate a viral cause and allow the clinician to optimise management, counsel appropriately, and potentially reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Jet Car Track Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located in Lakehurst, New Jersey, the Jet Car Track Site supports jet cars with J57 engines and has a maximum jet car thrust of 42,000 pounds with a maximum speed of...

  12. Sequence typing of adenovirus from samples from hematological stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qurashi, Yasir Mohammed A; Guiver, Malcolm; Cooper, Robert J

    2011-11-01

    Adenovirus infections are usually mild or even asymptomatic, but infections with the virus are being recognized increasingly as a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the immunocompromised, particularly hematological stem cell transplant patients where infections can be life threatening and mortality may reach 60%. Typing by sequencing the HVR7 region of the hexon was established and validated using 60 isolates of different serotypes from the six of the seven species which had been typed previously by serum neutralization. Analysis of nucleotide sequences was used to type 227 samples from 41 hematological stem cell transplant recipients. Types from six species were detected but species C types were detected in 51.4% and species A in 34.3% of patients. Seven patients were infected with different adenovirus types sequentially and a further six patients had evidence of simultaneous multiple infections. Many of the sequences had several differences from the prototype strains which will allow tracing of outbreaks and provide evidence for cross-infection in a hospital setting. In this study, the phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences from hematological stem cell transplant patients' samples showed evidence of two possible cross-infection incidents involving three and five patients, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Eric A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Camacho, Zenaido T. [Department of Cell Biology, Department of Natural Sciences, Western New Mexico University, Silver City, NM 88062 (United States); Hillestad, Matthew L. [Nephrology Training Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J. [Virology and Gene Therapy Graduate Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Mercier, George T. [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Barry, Michael A., E-mail: mab@mayo.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Department of Immunology and Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  14. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5

  15. Identification of a novel aviadenovirus, designated pigeon adenovirus 2 in domestic pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, L; Rubbenstroth, D; Meixner, M; Liere, K; Bartels, H; Rautenschlein, S

    2017-01-02

    The young pigeon disease syndrome (YPDS) affects mainly young pigeons of less than one year of age and leads to crop stasis, vomitus, diarrhea, anorexia and occasionally death. This disease is internationally a major health problem because of its seasonal appearance during competitions such as homing pigeon races or exhibitions of ornamental birds. While the etiology of YPDS is still unclear, adenoviruses are frequently discussed as potential causative agents. Electron microscopy of feces from a YPDS outbreak revealed massive shedding of adenovirus-like particles. Whole genome sequencing of this sample identified a novel adenovirus tentatively named pigeon adenovirus 2 (PiAdV-2). Phylogenetic and comparative genome analysis suggest PiAdV-2 to belong to a new species within the genus Aviadenovirus, for which we propose the name Pigeon aviadenovirus B. The PiAdV-2 genome shares 54.9% nucleotide sequence identity with pigeon adenovirus 1 (PiAdV-1). In a screening of further YPDS-affected flocks two variants of PiAdV-2 (variant A and B) were detected which shared 97.6% nucleotide identity of partial polymerase sequences, but only 79.7% nucleotide identity of partial hexon sequences. The distribution of both PiAdV-2 variants was further investigated in fecal samples collected between 2008 and 2015 from healthy or YPDS-affected racing pigeons of different lofts. Independent of their health status, approximately 20% of young and 13% of adult pigeon flocks harbored PiAdV-2 variants. Birds were free of PiAdV-1 or other aviadenoviruses as determined by PCRs targeting the aviadenovirus polymerase or the PiAdV-1 fiber gene, respectively. In conclusion, there is no indication of a correlation between YPDS outbreaks and the presence of PiAdV-2 or other aviadenoviruses, arguing against an causative role in this disease complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical pharmacology of CAR-T cells: Linking cellular pharmacodynamics to pharmacokinetics and antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norelli, M; Casucci, M; Bonini, C; Bondanza, A

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of T cells genetically modified with tumor-reactive chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a rapidly emerging field in oncology, which in preliminary clinical trials has already shown striking antitumor efficacy. Despite these premises, there are still a number of open issues related to CAR-T cells, spanning from their exact mechanism of action (pharmacodynamics), to the factors associated with their in vivo persistence (pharmacokinetics), and, finally, to the relative contribution of each of the two in determining the antitumor effects and accompanying toxicities. In light of the unprecedented curative potential of CAR-T cells and of their predicted wide availability in the next few years, in this review we will summarize the current knowledge on the clinical pharmacology aspects of what is anticipated to be a brand new class of biopharmaceuticals to join the therapeutic armamentarium of cancer doctors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  18. Approved CAR T cell therapies : Ice bucket challenges on glaring safety risks and long-term impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Zheng (Pingpin); J.M. Kros (Johan); J. Li (Jin)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractTwo autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies (Kymriah™ and Yescarta™) were recently approved by the FDA. Kymriah™ is for the treatment of pediatric patients and young adults with refractory or relapse (R/R) B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Yescarta™ is

  19. Functional analysis of four naturally occurring variants of human constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shinobu; Kurose, Kouichi; Jinno, Hideto; Sai, Kimie; Ozawa, Shogo; Hasegawa, Ryuichi; Komamura, Kazuo; Kotake, Takeshi; Morishita, Hideki; Kamakura, Shiro; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Tomoike, Hitonobu; Tamura, Tomohide; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Yamada, Yasuhide; Ohe, Yuichiro; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Shirao, Kuniaki; Kubota, Kaoru; Minami, Hironobu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Saijo, Nagahiro; Saito, Yoshiro; Sawada, Jun-ichi

    2005-01-01

    The human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a member of the orphan nuclear receptor superfamily that plays an important role in the control of drug metabolism and disposition. In this study, we sequenced all the coding exons of the NR1I3 gene for 334 Japanese subjects. We identified three novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that induce non-synonymous alterations of amino acids (His246Arg, Leu308Pro, and Asn323Ser) residing in the ligand-binding domain of CAR, in addition to the Val133Gly variant, which was another CAR variant identified in our previous study. We performed functional analysis of these four naturally occurring CAR variants in COS-7 cells using a CYP3A4 promoter/enhancer reporter gene that includes the CAR responsive elements. The His246Arg variant caused marked reductions in both transactivation of the reporter gene and in the response to 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO), which is a human CAR-specific agonist. The transactivation ability of the Leu308Pro variant was also significantly decreased, but its responsiveness to CITCO was not abrogated. The transactivation ability and CITCO response of the Val133Gly and Asn323Ser variants did not change as compared to the wild-type CAR. These data suggest that the His246Arg and Leu308Pro variants, especially His246Arg, may influence the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters that are transactivated by CAR.

  20. Report on electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars; Redegoerelse - elbiler og plug-in hybridbiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkjaer Toennesen, A.; Winther, K.; Noerregaard, K. (Teknologisk Institut, Taastrup (Denmark)); Larsen, Esben; Christensen, Linda; Kveiborg, O. (Danmarks Teknologiske Univ., Kgs. Lyngby (DTU) (Denmark))

    2010-04-15

    The Center for Green Transport at the Danish Transport Authority has prepared this statement in order to uncover driving technical aspects, user expectations and needs, and the environmental consequences of using electric and plug-in hybrid cars. An electric car is defined as a car driven by an electric motor that has a battery that can be charged with power from the grid. A plug-in hybrid car is defined as a car that combines gasoline or diesel engine with an electric motor with a battery which can be recharged with power from the grid. From an overall consideration related to the transport sector electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars have the major advantage that negative impacts on environment and climate from traffic can be reduced while the high mobility is maintained. Through an increased use of electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars, the many advantages attached to the car as an individual transportation form is maintained, while CO{sub 2} emissions etc. are reduced. Electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars is one of the technologies that are considered to have particularly great prospects in the medium term when it comes to promoting new technologies in transport. Another advantage of using electric vehicles is the power supply factor. An increased use of electricity in transport will reduce the need for and dependence on fossil fuels in the sector. Both electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars are expected to be used for storage of wind power, a possibility which is hardly available today. The plug-in hybrid car could meet some of the challenges facing the pure electric car, because it also can use conventional fuel. The report presents analyses based on three focus areas: a) Users' needs, expectations and economics in relation to vehicles; b) The technology - and hence the manufacturers' opportunities and challenges; c) Connection to the power grid. (ln)

  1. New Chimeric Antigen Receptor Design for Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuedi Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell therapy has become popular in immunotherapy, particularly after its tremendous success in the treatment of lineage-restricted hematologic cancers. However, the application of CAR T-cell therapy for solid tumors has not reached its full potential because of the lack of specific tumor antigens and inhibitory factors in suppressive tumor microenvironment (TME (e.g., programmed death ligand-1, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and transforming growth factor-β. In this review, we include some limitations in CAR design, such as tumor heterogeneity, indefinite spatial distance between CAR T-cell and its target cell, and suppressive TME. We also summarize some new approaches to overcome these hurdles, including targeting neoantigens and/or multiple antigens at once and depleting some inhibitory factors.

  2. [Prerequisite for hematopoietic cellular therapy programs to set up chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy (CAR T-cells): Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Ferrand, Christophe; Chalandon, Yves; Ballot, Caroline; Castilla Llorente, Cristina; Deschamps, Marina; Gauthier, Jordan; Labalette, Myriam; Larghero, Jérôme; Maheux, Camille; Moreau, Anne-Sophie; Varlet, Pauline; Pétillon, Marie-Odile; Pinturaud, Marine; Rubio, Marie Thérèse; Chabannon, Christian

    2017-12-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous or allogeneic human lymphocytes that are genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor targeting an antigen expressed on tumor cells such as CD19. CAR T-cells represent a new class of medicinal products, and belong to the broad category of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs), as defined by EC Regulation 2007-1394. Specifically, they are categorized as gene therapy medicinal products. Although CAR T-cells are cellular therapies, the organization for manufacturing and delivery is far different from the one used to deliver hematopoietic cell grafts, for different reasons including their classification as medicinal products. Currently available clinical observations were mostly produced in the context of trials conducted either in the USA or in China. They demonstrate remarkable efficacy for patients presenting advanced or poor-prognosis hematological malignancies, however with severe side effects in a significant proportion of patients. Toxicities can and must be anticipated and dealt with in the context of a full coordination between the clinical cell therapy ward in charge of the patient, and the neighboring intensive care unit. The present workshop aimed at identifying prerequisites to be met in order for French hospitals to get efficiently organized and fulfill sponsors' expectations before initiation of clinical trials designed to investigate CAR T-cells. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Elutriated lymphocytes for manufacturing chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stroncek, David F.; Lee, Daniel W.; Ren, Jiaqiang; Sabatino, Marianna; Highfill, Steven; Khuu, Hanh; Shah, Nirali N.; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Fry, Terry J.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells manufactured from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) concentrates for the treatment of hematologic malignancies have been promising, but CAR T cell yields have been variable. This variability is due in part to the contamination of the PBMC concentrates with monocytes and granulocytes. Methods Counter-flow elutriation allows for the closed system separation of lymphocytes from monocytes and granulocytes. We ...

  4. 77 FR 3482 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen Receptors Into Therapeutics for.... 61/473,409 entitled ``Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III chimeric antigen receptors... EGFRvIII chimeric antigen (CARs) and methods of using these engineered T cells to treat and/or prevent...

  5. Homology-Directed Recombination for Enhanced Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malika Hale

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene editing by homology-directed recombination (HDR can be used to couple delivery of a therapeutic gene cassette with targeted genomic modifications to generate engineered human T cells with clinically useful profiles. Here, we explore the functionality of therapeutic cassettes delivered by these means and test the flexibility of this approach to clinically relevant alleles. Because CCR5-negative T cells are resistant to HIV-1 infection, CCR5-negative anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells could be used to treat patients with HIV-associated B cell malignancies. We show that targeted delivery of an anti-CD19 CAR cassette to the CCR5 locus using a recombinant AAV homology template and an engineered megaTAL nuclease results in T cells that are functionally equivalent, in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models, to CAR T cells generated by random integration using lentiviral delivery. With the goal of developing off-the-shelf CAR T cell therapies, we next targeted CARs to the T cell receptor alpha constant (TRAC locus by HDR, producing TCR-negative anti-CD19 CAR and anti-B cell maturation antigen (BCMA CAR T cells. These novel cell products exhibited in vitro cytolytic activity against both tumor cell lines and primary cell targets. Our combined results indicate that high-efficiency HDR delivery of therapeutic genes may provide a flexible and robust method that can extend the clinical utility of cell therapeutics.

  6. Background free CARS imaging by phase sensitive heterodyne CARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we show that heterodyne CARS, based on a controlled and stable phase-preserving chain, can be used to measure amplitude and phase information of molecular vibration modes. The technique is validated by a comparison of the imaginary part of the heterodyne CARS spectrum to the

  7. Target Antigen Density Governs the Efficacy of Anti-CD20-CD28-CD3 zeta Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified Effector CD8(+) T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Terakura, Seitaro; Martens, Anton C.; van Meerten, Tom; Uchiyama, Susumu; Imai, Misa; Sakemura, Reona; Goto, Tatsunori; Hanajiri, Ryo; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Tomita, Akihiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Naoe, Tomoki; Murata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)-transduced T (CAR-T) cells has been attributed to supraphysiological signaling through CARs. Second-and later-generation CARs simultaneously transmit costimulatory signals with CD3 zeta signals upon ligation, but may lead to severe adverse effects

  8. Adenovirus-mediated sphingomyelin synthase 2 increases atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE KO mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yarui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2 contributes to de novo sphingomyelin (SM biosynthesis. Its activity is related to SM levels in the plasma and the cell membrane. In this study, we investigated the possibility of a direct relationship between SMS and atherosclerosis. Methods The Adenovirus containing SMS2 gene was given into 10-week ApoE KO C57BL/6J mice by femoral intravenous injection. In the control group, the Adenovirus containing GFP was given. To confirm this model, we took both mRNA level examination (RT-PCR and protein level examination (SMS activity assay. Result We generated recombinant adenovirus vectors containing either human SMS2 cDNA (AdV-SMS2 or GFP cDNA (AdV-GFP. On day six after intravenous infusion of 2 × 1011 particle numbers into ten-week-old apoE KO mice, AdV-SMS2 treatment significantly increased liver SMS2 mRNA levels and SMS activity (by 2.7-fold, 2.3-fold, p Conclusions Our results present direct morphological evidence for the pro-atherogenic capabilities of SMS2. SMS2 could be a potential target for treating atherosclerosis.

  9. Breaking car use habits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Møller, Berit Thorup

    2008-01-01

    Based on calls for innovative ways of reducing car traffic and research indicating that car driving is often the result of habitual decision-making and choice processes, this paper reports on a field experiment designed to test a tool aimed to entice drivers to skip the habitual choice of the car...... and consider using-or at least trying-public transport instead. About 1,000 car drivers participated in the experiment either as experimental subjects, receiving a free one-month travelcard, or as control subjects. As predicted, the intervention had a significant impact on drivers' use of public transport...... and it also neutralized the impact of car driving habits on mode choice. However, in the longer run (i.e., four months after the experiment) experimental subjects did not use public transport more than control subjects. Hence, it seems that although many car drivers choose travel mode habitually, their final...

  10. Design of an intelligent car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yongyi

    2017-03-01

    The design of simple intelligent car, using AT89S52 single chip microcomputer as the car detection and control core; The metal sensor TL - Q5MC induction to iron, to detect the way to send feedback to the signal of single chip microcomputer, make SCM according to the scheduled work mode to control the car in the area according to the predetermined speed, and the operation mode of the microcontroller choose different also can control the car driving along s-shaped iron; Use A44E hall element to detect the car speeds; Adopts 1602 LCD display time of car driving, driving the car to stop, take turns to show the car driving time, distance, average speed and the speed of time. This design has simple structure and is easy to implement, but are highly intelligent, humane, to a certain extent reflects the intelligence.

  11. Misuse of car safety seats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, M J; Stroup, K B; Gerhart, S

    1988-01-01

    Correct use of car seats for small children is essential to prevent serious injuries and death from automotive accidents. Failure to use a car seat properly can contribute to serious injury or death of a child. A case study in which misuse of a car seat occurred is reported. The infant died of hemorrhage and shock secondary to liver laceration which resulted from excessive pressure over the abdomen sustained on impact. Surveys of car seat use for small children prior to and following a child restraint law are also reported. Observers noted types of car seats and specific forms of misuse. Survey results suggest that parents are more likely to misuse car seats for infants than toddlers. Medical professionals can reinforce the importance of proper car seat use by incorporating specific car seat use questions into the patient interview and by providing educational materials.

  12. GUCY2C-directed CAR-T cells oppose colorectal cancer metastases without autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Michael S; Kraft, Crystal L; Abraham, Tara S; Baybutt, Trevor R; Marszalowicz, Glen P; Li, Peng; Waldman, Scott A; Snook, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) is an emerging paradigm in which T cells are genetically modified to target cancer-associated antigens and eradicate tumors. However, challenges treating epithelial cancers with ACT reflect antigen targets that are not tumor-specific, permitting immune damage to normal tissues, and preclinical testing in artificial xenogeneic models, preventing prediction of toxicities in patients. In that context, mucosa-restricted antigens expressed by cancers exploit anatomical compartmentalization which shields mucosae from systemic antitumor immunity. This shielding may be amplified with ACT platforms employing antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), which mediate MHC-independent recog-nition of antigens. GUCY2C is a cancer mucosa antigen expressed on the luminal surfaces of the intestinal mucosa in mice and humans, and universally overexpressed by colorectal tumors, suggesting its unique utility as an ACT target. T cells expressing CARs directed by a GUCY2C-specific antibody fragment recognized GUCY2C, quantified by expression of activation markers and cytokines. Further, GUCY2C CAR-T cells lysed GUCY2C-expressing, but not GUCY2C-deficient, mouse colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, GUCY2C CAR-T cells reduced tumor number and morbidity and improved survival in mice harboring GUCY2C-expressing colorectal cancer metastases. GUCY2C-directed T cell efficacy reflected CAR affinity and surface expression and was achieved without immune-mediated damage to normal tissues in syngeneic mice. These observations highlight the potential for therapeutic translation of GUCY2C-directed CAR-T cells to treat metastatic tumors, without collateral autoimmunity, in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  13. Car-use habits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Berit Thorup; Thøgersen, John

    2008-01-01

    It is often claimed that many drivers use their private car rather habitually. The claim gains credibility from the fact that travelling to many everyday destinations fulfils all the prerequisites for habit formation: it is recurring, performed under stable circumstances and produces rewarding...... consequences. Since the decision is made quite automatically and only one choice alternative is considered (the habitually chosen one), behaviour guided by habit is difficult to change. The implications of car use habits for converting drivers to commuters using public transportation is analysed based...... to do so, car use habit, and the interaction between the two, confirms the theory-derived hypothesis that car use habits act as an obstacle to the transformation of intentions to commute by public transportation into action....

  14. 49 CFR 1037.2 - Cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cars. 1037.2 Section 1037.2 Transportation Other... GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS BULK GRAIN AND GRAIN PRODUCTS-LOSS AND DAMAGE CLAIMS § 1037.2 Cars. A car is... railroad-leased cars. [57 FR 54334, Nov. 18, 1992] ...

  15. Hepatoma targeting peptide conjugated bio-reducible polymer complexed with oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Kim, Hyun Ah; Nam, Kihoon; Na, Youjin; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, SungWan

    2015-12-28

    Despite adenovirus (Ad) vector's numerous advantages for cancer gene therapy, such as high ability of endosomal escape, efficient nuclear entry mechanism, and high transduction, and therapeutic efficacy, tumor specific targeting and antiviral immune response still remain as a critical challenge in clinical setting. To overcome these obstacles and achieve cancer-specific targeting, we constructed tumor targeting bioreducible polymer, an arginine grafted bio-reducible polymer (ABP)-PEG-HCBP1, by conjugating PEGylated ABP with HCBP1 peptides which has high affinity and selectivity towards hepatoma. The ABP-PEG-HCBP1-conjugated replication incompetent GFP-expressing ad, (Ad/GFP)-ABP-PEG-HCBP1, showed a hepatoma cancer specific uptake and transduction compared to either naked Ad/GFP or Ad/GFP-ABP. Competition assays demonstrated that Ad/GFP-ABP-PEG-HCBP1-mediated transduction was specifically inhibited by HCBP1 peptide rather than coxsackie and adenovirus receptor specific antibody. In addition, ABP-PEG-HCBP1 can protect biological activity of Ad against serum, and considerably reduced both innate and adaptive immune response against Ad. shMet-expressing oncolytic Ad (oAd; RdB/shMet) complexed with ABP-PEG-HCBP1 delivered oAd efficiently into hepatoma cancer cells. The oAd/ABP-PEG-HCBP1 demonstrated enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy in comparison to oAd/ABP complex. Furthermore, Huh7 and HT1080 cancer cells treated with oAd/shMet-ABP-PEG-HCBP1 complex had significantly decreased Met and VEGF expression in hepatoma cancer, but not in non-hepatoma cancer. In sum, these results suggest that HCBP1-conjugated bioreducible polymer could be used to deliver oncolytic Ad safely and efficiently to treat hepatoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating the role of CRM1-mediated export for adenovirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Christoph C.; Izadpanah, Reza; Bridge, Eileen

    2003-01-01

    A complex of the Adenovirus (Ad) early region 1b 55-kDa (E1b-55kDa) and early region 4 ORF6 34-kDa (E4-34kDa) proteins promotes viral late gene expression. E1b-55kDa and E4-34kDa have leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) similar to that of HIV Rev. It was proposed that E1b-55kDa and/or E4-34kDa might promote the export of Ad late mRNA via their Rev-like NESs, and the transport receptor CRM1. We treated infected cells with the cytotoxin leptomycin B to inhibit CRM1-mediated export; treatment initially delays the onset of late gene expression, but this activity completely recovers as the late phase progresses. We find that the E1b-55kDa NES is not required to promote late gene expression. Previous results showed that E4-34kDa-mediated late gene expression does not require an intact NES (J. Virol. 74 (2000), 6684-6688). Our results indicate that these Ad regulatory proteins promote late gene expression without intact NESs or active CRM1

  17. Gasoline cars produce more carbonaceous particulate matter than modern filter-equipped diesel cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, S M; El Haddad, I; Pieber, S M; Zardini, A A; Suarez-Bertoa, R; Clairotte, M; Daellenbach, K R; Huang, R-J; Slowik, J G; Hellebust, S; Temime-Roussel, B; Marchand, N; de Gouw, J; Jimenez, J L; Hayes, P L; Robinson, A L; Baltensperger, U; Astorga, C; Prévôt, A S H

    2017-07-13

    Carbonaceous particulate matter (PM), comprising black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol (POA) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA, from atmospheric aging of precursors), is a highly toxic vehicle exhaust component. Therefore, understanding vehicle pollution requires knowledge of both primary emissions, and how these emissions age in the atmosphere. We provide a systematic examination of carbonaceous PM emissions and parameterisation of SOA formation from modern diesel and gasoline cars at different temperatures (22, -7 °C) during controlled laboratory experiments. Carbonaceous PM emission and SOA formation is markedly higher from gasoline than diesel particle filter (DPF) and catalyst-equipped diesel cars, more so at -7 °C, contrasting with nitrogen oxides (NO X ). Higher SOA formation from gasoline cars and primary emission reductions for diesels implies gasoline cars will increasingly dominate vehicular total carbonaceous PM, though older non-DPF-equipped diesels will continue to dominate the primary fraction for some time. Supported by state-of-the-art source apportionment of ambient fossil fuel derived PM, our results show that whether gasoline or diesel cars are more polluting depends on the pollutant in question, i.e. that diesel cars are not necessarily worse polluters than gasoline cars.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of human adenovirus infections in Denmark, 2011–2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnadas, Céline; Schmidt, Dennis Jelsbak; Fischer, Thea K.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) can cause respiratory tract infections, conjunctivitis, diarrhoea and outbreaks have been reported. However, little is known about the disease burden and the molecular epidemiology of HAdV. Objectives: To retrospectively perform a molecular characterization ...

  19. Characteristics of adenovirus urethritis among heterosexual men and men who have sex with men: a review of clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaraweera, Geethani R; Garcia, Katherine; Druce, Julian; Williams, Henrietta; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Fairley, Christopher K; Chow, Eric Pf; Denham, Ian M; Read, Timothy R H; Chen, Marcus Y

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the clinical features of adenovirus urethritis in men and to compare the frequency of these between heterosexual men and men who have sex with men (MSM). This was a review of the clinical and laboratory information from men diagnosed with PCR-confirmed adenovirus urethritis at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between January 2006 and April 2014. 102 adenovirus urethritis cases were reported, among which 61 were heterosexual men and 41 MSM. Eighty-nine per cent (n=91) had signs of meatitis or conjunctivitis: 51% had meatitis only; 32% meatitis together with conjunctivitis and 6% with conjunctivitis only. The distribution of symptoms and signs was similar among heterosexual men and MSM (p values >0.1). Adenovirus was the sole pathogen found in 93% of cases, excluding gonorrhoea, chlamydia, Mycoplasma genitalium and herpes simplex virus. Only 37% had ≥5 polymorphs per high-power field from a urethral smear. Where samples were still available for adenoviral sequencing (n=20), all were subgroup D. The clinical features of adenovirus urethritis in men can be distinctive and aid diagnosis, distinguishing it from other treatable causes of male urethritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Formation of a Multiple Protein Complex on the Adenovirus Packaging Sequence by the IVa2 Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler, Ryan E.; Ewing, Sean G.; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    During adenovirus virion assembly, the packaging sequence mediates the encapsidation of the viral genome. This sequence is composed of seven functional units, termed A repeats. Recent evidence suggests that the adenovirus IVa2 protein binds the packaging sequence and is involved in packaging of the genome. Study of the IVa2-packaging sequence interaction has been hindered by difficulty in purifying the protein produced in virus-infected cells or by recombinant techniques. We report the first ...

  1. Gasoline-powered series hybrid cars cause lower life cycle carbon emissions than battery cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinrenken, Christoph; Lackner, Klaus S.

    2012-02-01

    Battery cars powered by grid electricity promise reduced life cycle green house gas (GHG) emissions from the automotive sector. Such scenarios usually point to the much higher emissions from conventional, internal combustion engine cars. However, today's commercially available series hybrid technology achieves the well known efficiency gains in electric drivetrains (regenerative breaking, lack of gearbox) even if the electricity is generated onboard, from conventional fuels. Here, we analyze life cycle GHG emissions for commercially available, state-of the-art plug-in battery cars (e.g. Nissan Leaf) and those of commercially available series hybrid cars (e.g., GM Volt, at same size and performance). Crucially, we find that series hybrid cars driven on (fossil) gasoline cause fewer emissions (126g CO2eq per km) than battery cars driven on current US grid electricity (142g CO2eq per km). We attribute this novel finding to the significant incremental emissions from plug-in battery cars due to losses during grid transmission and battery dis-/charging, and manufacturing larger batteries. We discuss crucial implications for strategic policy decisions towards a low carbon automotive sector as well as relative land intensity when powering cars by biofuel vs. bioelectricity.

  2. Gasoline-powered serial hybrid cars cause lower life cycle carbon emissions than battery cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinrenken, Christoph J.; Lackner, Klaus S.

    2011-04-01

    Battery cars powered by grid electricity promise reduced life cycle green house gas (GHG) emissions from the automotive sector. Such scenarios usually point to the much higher emissions from conventional, internal combustion engine cars. However, today's commercially available serial hybrid technology achieves the well known efficiency gains from regenerative breaking, lack of gearbox, and light weighting - even if the electricity is generated onboard, from conventional fuels. Here, we analyze emissions for commercially available, state-of the-art battery cars (e.g. Nissan Leaf) and those of commercially available serial hybrid cars (e.g., GM Volt, at same size and performance). Crucially, we find that serial hybrid cars driven on (fossil) gasoline cause fewer life cycle GHG emissions (126g CO2e per km) than battery cars driven on current US grid electricity (142g CO2e per km). We attribute this novel finding to the significant incremental life cycle emissions from battery cars from losses during grid transmission, battery dis-/charging, and larger batteries. We discuss crucial implications for strategic policy decisions towards a low carbon automotive sector as well as relative land intensity when powering cars by biofuel vs. bioelectricity.

  3. NREL Model Car Competitions | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    work together building cars with guidance from a parent, teacher, or coach to compete in race and Solar and Lithium Ion model car races in Colorado. Building solar- and battery-powered cars requires listPDF for Junior Solar Sprint and Lithium-Ion Battery model cars. Junior Solar Sprint Solar Made Pitsco

  4. DP97, a DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase, is a target gene-selective co-regulator of the constitutive androstane receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Yuichiro, E-mail: ykanno@phar.toho-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, Chiba (Japan); Serikawa, Takafumi; Inajima, Jun; Inouye, Yoshio [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 interacts with nuclear receptor CAR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 enhances CAR-mediated transcriptional activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1 or PGC1{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR. -- Abstract: The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that DP97, a member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase protein family, is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Using HepG2 cells expressing human CAR in the presence of tetracycline, we showed that knockdown of DP97 with small interfering RNAs suppressed tetracycline-inducible mRNA expression of CYP2B6 and UGT1A1 but not CYP3A4. Thus, DP97 was found to be a gene (or promoter)-selective co-activator for hCAR. DP97-mediated CAR transactivation was synergistically enhanced by the co-expression of SRC-1 or PGC1{alpha}, therefore it might act as mediator between hCAR and appropriate co-activators.

  5. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Development of CINPA1 analogs as novel and potent inverse agonists of constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenwei; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C; Lu, Yan; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-27

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) are master regulators of endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism and disposition. Because CAR is constitutively active in certain cellular contexts, inhibiting CAR might reduce drug-induced hepatotoxicity and resensitize drug-resistant cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. We recently reported a novel CAR inhibitor/inverse agonist CINPA1 (11). Here, we have obtained or designed 54 analogs of CINPA1 and used a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay to evaluate their CAR inhibition potency. Many of the 54 analogs showed CAR inverse agonistic activities higher than those of CINPA1, which has an IC50 value of 687 nM. Among them, 72 has an IC50 value of 11.7 nM, which is about 59-fold more potent than CINPA1 and over 10-fold more potent than clotrimazole (an IC50 value of 126.9 nM), the most potent CAR inverse agonist in a biochemical assay previously reported by others. Docking studies provide a molecular explanation of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) observed experimentally. To our knowledge, this effort is the first chemistry endeavor in designing and identifying potent CAR inverse agonists based on a novel chemical scaffold, leading to 72 as the most potent CAR inverse agonist so far. The 54 chemicals presented are novel and unique tools for characterizing CAR's function, and the SAR information gained from these 54 analogs could guide future efforts to develop improved CAR inverse agonists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Increase of child car seat temperature in cars parked in the outpatient parking lot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Tetsu; Suzue, Junji; Kamada, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukiko; Tananari, Yoshifumi; Maeno, Yasuki; Ito, Shinichi; Nishino, Hiroshi; Kakimoto, Noriko; Yamakawa, Rumi

    2011-12-01

    A guideline for the safe use of child car seats (CS) was published by the Japan Pediatric Society in 2008. There have been few studies of the increase of temperature of a CS in parked cars. The aim of this study was to determine the change in the temperature of the CS in cars parked in full sun. The temperature of CS was measured during summer (July and August) in 2006, 2007, and 2008. The CS used in this study (n= 50) were for children (≤ 6 years old) who were taken by car to Sugimura Children's Medical Clinic. Temperatures were only measured on sunny days. Measurements were performed from 09.00 to 17.00 hours. Thermochron (Thermochron i-Button: G type, Maxim Integrated Products, CA, USA) was used to measure the temperatures. The maximum temperatures of CS were compared in time at the clinic, taking into consideration seat colors, and car colors. Of the 50 cars, three cars were excluded due to being in the shade while the temperature was measured. A total of 47 cars were used for this study. The temperature of the CS ranged from 38.0 to 65.5°C (47.8 ± 5.8°C). Eighteen CS (38.3%) reached a temperature of 50°C or above. The maximum temperature of the 13.00-15.00-hours group was significantly higher than that of the 09.00-11.00-hours group (P= 0.035). The CS temperatures in the black car group were significantly higher than those of the white car group (P= 0.013). CS may become very hot while a car is parked in sun, especially if the car and the CS are black, so the CS should be cooled before a young child is placed in it. Guardians of small children should be aware of this risk. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Car stickers for 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    The 2012 car stickers are now available. Holders of blue car stickers will receive by internal mail their 2012 car stickers as of 5 December. Holders of red car stickers are kindly requested to come to the Registration Service (Building 55,1st floor) to renew their 2011 stickers. This service is open from Monday to Friday from 7.30 am to 5.30 pm non-stop. Documents related to the vehicles concerned are mandatory. Reception and Access Control Service – GS/IS/SIS General Infrastructure Services Department

  9. Car stickers for 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    The 2011 car stickers are now available. Holders of blue car stickers will receive their 2011 car stickers by internal mail as of 15 December.   Holders of red car stickers are kindly requested to come to the Registration Service (Building 55,1st floor) to renew their 2011 stickers. This service is open from Monday to Friday from 7.30 am to 5.30 pm non-stop. Documents for the vehicles concerned must be presented. Reception and Access Control Service – GS/ISG/SIS General Infrastructure Services Department

  10. Detection of enteric Adenoviruses in South-African waters using gene probes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene probes developed locally for both enteric Adenoviruses 40 and 41 were used to determine whether these viruses were present in both raw and treated waters. Approximately sixty water samples were concentrated by ultra filtration and analysed...

  11. CAR T Cells in Trials: Recent Achievements and Challenges that Remain in the Production of Modified T Cells for Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl, Ulrike; Arsenieva, Stanislava; Holzinger, Astrid; Abken, Hinrich

    2018-04-05

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells is attracting growing interest for the treatment of malignant diseases. Early trials with anti-CD19 CAR T cells have achieved spectacular remissions in B-cell leukemia and lymphoma, so far refractory, very recently resulting in the Food and Drug Administration approval of CD19 CAR T cells for therapy. With further applications and increasing numbers of patients, the reproducible manufacture of high-quality clinical-grade CAR T cells is becoming an ever greater challenge. New processing techniques, quality-control mechanisms, and logistic developments are required to meet both medical needs and regulatory restrictions. This paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in manufacturing CAR T cells and the current challenges that need to be overcome to implement this type of cell therapy in the treatment of a variety of malignant diseases and in a greater number of patients.

  12. The Socialist Car

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars K.

    2013-01-01

    Review of L.H. Siegelbaum (ed.) The Socialist Car. Automobility in the Eastern Block. Cornell University Press, 2011.......Review of L.H. Siegelbaum (ed.) The Socialist Car. Automobility in the Eastern Block. Cornell University Press, 2011....

  13. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T Cells for Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Cartellieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are powerful components of adaptive immunity, which essentially contribute to the elimination of tumors. Due to their cytotoxic capacity, T cells emerged as attractive candidates for specific immunotherapy of cancer. A promising approach is the genetic modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs. First generation CARs consist of a binding moiety specifically recognizing a tumor cell surface antigen and a lymphocyte activating signaling chain. The CAR-mediated recognition induces cytokine production and tumor-directed cytotoxicity of T cells. Second and third generation CARs include signal sequences from various costimulatory molecules resulting in enhanced T-cell persistence and sustained antitumor reaction. Clinical trials revealed that the adoptive transfer of T cells engineered with first generation CARs represents a feasible concept for the induction of clinical responses in some tumor patients. However, further improvement is required, which may be achieved by second or third generation CAR-engrafted T cells.

  14. Hepatocellular hypertrophy and cell proliferation in Sprague–Dawley rats from dietary exposure to potassium perfluorooctanesulfonate results from increased expression of xenosensor nuclear receptors PPARα and CAR/PXR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elcombe, Clifford R.; Elcombe, Barbara M.; Foster, John R.; Chang, Shu-Ching; Ehresman, David J.; Butenhoff, John L.

    2012-01-01

    14,643 increased CYP2B enzyme activity to a slight extent. All test compounds increased the liver cell proliferative index and decreased the liver apoptotic index. No histological changes of the thyroid were noted; however, PB and WY increased thyroid follicular cell proliferation index (seven-day treatment only), while K + PFOS did not. The thyroid follicular cell apoptotic index did not differ between groups. The hepatomegaly and hepatocellular adenoma observed after dietary exposure of Sprague–Dawley rats to K + PFOS likely are due to the increased expression of xenosensor nuclear receptors PPARα and CAR/PXR. Given the markedly lower or absent response of human hepatocytes to the proliferative stimulus from activation of PPARα and CAR/PXR, the hepatocellular proliferative response from activation of these receptors by PFOS observed in rats is not expected to be of human relevance.

  15. FLAG-tagged CD19-specific CAR-T cells eliminate CD19-bearing solid tumor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berahovich, Robert; Xu, Shirley; Zhou, Hua; Harto, Hizkia; Xu, Qumiao; Garcia, Andres; Liu, Fenyong; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Wu, Lijun

    2017-06-01

    Autologous T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specific for CD19 have demonstrated remarkable efficacy as therapeutics for B cell malignancies. In the present study, we generated FLAG-tagged CD19-specific CAR-T cells (CD19-FLAG) and compared them to their non-tagged counterparts for their effects on solid and hematological cancer cells in vitro and in vivo . For solid tumors, we used HeLa cervical carcinoma cells engineered to overexpress CD19 (HeLa-CD19), and for hematological cancer we used Raji Burkitt's lymphoma cells, which endogenously express CD19. Like non-tagged CD19 CAR-T cells, CD19-FLAG CAR-T cells expanded in culture >100-fold and exhibited potent cytolytic activity against both HeLa-CD19 and Raji cells in vitro . CD19-FLAG CAR-T cells also secreted significantly more IFN-gamma and IL-2 than the control T cells. In vivo , CD19-FLAG CAR-T cells significantly blocked the growth of HeLa-CD19 solid tumors, increased tumor cleaved caspase-3 levels, and expanded systemically. CD19-FLAG CAR-T cells also significantly reduced Raji tumor burden and extended mouse survival. These results demonstrate the strong efficacy of FLAG-tagged CD19 CAR-T cells in solid and hematological cancer models.

  16. Chimeric antigen receptors for adoptive T cell therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Fan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, conventional therapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML have high failure and relapse rates. Thus, developing new strategies is crucial for improving the treatment of AML. With the clinical success of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapies against B-lineage malignancies, many studies have attempted to translate the success of CAR T cell therapy to other malignancies, including AML. This review summarizes the current advances in CAR T cell therapy against AML, including preclinical studies and clinical trials, and discusses the potential AML-associated surface markers that could be used for further CAR technology. Finally, we describe strategies that might address the current issues of employing CAR T cell therapy in AML.

  17. Mapping of nuclear import signal and importin {alpha}3 binding regions of 52K protein of bovine adenovirus-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Carolyn P.; Ayalew, Lisanework E. [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Center (VIDO-InterVac), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 Canada (Canada); Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 S7N 5B4 Canada (Canada); Tikoo, Suresh K., E-mail: suresh.tik@usask.ca [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Center (VIDO-InterVac), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 Canada (Canada); Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 S7N 5B4 Canada (Canada); School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5 Canada (Canada)

    2012-10-10

    The L1 region of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3 encodes a non-structural protein designated 52K. Anti-52K serum detected a protein of 40 kDa, which localized to the nucleus but not to the nucleolus in BAdV-3-infected or transfected cells. Analysis of mutant 52K proteins suggested that three basic residues ({sup 105}RKR{sup 107}) of the identified domain (amino acids {sup 102}GMPRKRVLT{sup 110}) are essential for nuclear localization of 52K. The nuclear import of a GST-52K fusion protein utilizes the classical importin {alpha}/{beta}-dependent nuclear transport pathway. The 52K protein is preferentially bound to the cellular nuclear import receptor importin {alpha}3. Although deletion of amino acid 102-110 is sufficient to abrogate the nuclear localization of 52K, amino acid 90-133 are required for interaction with importin-{alpha}3 and localizing a cytoplasmic protein to the nucleus. These results suggest that 52K contains a bipartite NLS, which preferentially utilize an importin {alpha}3 nuclear import receptor-mediated pathway to transport 52K to the nucleus.

  18. The crystal structure of a coxsackievirus B3-RD variant and a refined 9-angstrom cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the virus complexed with decay-accelerating factor (DAF) provide a new footprint of DAF on the virus surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Joshua D; Cifuente, Javier O; Pan, Jieyan; Bergelson, Jeffrey M; Hafenstein, Susan

    2012-12-01

    The coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF) have been identified as cellular receptors for coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). The first described DAF-binding isolate was obtained during passage of the prototype strain, Nancy, on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which express DAF but very little CAR. Here, the structure of the resulting variant, CVB3-RD, has been solved by X-ray crystallography to 2.74 Å, and a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of CVB3-RD complexed with DAF has been refined to 9.0 Å. This new high-resolution structure permits us to correct an error in our previous view of DAF-virus interactions, providing a new footprint of DAF that bridges two adjacent protomers. The contact sites between the virus and DAF clearly encompass CVB3-RD residues recently shown to be required for binding to DAF; these residues interact with DAF short consensus repeat 2 (SCR2), which is known to be essential for virus binding. Based on the new structure, the mode of the DAF interaction with CVB3 differs significantly from the mode reported previously for DAF binding to echoviruses.

  19. New adenoviruses from new primate hosts - growing diversity reveals taxonomic weak points

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dadáková, E.; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Brožová, K.; Modrý, David; Celer, V.; Hrazdilová, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 107, February (2017), s. 305-307 ISSN 1055-7903 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adenovirus * primate * phylogeny * taxonomy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.419, year: 2016

  20. A rapid generation of adenovirus vector with a genetic modification in hexon protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Bingyan; Mao, Qinwen; Zhao, Junli; Li, Xing; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin

    2012-02-10

    The generation of hexon-modified adenovirus vector has proven difficult. In this paper, we developed a novel method for rapid generation of hexon-modified adenoviral vector via one step ligation in vitro followed by quick white/blue color screening. The new system has the following features. First, eGFP expression driven by the CMV promoter in E1 region functions as a reporter to evaluate the tropism of hexon-modified adenovirus in vitro. Second, it has two unique restriction enzyme sites with sticky ends located in the hexon HVR5 region. Third, a lacZ expression cassette under the control of plac promoter is placed between the two restriction enzyme sites, which allows recombinants to be selected using blue/white screening. To prove the principle of the method, genetically modified adenoviruses were successfully produced by insertion of NGR, RGD or Tat PTD peptide into hexon HVR5. Furthermore, the transduction efficiency of the Tat PTD modified virus was shown to be a significant enhancement in A172 and CHO-K1 cells. In conclusion, the novel system makes the production of truly retargeted vectors more promising, which would be of substantial benefit for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Substitution between Cars within the Household

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Borger, Bruno; Mulalic, Ismir; Rouwendal, Jan

    In this paper we study the demand for car kilometres in two-car households, focusing on the substitution between cars in response to fuel price changes. We use a large sample of detailed Danish data on two-car households to estimate—for each car owned by the household—own and cross-price effects...... of increases in fuel costs per kilometre. The empirical results show that failure to capture substitution between cars within the household can result in substantial misspecification biases. Ignoring substitution, we estimate fuel price elasticities of –0.81 and -0.65 for the primary and secondary cars...... efficient car, finding partial support for the underlying hypothesis. More importantly, the results of this extended model emphasize the importance of behavioural differences related to the position of the most fuel efficient car in the household, suggesting that households’ fuel efficiency choices...

  2. Cars, Cycles, and Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idleman, Hillis K. Ed.

    The purpose of this consumer education module is to provide information and skills, and the ability to raise questions and find answers, while seeking the best automobile or motorcycle buy available for the money. The module may be used for a full or part semester course. The five sections (cars and the consumer, renting and leasing cars, cars and…

  3. Regulation of G-protein coupled receptor traffic by an evolutionary conserved hydrophobic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelotti, Tim; Daunt, David; Shcherbakova, Olga G; Kobilka, Brian; Hurt, Carl M

    2010-04-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) expression of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is required for activation by extracellular ligands; however, mechanisms that regulate PM expression of GPCRs are poorly understood. For some GPCRs, such as alpha2c-adrenergic receptors (alpha(2c)-ARs), heterologous expression in non-native cells results in limited PM expression and extensive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention. Recently, ER export/retentions signals have been proposed to regulate cellular trafficking of several GPCRs. By utilizing a chimeric alpha(2a)/alpha(2c)-AR strategy, we identified an evolutionary conserved hydrophobic sequence (ALAAALAAAAA) in the extracellular amino terminal region that is responsible in part for alpha(2c)-AR subtype-specific trafficking. To our knowledge, this is the first luminal ER retention signal reported for a GPCR. Removal or disruption of the ER retention signal dramatically increased PM expression and decreased ER retention. Conversely, transplantation of this hydrophobic sequence into alpha(2a)-ARs reduced their PM expression and increased ER retention. This evolutionary conserved hydrophobic trafficking signal within alpha(2c)-ARs serves as a regulator of GPCR trafficking.

  4. Fatal adenovirus encephalomyeloradiculitis in an umbilical cord stem cell transplant recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Awosika, Oluwole O.; Lyons, Jennifer L.; Ciarlini, Pedro; Phillips, Richard E.; Alfson, Elizabeth D.; Johnson, Emily L.; Koo, Sophia; Marty, Francisco; Drew, Clifton; Zaki, Sherif; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Klein, Joshua P.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infections frequently complicate allogeneic stem cell transplants but nervous system involvement, usually presenting as encephalitis, is atypical. Progression from encephalitis to myeloradiculitis has not been described previously.1 We present a unique case of fatal adenoviral encephalomyeloradiculitis with imaging and pathologic correlates.

  5. CD19 CAR-T cells of defined CD4+:CD8+ composition in adult B cell ALL patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Gooley, Theodore A; Cherian, Sindhu; Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Melville, Katherine; Pender, Barbara; Budiarto, Tanya M; Robinson, Emily; Steevens, Natalia N; Chaney, Colette; Soma, Lorinda; Chen, Xueyan; Yeung, Cecilia; Wood, Brent; Li, Daniel; Cao, Jianhong; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jensen, Michael C; Riddell, Stanley R; Maloney, David G

    2016-06-01

    T cells that have been modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies; however, identification of the factors that determine toxicity and efficacy of these T cells has been challenging in prior studies in which phenotypically heterogeneous CAR-T cell products were prepared from unselected T cells. We conducted a clinical trial to evaluate CD19 CAR-T cells that were manufactured from defined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets and administered in a defined CD4+:CD8+ composition to adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after lymphodepletion chemotherapy. The defined composition product was remarkably potent, as 27 of 29 patients (93%) achieved BM remission, as determined by flow cytometry. We established that high CAR-T cell doses and tumor burden increase the risks of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Moreover, we identified serum biomarkers that allow testing of early intervention strategies in patients at the highest risk of toxicity. Risk-stratified CAR-T cell dosing based on BM disease burden decreased toxicity. CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-CAR transgene product immune responses developed after CAR-T cell infusion in some patients, limited CAR-T cell persistence, and increased relapse risk. Addition of fludarabine to the lymphodepletion regimen improved CAR-T cell persistence and disease-free survival. Immunotherapy with a CAR-T cell product of defined composition enabled identification of factors that correlated with CAR-T cell expansion, persistence, and toxicity and facilitated design of lymphodepletion and CAR-T cell dosing strategies that mitigated toxicity and improved disease-free survival. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01865617. R01-CA136551; Life Science Development Fund; Juno Therapeutics; Bezos Family Foundation.

  6. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PTEN and KRT10 improves cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Wang, K; Liu, W; Hao, Q

    2015-06-18

    Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in ovarian cancer patients, and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Overexpression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) has been shown to preserve the cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer cells, while cisplatin-induced keratin 10 (KRT10) overexpression mediates the resistance-reversing effect of PTEN. However, whether overexpression of PTEN or KRT10 can improve the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo has not been investigated. Therefore, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated PTEN or KRT10 overexpression on the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo. Recombinant adenoviruses carrying the gene for PTEN or KRT10 were constructed. The effects of overexpression of PTEN and KRT10 on cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells were examined using the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays in vitro. Subcutaneously transplanted nude mice, as a model of human ovarian cancer, were used to test the effects of PTEN and KRT10 on cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo. The MTT assay showed that recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN enhanced the proliferation inhibition effect of cisplatin on C13K cells. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN also increased the cisplatin-induced apoptosis rate of C13K cells. Furthermore, recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN enhanced the inhibitory effect of cisplatin on C13K xenograft tumor growth. Thus, recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN may improve the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Effect of adenovirus infection on transgene expression under the adenoviral MLP/TPL and the CMVie promoter/enhancer in CHO cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. El-Mogy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The adenovirus major late promoter (MLP and its translational regulator – the tripartite leader (TPL sequence – can actively drive efficient gene expression during adenoviral infection. However, both elements have not been widely tested in transgene expression outside of the adenovirus genome context. In this study, we tested whether the combination of MLP and TPL would enhance transgene expression beyond that of the most widely used promoter in transgene expression in mammalian cells, the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMVie promoter/enhancer. The activity of these two regulatory elements was compared in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. Although transient expression was significantly higher under the control of the CMVie promoter/enhance compared to the MLP/TPL, this difference was greater at the level of transcription (30 folds than translation (11 folds. Even with adenovirus infection to provide additional elements (in trans, CMVie promoter/enhancer exhibited significantly higher activity relative to MLP/TPL. Interestingly, the CMVie promoter/enhancer was 1.9 folds more active in adenovirus-infected cells than in non-infected cells. Our study shows that the MLP-TPL drives lower transgene expression than the CMVie promoter/enhancer particularly at the transcription level. The data also highlight the utility of the TPL sequence at the translation level and/or possible overwhelming of the cellular translational machinery by the high transcription activity of the CMVie promoter/enhancer. In addition, here we present data that show stimulation of the CMVie promoter/enhancer by adenovirus infection, which may prove interesting in future work to test the combination of CMVie/TPL sequence, and additional adenovirus elements, for transgene expression.

  8. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells for the treatment of solid tumors: Defining the challenges and next steps☆

    OpenAIRE

    Beatty, Gregory L.; O’Hara, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has shown promise in CD19 expressing hematologic malignancies, but how to translate this success to solid malignancies remains elusive. Effective translation of CAR T cells to solid tumors will require an understanding of potential therapeutic barriers, including factors that regulate CAR T cells expansion, persistence, trafficking, and fate within tumors. Herein, we describe the current state of CAR T cells in solid tumors; define key barriers t...

  9. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region in adenovirus 5 DNA involved in cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of investigations into the primary structure of the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The phenomenon of cell transformation is discussed in general terms and the principles of a number of fairly recent techniques, which have been in use for DNA sequence determination since 1975 are dealt with. A few of the author's own techniques are described which deal both with nucleotide sequence analysis and with the determination of DNA cleavage sites of restriction endonucleases. The results are given of the mapping of cleavage sites in the HpaI-E fragment of adenovirus DNA of HpaII, HaeIII, AluI, HinfI and TaqI and of the determination of the nucleotide sequence in the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The results of the sequence determination of the Ad5 HindIII-G fragment are discussed in relation with the investigation on the transforming proteins isolated from in vitro and in vivo synthesizing systems. Labelling procedures of DNA are described including the exonuclease III/DNA polymerase 1 method and TA polynucleotide kinase labelling of DNA fragments. (Auth.)

  10. Oral or parenteral administration of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing the measles virus haemagglutinin and fusion proteins: protective immune responses in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooks, A R; Jeevarajah, D; Lee, J; Warnes, A; Niewiesk, S; ter Meulen, V; Stephenson, J R; Clegg, J C

    1998-05-01

    The genes encoding the measles virus (MV) haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins were placed under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter in a replication-deficient adenovirus vector. Immunofluorescence and radioimmune precipitation demonstrated the synthesis of each protein and biological activity was confirmed by the detection of haemadsorption and fusion activities in infected cells. Oral as well as parenteral administration of the H-expressing recombinant adenovirus elicited a significant protective response in mice challenged with MV. While the F-expressing adenovirus failed to protect mice, cotton rats immunized with either the H- or F-expressing recombinant showed reduced MV replication in the lungs. Antibodies elicited in mice following immunization with either recombinant had no in vitro neutralizing activity, suggesting a protective mechanism involving a cell-mediated immune response. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using oral administration of adenovirus recombinants to induce protective responses to heterologous proteins.

  11. Uptake of 131I-FIAU in BMSCs infected by adenovirus vector-mediated HSV1-TK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Binqing; Wu Tao; Sun Xun; An Rui

    2010-01-01

    Report gene HSV1-TK and therapy gene were connected by IRES, and recombinant adenovirus vector Ad5-TK-IRES-BDNF-EGFP was constructed and infected with BMSCs at MOI of 0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250, with the control recombinant adenovirus vector of Ad5-EGFP. Green fluorescence cell positive rate was observed under the microscopy. MTT assay was used to determine the cell proliferation. bFGF and EGF were used to induce the BMSCs, and RQ-PCR to determine target gene expression in infection BMSCs. Uptake of 131 I-FIAU was assessed by gamma counter. The data were processed by SPSS11.code. Recombinant adenovirus at MOI 150 had high infectionefficiency and low toxic in BMSCs. There was a strong relation between the mRNA expression of TK and BDNF in infection BMSCs. The significance between the infection BMSCs and control BMSCs for uptake of 131 I-FIAU at all the time points was t=23.06-173.83 and P 131 I-FIAU. This suggests a suitable gene vector for tracing genetically modified stem cells. (authors)

  12. Preclinical Models in Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T-Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Elizabeth Louise; Wang, Pin

    2018-05-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has enormous potential in inducing long-term remission in cancer patients, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells have been largely successful in treating hematological malignancies in the clinic. CAR-T therapy has not been as effective in treating solid tumors, in part due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Additionally, CAR-T therapy can cause dangerous side effects, including off-tumor toxicity, cytokine release syndrome, and neurotoxicity. Animal models of CAR-T therapy often fail to predict such adverse events and frequently overestimate the efficacy of the treatment. Nearly all preclinical CAR-T studies have been performed in mice, including syngeneic, xenograft, transgenic, and humanized mouse models. Recently, a few studies have used primate models to mimic clinical side effects better. To date, no single model perfectly recapitulates the human immune system and tumor microenvironment, and some models have revealed CAR-T limitations that were contradicted or missed entirely in other models. Careful model selection based on the primary goals of the study is a crucial step in evaluating CAR-T treatment. Advancements are being made in preclinical models, with the ultimate objective of providing safer, more effective CAR-T therapy to patients.

  13. Xenosensor CAR mediates down-regulation of miR-122 and up-regulation of miR-122 targets in the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A.; Mostovich, Lyudmila A. [The Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, Timakova str., 2/12, Novosibirsk 630117 (Russian Federation); Pustylnyak, Yuliya A. [Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str., 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pustylnyak, Vladimir O., E-mail: pustylnyak@ngs.ru [The Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, Timakova str., 2/12, Novosibirsk 630117 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str., 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); The Institute International Tomography Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya str. 3-A, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-01

    MiR-122 is a major hepatic microRNA, accounting for more than 70% of the total liver miRNA population. It has been shown that miR-122 is associated with liver diseases, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Mir-122 is an intergenic miRNA with its own promoter. Pri-miR-122 expression is regulated by liver-enriched transcription factors, mainly by HNF4α, which mediates the expression via the interaction with a specific DR1 site. It has been shown that phenobarbital-mediated activation of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), xenobiotic nuclear receptor, is associated with a decrease in miR-122 in the liver. In the present study, we investigated HNF4α–CAR cross-talk in the regulation of miR-122 levels and promitogenic signalling in mouse livers. The level of miR-122 was significantly repressed by treatment with 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), which is an agonist of mouse CAR. ChIP assays demonstrated that TCPOBOP-activated CAR inhibited HNF4α transactivation by competing with HNF4α for binding to the DR1 site in the pri-miR-122 promoter. Such transcription factor replacement was strongly correlated with miR-122 down-regulation. Additionally, the decrease in miR-122 levels produced by CAR activation is accompanied by an increase in mRNA and cellular protein levels of E2f1 and its accumulation on the target cMyc gene promoter. The increase in accumulation of E2f1 on the target cMyc gene promoter is accompanied by an increase in cMyc levels and transcriptional activity. Thus, our results provide evidence to support the conclusion that CAR activation decreases miR-122 levels through suppression of HNF4α transcriptional activity and indirectly regulates the promitogenic protein cMyc. HNF4α–CAR cross-talk may provide new opportunities for understanding liver diseases and developing more effective therapeutic approaches to better drug treatments. - Highlights: • CAR activation decreased the level of miR-122 in mouse livers. • CAR decreases

  14. Xenosensor CAR mediates down-regulation of miR-122 and up-regulation of miR-122 targets in the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A.; Mostovich, Lyudmila A.; Pustylnyak, Yuliya A.; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O.

    2015-01-01

    MiR-122 is a major hepatic microRNA, accounting for more than 70% of the total liver miRNA population. It has been shown that miR-122 is associated with liver diseases, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Mir-122 is an intergenic miRNA with its own promoter. Pri-miR-122 expression is regulated by liver-enriched transcription factors, mainly by HNF4α, which mediates the expression via the interaction with a specific DR1 site. It has been shown that phenobarbital-mediated activation of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), xenobiotic nuclear receptor, is associated with a decrease in miR-122 in the liver. In the present study, we investigated HNF4α–CAR cross-talk in the regulation of miR-122 levels and promitogenic signalling in mouse livers. The level of miR-122 was significantly repressed by treatment with 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), which is an agonist of mouse CAR. ChIP assays demonstrated that TCPOBOP-activated CAR inhibited HNF4α transactivation by competing with HNF4α for binding to the DR1 site in the pri-miR-122 promoter. Such transcription factor replacement was strongly correlated with miR-122 down-regulation. Additionally, the decrease in miR-122 levels produced by CAR activation is accompanied by an increase in mRNA and cellular protein levels of E2f1 and its accumulation on the target cMyc gene promoter. The increase in accumulation of E2f1 on the target cMyc gene promoter is accompanied by an increase in cMyc levels and transcriptional activity. Thus, our results provide evidence to support the conclusion that CAR activation decreases miR-122 levels through suppression of HNF4α transcriptional activity and indirectly regulates the promitogenic protein cMyc. HNF4α–CAR cross-talk may provide new opportunities for understanding liver diseases and developing more effective therapeutic approaches to better drug treatments. - Highlights: • CAR activation decreased the level of miR-122 in mouse livers. • CAR decreases

  15. Crash protection of stock car racing drivers--application of biomechanical analysis of Indy car crash research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, John W; Begeman, Paul C; Faller, Ronald K; Sicking, Dean L; McClellan, Scott B; Maynard, Edwin; Donegan, Michael W; Mallott, Annette M; Gideon, Thomas W

    2006-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis of Indy car crashes using on-board impact recorders (Melvin et al. 1998, Melvin et al. 2001) indicates that Indy car driver protection in high-energy crashes can be achieved in frontal, side, and rear crashes with severities in the range of 100 to 135 G peak deceleration and velocity changes in the range of 50 to 70 mph. These crashes were predominantly single-car impacts with the rigid concrete walls of oval tracks. This impressive level of protection was found to be due to the unique combination of a very supportive and tight-fitting cockpit-seating package, a six-point belt restraint system, and effective head padding with an extremely strong chassis that defines the seat and cockpit of a modern Indy car. In 2000 and 2001, a series of fatal crashes in stock car racing created great concern for improving the crash protection for drivers in those racecars. Unlike the Indy car, the typical racing stock car features a more spacious driver cockpit due to its resemblance to the shape of a passenger car. The typical racing seat used in stock cars did not have the same configuration or support characteristics of the Indy car seat, and five-point belt restraints were used. The tubular steel space frame chassis of a stock car also differs from an Indy car's composite chassis structure in both form and mechanical behavior. This paper describes the application of results of the biomechanical analysis of the Indy car crash studies to the unique requirements of stock car racing driver crash protection. Sled test and full-scale crash test data using both Hybrid III frontal crash anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) and BioSID side crash ATDs for the purpose of evaluating countermeasures involving restraint systems, seats and head/neck restraints has been instrumental in guiding these developments. In addition, the development of deformable walls for oval tracks (the SAFER Barrier) is described as an adjunct to improved occupant restraint through control

  16. Systemic treatment with CAR-engineered T cells against PSCA delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillerdal, Victoria; Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Leja, Justyna; Essand, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has successfully been used to treat both chronic and acute lymphocytic leukemia as well as other hematological cancers. Experimental therapy with CAR-engineered T cells has also shown promising results on solid tumors. The prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a protein expressed on the surface of prostate epithelial cells as well as in primary and metastatic prostate cancer cells and therefore a promising target for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. We developed a third-generation CAR against PSCA including the CD28, OX-40 and CD3 ζ signaling domains. T cells were transduced with a lentivirus encoding the PSCA-CAR and evaluated for cytokine production (paired Student’s t-test), proliferation (paired Student’s t-test), CD107a expression (paired Student’s t-test) and target cell killing in vitro and tumor growth and survival in vivo (Log-rank test comparing Kaplan-Meier survival curves). PSCA-CAR T cells exhibit specific interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 secretion and specific proliferation in response to PSCA-expressing target cells. Furthermore, the PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells efficiently kill PSCA-expressing tumor cells in vitro and systemic treatment with PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells significantly delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice. Our data confirms that PSCA-CAR T cells may be developed for treatment of prostate cancer

  17. Modelling and optimization of car-to-car compatibility - Modellierung und optimierung von pkw-pkw-kompatibilität

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, H.G.; Nastic, T.; Huibers, J.H.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper simple and more detailed MADYMO multibody models were used to simulate the car structure for improving the car-to-car compatibility of the whole car fleet. As a first step, survey studies were performed to develop a method for the optimization of car design with respect to frontal and

  18. CAR T-Cell Therapies in Glioblastoma: A First Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Stupp, Roger; Linette, Gerald P; Posey, Avery D; June, Carl H

    2018-02-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients includes surgery to the extent, temozolomide combined with radiotherapy, and alternating electric fields therapy. After recurrence, there is no standard therapy and survival is less than 9 months. Recurrent glioblastoma offers a unique opportunity to investigate new treatment approaches in a malignancy known for remarkable genetic heterogeneity, an immunosuppressive microenvironment, and a partially permissive anatomic blood-brain barrier. Results from three first-in-man chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell trials targeting IL13Rα2, Her2/CMV, and EGFRvIII have recently been reported. Each one of these trials addresses important questions, such as T-cell trafficking to CNS, engraftment and persistence, tumor microenvironment remodeling, and monitoring of glioma response to CAR T cells. Objective radiologic responses have been reported. Here, we discuss and summarize the results of these trials and suggest opportunities for the field. Clin Cancer Res; 24(3); 535-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Car Covers | Outdoor Covers Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Covers, Outdoor

    2018-01-01

    Protect your car from the elements with Ultimate Touch Car Cover. The multi-layer non-woven fabric is soft on the finish and offers 4 seasons all weather protection.https://outdoorcovers.ca/car-covers/

  20. Liver X receptor α and farnesoid X receptor are major transcriptional regulators of OATP1B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E; Böttcher, Kerstin; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Kroemer, Heyo K; Schuetz, Erin G; Kim, Richard B

    2010-11-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) is a liver-enriched transporter involved in the hepatocellular uptake of many endogenous molecules and several structurally divergent drugs in clinical use. Although OATP1B1 coding region polymorphisms are known to make an impact on substrate drug disposition in humans, little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of this transporter. In this study, we note that messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of OATP1B1 in a large human liver bank exhibited marked interindividual variability that was not associated with coding region polymorphisms. Accordingly, we hypothesized that such variability in expression is reflective of nuclear receptor-mediated transcriptional regulation of this transporter. We tested prototypical ligands for the nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), liver X receptor (LXR) α, and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in a human hepatoma-derived cell line and noted induction of OATP1B1 mRNA when the cells were treated with LXRα or FXR ligands. To confirm a direct role for LXRα and FXR to OATP1B1 expression, we performed detailed promoter analysis and cell-based reporter gene assays resulting in the identification of two functional FXR response elements and one LXRα response element. The direct interaction between nuclear receptors with the identified response elements was assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Using isolated primary human hepatocytes, we show that LXRα or FXR agonists, but not PXR or CAR agonists, are capable of OATP1B1 induction. We note that OATP1B1 transcriptional regulation is under dual nuclear receptor control through the oxysterol sensing LXRα and the bile acid sensor FXR. Accordingly, the interplay between OATP1B1 and nuclear receptors may play an important and heretofore unrecognized role during cholestasis, drug-induced liver injury, and OATP1B1 induction-related drug interactions.

  1. Autonomous and nonautonomous regulation of axis formation by antagonistic signaling via 7-span cAMP receptors and GSK3 in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, G T; Kimmel, A R

    1997-08-15

    Early during Dictyostelium development a fundamental cell-fate decision establishes the anteroposterior (prestalk/prespore) axis. Signaling via the 7-transmembrane cAMP receptor CAR4 is essential for creating and maintaining a normal pattern; car4-null alleles have decreased levels of prestalk-specific mRNAs but enhanced expression of prespore genes. car4- cells produce all of the signals required for prestalk differentiation but lack an extracellular factor necessary for prespore differentiation of wild-type cells. This secreted factor decreases the sensitivity of prespore cells to inhibition by the prestalk morphogen DIF-1. At the cell autonomous level, CAR4 is linked to intracellular circuits that activate prestalk but inhibit prespore differentiation. The autonomous action of CAR4 is antagonistic to the positive intracellular signals mediated by another cAMP receptor, CAR1 and/or