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Sample records for adenovirus encoding cd40l

  1. CD40-CD40L interactions partly participate in the endothelial cel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... (mAb) in vitro. On ECs, blockade of CD40/CD40L decreased the expression of IL (interleukin)-6, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) in adenovirus vector-induced ..... Possible reflection of T lymphocyte and platelet involvement ... nuclear factor-kappaB activation by tumor necrosis factor-alpha,.

  2. Mechanisms of Nifedipine-Downregulated CD40L/sCD40L Signaling in Collagen Stimulated Human Platelets.

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    Tso-Hsiao Chen

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived soluble CD40L (sCD40L release plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Nifedipine, a dihydropyridine-based L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB, has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerotic effect beyond its blood pressure-lowering effect, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether nifedipine affects sCD40L release from collagen-stimulated human platelets and to determine the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/-γ (PPAR-β/-γ. We found that treatment with nifedipine significantly inhibited the platelet surface CD40L expression and sCD40L release in response to collagen, while the inhibition was markedly reversed by blocking PPAR-β/-γ activity with specific antagonist such as GSK0660 and GW9662. Meanwhile, nifedipine also enhanced nitric oxide (NO and cyclic GMP formation in a PPAR-β/-γ-dependent manner. When the NO/cyclic GMP pathway was suppressed, nifedipine-mediated inhibition of sCD40L release was abolished significantly. Collagen-induced phosphorylation of p38MAPK, ERK1/2 and HSP27, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 expression/activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation were significantly inhibited by nifedipine, whereas these alterations were all attenuated by co-treatment with PPAR-β/-γ antagonists. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PPAR-β/-γ-dependent pathways contribute to nifedipine-mediated downregulation of CD40L/sCD40L signaling in activated platelets through regulation of NO/ p38MAPK/ERK1/2/HSP27/MMP-2 signalings and provide a novel mechanism regarding the anti-atherosclerotic effect of nifedipine.

  3. The multi-functionality of CD40L and its receptor CD40 in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, Dirk; Eijgelaar, Wouter J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Lutgens, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Disrupting the CD40-CD40L co-stimulatory pathway reduces atherosclerosis and induces a stable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype that is low in inflammation and high in fibrosis. Therefore, inhibition of the CD40-CD40L pathway is an attractive therapeutic target to reduce clinical complications of

  4. The CD40-CD40L Dyad in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Suzanne A. B. M.; Seijkens, Tom T. P.; van Dorst, Koos J. F.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; Kooij, Gijs; Lutgens, Esther

    2017-01-01

    The CD40-CD40L dyad is an immune checkpoint regulator that promotes both innate and adaptive immune responses and has therefore an essential role in the development of inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). In MS, CD40 and CD40L are expressed on immune cells present in blood and

  5. The role of CD40 in CD40L- and antibody-mediated platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Florian; Ingersoll, Susan B; Amirkhosravi, Ali; Meyer, Todd; Siddiqui, Farooq A; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Walker, Jamie M; Amaya, Mildred; Desai, Hina; Francis, John L

    2005-06-01

    Our initial finding that CD40- and CD40 ligand (CD40L)-deficient mice displayed prolonged tail bleeding and platelet function analyzer (PFA-100) closure times prompted us to further investigate the role of the CD40-CD40L dyad in primary hemostasis and platelet function. Recombinant human soluble CD40L (rhsCD40L), chemical cross-linking of which suggested a trimeric structure of the protein in solution, activated platelets in a CD40-dependent manner as evidenced by increased CD62P expression. CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb) M3, which completely blocked rhsCD40L-induced platelet activation, also prolonged PFA-100 closure times of normal human blood. In contrast, CD40 mAb G28-5 showed less potential in blocking rhsCD40L-induced CD62P expression and did not affect PFA-100 closure times. However, when added to the platelets after rhsCD40L, G28-5 significantly enhanced the platelet response by causing clustering of, and signaling through, FcgammaRII. Similarly, higher order multimeric immune complexes formed at a 1/3 molar ratio of M90, a CD40L mAb, to rhsCD40L induced strong Fcgamma RII-mediated platelet activation when translocated to the platelet surface in a CD40-dependent manner, including the induction of morphological shape changes, fibrinogen binding, platelet aggregation, dense granule release, microparticle generation and monocyte-platelet-conjugate formation. The results suggest that CD40 may play a role in primary hemostasis and platelet biology by two independent mechanisms: First, by functioning as a primary signaling receptor for CD40L and, second, by serving as a docking molecule for CD40L immune complexes. The latter would also provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the unexpected high incidence of CD40L mAb-associated thrombotic events in recent human and animal studies.

  6. Rapid and sustained CD4(+) T-cell-independent immunity from adenovirus-encoded vaccine antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Bartholdy, Christina; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2007-01-01

    Many novel vaccine strategies rely on recombinant viral vectors for antigen delivery, and adenovirus vectors have emerged among the most potent of these. In this report, we have compared the immune response induced through priming with adenovirus vector-encoded full-length viral protein...... to that elicited with an adenovirus-encoded minimal epitope covalently linked to beta(2)-microglobulin. We demonstrate that the beta(2)-microglobulin-linked epitope induced an accelerated and augmented CD8(+) T-cell response. Furthermore, the immunity conferred by vaccination with beta(2)-microglobulin...... in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help were sustained in the long term and able to expand and control a secondary challenge with LCMV. Our results demonstrate that modifications to the antigen used in adenovirus vaccines may be used to improve the induced T-cell response. Such a strategy for CD4(+) T...

  7. Novel adenovirus encoded virus-like particles displaying the placental malaria associated VAR2CSA antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne-Marie C; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; Salanti, Ali

    2017-01-01

    and the CSA binding region of VAR2CSA has been identified as a promising vaccine target against placental malaria. Here we designed adenovirus encoded virus-like particles (VLP) by co-encoding Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) gag and VAR2CSA. The VAR2CSA antigen was fused to the transmembrane (TM...... revealed a unique targeting of several epitopes in mice that had been primed with VAR2CSA HA TM-CT. Consequently, modification of VLP anchors is an important point of optimization in virus-encoded retroviral VLP-based vaccines, and adenovirus VLPs boosted by recombinant proteins offer hope of increasing...

  8. CD40L Expression Allows CD8+ T Cells to Promote Their Own Expansion and Differentiation through Dendritic Cells

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    Neil Q. Tay

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells play an important role in providing protective immunity against a wide range of pathogens, and a number of different factors control their activation. Although CD40L-mediated CD40 licensing of dendritic cells (DCs by CD4+ T cells is known to be necessary for the generation of a robust CD8+ T cell response, the contribution of CD8+ T cell-expressed CD40L on DC licensing is less clear. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cells are able to induce the production of IL-12 p70 by DCs in a CD40L-dependent manner, providing some evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated activation of DCs is possible. To better understand the role of CD40L on CD8+ T cell responses, we generated and characterized CD40L-expressing CD8+ T cells both in vitro and in vivo. We found that CD40L was expressed on 30–50% of effector CD8+ T cells when stimulated and that this expression was transient. The expression of CD40L on CD8+ T cells promoted the proliferation and differentiation of both the CD40L-expressing CD8+ T cells and the bystander effector CD8+ T cells. This process occurred via a cell-extrinsic manner and was mediated by DCs. These data demonstrate the existence of a mechanism where CD8+ T cells and DCs cooperate to maximize CD8+ T cell responses.

  9. CD40L Expression Allows CD8+T Cells to Promote Their Own Expansion and Differentiation through Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Neil Q; Lee, Debbie C P; Chua, Yen Leong; Prabhu, Nayana; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J; Kemeny, David M

    2017-01-01

    CD8 + T cells play an important role in providing protective immunity against a wide range of pathogens, and a number of different factors control their activation. Although CD40L-mediated CD40 licensing of dendritic cells (DCs) by CD4 + T cells is known to be necessary for the generation of a robust CD8 + T cell response, the contribution of CD8 + T cell-expressed CD40L on DC licensing is less clear. We have previously shown that CD8 + T cells are able to induce the production of IL-12 p70 by DCs in a CD40L-dependent manner, providing some evidence that CD8 + T cell-mediated activation of DCs is possible. To better understand the role of CD40L on CD8 + T cell responses, we generated and characterized CD40L-expressing CD8 + T cells both in vitro and in vivo . We found that CD40L was expressed on 30-50% of effector CD8 + T cells when stimulated and that this expression was transient. The expression of CD40L on CD8 + T cells promoted the proliferation and differentiation of both the CD40L-expressing CD8 + T cells and the bystander effector CD8 + T cells. This process occurred via a cell-extrinsic manner and was mediated by DCs. These data demonstrate the existence of a mechanism where CD8 + T cells and DCs cooperate to maximize CD8 + T cell responses.

  10. Genetic adjuvantation of recombinant MVA with CD40L potentiates CD8 T cell mediated immunity

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    Henning eLauterbach

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA is a safe and promising viral vaccine vector that is currently investigated in several clinical and pre-clinical trials. In contrast to inactivated or sub-unit vaccines, MVA is able to induce strong humoral as well as cellular immune responses. In order to further improve its CD8 T cell inducing capacity, we genetically adjuvanted MVA with the coding sequence of murine CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily. Immunization of mice with this new vector led to strongly enhanced primary and memory CD8 T cell responses. Concordant with the enhanced CD8 T cell response, we could detect stronger activation of dendritic cells and higher systemic levels of innate cytokines (including IL-12p70 early after immunization. Interestingly, acquisition of memory characteristics (i.e., IL-7R expression was accelerated after immunization with MVA-CD40L in comparison to non-adjuvanted MVA. Furthermore, the generated CTLs also showed improved functionality as demonstrated by intracellular cytokine staining and in vivo killing activity. Importantly, the superior CTL response after a single MVA-CD40L immunization was able to protect B cell deficient mice against a fatal infection with ectromelia virus. Taken together, we show that genetic adjuvantation of MVA can change strength, quality and functionality of innate and adaptive immune responses. These data should facilitate a rational vaccine design with a focus on rapid induction of large numbers of CD8 T cells able to protect against specific diseases.

  11. The role of CD40L, IL-10 and IL-17 in radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ting

    2003-01-01

    CD40L/CD40 interaction is central to the control of thymus-dependent humoral immunity and cell mediated immune responses. IL-17 has been shown to induce the production of IL-6 and G-CSF, which can induce proliferation and differentiation of CD34 + hematopoietic progenitors. IL-10 can interfere with up-regulation of costimulatory molecules, thus suppressing the production of costimulatory cytokines, such as IL-12. IL-10 has been implicated as an essential mediator in the induction of systemic immune suppression following ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Treating UV-irradiated mice with anti-IL-10 blocks the induction of immune suppression

  12. Impaired CD40L signaling is a cause of defective IL-12 and TNF-alpha production in Sézary syndrome: circumvention by hexameric soluble CD40L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Lars E; Huard, Bertrand; Wysocka, Maria; Shane, Ryan; Contassot, Emmanuel; Arrighi, Jean-François; Piguet, Vincent; Calderara, Silvio; Rook, Alain H

    2005-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SzS) is an advanced form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma characterized by peripheral blood involvement, impaired cell-mediated immunity, and T-helper 1 (TH1) cytokine production. To understand the mechanism of these defects, we studied the expression and function of CD40L in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with SzS. We found that PBMCs of patients with SzS have a defect in interleukin-12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production upon anti-CD3 stimulation and that tumor CD4+ T lymphocytes have a specific defect in CD40L induction after anti-CD3 ligation in vitro. This defect may explain the poor IL-12 production, because IL-12 production by anti-CD3-stimulated PBMCs was dependent on CD40L in healthy donors. The observed defect in tumor cell CD40L expression appears to be due to inappropriate T-cell signaling upon CD3 ligation, because expression of other T-cell activation antigens such as CD25, and to a lesser extent CD69, are also impaired on tumor cells. Importantly however, the inability of SzS PBMCs to appropriately produce IL-12 and TNF-alpha could be restored by recombinant hexameric CD40L. Taken together, our results demonstrate that impaired IL-12 and TNF-alpha production in SzS is associated with defective CD4+ T lymphocyte CD40L induction and indicate that CD40L may have therapeutic potential in SzS.

  13. Expression of CD40 and CD40L in Gastric Cancer Tissue and Its Clinical Significance

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    Rui Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To study expression of CD40 and CD40L in gastric cancer tissue we assessed gastric cancer patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology of The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University and control subjects. Gastric cancer and normal (from around tumours tissue samples were obtained from patients. Venous blood samples (gastric cancer and ulcer groups were drawn on the morning of the day before surgery for the measurement of peripheral sCD40L. The expression of CD40 in gastric carcinoma specimens was examined immuno-histochemically. The clinicopathological factors, including age, sex, tumor size, gross appearance, degree of cellular differentiation, histological classification, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and TNM stage were analyzed according to the different expression of CD40. The results indicated a high CD40 expression in gastric cancer tissues. This positive expression of CD40 revealed a significant (P < 0.05 correlation with lymphatic metastasis and tumor TNM stage in gastric cancer patients. It is concluded that higher CD40 expression existed in expanding type tumors and could play an important role in clinical diagnosis of gastric cancer patients.

  14. CD40L and TNF both activate the classical NF-κB pathway, which is not required for the CD40L induced alternative pathway in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigner, J; Basilio, J; Resch, U; de Martin, R

    2018-01-01

    CD40L and TNF signal through engagement of their respective receptors, which are both members of the TNF receptor family. They use partially common signaling molecules leading, among others, to activation of the NF-κB pathway. However, whereas TNF activates the classical, CD40L has been reported to activate the alternative NF-κB pathway, leading to the anticipation that differences in the pattern of inflammatory gene expression would occur. Here, we have compared the gene expression repertoire of CD40L (CD154) and TNF stimulated HUVEC and report that unexpectedly, apart from a stronger response to TNF, no major qualitative differences could be observed. This applies for the period of up to 6 h, a time where the alternative pathway has already been activated. Analysis of the early events after receptor engagement revealed that both TNF and CD40L activate the classical NF-κB pathway, and confirm activation of the alternative by the latter. Furthermore, using genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the classical pathway we show that activation of the alternative occurs independently of the former. This reveals novel insights into NF-κB signaling by CD40L and TNF in endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. CD40L induces multidrug resistance to apoptosis in breast carcinoma and lymphoma cells through caspase independent and dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorzanger-Rousselot, Nathalie; Alberti, Laurent; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    CD40L was found to reduce doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through caspase-3 dependent mechanism. Whether this represents a general mechanism for other tumor types is unknown. The resistance induced by CD40L against apoptosis induced by a panel of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs in non Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast carcinoma cell lines was investigated. Doxorubicin, cisplatyl, etoposide, vinblastin and paclitaxel increased apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in breast carcinoma as well as in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. Co-culture with irradiated L cells expressing CD40L significantly reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines treated with these drugs. In breast carcinoma cell lines, these 5 drugs induced an inconsistent increase of caspase-3/7 activity, while in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines all 5 drugs increased caspase-3/7 activity up to 28-fold above baseline. Co-culture with CD40L L cells reduced (-39% to -89%) the activation of caspase-3/7 induced by these agents in all 5 non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, but in none of the 2 breast carcinoma cell lines. Co culture with CD40L L cells also blocked the apoptosis induced by exogenous ceramides in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through a caspase-3-like, 8-like and 9-like dependent pathways. These results indicate that CD40L expressed on adjacent non tumoral cells induces multidrug resistance to cytotoxic agents and ceramides in both breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, albeit through a caspase independent and dependent pathway respectively

  16. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

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    Donna C Davidson

    Full Text Available Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND, indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1 positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  17. Despite disorganized synapse structure, Th2 cells maintain directional delivery of CD40L to antigen-presenting B cells.

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    Jennifer L Gardell

    Full Text Available Upon recognition of peptide displayed on MHC molecules, Th1 and Th2 cells form distinct immunological synapse structures. Th1 cells have a bull's eye synapse structure with TCR/ MHC-peptide interactions occurring central to a ring of adhesion molecules, while Th2 cells have a multifocal synapse with small clusters of TCR/MHC interactions throughout the area of T cell/antigen-presenting cell interaction. In this study, we investigated whether this structural difference in the immunological synapse affects delivery of T cell help. The immunological synapse is thought to ensure antigen-specific delivery of cytolytic granules and killing of target cells by NK cells and cytolytic T cells. In helper T cells, it has been proposed that the immunological synapse may direct delivery of other effector molecules including cytokines. CD40 ligand (CD40L is a membrane-bound cytokine essential for antigen-specific T cell help for B cells in the antibody response. We incubated Th1 and Th2 cells overnight with a mixture of antigen-presenting and bystander B cells, and the delivery of CD40L to B cells and subsequent B cell responses were compared. Despite distinct immunological synapse structures, Th1 and Th2 cell do not differ in their ability to deliver CD40L and T cell help in an antigen-specific fashion, or in their susceptibility to inhibition of help by a blocking anti-CD40L antibody.

  18. Despite disorganized synapse structure, Th2 cells maintain directional delivery of CD40L to antigen-presenting B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardell, Jennifer L; Parker, David C

    2017-01-01

    Upon recognition of peptide displayed on MHC molecules, Th1 and Th2 cells form distinct immunological synapse structures. Th1 cells have a bull's eye synapse structure with TCR/ MHC-peptide interactions occurring central to a ring of adhesion molecules, while Th2 cells have a multifocal synapse with small clusters of TCR/MHC interactions throughout the area of T cell/antigen-presenting cell interaction. In this study, we investigated whether this structural difference in the immunological synapse affects delivery of T cell help. The immunological synapse is thought to ensure antigen-specific delivery of cytolytic granules and killing of target cells by NK cells and cytolytic T cells. In helper T cells, it has been proposed that the immunological synapse may direct delivery of other effector molecules including cytokines. CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a membrane-bound cytokine essential for antigen-specific T cell help for B cells in the antibody response. We incubated Th1 and Th2 cells overnight with a mixture of antigen-presenting and bystander B cells, and the delivery of CD40L to B cells and subsequent B cell responses were compared. Despite distinct immunological synapse structures, Th1 and Th2 cell do not differ in their ability to deliver CD40L and T cell help in an antigen-specific fashion, or in their susceptibility to inhibition of help by a blocking anti-CD40L antibody.

  19. Treatment efficacy and immune stimulation by AdCD40L gene therapy of spontaneous canine malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, Sara; Sadeghi, Arian; Svensson, Emma; Segall, Thomas; Dimopoulou, Maria; Korsgren, Olle; Hemminki, Akseli; Loskog, Angelica S I; Tötterman, Thomas H; von Euler, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a serious disease in both humans and dogs, and the high metastatic potential results in poor prognosis for many patients. Its similarities with human melanoma make spontaneous canine melanoma an excellent model for comparative studies of novel therapies and tumor biology. We report a pilot study of local adenovector CD40L (AdCD40L) immunogene treatment in 19 cases of canine melanoma (14 oral, 4 cutaneous, and 1 conjunctival). Three patients were World Health Organization stage I, 2 were stage II, 10 stage III, and 4 stage IV. One to 6 intratumoral injections of AdCD40L were given every 7 days, followed by cytoreductive surgery in 9 cases and only immunotherapy in 10 cases. Tumor tissue was infiltrated with T and B lymphocytes after treatment, suggesting immune stimulation. The best overall response included 5 complete responses, 8 partial responses, and 4 stable and 2 progressive disease statuses according to the World Health Organization response criteria. Median survival was 160 days (range, 20-1141 d), with 3 dogs still alive at submission. Our results suggest that local AdCD40L therapy is safe and could have beneficial effects in dogs, supporting further treatment development. Clinical translation to human patients is in progress.

  20. CD40L induces functional tunneling nanotube networks exclusively in dendritic cells programmed by mediators of type 1 immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccard, Colleen R; Watkins, Simon C; Kalinski, Pawel; Fecek, Ronald J; Yates, Aarika L; Salter, Russell D; Ayyavoo, Velpandi; Rinaldo, Charles R; Mailliard, Robbie B

    2015-02-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DC) to mediate CD4(+) T cell help for cellular immunity is guided by instructive signals received during DC maturation, as well as the resulting pattern of DC responsiveness to the Th signal, CD40L. Furthermore, the professional transfer of antigenic information from migratory DC to lymph node-residing DC is critical for the effective induction of cellular immune responses. In this study we report that, in addition to their enhanced IL-12p70 producing capacity, human DC matured in the presence of inflammatory mediators of type 1 immunity are uniquely programmed to form networks of tunneling nanotube-like structures in response to CD40L-expressing Th cells or rCD40L. This immunologic process of DC reticulation facilitates intercellular trafficking of endosome-associated vesicles and Ag, but also pathogens such HIV-1, and is regulated by the opposing roles of IFN-γ and IL-4. The initiation of DC reticulation represents a novel helper function of CD40L and a superior mechanism of intercellular communication possessed by type 1 polarized DC, as well as a target for exploitation by pathogens to enhance direct cell-to-cell spread. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Functional B cell abnormalities in HIV type 1 infection: role of CD40L and CD70

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, K. C.; Otto, S. A.; Lens, S. M.; van Lier, R. A.; Miedema, F.; Meyaard, L.

    1997-01-01

    Early in HIV-1 infection, B cell responses to T cell-dependent antigens are impaired. In addition to the receptor-ligand pair CD40/CD40L, CD27/CD70 also appears to be involved in T cell-dependent B cell stimulation. We have shown that CD70+ B cells are the main producers of Ig when stimulated in a T

  2. IL-12-mediated STAT4 signaling and TCR signal strength cooperate in the induction of CD40L in human and mouse CD8+ T cells.

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    Stark, Regina; Hartung, Anett; Zehn, Dietmar; Frentsch, Marco; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    CD40L is one of the key molecules bridging the activation of specific T cells and the maturation of professional and nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells including B cells. CD4(+) T cells have been regarded as the major T-cell subset that expresses CD40L upon cognate activation; however, we demonstrate here that a putative CD8(+) helper T-cell subset expressing CD40L is induced in human and murine CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in mice immunized with antigen-pulsed dendritic cells. IL-12 and STAT4-mediated signaling was the major instructive cytokine signal boosting the ability of CD8(+) T cells to express CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, TCR signaling strength modulated CD40L expression in CD8(+) T cells after primary differentiation in vitro as well as in vivo. The induction of CD40L in CD8(+) T cells regulated by IL-12 and TCR signaling may enable CD8(+) T cells to respond autonomously of CD4(+) T cells. Thus, we propose that under proinflammatory conditions, a self-sustaining positive feedback loop could facilitate the efficient priming of T cells stimulated by high affinity peptide displaying APCs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Polypeptide structure and encoding location of the adenovirus serotype 2 late, nonstructural 33K protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterom-Dragon, E.A.; Anderson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radiochemical microsequence analysis of selected tryptic peptides of the adenovirus type 2 33K nonstructural protein has revealed the precise region of the genomic nucleotide sequence that encodes this protein. The initiation codon for the 33K protein lies 606 nucleotides to the right of the EcoRI restriction site at 70.7 map units and 281 nucleotides to the left of the postulated carboxyterminal codon of the adenovirus 100K protein. The coding regions for these two proteins thus overlap; however, the 33K protein is derived from the +1 frame with respect to the postulated 100K reading frame. Our results contradict an earlier published report suggesting that these two proteins share extensive amino acid sequence homology. The published nucleotide sequence of the Ad2 EcoRI-F fragment (70.7 to 75.9 map units) cannot accomodate in a single reading frame the peptide sequences of the 33K protein that we have determined. Sequence analysis of DNA fragments derived from virus has confirmed the published nucleotide sequence in all critical regions with respect to the coding region for the 33K protein. Consequently, our data are only consistent with the existence of an mRNA splice within the coding for 33K. Consensus donor and acceptor splice sequences have been located that would predict the removal of 202 nucleotides from the transcripts for the 33K protein. Removal of these nucleotides would explain the structure of a peptide that cannot otherwise be directly encoded by the EcoRI-F fragment. Identification of the precise splice points by peptide sequencing has permitted a prediction of the complete amino acid sequence for the 33K protein

  4. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  5. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

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    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  6. Intraperitoneal administration of a tumor-associated antigen SART3, CD40L, and GM-CSF gene-loaded polyplex micelle elicits a vaccine effect in mouse tumor models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Furugaki

    Full Text Available Polyplex micelles have demonstrated biocompatibility and achieve efficient gene transfection in vivo. Here, we investigated a polyplex micelle encapsulating genes encoding the tumor-associated antigen squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells-3 (SART3, adjuvant CD40L, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as a DNA vaccine platform in mouse tumor models with different types of major histocompatibility antigen complex (MHC. Intraperitoneally administrated polyplex micelles were predominantly found in the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Compared with mock controls, the triple gene vaccine significantly prolonged the survival of mice harboring peritoneal dissemination of CT26 colorectal cancer cells, of which long-term surviving mice showed complete rejection when re-challenged with CT26 tumors. Moreover, the DNA vaccine inhibited the growth and metastasis of subcutaneous CT26 and Lewis lung tumors in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively, which represent different MHC haplotypes. The DNA vaccine highly stimulated both cytotoxic T lymphocyte and natural killer cell activities, and increased the infiltration of CD11c+ DCs and CD4+/CD8a+ T cells into tumors. Depletion of CD4+ or CD8a+ T cells by neutralizing antibodies deteriorated the anti-tumor efficacy of the DNA vaccine. In conclusion, a SART3/CD40L+GM-CSF gene-loaded polyplex micelle can be applied as a novel vaccine platform to elicit tumor rejection immunity regardless of the recipient MHC haplotype.

  7. Adenovirus carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin induces cancer cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyan; Wu, Liqin; Duan, Xuemei; Cui, Lianzhen; Luo, Jingjing; Li, Gongchu

    2014-06-30

    Lectins exist widely in marine bioresources such as bacteria, algae, invertebrate animals and fishes. Some purified marine lectins have been found to elicit cytotoxicity to cancer cells. However, there are few reports describing the cytotoxic effect of marine lectins on cancer cells through virus-mediated gene delivery. We show here that a replication-deficient adenovirus-carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (Ad.FLAG-HddSBL) suppressed cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, as compared to the control virus Ad.FLAG. A down-regulated level of anti-apoptosis factor Bcl-2 was suggested to be responsible for the apoptosis induced by Ad.FLAG-HddSBL infection. Further subcellular localization studies revealed that HddSBL distributed in cell membrane, ER, and the nucleus, but not in mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. In contrast, a previously reported mannose-binding lectin Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin entered the nucleus as well, but did not distribute in inner membrane systems, suggesting differed intracellular sialylation and mannosylation, which may provide different targets for lectin binding. Further cancer-specific controlling of HddSBL expression and animal studies may help to provide insights into a novel way of anti-cancer marine lectin gene therapy. Lectins may provide a reservoir of anti-cancer genes.

  8. Expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of human CD40L deficiency: the occurrence of paracoccidioidomycosis and other unusual infections in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Marques, Otavio; Schimke, Lena-Friederike; Pereira, Paulo Vítor Soeiro; Falcai, Angela; de Oliveira, João Bosco; Hackett, Mary J; Errante, Paolo Ruggero; Weber, Cristina Worm; Ferreira, Janaíra Fernandes; Kuntze, Gisele; Rosário-Filho, Nelson Augusto; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares Costa; Condino-Neto, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L) deficiency or X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (X-HIGM) is a well-described primary immunodeficiency in which Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a common clinical feature. We have identified an unusual high incidence of fungal infections and other not yet described infections in a cohort of 11 X-HIGM patients from nine unrelated Brazilian families. Among these, we describe the first case of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) in X-HIGM. The molecular genetic analysis of CD40L was performed by gene sequencing and evaluation of CD40L protein expression. Nine of these 11 patients (82%) had fungal infections. These included fungal species common to CD40L deficiency (P. jiroveci and Candida albicans) as well as Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. One patient presented with PCM at age 11 years and is now doing well at 18 years of age. Additionally, one patient presented with a simultaneous infection with Klebsiella and Acinetobacter, and one with condyloma caused by human papilloma virus. Molecular analysis revealed four previously described CD40L mutations, two novel missense mutations (c.433 T > G and c.476 G > C) resulting in the absence of CD40L protein expression by activated CD4(+) cells and one novel insertion (c.484_485insAA) within the TNFH domain leading to a frame shift and premature stop codon. These observations demonstrated that the susceptibility to fungal infections in X-HIGM extends beyond those typically associated with X-HIGM (P. jiroveci and C. albicans) and that these patients need to be monitored for those pathogens.

  9. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia.

  10. CD40L-adjuvanted DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara simian immunodeficiency virus SIV239 vaccine enhances SIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity and improves protection against a heterologous SIVE660 mucosal challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwa, Suefen; Lai, Lilin; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Siddiqui, Mariam; Pillai, Vinod B; Labranche, Celia; Yu, Tianwei; Moss, Bernard; Montefiori, David C; Robinson, Harriet L; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Amara, Rama Rao

    2014-09-01

    It remains a challenge to develop a successful human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine that is capable of preventing infection. Here, we utilized the benefits of CD40L, a costimulatory molecule that can stimulate both dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells, as an adjuvant for our simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine in rhesus macaques. We coexpressed the CD40L with our DNA/SIV vaccine such that the CD40L is anchored on the membrane of SIV virus-like particle (VLP). These CD40L containing SIV VLPs showed enhanced activation of DCs in vitro. We then tested the potential of DNA/SIV-CD40L vaccine to adjuvant the DNA prime of a DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccine in rhesus macaques. Our results demonstrated that the CD40L adjuvant enhanced the functional quality of anti-Env antibody response and breadth of anti-SIV CD8 and CD4 T cell responses, significantly delayed the acquisition of heterologous mucosal SIV infection, and improved viral control. Notably, the CD40L adjuvant enhanced the control of viral replication in the gut at the site of challenge that was associated with lower mucosal CD8 immune activation, one of the strong predictors of disease progression. Collectively, our results highlight the benefits of CD40L adjuvant for enhancing antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, leading to enhanced protection against a pathogenic SIV. A single adjuvant that enhances both humoral and cellular immunity is rare and thus underlines the importance and practicality of CD40L as an adjuvant for vaccines against infectious diseases, including HIV-1. Despite many advances in the field of AIDS research, an effective AIDS vaccine that can prevent infection remains elusive. CD40L is a key stimulator of dendritic cells and B cells and can therefore enhance T cell and antibody responses, but its overly potent nature can lead to adverse effects unless used in small doses. In order to modulate local expression of CD40L at relatively lower levels, we expressed

  11. Earlier low-dose TBI or DST overcomes CD8+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance to allogeneic marrow in recipients of anti-CD40L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroshi; Kurtz, Josef; Wekerle, Thomas; Ho, Leon; Sykes, Megan

    2004-01-01

    Treatment with a single injection of anti-CD40L (CD154) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and fully mismatched allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) allows rapid tolerization of CD4+ T cells to the donor. The addition of in vivo CD8 T-cell depletion leads to permanent mixed hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance. We now describe two approaches that obviate the requirement for CD8 T-cell depletion by rapidly tolerizing recipient CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 cells. Administration of donor-specific transfusion (DST) to mice receiving 3 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), BMT and anti-CD40L mAb on day 0 uniformly led to permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance, compared with only 40% of mice receiving similar treatment without DST. In the absence of DST, moving the timing of 3 Gy TBI to day -1 or day -2 instead of day 0 led to rapid (by 2 weeks) induction of CD8+ cell tolerance, and also permitted uniform achievement of permanent mixed chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in recipients of anti-CD40L and BMT on day 0. These nontoxic regimens overcome CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance without requiring host T-cell depletion, permitting the induction of permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance.

  12. A GM-CSF and CD40L bystander vaccine is effective in a murine breast cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman H

    2015-12-01

    -γ secreting T-cells on ELISPOT for BCG treated groups, and a trend for higher numbers of tumor infiltrating CD3+ lymphocytes. Some tumors in the 4T1-BCG demonstrated organized lymphoid structures within the tumor microenvironment as well. Conclusion: The use of BCG bystander cell lines demonstrates proof of concept for anti-tumor activity and immunogenicity in an immunocompetent murine model of breast cancer. This vaccine is being evaluated in lung cancer and should be explored further in clinical trials of breast cancer patients at high risk of recurrence or in combination with other immunomodulatory agents. Keywords: breast cancer, immunotherapy, bystander vaccine, CD40L, GM-CSF

  13. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene combined with radiation therapy on human lymphoma cells lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wan Jianmei; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Human lymphoma cell lines were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTF. The cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry, and the p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting. The results showed that extrinsic p53 gene have expressed to some degree, but not at high level. The role of inhibition and radiation sensitivity of rAd-p53 was not significant to human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  14. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran-yi, E-mail: liuranyi@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Zhou, Ling [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Zhang, Yan-ling [School of Biotechnology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Huang, Bi-jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Li, Li-xia [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command of PLA, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-xue [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Huang, Wenlin, E-mail: hwenl@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tumor-Targeted Drug, Doublle Bioproducts Inc., Guangzhou 510663 (China)

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •H101 promotes endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication. •H101 rescued Ad-Endo replication by supplying E1A and E1B19k proteins. •Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 in NPC cells. •Ad-Endo and oncolytic Ad H101 have synergistic antitumor effects on NPC. -- Abstract: A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  15. Antitumor efficacy of a recombinant adenovirus encoding endostatin combined with an E1B55KD-deficient adenovirus in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-xia; Zhang, Yan-ling; Zhou, Ling; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min; Fu, Xiang; Ye, Chun-ling; Wu, Jiang-xue; Liu, Ran-yi; Huang, Wenlin

    2013-10-14

    Gene therapy using a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) encoding secretory human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to be a promising antiangiogenesis and antitumor strategy of in animal models and clinical trials. The E1B55KD-deficient Ad dl1520 was also found to replicate selectively in and destroy cancer cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antitumor effects of antiangiogenic agent Ad-Endo combined with the oncolytic Ad dl1520 on gastric cancer (GC) in vitro and in vivo and determine the mechanisms of these effects. The Ad DNA copy number was determined by real-time PCR, and gene expression was assessed by ELISA, Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. The anti-proliferation effect (cytotoxicity) of Ad was assessed using the colorimetry-based MTT cell viability assay. The antitumor effects were evaluated in BALB/c nude mice carrying SGC-7901 GC xenografts. The microvessel density and Ad replication in tumor tissue were evaluated by checking the expression of CD34 and hexon proteins, respectively. dl1520 replicated selectively in GC cells harboring an abnormal p53 pathway, including p53 mutation and the loss of p14(ARF) expression, but did not in normal epithelial cells. In cultured GC cells, dl1520 rescued Ad-Endo replication, and dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In turn, the addition of Ad-Endo enhanced the inhibitory effect of dl1520 on the proliferation of GC cells. The transgenic expression of Ad5 E1A and E1B19K simulated the rescue effect of dl1520 supporting Ad-Endo replication in GC cells. In the nude mouse xenograft model, the combined treatment with dl1520 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited tumor angiogenesis and the growth of GC xenografts through the increased endostatin expression and oncolytic effects. Ad-Endo combined with dl1520 has more antitumor efficacy against GC than Ad-Endo or dl1520 alone. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-mediated antiangiogenic

  16. Vaccination using recombinants influenza and adenoviruses encoding amastigote surface protein-2 are highly effective on protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Rafael Polidoro Alves; Filho, Bruno Galvão; Dos Santos, Luara Isabela; Junior, Policarpo Ademar Sales; Marques, Pedro Elias; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; Cara, Denise Carmona; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Machado, Alexandre Vieira

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we evaluated the protection raised by immunization with recombinant influenza viruses carrying sequences coding for polypeptides corresponding to medial and carboxi-terminal moieties of Trypanosoma cruzi ´s amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP2). Those viruses were used in sequential immunization with recombinant adenovirus (heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol) encoding the complete sequence of ASP2 (Ad-ASP2) in two mouse strains (C57BL/6 and C3H/He). The CD8 effector response elicited by this protocol was comparable to that observed in mice immunized twice with Ad-ASP2 and more robust than that observed in mice that were immunized once with Ad-ASP2. Whereas a single immunization with Ad-ASP2 sufficed to completely protect C57BL/6 mice, a higher survival rate was observed in C3H/He mice that were primed with recombinant influenza virus and boosted with Ad-ASP2 after being challenged with T. cruzi. Analyzing the phenotype of CD8+ T cells obtained from spleen of vaccinated C3H/He mice we observed that heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol elicited more CD8+ T cells specific for the immunodominant epitope as well as a higher number of CD8+ T cells producing TNF-α and IFN-γ and a higher mobilization of surface marker CD107a. Taken together, our results suggest that immunodominant subpopulations of CD8+ T elicited after immunization could be directly related to degree of protection achieved by different immunization protocols using different viral vectors. Overall, these results demonstrated the usefulness of recombinant influenza viruses in immunization protocols against Chagas Disease.

  17. Novel exosome-targeted T-cell-based vaccine counteracts T-cell anergy and converts CTL exhaustion in chronic infection via CD40L signaling through the mTORC1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Xu, Aizhang; Zhang, Xueying; Wu, Jie; Freywald, Andrew; Xu, Jianqing; Xiang, Jim

    2017-06-01

    CD8 + cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) exhaustion is a chief issue for ineffective virus elimination in chronic infectious diseases. We generated novel ovalbumin (OVA)-specific OVA-Texo and HIV-specific Gag-Texo vaccines inducing therapeutic immunity. To assess their therapeutic effect in chronic infection, we developed a new chronic infection model by i.v. infecting C57BL/6 mice with the OVA-expressing adenovirus AdVova. During chronic AdVova infection, mouse CTLs were found to express the inhibitory molecules programmed cell-death protein-1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte-activation gene-3 (LAG-3) and to be functionally exhausted, showing a significant deficiency in T-cell proliferation, IFN-γ production and cytolytic effects. Naive CD8 + T cells upregulated inhibitory PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator and T-cell anergy-associated molecules (Grail and Itch) while down-regulating the proliferative response upon stimulation in mice with chronic infection. Remarkably, the OVA-Texo vaccine counteracted T-cell anergy and converted CTL exhaustion. The latter was associated with (i) the upregulation of a marker for CTL functionality, diacetylated histone-H3 (diAcH3), (ii) a fourfold increase in CTLs, occurring independent of host DCs or CD4 + T cells, and (iii) the restoration of CTL IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity. In vivo OVA-Texo-stimulated CTLs upregulated the activities of the mTORC1 pathway-related molecules Akt, S6, eIF4E and T-bet, and treatment of the CTLs with an mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, significantly reduced the OVA-Texo-induced increase in CTLs. Interestingly, OVA-Texo-mediated CD40L signaling played a critical role in the observed immunological effects. Importantly, the Gag-Texo vaccine induced Gag-specific therapeutic immunity in chronic infection. Therefore, this study should have a serious impact on the development of new therapeutic vaccines for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection.

  18. Use of CD40L immunoconjugates to overcome the defective immune response to vaccines for infections and cancer in the aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu Cheng; Thoman, Marilyn; Linton, Phyllis-Jean; Deisseroth, Albert

    2009-12-01

    :147-164, 1998; Ben-Yehuda and Weksler In: Cancer Investigation 10:525-531, 1992]. One of the more interesting examples of the functional defects in the cells of the adaptive immune response is a reduced level of expression in the surface cytoadhesion and activation receptor molecules on CD4 helper T cells undergoing activation during vaccination. Upon infection or vaccination, CD40L is typically increased on the surface of CD4 helper T cells during activation, and this increased expression is absolutely essential to the CD40L promotion of expansion of antigen-specific B cells and CD 8 effector T cells in response to infection or vaccination [Singh et al. In: Protein Sci 7:1124-1135, 1998; Grewal and Flavell In: Immunol Res 16: 59-70, 1997; Kornbluth In: J Hematother Stem Cell Res 11:787-801, 2002; Garcia de Vinuesa et al. In: Eur J Immunol 29:3216-3224, 1999]. In aged human beings and mice, the reduced levels of expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L) in activated CD4 helper T cells is dramatically reduced [Eaton et al. In: J Exp Med 200:1613-1622, 2004; Dong et al. In: J Gen Virol 84:1623-1628, 2003]. To circumvent the reduction in CD40L expression and the subsequent reduction in immune response in the elderly, we have developed a chimeric vaccine comprised of the CD40L linked to the target antigen, in a replication incompetent adenoviral vector and in booster protein. This review will discuss the implementation the potential use of this approach for the vaccination of the older populations for cancer and infection.

  19. Anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic intervention strategies using atorvastatin, clopidogrel and knock-down of CD40L do not modify radiation-induced atherosclerosis in ApoE null mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Saske; Heeneman, Sylvia; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; te Poele, Johannes A. M.; Pol, Jeffrey F. C.; Gabriels, Karen; Russell, Nicola S.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that irradiating the carotid arteries of ApoE(-/-) mice accelerated the development of macrophage-rich, inflammatory and thrombotic atherosclerotic lesions. In this study we investigated the potential of anti-inflammatory (atorvastatin, CD40L knockout) and anti-thrombotic

  20. Maturation of dendritic cells by recombinant human CD40L-trimer leads to a homogeneous cell population with enhanced surface marker expression and increased cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    -cell activating capacity of the DC. We studied DC phenotype and cytokine production as well as the T-cell proliferation and cytotoxic T lympocyte (CTL) activation induced by DC generated in vitro. In addition, the effect of exposure to recombinant human CD40L-trimer (huCD40LT) on these parameters was investigated...... enhanced by exposure to huCD40LT even compared to TNF-alpha exposure. Only a moderate cytokine production was observed initially, while TNF-alpha addition or CD40 triggering, especially, induced enhanced production of IL-6 and IL-12 p40. Surprisingly, comparable induction of T-cell proliferation by a DC......Dendritic cells (DC) have been shown to be potent inducers of specific cytotoxic T-cell responses both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, exposure to cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha or CD40 triggering changes DC phenotype and cytokine production and may enhance the T...

  1. Maturation of dendritic cells by recombinant human CD40L-trimer leads to a homogeneous cell population with enhanced surface marker expression and increased cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have been shown to be potent inducers of specific cytotoxic T-cell responses both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, exposure to cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha or CD40 triggering changes DC phenotype and cytokine production and may enhance the T-cell act...... marker expression and high production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, the induction of responses to allo or recall antigens presented by huCD40LT maturated DC was comparable to the responses obtained with the DC maturated through TNF-alpha exposure.......Dendritic cells (DC) have been shown to be potent inducers of specific cytotoxic T-cell responses both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, exposure to cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha or CD40 triggering changes DC phenotype and cytokine production and may enhance the T......-cell activating capacity of the DC. We studied DC phenotype and cytokine production as well as the T-cell proliferation and cytotoxic T lympocyte (CTL) activation induced by DC generated in vitro. In addition, the effect of exposure to recombinant human CD40L-trimer (huCD40LT) on these parameters was investigated...

  2. Anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic intervention strategies using atorvastatin, clopidogrel and knock-down of CD40L do not modify radiation-induced atherosclerosis in ApoE null mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoving, Saske; Heeneman, Sylvia; Gijbels, Marion J.J.; Poele, Johannes A.M. te; Pol, Jeffrey F.C.; Gabriels, Karen; Russell, Nicola S.; Daemen, Mat J.A.P.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously showed that irradiating the carotid arteries of ApoE −/− mice accelerated the development of macrophage-rich, inflammatory and thrombotic atherosclerotic lesions. In this study we investigated the potential of anti-inflammatory (atorvastatin, CD40L knockout) and anti-thrombotic (clopidogrel) intervention strategies to inhibit radiation-induced atherosclerosis. Material and methods: ApoE −/− mice were given 0 or 14 Gy to the neck and the carotid arteries were harvested at 4 or 28 weeks after irradiation. Atorvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) or clopidogrel (20 mg/kg/day) was given in the chow; control groups received regular chow. Clopidogrel inhibited platelet aggregation by 50%. CD40L −/− /ApoE −/− and ApoE −/− littermates were also given 0 or 14 Gy to the neck and the carotid arteries were harvested after 30 weeks. Results: Clopidogrel decreased MCP-1 expression in the carotid artery at 4 weeks after irradiation. Expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, thrombomodulin, tissue factor and eNOS was unchanged in atorvastatin and clopidogrel-treated mice. Neither drug inhibited either age-related or radiation-induced atherosclerosis. Furthermore, loss of the inflammatory mediator CD40L did not influence the development of age-related and radiation-induced atherosclerosis. Conclusions: The effects of radiation-induced atherosclerosis could not be circumvented by these specific anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant therapies. This suggests that more effective drug combinations may be required to overcome the radiation stimulus, or that other underlying mechanistic pathways are involved compared to age-related atherosclerosis.

  3. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on the growth and radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Methods: Human lymphoma cell lines Raji and Daudi were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT. The p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting, and p53 mRNA was detected by BT-PCB. Results: The MTT results showed that the inhibitory effect and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 on human lymphoma cell lines were not obvious [Raji: (27.5±4.1)%; Daudi: (28.1±1.6)%]. The results of Western blotting and BT-PCB showed that extrinsic p53 protein and p53 mRNA were expressed to some degree, but not at high-level. In addition, the results didn't demonstrate obvious radiosensitivity enhancement. Conclusions: The role of inhibition and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 was not significant on human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  4. DNA prime/Adenovirus boost malaria vaccine encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 induces sterile protection associated with cell-mediated immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin Chuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad. The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1. The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea, possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3, preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27% were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44-817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5-102 and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13-408; AMA1 348, range 88-1270 and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019. Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. SIGNIFICANCE: The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%. Protection

  5. Waterborne adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with numerous disease outbreaks, particularly those involving d-cares, schools, children's camps, hospitals and other health care centers, and military settings. In addition, adenoviruses have been responsible for many recreational water outbreaks, including a great number of swimming pool outbreaks than any other waterborne virus (Gerba and Enriquez 1997). Two drinking water outbreaks have been documented for adenovirus (Divizia et al. 2004; Kukkula et al. 1997) but none for food. Of the 51 known adenovirus serotypes, one third are associated with human disease, while other infections are asymptomatic. Human disease associated with adenovirus infections include gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye infections, acute hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis (Table 2). Children and the immunocompromised are more severely impacted by adenovirus infections. Subsequently, adenovirus is included in the EPA's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), which is a list of unregulated contaminants found in public water systems that may pose a risk to public health (National Research Council 1999). Adenoviruses have been detected in various waters worldwide including wastewater, river water, oceans, and swimming pools (Hurst et al. 1988; Irving and Smith 1981; Pina et al. 1998). Adenoviruses typically outnumber the enteroviruses, when both are detected in surface waters. Chapron et al. (2000) found that 38% of 29 surface water samples were positive for infectious Ad40 and Ad41. Data are lacking regarding the occurrence of adenovirus in water in the US, particularly for groundwater and drinking water. Studies have shown, however, that adenoviruses survive longer in water than enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus (Enriquez et al. 1995), which may be due to their double-stranded DNA. Risk assessments have been conducted on waterborne adenovirus (Crabtree et al. 1997; van Heerden et al. 2005c). Using dose-response data for inhalation

  6. Induction of IL-12 Production in Human Peripheral Monocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi Is Mediated by Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Mucin-Like Glycoproteins and Potentiated by IFN-γ and CD40-CD40L Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Cristina Jamli Abel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, is characterized by immunopathology driven by IFN-γ secreting Th1-like T cells. T. cruzi has a thick coat of mucin-like glycoproteins covering its surface, which plays an important role in parasite invasion and host immunomodulation. It has been extensively described that T. cruzi or its products—like GPI anchors isolated from GPI-anchored mucins from the trypomastigote life cycle stage (tGPI-mucins—are potent inducers of proinflammatory responses (i.e., cytokines and NO production by IFN-γ primed murine macrophages. However, little is known about whether T. cruzi or GPI-mucins exert a similar action in human cells. We therefore decided to further investigate the in vitro cytokine production profile from human mononuclear cells from uninfected donors exposed to T. cruzi as well as tGPI-mucins. We observed that both living T. cruzi trypomastigotes and tGPI-mucins are potent inducers of IL-12 by human peripheral blood monocytes and this effect depends on CD40-CD40L interaction and IFN-γ. Our findings suggest that the polarized T1-type cytokine profile seen in T. cruzi infected patients might be a long-term effect of IL-12 production induced by lifelong exposure to T. cruzi tGPI-mucins.

  7. Circumvention of Immunity to the Adenovirus Major Coat Protein Hexon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumitra; Shirley, Pamela S.; McClelland, Alan; Kaleko, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Immunity to adenoviruses is an important hurdle to be overcome for successful gene therapy. The presence of antibodies to the capsid proteins prevents efficacious adenovirus vector administration in vivo. We tested whether immunity to a particular serotype of adenovirus (Ad5) may be overcome with a vector that encodes the hexon sequences from a different adenovirus serotype (Ad12). We successfully constructed an adenovirus vector with a chimeric Ad5-Ad12 hexon which was not neutralized by plasma from C57BL/6 mice immunized with Ad5. The vector was also capable of transducing the livers of C57BL/6 mice previously immunized with Ad5. PMID:9658137

  8. Th cells promote CTL survival and memory via acquired pMHC-I and endogenous IL-2 and CD40L signaling and by modulating apoptosis-controlling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channakeshava Sokke Umeshappa

    Full Text Available Involvement of CD4(+ helper T (Th cells is crucial for CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity. However, CD4(+ Th's signals that govern CTL survival and functional memory are still not completely understood. In this study, we assessed the role of CD4(+ Th cells with acquired antigen-presenting machineries in determining CTL fates. We utilized an adoptive co-transfer into CD4(+ T cell-sufficient or -deficient mice of OTI CTLs and OTII Th cells or Th cells with various gene deficiencies pre-stimulated in vitro by ovalbumin (OVA-pulsed dendritic cell (DCova. CTL survival was kinetically assessed in these mice using FITC-anti-CD8 and PE-H-2K(b/OVA257-264 tetramer staining by flow cytometry. We show that by acting via endogenous CD40L and IL-2, and acquired peptide-MHC-I (pMHC-I complex signaling, CD4(+ Th cells enhance survival of transferred effector CTLs and their differentiation into the functional memory CTLs capable of protecting against highly-metastasizing tumor challenge. Moreover, RT-PCR, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis demonstrate that increased survival of CD4(+ Th cell-helped CTLs is matched with enhanced Akt1/NF-κB activation, down-regulation of TRAIL, and altered expression profiles with up-regulation of prosurvival (Bcl-2 and down-regulation of proapoptotic (Bcl-10, Casp-3, Casp-4, Casp-7 molecules. Taken together, our results reveal a previously unexplored mechanistic role for CD4(+ Th cells in programming CTL survival and memory recall responses. This knowledge could also aid in the development of efficient adoptive CTL cancer therapy.

  9. Generation of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against a conformational epitope of human adenovirus type 7 (HAdv-7 incorporated in capsid encoded in a HAdv-3-based vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Liu

    Full Text Available The generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs by epitope-based immunization is difficult because the immunogenicity of simple peptides is poor and T cells must be potently stimulated and immunological memory elicited. A strategy in which antigen is incorporated into the adenoviral capsid protein has been used previously to develop antibody responses against several vaccine targets and may offer a solution to this problem. In this study, we used a similar strategy to develop HAdv-7-neutralizing MAbs using rAdMHE3 virions into which hexon hypervariable region 5 (HVR5 of adenovirus type 7 (HAdv-7 was incorporated. The epitope mutant rAdMHE3 was generated by replacing HVR5 of Ad3EGFP, a recombinant HAdv-3-based vector expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein, with HVR5 of HAdv-7. We immunized BALB/c mice with rAdMHE3 virions and produced 22 different MAbs against them, four of which showed neutralizing activity against HAdv-7 in vitro. Using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analysis and an antibody-binding-competition ELISA with Ad3EGFP, HAdv-7, and a series of chimeric adenoviral particles containing epitope mutants, we demonstrated that the four MAbs recognize the neutralization site within HVR5 of the HAdv-7 virion. Using an immunoblotting analysis and ELISA with HAdv-7, recombinant peptides, and a synthetic peptide, we also showed that the neutralizing epitope within HVR5 of the HAdv-7 virion is a conformational epitope. These findings suggest that it is feasible to use a strategy in which antigen is incorporated into the adenoviral capsid protein to generate neutralizing MAbs. This strategy may also be useful for developing therapeutic neutralizing MAbs and designing recombinant vector vaccines against HAdv-7, and in structural analysis of adenoviruses.

  10. Immune responses to adenoviruses: viral evasion mechanisms and their implications for the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, W S; Doronin, K; Toth, K; Kuppuswamy, M; Lichtenstein, D L; Tollefson, A E

    1999-08-01

    Adenoviruses encode proteins that block responses to interferons, intrinsic cellular apoptosis, killing by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes and killing by the death ligands TNF, Fas ligand and TRAIL. The viral proteins are believed to prolong acute and persistent adenovirus infections. The proteins may prove useful in protecting adenovirus gene therapy vectors and transplanted cells from the immune system.

  11. Dendritic Cells Genetically Modified with an Adenovirus Vector Encoding the cDNA for a Model Antigen Induce Protective and Therapeutic Antitumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenru; Kong, Hwai-Loong; Carpenter, Heather; Torii, Hideshi; Granstein, Richard; Rafii, Shahin; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    1997-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that play a critical role in the initiation of antitumor immune responses. In this study, we show that genetic modifications of a murine epidermis-derived DC line and primary bone marrow–derived DCs to express a model antigen β-galactosidase (βgal) can be achieved through the use of a replication-deficient, recombinant adenovirus vector, and that the modified DCs are capable of eliciting antigen-specific, MHC-restricted CTL responses. Importantly, using a murine metastatic lung tumor model with syngeneic colon carcinoma cells expressing βgal, we show that immunization of mice with the genetically modified DC line or bone marrow DCs confers potent protection against a lethal tumor challenge, as well as suppression of preestablished tumors, resulting in a significant survival advantage. We conclude that genetic modification of DCs to express antigens that are also expressed in tumors can lead to antigen-specific, antitumor killer cells, with a concomitant resistance to tumor challenge and a decrease in the size of existing tumors. PMID:9334364

  12. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new developments since 2006. In addition, we will cover the development of antivirals that interfere with human adenovirus (HAdV) replication and the impact of HAdV on human disease. PMID:23388625

  13. Characterisation of the Equine adenovirus 2 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Carla; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Barton, Mary; Mahony, Timothy J

    2015-09-30

    Equine adenovirus 2 (EAdV-2) is one of two serotypes of adenoviruses known to infect equines. Initial studies did not associate EAdV-2 infections with any specific clinical syndromes, although more recent evidence suggests that EAdV-2 may be associated with clinical and subclinical gastrointestinal infections of foals and adults respectively. In contrast, Equine adenovirus 1 is well recognised as a pathogen associated with upper respiratory tract infections of horses. In this study the complete genome sequence of EAdV-2 is reported. As expected, genes common to the adenoviruses were identified. Phylogenetic reconstructions using selected EAdV-2 genes confirmed the classification of this virus within the Mastadenovirus genus, and supported the hypothesis that EAdV-2 and EAdV-1 have evolved from separate lineages within the adenoviruses. One spliced open reading frame was identified that encoded for a polypeptide with high similarity to the pIX and E1b_55K adenovirus homologues and was designated pIX_E1b_55K. In addition to this fused version of E1b_55K, a separate E1b_55K encoding gene was also identified. These polypeptides do not appear to have evolved from a gene duplication event as the fused and unfused E1b_55K were most similar to E1b_55K homologues from the Atadenovirus and Mastadenovirus genera respectively. The results of this study suggest that EAdV-2 has an unusual evolutionary history that warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Immune evasion by adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahr, J A; Gooding, L R

    1999-04-01

    Adenovirus is a human pathogen that infects mainly respiratory and gastrointestinal epithelia. While the pathology caused by this virus is generally not life threatening in immunocompetent individuals, there is a large literature describing its ability to establish a persistent infection. These persistent infections typically occur in apparently healthy individuals with no outward signs of disease. Such a long term and benign interaction between virus and immune system requires adenoviruses to dampen host antiviral effector mechanisms that would otherwise eliminate the virus and cause immune-mediated pathology to the host. Adenovirus devotes a significant portion of its genome to gene products whose sole function seems to be the modulation of host immune responses. This review focuses on what is currently understood about how these immunomodulatory mechanisms work and how they might play a role in maintaining the virus in a persistent state.

  15. Structure of human adenovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Reddy, Vijay S. (Scripps); (Vanderbilt)

    2012-07-11

    A detailed structural analysis of the entire human adenovirus capsid has been stymied by the complexity and size of this 150 MDa macromolecular complex. Over the past 10 years, the steady improvements in viral genome manipulation concomitant with advances in crystallographic techniques and data processing software has allowed structure determination of this virus by X-ray diffraction at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution. The virus structure revealed the location, folds, and interactions of major and minor (cement proteins) on the inner and outer capsid surface. This new structural information sheds further light on the process of adenovirus capsid assembly and virus-host cell interactions.

  16. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  17. [Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynans, Sylwia; Dzieciątkowski, Tomasz; Młynarczyk, Grażyna

    2013-09-11

    Human adenoviruses belong to the Adenoviridae family and they are divided into seven species, including 56 types. Adenoviruses are common opportunistic pathogens that are rarely associated with clinical symptoms in immunocompetent patients. However, they are emerging pathogens causing morbidity and mortality in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplants, HIV infected patients and patients with primary immune deficiencies. Clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic viraemia to respiratory and gastrointestinal disease, haemorrhagic cystitis and severe disseminated illness. There is currently no formally approved therapy for the treatment of adenovirus infections. This article presents current knowledge about adenoviruses, their pathogenicity and information about available methods to diagnose and treat adenoviral infections.

  18. Canine adenoviruses and herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-07-01

    Canine adenoviruses (CAVs) and canine herpesvirus (CHV) are pathogens of dogs that have been known for several decades. The two distinct types of CAVs, type 1 and type 2, are responsible for infectious canine hepatitis and infectious tracheobronchitis, respectively. In the present article, the currently available literature on CAVs and CHV is reviewed, providing a meaningful update on the epidemiologic, pathogenetic, clinical, diagnostic, and prophylactic aspects of the infections caused by these important pathogens.

  19. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New Adenovirus in Bats, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Michael; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Speck, Stephanie; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2009-01-01

    We tested 55 deceased vespertilionid bats of 12 species from southern Germany for virus infections. A new adenovirus was isolated from tissue samples of 2 Pipistrellus pipistrellus bats, which represents the only chiropteran virus isolate found in Europe besides lyssavirus (rabies virus). Evidence was found for adenovirus transmission between bats. PMID:19961700

  1. Sequential priming with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccines, with or without encoded cytokines, and a replicating adenovirus-SIV recombinant followed by protein boosting does not control a pathogenic SIVmac251 mucosal challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demberg, Thorsten; Boyer, Jean D; Malkevich, Nina; Patterson, L Jean; Venzon, David; Summers, Ebonita L; Kalisz, Irene; Kalyanaraman, V S; Lee, Eun Mi; Weiner, David B; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2008-11-01

    Previously, combination DNA/nonreplicating adenovirus (Ad)- or poxvirus-vectored vaccines have strongly protected against SHIV(89.6P), DNAs expressing cytokines have modulated immunity elicited by DNA vaccines, and replication-competent Ad-recombinant priming and protein boosting has strongly protected against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge. Here we evaluated a vaccine strategy composed of these promising components. Seven rhesus macaques per group were primed twice with multigenic SIV plasmid DNA with or without interleukin-12 (IL-12) DNA or IL-15 DNA. After a multigenic replicating Ad-SIV immunization, all groups received two booster immunizations with SIV gp140 and SIV Nef protein. Four control macaques received control DNA plasmids, empty Ad vector, and adjuvant. All vaccine components were immunogenic, but the cytokine DNAs had little effect. Macaques that received IL-15-DNA exhibited higher peak anti-Nef titers, a more rapid anti-Nef anamnestic response postchallenge, and expanded CD8(CM) T cells 2 weeks postchallenge compared to the DNA-only group. Other immune responses were indistinguishable between groups. Overall, no protection against intrarectal challenge with SIV(mac251) was observed, although immunized non-Mamu-A*01 macaques as a group exhibited a statistically significant 1-log decline in acute viremia compared to non-Mamu-A*01 controls. Possible factors contributing to the poor outcome include administration of cytokine DNAs to sites different from the Ad recombinants (intramuscular and intratracheal, respectively), too few DNA priming immunizations, a suboptimal DNA delivery method, failure to ensure delivery of SIV and cytokine plasmids to the same cell, and instability and short half-life of the IL-15 component. Future experiments should address these issues to determine if this combination approach is able to control a virulent SIV challenge.

  2. Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Rynans

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses belong to the Adenoviridae family and they are divided into seven species, including 56 types. Adenoviruses are common opportunistic pathogens that are rarely associated with clinical symptoms in immunocompetent patients. However, they are emerging pathogens causing morbidity and mortality in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplants, HIV infected patients and patients with primary immune deficiencies. Clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic viraemia to respiratory and gastrointestinal disease, haemorrhagic cystitis and severe disseminated illness. There is currently no formally approved therapy for the treatment of adenovirus infections.This article presents current knowledge about adenoviruses, their pathogenicity and information about available methods to diagnose and treat adenoviral infections.

  3. Tracking adenovirus infections in reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to screen reptiles for the presence of adenovirus (AdV) infection, develop serological tests for the detection of antibodies against AdVs in squamate reptiles and to examine the serological relationships between lizard and snake AdVs, helping to ensure the establishment and maintenance of healthy populations. An additional aim of the project was the establishment of an agamid cell line and isolation of adenoviruses from bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). A...

  4. Safety profile, efficacy, and biodistribution of a bicistronic high-capacity adenovirus vector encoding a combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy as a prelude to a phase I clinical trial for glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puntel, Mariana [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Ghulam, Muhammad A.K.M. [Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Farrokhi, Catherine [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); VanderVeen, Nathan; Paran, Christopher; Appelhans, Ashley [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Kroeger, Kurt M.; Salem, Alireza [Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Lacayo, Liliana [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Pechnick, Robert N. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kelson, Kyle R.; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Kennedy, Sean [Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip [Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); and others

    2013-05-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their high transduction efficiency; however, their clinical usefulness has been hampered by their immunogenicity and the presence of anti-Ad immunity in humans. We reported the efficacy of a gene therapy approach for glioma consisting of intratumoral injection of Ads encoding conditionally cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase (Ad-TK) and the immunostimulatory cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand 3 (Ad-Flt3L). Herein, we report the biodistribution, efficacy, and neurological and systemic effects of a bicistronic high-capacity Ad, i.e., HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L. HC-Ads elicit sustained transgene expression, even in the presence of anti-Ad immunity, and can encode large therapeutic cassettes, including regulatory elements to enable turning gene expression “on” or “off” according to clinical need. The inclusion of two therapeutic transgenes within a single vector enables a reduction of the total vector load without adversely impacting efficacy. Because clinically the vectors will be delivered into the surgical cavity, normal regions of the brain parenchyma are likely to be transduced. Thus, we assessed any potential toxicities elicited by escalating doses of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L (1 × 10{sup 8}, 1 × 10{sup 9}, or 1 × 10{sup 10} viral particles [vp]) delivered into the rat brain parenchyma. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points. The results indicate that doses up to 1 × 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered into the normal rat brain and underpin further developments for its implementation in a phase I clinical trial for glioma. - Highlights: ► High capacity Ad vectors elicit sustained therapeutic gene expression in the brain. ► HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L encodes two therapeutic genes and a transcriptional switch. ► We performed a dose escalation study at

  5. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    2013-01-01

    bacteria, using Listeria monocytogenes as a model organism. Protection in C57BL/6 mice against recombinant L. monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant epitope of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP33) was greatly accelerated, augmented, and prolonged following vaccination with an adenoviral vaccine encoding GP......The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC...... class II-associated invariant chain (Ii) greatly enhances both the presentation of most target Ags, as well as overall protection against viral infection, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The present study extends this vaccination concept to include protection against intracellular...

  6. A Plasmodium vivax Plasmid DNA- and Adenovirus-Vectored Malaria Vaccine Encoding Blood-Stage Antigens AMA1 and MSP142in a Prime/Boost Heterologous Immunization Regimen Partially Protects Aotus Monkeys against Blood-Stage Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-04-01

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium , which are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum , it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against P. vivax malaria. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the 42-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 42 ) in a plasmid recombinant DNA prime/adenoviral (Ad) vector boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with plasmid DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens with each antigen, prime/boost regimens with both antigens, and empty vector controls and then subjected to blood-stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, on the basis of their ability to induce the longest prepatent period and the longest time to the peak level of parasitemia, the lowest peak and mean levels of parasitemia, the smallest area under the parasitemia curve, and the highest self-cure rate. Overall, prechallenge MSP1 42 antibody titers strongly correlated with a decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, the P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad serotype 5 vaccine encoding blood-stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP1 42 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and this regimen for further development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Mucosal immunity induced by adenovirus-based H5N1 HPAI vaccine confers protection against a lethal H5N2 avian influenza virus challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Seok; Lee, Jiyeung; Ahn, So Shin; Byun, Young-Ho; Seong, Baik Lin; Baek, Yun Hee; Song, Min-Suk; Choi, Young Ki; Na, Yun Jeong; Hwang, Inhwan; Sung, Young Chul; Lee, Chang Geun

    2009-01-01

    Development of effective vaccines against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses is a global public health priority. Considering the difficulty in predicting HPAI H5N1 pandemic strains, one strategy used in their design includes the development of formulations with the capacity of eliciting broad cross-protective immunity against multiple viral antigens. To this end we constructed a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus-based avian influenza virus vaccine (rAdv-AI) expressing the codon-optimized M2eX-HA-hCD40L and the M1-M2 fusion genes from HPAI H5N1 human isolate. Although there were no significant differences in the systemic immune responses observed between the intramuscular prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IM/IM) and the intranasal prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IN/IM), IN/IM induced more potent CD8 + T cell and antibody responses at mucosal sites than the IM/IM vaccination, resulting in more effective protection against lethal H5N2 avian influenza (AI) virus challenge. These findings suggest that the strategies used to induce multi-antigen-targeted mucosal immunity, such as IN/IM delivery of rAdv-AI, may be a promising approach for developing broad protective vaccines that may be more effective against the new HPAI pandemic strains.

  8. The Murine CAR Homolog Is a Receptor for Coxsackie B Viruses and Adenoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, Jeffrey M.; Krithivas, Anita; Celi, Leo; Droguett, Gustavo; Horwitz, Marshall S.; Wickham, Thomas; Crowell, Richard L.; Finberg, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding the murine homolog (mCAR) of the human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) were isolated. Nonpermissive CHO cells transfected with mCAR cDNA became susceptible to infection by coxsackieviruses B3 and B4 and showed increased susceptibility to adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. These results indicate that the same receptor is responsible for virus interactions with both murine and human cells. Analysis of receptor expression in human and murine tissues should be useful in defining factors governing virus tropism in vivo. PMID:9420240

  9. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy.

  10. Genetic and Antigenic Analysis of Adenovirus Type 3 Strains Showing Intermediate Behavior in Standard Seroneutralization Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia TB Moraes

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available During an epidemiological survey of acute respiratory infection in Rio de Janeiro, among 208 adenovirus isolates, we found two strains that we were not able, by a standard neutralization procedure, to distinguish between type 3 or 7. However, DNA restriction pattern for the two strains with different enzymes were analyzed and showed a typical Ad3h profile. Using a cross-neutralization test in which both Ad3p and Ad7p antisera were used in different concentration against 100 TCID50 of each adenovirus standard and both isolates, we were able to confirm that the two isolates belong to serotype 3. An hemagglutination inhibition test also corroborated the identification of both strains as adenovirus type 3. Comparing Ad3h and Ad3p genome, we observed 16 different restriction enzyme sites, three of which were located in genomic regions encoding polypeptides involved in neutralization sites

  11. Non-Replicating Adenovirus-Vectored Anthrax Vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Kampen, K. R.; Zhang, J.; Jex, E.; Tang, D. C.

    2007-01-01

    As bioterrorism is emerging as a national threat, it is urgent to develop a new generation of anthrax vaccines that can be rapidly produced and mass administered in an emergency setting. We have demonstrated that protective immunity against anthrax spores could be elicited in mice by intranasal administration of a non-replicating human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-derived vector encoding Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in a single-dose regimen. The potency of an Ad5 vector encoding PA was remarkably enhanced by codon optimization of the PA gene to match the tRNA pool found in human cells. This nasal vaccine can be mass-administered by non-medical personnel during a bioterrorist attack. In addition, replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free Ad5-vectored anthrax vaccines can be mass produced in PER.C6 cells in serum-free wave bioreactors and purified by column chromatography to meet a surge in demand. The non-replicating nature of this new generation of anthrax vaccine ensures an excellent safety profile for vaccines and the environment.(author)

  12. Evaluation of fiber-modified adenovirus vector-vaccine against foot-and-mouth diseaes in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel vaccination approaches against foot-and-mouth-disease (FMD) include the use of a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 vector (Ad5) that contains the capsid encoding regions of FMD virus (FMDV). An Ad5.A24 has proven effective as a vaccine against FMD in swine and cattle. However, ther...

  13. Genetic delivery of an immunoRNase by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Hammer, Katharina; Arndt, Michaela A E; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Dorer, Dominik; Engelhardt, Sarah; Kontermann, Roland E; Hess, Jochen; Allgayer, Heike; Krauss, Jürgen; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2015-05-01

    Antibody therapy of solid cancers is well established, but suffers from unsatisfactory tumor penetration of large immunoglobulins or from low serum retention of antibody fragments. Oncolytic viruses are in advanced clinical development showing excellent safety, but suboptimal potency due to limited virus spread within tumors. Here, by developing an immunoRNase-encoding oncolytic adenovirus, we combine viral oncolysis with intratumoral genetic delivery of a small antibody-fusion protein for targeted bystander killing of tumor cells (viro-antibody therapy). Specifically, we explore genetic delivery of a small immunoRNase consisting of an EGFR-binding scFv antibody fragment fused to the RNase Onconase (ONC(EGFR)) that induces tumor cell death by RNA degradation after cellular internalization. Onconase is a frog RNase that combines lack of immunogenicity and excellent safety in patients with high tumor killing potency due to its resistance to the human cytosolic RNase inhibitor. We show that ONC(EGFR) expression by oncolytic adenoviruses is feasible with an optimized, replication-dependent gene expression strategy. Virus-encoded ONC(EGFR) induces potent and EGFR-dependent bystander killing of tumor cells. Importantly, the ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus showed dramatically increased cytotoxicity specifically to EGFR-positive tumor cells in vitro and significantly enhanced therapeutic activity in a mouse xenograft tumor model. The latter demonstrates that ONC(EGFR) is expressed at levels sufficient to trigger tumor cell killing in vivo. The established ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus represents a novel agent for treatment of EGFR-positive tumors. This viro-antibody therapy platform can be further developed for targeted/personalized cancer therapy by exploiting antibody diversity to target further established or emerging tumor markers or combinations thereof. © 2014 UICC.

  14. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  15. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T.

    2006-01-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology

  16. Nuclear Actin and Myosins in Adenovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host’s transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  17. Construction and evaluation of novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vaccine vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N; Iampietro, M Justin; Bricault, Christine A; Teigler, Jeffrey E; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-02-01

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. The phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. Here we describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors. Although there have been substantial efforts in the development of vaccine vectors from human and chimpanzee adenoviruses, far less is known about rhesus monkey adenoviruses. In this report, we describe the isolation and vectorization of three novel rhesus monkey adenoviruses. These vectors exhibit virologic and immunologic characteristics that make them attractive as potential candidate vaccine vectors for both HIV-1 and other pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Enfermedad neurologica por adenovirus Neurologic disease due to adenovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L. Lema

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de adenovirus (ADV en las infecciones del sistema nervioso central (SNC. Se analizaron 108 muestras de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR provenientes de 79 casos de encefalitis, 7 meningitis y 22 de otras patologías neurológicas, recibidas en el período 2000-2002. Cuarenta y nueve (47.35% se obtuvieron de pacientes inmunocomprometidos. La presencia de ADV se investigó mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa en formato anidado (Nested-PCR. La identificación del genogrupo se realizó mediante análisis filogenético de la secuencia nucleotídica parcial de la región que codifica para la proteína del hexón. Se detectó la presencia de ADV en 6 de 108 (5.5% muestras de LCR analizadas. Todos los casos positivos pertenecieron a pacientes con encefalitis que fueron 79, (6/79, 7.6%. No se observó diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los casos de infección por ADV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos e inmunocompetentes (p>0.05. Las cepas de ADV detectadas se agruparon en los genogrupos B1 y C. En conclusión, nuestros resultados describen el rol de los ADV en las infecciones neurológicas en Argentina. La información presentada contribuye al conocimiento de su epidemiología, en particular en casos de encefalitis.The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of adenovirusm (ADV infections in neurological disorders. A total of 108 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 79 encephalitis cases, 7 meningitis and 22 other neurological diseases analysed in our laboratory between 2000 and 2002 were studied. Forty nine (47.4% belonged to immunocompromised patients. Viral genome was detected using nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR and ADV genotypes were identified using partial gene sequence analysis of hexon gene. Adenovirus were detected in 6 of 108 (5.5% CSF samples tested. All of these were from encephalitis cases, 6/79, representing 7.6% of them. No statistically

  19. Adenovirus-vectored drug-vaccine duo as a potential driver for conferring mass protection against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Tarbet, E Bart; Toro, Haroldo; Tang, De-chu C

    2011-11-01

    The disease-fighting power of vaccines has been a public health bonanza credited with the worldwide reduction of mortality and morbidity. The goal to further amplify its power by boosting vaccine coverage requires the development of a new generation of rapid-response vaccines that can be mass produced at low costs and mass administered by nonmedical personnel. The new vaccines also have to be endowed with a higher safety margin than that of conventional vaccines. The nonreplicating adenovirus-vectored vaccine holds promise in boosting vaccine coverage because the vector can be rapidly manufactured in serum-free suspension cells in response to a surge in demand, and noninvasively administered by nasal spray into human subjects in compliance with evolutionary medicine. In contrast to parenteral injection, noninvasive mucosal vaccination minimizes systemic inflammation. Moreover, pre-existing adenovirus immunity does not interfere appreciably with the potency of an adenovirus-vectored nasal vaccine. Nasal administration of adenovirus vectors encoding pathogen antigens is not only fear-free and painless, but also confers rapid and sustained protection against mucosal pathogens as a drug-vaccine duo since adenovirus particles alone without transgene expression can induce an anti-influenza state in the airway. In addition to human vaccination, animals can also be mass immunized by this class of vectored vaccines.

  20. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020 Adenovirus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Adenovirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens...

  1. Adenovirus transduction: More complicated than receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Martis, Prithy C; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2017-02-01

    The abundance and accessibility of a primary virus receptor are critical factors that impact the susceptibility of a host cell to virus infection. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has two transmembrane isoforms that occur due to alternative splicing and differ in localization and function in polarized epithelia. To determine the relevance of isoform-specific expression across cell types, the abundance and localization of both isoforms were determined in ten common cell lines, and correlated with susceptibility to adenovirus transduction relative to polarized primary human airway epithelia. Data show that the gene and protein expression for each isoform of CAR varies significantly between cell lines and polarization, as indicated by high transepithelial resistance, is inversely related to adenovirus transduction. In summary, the variability of polarity and isoform-specific expression among model cells are critical parameters that must be considered when evaluating the clinical relevance of potential adenovirus-mediated gene therapy and anti-adenovirus strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The complete nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and origin of human adenovirus type 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, Daniel; Furthmann, Anne; Sandig, Volker; Lieber, Andre

    2003-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence and transcription map of human adenovirus type 11 are reported here. This is the first published sequence for a subgenera B human adenovirus and demonstrates a genome organization highly similar to those of other human adenoviruses. All of the genes from the early, intermediate, and late regions are present in the expected locations of the genome for a human adenovirus. The genome size is 34,794 bp in length and has a GC content of 48.9%. Sequence alignment with genomes of groups A (Ad12), C (Ad5), D (Ad17), E (Simian adenovirus 25), and F (Ad40) revealed homologies of 64, 54, 68, 75, and 52%, respectively. Detailed genomic analysis demonstrated that Ads 11 and 35 are highly conserved in all areas except the hexon hypervariable regions and fiber. Similarly, comparison of Ad11 with subgroup E SAV25 revealed poor homology between fibers but high homology in proteins encoded by all other areas of the genome. We propose an evolutionary model in which functional viruses can be reconstituted following fiber substitution from one serotype to another. According to this model either the Ad11 genome is a derivative of Ad35, from which the fiber was substituted with Ad7, or the Ad35 genome is the product of a fiber substitution from Ad21 into the Ad11 genome. This model also provides a possible explanation for the origin of group E Ads, which are evolutionarily derived from a group C fiber substitution into a group B genome

  3. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  4. VEGF targeting in mesotheliomas using an interleukin-6 signal inhibitor based on adenovirus gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yasuo; Yoshio-Hoshino, Naoko; Aoki, Chieko; Nishimoto, Norihiro

    2010-06-01

    Malignant mesotheliomas reportedly secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6) which augments production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from mesothelioma cells. We previously reported the development of a new receptor inhibitor of IL-6 (NRI) by genetically engineering tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody. Since NRI is encoded on a single gene, it is easily applicable to a gene delivery system using virus vehicles. In this study, we report VEGF targeting through NRI expression based on adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in mesothelioma cells. We constructed an NRI expression vector in the context of a tropism-modified adenovirus vector that had enhanced infectivity in mesothelioma cells. This virus effectively induced NRI secretion from mesothelioma cells. This virus infection also reduced the VEGF production in mesothelioma cells. These results indicate that NRI shows potential as an agent in the treatment of mesotheliomas.

  5. Adenoviruses types, cell receptors and local innate cytokines in adenovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong-Fu; Lee, Chun-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus is a common infectious pathogen in both children and adults. It is a significant cause of morbidity in immunocompetent people living in crowded living conditions and of mortality in immunocompromised hosts. It has more recently become a popular vehicle for gene therapy applications. The host response to wild-type infection and gene therapy vector exposure involves both virus entry receptor and the innate immune systems. Cell-mediated recognition of viruses via capsid components has received significant attention, principally thought to be regulated by the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR), CD46, integrins and heparin sulfate-containing proteoglycans. Antiviral innate immune responses are initiated by the infected cell, which activates the interferon response to block viral replication, while simultaneously releasing chemokines to attract neutrophils and NK cells. This review discusses the innate immune response primarily during wild-type adenovirus infection because this serves as the basis for understanding the response during both natural infection and exposure to adenovirus vectors.

  6. Adenovirus 5 and 35 vectors expressing Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite surface protein elicit potent antigen-specific cellular IFN-gamma and antibody responses in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shott, Joseph P.; McGrath, Shannon M.; Pau, Maria Grazia; Custers, Jerome H. V.; Ophorst, Olga; Demoitié, Marie-Ange; Dubois, Marie-Claude; Komisar, Jack; Cobb, Michelle; Kester, Kent E.; Dubois, Patrice; Cohen, Joe; Goudsmit, Jaap; Heppner, D. Gray; Stewart, V. Ann

    2008-01-01

    Falciparum malaria vaccine candidates have been developed using recombinant, replication-deficient serotype 5 and 35 adenoviruses (Ad5, Ad35) encoding the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite surface protein (CSP) (Ad5.CS, Ad35.CS) (Crucell Holland BV, Leiden, The Netherlands). To evaluate the

  7. Adenovirus coxsackie adenovirus receptor-mediated binding to human erythrocytes does not preclude systemic transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, L A; Moreno, R; Calderón, H; Alemany, R

    2016-12-01

    There is great skepticism in the capability of adenovirus vectors and oncolytic adenoviruses to reach specific organs or tumors upon systemic administration. Besides antibodies, the presence of CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus receptor) in human erythrocytes has been postulated to sequester CAR-binding adenoviruses, commonly used in gene therapy and oncolytic applications. The use of non-CAR-binding fibers or serotypes has been postulated to solve this limitation. Given the lack of integrins in erythrocytes and therefore of internalization of the CAR-bound virus, we hypothesized that the interaction of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) with CAR in human erythrocytes could be reversible. In this work, we have studied the effects of Ad5 interaction with human erythrocytes via CAR. Although erythrocyte binding was observed, it did not reduce viral transduction of tumor cells in vitro after long-term incubations. Transplantation of human erythrocytes into nude mice did not reduce Ad5 extravasation and transduction of liver and human xenograft tumors after systemic administration. These findings indicate that despite human erythrocytes are able to bind to Ad5, this binding is reversible and does not prevent extravasation and organ transduction after systemic delivery. Thus, the poor bioavailability of systemically delivered CAR-binding adenoviruses in humans is likely due to other factors such as liver sequestration or neutralizing antibodies.

  8. Deaths from Adenovirus in the US Military

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-26

    Dr. Joel Gaydos, science advisor for the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, and Dr. Robert Potter, a research associate for the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, discuss deaths from adenovirus in the US military.  Created: 3/26/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/29/2012.

  9. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  10. Simplified Microneutralization Test for Serotyping Adenovirus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    with rapidly growing , relatively high-Ad-titer Validation results revealed agreement of the simplified mi- viral isolates but may not perform as well...Quantitative colorimetric Not typed due to co-infection with Poliovirus 1. microneutralization assay for characterization of adenoviruses. J. Clin. Mi

  11. Characterisation of gastroenteritis associated adenoviruses in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To analyse adenovirus (Ad) numbers and types associated with paediatric gastro-enteritis in South Africa Setting. Gauteng, 1994-1996. Methods. A total of 234 paediatric diarrhoeal stool samples were screened for Ad using commercial enzyme-linked iInmunosorbent assays (EUSAs). Adenoviral isolates were ...

  12. A Phase I Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Adjuvanted HIV-1 Gag-Pol-Nef Fusion Protein and Adenovirus 35 Gag-RT-Int-Nef Vaccine in Healthy HIV-Uninfected African Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Omosa-Manyonyi

    Full Text Available Sequential prime-boost or co-administration of HIV vaccine candidates based on an adjuvanted clade B p24, RT, Nef, p17 fusion protein (F4/AS01 plus a non-replicating adenovirus 35 expressing clade A Gag, RT, Int and Nef (Ad35-GRIN may lead to a unique immune profile, inducing both strong T-cell and antibody responses.In a phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 146 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to one of four regimens: heterologous prime-boost with two doses of F4/AS01E or F4/AS01B followed by Ad35-GRIN; Ad35-GRIN followed by two doses of F4/AS01B; or three co-administrations of Ad35-GRIN and F4/AS01B. T cell and antibody responses were measured.The vaccines were generally well-tolerated, and did not cause serious adverse events. The response rate, by IFN-γ ELISPOT, was greater when Ad35-GRIN was the priming vaccine and in the co-administration groups. F4/AS01 induced CD4+ T-cells expressing primarily CD40L and IL2 +/- TNF-α, while Ad35-GRIN induced predominantly CD8+ T-cells expressing IFN-γ +/- IL2 or TNF-α. Viral inhibition was induced after Ad35-GRIN vaccination, regardless of the regimen. Strong F4-specific antibody responses were induced. Immune responses persisted at least a year after the last vaccination. The complementary response profiles, characteristic of each vaccine, were both expressed after co-administration.Co-administration of an adjuvanted protein and an adenovirus vector showed an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile and resulted in strong, multifunctional and complementary HIV-specific immune responses.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01264445.

  13. Adenovirus core protein VII down-regulates the DNA damage response on the host genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Della Fera, Ashley N; Otter, Clayton J; Herrmann, Christin; Pancholi, Neha J; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-08-09

    Viral manipulation of cellular proteins allows viruses to suppress host defenses and generate infectious progeny. Due to the linear double-stranded DNA nature of the adenovirus genome, the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is considered a barrier for successful infection. The adenovirus genome is packaged with protein VII, a viral-encoded histone-like core protein that is suggested to protect incoming viral genomes from detection by cellular DNA damage machinery. We showed that protein VII localizes to host chromatin during infection, leading us to hypothesize that protein VII may affect DNA damage responses on the cellular genome. Here, we show that protein VII at cellular chromatin results in a significant decrease in accumulation of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) following irradiation, indicating that protein VII inhibits DDR signaling. The oncoprotein SET was recently suggested to modulate the DDR by affecting access of repair proteins to chromatin. Since protein VII binds SET, we investigated a role for SET in DDR inhibition by protein VII. We show that knockdown of SET partially rescues the protein VII-induced decrease in γH2AX accumulation on the host genome, suggesting that SET is required for inhibition. Finally, we show that knockdown of SET also allows ATM to localize to incoming viral genomes bound by protein VII during infection with a mutant lacking early region E4. Together, our data suggest that the protein VII-SET interaction contributes to DDR evasion by adenovirus. Our results provide an additional example of a strategy used by adenovirus to manipulate the host DDR and show how viruses can modify cellular processes through manipulation of host chromatin. IMPORTANCE The DNA damage response (DDR) is a cellular network crucial for maintaining genome integrity. DNA viruses replicating in the nucleus challenge the resident genome and must overcome cellular responses, including the DDR. Adenoviruses are prevalent human pathogens that can cause a

  14. Inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and forced internalization of TRAIL receptor 1 by adenovirus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, A E; Toth, K; Doronin, K; Kuppuswamy, M; Doronina, O A; Lichtenstein, D L; Hermiston, T W; Smith, C A; Wold, W S

    2001-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through two receptors, TRAIL-R1 (also known as death receptor 4) and TRAIL-R2 (also known as death receptor 5), that are members of the TNF receptor superfamily of death domain-containing receptors. We show that human adenovirus type 5 encodes three proteins, named RID (previously named E3-10.4K/14.5K), E3-14.7K, and E1B-19K, that independently inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis of infected human cells. This conclusion was derived from studies using wild-type adenovirus, adenovirus replication-competent mutants that lack one or more of the RID, E3-14.7K, and E1B-19K genes, and adenovirus E1-minus replication-defective vectors that express all E3 genes, RID plus E3-14.7K only, RID only, or E3-14.7K only. RID inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis when cells are sensitized to TRAIL either by adenovirus infection or treatment with cycloheximide. RID induces the internalization of TRAIL-R1 from the cell surface, as shown by flow cytometry and indirect immunofluorescence for TRAIL-R1. TRAIL-R1 was internalized in distinct vesicles which are very likely to be endosomes and lysosomes. TRAIL-R1 is degraded, as indicated by the disappearance of the TRAIL-R1 immunofluorescence signal. Degradation was inhibited by bafilomycin A1, a drug that prevents acidification of vesicles and the sorting of receptors from late endosomes to lysosomes, implying that degradation occurs in lysosomes. RID was also shown previously to internalize and degrade another death domain receptor, Fas, and to prevent apoptosis through Fas and the TNF receptor. RID was shown previously to force the internalization and degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. E1B-19K was shown previously to block apoptosis through Fas, and both E1B-19K and E3-14.7K were found to prevent apoptosis through the TNF receptor. These findings suggest that the receptors for TRAIL, Fas ligand, and TNF play a role in limiting virus

  15. Engineering the Rapid Adenovirus Production and Amplification (RAPA) Cell Line to Expedite the Generation of Recombinant Adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Fan, Jiaming; Liao, Junyi; Zou, Yulong; Song, Dongzhe; Liu, Jianxiang; Cui, Jing; Liu, Feng; Ma, Chao; Hu, Xue; Li, Li; Yu, Yichun; Qu, Xiangyang; Chen, Liqun; Yu, Xinyi; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhao, Chen; Zeng, Zongyue; Zhang, Ruyi; Yan, Shujuan; Wu, Xingye; Shu, Yi; Reid, Russell R; Lee, Michael J; Wolf, Jennifer Moritis; He, Tong-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    While recombinant adenoviruses are among the most widely-used gene delivery vectors and usually propagated in HEK-293 cells, generating recombinant adenoviruses remains time-consuming and labor-intense. We sought to develop a rapid adenovirus production and amplification (RAPA) line by assessing human Ad5 genes (E1A, E1B19K/55K, pTP, DBP, and DNA Pol) and OCT1 for their contributions to adenovirus production. Stable transgene expression in 293T cells was accomplished by using piggyBac system. Transgene expression was determined by qPCR. Adenoviral production was assessed with titering, fluorescent markers and/or luciferase activity. Osteogenic activity was assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity. Overexpression of both E1A and pTP led to a significant increase in adenovirus amplification, whereas other transgene combinations did not significantly affect adenovirus amplification. When E1A and pTP were stably expressed in 293T cells, the resultant RAPA line showed high efficiency in adenovirus amplification and production. The produced AdBMP9 infected mesenchymal stem cells with highest efficiency and induced most effective osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, adenovirus production efficiency in RAPA cells was dependent on the amount of transfected DNA. Under optimal transfection conditions high-titer adenoviruses were obtained within 5 days of transfection. The RAPA cells are highly efficient for adenovirus production and amplification. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Completion of the DNA sequence of mouse adenovirus type 1: sequence of E2B, L1, and L2 (18-51 map units).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, J D; Hirsch, G N; LaRue, E A; Fulcher, R A; Spindler, K R

    1997-09-01

    The DNA sequence of 9991 nt, corresponding to 18-51 map units of mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1), was determined, completing the sequence of the Larsen strain of MAV-1. The length of the complete MAV-1 genome is 30,946 nucleotides, consistent with previous experimental estimates. The 18-51 map unit region encodes early region 2B proteins necessary for adenoviral replication as well as late region L1 and L2 structural and packaging proteins. Sequence comparison in this region with human adenoviruses indicates broad similarities, including colinear preservation of all recognized open reading frames (ORFs), with highest amino acid identity occurring in the DNA polymerase and polypeptide III (penton base subunit) ORFs. Virus-associated (VA) RNA is not encoded in the region where VA RNAs are found in the human adenoviruses, between E2B and L1, nor is it encoded anywhere in the entire MAV-1 genome. The MAV-1 polypeptide III lacks the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif which is involved in an association with cell-surface integrins. Only one RGD sequence is found in an identified coding region in the entire MAV-1 genome. Similar to the porcine adenovirus, this RGD sequence is found in the C-terminus of the MAV-1 fiber protein.

  17. SPRi-based adenovirus detection using a surrogate antibody method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadian, Pegah N; Yildirim, Nimet; Gu, April Z; Goluch, Edgar D

    2015-12-15

    Adenovirus infection, which is a waterborne viral disease, is one of the most prevelant causes of human morbidity in the world. Thus, methods for rapid detection of this infectious virus in the environment are urgently needed for public health protection. In this study, we developed a rapid, real-time, sensitive, and label-free SPRi-based biosensor for rapid, sensitive and highly selective detection of adenoviruses. The sensing protocol consists of mixing the sample containing adenovirus with a predetermined concentration of adenovirus antibody. The mixture was filtered to remove the free antibodies from the sample. A secondary antibody, which was specific to the adenovirus antibody, was immobilized onto the SPRi chip surface covalently and the filtrate was flowed over the sensor surface. When the free adenovirus antibodies bound to the surface-immobilized secondary antibodies, we observed this binding via changes in reflectivity. In this approach, a higher amount of adenoviruses resulted in fewer free adenovirus antibodies and thus smaller reflectivity changes. A dose-response curve was generated, and the linear detection range was determined to be from 10 PFU/mL to 5000 PFU/mL with an R(2) value greater than 0.9. The results also showed that the developed biosensing system had a high specificity towards adenovirus (less than 20% signal change when tested in a sample matrix containing rotavirus and lentivirus). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  19. Increased T cell breadth and antibody response elicited in prime-boost regimen by viral vector encoded homologous SIV Gag/Env in outbred CD1 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne Marie Carola; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2016-01-01

    ) or homologous (SIVmac239) gag sequences using adenovirus (Ad5) and MVA vectors. Env (SIVmac239) was co-encoded in the vectors to study the induction of antibodies, which is a primary target of current HIV vaccine designs. All three vaccines were designed as virus-encoded virus-like particle vaccines. Antibody...

  20. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  1. Magnesium-Dependent Interaction of PKR with Adenovirus VAI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Launer -Felty; C Wong; A Wahid; G Conn; J Cole

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity pathway for defense against viral infection. PKR is activated to undergo autophosphorylation upon binding to RNAs that contain duplex regions. Activated PKR phosphorylates the {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis in virus-infected cells. Viruses have evolved diverse PKR-inhibitory strategies to evade the antiviral response. Adenovirus encodes virus-associated RNA I (VAI), a highly structured RNA inhibitor that binds PKR but fails to activate. We have characterized the stoichiometry and affinity of PKR binding to define the mechanism of PKR inhibition by VAI. Sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that PKR interactions with VAI are modulated by Mg{sup 2+}. Two PKR monomers bind in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, but a single monomer binds in the presence of divalent ion. Known RNA activators of PKR are capable of binding multiple PKR monomers to allow the kinase domains to come into close proximity and thus enhance dimerization. We propose that VAI acts as an inhibitor of PKR because it binds and sequesters a single PKR in the presence of divalent cation.

  2. Molecular architecture and function of adenovirus DNA polymerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenkman, A.B. (Arjan Bernard)

    2002-01-01

    Central to this thesis is the role of adenovirus DNA polymerase (Ad pol) in adenovirus DNA replication. Ad pol is a member of the family B DNA polymerases but belongs to a distinct subclass of polymerases that use a protein as primer. As Ad pol catalyses both the initiation and elongation phases and

  3. Incidence of adenovirus detected by immunoenzymatic assay from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenovirus is recognized as the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in children less than 5 years of age. Due to the lack of recent reports about the surveillance of enteric adenovirus (EAd) infection in Cameroon, in this study we assessed the prevalence rate of HAV infection on 65 stool samples belonging to 65 ...

  4. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  5. A Novel Adenovirus in Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins. PMID:24811321

  6. Neutralizing antibodies to adenovirus serotype 5 vaccine vectors are directed primarily against the adenovirus hexon protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumida, Shawn M.; Truitt, Diana M.; Lemckert, Angelique A. C.; Vogels, Ronald; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Addo, Marylyn M.; Lockman, Shahin; Peter, Trevor; Peyerl, Fred W.; Kishko, Michael G.; Jackson, Shawn S.; Gorgone, Darci A.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Essex, Myron; Walker, Bruce D.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo J. E.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2005-01-01

    The utility of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) vector-based vaccines for HIV-1 and other pathogens will likely be limited by the high prevalence of pre-existing Ad5-specific neutralizing Abs (NAbs) in human populations. However, the immunodominant targets of Ad5-specific NAbs in humans

  7. What do we know about adenovirus in renal transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florescu, Marius C; Miles, Clifford D; Florescu, Diana F

    2013-08-01

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens that have the potential to cause opportunistic infections with significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. The significance of adenoviral infection and disease is incompletely known in the setting of kidney transplantation. Reported adenovirus infections in renal transplant recipients have typically manifested as hemorrhagic cystitis and tubulointerstitial nephritis, less severe diseases than often seen in other solid organ transplant recipients (i.e. pneumonia, hepatitis and enteritis). The prevalent adenovirus subgroups associated with cystitis and nephritis are B1 and B2 with the serotypes 7, 11, 34, 35. However, disseminated or severe adenovirus infections, including fatal cases, have been described in renal transplant recipients. There is uncertainty regarding monitoring of and treatment of this virus. Although not supported by randomized clinical trials, cidofovir is used for the treatment of adenovirus disease not responding to reduction of immunosuppression.

  8. Molecular basis of immune evasion strategies by adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayder, H; Müllbacher, A

    1996-12-01

    Human adenoviruses have provided valuable insights into virus-host interactions at the clinical and experimental levels. In addition to the medical importance of adenoviruses in acute infections and the ability of the virus to persist in the host, adenovirus-based recombinants are being developed as potential vaccine vectors. It is now clear that adenoviruses employ various strategies to modulate the innate and the adaptive host immune defences. Adenovirus genome-coded products that interact with the immune response of the host have been identified, and to a large extent the molecular mechanisms of their functions have been revealed. Such knowledge will no doubt influence our approach to the areas of viral pathogenesis, vaccine development and immune modulation for disease management.

  9. MHC class II-associated invariant chain linkage of antigen dramatically improves cell-mediated immunity induced by adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria; Orskov, Cathrine

    2008-01-01

    The ideal vaccine induces a potent protective immune response, which should be rapidly induced, long-standing, and of broad specificity. Recombinant adenoviral vectors induce potent Ab and CD8+ T cell responses against transgenic Ags within weeks of administration, and they are among the most...... potent and versatile Ag delivery vehicles available. However, the impact of chronic infections like HIV and hepatitis C virus underscore the need for further improvements. In this study, we show that the protective immune response to an adenovirus-encoded vaccine Ag can be accelerated, enhanced......, broadened, and prolonged by tethering of the rAg to the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, adenovirus-vectored vaccines expressing lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-derived glycoprotein linked to Ii increased the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell stimulatory capacity in vitro and in vivo...

  10. Alternate adenovirus type-pairs for a possible circumvention of host immune response to recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nász, I; Adám, E; Lengyel, A

    2001-01-01

    With the help of monoclonal antibodies the existence of at least 18 different earlier not known intertype (IT) specific epitopes were demonstrated in different numbers and combinations on the hexons of different adenovirus serotypes. The IT specific epitopes play an important role in the experimental gene therapy and in the recombinant adenovirus vaccination because of the harmful immune response of the recipient organisms directed against the many different epitopes of the adenovirus vector. For the elimination of harmful effect the authors suggest the use of multiple vectors, each prepared from different adenovirus serotypes showing the loosest antigenic relationship to each other. The vectors would be used sequentially when second or multiple administration is needed. For this purpose the authors determined and described 31 such adenovirus type-pairs, which are probably the best alternates for sequential use in experimental gene therapy.

  11. Combined CD8+ and CD4+ adenovirus hexon-specific T cells associated with viral clearance after stem cell transplantation as treatment for adenovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvliet, Maarten L; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; van Liempt, Ellis; Veltrop-Duits, Louise A; Lankester, Arjan C; Kalpoe, Jayant S; Kester, Michel G D; van der Steen, Dirk M; van Tol, Maarten J; Willemze, Roel; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Schilham, Marco W; Meij, Pauline

    2010-11-01

    Human adenovirus can cause morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Reconstitution of adenovirus-specific CD4(+) T cells has been reported to be associated with sustained protection from adenovirus disease, but epitope specificity of these responses has not been characterized. Since mainly CD4(+) T cells and no CD8(+) T cells specific for adenovirus have been detected after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, the relative contribution of adenovirus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in protection from adenovirus disease remains to be elucidated. The presence of human adenovirus hexon-specific T cells was investigated in peripheral blood of pediatric and adult allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients, who showed spontaneous resolution of disseminated adenovirus infection. Subsequently, a clinical grade method was developed for rapid generation of adenovirus-specific T-cell lines for adoptive immunotherapy. Clearance of human adenovirus viremia coincided with emergence of a coordinated CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell response against adenovirus hexon epitopes in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Activation of adenovirus hexon-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells with a hexon protein-spanning peptide pool followed by interferon-γ-based isolation allowed rapid expansion of highly specific T-cell lines from healthy adults, including donors with very low frequencies of adenovirus hexon-specific T cells. Adenovirus-specific T-cell lines recognized multiple MHC class I and II restricted epitopes, including known and novel epitopes, and efficiently lysed human adenovirus-infected target cells. This study provides a rationale and strategy for the adoptive transfer of donor-derived human adenovirus hexon-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells for the treatment of disseminated adenovirus infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  12. Development of replication-deficient adenovirus malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Michael R; Sedegah, Martha; Limbach, Keith

    2017-03-01

    Malaria remains a major threat to endemic populations and travelers, including military personnel to these areas. A malaria vaccine is feasible, as radiation attenuated sporozoites induce nearly 100% efficacy. Areas covered: This review covers current malaria clinical trials using adenoviruses and pre-clinical research. Heterologous prime-boost regimens, including replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 (HuAd5) carrying malaria antigens, are efficacious. However, efficacy appears to be adversely affected by pre-existing anti-HuAd5 antibodies. Current strategies focus on replacing HuAd5 with rarer human adenoviruses or adenoviruses isolated from non-human primates (NHPs). The chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 is undergoing evaluation in clinical trials including infants in malaria-endemic areas. Key antigens have been identified and are being used alone, in combination, or with protein subunit vaccines. Gorilla adenoviruses carrying malaria antigens are also currently being evaluated in preclinical models. These replacement adenovirus vectors will be successfully used to develop vaccines against malaria, as well as other infectious diseases. Expert commentary: Simplified prime-boost single shot regimens, dry-coated live vector vaccines or silicon microneedle arrays could be developed for malaria or other vaccines. Replacement vectors with similar or superior immunogenicity have rapidly advanced, and several are now in extensive Phase 2 and beyond in malaria as well as other diseases, notably Ebola.

  13. Adrenal gland infection by serotype 5 adenovirus requires coagulation factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Tran

    Full Text Available Recombinant, replication-deficient serotype 5 adenovirus infects the liver upon in vivo, systemic injection in rodents. This infection requires the binding of factor X to the capsid of this adenovirus. Another organ, the adrenal gland is also infected upon systemic administration of Ad, however, whether this infection is dependent on the cocksackie adenovirus receptor (CAR or depends on the binding of factor X to the viral capsid remained to be determined. In the present work, we have used a pharmacological agent (warfarin as well as recombinant adenoviruses lacking the binding site of Factor X to elucidate this mechanism in mice. We demonstrate that, as observed in the liver, adenovirus infection of the adrenal glands in vivo requires Factor X. Considering that the level of transduction of the adrenal glands is well-below that of the liver and that capsid-modified adenoviruses are unlikely to selectively infect the adrenal glands, we have used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT imaging of gene expression to determine whether local virus administration (direct injection in the kidney could increase gene transfer to the adrenal glands. We demonstrate that direct injection of the virus in the kidney increases gene transfer in the adrenal gland but liver transduction remains important. These observations strongly suggest that serotype 5 adenovirus uses a similar mechanism to infect liver and adrenal gland and that selective transgene expression in the latter is more likely to be achieved through transcriptional targeting.

  14. Adenovirus-5-Vectored P. falciparum Vaccine Expressing CSP and AMA1. Part B: Safety, Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of the CSP Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    immune responses may be at least partially antigen dependent. In a study of an adenovectored HIV vaccine, ELISpot responses to gag but not to env ...study. Repeat doses of adenovectored vaccines such as one encoding HIV gag (161010 pu dose) have been given at four weeks but have not significantly...Lally MA, O’Neill LD, Edupuganti S, et al. (2009) Safety and immunogenicity of adenovirus-vectored near-consensus HIV type 1 clade B gag vaccines in

  15. Adenovirus Infection in Children with Diarrhea Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ad40) and type 41(Ad41), can cause acute and severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. This study was conducted to delineate the epidemiological features of adenoviruses identified in children with gastroenteritis in Northwestern Nigeria.

  16. Adenovirus targeting for gene therapy of pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geer, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Omdat pancreascarcinoom (alvleesklierkanker) een slechte prognose kent, worden nieuwe behandelmethoden onderzocht zoals gentherapie met behulp van een adenovirus (verkoudheidsvirus). Conditioneel Replicerende Adenovirussen (CRAds) zijn in staat om zich alleen te vermeerderen in tumorcellen en deze

  17. Role of MyD88 in adenovirus keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaohong; Ramke, Mirja; Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V; Lee, Jeong Yoon; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2017-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical to the early detection and innate immune responses to pathogens. In particular, the toll-like receptor (TLR) system and its associated adaptor proteins have essential roles in early host responses to infection. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, caused by the human adenovirus, is a severe ocular surface infection associated with corneal inflammation (stromal keratitis). We previously showed that adenovirus capsid was a key molecular pattern in adenovirus keratitis, with viral DNA having a lesser role. We have now investigated the role of the adaptor molecule MyD88 in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis in which there is no viral replication. In MyD88 -/- mice infected with human adenovirus type 37, clinical keratitis was markedly reduced, along with infiltration of CD45 + cells, and expression of inflammatory cytokines. Reduction of inflammatory cytokines was also observed in infected primary human corneal fibroblasts pretreated with a MyD88 inhibitory peptide. Keratitis similar to wild type mice was observed in TLR2, TLR9 and IL-1R knockout mice, but was reduced in TLR2/9 double knockout mice, consistent with synergy of TLR2 and TLR9 in the response to adenovirus infection. MyD88 co-immunoprecipitated with Src kinase in mice corneas and in human corneal fibroblasts infected with adenovirus, and MyD88 inhibitory peptide reduced Src phosphorylation, linking MyD88 activation to inflammatory gene expression through a signaling cascade previously shown to be directed by Src. Our findings reveal a critical role for the PRRs TLR2 and 9, and their adaptor protein MyD88, in corneal inflammation upon adenovirus infection.

  18. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Matoq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection.

  19. Human adenovirus-36 and childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Richard L

    2011-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that obesity in humans is associated with infection with human adenovirus-36 (Adv36). Infection of experimental animals with Adv36 demonstrates that this virus causes obesity. Human studies have shown a prevalence of Adv36 infection of 30% or greater in obese adult humans, but a correlation with obesity has not always been demonstrated. In contrast, three published studies and one presented study with a total of 559 children all show that there is an increase in prevalence of Adv36 infection in obese children (28%) compared to non-obese children (10%). The explanation for the apparently more robust correlation of Adv36 infection with obesity in children vs. adults is not clear. The data in animals and people suggests that Adv36 has contributed to the worldwide increase in childhood obesity. More research is needed to identify prevalences and consequences of Adv36 infection in people of all age groups and geographic locations.

  20. Adenovirus infections in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are an important cause of infections in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, and they continue to provide clinical challenges pertaining to diagnostics and treatment. The growing number of HAdV types identified by genomic analysis, as well as the improved understanding of the sites of viral persistence and reactivation, requires continuous adaptions of diagnostic approaches to facilitate timely detection and monitoring of HAdV infections. In view of the clinical relevance of life-threatening HAdV diseases in the immunocompromised setting, there is an urgent need for highly effective treatment modalities lacking major side effects. The present review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding and management of HAdV infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Jill Williams

    Full Text Available Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells. To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ. Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  2. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting.As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells.These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  3. Marine Lectins DlFBL and HddSBL Fused with Soluble Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor Facilitate Adenovirus Infection in Cancer Cells BUT Have Different Effects on Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bingbing; Mei, Shengsheng; Cui, Lianzhen; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jianhong; Wu, Tao; Li, Gongchu

    2017-03-14

    Cancer development and progression are usually associated with glycosylation change, providing prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets, for various cancers. In this work, Dicentrarchus labrax fucose binding lectin (DlFBL) and Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (HddSBL) were genetically fused with soluble coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (sCAR), and produced through a bacterial expression system. Results showed that recombinant sCAR-DlFBL not only facilitated adenovirus Ad-EGFP infection in K562/ADR and U87MG cells, but also enhanced the cytotoxicity of adenovirus harboring gene encoding Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin (PPA) or DlFBL (Ad-PPA or Ad-DlFBL) on U87MG cells through inducing apoptosis. Recombinant sCAR-HddSBL facilitated Ad-EGFP infection, but dramatically counteracted the cytotoxicity of both Ad-PPA and Ad-DlFBL in U87MG cells. Further analysis revealed that sCAR-HddSBL, but not sCAR-DlFBL, significantly upregulated transcription factor E2F1 levels in U87MG cells, which might be responsible for the adverse effect of sCAR-HddSBL on Ad-PPA and Ad-DlFBL. Taken together, our data suggested that sCAR-DlFBL could be further developed to redirect therapeutic adenoviruses to infect cancer cells such as U87MG, and the sCAR-lectin fusion proteins for adenoviral retargeting should be carefully examined for possible survival signaling induced by lectins, such as HddSBL.

  4. Hexons from adenovirus serotypes 5 and 48 differentially protect adenovirus vectors from neutralization by mouse and human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Andrew W.; Moitra, Rituparna; Xu, Zhili

    2018-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used in gene therapy clinical trials, and preclinical studies with these vectors are often conducted in mice. It is therefore critical to understand whether mouse studies adequately predict the behavior of adenovirus vectors in humans. The most commonly-used adenovirus vectors are derived from adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5). The Ad5 hexon protein can bind coagulation factor X (FX), and binding of FX has a major impact on vector interactions with other blood proteins. In mouse serum, FX protects Ad5 vectors from neutralization by natural antibodies and complement. In the current study, we similarly find that human FX inhibits neutralization of Ad5 vectors by human serum, and this finding is consistent among individual human sera. We show that human IgM and human IgG can each induce complement-mediated neutralization when Ad5 vectors are not protected by FX. Although mouse and human serum had similar effects on Ad5 vectors, we found that this was not true for a chimeric Ad5 vector that incorporated hexon regions from adenovirus serotype 48. Interestingly, this hexon-chimeric vector was neutralized by human serum, but not by mouse serum. These findings indicate that studies in mouse serum accurately predict the behavior of Ad5 vectors in human serum, but mouse serum is not an accurate model system for all adenovirus vectors. PMID:29401488

  5. Rejection of adenovirus infection is independent of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in cisplatin-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nian-Hua; Peng, Rui-Qing; Ding, Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Shi

    2016-08-01

    The adenovirus vector-based cancer gene therapy is controversial. Low transduction efficacy is believed to be one of the main barriers for the decreased expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on tumor cells. However, the expression of CAR on primary tumor tissue and tumor tissue survived from treatment has still been not extensively studied. The present study analyzed the adenovirus infection rates and CAR expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and its cisplatin-resistant subline A549/DDP. The results showed that although the CAR expression in A549 and A549/DDP was not different, compared with the A549, A549/DDP appeared obviously to reject adenovirus infection. Moreover, we modified CAR expression in the two cell lines with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA), and analyzed the adenovirus infection rates after modifying agent treatments. Both TSA and MG-132 pretreatments could increase the CAR expression in the two cell lines, but the drug pretreatments could only make A549 cells more susceptible to adenovirus infectivity.

  6. Hexons from adenovirus serotypes 5 and 48 differentially protect adenovirus vectors from neutralization by mouse and human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Andrew W; Moitra, Rituparna; Xu, Zhili; Byrnes, Andrew P

    2018-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used in gene therapy clinical trials, and preclinical studies with these vectors are often conducted in mice. It is therefore critical to understand whether mouse studies adequately predict the behavior of adenovirus vectors in humans. The most commonly-used adenovirus vectors are derived from adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5). The Ad5 hexon protein can bind coagulation factor X (FX), and binding of FX has a major impact on vector interactions with other blood proteins. In mouse serum, FX protects Ad5 vectors from neutralization by natural antibodies and complement. In the current study, we similarly find that human FX inhibits neutralization of Ad5 vectors by human serum, and this finding is consistent among individual human sera. We show that human IgM and human IgG can each induce complement-mediated neutralization when Ad5 vectors are not protected by FX. Although mouse and human serum had similar effects on Ad5 vectors, we found that this was not true for a chimeric Ad5 vector that incorporated hexon regions from adenovirus serotype 48. Interestingly, this hexon-chimeric vector was neutralized by human serum, but not by mouse serum. These findings indicate that studies in mouse serum accurately predict the behavior of Ad5 vectors in human serum, but mouse serum is not an accurate model system for all adenovirus vectors.

  7. Human adenovirus 52 uses sialic acid-containing glycoproteins and the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor for binding to target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenman, Annasara; Liaci, A Manuel; Liu, Yan; Årdahl, Carin; Rajan, Anandi; Nilsson, Emma; Bradford, Will; Kaeshammer, Lisa; Jones, Morris S; Frängsmyr, Lars; Feizi, Ten; Stehle, Thilo; Arnberg, Niklas

    2015-02-01

    Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52) is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK) binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK) binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy.

  8. Human adenovirus 52 uses sialic acid-containing glycoproteins and the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor for binding to target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annasara Lenman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52 is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy.

  9. Targeting of Adenovirus Vectors to Breast Cancer Mediated by Soluble Receptor-Ligand Fusion Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dmitriev, Igor

    2002-01-01

    The use of adenovirus (Ad) vectors for cancer gene therapy is currently limited by several factors, including broad Ad tropism associated with expression of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR...

  10. Targeting of Adenovirus Vectors to Breast Cancer Mediated by Soluble Receptor-Ligand Fusion Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dmitriev, Igor

    2001-01-01

    The use of adenovirus (Ad) vectors for cancer gene therapy applications is currently limited due to the broad viral tropism associated with the widespread expression of primary coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in human tissues...

  11. Falcon adenovirus in an American kestrel (Falco sparverius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K; Phalen, David N

    2007-06-01

    A fatal adenovirus infection is described in a wild-caught American kestrel (Falco sparverius). Predominate lesions were a moderate to severe hepatitis with diffuse single-cell necrosis of hepatocytes and a splenitis characterized by necrosis of cells surrounding the sheathed arteries. Pan-nuclear eosinophilic to magenta inclusion bodies were abundant within hepatocytes. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify a portion of the hexon gene from DNA extracted from the bird's liver and spleen. Sequence analysis showed that the adenovirus infecting this kestrel was the falcon adenovirus with a sequence homology of 99.5% to the isolate from the Northern aplomado falcon (Falco femoralis) variant and 98.6% homology to isolates from the taita (Falco fasciinucha) and orange-breasted falcons (Falco deiroleucus). This report expands the range of species of falcons that are susceptible to falcon adenovirus infection and disease. Given that this kestrel was recently wild caught and housed in isolation with other wild-caught kestrels, it is likely that the falcon adenovirus is present in wild populations of American kestrels.

  12. Viability of human adenovirus from hospital fomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganime, Ana Carolina; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Santos, Marisa; Costa Filho, Rubens; Leite, José Paulo G; Miagostovich, Marize P

    2014-12-01

    The monitoring of environmental microbial contamination in healthcare facilities may be a valuable tool to determine pathogens transmission in those settings; however, such procedure is limited to bacterial indicators. Viruses are found commonly in those environments and are rarely used for these procedures. The aim of this study was to assess distribution and viability of a human DNA virus on fomites in an Adult Intensive Care Unit of a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Human adenoviruses (HAdV) were investigated in 141 fomites by scraping the surface area and screening by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using TaqMan® System (Carlsbad, CA). Ten positive samples were selected for virus isolation in A549 and/or HEp2c cell lines. A total of 63 samples (44.7%) were positive and presented viral load ranging from 2.48 × 10(1) to 2.1 × 10(3) genomic copies per millilitre (gc/ml). The viability was demonstrated by integrated cell culture/nested-PCR in 5 out of 10 samples. Nucleotide sequencing confirmed all samples as HAdV and characterized one of them as specie B, serotype 3 (HAdV-3). The results indicate the risk of nosocomial transmission via contaminated fomites and point out the use of HAdV as biomarkers of environmental contamination. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen San Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25, but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  14. Increasing the Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenovirus Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. M. Wold

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad vectors present a new modality to treat cancer. These vectors attack tumors via replicating in and killing cancer cells. Upon completion of the vector replication cycle, the infected tumor cell lyses and releases progeny virions that are capable of infecting neighboring tumor cells. Repeated cycles of vector replication and cell lysis can destroy the tumor. Numerous Ad vectors have been generated and tested, some of them reaching human clinical trials. In 2005, the first oncolytic Ad was approved for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer by the Chinese FDA. Oncolytic Ads have been proven to be safe, with no serious adverse effects reported even when high doses of the vector were injected intravenously. The vectors demonstrated modest anti-tumor effect when applied as a single agent; their efficacy improved when they were combined with another modality. The efficacy of oncolytic Ads can be improved using various approaches, including vector design, delivery techniques, and ancillary treatment, which will be discussed in this review.

  15. Full genome sequence analysis of a novel adenovirus of rhesus macaque origin indicates a new simian adenovirus type and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouli, Daniel; Howell, Grant L; Legasse, Alfred W; Kahl, Christoph; Axthelm, Michael K; Hansen, Scott G; Früh, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Multiple novel simian adenoviruses have been isolated over the past years and their potential to cross the species barrier and infect the human population is an ever present threat. Here we describe the isolation and full genome sequencing of a novel simian adenovirus (SAdV) isolated from the urine of two independent, never co-housed, late stage simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques. The viral genome sequences revealed a novel type with a unique genome length, GC content, E3 region and DNA polymerase amino acid sequence that is sufficiently distinct from all currently known human- or simian adenovirus species to warrant classifying these isolates as a novel species of simian adenovirus. This new species, termed Simian mastadenovirus D (SAdV-D), displays the standard genome organization for the genus Mastadenovirus containing only one copy of the fiber gene which sets it apart from the old world monkey adenovirus species HAdV-G, SAdV-B and SAdV-C.

  16. Comparative Inactivation of Enteroviruses and Adenovirus 2 by UV Light

    OpenAIRE

    Gerba, Charles P.; Gramos, Dawn M.; Nwachuku, Nena

    2002-01-01

    The doses of UV irradiation necessary to inactivate selected enteric viruses on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Contaminant Candidate List were determined. Three-log reductions of echovirus 1, echovirus 11, coxsackievirus B3, coxsackievirus B5, poliovirus 1, and human adenovirus type 2 were effected by doses of 25, 20.5, 24.5, 27, 23, and 119 mW/cm2, respectively. Human adenovirus type 2 is the most UV light-resistant enteric virus reported to date.

  17. Comparative inactivation of enteroviruses and adenovirus 2 by UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerba, Charles P; Gramos, Dawn M; Nwachuku, Nena

    2002-10-01

    The doses of UV irradiation necessary to inactivate selected enteric viruses on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Contaminant Candidate List were determined. Three-log reductions of echovirus 1, echovirus 11, coxsackievirus B3, coxsackievirus B5, poliovirus 1, and human adenovirus type 2 were effected by doses of 25, 20.5, 24.5, 27, 23, and 119 mW/cm(2), respectively. Human adenovirus type 2 is the most UV light-resistant enteric virus reported to date.

  18. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  19. Adenovirus respiratory tract infections in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia S Ampuero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness.

  20. Adenovirus respiratory tract infections in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Julia S; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S; Laguna-Torres, V Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness.

  1. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E. [Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, M. van [Viroclinics Biosciences, Marconistraat 16, 3029 AK Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boheemen, S. van [Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jong, A.A.W. de [Department of Pathology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L. [Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Viroclinics Biosciences, Marconistraat 16, 3029 AK Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kuiken, T., E-mail: t.Kuiken@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls.

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E.; Leeuwen, M. van; Boheemen, S. van; Jong, A.A.W. de; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L.; Kuiken, T.

    2013-01-01

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewes, R; van de Bildt, M W G; Schapendonk, C M E; van Leeuwen, M; van Boheemen, S; de Jong, A A W; Osterhaus, A D M E; Smits, S L; Kuiken, T

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Enteritis in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) associated with a potentially novel adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, David F; Grierson, Sylvia S; Martelli, Francesca; Higgins, Robert J; Jeffrey, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Adenovirus-associated enteritis was diagnosed by histopathology of small intestine in a 2-year-old alpaca (Vicugna pacos). Electron microscopy confirmed intracytoplasmic and intranuclear adenoviral particles within enterocytes. Nucleic acid was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue sections, and a pan-adenovirus nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was employed to target a partial sequence of the polymerase gene. The PCR product (321 bp) was cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence against the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) nucleotide database demonstrated 68% identity with the isolates Canine adenovirus 1 and Bovine adenovirus 3. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence against the NCBI database demonstrated 75% identity with Bovine adenovirus 3. Phylogenetic analysis supported the relatively close relationship of this isolate to Bovine adenovirus 3, but the alpaca isolate was sufficiently distant to be considered a potentially novel adenovirus for this species.

  5. Novel adenovirus detected in captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) suffering from self-limiting gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Guerri, Consuelo; García-Párraga, Daniel; Nieto-Pelegrín, Elvira; Melero, Mar; Álvaro, Teresa; Valls, Mónica; Crespo, Jose Luis; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Jose Manuel

    2015-03-07

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens in vertebrates, including humans. In marine mammals, adenovirus has been associated with fatal hepatitis in sea lions. However, only in rare cases have adenoviruses been detected in cetaceans, where no clear correlation was found between presence of the virus and disease status. A novel adenovirus was identified in four captive bottlenose dolphins with self-limiting gastroenteritis. Viral detection and identification were achieved by: PCR-amplification from fecal samples; sequencing of partial adenovirus polymerase (pol) and hexon genes; producing the virus in HeLa cells, with PCR and immunofluorescence detection, and with sequencing of the amplified pol and hexon gene fragments. A causative role of this adenovirus for gastroenteritis was suggested by: 1) we failed to identify other potential etiological agents; 2) the exclusive detection of this novel adenovirus and of seropositivity for canine adenoviruses 1 and 2 in the four sick dolphins, but not in 10 healthy individuals of the same captive population; and 3) the virus disappeared from feces after clinical signs receded. The partial sequences of the amplified fragments of the pol and hexon genes were closest to those of adenoviruses identified in sea lions with fatal adenoviral hepatitis, and to a Genbank-deposited sequence obtained from a harbour porpoise. These data suggest that adenovirus can cause self-limiting gastroenteritis in dolphins. This adenoviral infection can be detected by serology and by PCR detection in fecal material. Lack of signs of hepatitis in sick dolphins may reflect restricted tissue tropism or virulence of this adenovirus compared to those of the adenovirus identified in sea lions. Gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis supports a common origin of adenoviruses that affect sea mammals. Our findings suggest the need for vigilance against adenoviruses in captive and wild dolphin populations.

  6. Localization of adenovirus DNA replication in KB cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlak, J.M.; Rozijn, Th.H.; Spies, F.

    1975-01-01

    The localization of adenovirus type 5 DNA replication has been investigated by both fractionation of isolated nuclei and electron-microscope autoradiography. Nuclear fractionation by means of the M-band-technique of Tremblay et al. (Tremblay, G. Y., Daniels, M. J., and Schaechter, M. (1969). J. Mol.

  7. Gene therapy for meningioma: improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L. M.; van der Valk, Paul; Leonhart, Angelique M.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Pinedo, Herbert M.; Curiel, David T.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Gerritsen, Winald R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECT: Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  8. Gene therapy for meningioma : improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, CMF; Grill, J; Lamfers, MLM; Van der Valk, P; Leonhart, AM; Van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Curiel, DT; Vandertop, WP; Gerritsen, WR

    Object. Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  9. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Vrij, J.; Willemsen, R. A.; Lindholm, L.; Hoeben, R. C.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; de Ridder, C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Essand, M.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Jennings, I.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nugent, R.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schenk, E.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Slade, M.; Szyjanowicz, P.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, L.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Zuber, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 795-805 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  10. Isolation and Identification of Adenovirus Recovered from the Stool ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to establish the role of adenovirus in gastroenteritis in Nigerian children, stool samples were collected from 138 young children with gastroenteritis and 29 other age-matched controls. The samples were inoculated into 6 different tissue culture cell lines and isolates with characteristic CPE were subjected to CFT ...

  11. A non-replicative adenovirus vaccine platform for poultry diseases ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-04-09

    Apr 9, 2018 ... Using a non-replicative adenovirus to transfer genetic material into cells, researchers will generate two proteins (HN and F) that are known targets of protective immunity against ND. Unlike traditional ND vaccines that are produced using eggs, the resulting vaccine will be produced in a cell culture system, ...

  12. Prevalence of rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus infection in young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of three enteric viruses, namely rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus, as agents of diarrhoea in and around Gaborone, Botswana. Design: The sample were categorised into four groups according to the age of the patient: 0-3 months, 4-6 months, 7-12 months and 25-60 months.

  13. Evaluation of anti-adenovirus activity of some plants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... Evaluation of anti-adenovirus activity of some plants from Lamiaceae family grown in Iran in cell culture. Horieh Saderi1 and Maryam Abbasi2*. 1Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran. 2Student Research Center, School of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

  14. Pharmacological Interventions for Improving Adenovirus Usage in Gene Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, Hidde J.; Bellu, Anna Rita

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy may be an innovative and promising new treatment strategy for cancer but is limited due to a low efficiency and specificity of gene delivery to the target cells. Adenovirus is the preferred gene therapy vector for systemic delivery because of its unparalleled in vivo transduction

  15. prevalence of rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus infection in young

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 80 No. 12 December 2003. PREVALENCE OF ROTAVIRUS, ADENOVIRUS AND ASTROVIRUS INFECTION IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH GASTROENTERITIS IN GABORONE,. BOTSWANA. G. Basu, BSc, (Lucknow, India), MSc, P.O. Box 2327, Gaborone, Botswana, J. Rossouw, BSc ...

  16. Evaluation of anti-adenovirus activity of some plants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The family Lamiaceae included some plants such as thyme species which have a lot of medical properties even in the Iranian traditional medicine. Some of these properties have not been approved by this original article. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-adenovirus effect of the three plants from Lamiaceae ...

  17. Integrin and Defensin Modulate the Mechanical Properties of Adenovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Joost; Reddy, Vijay S.; May, Eric R.; Roos, Wouter H.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    The propensity for capsid disassembly and uncoating of human adenovirus is modulated by interactions with host cell molecules like integrins and alpha defensins. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation to elucidate, at the single-particle level, the mechanism by which binding of

  18. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B. Luz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100 Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  19. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A. [Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges [CHU Hotel Dieu, INSERM, Nantes (France); CHU de Nantes, Institut des Maladies de l' Appareil Digestif, Nantes (France); Martin-Duque, Pilar [Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza (Spain); Vieja, Antonio de la [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Madrid (Spain); Briat, Arnaud [INSERM U877, Grenoble (France); Harrington, Kevin J. [Chester Beatty Laboratories, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A.; Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges; Martin-Duque, Pilar; Vieja, Antonio de la; Briat, Arnaud; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  1. An adenovirus vectored mucosal adjuvant augments protection of mice immunized intranasally with an adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Diana M; Moraes, Mauro P; Liao, Xiaofen; Dias, Camila C; Tulman, Edan R; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Rood, Debra; Grubman, Marvin J; Silbart, Lawrence K

    2013-04-26

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious pathogen that causes severe morbidity and economic losses to the livestock industry in many countries. The oral and respiratory mucosae are the main ports of entry of FMDV, so the stimulation of local immunity in these tissues may help prevent initial infection and viral spread. E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) has been described as one of the few molecules that have adjuvant activity at mucosal surfaces. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of replication-defective adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vectors encoding either of two LT-based mucosal adjuvants, LTB or LTR72. These vectored adjuvants were delivered intranasally to mice concurrent with an Ad5-FMDV vaccine (Ad5-A24) to assess their ability to augment mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses to Ad5-A24 and protection against FMDV. Mice receiving Ad5-A24 plus Ad5-LTR72 had higher levels of mucosal and systemic neutralizing antibodies than those receiving Ad5-A24 alone or Ad5-A24 plus Ad5-LTB. The vaccine plus Ad5-LTR72 group also demonstrated 100% survival after intradermal challenge with a lethal dose of homologous FMDV serotype A24. These results suggest that Ad5-LTR72 could be used as an important tool to enhance mucosal and systemic immunity against FMDV and potentially other pathogens with a common route of entry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human erythrocytes bind and inactivate type 5 adenovirus by presenting Coxsackie virus-adenovirus receptor and complement receptor 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carlisle, R. C.; Di, Y.; Cerny, A. M.; Sonnen, A. F. P.; Sim, R. B.; Green, N. K.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Gilbert, R. J. C.; Fisher, K. D.; Finberg, R. W.; Seymour, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 9 (2009), s. 1909-1918 ISSN 0006-4971 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : adenovirus * erythrocyte * complement receptor 1 Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 10.555, year: 2009

  3. Safety and efficacy of adenovirus-mediated transfer of the human aquaporin-1 cDNA to irradiated parotid glands of non-human primates.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, A C; Baccaglini, L; Fox, P C; O'Connell, Brian C.; Kenshalo, D; Oweisy, H; Hoque, A T; Sun, D; Herscher, L L; Braddon, V R; Delporte, Christine; Baum, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of a single administration of a recombinant adenovirus encoding human aquaporin-1 (AdhAQP1) to the parotid glands of adult rhesus monkeys. In anticipation of possible clinical use of this virus to correct irradiation damage to salivary glands, AdhAQP1 was administered (at either 2 x 10(9) or 1 x 10(8) plaque-forming units/gland) intraductally to irradiated glands and to their contralateral nonirradiated glands. Radiation (single dose, 10 Gy) signif...

  4. Bovine adenovirus serotype 3 utilizes sialic acid as a cellular receptor for virus entry

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Sharma, Anurag; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2009-01-01

    Bovine adenovirus serotype 3 (BAd3) and porcine adenovirus serotype 3 (PAd3) entry into the host cells is independent of Coxsackievirus -adenovirus receptor and integrins. The role of sialic acid in BAd3 and PAd3 entry was investigated. Removal of sialic acid by neuraminidase, or blocking sialic acid by wheat germ agglutinin lectin significantly inhibited BAd3, but not PAd3, transduction of Madin Darby bovine kidney cells. Maackia amurensis agglutinin or Sambucus nigra (elder) agglutinin trea...

  5. Nucleotide sequence analysis of regions of adenovirus 5 DNA containing the origins of DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbergh, P.H.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the investigations described is the determination of nucleotide sequences at the molecular ends of the linear adenovirus type 5 DNA. Knowledge of the primary structure at the termini of this DNA molecule is of particular interest in the study of the mechanism of replication of adenovirus DNA. The initiation- and termination sites of adenovirus DNA replication are located at the ends of the DNA molecule. (Auth.)

  6. Early RNA of adenovirus type 3 in permissive and abortive infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Groff, D E; Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    Early adenovirus type 3 cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNAs from HeLa and BHK-21 cells were detected and mapped on the viral genome by gel blotting and hybridization techniques. The sizes and locations of the 16 adenovirus type 3 RNAs were identical in the two cell types, although relative molarities of the various RNA species differed. Each of the early adenovirus type 3 RNAs was associated with polysomes in both cell types, suggesting that the abortive infection of hamster cells does not result...

  7. Optimization and evaluation of a method to detect adenoviruses in river water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes the recoveries of spiked adenovirus through various stages of experimental optimization procedures. This dataset is associated with the...

  8. ENTERIC ADENOVIRUS INFECTION IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jam-Afzon S. Modarres

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are one of the most important etiological agents of serious gastroenteritis among infants and young children. Fecal specimens from patients with an acute gastroenteritis were evaluated for the presence of adenovirus (Ad40, 41 from April 2002 to February 2004. During the study, 1052 samples were collected from children under the age of 5 years in six educational and therapeutic pediatric centers. The specimens were tested for adenovirus (Ad40, 41 by EIA technique in the Virology Department of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Adenoviruses (Ad40, 41 were detected from 27(2.6% samples, but were not detected in 150 samples of healthy control group. In this study the highest rate of adenovirus was found in children aged 6 to 12 months (40.7%, but the male to female ratio inpatients was approximately equal. Adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infections peaked in the winter as 48.1% was detected from December to March. There were a statistically significant difference between age and infection (P < 0.001, also between season with adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection (P = 0.005. Breast-feeding had a protective action against adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection. This study revealed that enteric adenovirus (Ad40, 41 is an etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis among children in Tehran.

  9. Adenovirus type 5 induces progression of quiescent rat cells into S phase without polyamine accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, B F; Shaw, D C; Bellett, A J

    1982-01-01

    Adenovirus type 5 induces cellular DNA synthesis and thymidine kinase in quiescent rat cells but does not induce ornithine decarboxylase. We now show that unlike serum, adenovirus type 5 fails to induce S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase or polyamine accumulation. The inhibition by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) of the induction of thymidine kinase by adenovirus type 5 is probably unrelated to its effects on polyamine biosynthesis. Thus, induction of cellular thymidine kinase and DNA replication by adenovirus type 5 is uncoupled from polyamine accumulation. PMID:7177112

  10. Retrospective study of adenovirus in autopsied pulmonary tissue of pediatric fatal pneumonia in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Si-Tang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenovirus are the important pathogen of pediatric severe pneumonia. The aim of this study is to analyze the infection, subtype and distribution of adenovirus in autopsied pulmonary tissue of fatal pneumonia in infants and children, and the relationships between adenovirus infection and respiratory illness in South China. Methods Nested PCR was performed on DNA extracted from autopsied lung tissue from patients who died of severe pneumonia, and the positive nested PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The adenovirus in autopsied pulmonary tissue was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry assay in a blind way. Results In the 175 autopsied pulmonary tissues, the positive percentage of adenovirus was 9.14% (16/175 and 2.29% (4/175 detected with nested PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. There are three cases of adenovirus serotype 3, twelve cases of adenovirus serotype 4 and one case of serotype 41 determined by sequencing of the cloned positive nested PCR products. Conclusion Adenovirus is an important cause of severe pneumonia, and these data suggest that adenovirus serotype 4 might be an important pathogen responsible for the fatal pneumonia in Guangzhou, South China.

  11. Concentration of Reovirus and Adenovirus from Sewage and Effluents by Protamine Sulfate (Salmine) Treatment 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Beatrice

    1972-01-01

    Protamine sulfate was employed to recover reoviruses, adenoviruses, and certain enteroviruses from sewage and treated effluents; 50- to 400-fold concentration of viral content was achieved. PMID:4342842

  12. Recent advances in genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagasato, Masaki; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Aoki, Kazunori

    2017-05-01

    Adenoviruses are widely used to deliver genes to a variety of cell types and have been used in a number of clinical trials for gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. However, several concerns must be addressed for the clinical use of adenovirus vectors. Selective delivery of a therapeutic gene by adenovirus vectors to target cancer is precluded by the widespread distribution of the primary cellular receptors. The systemic administration of adenoviruses results in hepatic tropism independent of the primary receptors. Adenoviruses induce strong innate and acquired immunity in vivo. Furthermore, several modifications to these vectors are necessary to enhance their oncolytic activity and ensure patient safety. As such, the adenovirus genome has been engineered to overcome these problems. The first part of the present review outlines recent progress in the genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment. In addition, several groups have recently developed cancer-targeting adenovirus vectors by using libraries that display random peptides on a fiber knob. Pancreatic cancer-targeting sequences have been isolated, and these oncolytic vectors have been shown by our group to be associated with a higher gene transduction efficiency and more potent oncolytic activity in cell lines, murine models, and surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer. In the second part of this review, we explain that combining cancer-targeting strategies can be a promising approach to increase the clinical usefulness of oncolytic adenovirus vectors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  14. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweeney K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Katrina Sweeney, Gunnel Halldén Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Abstract: Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting localized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support

  15. Modeling Adenovirus Latency in Human Lymphocyte Cell Lines ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yange; Huang, Wen; Ornelles, David A.; Gooding, Linda R.

    2010-01-01

    Species C adenovirus establishes a latent infection in lymphocytes of the tonsils and adenoids. To understand how this lytic virus is maintained in these cells, four human lymphocytic cell lines that support the entire virus life cycle were examined. The T-cell line Jurkat ceased proliferation and died shortly after virus infection. BJAB, Ramos (B cells), and KE37 (T cells) continued to divide at nearly normal rates while replicating the virus genome. Viral genome numbers peaked and then decl...

  16. An Update on Canine Adenovirus Type 2 and Its Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Kremer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus vectors have significant potential for long- or short-term gene transfer. Preclinical and clinical studies using human derived adenoviruses (HAd have demonstrated the feasibility of flexible hybrid vector designs, robust expression and induction of protective immunity. However, clinical use of HAd vectors can, under some conditions, be limited by pre-existing vector immunity. Pre-existing humoral and cellular anti-capsid immunity limits the efficacy and duration of transgene expression and is poorly circumvented by injections of larger doses and immuno-suppressing drugs. This review updates canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV-2, also known as CAdV-2 biology and gives an overview of the generation of early region 1 (E1-deleted to helper-dependent (HD CAV-2 vectors. We also summarize the essential characteristics concerning their interaction with the anti-HAd memory immune responses in humans, the preferential transduction of neurons, and its high level of retrograde axonal transport in the central and peripheral nervous system. CAV-2 vectors are particularly interesting tools to study the pathophysiology and potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as anti-tumoral and anti-viral vaccines, tracer of synaptic junctions, oncolytic virus and as a platform to generate chimeric vectors.

  17. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancement of the priming efficacy of DNA vaccines encoding dendritic cell-targeted antigens by synergistic toll-like receptor ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornbluth Richard S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting of protein antigens to dendritic cells (DC via the DEC205 receptor enhances presentation of antigen-derived peptides on MHC-I and MHC-II molecules and, in the presence of costimulatory signals, antigen-specific immune responses. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single chain antibodies directed against DEC205. To further improve this strategy, we evaluated different toll-like receptor ligands (TLR and CD40 ligands (CD40L as adjuvants for DNA vaccines encoding a DEC205-single-chain antibody fused to the ovalbumin model antigen or HIV-1 Gag and assessed the priming efficacy of DNA in a DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunization regimen. Results Mice were primed with the adjuvanted DEC-205 targeted DNA vaccines and boosted with adenoviral vectors encoding the same antigens. CD8+ T cell responses were determined after the adenoviral booster immunization, to determine how well the different DNA immunization regimens prime for the adenoviral boost. In the absence of adjuvants, targeting of DNA-encoded ovalbumin to DCs suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses after the adenoviral booster immunization. CD8+ T-cell responses to the DEC205 targeted DNA vaccines increased only slightly by adding either the TLR-9 ligand CpG, the TLR-3 ligand Poly I:C, or CD40 ligand expression plasmids. However, the combination of both TLR-ligands led to a strong enhancement of CD8+ T-cell responses compared to a non-targeted DNA vaccine. This finding was confirmed using HIV Gag as antigen. Conclusion Although DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunizations belong to the strongest inducers of cytotoxic T cell responses in different animal models and humans, the CD8+ T cell responses can be further improved by targeting the DNA encoded antigen to DEC205 in the presence of synergistic TLR ligands CpG and Poly I:C.

  19. Single-dose protection against Plasmodium berghei by a simian adenovirus vector using a human cytomegalovirus promoter containing intron A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S; Reyes-Sandoval, A; Draper, S J; Moore, A C; Gilbert, S C; Gao, G P; Wilson, J M; Hill, A V S

    2008-04-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdH5) vector vaccines elicit strong immune responses to the encoded antigen and have been used in various disease models. We designed AdH5 vectors expressing antigen under the control of a human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early promoter containing its intron A sequence. The transcriptional levels of antigen and immune responses to antigen for vectors with the HCMV promoter with the intron A sequence (LP) were greater than those for AdH5 vectors using the HCMV promoter sequence without intron A (SP). We compared an E1E3-deleted AdH5 adenoviral vector, which affords more space for insertion of foreign sequences, and showed it to be as immunogenic as an E1-deleted AdH5 vector. Neutralizing antibodies to AdH5 limit the efficacy of vaccines based on the AdH5 serotype, and simian adenoviral vectors offer an attractive option to overcome this problem. We constructed E1E3-deleted human and simian adenoviral vectors encoding the pre-erythrocytic-stage malarial antigen Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein. We compared the immunogenicity and efficacy of AdC6, a recombinant simian adenovirus serotype 6 vector, in a murine malaria model to those of AdH5 and the poxviral vectors MVA and FP9. AdC6 induced sterile protection from a single dose in 90% of mice, in contrast to AdH5 (25%) and poxviral vectors MVA and FP9 (0%). Adenoviral vectors maintained potent CD8(+) T-cell responses for a longer period after immunization than did poxviral vectors and mainly induced an effector memory phenotype of cells. Significantly, AdC6 was able to maintain protection in the presence of preexisting immunity to AdH5.

  20. Purification and characterization of adenovirus core protein VII: a histone-like protein that is critical for adenovirus core formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Moria, Nithesh; Williams, Martin; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Pouton, Colin W

    2017-07-01

    Adenovirus protein VII is a highly cationic core protein that forms a nucleosome-like structure in the adenovirus core by condensing DNA in combination with protein V and mu. It has been proposed that protein VII could condense DNA in a manner analogous to mammalian histones. Due to the lack of an expression and purification protocol, the interactions between protein VII and DNA are poorly understood. In this study we describe methods for the purification of biologically active recombinant protein VII using an E. coli expression system. We expressed a cleavable fusion of protein VII with thioredoxin and established methods for purification of this fusion protein in denatured form. We describe an efficient method for resolving the cleavage products to obtain pure protein VII using hydroxyapatite column chromatography. Mass spectroscopy data confirmed its mass and purity to be 19.4 kDa and >98 %, respectively. Purified recombinant protein VII spontaneously condensed dsDNA to form particles, as shown by dye exclusion assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and nuclease protection assay. Additionally, an in vitro bioluminescence assay revealed that protein VII can be used to enhance the transfection of mammalian cells with lipofectamine/DNA complexes. The availability of recombinant protein VII will facilitate future studies of the structure of the adenovirus core. Improved understanding of the structure and function of protein VII will be valuable in elucidating the mechanism of adenoviral DNA condensation, defining the morphology of the adenovirus core and establishing the mechanism by which adenoviral DNA enters the nucleus.

  1. A rapid Q-PCR titration protocol for adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus vectors that produces biologically relevant results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaher, Sean D.; Berk, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses are employed in the study of cellular processes and as expression vectors used in gene therapy. The success and reproducibility of these studies is dependent in part on having accurate and meaningful titers of replication competent and helper-dependent adenovirus stocks, which is problematic due to the use of varied and divergent titration protocols. Physical titration methods, which quantify the total number of viral particles, are used by many, but are poor at estimating activity. Biological titration methods, such as plaque assays, are more biologically relevant, but are time consuming and not applicable to helper-dependent gene therapy vectors. To address this, a protocol was developed called “infectious genome titration” in which viral DNA is isolated from the nuclei of cells ~3 h post-infection, and then quantified by Q-PCR. This approach ensures that only biologically active virions are counted as part of the titer determination. This approach is rapid, robust, sensitive, reproducible, and applicable to all forms of adenovirus. Unlike other Q-PCR-based methods, titers determined by this protocol are well correlated with biological activity. PMID:23624118

  2. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  3. Encoders and Fault Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring large-scale systems is of fundamental importance in modern infrastructures. Many of these large-scale systems are complex interconnections of sub-components which interact by means of communication channels with limited bandwidth. Therefore the information must be encoded in order to be

  4. 78 FR 3906 - Prospective Grant of a Co-Exclusive License: Adenovirus-Based Controls and Calibrators for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of a Co-Exclusive License: Adenovirus...), issued January 11, 2000 and entitled ``Adenovirus Comprising Deletions on the E1A, E1B And E3 Regions for... October 24, 2000, and entitled ``Replication Deficient Recombinant Adenovirus Vector'' to Life...

  5. Interspecies differences in virus uptake versus cardiac function of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freiberg, F.; Sauter, M.; Pinkert, S.; Govindarajan, T.; Kaldrack, J.; Thakkar, M.; Fechner, H.; Klingel, K.; Gotthardt, M.

    2014-01-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell contact protein with an important role in virus uptake. Its extracellular immunoglobulin domains mediate the binding to coxsackievirus and adenovirus as well as homophilic and heterophilic interactions between cells. The cytoplasmic tail

  6. A simple negative selection method to identify adenovirus recombinants using colony PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The negative selection method to identify AdEasy adenovirus recombinants by colony PCR can identify the recombined colony within a short time-period, and maximally avoid damage to the recombinant plasmid by limiting recombination time, resulting in improved adenovirus packaging.

  7. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  8. Macropinocytotic uptake and infection of human epithelial cells with species B2 adenovirus type 35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kälin, S.; Amstutz, B.; Gastaldelli, M.; Wolfrum, N.; Boucke, K.; Havenga, M.; DiGennaro, F.; Liska, N.; Hemmi, S.; Greber, U.F.

    2010-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 35 (HAdV-35; here referred to as Ad35) causes kidney and urinary tract infections and infects respiratory organs of immunocompromised individuals. Unlike other adenoviruses, Ad35 has a low seroprevalence, which makes Ad35-based vectors promising candidates for gene therapy.

  9. Crystal structure of the fibre head domain of the Atadenovirus Snake Adenovirus 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu K Singh

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are non-enveloped icosahedral viruses with trimeric fibre proteins protruding from their vertices. There are five known genera, from which only Mastadenoviruses have been widely studied. Apart from studying adenovirus as a biological model system and with a view to prevent or combat viral infection, there is a major interest in using adenovirus for vaccination, cancer therapy and gene therapy purposes. Adenoviruses from the Atadenovirus genus have been isolated from squamate reptile hosts, ruminants and birds and have a characteristic gene organization and capsid morphology. The carboxy-terminal virus-distal fibre head domains are likely responsible for primary receptor recognition. We determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the Snake Adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1 fibre head using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD method. Despite the absence of significant sequence homology, this Atadenovirus fibre head has the same beta-sandwich propeller topology as other adenovirus fibre heads. However, it is about half the size, mainly due to much shorter loops connecting the beta-strands. The detailed structure of the SnAdV-1 fibre head and other animal adenovirus fibre heads, together with the future identification of their natural receptors, may lead to the development of new strategies to target adenovirus vectors to cells of interest.

  10. Avian influenza mucosal vaccination in chickens with replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated protection conferred by mucosal vaccination with replication competent adenovirus (RCA)-free recombinant adenovirus expressing a codon-optimized avian influenza (AI) H5 gene (AdTW68.H5ck). Commercial layer-type chicken groups were singly vaccinated ocularly at 5 days of age, or singly v...

  11. Presence of adenovirus species C in infiltrating lymphocytes of human sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kosulin

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses are known to persist in T-lymphocytes of tonsils, adenoids and intestinal tract. The oncogenic potential of different adenovirus types has been widely studied in rodents, in which adenovirus inoculation can induce multiple tumors such as undifferentiated sarcomas, adenocarcinomas and neuroectodermal tumors. However, the oncogenic potential of this virus has never been proven in human subjects. Using a highly sensitive broad-spectrum qRT-PCR, we have screened a set of different human sarcomas including leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and gastro intestinal stroma tumors. Primers binding the viral oncogene E1A and the capsid-coding gene Hexon were used to detect the presence of adenovirus DNA in tumor samples. We found that 18% of the tested leiomyosarcomas and 35% of the liposarcomas were positive for the presence of adenovirus DNA, being species C types the most frequently detected adenoviruses. However, only in one sample of the gastro intestinal stroma tumors the virus DNA could be detected. The occurrence of adenovirus in the tumor sections was confirmed by subsequent fluorescence in-situ-hybridization analysis and co-staining with the transcription factor Bcl11b gives evidence for the presence of the virus in infiltrating T-lymphocytes within the tumors. Together these data underline, for the first time, the persistence of adenovirus in T-lymphocytes infiltrated in muscular and fatty tissue tumor samples. If an impaired immune system leads to the viral persistence and reactivation of the virus is involved in additional diseases needs further investigation.

  12. A novel technology to target adenovirus vectors : application in cells involved in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, Jan Cornelis Emile

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a novel technology is described to target adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors are powerful tools to modulate gene expression. The use of these vectors however, is hampered by the fact that many for gene therapy interesting cell types do not, or only at low levels express the CAR

  13. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Vasopressin is synthesized by magnocellular neurons in supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) hypothalamic nuclei and released by their axon terminals in the neurohypophysis (NH). With its actions as an antidiuretic hormone and vasoactive agent, vasopressin plays a pivotal role in the control of body fluids and cardiovascular homeostasis. Because of its well-defined neurobiology and functional importance, the SON/PVN-NH system is ideal to establish methods for gene transfer of genetic material into specific pathways in the mouse central nervous system. In these studies, we compared the efficiency of transferring the gene lacZ, encoding for beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), versus a gene encoding for green fluorescent protein by using replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors in adult mice. Transfection with viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units per coverslip of NH, PVN, and SON in dissociated, cultured cells caused efficient transfection without cytotoxicity. However, over an extended period of time, higher levels (50% to 75% of the cells) of beta-gal expression were detected in comparison with green fluorescent protein (5% to 50% of the cells). With the use of a stereotaxic approach, the pituitary glands of mice were injected with Ad (4 x 10(6) plaque-forming units). In material from these animals, we were able to visualize the expression of the beta-gal gene in the NH and in magnocellular neurons of both the PVN and SON. The results of these experiments indicate that Ad-Rous sarcoma virus promoter-beta-gal is taken up by nerve terminals at the injection site (NH) and retrogradely transported to the soma of the neurons projecting to the NH. We conclude that the application of these experimental approaches will provide powerful tools for physiological studies and potential approaches to deliver therapeutic genes to treat diseases.

  14. Adenovirus type 5 with modified hexons induces robust transgene-specific immune responses in mice with pre-existing immunity against adenovirus type 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shinya; Okuda, Kenji; Ura, Takehiro; Kondo, Asami; Yoshida, Atsushi; Yoshizaki, Shinji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Klinman, Dennis; Shimada, Masaru

    2009-07-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) is widely used as a vehicle for vaccine delivery in the treatment of infectious disease and cancer. However, the efficacy of Ad5 vectors has been limited in humans because exposure to Ad5 infections results in most adults having neutralizing antibodies against Ad5. To overcome this limitation, the hexon epitope present in the fifth hypervariable region of Ad5 was modified. To evaluate the ability of Ad5 vectors encoding the HIV env protein to induce Ag-specific immune responses in the face of pre-existing anti-Ad5 immunity, mice were administrated intramuscularly with the Ad-Luc vector, and then vaccinated with parental or hexon-modified Ad5 vectors (Ad-HisHIV, Ad-END/AAAHIV or Ad-HIV) at week 8. HIV-specific cell-mediated immune responses were detected through a combination of tetramer assays and intracellular cytokine staining from weeks 8-23. The hexon-modified Ad vector was able to escape from anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibody, and mice with the modified vector generated significantly lower individual neutralizing antibody than those immunized with the parental vector. Furthermore, mice with pre-existing anti-Ad immunity immunized with the modified vector generated significantly stronger cell-mediated anti-env responses than those immunized with the parental vector. These data demonstrate that Ad5 vector with hexon modification reduce their sensitivity to pre-existing anti-Ad immunity and improve their clinical utility. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Resident corneal c-fms(+) macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-06-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45(+) cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Resident corneal c-fms+ macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-01-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45+ cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. PMID:27185163

  17. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read , compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  18. Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccine as a Rapid-Response Tool Against Avian Influenza Pandemic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Kampen, K. R.; Tang, D. C.

    2007-01-01

    Influenza viruses in nature undergo genetic mutation and reassortment. Three pandemics of avian influenza in man were recorded in the twentieth century. Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses currently in circulation pose a threat for another world-wide pandemic, if they become transmissible from man to man. Manufacturing protective vaccines using current egg-based technology is often difficult due to the virulence of the virus and its adverse effects on the embryonating egg substrate. New technologies allow the creation of safe and protective pandemic influenza vaccines without the need for egg based substrates. These technologies allow new vaccines to be created in less than one month. Manufacturing is in tissue culture, not eggs. Vaccine can be administered to man non-invasively, without adjuvants, eliciting a rapid and protective immune response. Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) virus was elicited in chickens by single-dose in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-derived vector encoding an H5N9 avian influenza virus hemagglutinin. Vaccinated chickens were protected against both H5N1 and H5N2 HPAI virus challenges. Mass-administration of this bird flu vaccine can be streamlined with available robotic in ovo injectors. Vaccination using this vaccine could protect the the largest host reservoir (chickens) and greatly reduce the exposure of man to avian influenza. In addition, Ad5-vectored vaccines can be produced rapidly and the safety margin of a non-replicating vector is superior to that of a replicating counterpart. Furthermore, this mode of vaccination is compatible with epidemiological surveys of natural AI virus infections. In addition to mass immunization of poultry, both animals and humans have been effectively immunized by intranasal administration of Ad5-vectored influenza vaccines without any appreciable side effects, even in mice and human volunteers with

  19. High-efficiency system for the construction of adenovirus vectors and its application to the generation of representative adenovirus-based cDNA expression libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillgenberg, Moritz; Hofmann, Christian; Stadler, Herbert; Löser, Peter

    2006-06-01

    We here describe a convenient system for the production of recombinant adenovirus vectors and its use for the construction of a representative adenovirus-based cDNA expression library. The system is based on direct site-specific insertion of transgene cassettes into a replicating donor virus. The transgene is inserted into a donor plasmid containing the viral 5' inverted terminal repeat, the complete viral packaging signal, and a single loxP site. The plasmid is then transfected into a Cre recombinase-expressing packaging cell line that has been infected with a donor virus containing a partially deleted packaging signal flanked by loxP sites. Cre recombinase, by two steps of action, sequentially catalyzes the generation of a nonpackageable donor virus acceptor substrate and the generation of the desired recombinant adenovirus vector. Due to its growth impairment, residual donor virus can efficiently be counterselected during amplification of the recombinant adenovirus vector. By using this adenovirus construction system, a plasmid-based human liver cDNA library was converted by a single step into an adenovirus-based cDNA expression library with about 10(6) independent adenovirus clones. The high-titer purified library was shown to contain about 44% of full-length cDNAs with an average insert size of 1.3 kb. cDNAs of a gene expressed at a high level (human alpha(1)-antitrypsin) and a gene expressed at a relatively low level (human coagulation factor IX) in human liver were isolated from the adenovirus-based library using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based screening procedure.

  20. Clinicopathological features of 11 suspected outbreaks of bovine adenovirus infection and development of a real-time quantitative PCR to detect bovine adenovirus type 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaatstra, B L; Tisdall, D J; Blackwood, M; Fairley, R A

    2016-09-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to investigate 11 outbreaks of presumptive fatal adenovirus infection diagnosed through two New Zealand diagnostic laboratories during 2014 and 2015. Outbreaks occurred in 6-12-month-old Friesian or Friesian cross cattle during autumn, winter and spring. Individual outbreaks were short in duration, with mortality rates ranging from 3/250 to 20/600 (1.2 to 3.3%). Clinical signs included severe diarrhoea, depression, recumbency, and death. Post-mortem examination revealed congestion and oedema of the alimentary tract and fluid to haemorrhagic intestinal contents. Histopathological lesions were characterised by congestion and haemorrhage of the alimentary tract mucosa, oedema of the submucosa, and mild interstitial inflammation in the kidneys. Large basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were identified in vascular endothelial cells of the alimentary tract in 11/11 cases and of the kidney in 8/9 cases. A real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay was designed to detect bovine adenovirus type 10 (BAdV-10) using hexon gene sequences available in GenBank. DNA extracted from a field case and confirmed by sequencing was used as a positive control. The qPCR had a reaction efficiency of 101% (R(2)=0.99) and the limit of detection was adenovirus Wic isolate Ma20-1, a close relative of BadV-10. Bovine adenovirus type 10 was identified in FFPE tissues from cattle with histopathological evidence of adenovirus infection. Bovine adenoviruses, and especially BAdV-10, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for acute enteric disease and death in young cattle. The qPCR detected BAdV-10 from FFPE tissue of cattle with suspected adenoviral infection diagnosed by histopathology. However results should be interpreted in light of clinical and pathological findings due to the possibility of adenovirus shedding by healthy cattle and the presence of pathogenic adenoviruses other than BAdV-10.

  1. Modeling adenovirus latency in human lymphocyte cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yange; Huang, Wen; Ornelles, David A; Gooding, Linda R

    2010-09-01

    Species C adenovirus establishes a latent infection in lymphocytes of the tonsils and adenoids. To understand how this lytic virus is maintained in these cells, four human lymphocytic cell lines that support the entire virus life cycle were examined. The T-cell line Jurkat ceased proliferation and died shortly after virus infection. BJAB, Ramos (B cells), and KE37 (T cells) continued to divide at nearly normal rates while replicating the virus genome. Viral genome numbers peaked and then declined in BJAB cells below one genome per cell at 130 to 150 days postinfection. Ramos and KE37 cells maintained the virus genome at over 100 copies per cell over a comparable period of time. BJAB cells maintained the viral DNA as a monomeric episome. All three persistently infected cells lost expression of the cell surface coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) within 24 h postinfection, and CAR expression remained low for at least 340 days postinfection. CAR loss proceeded via a two-stage process. First, an initial loss of cell surface staining for CAR required virus late gene expression and a CAR-binding fiber protein even while CAR protein and mRNA levels remained high. Second, CAR mRNA disappeared at around 30 days postinfection and remained low even after virus DNA was lost from the cells. At late times postinfection (day 180), BJAB cells could not be reinfected with adenovirus, even when CAR was reintroduced to the cells via retroviral transduction, suggesting that the expression of multiple genes had been stably altered in these cells following infection.

  2. Novel adenovirus detected in kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei) with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, János; Mándoki, Míra; Sós, Endre; Kertész, Péter; Koroknai, Viktória; Bányai, Krisztián; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2017-03-01

    A male kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei) originating from a zoo facility was delivered for post mortem evaluation in Hungary. Acute lobar pneumonia with histopathologic changes resembling an adenovirus (AdV) infection was detected by light microscopic examination. The presence of an AdV was confirmed by obtaining partial sequence data from the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA-polymerase. Although the exact taxonomic position of this novel marsupial origin virus could not be determined, pairwise identity analyses and phylogenetic calculations revealed that it is distantly related to other members in the family Adenoviridae.

  3. Cryo-EM structure of human adenovirus D26 reveals the conservation of structural organization among human adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaodi; Veesler, David; Campbell, Melody G; Barry, Mary E; Asturias, Francisco J; Barry, Michael A; Reddy, Vijay S

    2017-05-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) cause acute respiratory, ocular, and gastroenteric diseases and are also frequently used as gene and vaccine delivery vectors. Unlike the archetype human adenovirus C5 (HAdV-C5), human adenovirus D26 (HAdV-D26) belongs to species-D HAdVs, which target different cellular receptors, and is differentially recognized by immune surveillance mechanisms. HAdV-D26 is being championed as a lower seroprevalent vaccine and oncolytic vector in preclinical and human clinical studies. To understand the molecular basis for their distinct biological properties and independently validate the structures of minor proteins, we determined the first structure of species-D HAdV at 3.7 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. All the hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs), including HVR1, have been identified and exhibit a distinct organization compared to those of HAdV-C5. Despite the differences in the arrangement of helices in the coiled-coil structures, protein IX molecules form a continuous hexagonal network on the capsid exterior. In addition to the structurally conserved region (3 to 300) of IIIa, we identified an extra helical domain comprising residues 314 to 390 that further stabilizes the vertex region. Multiple (two to three) copies of the cleaved amino-terminal fragment of protein VI (pVIn) are observed in each hexon cavity, suggesting that there could be ≥480 copies of VI present in HAdV-D26. In addition, a localized asymmetric reconstruction of the vertex region provides new details of the three-pronged "claw hold" of the trimeric fiber and its interactions with the penton base. These observations resolve the previous conflicting assignments of the minor proteins and suggest the likely conservation of their organization across different HAdVs.

  4. Disorders of phonological encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, B

    1992-03-01

    Studies of phonological disturbances in aphasic speech are reviewed. It is argued that failure to test for error consistency in individual patients makes it generally improper to draw inferences about specific disorders of phonological encoding. A minimalist interpretation of available data on phonological errors is therefore proposed that involves variable loss of information in transmission between processing subsystems. Proposals for systematic loss or corruption of phonological information in lexical representations or in translation subsystems is shown to be inadequately grounded. The review concludes with some simple methodological prescriptions for future research.

  5. A novel adenovirus of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Carsten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adenoviruses (AdV broadly infect vertebrate hosts including a variety of primates. We identified a novel AdV in the feces of captive gorillas by isolation in cell culture, electron microscopy and PCR. From the supernatants of infected cultures we amplified DNA polymerase (DPOL, preterminal protein (pTP and hexon gene sequences with generic pan primate AdV PCR assays. The sequences in-between were amplified by long-distance PCRs of 2 - 10 kb length, resulting in a final sequence of 15.6 kb. Phylogenetic analysis placed the novel gorilla AdV into a cluster of primate AdVs belonging to the species Human adenovirus B (HAdV-B. Depending on the analyzed gene, its position within the cluster was variable. To further elucidate its origin, feces samples of wild gorillas were analyzed. AdV hexon sequences were detected which are indicative for three distinct and novel gorilla HAdV-B viruses, among them a virus nearly identical to the novel AdV isolated from captive gorillas. This shows that the discovered virus is a member of a group of HAdV-B viruses that naturally infect gorillas. The mixed phylogenetic clusters of gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo and human AdVs within the HAdV-B species indicate that host switches may have been a component of the evolution of human and non-human primate HAdV-B viruses.

  6. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Eric A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Camacho, Zenaido T. [Department of Cell Biology, Department of Natural Sciences, Western New Mexico University, Silver City, NM 88062 (United States); Hillestad, Matthew L. [Nephrology Training Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J. [Virology and Gene Therapy Graduate Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Mercier, George T. [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Barry, Michael A., E-mail: mab@mayo.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Department of Immunology and Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  7. Adenovirus chromatin structure at different stages of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniell, E.; Groff, D.E.; Fedor, M.J.

    1981-12-01

    The authors investigated the structure of adenovirus deoxyribonecleic acid (DNA)-protein complexes in nuclei of infected cells by using micrococal nuclease. Parental (infecting) DNA was digested into multimers which had a unit fragment size that was indistinguishable from the size of the nucleosomal repeat of cellular chromatin. This pattern was maintained in parental DNA throughout infection. Similar repeating units were detected in hamster cells that were nonpermissive for human adenovirus and in cells pretreated with n-butyrate. Late in infection, the pattern of digestion of viral DNA was determined by two different experimental approaches. Nuclear DNA was electrophoresed, blotted, and hybridized with labeled viral sequences; in this procedure all virus-specific DNA was detected. This technique revealed a diffuse protected band of viral DNA that was smaller than 160 base pairs, but no discrete multimers. All regions of the genome were represented in the protected DNA. To examine the nuclease protection of newly replicated viral DNA, infected cells were labeled with (/sup 3/)thymidine after blocking of cellular DNA synthesis but not viral DNA synthesis. With this procedure they identified a repeating unit which was distinctly different from the cellular nucleosomal repeat. The authors found broad bands with midpoints at 200, 400, and 600 base pairs, as well as the limit digest material revealed by blotting. High-resolution acrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the viral species comprised a series of closely spaced bands ranging in size from less than 30 to 250 base pairs.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of hypothalamic glucokinase affects feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranga, Romina María; Millán, Carola; Barahona, María José; Recabal, Antonia; Salgado, Magdiel; Martinez, Fernando; Ordenes, Patricio; Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Sepúlveda, Fernando; Uribe, Elena; García-Robles, María de Los Ángeles

    2017-06-16

    Glucokinase (GK), the hexokinase involved in glucosensing in pancreatic β-cells, is also expressed in arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons and hypothalamic tanycytes, the cells that surround the basal third ventricle (3V). Several lines of evidence suggest that tanycytes may be involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Tanycytes have extended cell processes that contact the feeding-regulating neurons in the AN, particularly, agouti-related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. In this study, we developed an adenovirus expressing GK shRNA to inhibit GK expression in vivo. When injected into the 3V of rats, this adenovirus preferentially transduced tanycytes. qRT-PCR and Western blot assays confirmed GK mRNA and protein levels were lower in GK knockdown animals compared to the controls. In response to an intracerebroventricular glucose injection, the mRNA levels of anorexigenic POMC and CART and orexigenic AgRP and NPY neuropeptides were altered in GK knockdown animals. Similarly, food intake, meal duration, frequency of eating events and the cumulative eating time were increased, whereas the intervals between meals were decreased in GK knockdown rats, suggesting a decrease in satiety. Thus, GK expression in the ventricular cells appears to play an important role in feeding behavior.

  9. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V Borovjagin

    Full Text Available To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI, a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3 fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(vβ3/α(vβ5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  10. Genetic reconstitution of the human Adenovirus type 2 temperature-sensitive 1 mutant defective in endosomal escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastaldelli Michele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Adenoviruses infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts, the urinary and digestive tracts, lymphoid systems and heart, and give rise to epidemic conjunctivitis. More than 51 human serotypes have been identified to-date, and classified into 6 species A-F. The species C Adenoviruses Ad2 and Ad5 (Ad2/5 cause upper and lower respiratory disease, but how viral structure relates to the selection of particular infectious uptake pathways is not known. An adenovirus mutant, Ad2-ts1 had been isolated upon chemical mutagenesis in the past, and shown to have unprocessed capsid proteins. Ad2-ts1 fails to package the viral protease L3/p23, and Ad2-ts1 virions do not efficiently escape from endosomes. It had been suggested that the C22187T point mutation leading to the substitution of the conserved proline 137 to leucine (P137L in the L3/p23 protease was at least in part responsible for this phenotype. To clarify if the C22187T mutation is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype, we sequenced the genes encoding the structural proteins of Ad2-ts1, and confirmed that the Ad2-ts1 DNA carries the point mutation C22187T. Introduction of C22187T to the wild-type Ad2 genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (Ad2-BAC gave Ad2-BAC46 virions with the full Ad2-ts1 phenotype. Reversion of Ad2-BAC46 gave wild-type Ad2 particles indicating that P137L is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype. The kinetics of Ad2-ts1 uptake into cells were comparable to Ad2 suggesting similar endocytic uptake mechanisms. Surprisingly, infectious Ad2 or Ad5 but not Ad2-ts1 uptake required CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein, which controls clathrin-mediated endocytosis and membrane transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi-network. The data show that no other mutations than P137L in the viral protease are necessary to give rise to particles that are defective in capsid processing and endosomal escape. This provides a basis for

  11. Selectivity and Efficiency of Late Transgene Expression by Transcriptionally Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses Are Dependent on the Transgene Insertion Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirin, Christina; Rohmer, Stanimira; Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Behr, Michael; Hesse, Andrea; Engelhardt, Sarah; Erbs, Philippe; Enk, Alexander H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Key challenges facing cancer therapy are the development of tumor-specific drugs and potent multimodal regimens. Oncolytic adenoviruses possess the potential to realize both aims by restricting virus replication to tumors and inserting therapeutic genes into the virus genome, respectively. A major effort in this regard is to express transgenes in a tumor-specific manner without affecting virus replication. Using both luciferase as a sensitive reporter and genetic prodrug activation, we show that promoter control of E1A facilitates highly selective expression of transgenes inserted into the late transcription unit. This, however, required multistep optimization of late transgene expression. Transgene insertion via internal ribosome entry site (IRES), splice acceptor (SA), or viral 2A sequences resulted in replication-dependent expression. Unexpectedly, analyses in appropriate substrates and with matching control viruses revealed that IRES and SA, but not 2A, facilitated indirect transgene targeting via tyrosinase promoter control of E1A. Transgene expression via SA was more selective (up to 1,500-fold) but less effective than via IRES. Notably, we also revealed transgene-dependent interference with splicing. Hence, the prodrug convertase FCU1 (a cytosine deaminase–uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fusion protein) was expressed only after optimizing the sequence surrounding the SA site and mutating a cryptic splice site within the transgene. The resulting tyrosinase promoter-regulated and FCU1-encoding adenovirus combined effective oncolysis with targeted prodrug activation therapy of melanoma. Thus, prodrug activation showed potent bystander killing and increased cytotoxicity of the virus up to 10-fold. We conclude that armed oncolytic viruses can be improved substantially by comparing and optimizing strategies for targeted transgene expression, thereby implementing selective and multimodal cancer therapies. PMID:20939692

  12. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a modifier of cardiac conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Roos F.J.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Freiberg, Fabian; Verkerk, Arie O.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Podliesna, Svitlana; Chen, Chen; Purfürst, Bettina; Spallek, Bastian; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Baczko, Istvan; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; George, Alfred L.; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Lodder, Elisabeth M.; de Bakker, Jacques M.T.; Fischer, Robert; Coronel, Ruben; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Gotthardt, Michael; Remme, Carol Ann

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the modulatory effect of the Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on ventricular conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Background A heritable component in risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF) during myocardial infarction (MI) has been well established. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) for VF during acute MI has led to the identification of a locus on chromosome 21q21 (rs2824292) in the vicinity of the CXADR gene. CXADR encodes the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a cell adhesion molecule predominantly located at intercalated discs of the cardiomyocyte. Methods The correlation between CAR transcript levels and rs2824292 genotype was investigated in human left ventricular samples. Electrophysiological studies and molecular analyses were performed CAR haploinsufficient mice (CAR+/−). Results In human left ventricular samples, the risk allele at the chr21q21 GWAS locus was associated with lower CXADR mRNA levels, suggesting that decreased cardiac levels of CAR predispose to ischemia-induced VF. Hearts from CAR+/− mice displayed ventricular conduction slowing in addition to an earlier onset of ventricular arrhythmias during the early phase of acute myocardial ischemia following LAD ligation. Connexin43 expression and distribution was unaffected, but CAR+/− hearts displayed increased arrhythmia susceptibility upon pharmacological electrical uncoupling. Patch-clamp analysis of isolated CAR+/− myocytes showed reduced sodium current magnitude specifically at the intercalated disc. Moreover, CAR co-precipitated with NaV1.5 in vitro, suggesting that CAR affects sodium channel function through a physical interaction with NaV1.5. Conclusion We identify CAR as a novel modifier of ventricular conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Genetic determinants of arrhythmia susceptibility (such as CAR) may constitute future targets for risk

  13. Adenovirus urethritis and concurrent conjunctivitis: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Olivia Louise; Samuel, Mannampallil Itty; Sudhanva, Malur; Ellis, Joanna; Taylor, Chris

    2015-03-01

    We present eight cases and review the literature of concurrent urethritis and conjunctivitis where adenovirus was identified as the causative pathogen. The focus of this review concerns the identification of specific sexual practices, symptoms, signs and any serotypes that seem more commonly associated with such adenovirus infections. We discuss the seasonality of adenovirus infection and provide practical advice for clinicians to give to the patient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Ileocecal Intussusception with Histomorphological Features of Inflammatory Neuropathy in Adenovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Kaemmerer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological mechanisms for ileocecal intussusception in children with adenovirus infection are not well characterized. Here we demonstrate coincidence of adenovirus infection and inflammatory neuropathy of myenteric plexus in two children with ileocecal intussusception. Inflammatory neuropathy, an unspecific morphological feature which is found in peristalsis disorders, was morphologically characterized by the influx of CD3 positive lymphocytes in nervous plexus. To our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting peristalsis disorders from inflammatory neuropathy as additional mechanism in the pathophysiological concept of adenovirus-associated ileocecal intussusception.

  15. Time encoded radiation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  16. Encoding the Factorisation Calculus

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    Reuben N. S. Rowe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jay and Given-Wilson have recently introduced the Factorisation (or SF- calculus as a minimal fundamental model of intensional computation. It is a combinatory calculus containing a special combinator, F, which is able to examine the internal structure of its first argument. The calculus is significant in that as well as being combinatorially complete it also exhibits the property of structural completeness, i.e. it is able to represent any function on terms definable using pattern matching on arbitrary normal forms. In particular, it admits a term that can decide the structural equality of any two arbitrary normal forms. Since SF-calculus is combinatorially complete, it is clearly at least as powerful as the more familiar and paradigmatic Turing-powerful computational models of Lambda Calculus and Combinatory Logic. Its relationship to these models in the converse direction is less obvious, however. Jay and Given-Wilson have suggested that SF-calculus is strictly more powerful than the aforementioned models, but a detailed study of the connections between these models is yet to be undertaken. This paper begins to bridge that gap by presenting a faithful encoding of the Factorisation Calculus into the Lambda Calculus preserving both reduction and strong normalisation. The existence of such an encoding is a new result. It also suggests that there is, in some sense, an equivalence between the former model and the latter. We discuss to what extent our result constitutes an equivalence by considering it in the context of some previously defined frameworks for comparing computational power and expressiveness.

  17. Random sampling of the Central European bat fauna reveals the existence of numerous hitherto unknown adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovszky, Márton; Kohl, Claudia; Boldogh, Sándor; Görföl, Tamás; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Kurth, Andreas; Harrach, Balázs

    2015-12-01

    From over 1250 extant species of the order Chiroptera, 25 and 28 are known to occur in Germany and Hungary, respectively. Close to 350 samples originating from 28 bat species (17 from Germany, 27 from Hungary) were screened for the presence of adenoviruses (AdVs) using a nested PCR that targets the DNA polymerase gene of AdVs. An additional PCR was designed and applied to amplify a fragment from the gene encoding the IVa2 protein of mastadenoviruses. All German samples originated from organs of bats found moribund or dead. The Hungarian samples were excrements collected from colonies of known bat species, throat or rectal swab samples, taken from live individuals that had been captured for faunistic surveys and migration studies, as well as internal organs of dead specimens. Overall, 51 samples (14.73%) were found positive. We detected 28 seemingly novel and six previously described bat AdVs by sequencing the PCR products. The positivity rate was the highest among the guano samples of bat colonies. In phylogeny reconstructions, the AdVs detected in bats clustered roughly, but not perfectly, according to the hosts' families (Vespertilionidae, Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Phyllostomidae and Pteropodidae). In a few cases, identical sequences were derived from animals of closely related species. On the other hand, some bat species proved to harbour more than one type of AdV. The high prevalence of infection and the large number of chiropteran species worldwide make us hypothesise that hundreds of different yet unknown AdV types might circulate in bats.

  18. Adenovirus Vector-Derived VA-RNA-Mediated Innate Immune Responses

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    Hiroyuki Mizuguchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The major limitation of the clinical use of replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad vectors is the interference by innate immune responses, including induction of inflammatory cytokines and interferons (IFN, following in vivo application of Ad vectors. Ad vector-induced production of inflammatory cytokines and IFNs also results in severe organ damage and efficient induction of acquired immune responses against Ad proteins and transgene products. Ad vector-induced innate immune responses are triggered by the recognition of Ad components by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. In order to reduce the side effects by Ad vector-induced innate immune responses and to develop safer Ad vectors, it is crucial to clarify which PRRs and which Ad components are involved in Ad vector-induced innate immune responses. Our group previously demonstrated that myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88 and toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 play crucial roles in the Ad vector-induced inflammatory cytokine production in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Furthermore, our group recently found that virus associated-RNAs (VA-RNAs, which are about 160 nucleotide-long non-coding small RNAs encoded in the Ad genome, are involved in IFN production through the IFN-β promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1-mediated signaling pathway following Ad vector transduction. The aim of this review is to highlight the Ad vector-induced innate immune responses following transduction, especially VA-RNA-mediated innate immune responses. Our findings on the mechanism of Ad vector-induced innate immune responses should make an important contribution to the development of safer Ad vectors, such as an Ad vector lacking expression of VA-RNAs.

  19. Coliphage and adenovirus concentrations at various points along the net-zero system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Coliphage and adenovirus concentrations per liter. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Gassie, L., J. Englehardt, J. Wang, N. Brinkman, J....

  20. Detection of enteric Adenoviruses in South-African waters using gene probes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene probes developed locally for both enteric Adenoviruses 40 and 41 were used to determine whether these viruses were present in both raw and treated waters. Approximately sixty water samples were concentrated by ultra filtration and analysed...

  1. New adenoviruses from new primate hosts - growing diversity reveals taxonomic weak points

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dadáková, E.; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Brožová, K.; Modrý, David; Celer, V.; Hrazdilová, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 107, February (2017), s. 305-307 ISSN 1055-7903 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adenovirus * primate * phylogeny * taxonomy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.419, year: 2016

  2. Adenovirus, herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus infection in a lung transplant recipient

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    Sandhya Nagarakanti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft infections post lung transplantation have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. We report a rare case of triple viral infection with adenovirus, Herpes Simplex virus (HSV and Cytomegalovirus (CMV in a lung transplant recipient.

  3. Construction of Metabolically Biotinylated Adenovirus with Deleted Fiber Knob as Targeting Vector

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    Schnitzer Jan E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene delivery vectors based on adenovirus, particularly human adenovirus serotype 5 (hAd5 have great potential for the treatment of variety of diseases. However, the tropism of hAd5 needs to be modified to achieve tissue- or cell- specific therapies for the successful application of this vector system to clinic. Here, we modified hAd5 tropism by replacing the fiber knob which contains the coxsackievirus B and adenovirus receptor (CAR-binding sites with a biotin acceptor peptide, a truncated form of Propionibacterium shermanii 1.3 S transcarboxylase domain (PSTCD, to enable metabolically biotinylation of the virus. We demonstrate here that the new adenovirus no longer shows CAR-dependent cell uptake and transduction. When metabolically biotinylated and avidin-coated, it forms a nano-complex that can be retargeted to distinct cells using biotinylated antibodies. This vector may prove useful in the path towards achieving targeted gene delivery.

  4. Clinical Trials Using Adenovirus/Cytomegalovirus/Epstein-Barr Virus-specific Allogeneic Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying adenovirus/cytomegalovirus/epstein-barr virus-specific allogeneic cytotoxic t lymphocytes.

  5. PCR Analysis of Egyptian Respiratory Adenovirus Isolates, Including Identification of Species, Serotypes, and Coinfections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Metzgar, David; Osuna, Miguel; Yingst, Samuel; Rakha, Magda; Earhart, Kenneth; Elyan, Diaa; Esmat, Hala; Saad, Magdi D; Kajon, Adriana; Wu, Jianguo; Gray, Gregory C; Ryan, Margaret A; Russell, Kevin L

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-eight adenovirus (Ad) isolates and associated clinical data were collected from walk-in patients with influenza-like illness in Egypt during routine influenza surveillance from 1999 through 2002...

  6. Vasculature-Specific Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krasnykh, Victor

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this project was to use the previously identified peptides with the reported specificity for neovasculature of prostate tumors to genetically modify the natural tropism of human adenovirus...

  7. Neuroblastomas and medulloblastomas exhibit more Coxsackie adenovirus receptor expression than gliomas and other brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Annette; Fan, Xiaolong; Salford, Leif G; Widegren, Bengt; Englund, Elisabet

    2007-06-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated treatment is a potential therapy for tumors of the central nervous system. To obtain a significant therapeutic effect by adenoviral vectors, a sufficient infection is required, the power of which depends predominantly on the level of Coxsackie adenovirus receptors. We stained surgical biopsies of central nervous system tumors and neuroblastomas for Coxsackie adenovirus receptors. For gliomas, the level of the receptor was low and markedly variable among individual tumors. By contrast, neuroblastomas and medulloblastomas exhibited a higher degree of Coxsackie adenovirus receptor expression than gliomas and other brain tumors. We conclude that neuroblastomas and medulloblastomas could be suitable for adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. Adverse effects of the treatment, however, must be considered because neurons and reactive astrocytes also express a significant amount of the receptor.

  8. Development of an immunotherapeutic adenovirus targeting hormone-independent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jae Sik Kim,1 Sang Don Lee,2 Sang Jin Lee,3 Moon Kee Chung21Department of Urology, The Catholic University of Korea Incheon St Mary's Hospital, Incheon, 2Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan, 3Genitourinary Cancer Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang, KoreaBackground: To develop a targeting therapy for hormone-independent prostate cancer, we constructed and characterized conditionally replicating oncolytic adenovirus (Ad equipped with mRFP(monomeric red fluorescence protein/ttk (modified herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase This construct was then further modified to express both mRFP/ttk and a soluble form of cytokine FLT3L (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand simultaneously.Methods: To construct the recombinant oncolytic adenovirus, E1a and E4 genes, which are necessary for adenovirus replication, were controlled by the prostate-specific enhancer sequence (PSES targeting prostate cancer cells expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA. Simultaneously, it expressed the mRFP/ttk fusion protein in order to be able to elicit the cytotoxic effect.Results: The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk chimeric recombinant adenovirus was generated successfully. When replication of Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk was evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines under fluorescence microscopy, red fluorescence intensity increased more in LNCaP cells, suggesting that the mRFP/ttk fusion protein was folded functionally. In addition, the replication assay including wild-type adenovirus as a positive control showed that PSES-positive cells (LNCaP and CWR22rv permitted virus replication but not PSES-negative cells (DU145 and PC3. Next, we evaluated the killing activity of this recombinant adenovirus. The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk killed LNCaP and CWR22rv more effectively. Unlike PSES-positive cells, DU145 and PC3 were resistant to killing by this recombinant

  9. Selecting Operations for Assembler Encoding

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    Tomasz Praczyk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembler Encoding is a neuro-evolutionary method in which a neural network is represented in the form of a simple program called Assembler Encoding Program. The task of the program is to create the so-called Network Definition Matrix which maintains all the information necessary to construct the network. To generate Assembler Encoding Programs and the subsequent neural networks evolutionary techniques are used.
    The performance of Assembler Encoding strongly depends on operations used in Assembler Encoding Programs. To select the most effective operations, experiments in the optimization and the predator-prey problem were carried out. In the experiments, Assembler Encoding Programs equipped with different types of operations were tested. The results of the tests are presented at the end of the paper.

  10. Ganciclovir inhibits human adenovirus replication and pathogenicity in permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Balakrishnan, Lata; Dewhurst, Stephen; Capella, Cristina; Buller, R Mark L; Toth, Karoly; Wold, William S M

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Partial characterization of new adenoviruses found in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Inna; Behncke, Helge; Schmidt, Volker; Geflügel, F T A; Papp, Tibor; Stöhr, Anke C; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-06-01

    In the years 2011-2012, a consensus nested polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection of adenovirus (AdV) infection in reptiles. During this screening, three new AdVs were detected. One of these viruses was detected in three lizards from a group of green striped tree dragons (Japalura splendida). Another was detected in a green anole (Anolis carolinensis). A third virus was detected in a Jackson's chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii). Analysis of a portion of the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase genes of each of these viruses revealed that they all were different from one another and from all previously described reptilian AdVs. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial DNA polymerase gene sequence showed that all newly detected viruses clustered within the genus Atadenovirus. This is the first description of AdVs in these lizard species.

  12. Detection of a putative novel adenovirus by PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic characterisation of two gene fragments from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of a cat diagnosed with disseminated adenovirus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Béla; Hornyák, Ákos; Demeter, Zoltán; Forgách, Petra; Kennedy, Frances; Rusvai, Miklós

    2017-12-01

    Adenoviral nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of a cat that had suffered from disseminated adenovirus infection. The identity of the amplified products from the hexon and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase genes was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The sequences were clearly distinguishable from corresponding hexon and polymerase sequences of other mastadenoviruses, including human adenoviruses. These results suggest the possible existence of a distinct feline adenovirus.

  13. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  14. A molecular epidemiology survey of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in children residing in Southern Palestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Qurei

    Full Text Available A molecular epidemiology survey was performed in order to establish and document the respiratory adenovirus pathogen profiles among children in Southern Palestine. Three hundred and thirty-eight hospitalized pediatric cases with adenovirus-associated respiratory tract infections were analyzed. Forty four cases out of the 338 were evaluated in more detail for the adenoviruses types present. All of the children resided in Southern Palestine, that is, in city, village and refugee camp environments within the districts of Hebron and Bethlehem. Human adenoviruses circulated throughout 2005-2010, with major outbreaks occurring in the spring months. A larger percent of the children diagnosed with adenoviral infections were male infants. DNA sequence analysis of the hexon genes from 44 samples revealed that several distinct adenovirus types circulated in the region; these were HAdV-C1, HAdV-C2, HAdV-B3 and HAdV-C5. However, not all of these types were detected within each year. This is the first study ever conducted in Palestine of the genetic epidemiology of respiratory adenovirus infections.

  15. Isolation of a novel adenovirus from California sea lions Zalophus californianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, T; Colegrove, K M; Hanson, M; Gulland, F M D

    2011-05-09

    Viral hepatitis associated with adenoviral infection has been reported in California sea lions Zalophus californianus admitted to rehabilitation centers along the California coast since the 1970s. Canine adenovirus 1 (CAdV-1) causes viral hepatitis in dogs and infects a number of wildlife species. Attempts to isolate the virus from previous sea lion hepatitis cases were unsuccessful, but as the hepatitis had morphologic features resembling canine infectious hepatitis, and since the virus has a wide host range, it was thought that perhaps the etiologic agent was CAdV-1. Here, we identify a novel adenovirus in 2 stranded California sea lions and associate the infection with viral hepatitis and endothelial cell infection. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the classification of the sea lion adenovirus in the Mastadenovirus genus with the most similarity to tree shrew adenovirus 1 (TSAdV-1, 77%). However, as the sea lion adenovirus appeared to be equally distant from the other Mastadenovirus species based on phylogenetic analysis, results indicate that it represents an independent lineage and species. Although sequences from this novel virus, otarine adenovirus 1 (OtAdV-1), show some similarity to CAdV-1 and 2, it is clearly distinct and likely the cause of the viral hepatitis in the stranded California sea lions.

  16. Adenovirus Particles that Display the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein NANP Repeat Induce Sporozoite-Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Christopher; Overstreet, Michael G.; Guedon, Jean-Marc; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Ward, Cameron; Karen, Kasey A.; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus particles can be engineered to display exogenous peptides on their surfaces by modification of viral capsid proteins, and particles that display pathogen-derived peptides can induce protective immunity. We constructed viable recombinant adenoviruses that display B-cell epitopes from the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) in the major adenovirus capsid protein, hexon. Recombinants induced high-titer antibodies against CSP when injected intraperitoneally into mice...

  17. Breadth of T cell responses after immunization with adenovirus vectors encoding ancestral antigens or polyvalent papillomavirus antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2017-01-01

    - either by inducing cross-reactive T cells or by administering a polyvalent vaccine. To test these strategies, we designed 3 ancestral and 2 circulating sequences based on the two domains of the E1 and E2 proteins of papillomaviruses (PVs) that exhibit the highest degree of conservation in comparison...... circulating strains and a putative ancestor of oncogenic HPVs, we showed that the ancestral vaccine antigen has to be approximately 90% identical to the circulating PVs before a marked drop of ~90% mean CD8+ T cell responses ensues. Interestingly, the combination of two or three type-specific PV vaccines did...... not induce a significant decrease of the CD8+ T cell response to the individual targeted PV types. Polyvalent HPV vaccine based on the E1 and E2 proteins seem to be capable of triggering responses towards more than one type of PV while the cross-reactivity of ancestral vaccine seems insufficient...

  18. Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified GPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, Nancy J.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Shedlock, Devon J.; Xu, Ling; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Popernack, Paul M.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Pau, Maria G.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Jahrling, Peter B.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or

  19. Effect of HIV-1 envelope cytoplasmic tail on adenovirus primed virus encoded virus-like particle immunizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne Marie C; Ragonnaud, Emeline; Seaton, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    cytoplasmic tail on epitope presentation and subsequent immune responses, which is relevant for the interpretation of current clinical trials that are using truncated Env as an immunogen. The regimens described here provide similar neutralization titers, and thus are useful for investigating the importance...

  20. Role of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression and viral load of adenovirus and enterovirus in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mirnalini; Mishra, Baijayantimala; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Bahl, Ajay; Ratho, Radha Kanta; Talwar, Kewal Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) and adenoviruses (AdVs) are two important etiological agents of viral myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Both these viruses share a common receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), for their infection. However, the role of viral load and CAR expression in disease severity has not yet been completely elucidated. The present study aimed to determine viral load of EV and AdV in DCM patients and correlate them with the level of CAR expression in these patients. Sixty-three DCM cases and 30 controls, each of whom died of heart disease other than DCM and non-cardiac disease respectively, were included. Viral load was determined by TaqMan real-time PCR using primers and probes specific for the AdV hexon gene and the 5'UTR region of EV. The CAR mRNA level was semi-quantitated by RT-PCR, and antigen expression was studied by immunohistochemistry. A significantly high AdV load (p < 0.05) and CAR expression (p < 0.05) were observed in DCM cases versus controls, whereas the EV load showed no significant difference. The data suggests a clinical threshold of 128 AdV copies/500 ng of DNA for DCM, with 66.7 % sensitivity and 65 % specificity. A positive correlation between AdV load and CAR expression (p < 0.001) was also observed in DCM cases. The high adenoviral load and increased CAR expression in DCM and their association with adverse disease outcome indicates role of both virus and receptor in disease pathogenesis. Thus, the need for targeting both the virus and the receptor for treatment of viral myocarditis and early DCM requires further confirmation with larger studies.

  1. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor is increased in adipose tissue of obese subjects: a role for adenovirus infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Marta; Moreno, María; Bassols, Judit; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Ortega, Francisco; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) was originally identified as a common receptor for coxsackie B viruses and type C adenoviruses. The objective was to investigate CAR gene expression in human adipose tissue to explore its associations with adipocyte physiology. This was an ex vivo study in 91 visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and 109 sc adipose tissue (SAT) human samples (61 paired) obtained during elective surgical procedures. Patients were recruited at the Endocrinology Service of the Hospital Universitari Dr Josep Trueta. CAR mRNA was measured in human adipose tissue samples and confirmed at the protein level and in adipose tissue fractions. The effects of inflammatory stimuli on CAR gene expression were also evaluated. In paired samples, CAR was 46-fold higher in VAT vs SAT (P < .0001), being higher also at the protein level (P = .04). CAR was predominantly found in stromal vascular cell fractions (SVFs) in both fat depots. CAR mRNA (P = .006) and protein levels (P = .01) in VAT were significantly increased in obese vs nonobese subjects. In fact, CAR mRNA levels in SAT were positively associated with body mass index (r = 0.26; P = .008) and percentage fat mass (r = 0.28; P = .004). In VAT, MGLL, FSP27, AKAP, omentin, TKT, S14, and FABP contributed independently to CAR mRNA variation after adjusting for age and body mass index. Macrophage-conditioned medium led to increased CAR gene expression in mature adipocytes in vitro. The increased expression of CAR in adipose tissue from obese subjects, mainly in SVFs, suggests that CAR might play a role in adipose tissue dysfunction, given its dual associations with adipogenic and inflammatory genes.

  2. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of an adenovirus-PEI-bile-acid complex in tumors with low coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cho-Hee; Kasala, Dayananda; Na, Youjin; Lee, Min Sang; Kim, Sung Wan; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2014-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) is a potential vehicle for cancer gene therapy. However, cells that express low levels of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) demonstrate poor Ad infection efficiency. We developed a bile acid-conjugated poly(ethyleneimine) (DA3)-coated Ad complex (Ad/DA3) to enhance Ad transduction efficiency. The size distribution and zeta potential of Ad/DA3 increased to 324 ± 3.08 nm and 10.13 ± 0.21 mV, respectively, compared with those of naked Ad (108 ± 2.26 nm and -17.7 ± 1.5 mV). The transduction efficiency of Ad/DA3 increased in a DA3 polymer concentration-dependent manner. Enhanced gene transfer by Ad/DA3 was more evident in CAR-moderate and CAR-negative cancer cells. Competition assays with a CAR-specific antibody revealed that internalization of Ad/DA3 was not mediated primarily by CAR but involved clathrin-, caveolae-, and macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis. Cancer cell death was significantly increased when oncolytic Ad and DA3 were complexed (RdB-KOX/DA3) compared to that of naked oncolytic Ad and was inversely proportional to CAR levels. Importantly, RdB-KOX/DA3 significantly enhanced apoptosis, reduced angiogenesis, reduced proliferation, and increased active viral replication in human tumor xenografts compared to that of naked Ad. These results demonstrate that a hybrid vector system can increase the efficacy of oncolytic Ad virotherapy, particularly in CAR-limited tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Up-regulation of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer impairs adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, Takuya; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Yasui, Takaharu; Onimaru, Manabu; Toma, Hiroki; Sato, Norihiro; Tanaka, Masao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We previously reported that radiation enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene expression in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that adenoviral gene therapy might be more effective in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells. In the present study, we compared the transduction efficiency of adenovirus-delivered genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We used an adenovirus expressing the hepatocyte growth factor antagonist, NK4 (Ad-NK4), as a representative gene therapy. We established two radioresistant human pancreatic cancer cell lines using fractionated irradiation. Radiosensitive and radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells were infected with Ad-NK4, and NK4 levels in the cells were measured. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the differences in the transduction efficiency between these cells, we measured expression of the genes mediating adenovirus infection and endocytosis. The results revealed that NK4 levels in radioresistant cells were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those in radiosensitive cells, although there were no significant differences in adenovirus uptake between radiosensitive cells and radioresistant cells. Integrin β3 was up-regulated and the Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor was down-regulated in radioresistant cells, and inhibition of integrin β3 promoted adenovirus gene transfer. These results suggest that inhibition of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells could enhance adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. (author)

  4. Peri-encoding predictors of memory encoding and consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noga; Pell, Liat; Edelson, Micah G; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Pine, Alex; Dudai, Yadin

    2015-03-01

    We review reports of brain activations that occur immediately prior to the onset or following the offset of to-be-remembered information and can predict subsequent mnemonic success. Memory-predictive pre-encoding processes, occurring from fractions of a second to minutes prior to event onset, are mainly associated with activations in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), amygdala and midbrain, and with enhanced theta oscillations. These activations may be considered as the neural correlates of one or more cognitive operations, including contextual processing, attention, and the engagement of distinct computational modes associated with prior encoding or retrieval. Post-encoding activations that correlate with subsequent memory performance are mainly observed in the MTL, sensory cortices and frontal regions. These activations may reflect binding of elements of the encoded information and initiation of memory consolidation. In all, the findings reviewed here illustrate the importance of brain states in the immediate peri-encoding time windows in determining encoding success. Understanding these brain states and their specific effects on memory may lead to optimization of the encoding of desired memories and mitigation of undesired ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oncolytic adenoviruses as a therapeutic approach for osteosarcoma: A new hope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Garcia-Moure

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer among those with non-hematological origin and affects mainly pediatric patients. In the last 50 years, refinements in surgical procedures, as well as the introduction of aggressive neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapeutic cocktails, have increased to nearly 70% the survival rate of these patients. Despite the initial therapeutic progress the fight against osteosarcoma has not substantially improved during the last three decades, and almost 30% of the patients do not respond or recur after the standard treatment. For this group there is an urgent need to implement new therapeutic approaches. Oncolytic adenoviruses are conditionally replicative viruses engineered to selectively replicate in and kill tumor cells, while remaining quiescent in healthy cells. In the last years there have been multiple preclinical and clinical studies using these viruses as therapeutic agents in the treatment of a broad range of cancers, including osteosarcoma. In this review, we summarize some of the most relevant published literature about the use of oncolytic adenoviruses to treat human osteosarcoma tumors in subcutaneous, orthotopic and metastatic mouse models. In conclusion, up to date the preclinical studies with oncolytic adenoviruses have demonstrated that are safe and efficacious against local and metastatic osteosarcoma. Knowledge arising from phase I/II clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses in other tumors have shown the potential of viruses to awake the patient´s own immune system generating a response against the tumor. Generating osteosarcoma immune-competent adenoviruses friendly models will allow to better understand this potential. Future clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses for osteosarcoma tumors are warranted. Keywords: Oncolytic adenovirus, Virotherapy, Osteosarcoma, Bones, Cancer, Tumor

  6. Molecular epidemiology and surveillance of circulating rotavirus and adenovirus in Congolese children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayindou, Gontran; Ngokana, Berge; Sidibé, Anissa; Moundélé, Victoire; Koukouikila-Koussounda, Felix; Christevy Vouvoungui, Jeannhey; Kwedi Nolna, Sylvie; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Ntoumi, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Infectious Diarrhea caused by rotavirus and adenovirus, is a leading cause of death in children in sub-Sahara Africa but there is limited published data on the diverse rotavirus genotypes and adenovirus serotypes circulating in the Republic of Congo. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus A (RVA) and Adenovirus serotype 40 and 41 in Congolese children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from 655 Congolese children less than 60 months of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis between June 2012 and June 2013. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens were tested using commercially available ELISA kits and the RVA G- and P- genotypes were identified by seminested multiplex RT-PCR. Three hundred and four (46.4%) children were tested positive for RVA. Adenovirus infection was found in 5.5% of the 564 tested children. Rotavirus infection was frequently observed in children between 6-12 months (55.9%). The dry season months recorded increased RVA infection while no seasonality of adenovirus infection was demonstrated. The most common RVA genotypes were G1 (57.5%), G2 (6.4%), G1G2 mixture (15.5%), P[8] (58%), P[6] (13.2%), and P[8]P[6] mixture (26%). Additionally, the genotype G12P[6] was significantly associated with increased vomiting. This first study on Congolese children demonstrates a high prevalence and clinical significance of existing rotavirus genotypes. Adenovirus prevalence is similar to that of other Central African countries. This baseline epidemiology and molecular characterization study will contribute significantly to the RVA surveillance after vaccine implementation in the country. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fiber mediated receptor masking in non-infected bystander cells restricts adenovirus cell killing effect but promotes adenovirus host co-existence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Rebetz

    Full Text Available The basic concept of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAD as oncolytic agents is that progenies generated from each round of infection will disperse, infect and kill new cancer cells. However, CRAD has only inhibited, but not eradicated tumor growth in xenograft tumor therapy, and CRAD therapy has had only marginal clinical benefit to cancer patients. Here, we found that CRAD propagation and cancer cell survival co-existed for long periods of time when infection was initiated at low multiplicity of infection (MOI, and cancer cell killing was inefficient and slow compared to the assumed cell killing effect upon infection at high MOI. Excessive production of fiber molecules from initial CRAD infection of only 1 to 2% cancer cells and their release prior to the viral particle itself caused a tropism-specific receptor masking in both infected and non-infected bystander cells. Consequently, the non-infected bystander cells were inefficiently bound and infected by CRAD progenies. Further, fiber overproduction with concomitant restriction of adenovirus spread was observed in xenograft cancer therapy models. Besides the CAR-binding Ad4, Ad5, and Ad37, infection with CD46-binding Ad35 and Ad11 also caused receptor masking. Fiber overproduction and its resulting receptor masking thus play a key role in limiting CRAD functionality, but potentially promote adenovirus and host cell co-existence. These findings also give important clues for understanding mechanisms underlying the natural infection course of various adenoviruses.

  8. Replication-deficient human adenovirus type 35 vectors for gene transfer and vaccination: efficient human cell infection and bypass of preexisting adenovirus immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, Ronald; Zuijdgeest, David; van Rijnsoever, Richard; Hartkoorn, Eric; Damen, Irma; de Béthune, Marie-Pierre; Kostense, Stefan; Penders, Germaine; Helmus, Niels; Koudstaal, Wouter; Cecchini, Marco; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Sprangers, Mieke; Lemckert, Angelique; Ophorst, Olga; Koel, Björn; van Meerendonk, Michelle; Quax, Paul; Panitti, Laura; Grimbergen, Jos; Bout, Abraham; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo

    2003-01-01

    Replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) can be produced to high titers in complementing cell lines, such as PER.C6, and is widely used as a vaccine and gene therapy vector. However, preexisting immunity against Ad5 hampers consistency of gene transfer, immunological responses, and

  9. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua. The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9% in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3 in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%, and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%. Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population.

  10. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-Keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population.

  11. Adenovirus serotype 7 associated with a severe lower respiratory tract disease outbreak in infants in Shaanxi Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wenbo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia caused by adenovirus infection is usually severe especially with adenovirus serotype 7 commonly associated with lower respiratory tract disease outbreaks. We reported an outbreak of 70 cases of severe pneumonia with one death of infants in Shaanxi Province, China. Sampling showed adenovirus 7 (Ad7 as the primary pathogen with some co-infections. Results Two strains of adenovirus and two strains of enterovirus were isolated, the 21 pharynx swabs showed 14 positive amplifications for adenovirus; three co-infections with respiratory syncytial virus, two positive for rhinovirus, one positive for parainfluenza 3, and four negative. Adenovirus typing showed nine of the nine adenovirus positive samples were HAdV-7, three were HAdV-3 and two were too weak to perform sequencing. The entire hexon gene of adenovirus was sequenced and analyzed for the two adenovirus serotype 7 isolates, showing the nucleic acid homology was 99.8% between the two strains and 99.5% compared to the reference strain HAdV-7 (GenBank accession number AY769946. For the 21 acute phase serum samples from the 21 patients, six samples had positives results for ELISA detection of HAdV IgA, and the neutralization titers of the convalescent-phase samples were four times higher than those of the acute-phase samples in nine pairs. Conclusions We concluded adenovirus was the viral pathogen, primarily HAdV-7, with some co-infections responsible for the outbreak. This is the first report of an infant pneumonia outbreak caused by adenovirus serotype 7 in Shaanxi Province, China.

  12. Interaction of human adenoviruses and coliphages with kaolinite and bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Maria I; Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Tselepi, Maria A; Kokkinos, Petros A; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros C; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2015-06-01

    Human adenoviruses (hAdVs) are pathogenic viruses responsible for public health problems worldwide. They have also been used as viral indicators in environmental systems. Coliphages (e.g., MS2, ΦX174) have also been studied as indicators of viral pollution in fecally contaminated water. Our objective was to evaluate the distribution of three viral fecal indicators (hAdVs, MS2, and ΦΧ174), between two different phyllosilicate clays (kaolinite and bentonite) and the aqueous phase. A series of static and dynamic experiments were conducted under two different temperatures (4, 25°C) for a time period of seven days. HAdV adsorption was examined in DNase I reaction buffer (pH=7.6, and ionic strength (IS)=1.4mM), whereas coliphage adsorption in phosphate buffered saline solution (pH=7, IS=2mM). Moreover, the effect of IS on hAdV adsorption under static conditions was evaluated. The adsorption of hAdV was assessed by real-time PCR and its infectivity was tested by cultivation methods. The coliphages MS2 and ΦΧ174 were assayed by the double-layer overlay method. The experimental results have shown that coliphage adsorption onto both kaolinite and bentonite was higher for the dynamic than the static experiments; whereas hAdV adsorption was lower under dynamic conditions. The adsorption of hAdV increased with decreasing temperature, contrary to the results obtained for the coliphages. This study examines the combined effect of temperature, agitation, clay type, and IS on hAdV adsorption onto clays. The results provide useful new information on the effective removal of viral fecal indicators (MS2, ΦX174 and hAdV) from dilute aqueous solutions by adsorption onto kaolinite and bentonite. Factors enabling enteric viruses to penetrate soils, groundwater and travel long distances within aquifers are important public health issues. Because the observed adsorption behavior of surrogate coliphages MS2 and ΦΧ174 is substantially different to that of hAdV, neither MS2 nor

  13. Detection and Analysis of Six Lizard Adenoviruses by Consensus Primer PCR Provides Further Evidence of a Reptilian Origin for the Atadenoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Wellehan, James F. X.; Johnson, April J.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Garner, Michael M.; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2004-01-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phyloge...

  14. Adenovirus-vectored drug-vaccine duo as a rapid-response tool for conferring seamless protection against influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhang

    Full Text Available Few other diseases exert such a huge toll of suffering as influenza. We report here that intranasal (i.n. administration of E1/E3-defective (ΔE1E3 adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 particles rapidly induced an anti-influenza state as a means of prophylactic therapy which persisted for several weeks in mice. By encoding an influenza virus (IFV hemagglutinin (HA HA1 domain, an Ad5-HA1 vector conferred rapid protection as a prophylactic drug followed by elicitation of sustained protective immunity as a vaccine for inducing seamless protection against influenza as a drug-vaccine duo (DVD in a single package. Since Ad5 particles induce a complex web of host responses, which could arrest influenza by activating a specific arm of innate immunity to impede IFV growth in the airway, it is conceivable that this multi-pronged influenza DVD may escape the fate of drug resistance that impairs the current influenza drugs.

  15. Mapping of nuclear import signal and importin {alpha}3 binding regions of 52K protein of bovine adenovirus-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Carolyn P.; Ayalew, Lisanework E. [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Center (VIDO-InterVac), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 Canada (Canada); Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 S7N 5B4 Canada (Canada); Tikoo, Suresh K., E-mail: suresh.tik@usask.ca [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Center (VIDO-InterVac), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 Canada (Canada); Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 S7N 5B4 Canada (Canada); School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5 Canada (Canada)

    2012-10-10

    The L1 region of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3 encodes a non-structural protein designated 52K. Anti-52K serum detected a protein of 40 kDa, which localized to the nucleus but not to the nucleolus in BAdV-3-infected or transfected cells. Analysis of mutant 52K proteins suggested that three basic residues ({sup 105}RKR{sup 107}) of the identified domain (amino acids {sup 102}GMPRKRVLT{sup 110}) are essential for nuclear localization of 52K. The nuclear import of a GST-52K fusion protein utilizes the classical importin {alpha}/{beta}-dependent nuclear transport pathway. The 52K protein is preferentially bound to the cellular nuclear import receptor importin {alpha}3. Although deletion of amino acid 102-110 is sufficient to abrogate the nuclear localization of 52K, amino acid 90-133 are required for interaction with importin-{alpha}3 and localizing a cytoplasmic protein to the nucleus. These results suggest that 52K contains a bipartite NLS, which preferentially utilize an importin {alpha}3 nuclear import receptor-mediated pathway to transport 52K to the nucleus.

  16. Comparative study of adenoviruses with monoclonal antibodies Estudo comparativo de diferentes tipos de adenovirus através de anticorpos monoclonais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Maria de Paiva

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available The obtainment of monoclonal antibodies for adenovirus species 4(Ad4 is described.The specificities of selected monoclonal antibodies were determined by means of viral neutralization test in cell culture, immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, in the presence of the following species of human adenovirus: 1, 2, 5 (subgenus C, 4 (subgenus E, 7 and 16 (subgenus B and 9 (subgenus D. Two monoclonal antibodies species specific to adenovirus 4 (1CIII and 3DIII and one monoclonal antibody that cross reacted with adenovirus species 4 and 7 (2HIII were obtained.O estudo relata a obtenção de anticorpos monoclonais para o adenovirus tipo (espécie 4. A especificidade dos anticorpos monoclonais, selecionados nesse experimento, foi determinada testando-os frente às diferentes espécies de adenovírus: 1, 2, 5 (subgênero C, 4 (subgênero E, 7 e 16 (subgênero B e 9 (subgênero D, pelas técnicas de neutralização em cultura de células, imunofluorescência e ensaio imunoenzimático (ELISA. Os resultados demonstram a obtenção de anticorpos monoclonais que reagiram de maneira específica para o adenovírus 4 (1CIII e 3DIII e anticorpo monoclonal apresentando reação cruzada com as espécies de adenovírus 4 e 7 (2HIII.

  17. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  18. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA.

  19. Hyperplastic stomatitis and esophagitis in a tortoise (Testudo graeca) associated with an adenovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Pénzes, Judit J; Costa, Taiana; Martorell, Jaime; Martínez, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    A 2-year-old female, spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with poor body condition (1/5) and weakness. Fecal analysis revealed large numbers of oxyurid-like eggs, and radiographs were compatible with gastrointestinal obstruction. Despite supportive medical treatment, the animal died. At gross examination, an intestinal obstruction was confirmed. Histopathology revealed severe hyperplastic esophagitis and stomatitis with marked epithelial cytomegaly and enormous basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Electron microscopy examination revealed a large number of 60-80 nm, nonenveloped, icosahedral virions arranged in crystalline arrays within nuclear inclusions of esophageal epithelial cells, morphologically compatible with adenovirus-like particles. PCR for virus identification was performed with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. A nested, consensus pan-adenovirus PCR and sequencing analysis showed a novel adenovirus. According to phylogenetic calculations, it clustered to genus Atadenovirus in contrast with all other chelonian adenoviruses described to date. The present report details the pathologic findings associated with an adenovirus infection restricted to the upper digestive tract. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akikazu Sakudo

    Full Text Available Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second, exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite, ultraviolet light (UV-A and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA.

  1. Fidelity of adenovirus RNA transcription in isolated HeLa cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennström, B; Philipson, L

    1977-05-01

    An in vitro nuclear system from adenovirus type 2-infected cells was developed to study transcription of viral RNA. Nuclei isolated from adenovirus-infected HeLa cells late in the infectious cycle synthesized in vitro only RNA from the r-strand of adenovirus DNA. Around 15% of the virus-specific RNA in isolated nuclei was polyadenylated. Short pulse labeling of nascent RNA followbd by hybrization of size-fractionated RNA to specific restriction endonuclease fragments of the genome suggested that the origin(s) for transcription is located on the r-strand in the left 30% of the adenovirus 2 genome at late times in the infectious cycle. Pulse-chase experiments were used to estimate the elongation rate of adenovirus high-molecular-weight RNA in isolated nuclei. An elongation of a least six nucleotides per second was observed in vitro. Viral RNA synthesis in the vitro nuclei showed several similarities to the in vivo system late in the infectious cycle.

  2. Cancer-Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses for Modulation of the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Capasso, Cristian; Vaha-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Otto; Hemminki, Akseli

    2018-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy and it is the first approved virus-derived drug for treatment of cancer. As an oncolytic agent, it can induce lysis of infected cells, but it can also engage the immune system, promoting activation and maturation of antigen- presenting cells (APCs). In essence, oncolysis combined with the associated immunostimulatory actions result in a "personalized in situ vaccine" for each patient. In order to take full advantage of these features, we should try to understand how adenovirus interacts with the immune system, what are the receptors involved in triggering subsequent signals and which kind of responses they elicit. Tackling these questions will give us further insight in how to manipulate adenovirus-mediated immune responses for enhancement of anti-tumor efficacy. In this review, we first highlight how oncolytic adenovirus interacts with the innate immune system and its receptors such as Toll-like receptors, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)- like receptors and other immune sensors. Then we describe the effect of these interactions on the adaptive immune system and its cells, especially B and T lymphocytes. Finally, we summarize the most significant preclinical and clinical results in the field of gene therapy where researchers have engineered adenovirus to manipulate the host immune system by expressing cytokines and signalingmediators. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Adenovirus and mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Szilvia L; Gál, János

    2009-07-02

    A female, adult ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) with fatty liver was submitted for virologic examination in Hungary. Signs of an adenovirus infection including degeneration of the liver cells, enlarged nuclei and intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected by light microscopic examination. The presence of an adenovirus was later confirmed by obtaining partial sequence data from the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA-polymerase. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this novel chelonian adenovirus was distinct from previously described reptilian adenoviruses, not belonging to any of the recognized genera of the family Adenoviridae. As a part of the routine diagnostic procedure for chelonians the detection of herpes-, rana- and iridoviruses together with Mycoplasma spp. was attempted. Amplicons were generated by a general mycoplasma polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 16S/23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) intergenic spacer region, as well as, a specific Mycoplasma agassizii PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Based on the analyses of partial sequences of the 16S rRNA gene, the Mycoplasma sp. of the ornate box turtle seemed to be identical with the recently described eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) Mycoplasma sp. This is the first report of a novel chelonian adenovirus and a mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (T. ornata ornata) in Europe.

  4. Isoform-specific regulation and localization of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in human airway epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J D A Excoffon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus is an important respiratory pathogen. Adenovirus fiber from most serotypes co-opts the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR to bind and enter cells. However, CAR is a cell adhesion molecule localized on the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelia. Separation from the lumen of the airways by tight junctions renders airway epithelia resistant to inhaled adenovirus infection. Although a role for CAR in viral spread and egress has been established, the mechanism of initial respiratory infection remains controversial. CAR exists in several protein isoforms including two transmembrane isoforms that differ only at the carboxy-terminus (CAR(Ex7 and CAR(Ex8. We found low-level expression of the CAR(Ex8 isoform in well-differentiated human airway epithelia. Surprisingly, in contrast to CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 localizes to the apical membrane of epithelia where it augments adenovirus infection. Interestingly, despite sharing a similar class of PDZ-binding domain with CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 differentially interacts with PICK1, PSD-95, and MAGI-1b. MAGI-1b appears to stoichiometrically regulate the degradation of CAR(Ex8 providing a potential mechanism for the apical localization of CAR(Ex8 in airway epithelial. In summary, apical localization of CAR(Ex8 may be responsible for initiation of respiratory adenoviral infections and this localization appears to be regulated by interactions with PDZ-domain containing proteins.

  5. Isoform-specific regulation and localization of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in human airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excoffon, Katherine J D A; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Mobily, Matthew E; Karp, Philip H; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Zabner, Joseph

    2010-03-26

    Adenovirus is an important respiratory pathogen. Adenovirus fiber from most serotypes co-opts the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) to bind and enter cells. However, CAR is a cell adhesion molecule localized on the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelia. Separation from the lumen of the airways by tight junctions renders airway epithelia resistant to inhaled adenovirus infection. Although a role for CAR in viral spread and egress has been established, the mechanism of initial respiratory infection remains controversial. CAR exists in several protein isoforms including two transmembrane isoforms that differ only at the carboxy-terminus (CAR(Ex7) and CAR(Ex8)). We found low-level expression of the CAR(Ex8) isoform in well-differentiated human airway epithelia. Surprisingly, in contrast to CAR(Ex7), CAR(Ex8) localizes to the apical membrane of epithelia where it augments adenovirus infection. Interestingly, despite sharing a similar class of PDZ-binding domain with CAR(Ex7), CAR(Ex8) differentially interacts with PICK1, PSD-95, and MAGI-1b. MAGI-1b appears to stoichiometrically regulate the degradation of CAR(Ex8) providing a potential mechanism for the apical localization of CAR(Ex8) in airway epithelial. In summary, apical localization of CAR(Ex8) may be responsible for initiation of respiratory adenoviral infections and this localization appears to be regulated by interactions with PDZ-domain containing proteins.

  6. Peptide Signals Encode Protein Localization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jay H.; Keiler, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    Many bacterial proteins are localized to precise intracellular locations, but in most cases the mechanism for encoding localization information is not known. Screening libraries of peptides fused to green fluorescent protein identified sequences that directed the protein to helical structures or to midcell. These peptides indicate that protein localization can be encoded in 20-amino-acid peptides instead of complex protein-protein interactions and raise the possibility that the location of a ...

  7. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

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    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption.

  8. Construction of an infectious clone of human adenovirus type 41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duo-Ling; Dong, Liu-Xin; Li, Meng; Guo, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Min; Liu, Xin-Feng; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Hung, Tao

    2012-07-01

    Human adenovirus type 41 (HAdV-41) is well known for its fastidiousness in cell culture. To construct an infectious clone of HAdV-41, a DNA fragment containing the left and right ends of HAdV-41 as well as a kanamycin resistance gene and a pBR322 replication origin was excised from the previously constructed plasmid pAd41-GFP. Using homologous recombination, the plasmid pKAd41 was generated by co-transformation of the E. coli BJ5183 strain with this fragment and HAdV-41 genomic DNA. Virus was rescued from pKAd41-transfected 293TE7 cells, a HAdV-41 E1B55K-expressing cell line. The genomic integrity of the rescued virus was verified by restriction analysis and sequencing. Two fibers on the virion were confirmed by western blot. Immunofluorescence showed that more expression of the hexon protein could be found in 293TE7 cells than in 293 cells after HAdV-41 infection. The feature of non-lytic replication was preserved in 293TE7 cells, since very few progeny HAdV-41 viruses were released to the culture medium. These results show that pKAd41 is an effective infectious clone and suggest that the combination of pKAd41 and 293TE7 cells is an ideal system for virological study of HAdV-41.

  9. ADV36 adipogenic adenovirus in human liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Garozzo, Adriana; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and liver steatosis are usually described as related diseases. Obesity is regarded as exclusive consequence of an imbalance between food intake and physical exercise, modulated by endocrine and genetic factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is a condition whose natural history is related to, but not completely explained by over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance. There is evidence that environmental infections, and notably adipogenic adenoviruses (ADV) infections in humans, are associated not only with obesity, which is sufficiently established, but also with allied conditions, such as fatty liver. In order to elucidate the role, if any, of previous ADV36 infection in humans, we investigated association of ADV36-ADV37 seropositivity with obesity and fatty liver in humans. Moreover, the possibility that lifestyle-nutritional intervention in patients with NAFLD and different ADV36 seropositive status, achieves different clinical outcomes on ultrasound bright liver imaging, insulin resistance and obesity was challenged. ADV36 seropositive patients have a more consistent decrease in insulin resistance, fatty liver severity and body weight in comparison with ADV36 seronegative patients, indicating a greater responsiveness to nutritional intervention. These effects were not dependent on a greater pre-interventional body weight and older age. These results imply that no obvious disadvantage - and, seemingly, that some benefit - is linked to ADV36 seropositivity, at least in NAFLD. ADV36 previous infection can boost weight loss and recovery of insulin sensitivity under interventional treatment. PMID:25356033

  10. Replication-uncoupled histone deposition during adenovirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-06-01

    In infected cells, the chromatin structure of the adenovirus genome DNA plays critical roles in its genome functions. Previously, we reported that in early phases of infection, incoming viral DNA is associated with both viral core protein VII and cellular histones. Here we show that in late phases of infection, newly synthesized viral DNA is also associated with histones. We also found that the knockdown of CAF-1, a histone chaperone that functions in the replication-coupled deposition of histones, does not affect the level of histone H3 bound on viral chromatin, although CAF-1 is accumulated at viral DNA replication foci together with PCNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using epitope-tagged histone H3 demonstrated that histone variant H3.3, which is deposited onto the cellular genome in a replication-independent manner, is selectively associated with both incoming and newly synthesized viral DNAs. Microscopic analyses indicated that histones but not USF1, a transcription factor that regulates viral late gene expression, are excluded from viral DNA replication foci and that this is achieved by the oligomerization of the DNA binding protein (DBP). Taken together, these results suggest that histone deposition onto newly synthesized viral DNA is most likely uncoupled with viral DNA replication, and a possible role of DBP oligomerization in this replication-uncoupled histone deposition is discussed.

  11. Severe Necrotizing Adenovirus Tubulointerstitial Nephritis in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Parasuraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (AdV are emerging pathogens with a prevalence of 11% viruria and 6.5% viremia in kidney transplant recipients. Although AdV infection is common, interstitial nephritis (ADVIN is rare with only 13 biopsy proven cases reported in the literature. We report a case of severe ADVIN with characteristic histological features that includes severe necrotizing granulomatous lesion with widespread tubular basement membrane rupture and hyperchromatic smudgy intranuclear inclusions in the tubular epithelial cells. The patient was asymptomatic at presentation, and the high AdV viral load (quantitative PCR>2,000,000 copies/mL in the urine and 646,642 copies/mL in the serum confirmed the diagnosis. The patient showed excellent response to a combination of immunosuppression reduction, intravenous cidofovir, and immunoglobulin therapy resulting in complete resolution of infection and recovery of allograft function. Awareness of characteristic biopsy findings may help to clinch the diagnosis early which is essential since the disseminated infection is associated with high mortality of 18% in kidney transplant recipients. Cidofovir is considered the agent of choice for AdV infection in immunocompromised despite lack of randomized trials, and the addition of intravenous immunoglobulin may aid in resolution of infection while help prevention of rejection.

  12. Analysing and Comparing Encodability Criteria

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    Kirstin Peters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Encodings or the proof of their absence are the main way to compare process calculi. To analyse the quality of encodings and to rule out trivial or meaningless encodings, they are augmented with quality criteria. There exists a bunch of different criteria and different variants of criteria in order to reason in different settings. This leads to incomparable results. Moreover it is not always clear whether the criteria used to obtain a result in a particular setting do indeed fit to this setting. We show how to formally reason about and compare encodability criteria by mapping them on requirements on a relation between source and target terms that is induced by the encoding function. In particular we analyse the common criteria full abstraction, operational correspondence, divergence reflection, success sensitiveness, and respect of barbs; e.g. we analyse the exact nature of the simulation relation (coupled simulation versus bisimulation that is induced by different variants of operational correspondence. This way we reduce the problem of analysing or comparing encodability criteria to the better understood problem of comparing relations on processes.

  13. Immunogenicity of heterologous recombinant adenovirus prime-boost vaccine regimens is enhanced by circumventing vector cross-reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorner, Anna R.; Lemckert, Angelique A. C.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Lynch, Diana M.; Ewald, Bonnie A.; Denholtz, Matthew; Havenga, Menzo J. E.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of preexisting immunity to adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) in human populations has led to the development of recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vectors derived from rare Ad serotypes as vaccine candidates for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and other pathogens. Vaccine vectors have

  14. Truncating the i-leader open reading frame enhances release of human adenovirus type 5 in glioma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.K. van den Hengel (Sanne); J. Vrij (Jeroen); T.G. Uil (Taco); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); R.C. Hoeben (Rob)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The survival of glioma patients with the current treatments is poor. Early clinical trails with replicating adenoviruses demonstrated the feasibility and safety of the use of adenoviruses as oncolytic agents. Antitumor efficacy has been moderate due to inefficient virus

  15. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved

  17. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  18. BS69 : A novel adenovirus E1A-associated protein that inhibits E1A transactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Gennissen, A.M.C.; Ramos, Y.F.M.; Kerkhoven, R.; Sonntag-Buck, V.; Stunnenberg, H.G.; Bernards, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus ElA gene products are nuclear phosphoproteins that can transactivate the other adenovirus early genes as well as several cellular genes, and can transform primary rodent cells in culture. Transformation and transactivation by ElA proteins is most likely to be mediated through

  19. Antigen capsid-display on human adenovirus 35 via pIX fusion is a potent vaccine platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine C Salisch

    Full Text Available Durable protection against complex pathogens is likely to require immunity that comprises both humoral and cellular responses. While heterologous prime-boost regimens based on recombinant, replication-incompetent Adenoviral vectors (AdV and adjuvanted protein have been able to induce high levels of concomitant humoral and cellular responses, complex manufacturing and handling in the field may limit their success. To combine the benefits of genetic and protein-based vaccination within one vaccine construct and to facilitate their use, we generated Human Adenovirus 35 (HAdV35 vectors genetically encoding a model antigen based on the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum circumsporozoite (CS protein and displaying a truncated version of the same antigen (CSshort via protein IX on the capsid, with or without a flexible glycine-linker and/or a 45Å-spacer. The four tested pIX-antigen display variants were efficiently incorporated and presented on the HAdV35 capsid irrespective of whether a transgene was encoded or not. Transgene-expression and producibility of the display-/expression vectors were not impeded by the pIX-display. In mice, the pIX-modified vectors induced strong humoral antigen-specific immunity that increased with the inclusion of the linker-/spacer molecules, exceeded the responses induced by the genetic, transgene-expressing HAdV35 vector, and surpassed recombinant protein in potency. In addition, the pIX- display/expression vectors elicited high antigen-specific cellular immune responses that matched those of the genetic HAdV35 vector expressing CS. pIX-modified display-/expression HAdV vectors may therefore be a valuable technology for the development of vaccines against complex pathogens, especially in resource-limited settings.

  20. Adenovirus Particles that Display the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein NANP Repeat Induce Sporozoite-Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Christopher; Overstreet, Michael G.; Guedon, Jean-Marc; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Ward, Cameron; Karen, Kasey A.; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus particles can be engineered to display exogenous peptides on their surfaces by modification of viral capsid proteins, and particles that display pathogen-derived peptides can induce protective immunity. We constructed viable recombinant adenoviruses that display B-cell epitopes from the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) in the major adenovirus capsid protein, hexon. Recombinants induced high-titer antibodies against CSP when injected intraperitoneally into mice. Serum obtained from immunized mice recognized both recombinant PfCSP protein and P. falciparum sporozoites, and neutralized P. falciparum sporozoites in vitro. Replicating adenovirus vaccines have provided economical protection against adenovirus disease for over three decades. The recombinants described here may provide a path to an affordable malaria vaccine in the developing world. PMID:21199707

  1. Species determination of fowl adenoviruses based on the 52K gene region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günes, Ayse; Marek, Ana; Hess, Michael

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, the classification of fowl adenoviruses (FAdVs) based on a part of the 52K gene region was described. A total of 44 FAdV field samples from different countries and sources were detected using a recently developed SYBR Green-based real-time PCR. Amplified products were sequenced, and phylogenetic analyses were conducted on the basis of the 116-bp region. For comparison, the already published sequences of the 52K gene region of aviadenoviruses were used in the analyses. The phylogenetic analysis allowed the grouping of the FAdVs into the established five different FAdV species: Fowl adenovirus A to Fowl adenovirus E. The existence of the species was supported by high bootstrap values (> 70%). This method provides the advantages of quantitation and high sensitivity for FAdV detection in combination with species assignment.

  2. Adenovirus-related epidemic keratoconjunctivitis outbreak at a hospital-affiliated ophthalmology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Matthew P; Siddiqui, Naureen; Ivancic, Rose; Wong, David

    2018-01-02

    Adenovirus-associated epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (A-EKC) is a cause of large and prolonged outbreaks in ophthalmology clinics and can result in substantial morbidity. A-EKC outbreaks are often the result of contaminated ophthalmologic equipment, surfaces, or hands. Contaminated multidose eye drops are also a likely culprit, but few prior studies provide clear epidemiologic evidence that adenovirus transmission resulted from contamination of eye drops. We describe an A-EKC outbreak at a large, hospital-affiliated eye clinic that affected 44 patients. The unique epidemiology of the outbreak provides strong evidence that contaminated multidose dilating eye drops resulted in adenovirus transmission. Removal of multidose eye medication from the clinic, combined with case finding, enhanced infection control and enhanced environmental cleaning, led to rapid control of the outbreak. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenoviruses isolated from civilian and military personnel in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albuquerque Maria Carolina Maciel de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus are important pathogen primarily associated to respiratory infections of children and military personnel, even though it is also associated to cases of conjunctivitis and keratoconjunctivitis. We analyzed respiratory secretion collected from subjects with and without respiratory infection symptoms, being 181 civilians and 221 military subjects. The samples were inoculated in HEp-2 and/or A549 tissue cultures for viral isolation. Samples presenting cytopathogenic effect (CPE in any tissue culture were tested by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay to confirm adenovirus isolation. The isolates confirmed as adenovirus were further analyzed by restriction endonuclease assay for determination of viral species. Three isolates were identified as specie A (two from civilian and one from military, one isolate from military was identified as specie C, and one isolate from civilian was identified as specie D. For two isolates the specie could not be identified.

  4. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus

  5. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Z.Q. [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ertl, H.C., E-mail: ertl@wistar.upenn.edu [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rupprecht, C.E. [The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  6. Acanthamoeba castellanii is not be an adequate model to study human adenovirus interactions with macrophagic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Elodie; Cateau, Estelle; Leveque, Nicolas; Kaaki, Sihem; Beby-Defaux, Agnès; Rodier, Marie-Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Free living amoebae (FLA) including Acanthamoeba castellanii, are protozoa that feed on different microorganisms including viruses. These microorganisms show remarkable similarities with macrophages in cellular structures, physiology or ability to phagocyte preys, and some authors have therefore wondered whether Acanthamoeba and macrophages are evolutionary related. It has been considered that this amoeba may be an in vitro model to investigate relationships between pathogens and macrophagic cells. So, we intended in this study to compare the interactions between a human adenovirus strain and A. castellanii or THP-1 macrophagic cells. The results of molecular and microscopy techniques following co-cultures experiments have shown that the presence of the adenovirus decreased the viability of macrophages, while it has no effect on amoebic viability. On another hand, the viral replication occurred only in macrophages. These results showed that this amoebal model is not relevant to explore the relationships between adenoviruses and macrophages in in vitro experiments.

  7. Acanthamoeba castellanii is not be an adequate model to study human adenovirus interactions with macrophagic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Maisonneuve

    Full Text Available Free living amoebae (FLA including Acanthamoeba castellanii, are protozoa that feed on different microorganisms including viruses. These microorganisms show remarkable similarities with macrophages in cellular structures, physiology or ability to phagocyte preys, and some authors have therefore wondered whether Acanthamoeba and macrophages are evolutionary related. It has been considered that this amoeba may be an in vitro model to investigate relationships between pathogens and macrophagic cells. So, we intended in this study to compare the interactions between a human adenovirus strain and A. castellanii or THP-1 macrophagic cells. The results of molecular and microscopy techniques following co-cultures experiments have shown that the presence of the adenovirus decreased the viability of macrophages, while it has no effect on amoebic viability. On another hand, the viral replication occurred only in macrophages. These results showed that this amoebal model is not relevant to explore the relationships between adenoviruses and macrophages in in vitro experiments.

  8. Activating Ras mutations fail to ensure efficient replication of adenovirus mutants lacking VA-RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schümann, Michael; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses lacking their PKR-antagonizing VA RNAs replicate poorly in primary cells. It has been suggested that these virus recombinants still replicate efficiently in tumor cells with Ras mutations and might therefore be useful in tumor therapy. The ability of interferon-sensitive viruses...... to grow in Ras-mutant tumor cells is generally ascribed to a postulated inhibitory effect of mutant Ras on PKR. We have constructed a set of isogenic adenoviruses that lack either or both VA RNA species, and tested virus replication in a variety of cell species with different Ras status. In tendency, VA...... mutational status, upon infection with VA-less adenoviruses in the presence of interferon, but also upon addition of the PKR activator polyIC to cells. When comparing two isogenic cell lines that differ solely with regard to the presence or absence of mutant Ras, no difference was observed concerning...

  9. Mislocalization of the MRN complex prevents ATR signaling during adenovirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carson, Christian T; Orazio, Nicole I; Lee, Darwin V

    2009-01-01

    replication centres, but there is minimal ATR activation. We show that the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex is recruited to viral centres only during infection with adenoviruses lacking the early region E4 and ATR signaling is activated. This suggests a novel requirement for the MRN complex in ATR activation......The protein kinases ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM-Rad3 related (ATR) are activated in response to DNA damage, genotoxic stress and virus infections. Here we show that during infection with wild-type adenovirus, ATR and its cofactors RPA32, ATRIP and TopBP1 accumulate at viral...... for immobilization of the MRN complex and show that this prevents ATR signaling during adenovirus infection. We propose that immobilization of the MRN damage sensor by E4orf3 protein prevents recognition of viral genomes and blocks detrimental aspects of checkpoint signaling during virus infection....

  10. Redirecting adenovirus tropism by genetic, chemical, and mechanical modification of the adenovirus surface for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2016-06-01

    Despite remarkable advancements, clinical evaluations of adenovirus (Ad)-mediated cancer gene therapies have highlighted the need for improved delivery and targeting. Genetic modification of Ad capsid proteins has been extensively attempted. Although genetic modification enhances the therapeutic potential of Ad, it is difficult to successfully incorporate extraneous moieties into the capsid and the engineering process is laborious. Recently, chemical modification of the Ad surface with nanomaterials and targeting moieties has been found to enhance Ad internalization into the target by both passive and active mechanisms. Alternatively, external stimulus-mediated targeting can result in selective accumulation of Ad in the tumor and prevent dissemination of Ad into surrounding nontarget tissues. In the present review, we discuss various genetic, chemical, and mechanical engineering strategies for overcoming the challenges that hinder the therapeutic efficacy of Ad-based approaches. Surface modification of Ad by genetic, chemical, or mechanical engineering strategies enables Ad to overcome the shortcomings of conventional Ad and enhances delivery efficiency through distinct and unique mechanisms that unmodified Ad cannot mimic. However, although the therapeutic potential of Ad-mediated gene therapy has been enhanced by various surface modification strategies, each strategy still possesses innate limitations that must be addressed, requiring innovative ideas and designs.

  11. Imaging of human sodium-iodide symporter gene expression mediated by recombinant adenovirus in skeletal muscle of living rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Park, Seong-Wook; Lee, Heuiran; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Yang, You-Jung; Moon, Dae Hyuk

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of recombinant adenovirus-mediated human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression by 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy in skeletal muscle of rats. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS gene [Rad-CMV-hNIS 5 x 10 7 , 2 x 10 8 or 1 x 10 9 plaque forming units (pfu)] or β-galactosidase gene (Rad-CMV-LacZ 1 x 10 9 pfu) was injected into the right biceps femoris muscle of rats (n=5-6 for each group). Three days after gene transfer, scintigraphy was performed using a gamma camera 30 min after injection of 99m TcO 4 - (1.85 MBq). An additional two rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS underwent 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy with sodium perchlorate. After the imaging studies, rats were sacrificed for assessment of the biodistribution of 99m TcO 4 - and measurement of hNIS mRNA expression. In all the rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS, hNIS expression was successfully imaged by 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy, while rats injected with Rad-CMV-LacZ or lower doses of Rad-CMV-hNIS failed to show uptake. The biodistribution studies indicated that a significantly different amount of 99m TcO 4 - was retained in the liver (p 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS. The muscular hNIS mRNA level quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was significantly higher in rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS (p 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS were specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. This study illustrated that 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy can monitor Rad-CMV-hNIS-mediated gene expression in skeletal muscle of rats, non-invasively and quantitatively. (orig.)

  12. Safety and efficacy of CMX001 as salvage therapy for severe adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florescu, Diana F; Pergam, Steven A; Neely, Michael N; Qiu, Fang; Johnston, Christine; Way, SingSing; Sande, Jane; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith A; Graham, Michael L; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Rigdon, Joseph; Painter, Wendy; Mommeja-Marin, Herve; Lanier, Randall; Anderson, Maggie; van der Horst, Charles

    2012-05-01

    No therapeutic agent has yet been established as the definitive therapy for adenovirus infections. We describe the clinical experience of 13 immunocompromised patients who received CMX001 (hexadecyloxypropyl cidofovir), an orally bioavailable lipid conjugate of cidofovir, for adenovirus disease. We retrospectively analyzed 13 patients with adenovirus disease and viremia treated with CMX001; data were available for ≥ 4 weeks after initiation of CMX001 therapy. Virologic response (VR) was defined as a 99% drop from baseline or undetectable adenovirus DNA in serum. The median age of the group was 6 years (range, 0.92-66 years). One patient had severe combined immunodeficiency, 1 patient was a small bowel transplant recipient, and 11 were allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients. Adenovirus disease was diagnosed at a median of 75 days (range, 15-720 days) after transplantation. All patients received i.v. cidofovir for a median of 21 days (range, 5-90 days) before CMX001 therapy. The median absolute lymphocyte count at CMX001 initiation was 300 cells/μL (range, 7-1500 cells/μL). Eight patients (61.5%) had a ≥ 1 log10 drop in viral load after the first week of therapy. By week 8, 9 patients (69.2%) demonstrated a VR, with a median time to achieve VR of 7 days (range, 3-35 days). The change in absolute lymphocyte count was inversely correlated with the change in log10 viral load only at week 6 (r = -0.74; P = .03). Patients with VR had longer survival than those without VR (median 196 days versus 54.5 days; P = .04). No serious adverse events were attributed to CMX001 during therapy. CMX001 may be a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of severe adenovirus disease in immunocompromised patients. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MUC1 and other sialoglycoconjugates inhibit adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcasoy, S M; Latoche, J; Gondor, M; Watkins, S C; Henderson, R A; Hughey, R; Finn, O J; Pilewski, J M

    1997-10-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses are currently being evaluated as gene transfer vectors for the treatment of airway diseases. Recent evidence indicates that gene transfer to differentiated airway epithelial cells is inefficient. We hypothesized that apical membrane glycoconjugates, such as the transmembrane mucin MUC1, reduce the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. To address this, studies were performed in primary bronchial epithelial and Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells transduced to express human MUC1. Colocalization of MUC1 and an adenoviral lacZ transgene in the bronchial epithelial cells revealed that at several multiplicities of infection, the percentage of cells expressing lacZ was five-fold less in MUC1-expressing cells. Moreover, lacZ expression was three- to eight-fold lower in MUC1-expressing than in control MDCK cells, demonstrating that MUC1 interferes with gene transfer and is not merely a phenotypic marker of a cell that is refractory to adenovirus infection. Neuraminidase pretreatment of cells to remove sialic acid residues prior to viral adsorption increased the efficiency of gene transfer two- to five-fold in human airway and MDCK cells, and in a xenograft model of human airway. This effect was also observed in cultured cells that do not express MUC1, suggesting that other sialylated glycoconjugates impact on the efficiency of gene transfer. An inhibitory effect of negatively charged glycoconjugates on adenovirus binding was further supported by the finding that adsorption of adenovirus with a polycation significantly increased gene transfer efficiency. These data demonstrate for the first time that sialoglycoconjugates on epithelial cells reduce the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

  14. Detection and analysis of six lizard adenoviruses by consensus primer PCR provides further evidence of a reptilian origin for the atadenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P; Johnson, Calvin M; Garner, Michael M; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2004-12-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses.

  15. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dissemination of human adenoviruses and rotavirus species A on fomites of hospital pediatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganime, Ana Carolina; Leite, José Paulo G; Figueiredo, Carlos Eduardo da Silva; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Melgaço, Fabiana Gil; Malta, Fabio Correia; Fumian, Tulio M; Miagostovich, Marize P

    2016-11-01

    Rotavirus A and human adenovirus dissemination were demonstrated both in a pediatric ward and in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the same pediatric hospital. Virus detection from fomites samples were higher in the pediatric ward (42.3% [137 out of 324]) than in the NICU (4.5% [7 out of 156]), revealing that cleaning processes used in our NICU are effective in reducing viral contamination, suggesting human adenovirus as a potential biomarker of contamination of hospital fomites. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Unique Sequence Features of the Human Adenovirus 31 Complete Genomic Sequence are Conserved in Clinical Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmayer, Soeren; Darr, Sebastian; Rehren, Fabienne; Heim, Albert; Madisch, Ijad

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Human adenoviruses (HAdV) are causing a broad spectrum of diseases. One of the most severe forms of adenovirus infection is a disseminated disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Several reports in recent years have identified HAdV-31 from species A (HAdV-A31) as a cause of disseminated disease in children following haematopoetic stem cell transplantation (hSCT) and liver transplantation. We sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of the HAdV-A31 proto...

  18. Future prospects for the development of cost-effective Adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fougeroux, Cyrielle; Holst, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    -vectored vaccine technology with a focus on adenoviral-based vaccines. Adenovirus (Ad) vaccines have proven to be efficient in military vaccinations against Ad4 and Ad7 and as highly efficient vectored vaccines against rabies. The question of how other adenovirus-based vaccines can become as efficient...... as the rabies vaccine is the underlying theme in this review. Here, we will first give an overview of the basic properties of vectored vaccines, followed by an introduction to the characteristics of adenoviral vectors and previously tested modifications of the vector backbone and expression cassettes...

  19. Sodium butyrate increases expression of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Katrin; Grötzinger, Carsten; Koschel, Annika; Fischer, Andreas; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Anders, Mario

    2010-03-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI), e.g., sodium butyrate (NaB), have been suggested to upregulate the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Its impact on CAR in colon carcinomas, however, is poorly understood. NaB treatment of colon cancer cells increased CAR expression preferentially in cell lines with low basic CAR levels. These findings suggest that downregulation of CAR gene expression is mediated by transcriptional regulation and that activation of the CAR gene promoter is modulated by histone acetylation. The employment of HDACI may, therefore, represent a promising approach for improving adenovirus-based therapies of colon cancers with low CAR expression levels.

  20. Gene-based neonatal immune priming potentiates a mucosal adenoviral vaccine encoding mycobacterial Ag85B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guixiang; Rady, Hamada F; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Mason, Carol; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-12-07

    Tuberculosis remains a major public health hazard worldwide, with neonates and young infants potentially more susceptible to infection than adults. BCG, the only vaccine currently available, provides some protection against tuberculous meningitis in children but variable efficacy in adults, and is not safe to use in immune compromised individuals. A safe and effective vaccine that could be given early in life, and that could also potentiate subsequent booster immunization, would represent a significant advance. To test this proposition, we have generated gene-based vaccine vectors expressing Ag85B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and designed experiments to test their immunogenicity and protective efficacy particularly when given in heterologous prime-boost combination, with the initial DNA vaccine component given soon after birth. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines elicited Th1-based immune responses against Ag85B in neonatal mice but did not protect them from subsequent aerosol challenge with virulent Mtb H37Rv. Recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding Ag85B, given via the intranasal route at six weeks of age, generated moderate immune responses and were poorly protective. However, neonatal DNA priming following by mucosal boosting with recombinant adenovirus generated strong immune responses, as evidenced by strong Ag85B-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, both in the lung-associated lymph nodes and the spleen, by the quality of these responding cells (assessed by their capacity to secrete multiple antimicrobial factors), and by improved protection, as indicated by reduced bacterial burden in the lungs following pulmonary TB challenge. These results suggest that neonatal immunization with gene-based vaccines may create a favorable immunological environment that potentiates the pulmonary mucosal boosting effects of a subsequent heterologous vector vaccine encoding the same antigen. Our data indicate that immunization early in life with mycobacterial

  1. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  2. Improving Adenovirus Based Gene Transfer: Strategies to Accomplish Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amalfitano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (Ad based gene transfer vectors continue to be the platform of choice for an increasing number of clinical trials worldwide. In fact, within the last five years, the number of clinical trials that utilize Ad based vectors has doubled, indicating growing enthusiasm for the numerous positive characteristics of this gene transfer platform. For example, Ad vectors can be easily and relatively inexpensively produced to high titers in a cGMP compliant manner, can be stably stored and transported, and have a broad applicability for a wide range of clinical conditions, including both gene therapy and vaccine applications. Ad vector based gene transfer will become more useful as strategies to counteract innate and/or pre-existing adaptive immune responses to Ads are developed and confirmed to be efficacious. The approaches attempting to overcome these limitations can be divided into two broad categories: pre-emptive immune modulation of the host, and selective modification of the Ad vector itself. The first category of methods includes the use of immunosuppressive drugs or specific compounds to block important immune pathways, which are known to be induced by Ads. The second category comprises several innovative strategies inclusive of: (1 Ad-capsid-display of specific inhibitors or ligands; (2 covalent modifications of the entire Ad vector capsid moiety; (3 the use of tissue specific promoters and local administration routes; (4 the use of genome modified Ads; and (5 the development of chimeric or alternative serotype Ads. This review article will focus on both the promise and the limitations of each of these immune evasion strategies, and in the process delineate future directions in developing safer and more efficacious Ad-based gene transfer strategies.

  3. Enteritis hemorrágica por adenovirus en pavos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bustos N.

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe por primera vez en Colombia la enteritis hemorrágica (EH, en pavos de 4 a 11 semanas de edad, mediante estudios macroscópicos, hislológicos y de microscopía electrónica. Se demostró una enteritis hemorrágica severa, y esplenomegalia con inclusiones intranucleares en la mayoría de las células de la pulpa blanca esplénica y en algunos mononucleares en el intestino delgado. Las inclusiones son características; consisten de un centro eosinófilico, rodeado de cromatina densa y condensada sobre la membrana nuclear y de una estructura muy basófila y densa sobre un polo nuclear que parece corresponder a un nucleolo. Al microscopio electrónico se aprecian fases del desarrollo viral, desde un material filamentoso y amorfo hasta la formación de grandes acúmulos de viriones y cápsides de 70-80 nm de diámetro con morfología típica de adenovirus. Los viriones se demostraron fácilmente en macerados de bazo fijado en formol, teñidos negativamente con fosfotungstato de potasio; no se visualizaron en el contenido intestinal hemorrágico estudiado con el mismo método. El estudio de microscopía de luz de bazo e intestino es suficiente para establecer el diagnóstico de esta entidad.

  4. Outbreak of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis caused by adenovirus in medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Carlos Pantoja; Florentino, Margarita Matias; Martinez, Irma Lopez; Lopez, Herlinda Mejia

    2009-01-01

    The present work documents an outbreak of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis among ophthalmology residents, its influence in the presentation of the community cases, the use of molecular techniques for its diagnosis, and the implementation of successful control measures for its containment. Isolation of the etiologic agent was achieved using cultured African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (VERO). Through molecular tests, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing, the genotype of the isolated virus was identified. The sequences obtained were aligned with data reported in the NCBI GenBank. A scheme of outbreak control measures was designed to enforce correct sanitary measures in the clinic. The statistical program, Epi info 2002, and openepi were used to determine the attack rate. The Excel Microsoft program was used to elaborate the endemic channel. Nine of the ten samples studied were isolated from the culture and identified by Adenovirus-specifc PCR. Sequencing allowed identification of Ad8 as the agent responsible for the outbreak. The attack rate was 24.39 cases per 100. The epidemic curve allowed identification of a disseminated source in the Institute of Ophthalmology "Conde de Valenciana." It was not possible to calculate the incubation periods among the cases. The endemic channel showed the presence of an epidemic keratoconjunctivitis among the patients that had been cared for at the out-patient services of the institute. One outbreak of a disseminated source caused by Ad8 was detected in the institute among its medical residents, probably associated with relaxation of the habitual sanitary measures during an epidemic of hemorrhagic conjunctivitis among the patients cared for at the institute. The proposed scheme to control the outbreak allowed for its containment and controlled the epidemic of associated cases.

  5. Viral RNAs detected in virions of porcine adenovirus type 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xing; Tikoo, Suresh Kumar

    2004-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that cellular and viral RNAs were packaged in the virions of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV 1), members of the Herpesviridae family, both of which are enveloped double-stranded DNA viruses. Here, we provide evidence suggesting that RNAs are packaged in the virions of porcine adenovirus type 3 (PAdV-3), which is a member of the Adenoviridae family, a non-enveloped double-stranded DNA virus. The RNAs packaged in PAdV-3 virions were enriched in the size range of 300-1000 bases long. By reverse transcription (RT) of RNAs isolated from purified PAdV-3 virions, PCR amplification, and DNA sequence analysis of PCR products, we determined the identities of some viral RNAs contained in PAdV-3 virions. The results indicated that the RNAs representing transcripts from E1A, E1B, DNA binding protein (DBP), DNA polymerase (POL), E4 and some of the late genes including pIIIA, pIII, pV, Hexon, 33 K, and fiber were detected from purified PAdV-3 virions. In contrast, we could not detect the RNAs representing transcripts of precursor terminal protein (pTP), 52 kDa, pX, or 100-kDa protein genes in purified virions. Because the transcripts of pIX, IVa2, E3, protease, pVI, pVII, and pVIII overlap with those of other genes in PAdV-3, we could not definitely conclude that RNAs representing these transcripts were packaged in virions although the expected DNA fragments were produced by RT-PCR in the RNAs isolated from purified virions

  6. Improving adenovirus based gene transfer: strategies to accomplish immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) based gene transfer vectors continue to be the platform of choice for an increasing number of clinical trials worldwide. In fact, within the last five years, the number of clinical trials that utilize Ad based vectors has doubled, indicating growing enthusiasm for the numerous positive characteristics of this gene transfer platform. For example, Ad vectors can be easily and relatively inexpensively produced to high titers in a cGMP compliant manner, can be stably stored and transported, and have a broad applicability for a wide range of clinical conditions, including both gene therapy and vaccine applications. Ad vector based gene transfer will become more useful as strategies to counteract innate and/or pre-existing adaptive immune responses to Ads are developed and confirmed to be efficacious. The approaches attempting to overcome these limitations can be divided into two broad categories: pre-emptive immune modulation of the host, and selective modification of the Ad vector itself. The first category of methods includes the use of immunosuppressive drugs or specific compounds to block important immune pathways, which are known to be induced by Ads. The second category comprises several innovative strategies inclusive of: (1) Ad-capsid-display of specific inhibitors or ligands; (2) covalent modifications of the entire Ad vector capsid moiety; (3) the use of tissue specific promoters and local administration routes; (4) the use of genome modified Ads; and (5) the development of chimeric or alternative serotype Ads. This review article will focus on both the promise and the limitations of each of these immune evasion strategies, and in the process delineate future directions in developing safer and more efficacious Ad-based gene transfer strategies.

  7. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Friederich

    Full Text Available More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  8. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  9. Key Role of the Scavenger Receptor MARCO in Mediating Adenovirus Infection and Subsequent Innate Responses of Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, Mareike D; Nielsen, Peter J; Stichling, Nicole; Cohen, Idan; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Wood, Connor; Engelhard, Peggy; Suomalainen, Maarit; Gyory, Ildiko; Huber, Michael; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Gordon, Siamon; Jakob, Thilo; Martin, Stefan F; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Greber, Urs F; Freudenberg, Marina A; Fejer, György

    2017-08-01

    The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed in several subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages and has been shown to participate in the recognition of various bacterial pathogens. However, the role of MARCO in antiviral defense is largely unexplored. Here, we investigated whether MARCO might be involved in the innate sensing of infection with adenovirus and recombinant adenoviral vectors by macrophages, which elicit vigorous immune responses in vivo Using cells derived from mice, we show that adenovirus infection is significantly more efficient in MARCO-positive alveolar macrophages (AMs) and in AM-like primary macrophage lines (Max Planck Institute cells) than in MARCO-negative bone marrow-derived macrophages. Using antibodies blocking ligand binding to MARCO, as well as gene-deficient and MARCO-transfected cells, we show that MARCO mediates the rapid adenovirus transduction of macrophages. By enhancing adenovirus infection, MARCO contributes to efficient innate virus recognition through the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS. This leads to strong proinflammatory responses, including the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), alpha/beta interferon, and mature IL-1α. These findings contribute to the understanding of viral pathogenesis in macrophages and may open new possibilities for the development of tools to influence the outcome of infection with adenovirus or adenovirus vectors. IMPORTANCE Macrophages play crucial roles in inflammation and defense against infection. Several macrophage subtypes have been identified with differing abilities to respond to infection with both natural adenoviruses and recombinant adenoviral vectors. Adenoviruses are important respiratory pathogens that elicit vigorous innate responses in vitro and in vivo The cell surface receptors mediating macrophage type-specific adenovirus sensing are largely unknown. The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed on some subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages, including lung alveolar macrophages

  10. Development of a nasal adenovirus-based vaccine: Effect of concentration and formulation on adenovirus stability and infectious titer during actuation from two delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, Sandra S; Clemens, Courtney C; Croyle, Maria A

    2010-02-25

    A nasal adenovirus-based vaccine is under development. To determine if aggregation occurs during vaccination, infectious titer (limiting dilution) and capsid integrity (dynamic light scattering) were assessed after extrusion of a model vector from two intranasal delivery devices. Preparations of 2.5x10(12) and 1.25x10(11) virus particles (vp)/ml were studied. Virus aggregated ( approximately 10%) in the multi-dose vessel. Virus titer dropped by one log. Virus in the unit-dose device aggregated ( approximately 1%). Titer remained unchanged. Aggregation was concentration dependent. Formulations prevented aggregation during actuation, freeze-thaw and long-term storage. The device, formulation and dose may significantly influence aggregation and potency of any nasal adenovirus 5-based vaccine. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pandemic influenza virus 2009 H1N1 and adenovirus in a high risk population of young adults: epidemiology, comparison of clinical presentations, and coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Heather C; Fugate, William H; Murray, Clinton K; Cropper, Thomas L; Lott, Lisa; McDonald, J Matthew

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (2009 H1N1) emerged worldwide, causing morbidity and mortality that disproportionately affected young adults. Upper respiratory infection (URI), largely due to adenovirus, is an endemic cause of morbidity in military training. Whether clinical presentations differ or excess morbidity results from coinfection is unclear. The Center for Advanced Molecular Detection evaluates epidemiology and rapid diagnostics of respiratory pathogens in trainees with URI. From May 1, 2009, to November 30, 2009, demographic, clinical, and PCR data from throat and nasal specimens for adenovirus and 2009 H1N1 were prospectively collected. 375 trainees with URI enrolled and were tested for both adenovirus and 2009 H1N1 by PCR (median age 20; 89% male). Adenovirus PCR was positive in 72% (96% serotype E-4) and 2009 H1N1 in 20%. Males were more likely to have adenovirus and females more likely to have 2009 H1N1 (p  =  0.047). Subjects with 2009 H1N1 presented an average of 1 week earlier in training, had shorter illness duration before enrollment, less sore throat, diarrhea, and fewer abnormal findings on throat exam. Coryza and cough were more common with 2009 H1N1 compared to adenovirus. Subjects with 2009 H1N1 were less likely to have adenovirus than those without, despite persistently high frequencies of adenovirus detections during peak 2009 H1N1 weeks (15% vs. 83%, p adenovirus and 2009 H1N1 was rare (4%). Rates of hospitalization and pneumonia did not differ between the adenovirus, 2009 H1N1, or coinfected groups. Military trainees with 2009 H1N1 vs. adenovirus have differing clinical presentations, and males are more likely to have adenovirus. Despite high frequencies of adenovirus infection, coinfection with adenovirus and 2009 H1N1 is rare and apparently does not result in increased morbidity.

  12. Intramuscular Delivery of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vector Expressing Humanized Protective Antigen Induces Rapid Protection against Anthrax That May Bypass Intranasally Originated Preexisting Adenovirus Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a s...

  13. Evaluation of methodology for detection of human adenoviruses in wastewater, drinking water, stream water and recreational waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y; Kim, J; Lewis, G D

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluates dialysis filtration and a range of PCR detection methods for identification and quantification of human adenoviruses in a range of environmental waters. Adenovirus was concentrated from large volumes (50-200 l) of environmental and potable water by hollow fibre microfiltration using commercial dialysis filters. By this method, an acceptable recovery of a seeded control bacteriophage MS2 from seawater (median 95.5%, range 36-98%, n=5), stream water (median 84.7%, range 23-94%, n=5) and storm water (median 59.5%, range 6.3-112%, n=5) was achieved. Adenovirus detection using integrated cell culture PCR (ICC-PCR), direct PCR, nested PCR, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and adenovirus group F-specific direct PCR was tested with PCR products sequenced for confirmation. Adenovirus was routinely detected from all water types by most methods, with ICC-PCR more sensitive than direct-nested PCR or qPCR. Group F adenovirus dominated in wastewater samples but was detected very infrequently in environmental waters. Human adenoviruses (HAdv) proved relatively common in environmental and potable waters when assessed using an efficient concentration method and sensitive detection method. ICC-PCR proved most sensitive, could be used semiquantitatively and demonstrated virus infectivity but was time consuming and expensive. qPCR provided quantitative results but was c. ten-fold less sensitive than the best methods.

  14. Polycations increase the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcasoy, S M; Latoche, J D; Gondor, M; Pitt, B R; Pilewski, J M

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses are being developed for gene therapy for cystic fibrosis and other lung diseases, and for prevention and treatment of vascular thrombosis. A major limitation to the clinical utility of adenoviruses is the low efficiency of gene transfer achieved in vivo. In addition, little is known about the initial interactions between adenoviruses and the target cell. To address the hypothesis that the negative charge presented by membrane glycoproteins reduces the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, primary cultures of human airway, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, an immortalized cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell line, and primary cultures of sheep pulmonary artery endothelium were infected with recombinant adenovirus containing the E. coli lacZ reporter gene (Ad2 beta gal2) in the presence of various polyions. For each cell type, adsorption of Ad2 beta gal2 in the presence of the polycations polybrene, protamine, DEAE-dextran, and poly-L-lysine significantly increased the percentage of cells that express lacZ. The polyanion heparin did not significantly alter gene transfer efficiency, but completely abrogated the effects of polycations. These data provide evidence that negatively charged moieties on the cell surface reduce the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, and that alteration of the charge interaction between adenoviruses and the cell surface may improve the potential clinical application of these vectors.

  15. The human adenovirus E4-ORF1 protein subverts discs large 1 to mediate membrane recruitment and dysregulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Kong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses infect epithelial cells lining mucous membranes to cause acute diseases in people. They are also utilized as vectors for vaccination and for gene and cancer therapy, as well as tools to discover mechanisms of cancer due to their tumorigenic potential in experimental animals. The adenovirus E4-ORF1 gene encodes an oncoprotein that promotes viral replication, cell survival, and transformation by activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K. While the mechanism of activation is not understood, this function depends on a complex formed between E4-ORF1 and the membrane-associated cellular PDZ protein Discs Large 1 (Dlg1, a common viral target having both tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions. Here, we report that in human epithelial cells, E4-ORF1 interacts with the regulatory and catalytic subunits of PI3K and elevates their levels. Like PI3K activation, PI3K protein elevation by E4-ORF1 requires Dlg1. We further show that Dlg1, E4-ORF1, and PI3K form a ternary complex at the plasma membrane. At this site, Dlg1 also co-localizes with the activated PI3K effector protein Akt, indicating that the ternary complex mediates PI3K signaling. Signifying the functional importance of the ternary complex, the capacity of E4-ORF1 to induce soft agar growth and focus formation in cells is ablated either by a mutation that prevents E4-ORF1 binding to Dlg1 or by a PI3K inhibitor drug. These results demonstrate that E4-ORF1 interacts with Dlg1 and PI3K to assemble a ternary complex where E4-ORF1 hijacks the Dlg1 oncogenic function to relocate cytoplasmic PI3K to the membrane for constitutive activation. This novel mechanism of Dlg1 subversion by adenovirus to dysregulate PI3K could be used by other pathogenic viruses, such as human papillomavirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, and influenza A virus, which also target Dlg1 and activate PI3K in cells.

  16. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  17. An adenovirus prime/plasmid boost strategy for induction of equipotent immune responses to two dengue virus serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan Sathyamangalam

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a public health problem of global significance for which there is neither an effective antiviral therapy nor a preventive vaccine. It is a mosquito-borne viral disease, caused by dengue (DEN viruses, which are members of the Flaviviridae family. There are four closely related serotypes, DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3 and DEN-4, each of which is capable of causing disease. As immunity to any one serotype can potentially sensitize an individual to severe disease during exposure to a heterologous serotype, the general consensus is that an effective vaccine should be tetravalent, that is, it must be capable of affording protection against all four serotypes. The current strategy of creating tetravalent vaccine formulations by mixing together four monovalent live attenuated vaccine viruses has revealed the phenomenon of viral interference leading to the manifestation of immune responses biased towards a single serotype. Results This work stems from the emergence of (i the DEN virus envelope (E domain III (EDIII as the most important region of the molecule from a vaccine perspective and (ii the adenovirus (Ad as a promising vaccine vector platform. We describe the construction of a recombinant, replication-defective Ad (rAd vector encoding a chimeric antigen made of in-frame linked EDIIIs of DEN virus serotypes 2 and 4. Using this rAd vector, in conjunction with a plasmid vector encoding the same chimeric bivalent antigen, in a prime-boost strategy, we show that it is possible to elicit equipotent neutralizing and T cell responses specific to both DEN serotypes 2 and 4. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that a DEN vaccine targeting more than one serotype may be based on a single DNA-based vector to circumvent viral interference. This work lays the foundation for developing a single Ad vector encoding EDIIIs of all four DEN serotypes to evoke a balanced immune response against each one of them. Thus, this work has

  18. Interleukin-Encoding Adenoviral Vectors as Genetic Adjuvant for Vaccination against Retroviral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity. PMID:24349306

  19. Adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 inhibits the proliferation of human renal cell carcinoma cell line OS-RC-2 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Sheng; Du, Zhen-Fang; Huang, Min

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 on the proliferation of human renal cell carcinoma cell line OS-RC-2 in vitro. NDRG2 was harvested by RT-PCR, confirmed by DNA sequencing, and then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP, which encodes green fluorescent protein (GFP), to construct pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 plasmid. OS-RC-2 cells with NDRG2 negative expression were transfected with pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 plasmid. The growth of transfected OS-RC-2 cells was observed under light and fluorescence microscopes. After colony-forming cell assays, cell proliferation detection and MTT assays, the growth curves of cells in each group were plotted to investigate the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 on the proliferation of OS-RC-2 cells. Cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that NDRG2 protein was specifically located on subcellular organelle. A eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 was successfully constructed. After NDRG2 transfection, the growth of OS-RC-2 cells was inhibited. Flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested in S phase but the peak of cell apoptosis was not present, and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that NDRG2 protein was located in mitochondrion. NDRG2 can significantly inhibit the proliferation of OS-RC-2 cells in vitro and its protein is specifically expressed in the mitochondrion. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Coating of adenovirus type 5 with polymers containing quaternary amines prevents binding to blood components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šubr, Vladimír; Kostka, Libor; Selby-Milic, T.; Fisher, K.; Ulbrich, Karel; Seymour, W.; Carlisle, R. C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 135, č. 2 (2009), s. 152-158 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400500803 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : quaternary ammonium * HPMA * adenovirus Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.949, year: 2009

  1. Adenovirus DNA replication in vitro: Duplication of single-stranded DNA containing a panhandle structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegwater, P.A.J.; Rombouts, R.F.A.; Vliet, P.C. van der

    1988-01-01

    Adenovirus DNA replicates by displacement of one of the parental strands followed by duplication of the displaced parental single strand (complementary strand synthesis). Displacement synthesis has been performed in a reconstituted system composed of viral and cellular proteins, employing either the

  2. Oncolytic virotherapy of meningiomas in vitro with replication-competent adenovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L. M.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; van der Valk, Paul; Huisman, Anne; Sminia, Peter; Alemany, Ramon; Curiel, David T.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Dirven, Clemens M. F.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of the conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad) Ad.d24 for oncolysis of benign and malignant meningiomas. METHODS: Primary meningioma cells and organotypic spheroids were cultured from tumor biopsies of 12 consecutive unselected patients. Four different Ads were

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Adenovirus Type 7 in the United States, 1966-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Med Trop Sao Paulo 1997;39:185-9. GF, et al. Extrapulmonary manifestations of adenovirus type 7 pneumonia 31. Golovina GI, Zolotaryov FN, Yurlova TI...residues. J Virol 1996;70:1836-44. 22. McNeill KM, Ridgely Benton F, Monteith SC, Tuchscherer MA, Gaydos 44. Kajon AE, Murtagh P, Garcia Franco S, Freire

  4. Detection of adenovirus hexon sequence in a cat by polymerase chain reaction(short communication)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Lakatos, B.; Farkas, J.; Egberink, H.F.; Vennema, H.; Benko, M.

    1999-01-01

    Adenoviral nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in pharyngeal and rectal swab samples of a cat seropositive for adenovirus and suffering from transient hepatic failure. The samples were taken at a one-year interval, and both faecal samples as well as the second pharyngeal

  5. Fowl adenovirus serotype 9 vectored vaccine for protection of avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fowl adenovirus serotype 9, a non-pathogenic large double stranded DNA virus, was developed as a viral vector to express influenza genes as a potential vaccine. Two separate constructs were developed that expressed either the hemagglutinin gene of A/Chicken/Jalisco/2012 (H7) or A/ Chicken/Iowa/20...

  6. Use of synthetic vectors for neutralising antibody resistant delivery of replicating adenovirus DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carlisle, R. C.; Briggs, S. S.; Hale, A. B.; Green, N. K.; Fisher, K. D.; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Mautner, V.; Seymour, L. W.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 22 (2006), s. 1579-1586 ISSN 0969-7128 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : adenovirus * non-viral, * gene delivery Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.782, year: 2006

  7. Effect of neutralizing sera on factor X-mediated adenovirus serotype 5 gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, A.L.; Waddington, S.N.; Buckley, S.M.K.; Custers, J.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Rooijen, N. van; Goudsmit, J.; McVey, J.H.; Nicklin, S.A.; Baker, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The deployment of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors is hampered by preexisting immunity. When such vectors are delivered intravenously, hepatocyte transduction is mediated by the hexon-coagulation factor X (FX) interaction. Here, we demonstrate that human sera efficiently block FX-mediated

  8. Effect of X-rays on protein synthesis and RNA synthesis in adenovirus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorzkowski, B.; Majle, T.; Obrepalska, B.; Semkow, R.

    1977-01-01

    Ionizing radiation exerts a deteriorating effect on the rate of protein and RNA synthesis in HeLa cells. This effect is higher in cells infected with adenovirus, thus pointing to a higher radiosensitivity of viral syntheses compared with the cellular ones. (author)

  9. Chromatography paper strip sampling of enteric adenoviruses type 40 and 41 positive stool specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Mustafizur

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enteric subgroup F adenoviruses type 40 (Ad40 and 41 (Ad41 are the second most important cause of acute infantile gastroenteritis after rotaviruses. Repeated community outbreaks have been associated with antigenic changes among the Ad40 and Ad41 strains due to host immune pressure. Therefore large field epidemiological surveys and studies on the genetic variations in different isolates of Ad40 and Ad41 are important for disease control programs, the design of efficient diagnostic kits and vaccines against subgroup F adenoviruses. A novel method using sodium dodecyl sulphate SDS/EDTA-pretreated chromatography paper strips was evaluated for the collection, storage and shipping of Ad40/41 contaminated stool samples. Results This study shows that adenoviral DNA can be successfully detected in the filter strips by PCR after four months storage at -20°C, 4°C, room temperature (20–25°C and 37°C. Furthermore no adenoviral infectivity was observed upon contact with the SDS/EDTA-pretreated strips. Conclusions Collecting, storing and transporting adenovirus type 40 and 41 positive stool samples on SDS/EDTA-pretreated chromatography filter strips is a convenient, biosafe and cost effective method for studying new genome variants and monitoring spread of enteric adenovirus strains during outbreaks.

  10. Inhibitory effects of silver nanoparticles against adenovirus type 3 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nana; Zheng, Yang; Yin, Jianjian; Li, Xiujing; Zheng, Conglong

    2013-11-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with respiratory, ocular, or gastrointestinal disease. With various species and high morbidity, adenoviruses are increasingly recognized as significant viral pathogen among pediatric and immunocompromised patients. However, there is almost no specific drug for treatment. Silver nanoparticles are demonstrated to be virucidal against influenza A (H1N1) virus, human immunodeficiency virus and Hepatitis B virus. Currently, there is no data regarding whether the silver nanoparticles inhibit the adenovirus or not. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles on adenovirus type 3 (Ad3). The results revealed that HeLa cells infected with silver nanoparticles treated Ad3 did not show obvious CPE. The viability of HeLa cells infected with silver nanoparticles treated Ad3 was significantly higher than that of cells infected with untreated Ad3. There was a significant difference of fluorescence intensity between the cells infected with silver nanoparticles treated and untreated Ad3. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that silver nanoparticles could directly damage the structure of Ad3 particle. The PCR amplification products of DNA isolated from silver nanoparticles treated Ad3 was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The decreased DNA loads were also confirmed by real-time PCR experiment. The present study indicates silver nanoparticles exhibit remarkably inhibitory effects on Ad3 in vitro, which suggests silver nanoparticles could be a potential antiviral agent for inhibiting Ad3 infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adenovirus DNA replication in vitro is stimulated by RNA from uninfected HeLa cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, P.C. van der; Dam, D. van; Kwant, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Adenovirus DNA replication was studied in a partially reconstituted system consisting of purified viral proteins (DNA-binding protein, precursor terminal protein and Ad DNA polymerase) and a nuclear extract from uninfected HeLa cells. Optimal DNA replication required the presence of a heat-stable,

  12. Transcriptional activation by the E1A regions of adenovirus types 40 and 41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, A.E. van; Gilardi, P.; Perricaudet, M.; Rozijn, Th. H.; Sussenbach, J.S.

    In order to establish whether the poor growth of the two fastidious adenoviruses types 40 and 41 (Ad40 and Ad41) in HeLa cells is due to a reduced trans-activation by the early region to (E1A), we have determined the trans-activating effect of this region on the expression of the chloramphenicol

  13. E1A genes of adenovirus type 2 and type 5 are expressed at different levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moritz, Constanze; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    between these types, including the prototype dl1520/Onyx015. We tested the replication of the wild-type viruses WtD (a hybrid of the type 2 E1 region and type 5) and dl309 (type 5) in comparison with the mutants dl1520 (hybrid) and dl338 (type 5), the latter two lacking part of the E1B-55 kDa coding......Adenoviruses are an extensively studied system for modeling oncogenesis and for experimental cancer therapy. The most commonly analyzed virus types are 2 and 5, and little distinction has been made between them in past studies. Adenoviruses used for therapeutic purposes are frequently hybrids...... region. We found that the hybrid viruses replicated with considerably lower efficiency than their type 5 counterparts in H1299 cells (dl309:WtD = 3-4, dl338:dl1520 > 10). Moreover, adenovirus type 2 E1A expression from the hybrid viruses was strongly reduced in comparison to adenovirus type 5 E1A...

  14. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  15. Role of the adenovirus early region 1B tumor antigens in transformation and lytic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Leeuw, M.G.W. de; Houweling, A.; Eb, A.J. van der

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the contribution of each of the two adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) major early region lb (Elb) proteins in cell transformation and in lytic infection. An Ad5 El plasmid, in which the reading frame for the 19-kDa Elb protein was abolished by a stop codon close to the initiation codon,

  16. Sensitive analysis of genetic heterogeneity of adenovirus types 3 and 7 in the Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, G I; Zolotaryov, F N; Yurlova, T I

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of adenovirus strains isolated in the Soviet Union from 1976 to 1988 revealed four genome types of adenovirus type 3 (Ad3), i.e., Ad3a4, Ad3a9, Ad3a10, and Ad3a11, and four genome types of adenovirus type 7 (Ad7), i.e., Ad7p, Ad7a, Ad7a(1-5), and Ad7f1, identified with the DNA restriction enzymes BamHI, BglII, and HindIII. Three of them, Ad3a10, Ad3a11, and Ad7f1, are newly discovered. The genetic heterogeneity of adenoviruses was examined with restriction endonuclease Cfr13I with a 4-base recognition cleavage site. Eighteen different restriction patterns were identified among 21 selected Ad3 strains after cleavage of DNA with Cfr13I. Eight different subtypes were identified among 20 Ad7 strains by the same technique. For estimation of the relationships among these genome subtypes, pairwise analyses of comigrating DNA restriction fragments from isolates of Ad3 and Ad7 were done after digestion with Cfr13I or with restriction endonucleases recognizing DNA sequences of 6 bp. Surprisingly, the results were very discrepant. Images PMID:1658038

  17. PDGF-receptor beta-targeted adenovirus redirects gene transfer from hepatocytes to activated stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Marieke H.; Rots, Marianne G.; Beljaars, Leonie; Ypma, Arjen Y.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Poelstra, Klaas; Moshage, Albert; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic liver damage may lead to liver fibrosis. In this process, hepatic activated stellate cells are the key players. Thus, activated stellate cells are attractive targets for antifibrotic gene therapy. Recombinant, adenovirus is a promising vehicle for delivering therapeutic genes to liver cells.

  18. Multiple cross-species transmission events of human adenoviruses (HAdV) during hominine evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoppe, E.; Pauly, M.; Gillespie, T. R.; Akoua-Koffi, C.; Hohmann, G.; Fruth, B.; Karhemere, S.; Madinda, N. F.; Mugisha, L.; Muyembe, J.-J.; Todd, A.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Gray, M.; Robbins, M.; Bergl, R. A.; Wittig, R. M.; Zuberbuehler, K.; Boesch, C.; Schubert, G.; Leendertz, F. H.; Ehlers, B.; Calvignac-Spencer, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 8 (2015), s. 2072-2084 ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : adenovirus * African great apes * zoonosis Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 13.649, year: 2015

  19. Influence of Inorganic Ions on Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic ions on the aggregation and deposition (adsorption) behavior of human adenovirus (HAdV). Experiments were conducted to determine the surface charge and size of HAdV and viral adsorption capacity of sand in different salt c...

  20. Dynamin2 S-nitrosylation regulates adenovirus type 5 infection of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhimin; Kim, Jae Il; Frilot, Nicole; Daaka, Yehia

    2012-10-01

    Dynamin2 is a large GTPase that regulates vesicle trafficking, and the GTPase activity of dynamin2 is required for the multistep process of adenovirus infection. Activity of dynamin2 may be regulated by post-translational phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation modifications. In this study, we demonstrate a role for dynamin2 S-nitrosylation in adenovirus infection of epithelial cells. We show that adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) infection augments production of nitric oxide (NO) in epithelial cells and causes the S-nitrosylation of dynamin2, mainly on cysteine 86 (C86) and 607 (C607) residues. Forced overexpression of dynamin2 bearing C86A and/or C607A mutations decreases Ad5 infection. Diminishing NO synthesis by RNAi-induced knockdown of endogenous endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression attenuates virus infection of target cells. Ad5 infection promotes the kinetically dynamic S-nitrosylation of dynamin2 and eNOS: there is a rapid decrease in eNOS S-nitrosylation and a concomitant increase in the dynamin2 S-nitrosylation. These results support the hypothesis that dynamin2 S-nitrosylation following eNOS activation facilitates adenovirus infection of host epithelial cells.

  1. Influence of Inorganic Ions and Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, influence of solution chemistries to the transport properties (aggregation and attachment behavior) of human adenovirus (HAdV) was investigated. Results showed isoelectric point (IEP) of HAdV in different salt conditions varied minimally, and it ranged from pH 3.5 ...

  2. Virotherapy of ovarian cancer with polymer-cloaked adenovirus retargeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morrison, J.; Briggs, S. S.; Green, N.; Fisher, K.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Kehoe, S.; Seymour, L. W.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2008), s. 244-251 ISSN 1525-0016 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.970, year: 2008

  3. Relative transport of human adenovirus and MS2 in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is the most prevalent enteric virus found in the water environment by numerous monitoring studies and MS2 is the most common surrogate used for previous virus transport studies. However, the current knowledge on the transport behavior of HAdV in porous med...

  4. Evaluation of methods using celite to concentrate norovirus, adenovirus and enterovirus from wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteroviruses, noroviruses and adenoviruses are among the most common viruses infecting humans worldwide. These viruses are shed in the feces of infected individuals and can accumulate in wastewater. Therefore, wastewater is a source of a potentially diverse group of enteric viru...

  5. Polymer-coated adenovirus permits efficient retargeting and evades neutralising antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fisher, K. D.; Stallwood, Y.; Green, N. K.; Ulbrich, Karel; Mautner, V.; Seymour, L. W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2001), s. 341-348 ISSN 0969-7128 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : adenovirus * gene therapy * targetting Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.893, year: 2001

  6. Effect of organic carbon on sorption of human adenovirus to soil particles and laboratory containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A key factor controlling the relationship between virus release and human exposure is how virus particles interact with soils, sediments and other solid particles in the environment and in engineered treatment systems. Finding no previous investigations of human adenovirus (HAdV)...

  7. Extended plasma circulation time and decreased toxicity of polymer-coated adenovirus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Green, N. K.; Herbert, C. W.; Hale, S. J.; Hale, A. B.; Mautner, V.; Harkins, R.; Hermiston, T.; Ulbrich, Karel; Fisher, K. D.; Seymour, L. W.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 16 (2004), s. 1256-1263 ISSN 0969-7128 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * polymer coating Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.977, year: 2004

  8. Adenovirus serotype 5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease subunit vaccines: the first decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we present the results of the first decade of development of a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) containing the capsid and 3C protease coding regions of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) as a vaccine candidate. In proof-of concept studies we demonstrated that a single inoculation w...

  9. Targeting adenovirus gene delivery to activated tumour-associated vasculature via endothelial selectins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bachtarzi, H.; Stevenson, M.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Seymour, L. W.; Fisher, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 150, č. 2 (2011), s. 196-203 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : E-selectin * pHPMA * adenovirus Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 5.732, year: 2011

  10. Fatal adenovirus encephalomyeloradiculitis in an umbilical cord stem cell transplant recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Awosika, Oluwole O.; Lyons, Jennifer L.; Ciarlini, Pedro; Phillips, Richard E.; Alfson, Elizabeth D.; Johnson, Emily L.; Koo, Sophia; Marty, Francisco; Drew, Clifton; Zaki, Sherif; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Klein, Joshua P.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infections frequently complicate allogeneic stem cell transplants but nervous system involvement, usually presenting as encephalitis, is atypical. Progression from encephalitis to myeloradiculitis has not been described previously.1 We present a unique case of fatal adenoviral encephalomyeloradiculitis with imaging and pathologic correlates.

  11. Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy Against Viral Biothreat Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-12

    economy. Vaccine development is an important strategy to thwart the threat of these viral biothreat agents. There is an urgent need to improve...Alberta, Tl A 8K6. Canada E-mail: josh. wu@drdc-rddc.gc.ca .• 78 JoshQ.H. Wu existing vaccines against these agents and to develop new ones. Gene...of vaccines against viral biothreat agents. Genes encoding protective antigens of viral biothreat agents can be carried by these viral vectors and

  12. Isolation and identification of Adenovirus in hospitalized children, under five years, with acute respiratory disease, in Havana, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pumariega

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine Adenovirus (Ad strains isolated in Cuba, from 128 nasopharingeal swab specimens of children below five years old, with acute respiratory diseases, during 1996 and 1997, were studied by restriction enzyme analysis of genomic DNA with two endonucleases BamH I and Sma I. All different fragment patterns were compared with the respective prototypes. The identified adenoviruses were Ad 1 (n=4, Ad 2 (n=1 and Ad 6 (n=4. Males were more frequently infected than females. The analysis of the occurrence of these Adenovirus strains of subgenus C revealed that Ad 1 and Ad 6 were the predominant serotypes in 1996 and in 1997, respectively.

  13. Transmissibility of adenovirus-induced adiposity in a chicken model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhurandhar, N V; Israel, B A; Kolesar, J M; Mayhew, G; Cook, M E; Atkinson, R L

    2001-07-01

    We previously reported that human adenovirus Ad-36 induces adiposity and paradoxically lower levels of serum cholesterol (CHOL) and triglycerides (TG) in animals. To evaluate the transmissibility of Ad-36 and Ad-36 induced adiposity using a chicken model. Experiment 1--four chickens were housed (two per cage) and one from each cage was inoculated with Ad-36. Duration of presence of Ad-36 DNA in the blood of all chickens was monitored. Experiment 2--two groups of chickens were intranasally inoculated with Ad-36 (infected donors, I-D) or media (control donors, C-D). Blood drawn 36 h later from I-D and C-D groups was inoculated into wing veins of recipient chickens (infected receivers, I-R, and control receivers, C-R, respectively). On sacrifice, 5 weeks post-inoculation, blood was drawn, body weight noted and visceral fat was separated and weighed. Experiment 1--Ad-36 DNA appeared in the blood of the inoculated chickens and that of uninoculated chickens (cage mates) within 12 h of inoculation and the viral DNA persisted up to 25 days in the blood. Experiment 2--compared with C-D, visceral and total body fat were significantly greater and CHOL significantly lower for the I-D and I-R. TG were significantly lower for the I-D. Ad-36 was isolated from 12 out of 16 blood samples of the I-D that were used for inoculating I-R chickens. Ad-36 DNA was present in the blood and the adipose tissue of the I-D and I-R but not in the skeletal muscles of animals selected randomly for testing. As seen in experiment 1, Ad-36 infection can be transmitted horizontally from an infected chicken to another chicken sharing the cage. Additionally, experiment 2 demonstrated blood-borne transmission of Ad-36-induced adiposity in chickens. Transmissibility of Ad-36-induced adiposity in chicken model raises serious concerns about such a possibility in humans that needs further investigation.

  14. Human Adenovirus 36 Infection Increased the Risk of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei-Yan; Cao, Bing; Wang, Dong-Fang; Guo, Jing-Hui; Chen, Kai-Li; Shi, Mai; Yin, Jian; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human adenovirus 36 (HAdV-36), as the key pathogen, was supposed and discussed to be associated with obesity. We searched the references on the association between HAdV-36 infection and obesity with the different epidemiological methods, to explore the relationship with a larger sample size by meta-analysis and compare the differences of epidemiological methods and population subsets by the subgroup analyses. We conducted literature search on the association between HAdV-36 infections and obesity in English or Chinese published up to July 1, 2015. The primary outcome was the HAdV-36 infection rate in the obese and lean groups; the secondary outcomes were the BMI level and BMI z-score in the HAdV-36 positive and negative groups. The pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated for the primary outcome; the standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for the secondary and third outcomes. Prediction interval (PI) was graphically presented in the forest plot of the random effect meta-analyses. Metaregression analysis and subgroup analysis were performed. Finally 24 references with 10,191 study subjects were included in the meta-analysis. The obesity subjects were more likely to be infected with HAdV-36 compared to the lean controls (OR = 2.00; 95%CI: 1.46, 2.74; PI: 0.59, 6.76; P infection for obesity were 1.77 (95%CI: 1.19, 2.63; PI: 0.44, 7.03; P = 0.005) and 2.26 (95%CI: 1.67, 3.07; PI: 1.45, 3.54; P SMD of BMI was 0.28 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.47; PI: −0.53, 1.08; P = 0.006) in the HAdV-36 positive subjects with a high heterogeneity (I2 = 86.5%; P infection was higher than those without HAdV-36 infection (SMD = 0.19; 95%CI: −0.31, 0.70; PI: −2.10, 2.49), which had no significantly statistical difference (P = 0.453). HAdV-36 infection increased the risk of obesity. HAdV-36 also increased the risk of weight gain in adults, which was not observed in children. PMID:26705235

  15. The Revolution in Viral Genomics as Exemplified by the Bioinformatic Analysis of Human Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Torres

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 30 years, genomic and bioinformatic analysis of human adenoviruses has been achieved using a variety of DNA sequencing methods; initially with the use of restriction enzymes and more currently with the use of the GS FLX pyrosequencing technology. Following the conception of DNA sequencing in the 1970s, analysis of adenoviruses has evolved from 100 base pair mRNA fragments to entire genomes. Comparative genomics of adenoviruses made its debut in 1984 when nucleotides and amino acids of coding sequences within the hexon genes of two human adenoviruses (HAdV, HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5, were compared and analyzed. It was determined that there were three different zones (1-393, 394-1410, 1411-2910 within the hexon gene, of which HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5 shared zones 1 and 3 with 95% and 89.5% nucleotide identity, respectively. In 1992, HAdV-C5 became the first adenovirus genome to be fully sequenced using the Sanger method. Over the next seven years, whole genome analysis and characterization was completed using bioinformatic tools such as blastn, tblastx, ClustalV and FASTA, in order to determine key proteins in species HAdV-A through HAdV-F. The bioinformatic revolution was initiated with the introduction of a novel species, HAdV-G, that was typed and named by the use of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetics as opposed to traditional serology. HAdV bioinformatics will continue to advance as the latest sequencing technology enables scientists to add to and expand the resource databases. As a result of these advancements, how novel HAdVs are typed has changed. Bioinformatic analysis has become the revolutionary tool that has significantly accelerated the in-depth study of HAdV microevolution through comparative genomics.

  16. Identification of a novel aviadenovirus, designated pigeon adenovirus 2 in domestic pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, L; Rubbenstroth, D; Meixner, M; Liere, K; Bartels, H; Rautenschlein, S

    2017-01-02

    The young pigeon disease syndrome (YPDS) affects mainly young pigeons of less than one year of age and leads to crop stasis, vomitus, diarrhea, anorexia and occasionally death. This disease is internationally a major health problem because of its seasonal appearance during competitions such as homing pigeon races or exhibitions of ornamental birds. While the etiology of YPDS is still unclear, adenoviruses are frequently discussed as potential causative agents. Electron microscopy of feces from a YPDS outbreak revealed massive shedding of adenovirus-like particles. Whole genome sequencing of this sample identified a novel adenovirus tentatively named pigeon adenovirus 2 (PiAdV-2). Phylogenetic and comparative genome analysis suggest PiAdV-2 to belong to a new species within the genus Aviadenovirus, for which we propose the name Pigeon aviadenovirus B. The PiAdV-2 genome shares 54.9% nucleotide sequence identity with pigeon adenovirus 1 (PiAdV-1). In a screening of further YPDS-affected flocks two variants of PiAdV-2 (variant A and B) were detected which shared 97.6% nucleotide identity of partial polymerase sequences, but only 79.7% nucleotide identity of partial hexon sequences. The distribution of both PiAdV-2 variants was further investigated in fecal samples collected between 2008 and 2015 from healthy or YPDS-affected racing pigeons of different lofts. Independent of their health status, approximately 20% of young and 13% of adult pigeon flocks harbored PiAdV-2 variants. Birds were free of PiAdV-1 or other aviadenoviruses as determined by PCRs targeting the aviadenovirus polymerase or the PiAdV-1 fiber gene, respectively. In conclusion, there is no indication of a correlation between YPDS outbreaks and the presence of PiAdV-2 or other aviadenoviruses, arguing against an causative role in this disease complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Partial characterization of a new adenovirus lineage discovered in testudinoid turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doszpoly, Andor; Wellehan, James F X; Childress, April L; Tarján, Zoltán L; Kovács, Endre R; Harrach, Balázs; Benkő, Mária

    2013-07-01

    In the USA and in Hungary, almost simultaneously, adenoviruses of a putative novel lineage were detected by PCR and sequencing in turtles belonging to four different species (including two subspecies) of the superfamily Testudinoidea. In the USA, partial sequence of the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA polymerase was obtained from samples of a captive pancake tortoise (Malacochersus tornieri), four eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) and two red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans). In Hungary, several individuals of the latter subspecies as well as some yellow-bellied sliders (T. scripta scripta) were found to harbor identical, or closely related, putative new adenoviruses. From numerous attempts to amplify any other genomic fragment by PCR, only a nested method was successful, in which a 476-bp fragment of the hexon gene could be obtained from several samples. In phylogeny reconstructions, based on either DNA polymerase or hexon partial sequences, the putative new adenoviruses formed a clade distinct from the five accepted genera of the family Adenoviridae. Three viral sub-clades corresponding to the three host genera (Malacochersus, Terrapene, Trachemys) were observed. Attempts to isolate the new adenoviruses on turtle heart (TH-1) cells were unsuccessful. Targeted PCR screening of live and dead specimens revealed a prevalence of approximately 25% in small shelter colonies of red-eared and yellow-bellied sliders in Hungary. The potential pathology of these viruses needs further investigation; clinically healthy sliders were found to shed the viral DNA in detectable amounts. Based on the phylogenetic distance, the new adenovirus lineage seems to merit the rank of a novel genus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental Cross-Species Infection of Common Marmosets by Titi Monkey Adenovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunice C.; Liu, Maria; Brasky, Kathleen M.; Lanford, Robert E.; Kelly, Kristi R.; Bales, Karen L.; Schnurr, David P.; Canfield, Don R.; Patterson, Jean L.; Chiu, Charles Y.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV), as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses. PMID:23894316

  19. Adenovirus-specific IgG maturation as a surrogate marker in acute exacerbations of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeck, Lucas; Gencay, Mikael; Roth, Michael; Hirsch, Hans H; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Mueller, Beat; Tamm, Michael; Stolz, Daiana

    2014-08-01

    B cells in airways and lung parenchyma may be involved in COPD evolution; however, whether their pathogenic role is beneficial or harmful remains controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate the maturation of adenovirus-specific immunoglobulins in patients with COPD with respect to clinical outcome. The presence of adenovirus-specific immunoglobulins during acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) was analyzed at exacerbation and 2 to 3 weeks later. Patients with detectable adenovirus-specific IgM and low IgG avidity were grouped into fast and delayed IgG maturation. The clinical outcome of both groups was evaluated. Of 208 patients, 43 (20.7%) had serologic evidence of recent adenovirus infection and were grouped by fast IgG maturation (26 patients) and delayed IgG maturation (17 patients). Baseline characteristics, AECOPD therapy, and duration of hospitalization were similar in both groups, but the AECOPD recurrence rate within 6 months was higher (P = .003), and there was a trend for earlier AECOPD-related rehospitalizations (P = .061) in the delayed IgG maturation group. The time to rehospitalization or death within 2 years was shorter in patients with delayed IgG maturation (P = .003). Adenovirus-specific IgG maturation was an independent predictor of the number of AECOPD recurrences within 6 months (P = .001) and the occurrence of hospitalization or death within 2 years (P = .005). Delayed immunoglobulin avidity maturation following COPD exacerbation is associated with worse outcomes. ISRCTN Register; No.: ISRCTN77261143; URL: www.isrctn.org.

  20. Increased adenovirus Type 5 mediated transgene expression due to RhoB down-regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragomira Majhen

    Full Text Available Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 is a non-enveloped DNA virus frequently used as a gene transfer vector. Efficient Ad5 cell entry depends on the availability of its primary receptor, coxsackie and adenovirus receptor, which is responsible for attachment, and integrins, secondary receptors responsible for adenovirus internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, efficacious adenovirus-mediated transgene expression also depends on successful trafficking of Ad5 particles to the nucleus of the target cell. It has been shown that changes occurring in tumor cells during development of resistance to anticancer drugs can be beneficial for adenovirus mediated transgene expression. In this study, using an in vitro model consisting of a parental cell line, human laryngeal carcinoma HEp2 cells, and a cisplatin-resistant clone CK2, we investigated the cause of increased Ad5-mediated transgene expression in CK2 as compared to HEp2 cells. We show that the primary cause of increased Ad5-mediated transgene expression in CK2 cells is not modulation of receptors on the cell surface or change in Ad5wt attachment and/or internalization, but is rather the consequence of decreased RhoB expression. We propose that RhoB plays an important role in Ad5 post-internalization events and more particularly in Ad5 intracellular trafficking. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing changed Ad5 trafficking pattern between cells expressing different amount of RhoB, indicating the role of RhoB in Ad5 intracellular trafficking.

  1. Experimental cross-species infection of common marmosets by titi monkey adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixia Yu

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV, as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus. Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses.

  2. Co-expression of Erns and E2 genes of classical swine fever virus by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus completely protects pigs against virulent challenge with classical swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongke; Yang, Yuai; Zheng, Huanli; Xi, Dongmei; Lin, Mingxing; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yang, Linfu; Yan, Yulin; Chu, Xiaohui; Bi, Baoliang

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a recombinant adenovirus for future CSFV vaccines used in the pig industry for the reduction of losses involved in CSF outbreaks. The Erns and E2 genes of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), which encode the two main protective glycoproteins from the "Shimen" strain of CSFV, were combined and inserted into the replication-defective human adenovirus type-5 and named the rAd-Erns-E2. Nine pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups (three pigs in each group) including the rAd-Erns-E2, hAd-CMV control and DMEM control. Intramuscular vaccination with 2×10(6) TCID(50) of the rAd-Erns-E2 was administered two times with an interval of 21 days. At 42 days post inoculation, pigs in all groups were challenged with a lethal dose of 1×10(3) TCID(50) CSFV "Shimen" strain. Observation of clinical signs was made and the existence of CSFV RNA was detected. Animals in the hAd-CMV and DMEM groups showed severe clinical CSF symptoms and were euthanized from 7 to 10 days after the challenge. However, no adverse clinical CSF signs were observed in vaccinated pigs after the administration of rAd-Erns-E2 and even after CSFV challenge. Neither CSFV RNA nor pathological changes were detected in the tissues of interest of the above vaccinated pigs. These results implied that the recombination adenovirus carrying the Erns-E2 genes could be used to prevent swine from classical swine fever. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A + + B – → C reaction–diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction–diffusion–precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm

  4. A canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine vector confers protection against foot-and-mouth disease in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel R; Zhou, Xiaocui; Lefebvre, David J; Garnier, Annabelle; Watier, Fleur; Pignon, Charly; Lacour, Sandrine A; Zientara, Stephan; Bakkali-Kassimi, Labib; De Clercq, Kris; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2018-04-12

    Vaccination is a key element in the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). The majority of the antigenic sites that induce protective immune responses are localized on the FMD virus (FMDV) capsid that is formed by four virus-encoded structural proteins, VP1 to VP4. In the present study, recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2)-based FMD vaccines, Cav-P1/3C R° and Cav-VP1 R°, respectively expressing the structural P1 precursor protein along with the non-structural 3C protein or expressing the structural VP1 protein of the FMDV strain O/FRA/1/2001, were evaluated as novel vaccines against FMD. A strong humoral immune response was elicited in guinea pigs (GP) following immunization with Cav-P1/3C R°, while administration of Cav-VP1 R° did not induce a satisfying antibody response in GP or mice. GP were then used as an experimental model for the determination of the protection afforded by the Cav-P1/3C R° vaccine against challenge with the FMDV strain O 1 Manisa/Turkey/1969. The Cav-P1/3C R° vaccine protected GP from generalized FMD to a similar extent as a high potency double-oil emulsion O 1 Manisa vaccine. The results of the present study show that CAV2-based vector vaccines can express immunogenic FMDV antigens and offer protection against generalized FMD in GP. This suggest that Cav-P1/3C R° FMDV vaccine may protect natural host species from FMD. In combination with an appropriate diagnostic test, the Cav-P1/3C R° FMDV vaccine may also serve as a marker vaccine to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Replication-deficient adenovirus vector transfer of gfp reporter gene into supraoptic nucleus and subfornical organ neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Johnson, R. F.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    The present studies used defined cells of the subfornical organ (SFO) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) as model systems to demonstrate the efficacy of replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) for gene transfer. The studies investigated the effects of both direct transfection of the SON and indirect transfection (i.e., via retrograde transport) of SFO neurons. The SON of rats were injected with Ad (2 x 10(6) pfu) and sacrificed 1-7 days later for cell culture of the SON and of the SFO. In the SON, GFP fluorescence was visualized in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells while only neurons in the SFO expressed GFP. Successful in vitro transfection of cultured cells from the SON and SFO was also achieved with Ad (2 x 10(6) to 2 x 10(8) pfu). The expression of GFP in in vitro transfected cells was higher in nonneuronal (approximately 28% in SON and SFO) than neuronal (approximately 4% in SON and 10% in SFO) cells. The expression of GFP was time and viral concentration related. No apparent alterations in cellular morphology of transfected cells were detected and electrophysiological characterization of transfected cells was similar between GFP-expressing and nonexpressing neurons. We conclude that (1) GFP is an effective marker for gene transfer in living SON and SFO cells, (2) Ad infects both neuronal and nonneuronal cells, (3) Ad is taken up by axonal projections from the SON and retrogradely transported to the SFO where it is expressed at detectable levels, and (4) Ad does not adversely affect neuronal viability. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using adenoviral vectors to deliver genes to the SFO-SON axis. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  6. Efficacy of helper-dependent adenovirus vector-mediated gene therapy in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Sun, B; Bird, A; Chen, Y T; Oka, K; Chan, L

    2007-07-01

    Genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, also known as von Gierke disease; MIM 232200), an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism associated with life-threatening hypoglycemia and growth retardation. We tested whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated hepatic delivery of G6Pase would lead to prolonged survival and sustained correction of the metabolic abnormalities in G6Pase knockout (KO) mice, a model for a severe form of GSD-Ia. An HDAd vector encoding G6Pase was administered intravenously (2 or 5 x 10(12)vector particles/kg) to 2-week-old (w.o.) G6Pase-KO mice. Following HDAd vector administration survival was prolonged to a median of 7 months, in contrast to untreated affected mice that did not survive past 3 weeks of age. G6Pase levels increased more than tenfold between 3 days and 28 weeks after HDAd injection (P < 0.03). The weights of untreated 2 w.o. G6Pase-KO mice were approximately half those of their unaffected littermates, and treatment stimulated their growth to the size of wild-type mice. Severe hypoglycemia and hypercholesterolemia, which are hallmarks of GSD-Ia both in humans and in mice, were also restored to normalcy by the treatment. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was markedly reduced. The efficacy of HDAd-G6Pase treatment in reversing the physiological and biochemical abnormalities associated with GSD-Ia in affected G6Pase-KO mice justifies further preclinical evaluation in murine and canine models of GSD-Ia.

  7. Novel splice variant CAR 4/6 of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor is differentially expressed in cervical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietel, Marit; Häfner, Norman; Jansen, Lars; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B

    2011-06-01

    The coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a component of the tight junction complex and involved in cell adhesion. Loss of CAR expression can affect cell adhesion which in the context of carcinogenesis may influence both invasion and metastatic spread. Functional inactivation of CAR may also result from the interaction with its soluble isoforms. To relate alterations of CAR expression to tumor progression, we aimed to establish a highly specific real-time PCR protocol for quantification of all splice variants. In the process of cloning, we identified a novel splice variant termed CAR4/6 that lacked exon 5 but retained exon 6 encoding the transmembrane domain. Localization of CAR4/6 in the cell membrane was confirmed by ectopic expression in HT1080 cells. Expression analyses using cDNA arrays revealed that most normal tissues, including those of the female genital tract, express full-length CAR (CAR6/7) but not CAR4/6. Differential expression of both CAR splice variants was validated in microdissected epithelia (n = 66) derived from normal cervical ectodermal tissue, high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) and invasive squamous cervical carcinoma. CAR4/6 was not expressed in normal cervical tissue but in 42% of CIN2/3 and in most cervical carcinomas (p < 0.001). In contrast, CAR6/7 was detected in all of the microdissected samples. As for CAR4/6 expression levels of CAR6/7 were significantly lower in normal tissue as compared with CIN2/3 and cancer (p < 0.01). Ectopic expression of CAR4/6 in different cell lines enhanced the proliferative and invasive properties indicating a possible role in cancer progression.

  8. The evaluation of hollow-fiber ultrafiltration and celite concentration of enteroviruses, adenoviruses and bacteriophage from different water matrices

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data to support the evaluation of hollow-fiber ultrafiltration and celite concentration of enteroviruses, adenoviruses and bacteriophage from different water...

  9. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Prostate-Restricted Replication Competent Adenovirus-Ad-IU-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas A

    2005-01-01

    .... The goal of this research is to develop a novel therapeutic agent, Ad-IU-1, using PSES to control the replication of adenovirus and the expression of a therapeutic gene, herpes simplex thymidine kinase (TK...

  10. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Prostate-Restricted Replication Competent Adenovirus-AD-IU-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas A

    2006-01-01

    ... independent prostate cancers. The goal of this research is to develop a novel therapeutic agent, Ad-IU-1, using PSES to control the replication of adenovirus and the expression of a therapeutic gene, herpes simplex thymidine kinase (TK...

  11. Phase I Trial of Adenovirus-Mediated IL-12 Gene Transduction in Patients With Radiorecurrent Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Simon J

    2004-01-01

    .... Pre-clinical studies using adenovirus-mediated (Ad) transduction of IL-12 (Ad.mIL-12) in metastatic model of prostate cancer resulted in local growth suppression, survival enhancement and inhibition of pre-established metastases...

  12. DETECTION OF INFECTIOUS ADENOVIRUS IN TERTIARY TREATED AND UV DISINFECTED WASTEWATER DURING A UV DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infectious enteric adenovirus was isolated from urban wastewater receiving tertiary treatment and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of UV disinfection (low pressure, high intensity radiation) of total and fecal coliform bac...

  13. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Prostate-Restricted Replication Competent Adenovirus-AD-IU-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    ... independent prostate cancers. The goal of this research is to develop a novel therapeutic agent, Ad-lu-1, using PSES to control the replication of adenovirus and the expression of a therapeutic gene, herpes simplex thymidine kinase...

  14. Serological and Molecular Biological Studies of Parvovirus B19, Coxsackie B Viruses, and Adenoviruses as Potential Cardiotropic Viruses in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Stefka Kr.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflammatory diseases of the heart (myocarditis, pericarditis are commonly caused by viruses. Among the human cardiotropic viruses, parvovirus B19, Coxsackie B viruses, and adenoviruses play a leading role.

  15. Evolution and Cryo-electron Microscopy Capsid Structure of a North American Bat Adenovirus and Its Relationship to Other Mastadenoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenbrack, Nicole; Rogers, Matthew B.; Ashley, Robert E.; Keel, M. Kevin; Kubiski, Steven V.; Bryan, John A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Holmes, Edward C.; Hafenstein, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since the first description of adenoviruses in bats in 2006, a number of micro- and megabat species in Europe, Africa, and Asia have been shown to carry a wide diversity of adenoviruses. Here, we report on the evolutionary, biological, and structural characterization of a novel bat adenovirus (BtAdV) recovered from a Rafinesque's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) in Kentucky, USA, which is the first adenovirus isolated from North American bats. This virus (BtAdV 250-A) exhibits a close phylogenetic relationship with Canine mastadenovirus A (CAdV A), as previously observed with other BtAdVs. To further investigate the relationships between BtAdVs and CAdVs, we conducted mass spectrometric analysis and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the BtAdV 250-A capsid and also analyzed the in vitro host ranges of both viruses. Our results demonstrate that BtAdV 250-A represents a new mastadenovirus species that, in contrast to CAdV, has a unique capsid morphology that contains more prominent extensions of protein IX and can replicate efficiently in a phylogenetically diverse range of species. These findings, in addition to the recognition that both the genetic diversity of BtAdVs and the number of different bat species from disparate geographic regions infected with BtAdVs appears to be extensive, tentatively suggest that bats may have served as a potential reservoir for the cross-species transfer of adenoviruses to other hosts, as theorized for CAdV. IMPORTANCE Although many adenoviruses are host specific and likely codiverged with their hosts over millions of years, other adenoviruses appear to have emerged through successful cross-species transmission events on more recent time scales. The wide geographic distribution and genetic diversity of adenoviruses in bats and their close phylogenetic relationship to Canine mastadenovirus A (CAdV A) has raised important questions about how CAdV A, and possibly other mammalian adenoviruses

  16. Viable adenovirus vaccine prototypes: High-level production of a papillomavirus capsid antigen from the major late transcriptional unit

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Michael; DiFatta, Julie; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Schlegel, Richard; Ketner, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Safe, effective, orally delivered, live adenovirus vaccines have been in use for three decades. Recombinant derivatives of the live adenovirus vaccines may prove an economical alternative to current vaccines for a variety of diseases. To explore that possibility, we constructed a series of recombinants that express the major capsid protein (L1) of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV), a model for mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs) composed ...

  17. The evaluation of hollow-fiber ultrafiltration and celite concentration of enteroviruses, adenoviruses and bacteriophage from different water matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data to support the evaluation of hollow-fiber ultrafiltration and celite concentration of enteroviruses, adenoviruses and bacteriophage from different water matricesThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Rhodes , E., E. Huff, D. Hamilton, and J. Jones. The evaluation of hollow-fiber ultrafiltration and celite concentration of enteroviruses, adenoviruses and bacteriophage from different water matrices. JOURNAL OF VIROLOGICAL METHODS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 228(2): 31-38, (2016).

  18. A Dual-Action Armed Replicating Adenovirus for the Treatment of Osteoblastic Bone Metastases of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    sufficient to bind RANKL and inhibit osteoclastogenesis . Hence, the dual-action armed replicating adenovirus is designed to express the four cysteine...osteoprotegerin ameliorates bone resorption in a mouse ovariectomy model of osteoporosis . Mol Ther 3: 197-205. 2. Fueyo J, Gomez-Manzano C, Alemany R...recombinant adenovirus: suppression of the immune 900response with cyclosporin. Endocrinology, 137, 5166–5169. 90164. Jooss, K., Turka, L. A

  19. Two different serum-free media and osmolality effect upon human 293 cell growth and adenovirus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago B; Ferreira, Ana L; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M

    2005-11-01

    Adenoviruses are promising vectors for gene therapy and vaccination protocols. Consequently, the market demands for adenovirus are increasing, driving the search for new methodologies for large-scale production of concentrated vectors with warranted purity and efficacy, in a cost-effective way. Nevertheless, the production of adenovirus is currently limited by the so-called 'cell density effect', i.e. a drop in cell specific productivity concomitant with increased cell concentration at infection. Of two different serum-free culture media (CD293 and EX-Cell), evaluated for their effect on human 293 cells growth and adenovirus production at cell densities higher than 1x10(6) cells/ml, EX-Cell proved the better medium for cell growth. Although adenovirus production was equivalent in both media when the infection was performed at 1x10(6) cells/ml, at 3x10(6) cells/ml CD293 was the better. This result related to the high ammonia content in EX-Cell medium at the highest cell concentration at infection. Besides this, the large-scale production of these vectors at high cell densities often requires re-feed strategies, which increase medium osmolality. While a negative effect on cell growth was observed with increasing osmolalities, adenovirus productivity was only affected for osmolalities higher than 430 mOsm.

  20. Key Role of the Scavenger Receptor MARCO in Mediating Adenovirus Infection and Subsequent Innate Responses of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike D. Maler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed in several subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages and has been shown to participate in the recognition of various bacterial pathogens. However, the role of MARCO in antiviral defense is largely unexplored. Here, we investigated whether MARCO might be involved in the innate sensing of infection with adenovirus and recombinant adenoviral vectors by macrophages, which elicit vigorous immune responses in vivo. Using cells derived from mice, we show that adenovirus infection is significantly more efficient in MARCO-positive alveolar macrophages (AMs and in AM-like primary macrophage lines (Max Planck Institute cells than in MARCO-negative bone marrow-derived macrophages. Using antibodies blocking ligand binding to MARCO, as well as gene-deficient and MARCO-transfected cells, we show that MARCO mediates the rapid adenovirus transduction of macrophages. By enhancing adenovirus infection, MARCO contributes to efficient innate virus recognition through the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS. This leads to strong proinflammatory responses, including the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, alpha/beta interferon, and mature IL-1α. These findings contribute to the understanding of viral pathogenesis in macrophages and may open new possibilities for the development of tools to influence the outcome of infection with adenovirus or adenovirus vectors.

  1. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  2. Clinical and parasitological protection in a Leishmania infantum-macaque model vaccinated with adenovirus and the recombinant A2 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Gabriel; Teva, Antonio; Porrozzi, Renato; Pinto, Marcelo A; Marchevsky, Renato S; Rocha, Maria Gabrielle L; Dutra, Miriam S; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fernandes, Ana-Paula; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2014-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe vector-born disease of humans and dogs caused by Leishmania donovani complex parasites. Approximately 0.2 to 0.4 million new human VL cases occur annually worldwide. In the new world, these alarming numbers are primarily due to the impracticality of current control methods based on vector reduction and dog euthanasia. Thus, a prophylactic vaccine appears to be essential for VL control. The current efforts to develop an efficacious vaccine include the use of animal models that are as close to human VL. We have previously reported a L. infantum-macaque infection model that is reliable to determine which vaccine candidates are most worthy for further development. Among the few amastigote antigens tested so far, one of specific interest is the recombinant A2 (rA2) protein that protects against experimental L. infantum infections in mice and dogs. Primates were vaccinated using three rA2-based prime-boost immunization regimes: three doses of rA2 plus recombinant human interleukin-12 (rhIL-12) adsorbed in alum (rA2/rhIL-12/alum); two doses of non-replicative adenovirus recombinant vector encoding A2 (Ad5-A2) followed by two boosts with rA2/rhIL-12/alum (Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum); and plasmid DNA encoding A2 gene (DNA-A2) boosted with two doses of Ad5-A2 (DNA-A2+Ad5-A2). Primates received a subsequent infectious challenge with L. infantum. Vaccines, apart from being safe, were immunogenic as animals responded with increased pre-challenge production of anti-A2-specific IgG antibodies, though with some variability in the response, depending on the vaccine formulation/protocol. The relative parasite load in the liver was significantly lower in immunized macaques as compared to controls. Protection correlated with hepatic granuloma resolution, and reduction of clinical symptoms, particularly when primates were vaccinated with the Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum protocol. The remarkable clinical protection induced by A2 in an animal model that is

  3. Pandemic Influenza Virus 2009 H1N1 and Adenovirus in a High Risk Population of Young Adults: Epidemiology, Comparison of Clinical Presentations, and Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-08

    Pandemic Influenza Virus 2009 H1N1 and Adenovirus in a High Risk Population of Young Adults: Epidemiology, Comparison of Clinical Presentations, and... H1N1 influenza virus (2009 H1N1 ) emerged worldwide, causing morbidity and mortality that disproportionately affected young adults. Upper respiratory...adenovirus and 2009 H1N1 were prospectively collected. Results: 375 trainees with URI enrolled and were tested for both adenovirus and 2009 H1N1 by

  4. Assessment of the Incidence of Enteric Adenovirus Species and Serotypes in Surface Waters in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa: Tyume River as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Sibanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TaqMan real-time PCR was used for the detection and quantitation of adenoviruses in Tyume River water samples over a 12-month period. A total of 72 samples were analysed, and 22 samples were positive for adenovirus. Of the positive samples, 18 were collected from downstream sampling points. Among the downstream sampling points, adenovirus detection rate increased with distance downstream, being 28%, 33%, and 39% for Alice, Drayini, and Manqulweni, respectively. The Alice sampling site had the highest concentrations of adenovirus ranging between 6.54×103 genome copies/L and 8.49×104 genome copies/L. The observed trend could have been expected considering the level of anthropogenic activities in areas along the lower stretch of Tyume River, with the major one being the effluent of treated and semi treated sewage from wastewater treatment facilities. Adenovirus detection was sporadic at most sampling sites. Multiplex conventional PCR was used for the detection of clinically important adenovirus species B, C, and F and their serotypes. Species C and F adenoviruses were detected in 77% and 18% of the samples, respectively. Most adenovirus positive samples were obtained from areas of increased population densities. The presence of adenoviruses may confirm the risk of its transmission to the human population.

  5. The urethral smear as a tool in diagnosing adenovirus-induced urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønsberg, E; Hartgill, U

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus is a recognised cause of non-gonococcal urethritis, and is not uncommonly associated with extragenital signs and symptoms. This case report describes a patient with symptoms of conjunctivitis, meatitis and urethritis. The urethral smear revealed almost exclusively monocytes microscopically, raising the suspicion of a viral aetiology. Results confirmed the presence of adenovirus in both the eyes and urethra. Despite waning reliance on the urethral smear in sexual health clinics, it can still be an important diagnostic tool in assessing the aetiology of non-specific urethritis. Finding an obvious monocytic cell response in the urethral smear can indicate a viral cause and allow the clinician to optimise management, counsel appropriately, and potentially reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Priming with an Adenovirus 35-Circumsporozoite Protein (CS) Vaccine followed by RTS,S/AS01B Boosting Significantly Improves Immunogenicity to Plasmodium falciparum CS Compared to That with Either Malaria Vaccine Alone▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, V. Ann; McGrath, Shannon M.; Dubois, Patrice M.; Pau, Maria G.; Mettens, Pascal; Shott, Joseph; Cobb, Michelle; Burge, J. Robert; Larson, David; Ware, Lisa A.; Demoitie, Marie-Ange; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Bayat, Babak; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Dubois, Marie-Claude; Cohen, Joe; Goudsmit, Jaap; Heppner, D. Gray

    2007-01-01

    The RTS,S/AS02A protein-based vaccine consistently demonstrates significant protection against infection with Plasmodium falciparum malaria and also against clinical malaria and severe disease in children in areas of endemicity. Here we demonstrate with rhesus macaques that priming with a replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35) vector encoding circumsporozoite protein (CS) (Ad35.CS), followed by boosting with RTS,S in an improved MPL- and QS21-based adjuvant formulation, AS01B, maintains antibody responses and dramatically increases levels of T cells producing gamma interferon and other Th1 cytokines in response to CS peptides. The increased T-cell responses induced by the combination of Ad35.CS and RTS,S/AS01B are sustained for at least 6 months postvaccination and may translate to improved and more durable protection against P. falciparum infection in humans. PMID:17307942

  7. Heavy metals enhance the reactivation of nitrous acid-treated adenovirus in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperakis, S M

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with cadmium chloride and zinc chloride increases the survival rate of nitrous acid-treated adenovirus 2 (ade2). This increase is maximal if the time interval between cell treatment and virus infection is delayed by 36 h. The induction process requires protein synthesis only during the 3-h period immediately following treatment; cycloheximide does not prevent the expression of enhanced reactivation if added to the cells after this time.

  8. Calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline increases gene delivery with adenovirus type 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko T Ahonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenoviruses are attractive vectors for gene therapy because of their stability in vivo and the possibility of production at high titers. Despite exciting preclinical data with various approaches, there are only a few examples of clear efficacy in clinical trials. Effective gene delivery to target cells remains the key variable determining efficacy and thus enhanced transduction methods are important. METHODS/RESULTS: We found that heated serum could enhance adenovirus 5 mediated gene delivery up to twentyfold. A new protein-level interaction was found between fiber knob and serum transthyretin, but this was not responsible for the observed effect. Instead, we found that heating caused the calcium and phosphate present in the serum mix to precipitate, and this was responsible for enhanced gene delivery. This finding could have relevance for designing preclinical experiments with adenoviruses, since calcium and phosphate are present in many solutions. To translate this into an approach potentially testable in patients, we used calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline, both of which are clinically approved, to increase adenoviral gene transfer up to 300-fold in vitro. Gene transfer was increased with or without heating and in a manner independent from the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor. In vivo, in mouse studies, gene delivery was increased 2-, 110-, 12- and 13-fold to tumors, lungs, heart and liver and did not result in increased pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Antitumor efficacy of a replication competent virus was also increased significantly. CONCLUSION: In summary, adenoviral gene transfer and antitumor efficacy can be enhanced by calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline.

  9. Interaction between mouse adenovirus type 1 and cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Liesbeth; van Dam, Wim; Persoons, Leentje; Naesens, Lieve

    2012-01-01

    Application of human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) derived vectors for cancer gene therapy has been limited by the poor cell surface expression, on some tumor cell types, of the primary Ad5 receptor, the coxsackie-adenovirus-receptor (CAR), as well as the accumulation of Ad5 in the liver following interaction with blood coagulation factor X (FX) and subsequent tethering of the FX-Ad5 complex to heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) on liver cells. As an alternative vector, mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) is particularly attractive, since this non-human adenovirus displays pronounced endothelial cell tropism and does not use CAR as a cellular attachment receptor. We here demonstrate that MAV-1 uses cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) as primary cellular attachment receptor. Direct binding of MAV-1 to heparan sulfate-coated plates proved to be markedly more efficient compared to that of Ad5. Experiments with modified heparins revealed that the interaction of MAV-1 to HSPGs depends on their N-sulfation and, to a lesser extent, 6-O-sulfation rate. Whereas the interaction between Ad5 and HSPGs was enhanced by FX, this was not the case for MAV-1. A slot blot assay demonstrated the ability of MAV-1 to directly interact with FX, although the amount of FX complexed to MAV-1 was much lower than observed for Ad5. Analysis of the binding of MAV-1 and Ad5 to the NCI-60 panel of different human tumor cell lines revealed the preference of MAV-1 for ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, the data presented here enlarge our insight into the HSPG receptor usage of MAV-1 and support the development of an MAV-1-derived gene vector for human cancer therapy.

  10. Multiple Phenotypes in Adult Mice following Inactivation of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (Car) Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Pazirandeh, Ahmad; Sultana, Taranum; Mirza, Momina; Rozell, Björn; Hultenby, Kjell; Wallis, Karin; Vennström, Björn; Davis, Ben; Arner, Anders; Heuchel, Rainer; Löhr, Matthias; Philipson, Lennart; Sollerbrant, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    To determine the normal function of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), a protein found in tight junctions and other intercellular complexes, we constructed a mouse line in which the CAR gene could be disrupted at any chosen time point in a broad spectrum of cell types and tissues. All knockouts examined displayed a dilated intestinal tract and atrophy of the exocrine pancreas with appearance of tubular complexes characteristic of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The mice also exhib...

  11. Accurate identification of neutralizing antibodies to adenovirus Ad36, -a putative contributor of obesity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, Olga; Day, Rena Sue; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V

    2015-01-01

    In children and adults, human adenovirus serotype 36 (Ad36) is linked with increased adiposity, and important metabolic alterations. Since this property is not shared by many other human adenovirus serotypes, it is imperative to specifically identify exposure to Ad36. Although serum neutralization assay (SNA) is the gold standard to specifically detect neutralizing antibodies (NA) to Ad36, it requires 2-weeks to complete and considerable training to interpret the results. Whereas, an enzyme-immuno assay (EIA) may provide a quicker and objective determination. Evaluate the accuracy of commercially available EIA kits to detect NA to Ad36. Modify SNA to reduce time and increase objectivity. Sera of 15 seropositive or 16 seronegative subjects confirmed by SNA were used to test: 1) reproducibility of SNA to detect Ad36 exposure, by repeating assays twice; 2) an EIA that detects antibodies to all human adenovirus serotypes (NS-EIA) (Abcam-108705); 3) an EIA supposedly specific for Ad36 antibody (Ad36-EIA) (MyBioSource,#MBS705802), and 4) the concordance of SNA with a novel combination of SNA and immune-staining (SN-IS) kit (Cell BioLabs,#VPK-111). The SNA showed exact reproducibility. NS-EIA detected adenovirus antibodies in 94% samples, confirming the non-specificity of the assay for Ad36 serotype. All seronegative samples (as determined by SNA) were false positive by Ad36-EIA. In 97% samples, SN-IS showed fidelity with Ad36-antibody status as determined by SNA. The available EIA kits are not specific for detecting NA to Ad36. The modified SNA with immune-staining reduces assay time and increases accuracy of detecting by reducing subjectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of Adenovirus infection in host cell metabolism evaluated by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Carina; P Teixeira, Ana; M Alves, Paula

    2016-08-10

    Adenovirus-based vectors are powerful vehicles for gene transfer applications in vaccination and gene therapy. Although highly exploited in the clinical setting, key aspects of the adenovirus biology are still not well understood, in particular the subversion of host cell metabolism during viral infection and replication. The aim of this work was to gain insights on the metabolism of two human cell lines (HEK293 and an amniocyte-derived cell line, 1G3) after infection with an adenovirus serotype 5 vector (AdV5). In order to profile metabolic alterations, we used (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, which allowed the quantification of 35 metabolites in cell culture supernatants with low sample preparation and in a relatively short time. Significant differences between both cell lines in non-infected cultures were identified, namely in glutamine and acetate metabolism, as well as by-product secretion. The main response to AdV5 infection was an increase in glucose consumption and lactate production rates. Moreover, cultures performed with or without glutamine supplementation confirmed the exhaustion of this amino acid as one of the main causes of lower AdV5 production at high cell densities (10- and 1.5-fold less specific yields in HEK293 and 1G3 cells, respectively), and highlighted different degrees of glutamine dependency of adenovirus replication in each cell line. The observed metabolic alterations associated with AdV5 infection and specificity of the host cell line can be useful for targeted bioprocess optimization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction between mouse adenovirus type 1 and cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Lenaerts

    Full Text Available Application of human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 derived vectors for cancer gene therapy has been limited by the poor cell surface expression, on some tumor cell types, of the primary Ad5 receptor, the coxsackie-adenovirus-receptor (CAR, as well as the accumulation of Ad5 in the liver following interaction with blood coagulation factor X (FX and subsequent tethering of the FX-Ad5 complex to heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG on liver cells. As an alternative vector, mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1 is particularly attractive, since this non-human adenovirus displays pronounced endothelial cell tropism and does not use CAR as a cellular attachment receptor. We here demonstrate that MAV-1 uses cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs as primary cellular attachment receptor. Direct binding of MAV-1 to heparan sulfate-coated plates proved to be markedly more efficient compared to that of Ad5. Experiments with modified heparins revealed that the interaction of MAV-1 to HSPGs depends on their N-sulfation and, to a lesser extent, 6-O-sulfation rate. Whereas the interaction between Ad5 and HSPGs was enhanced by FX, this was not the case for MAV-1. A slot blot assay demonstrated the ability of MAV-1 to directly interact with FX, although the amount of FX complexed to MAV-1 was much lower than observed for Ad5. Analysis of the binding of MAV-1 and Ad5 to the NCI-60 panel of different human tumor cell lines revealed the preference of MAV-1 for ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, the data presented here enlarge our insight into the HSPG receptor usage of MAV-1 and support the development of an MAV-1-derived gene vector for human cancer therapy.

  14. Canine adenovirus type 2 vector generation via I-Sce1-mediated intracellular genome release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Ibanes

    Full Text Available When canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2, or also commonly referred to as CAV-2 vectors are injected into the brain parenchyma they preferentially transduce neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent regions, and allow transgene expression for at last >1 yr. Yet, translating these data into a user-friendly vector platform has been limited because CAV-2 vector generation is challenging. Generation of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors often requires transfection of linear DNA fragments of >30 kb containing the vector genome into an E1-transcomplementing cell line. In contrast to human adenovirus type 5 vector generation, CAV-2 vector generation is less efficient due, in part, to a reduced ability to initiate replication and poor transfectibility of canine cells with large, linear DNA fragments. To improve CAV-2 vector generation, we generated an E1-transcomplementing cell line expressing the estrogen receptor (ER fused to I-SceI, a yeast meganuclease, and plasmids containing the I-SceI recognition sites flanking the CAV-2 vector genome. Using transfection of supercoiled plasmid and intracellular genome release via 4-OH-tamoxifen-induced nuclear translocation of I-SceI, we improved CAV-2 vector titers 1,000 fold, and in turn increased the efficacy of CAV-2 vector generation.

  15. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region in adenovirus 5 DNA involved in cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of investigations into the primary structure of the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The phenomenon of cell transformation is discussed in general terms and the principles of a number of fairly recent techniques, which have been in use for DNA sequence determination since 1975 are dealt with. A few of the author's own techniques are described which deal both with nucleotide sequence analysis and with the determination of DNA cleavage sites of restriction endonucleases. The results are given of the mapping of cleavage sites in the HpaI-E fragment of adenovirus DNA of HpaII, HaeIII, AluI, HinfI and TaqI and of the determination of the nucleotide sequence in the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The results of the sequence determination of the Ad5 HindIII-G fragment are discussed in relation with the investigation on the transforming proteins isolated from in vitro and in vivo synthesizing systems. Labelling procedures of DNA are described including the exonuclease III/DNA polymerase 1 method and TA polynucleotide kinase labelling of DNA fragments. (Auth.)

  16. [Construction and expression of recombinant adenovirus containing human catalase gene in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Xiao-ling; Li, Ai-ling; Ning, Qi-lan; Yang, Xu-dong; Xu, Nan; Wang, Hui-lian

    2011-05-01

    To construct the adenovirus vector containing recombinant human catalase (CAT) and to express the recombinant gene in vitro. Total RNA was extracted from human leukocytes and full-length human CAT cDNA was obtained with RT-PCR method. The CAT gene was cloned into pcDNA3.1(+) vector and pcDNA3.1(+)CAT was constructed. The positive clones were confirmed by the restriction enzyme digestion and gene sequencing. The CAT gene was cloned into the entry vector pENTR1A, and pENTR1A-CAT vector was constructed. By LR reaction pENTR1A-CAT and pAd/CMV/V5-DEST was recombined in vitro, and the recombinant adenovirus pAd/CMV/V5-DEST-CAT was obtained. The positive pAd/CMV/V5-DEST-CAT was confirmed by sequencing and transfected into 293A cells with Pac I linearization and Lipofectamine 2 000, and the recombinant virus particles were packaged and amplified in the cells. The expression of CAT protein and CAT enzyme activities of the recombinant virus were determined by Western blot and 240 nm UV absorption methods. High expression of recombinant adenovirus was obtained and the expressed human catalase had high enzyme activity. Ad/CMV/V5-DEST-CAT vector containing human catalase gene has been constructed successfully; and the expressed enzyme in 293A cells has high activity.

  17. The serological and virological investigation of canine adenovirus infection on the dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Oya; Yapici, Orhan; Avci, Oguzhan; Simsek, Atilla; Atli, Kamil; Dik, Irmak; Yavru, Sibel; Hasircioglu, Sibel; Kale, Mehmet; Mamak, Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Two types of Canine Adenovirus (CAVs), Canine Adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), the virus which causes infectious canine hepatitis, and Canine Adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), which causes canine infectious laryngotracheitis, have been found in dogs. In this study, blood samples taken from 111 dogs, which were admitted to the Internal Medicine Clinic of Selcuk University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, with clinical symptoms. Seventy-seven dogs were sampled from Isparta and Burdur dog shelters by random sampling, regardless of the clinical findings. Dogs showed a systemic disease, characterized by fever, diarrhea, vomiting, oculonasal discharge, conjunctivitis, severe moist cough, signs of pulmonary disease and dehydration. Two dogs had corneal opacity and photophobia. In serological studies, 188 serum samples were investigated on the presence of CAV antibodies by ELISA. Total 103 (103/188-54.7%) blood samples were detected to be positive for CAV antibodies by ELISA. However, 85 (85/188-45.2%) blood samples were negative. Blood leukocyte samples from dogs were processed and inoculated onto confluent monolayers of MDCK cells using standard virological techniques. After third passage, cells were examined by direct immunoflourescence test for virus isolation. But positive result was not detected. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the high prevalence of CAV infection in dogs.

  18. Purification of infectious adenovirus in two hours by ultracentrifugation and tangential flow filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugai, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Takahito; Hirose, Megumi; Inabe, Kumiko; Kujime, Yukari; Terashima, Miho; Liu, Bingbing; Tang, Hong; Zhao, Mujun; Murata, Takehide; Kimura, Makoto; Pan, Jianzhi; Obata, Yuichi; Hamada, Hirofumi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2005-01-01

    Adenoviruses are excellent vectors for gene transfer and are used extensively for high-level expression of the products of transgenes in living cells. The development of simple and rapid methods for the purification of stable infectious recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) remains a challenge. We report here a method for the purification of infectious adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) that involves ultracentrifugation on a cesium chloride gradient at 604,000g for 15 min at 4 deg C and tangential flow filtration. The entire procedure requires less than two hours and infectious Ad5 can be recovered at levels higher than 64% of the number of plaque-forming units (pfu) in the initial crude preparation of viruses. We have obtained titers of infectious purified Ad5 of 1.35 x 10 10 pfu/ml and a ratio of particle titer to infectious titer of seven. The method described here allows the rapid purification of rAds for studies of gene function in vivo and in vitro, as well as the rapid purification of Ad5

  19. Human adenovirus detection among immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients presenting acute respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aripuana Watanabe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human adenoviruses (HAdV play an important role in the etiology of severe acute lower respiratory infection, especially in immunocompromised individuals. The aim of the present study was detect the HAdV through different methods: direct fluorescence assay (DFA and nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR-nested from patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI up to 7 days of symptoms onset. METHODS: Samples (n=643 were collected from different risk groups during from 2001 to 2010: 139 adults attended in an Emergency Room Patients (ERP; 205 health care workers (HCW; 69 from Renal Transplant Outpatients (RTO; 230 patients in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT program. RESULTS: Among all patients (n=643 adenovirus was detected on 13.2% by DFA and/or PCR: 6/139 (4.3% adults from ERP, 7/205 (3.4% from HCW samples, 4/69 (5.8% from RTO and 68/230 (29.5% from HSCT patients. Nested PCR showed higher detection (10% compared to DFA test (3.8% (p < 0.001. HSCT patients presented significantly higher prevalence of HAdV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Adenovirus detection through nested-PCR assay was higher. However the inclusion of molecular method in laboratorial routine diagnostic should be evaluated considering the reality of each specific health service.

  20. [An experimental study on recombinant adenovirus p53 transfected in oral dysplastic epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Zhang, Song-Tao; Li, Long-Jiang; Han, Bo; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Pan, Jian

    2009-04-01

    To investigate and evaluate the appropriate virus titer and transfection efficiency of recombinant adenovirus p53 into the oral dysplastic epithelial cells (POE-9n) and provide reference for oral precancerosis research. The transfection sensitivity of adenovirus into oral dysplastic epithelial cells was evaluated by the recombinant adenovirus p53 containing green fluorescent protein (rAd-GFP). Different titre rAd -p53 was transfected into oral dysplastic epithelial cells to evaluate the effects of rAd-p53 on cell proliferation inhibition by MIT assay. The expression of exogenous p53 gene in POE-9n cells was detected by immunocytochemistry. More than 95% POE-9n cells were transfected by rAd-GFP with MOI from 100 to 500 and there was no statistical difference between different MOI values (r=-0.124, P>0.05). It was found that rAd-p53 had significant inhibition effects on POE-9n cell proliferation with MOI from 100 to 500, and there were no significant differences at 96 h and 120 h after the transfection on cell proliferation inhibition (P>0.05). P53 protein was well expressed in rAd-p53 transfected POE-9n cells. Exogenous p53 can be successfully transfected into POE-9n cells by rAd-p53 and the virus titer of MOI 100 was high enough to ensure efficient transfection.

  1. A 5-year study of adenoviruses causing conjunctivitis in Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdin, Begüm Nalça; Pas, Suzan D; Durak, İsmet; Schutten, Martin; Sayıner, A Arzu

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviruses are a common cause of conjunctivitis. Genotypes are diverse and differ according to population and geographical distribution of the virus. There is limited data regarding ocular adenoviral infections and genotype distribution in Turkey. This study aimed to determine the adenovirus genotypes and their epidemiological features among patients with conjunctivitis between 2006 and 2010, in Izmir, Turkey. Adenoviral DNA was detected by PCR in 213 of 488 (44%) of the ocular samples collected from patients with viral conjunctivitis during the 5-year study period. Of these, 101 (47%) were randomly chosen and genotyped by sequence analysis. Seven genotypes were identified, including 3, 4, 8, 11, 19, 37, and 53. Genotype 8 and 4 were the dominant types detected in 67 (66.3%) and 25 (24.7%) of the samples, respectively. Other five genotypes (3, 11, 19, 37, 53) were detected in 9 (8.9%) samples. Genotype and seasonal differences observed throughout the study. Human adenoviruse (HAdV)-8 was the most frequent type, except 2008. The prevalence of genotype 4 increased starting from 2006, became dominant in 2008 and decreased in the following years. The peak season was mostly spring months, although it was possible to detect positive samples throughout the year. In conclusion, genotype 8 followed by genotype 4 was the most frequent adenoviral types causing conjunctivitis during the 5-year study period. Findings suggest that there is a slow shift between genotypes throughout the years. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. An Ago2-associated capped transcriptional start site small RNA suppresses adenovirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Wael; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2017-11-01

    Here we show that the adenovirus major late promoter produces a 31-nucleotide transcriptional start site small RNA (MLP-TSS-sRNA) that retains the 7-methylguanosine (m7G)-cap and is incorporated onto Ago2-containing RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC) in human adenovirus-37 infected cells. RNA polymerase II CLIP (UV-cross linking immunoprecipitation) experiments suggest that the MLP-TSS-sRNA is produced by promoter proximal stalling/termination of RNA polymerase II transcription at the site of the small RNA 3' end. The MLP-TSS-sRNA is highly stable in cells and functionally active, down-regulating complementary targets in a sequence and dose-dependent manner. The MLP-TSS-sRNA is transcribed from the opposite strand to the adenoviral DNA polymerase and preterminal protein mRNAs, two essential viral replication proteins. We show that the MLP-TSS-sRNA act in trans to reduce DNA polymerase and preterminal protein mRNA expression. As a consequence of this, the MLP-TSS-sRNA has an inhibitory effect on the efficiency of viral DNA replication. Collectively, our results suggest that this novel sRNA may serve a regulatory function controlling viral genome replication during a lytic and/or persistent adenovirus infection in its natural host. © 2017 Kamel and Akusjärvi; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jianfeng; Zhao Dong; Zhong Zhirong; Zhang Zhirong; Gong Tao; Sun Xun

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  4. Characterization of a Novel Bat Adenovirus Isolated from Straw-Colored Fruit Bat (Eidolon helvum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Ogawa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bats are important reservoirs for emerging zoonotic viruses. For extensive surveys of potential pathogens in straw-colored fruit bats (Eidolon helvum in Zambia, a total of 107 spleen samples of E. helvum in 2006 were inoculated onto Vero E6 cells. The cell culture inoculated with one of the samples (ZFB06-106 exhibited remarkable cytopathic changes. Based on the ultrastructural property in negative staining and cross-reactivity in immunofluorescence assays, the virus was suspected to be an adenovirus, and tentatively named E. helvum adenovirus 06-106 (EhAdV 06-106. Analysis of the full-length genome of 30,134 bp, determined by next-generation sequencing, showed the presence of 28 open reading frames. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that EhAdV 06-106 represented a novel bat adenovirus species in the genus Mastadenovirus. The virus shared similar characteristics of low G + C contents with recently isolated members of species Bat mastadenoviruses E, F and G, from which EhAdV 06-106 diverged by more than 15% based on the distance matrix analysis of DNA polymerase amino acid sequences. According to the taxonomic criteria, we propose the tentative new species name “Bat mastadenovirus H”. Because EhAdV 06-106 exhibited a wide in vitro cell tropism, the virus might have a potential risk as an emerging virus through cross-species transmission.

  5. The Serological and Virological Investigation of Canine Adenovirus Infection on the Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya Bulut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of Canine Adenovirus (CAVs, Canine Adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1, the virus which causes infectious canine hepatitis, and Canine Adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2, which causes canine infectious laryngotracheitis, have been found in dogs. In this study, blood samples taken from 111 dogs, which were admitted to the Internal Medicine Clinic of Selcuk University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, with clinical symptoms. Seventy-seven dogs were sampled from Isparta and Burdur dog shelters by random sampling, regardless of the clinical findings. Dogs showed a systemic disease, characterized by fever, diarrhea, vomiting, oculonasal discharge, conjunctivitis, severe moist cough, signs of pulmonary disease and dehydration. Two dogs had corneal opacity and photophobia. In serological studies, 188 serum samples were investigated on the presence of CAV antibodies by ELISA. Total 103 (103/188–54.7% blood samples were detected to be positive for CAV antibodies by ELISA. However, 85 (85/188–45.2% blood samples were negative. Blood leukocyte samples from dogs were processed and inoculated onto confluent monolayers of MDCK cells using standard virological techniques. After third passage, cells were examined by direct immunoflourescence test for virus isolation. But positive result was not detected. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the high prevalence of CAV infection in dogs.

  6. Characterization of a Novel Bat Adenovirus Isolated from Straw-Colored Fruit Bat (Eidolon helvum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hirohito; Kajihara, Masahiro; Nao, Naganori; Shigeno, Asako; Fujikura, Daisuke; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Mutemwa, Alisheke; Squarre, David; Yamada, Masao; Higashi, Hideaki; Sawa, Hirofumi; Takada, Ayato

    2017-12-04

    Bats are important reservoirs for emerging zoonotic viruses. For extensive surveys of potential pathogens in straw-colored fruit bats ( Eidolon helvum ) in Zambia, a total of 107 spleen samples of E. helvum in 2006 were inoculated onto Vero E6 cells. The cell culture inoculated with one of the samples (ZFB06-106) exhibited remarkable cytopathic changes. Based on the ultrastructural property in negative staining and cross-reactivity in immunofluorescence assays, the virus was suspected to be an adenovirus, and tentatively named E. helvum adenovirus 06-106 (EhAdV 06-106). Analysis of the full-length genome of 30,134 bp, determined by next-generation sequencing, showed the presence of 28 open reading frames. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that EhAdV 06-106 represented a novel bat adenovirus species in the genus Mastadenovirus . The virus shared similar characteristics of low G + C contents with recently isolated members of species Bat mastadenoviruses E , F and G , from which EhAdV 06-106 diverged by more than 15% based on the distance matrix analysis of DNA polymerase amino acid sequences. According to the taxonomic criteria, we propose the tentative new species name " Bat mastadenovirus H ". Because EhAdV 06-106 exhibited a wide in vitro cell tropism, the virus might have a potential risk as an emerging virus through cross-species transmission.

  7. [Outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis caused by adenovirus in a geriatric centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artieda, Juncal; Montes, Milagrosa; Vicente, Diego; Martínez, Consuelo; Piñeiro, Luis; Mendiola, Josune

    2010-12-01

    Adenovirus serotype 4a is a respiratory virus that occasionally causes conjunctivitis. This paper describes an outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis that occurred in a geriatric centre. Outbreak description and epidemiological research through a survey. For the microbiological study conjunctival swabs were collected using viral and bacterial transport media. Adenovirus was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The serotype was determined by sequencing of a fragment of the hexon and E1 genes. In autumn 2008 an outbreak of follicular conjunctivitis caused by adenovirus serotype 4a was detected. Twenty three percent 23% (69/300) of residents and 5% (9/180) of workers in a geriatric centre in Gipuzkoa were affected. The clinical symptoms were of prolonged duration (11±5 days). The temporal association of the cases suggested transmission from person to person. The sanitary measures established (asepsis and frequent hand washing, cleaning and disinfection of objects and surfaces) were effective, interrupting the transmission of the disease within a short period of time. Rapid detection, identification of the causative agent and implementing appropriate control measures can significantly reduce the impact on both health and economic costs of these outbreaks. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Epizootiology and pathologic findings associated with a newly described adenovirus in the red squirrel, Sciurus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jiménez, David; Graham, David; Couper, David; Benkö, Maria; Schöniger, Sandra; Gurnell, John; Sainsbury, Anthony W

    2011-04-01

    An infectious disease caused by Squirrelpox virus has contributed to the decline of red squirrels, Sciurus vulgaris, in the British Isles. Because of the heightened disease surveillance activity in red squirrels, adenovirus infection with associated mortality has been detected. Adenoviral disease is described in other rodent species usually associated with stressors. Here we 1) describe the pathologic findings in red squirrels found dead with adenoviral infection and gastrointestinal disease, and 2) investigate the epizootiology of the disease through pathologic investigation, scanning surveillance, and virologic studies. Ten red squirrels involved in conservation studies were diagnosed with adenoviral infection by electron microscopy or PCR. All squirrels exhibited diarrhea and small intestinal inflammation or hemorrhage was evident in seven cases. Lesions indicative of splenic lymphocytolysis were observed in one squirrel and leukocytic hepatitis in another. No adenovirus was detected in grey squirrels, Sciurus carolinensis, inhabiting the same forest area, but previous serologic studies showed that grey squirrels cannot be discounted as a reservoir of the virus. Scanning surveillance showed that 12% of 493 red squirrels had diarrheal disease and two of 13 free-living red squirrels with diarrheal disease had adenovirus infection. Adenoviral disease in declining free-living wild red squirrel populations in the British Isles occurs at a detectable frequency and its impact on the conservation of this species deserves further attention.

  9. Enhanced transduction and replication of RGD-fiber modified adenovirus in primary T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhak Sengupta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are often used as vehicles to mediate gene delivery for therapeutic purposes, but their research scope in hematological cells remains limited due to a narrow choice of host cells that express the adenoviral receptor (CAR. T cells, which are attractive targets for gene therapy of numerous diseases, remain resistant to adenoviral infection because of the absence of CAR expression. Here, we demonstrate that this resistance can be overcome when murine or human T cells are transduced with an adenovirus incorporating the RGD-fiber modification (Ad-RGD.A luciferase-expressing replication-deficient Ad-RGD infected 3-fold higher number of activated primary T cells than an adenovirus lacking the RGD-fiber modification in vitro. Infection with replication-competent Ad-RGD virus also caused increased cell cycling, higher E1A copy number and enriched hexon antigen expression in both human and murine T cells. Transduction with oncolytic Ad-RGD also resulted in higher titers of progeny virus and enhanced the killing of T cells. In vivo, 35-45% of splenic T cells were transduced by Ad-RGD.Collectively, our results prove that a fiber modified Ad-RGD successfully transduces and replicates in primary T cells of both murine and human origin.

  10. The antitumor effects of oncolytic adenovirus H101 against lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jie; Li, Qi-Hua; Yang, Ju-Lun; Liu, Feng; Wang, Li; Xu, Wen-Mang; Zhao, Wen-Xing

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in both men and women, with dismal survival rates due to late-stage diagnoses and a lack of efficacious therapies. The new treatment options with completely novel mechanism of therapeutic activity are needed for lung cancer to improve patient outcome. The present study was aimed at testing the efficacy of recombinant adenovirus H101 as an oncolytic agent for killing human lung cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. We assessed the coxsackievirus adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression on human lung cancer cell lines by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry staining. Viral infectivity and viral replication in lung cancer cells was assayed by flow cytometry and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. After H101 treatment, cytotoxic effect, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were further examined by lactate dehydrogenase release assay and flow cytometry in vitro, respectively. In vivo, antitumor effects of H101 were assessed on SCID Beige mice xenografted with human lung cancer cells. Receptor characterization confirmed that human lung cancer cell lines expressed CAR receptor for adenovirus type 5. Lung cancer cells were sensitive to infection by the H101 virus. H101 infection and replication resulted in very potent cytotoxicity, G2/M phase arrest and cell lysis. In vivo, we also showed that H101 significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection, with virus replication, cell degeneration and necrosis in the tumor tissue. These results have important implications for the treatment of human lung cancer.

  11. E1B and E4 oncoproteins of adenovirus antagonize the effect of apoptosis inducing factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Roberta L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Wilkinson, John C., E-mail: john.wilkinson@ndsu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Ornelles, David A., E-mail: ornelles@wakehealth.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Adenovirus inundates the productively infected cell with linear, double-stranded DNA and an abundance of single-stranded DNA. The cellular response to this stimulus is antagonized by the adenoviral E1B and E4 early genes. A mutant group C adenovirus that fails to express the E1B-55K and E4ORF3 genes is unable to suppress the DNA-damage response. Cells infected with this double-mutant virus display significant morphological heterogeneity at late times of infection and frequently contain fragmented nuclei. Nuclear fragmentation was due to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria into the nucleus. The release of AIF was dependent on active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which appeared to be activated by viral DNA replication. Nuclear fragmentation did not occur in AIF-deficient cells or in cells treated with a PARP-1 inhibitor. The E1B-55K or E4ORF3 proteins independently prevented nuclear fragmentation subsequent to PARP-1 activation, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of PAR-modified proteins. - Highlights: • E1B-55K or E4orf3 prevents nuclear fragmentation. • Nuclear fragmentation requires AIF and PARP-1 activity. • Adenovirus DNA replication activates PARP-1. • E1B-55K or E4orf3 proteins alter the distribution of PAR.

  12. Contributions of CD8 T cells to the pathogenesis of mouse adenovirus type 1 respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Caitlyn T; Andonian, Jennifer S; Seltzer, Harrison M; Procario, Megan C; Watson, Michael E; Weinberg, Jason B

    2017-07-01

    CD8 T cells are key components of the immune response to viruses, but their roles in the pathogenesis of adenovirus respiratory infection have not been characterized. We used mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) to define CD8 T cell contributions to the pathogenesis of adenovirus respiratory infection. CD8 T cell deficiency in β2m -/- mice had no effect on peak viral replication in lungs, but clearance of virus was delayed in β2m -/- mice. Virus-induced weight loss and increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid total protein, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, CCL2, and CCL5 concentrations were less in β2m -/- mice than in controls. CD8 T cell depletion had similar effects on virus clearance, weight loss, and inflammation. Deficiency of IFN-γ or perforin had no effect on viral replication or inflammation, but perforin-deficient mice were partially protected from weight loss. CD8 T cells promote MAV-1-induced pulmonary inflammation via a mechanism that is independent of direct antiviral effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Serological and Virological Investigation of Canine Adenovirus Infection on the Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Oya; Yapici, Orhan; Avci, Oguzhan; Simsek, Atilla; Atli, Kamil; Dik, Irmak; Yavru, Sibel; Hasircioglu, Sibel; Kale, Mehmet; Mamak, Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Two types of Canine Adenovirus (CAVs), Canine Adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), the virus which causes infectious canine hepatitis, and Canine Adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), which causes canine infectious laryngotracheitis, have been found in dogs. In this study, blood samples taken from 111 dogs, which were admitted to the Internal Medicine Clinic of Selcuk University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, with clinical symptoms. Seventy-seven dogs were sampled from Isparta and Burdur dog shelters by random sampling, regardless of the clinical findings. Dogs showed a systemic disease, characterized by fever, diarrhea, vomiting, oculonasal discharge, conjunctivitis, severe moist cough, signs of pulmonary disease and dehydration. Two dogs had corneal opacity and photophobia. In serological studies, 188 serum samples were investigated on the presence of CAV antibodies by ELISA. Total 103 (103/188–54.7%) blood samples were detected to be positive for CAV antibodies by ELISA. However, 85 (85/188–45.2%) blood samples were negative. Blood leukocyte samples from dogs were processed and inoculated onto confluent monolayers of MDCK cells using standard virological techniques. After third passage, cells were examined by direct immunoflourescence test for virus isolation. But positive result was not detected. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the high prevalence of CAV infection in dogs. PMID:24223508

  14. Cutting edge: adenovirus E19 has two mechanisms for affecting class I MHC expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, E M; Bennink, J R; Yewdell, J W; Brodsky, F M

    1999-05-01

    Viral strategies for immune evasion include inhibition of various steps in the class I MHC assembly pathway. Here, we demonstrate that adenovirus produces one gene product with a dual function in this regard. It is well established that adenovirus E19 binds class I molecules and retains them in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, E19 also delays the expression of class I alleles to which it cannot tightly bind. Here, we show that E19 binds TAP and acts as a tapasin inhibitor, preventing class I/TAP association. DeltaE19, an E19 mutant lacking the ER-retention signal, delays maturation of class I molecules, indicating that E19's inhibition of class I/TAP interaction is sufficient to delay class I expression. These data identify tapasin inhibition as a novel mechanism of viral immune evasion and suggest that, through this secondary mechanism, adenovirus can affect Ag presentation by MHC alleles that it can only weakly affect by direct retention.

  15. Sequence typing of adenovirus from samples from hematological stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qurashi, Yasir Mohammed A; Guiver, Malcolm; Cooper, Robert J

    2011-11-01

    Adenovirus infections are usually mild or even asymptomatic, but infections with the virus are being recognized increasingly as a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the immunocompromised, particularly hematological stem cell transplant patients where infections can be life threatening and mortality may reach 60%. Typing by sequencing the HVR7 region of the hexon was established and validated using 60 isolates of different serotypes from the six of the seven species which had been typed previously by serum neutralization. Analysis of nucleotide sequences was used to type 227 samples from 41 hematological stem cell transplant recipients. Types from six species were detected but species C types were detected in 51.4% and species A in 34.3% of patients. Seven patients were infected with different adenovirus types sequentially and a further six patients had evidence of simultaneous multiple infections. Many of the sequences had several differences from the prototype strains which will allow tracing of outbreaks and provide evidence for cross-infection in a hospital setting. In this study, the phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences from hematological stem cell transplant patients' samples showed evidence of two possible cross-infection incidents involving three and five patients, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; Pcolorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; Pcolorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment.

  17. Intramuscular delivery of adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing humanized protective antigen induces rapid protection against anthrax that may bypass intranasally originated preexisting adenovirus immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a single dose of 10⁸ infectious units of Ad5-PAopt achieved 100% protection from challenge with 10 times the 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) of anthrax lethal toxin 7 days after vaccination. Although preexisting intranasally induced immunity to Ad5 slightly weakened the humoral and cellular immune responses to Ad5-PAopt via intramuscular inoculation, 100% protection was achieved 15 days after vaccination in Fisher 344 rats. The protective efficacy conferred by intramuscular vaccination in the presence of preexisting intranasally induced immunity was significantly better than that of intranasal delivery of Ad5-PAopt and intramuscular injection with recombinant PA and aluminum adjuvant without preexisting immunity. As natural Ad5 infection often occurs via the mucosal route, the work here largely illuminates that intramuscular inoculation with Ad5-PAopt can overcome the negative effects of immunity induced by prior adenovirus infection and represents an efficient approach for protecting against emerging anthrax.

  18. Adenovirus-dependent changes in cell membrane permeability: role of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, P.; Pastan, I.; Willingham, M.C.

    1987-03-01

    Adenovirus-dependent release of choline phosphate from KB cells at pH 6.0 was partially blocked by ouabain. In K/sup +/-containing medium, maximum inhibition of release was obtained by 10/sup -5/ M ouabain and half-maximal inhibition was achieved by about 0.5 x 10/sup -6/ M ouabain. Ouabain did not block either the binding or the uptake of adenovirus by KB cells. Without K/sup +/, about 25% of cell-associated choline phosphate was released by adenovirus, whereas with 1 mM K/sup +/ about 50% was released. This activation by K/sup +/ was blocked by 0.1 mM ouabain. HeLa cells behaved like KB cells, but a mutant of HeLa cells resistant to ouabain (D98-OR) released much lower amounts of choline phosphate in response to human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2). Wild-type D98-OR cells bound nearly the same amount of adenovirus as did normal HeLa cells. Ad2 also increased the activity of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase in KB cells, with maximum activation at 50..mu..g of Ad2 per ml. In D98-OR cells, Ad2 failed to activate Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, ATPase activity. Ad2-dependent lysis of endocytic vesicles (receptosomes) was assayed by measuring Ad2-dependent enhancement of epidermal growth factor-Pseudomonas exotoxin toxicity. This action of adenovirus was increased when K/sup +/ was present in the medium. Under the conditions used, K/sup +/ had no effect on the amount of Ad2 or epidermal growth factor taken up by the cells. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that Ad2-dependent cellular efflux of choline phosphate and adenovirus-dependent lysis of receptosomes may require Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase activity.

  19. Adenovirus serotype 3 and 7 infection with acute respiratory failure in children in Taiwan, 2010-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yin Lai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Increased incidence of adenovirus infection in children was noticed since September 2010 in Taiwan and severe cases requiring intensive care were noted later. We did this study to find the clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with severe adenovirus infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We collected cases of severe adenovirus infection between November 2010 and June 2011 to analyze their clinical characteristics in two medical centers in northern Taiwan. Severe adenovirus infection was defined as laboratory-confirmed adenovirus cases with required intensive care. Hexon gene sequencing was performed for molecular genotyping. RESULTS: 45 patients were included, 22 cases (49% were infected with serotype 7, 19 (42% with serotype 3, and 4 with serotype 2. The median age (range was 2.75 years (0.08-15.43 years; 87% were below 5 years. Male to female ratio was 1.65 (28 to 17. Of these patients, 56% had underlying neurological diseases, 50% experienced fever higher than 40°C and 69% suffered fever longer than one week. The clinical diagnosis included pneumonia in 40 (89% patients, bronchopneumonia in 5 (11%, and encephalitis in 7 (16%. At least 22 patients had pleural effusion. They had complications of respiratory failure (53%, acute respiratory distress syndrome (24%, hypotension (40%, and 6 (13% patients needed extracorporeal membranous oxygenation. Ten (22% patients died, all with underlying major systemic diseases and 7 (70% infected with serotype 7. CONCLUSIONS: Adenovirus serotype 7 and 3 can cause severe disease-even death-in children, especially those with underlying neurological diseases. Patients infected with adenovirus serotype 7 tended to have a higher case-fatality rate.

  20. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-03-03

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 10(4) level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine.

  1. Engineering Genetically Encoded FRET Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenburg, Laurens; Merkx, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins can be exploited to create fully genetically encoded and thus subcellularly targetable sensors. FRET sensors report changes in energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor fluorescent protein that occur when an attached sensor domain undergoes a change in conformation in response to ligand binding. The design of sensitive FRET sensors remains challenging as there are few generally applicable design rules and each sensor must be optimized anew. In this review we discuss various strategies that address this shortcoming, including rational design approaches that exploit self-associating fluorescent domains and the directed evolution of FRET sensors using high-throughput screening. PMID:24991940

  2. Atomic Structures of Minor Proteins VI and VII in the Human Adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinghong; Wu, Lily; Sun, Ren; Zhou, Z Hong

    2017-10-04

    Human adenoviruses (Ad) are dsDNA viruses associated with infectious diseases, yet better known as tools for gene delivery and oncolytic anti-cancer therapy. Atomic structures of Ad provide the basis for the development of antivirals and for engineering efforts towards more effective applications. Since 2010, atomic models of human Ad5 have been independently derived from photographic film cryoEM and X-ray crystallography, but discrepancies exist concerning the assignment of cement proteins IIIa, VIII and IX. To clarify these discrepancies, here we have employed the technology of direct electron-counting to obtain a cryoEM structure of human Ad5 at 3.2 Å resolution. Our improved structure unambiguously confirmed our previous cryoEM models of proteins IIIa, VIII and IX and explained the likely cause of conflict in the crystallography models. The improved structure also allows the identification of three new components in the cavities of hexons - the cleaved N-terminus of precursor protein VI (pVIn), the cleaved N-terminus of precursor protein VII (pVIIn2), and mature protein VI. The binding of pVIIn2--by extension that of genome-condensing pVII--to hexons is consistent with the previously proposed dsDNA genome-capsid co-assembly for adenoviruses, which resembles that of ssRNA viruses but differs from the well-established mechanism of pumping dsDNA into a preformed protein capsid, as exemplified by tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses. IMPORTANCE Adenovirus is a double-edged sword to humans - as a widespread pathogen and a bioengineering tool for anti-cancer and gene therapy. Atomic structure of the virus provides the basis for antiviral and application developments, but conflicting atomic models from conventional/film cryoEM and X-ray crystallography for important cement proteins IIIa, VIII, and IX have caused confusion. Using the cutting-edge cryoEM technology with electron counting, we improved the structure of human adenovirus type 5 and confirmed our

  3. Crystallization of the C-terminal head domain of the avian adenovirus CELO long fibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardado Calvo, Pablo [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L. [Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Langlois, Patrick [Agence Francaise de Securité Sanitaire des Aliments, Unité Génétique Virale et Biosecurité, Site Les Croix, BP 53, F-22440 Ploufragan (France); Raaij, Mark J. van, E-mail: vanraaij@usc.es [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-05-01

    Avian adenovirus long-fibre head trimers were expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°). A complete highly redundant data set was collected to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source. Avian adenovirus CELO contains two different fibres: fibre 1, the long fibre, and fibre 2, the short fibre. The short fibre is responsible for binding to an unknown avian receptor and is essential for infection of birds. The long fibre is not essential, but is known to bind the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor protein. Both trimeric fibres are attached to the same penton base, of which each icosahedral virus contains 12 copies. The short fibre extends straight outwards, while the long fibre emerges at an angle. The carboxy-terminal amino acids 579–793 of the avian adenovirus long fibre have been expressed with an amino-terminal hexahistidine tag and the expressed trimeric protein has been purified by nickel-affinity chromatography and crystallized. Crystals were grown at low pH using PEG 10 000 as precipitant and belonged to space group C2. The crystals diffracted rotating-anode Cu Kα radiation to at least 1.9 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected from a single crystal to 2.2 Å resolution. Unit-cell parameters were a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°, suggesting one trimer per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of 46%. The long fibre head does not have significant sequence homology to any other protein of known structure and molecular-replacement attempts with known fibre-head structures were unsuccessful. However, a map calculated using SIRAS phasing shows a clear trimer with a shape similar to known adenovirus fibre-head structures. Structure solution is in progress.

  4. Neuronal and glial cell type-specific promoters within adenovirus recombinants restrict the expression of the apoptosis-inducing molecule Fas ligand to predetermined brain cell types, and abolish peripheral liver toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, A E; Larregina, A T; Smith-Arica, J; Dewey, R A; Southgate, T D; Ambar, B; Fontana, A; Castro, M G; Lowenstein, P R

    1999-03-01

    Gene therapy using Fas ligand (FasL) for treatment of tumours and protection of transplant rejection is hampered because of the systemic toxicity of FasL. In the present study, recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (RAds) encoding FasL under the control of either the neuronal-specific neuronal-specific enolase (NSE) promoter or the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter have been constructed. The cell type-specific expression of FasL in both neurons and glial cells in primary cultures, and in neuronal and glial cell lines is demonstrated. Furthermore, transgene expression driven by the neuronal and glial promoter was not detected in fibroblastic or epithelial cell lines. Expression of FasL driven by a major immediate early human cytomegalovirus promoter (MIEhCMV) was, however, achieved in all cells tested. As a final test of the stringency of transgene-specific expression, the RAds were injected directly into the bloodstream of mice. The RAds encoding FasL under the control of the non-cell type-specific MIEhCMV promoter induced acute generalized liver haemorrhage with hepatocyte apoptosis, while the RAds containing the NSE or GFAP promoter sequences were completely non-toxic. This demonstrates the specificity of transgene expression, enhanced safety during systemic administration, and tightly regulated control of transgene expression of highly cytotoxic gene products, encoded within transcriptionally targeted RAds.

  5. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, Benjamin C; Rowe, Laurence D; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Glick, David I; Baymuradov, Ulugbek K; Malladi, Venkat S; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Gabdank, Idan; Narayana, Aditi K; Onate, Kathrina C; Hilton, Jason; Ho, Marcus C; Lee, Brian T; Miyasato, Stuart R; Dreszer, Timothy R; Sloan, Cricket A; Strattan, J Seth; Tanaka, Forrest Y; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC) for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database) and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data) has been released as a separate Python package.

  6. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Hitz

    Full Text Available The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data has been released as a separate Python package.

  7. Construction and immunogenicity of replication-competent adenovirus 5 host range mutant recombinants expressing HIV-1 gp160 of SF162 and TV1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidajat, Rachmat; Kuate, Seraphin; Venzon, David; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi; Kalisz, Irene; Treece, James; Lian, Ying; Barnett, Susan W; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2010-05-21

    An HIV Env immunogen capable of eliciting broad immunity is critical for a successful vaccine. We constructed and characterized adenovirus 5 host range mutant (Ad5hr) recombinants encoding HIV(SF162) gp160 (subtype B) and HIV(TV1) gp160 (subtype C). Immunization of mice with one or both induced cellular immunity to subtype B and C peptides by ELISpot, and antibody responses with high binding titers to HIV Env of subtypes A, B, C, and E. Notably, Ad5hr-HIV(TV1) gp160 induced better cellular immunity than Ad5hr-HIV(SF162) gp160, either alone or following co-administration. Thus, the TV1 Env recombinant alone may be sufficient for eliciting immune responses against both subtype B and C envelopes. Further studies of Ad5hr-HIV(TV1) gp160 in rhesus macaques will evaluate the suitability of this insert for a future phase I clinical trial using a replication-competent Ad4 vector. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Gene therapy targeting hepatocellular carcinoma by a dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus harboring the focal adhesion kinase shRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Zhu, Yayun; Huang, Xinyu; Ai, Kaixing; Zheng, Qi; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy (CTGVT) approach has become a hotspot and a trend in the field of cancer biotherapy and oncolytic adenovirus is an ideal vector to carry the targeting genes. In this study, we used human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter to control the adenovirus early region 1a (E1A) and the human α-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter integrated with hypoxia response element (HRE) to control the adenovirus early region 1b (E1B). Then the novel double-regulated adenovirus Ad-hTERT-HREAF (named SG505) was engineered. The short-hairpin RNA against focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was inserted into SG505 and thus forming Ad-hTERT-HREAF-shRNA (called SG505‑siFAK). Then various oncolytic adenoviruses were examined to verify whether they could suppress liver cancer cells selectively and efficiently both in vitro and in vivo. Both replicative and replication-defective adenoviruses carrying FAK-shRNA significantly inhibited the expression of FAK in Hep3B and SMMC-7721 cell lines and efficiently suppressed the growth of liver cancer cell lines with minor effect to normal cells. Furthermore, the recombined oncolytic adenoviruses, SG505-siFAK, SG505-EGFP and SG505 were able to selectively propagate in AFP-positive liver cancer cells in vitro and the SG505-siFAK efficiently suppressed the expression of FAK. SG505-siFAK showed the most potent tumor inhibition capability among the three recombined adenovirus with IC50 levels of 0.092±0.009 and 0.424±0.414 pfu/cell in the Hep3B and HepG2 cell line, respectively. Animal experiment further confirmed that SG505-siFAK achieved the most significant tumor inhibition of Hep3B liver cancer xenografted growth by intratumoral injection comparing to the intravenous injection among the three recombined viruses. Immunohistochemical results indicated that FAK expression was downregulated significantly in the tumors treated with SG505-siFAK. The dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus SG505-siFAK was proven to inhibit the

  9. Characteristics of adenovirus urethritis among heterosexual men and men who have sex with men: a review of clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaraweera, Geethani R; Garcia, Katherine; Druce, Julian; Williams, Henrietta; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Fairley, Christopher K; Chow, Eric Pf; Denham, Ian M; Read, Timothy R H; Chen, Marcus Y

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the clinical features of adenovirus urethritis in men and to compare the frequency of these between heterosexual men and men who have sex with men (MSM). This was a review of the clinical and laboratory information from men diagnosed with PCR-confirmed adenovirus urethritis at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between January 2006 and April 2014. 102 adenovirus urethritis cases were reported, among which 61 were heterosexual men and 41 MSM. Eighty-nine per cent (n=91) had signs of meatitis or conjunctivitis: 51% had meatitis only; 32% meatitis together with conjunctivitis and 6% with conjunctivitis only. The distribution of symptoms and signs was similar among heterosexual men and MSM (p values >0.1). Adenovirus was the sole pathogen found in 93% of cases, excluding gonorrhoea, chlamydia, Mycoplasma genitalium and herpes simplex virus. Only 37% had ≥5 polymorphs per high-power field from a urethral smear. Where samples were still available for adenoviral sequencing (n=20), all were subgroup D. The clinical features of adenovirus urethritis in men can be distinctive and aid diagnosis, distinguishing it from other treatable causes of male urethritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. [Adenovirus mediated expression of recombinant human single chain interleukin-27(rhscIL-27) fusion gene in hepatoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-gang; Zhang, Ya-qing; Ye, Wan; Zou, Qiang; Chen, Wei; Jin, Hong; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Shao-lan

    2010-06-01

    To explore the adenovirus mediated expression of recombinant human single chain interleukin-27(rhscIL-27) fusion gene in hepatoma cells. The rhscIL-27 fusion gene was subcloned into the shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CMV and then clone the homologous recombinant adenovirus genomic plasmid pAdEasy in bacteria. The identified recombinant plasmid AdIL-27 was tranfected into 293 cells, and then the adenovirus did the package and amplification. The HepG2 cells were infected with AdIL-27 and the target gene expression was determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. The biological activity of rhscIL-27 was detected by IFN-gamma inducing assay. Restriction endonuclease and gene sequencing confirmed that the recombinant adenovirus vector of rhscIL-27 fusion gene was successfully constructed. The expression of rhscIL-27 fusion gene was observed at 48 h after the transfection of the HepG2 cells with AdIL-27. The IFN-gamma inducing assay showed that the rhscIL-27 protein has the ability inducing IFN-gamma secretion. By using adenovirus expression system, rhscIL-27 fusion gene with biological activity is expressed successfully in hepatoma cells. This experiment laid a foundation for gene therapy of hepatoma with IL-27.

  11. Sulawesi tortoise adenovirus-1 in two impressed tortoises (Manouria impressa) and a Burmese star tortoise (Geochelone platynota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Vanessa L; Innis, Charles J; Garner, Michael M; Risatti, Guillermo R; Nordhausen, Robert W; Gilbert-Marcheterre, Kelly; Wellehan, James F X; Childress, April L; Frasca, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    Sulawesi tortoise adenovirus-1 (STAdV-1) is a newly discovered virus infecting endangered and threatened tortoises. It was initially described from a confiscated group of 105 Sulawesi tortoises (Indotestudo forsteni) obtained by the Turtle Survival Alliance and distributed to five sites with available veterinary care across the United States. In a 3-yr period from the initial outbreak, one multi-species collection that rehabilitated and housed adenovirus-infected Sulawesi tortoises experienced deaths in impressed tortoises (Manouria impressa) and a Burmese star tortoise (Geochelone platynota). Impressed tortoises that died had evidence of systemic viral infection with histopathologic features of adenovirus. Adenovirus was identified by consensus nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing and subsequent sequencing of PCR products. Sequencing indicated that the adenovirus infecting these impressed tortoises and Burmese star tortoise was STAdV-1. In one impressed tortoise, viral infection was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. In situ hybridization using a semiautomated protocol and fluorescein-labeled riboprobe identified STAdV-1 inclusions in spleen, liver, kidney, and testis of one impressed tortoise. The impact of this virus on captive and wild populations of tortoises is unknown; however, these findings indicate that STAdV-1 can be transmitted to and can infect other tortoise species, the impressed tortoise and Burmese star tortoise, when cohabitated with infected Sulawesi tortoises.

  12. Mutation of the fiber shaft heparan sulphate binding site of a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus reduces liver tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anniina Koski

    Full Text Available Natural tropism to the liver is a major obstacle in systemic delivery of adenoviruses in cancer gene therapy. Adenovirus binding to soluble coagulation factors and to cellular heparan sulphate proteoglycans via the fiber shaft KKTK domain are suggested to cause liver tropism. Serotype 5 adenovirus constructs with mutated KKTK regions exhibit liver detargeting, but they also transduce tumors less efficiently, possibly due to altered fiber conformation. We constructed Ad5/3lucS*, a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus with a mutated KKTK region. The fiber knob swap was hypothesized to facilitate tumor transduction. This construct was studied with or without additional coagulation factor ablation. Ad5/3lucS* exhibited significantly reduced transduction of human hepatic cells in vitro and mouse livers in vivo. Combination of coagulation factor ablation by warfarinization to Ad5/3lucS* seemed to further enhance liver detargeting. Cancer cell transduction by Ad5/3lucS* was retained in vitro. In vivo, viral particle accumulation in M4A4-LM3 xenograft tumors was comparable to controls, but Ad5/3lucS* transgene expression was nearly abolished. Coagulation factor ablation did not affect tumor transduction. These studies set the stage for further investigations into the effects of the KKTK mutation and coagulation factor ablation in the context of 5/3 serotype chimerism. Of note, the putative disconnect between tumor transduction and transgene expression could prove useful in further understanding of adenovirus biology.

  13. Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-22

    AFRL-RH-WP-TP-2017-0001 Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain- Machine Interface Eduardo Chichilnisky Leland Stanford Junior...Oct 2016 – 30 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain- Machine Interface 5b...required. First, we developed novel models of retinal encoding that improve upon the state of the art, by using machine learning methods to

  14. Detection, typing and subtyping of enteric adenoviruses 40 and 41 in fecal samples, and observation of changing incidences of infections with these types and subtypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Jong (Jan); K. Bijlsma (Klaas); A.G. Wermenbol; M.W. Verweij-Uijterwaal; H.G.A.M. van der Avoort (Harrie); D.J. Wood; A.S. Bailey (Andrew); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal antibody (MAb) preparations specific for the enteric adenoviruses of subgenus F (AdF) were generated and evaluated as typing reagents in virus neutralization tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). A panel of 11 genome types of adenovirus 40 (Ad40), 24 genome

  15. The ENCODE project: missteps overshadowing a success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sean R

    2013-04-08

    Two clichés of science journalism have now played out around the ENCODE project. ENCODE's publicity first presented a misleading "all the textbooks are wrong" narrative about noncoding human DNA. Now several critiques of ENCODE's narrative have been published, and one was so vitriolic that it fueled "undignified academic squabble" stories that focused on tone more than substance. Neither story line does justice to our actual understanding of genomes, to ENCODE's results, or to the role of big science in biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Encoder designed to work in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toop, L.

    2007-05-15

    Dynapar has developed the Acuro AX71 absolute encoder for use on offshore or land-based oil rig operations. It provides feedback on the operation of automated systems such as draw works, racking systems, rotary tables and top drives. By ensuring that automated systems function properly, this encoder responds to a need by the oil and gas industry to keep workers safe and improve efficiency, particularly for operations in rugged situations. The encoder provides feedback from motor systems to controllers, giving information about position and speed of downhole drill bits. This newly developed encoder is better than commonly used incremental encoders which are not precise in strong electrical noise environments. Rather, the absolute encoder uses a different method of reporting to the controller. A digital signal is transmitted constantly as the device operates. It is less susceptible to noise issues. It is highly accurate, tolerant of noise and is not affected by power outages. However, the absolute encoder is generally more delicate in drilling applications with high ambient temperatures and shock levels. Dynapar addressed this issue by developing compact stainless steel housing that is useful for corrosion resistance in marine applications. The AX71 absolute encoder can withstand up to 100 G of mechanical shock and ambient temperatures of up to 60 degrees C. The encoder is ATEX certified without barriers, and offers the high resolution feedback of 4,000 counts of multiturn rotation and 16,000 counts of position. 1 fig.

  17. Universal dynamic goniometer for rotary encoders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Nikolai V.; Latyev, Svjatoslav M.; Naumova, Anastasiia I.

    2017-06-01

    A novel dynamic goniometer for the accuracy of rotary encoders has been developed on the base of the method of comparison with the reference encoder. The set-up of the goniometer considers all constructive and informative characteristics of measured encoders. The novel goniometer construction uses the new compensating method of instrumental errors in automatic working process. The advantages of the dynamic goniometer in combination with an optical rotary encoder at the reduction of the measuring time and a simultaneous increase of the accuracy.

  18. Regulation of the Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression is dependent on cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anurag; Xu, Yaqin; Sung, Biin; Vincent, C Theresa; Worgall, Tilla; Worgall, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), in addition to serving as viral receptor, is a component of tight junctions and plays an important role in tissue homeostasis. Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) in lung epithelial cells are linked to inflammation and susceptibility for respiratory tract infections. Here, we demonstrate that CAR expression and infectivity with adenovirus (Ad) are increased in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells. Inhibition of CFTR or histone deacetylase (HDAC) enhanced CAR expression while CFTR overexpression or restoration of the diminished HDAC activity in cystic fibrosis cells reduced CAR expression. This connects the CFTR to CAR expression and infectivity with adenovirus through HDAC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Recombinant mammaglobin A adenovirus-infected dendritic cells induce mammaglobin A-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes against breast cancer cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixia Cui

    Full Text Available Mammaglobin A (MGBA is a novel breast cancer-associated antigen almost exclusively over-expressed in primary and metastatic human breast cancers, making it a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer. The development of dendritic cell (DC-induced tumor antigen specific CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs may hold promise in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we constructed recombinant replication-defective adenoviral (Ad vectors encoding MGBA and evaluated their ability to trigger anti-tumor immunity in vitro. DCs were isolated from the human peripheral blood monocyte cells (PBMCs of two HLA-A33(+ healthy female volunteers, and infected with adenovirus carrying MGBA cDNA (Ad-MGBA. After that, the Ad-MGBA-infected DCs were used to stimulate CD8(+ CTLs in vitro and the latter was used for co-culture with breast cancer cell lines. The data revealed that infection with Ad-MGBA improved DC maturation and up-regulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and the secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12, but down-regulated interleukin-10 (IL-10 secretion from DCs. Ad-MGBA-infected DC-stimulated CD8(+CTLs displayed the highest cytotoxicity towards HLA-A33(+/MGBA(+ breast cancer MDA-MB-415 cells compared with other CD8(+CTL populations, and compared with the cytotoxicity towards HLA-A33(-/MGBA(+ breast cancer HBL-100 cells and HLA-A33(-/MGBA(- breast cancer MDA-MB 231 cells. In addition, Ad-MGBA-infected DC-stimulated CD8(+ CTLs showed a high level of IFNγ secretion when stimulated with HLA-A33(+/MGBA(+ breast cancer MDA-MB-415 cells, but not when stimulated with HLA-A33(-/MGBA(+ HBL-100 and HLA-A33(-/MGBA(-MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, killing of CD8(+CTLs against breast cancer was in a major histocompability complex (MHC-limited pattern. Finally, the data also determined the importance of TNF-α in activating DCs and T cells. These data together suggest that MGBA recombinant adenovirus-infected DCs could induce specific anti-tumor immunity

  20. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor is a modifier of cardiac conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Roos F J; Bezzina, Connie R; Freiberg, Fabian; Verkerk, Arie O; Adriaens, Michiel E; Podliesna, Svitlana; Chen, Chen; Purfürst, Bettina; Spallek, Bastian; Koopmann, Tamara T; Baczko, Istvan; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G; George, Alfred L; Bishopric, Nanette H; Lodder, Elisabeth M; de Bakker, Jacques M T; Fischer, Robert; Coronel, Ruben; Wilde, Arthur A M; Gotthardt, Michael; Remme, Carol Ann

    2014-02-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the modulatory effect of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on ventricular conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia. A heritable component in the risk of ventricular fibrillation during myocardial infarction has been well established. A recent genome-wide association study of ventricular fibrillation during acute myocardial infarction led to the identification of a locus on chromosome 21q21 (rs2824292) in the vicinity of the CXADR gene. CXADR encodes the CAR, a cell adhesion molecule predominantly located at the intercalated disks of the cardiomyocyte. The correlation between CAR transcript levels and rs2824292 genotype was investigated in human left ventricular samples. Electrophysiological studies and molecular analyses were performed using CAR haploinsufficient (CAR⁺/⁻) mice. In human left ventricular samples, the risk allele at the chr21q21 genome-wide association study locus was associated with lower CXADR messenger ribonucleic acid levels, suggesting that decreased cardiac levels of CAR predispose to ischemia-induced ventricular fibrillation. Hearts from CAR⁺/⁻ mice displayed slowing of ventricular conduction in addition to an earlier onset of ventricular arrhythmias during the early phase of acute myocardial ischemia after ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Expression and distribution of connexin 43 were unaffected, but CAR⁺/⁻ hearts displayed increased arrhythmia susceptibility on pharmacological electrical uncoupling. Patch-clamp analysis of isolated CAR⁺/⁻ myocytes showed reduced sodium current magnitude specifically at the intercalated disk. Moreover, CAR coprecipitated with NaV1.5 in vitro, suggesting that CAR affects sodium channel function through a physical interaction with NaV1.5. CAR is a novel modifier of ventricular conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Genetic determinants of arrhythmia

  1. Dual effects of adenovirus-mediated thrombopoietin gene transfer on hepatic oval cell proliferation and platelet counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiba, Miho; Shimomura, Takashi; Murai, Rie; Hashiguchi, Koichi; Saeki, Toshiya; Yoshida, Yoko; Kanbe, Takamasa; Tanabe, Naotada; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Miura, Norimasa; Tajima, Fumihito; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Shiota, Goshi

    2005-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the growth factor for megakaryocytes and platelets, however, it also acts as a potent regulator of stem cell proliferation. To examine the significance of TPO expression in proliferation of hepatic oval cells, the effect of adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer into livers of the Solt-Farber model, which mimics the condition where liver regeneration is impaired, was examined. Hepatic TPO mRNA peaked its expression at 2 days after gene transduction and then gradually decreased. The peripheral platelet number began to increase at 4 days (P < 0.05) and reached its plateau at 9 days (P < 0.01). Oval cells expressed c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO as well as immature hematopoietic and hepatocytic surface markers such as CD34 and AFP. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive oval cells in rats into which adenovirus-TPO gene was transferred at 7 and 9 days were significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each), and the total numbers of oval cells in the adenovirus-TPO gene transferred at 9 and 13 days were also significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each). Expression of SCF protein was increased at 4, 7, and 9 days by TPO gene administration and that of c-Kit was increased at 4 and 7 days. These data suggest that adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer stimulated oval cell proliferation in liver as well as increasing peripheral platelet counts, emphasizing the significance of the TPO/c-Mpl system in proliferation of hepatic oval cells

  2. 47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... encoder programming shall be protected by a lock or other security measures and be configured so that... for either manual or automatic operation. (2) Inputs. The encoder shall have two inputs, one for audio... initiating the automatic generation of the simultaneous tones shall be protected to prevent accidental...

  3. Effects of diazepam on encoding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, M.; Eling, P.; Luijtelaar, G. van; Coenen, A.

    1995-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are known to induce amnesic effects. To specify these effects more precisely, 40 healthy volunteers were given 15 mg diazepam or placebo. Effects on a chain of encoding operations were investigated: activation of memory representations, spreading of activation, semantic encoding and

  4. Virotherapy targeting cyclin E overexpression in tumors with adenovirus-enhanced cancer-selective promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Duan, Xiaoxian; Li, Xiao-Feng; Egger, Michael E; McMasters, Kelly M; Zhou, H Sam

    2015-02-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy can selectively destroy cancer cells and is a potential approach in cancer treatment. A strategy to increase tumor-specific selectivity is to control the expression of a key regulatory viral gene with a tumor-specific promoter. We have previously found that cyclin E expression is augmented in cancer cells after adenovirus (Ad) infection. Thus, the cyclin E promoter that is further activated by Ad in cancer cells may have unique properties for enhancing oncolytic viral replication. We have shown that high levels of viral E1a gene expression are achieved in cancer cells infected with Ad-cycE, in which the endogenous Ad E1a promoter was replaced with the cyclin E promoter. Ad-cycE shows markedly selective oncolytic efficacy in vitro and destroys various types of cancer cells, including those resistant to ONYX-015/dl1520. Furthermore, Ad-cycE shows a strong capacity to repress A549 xenograft tumor growth in nude mice and significantly prolongs survival. This study suggests the potential of Ad-cycE in cancer therapy and indicates the advantages of using promoters that can be upregulated by virus infection in cancer cells in development of oncolytic viruses. Key messages: Cyclin E promoter activity is high in cancer cells and enhanced by adenovirus infection. Cyclin E promoter is used to control the E1a gene of a tumor-specific oncolytic adenovirus. Ad-cycE efficiently targets cancer cells and induces oncolysis. Ad-cycE significantly repressed xenograft tumor and prolonged survival.

  5. Construction and characterization of calreticulin-HBsAg fusion gene recombinant adenovirus expression vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chun-Ling; Wang, Gui-Bin; Gu, Run-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2010-06-28

    To generate recombinant adenoviral vector containing calreticulin (CRT)-hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) fusion gene for developing a safe, effective and HBsAg-specific therapeutic vaccine. CRT and HBsAg gene were fused using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), endonuclease digestion and ligation methods. The fusion gene was cloned into pENTR/D-TOPO transfer vector after the base pairs of DNA (CACC) sequence was added to the 5' end. Adenoviral expression vector containing CRT-HBsAg fusion gene was constructed by homologous recombinantion. The human embryo kidney (HEK) 293A cells were transfected with linearized DNA plasmid of the recombinant adenoviral vector to package and amplify recombinant adenovirus. The recombinant adenovirus titer was characterized using the end-dilution assay. The expression of the CRT/HBsAg fusion protein in Ad-CRT/HBsAg infected 293A cells was detected by Western blotting. The CRT-HBsAg fusion gene was characterized by PCR and sequencing and its length and sequence were confirmed to be accurate. The CRT-HBsAg fusion gene recombinant pENTR/D-TOPO transfer vector was constructed. The recombinant adenoviral vector, Ad-CRT/HBsAg, was generated successfully. The titer of Ad-CRT/HBsAg was characterized as 3.9 x 10(11) pfu/mL. The CRT-HBsAg fusion protein was expressed by HEK 293A cells correctly. CRT/HBsAg fusion gene recombinant replication-defective adenovirus expression vector is constructed successfully and this study has provided an experimental basis for further studies of Hepatitis B virus gene therapy.

  6. ENDEMIC INFECTION OF STRANDED SOUTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS NEREIS) WITH NOVEL PARVOVIRUS, POLYOMAVIRUS, AND ADENOVIRUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Juliana D; Ng, Terry F; Miller, Melissa; Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Dodd, Erin; Batac, Francesca; Delwart, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Over the past century, the southern sea otter (SSO; Enhydra lutris nereis) population has been slowly recovering from near extinction due to overharvest. The SSO is a threatened subspecies under federal law and a fully protected species under California law, US. Through a multiagency collaborative program, stranded animals are rehabilitated and released, while deceased animals are necropsied and tissues are cryopreserved to facilitate scientific study. Here, we processed archival tissues to enrich particle-associated viral nucleic acids, which we randomly amplified and deeply sequenced to identify viral genomes through sequence similarities. Anelloviruses and endogenous retroviral sequences made up over 50% of observed viral sequences. Polyomavirus, parvovirus, and adenovirus sequences made up most of the remaining reads. We characterized and phylogenetically analyzed the full genome of sea otter polyomavirus 1 and the complete coding sequence of sea otter parvovirus 1 and found that the closest known viruses infect primates and domestic pigs ( Sus scrofa domesticus), respectively. We tested archived tissues from 69 stranded SSO necropsied over 14 yr (2000-13) by PCR. Polyomavirus, parvovirus, and adenovirus infections were detected in 51, 61, and 29% of examined animals, respectively, with no significant increase in frequency over time, suggesting endemic infection. We found that 80% of tested SSO were infected with at least one of the three DNA viruses, whose tissue distribution we determined in 261 tissue samples. Parvovirus DNA was most frequently detected in mesenteric lymph node, polyomavirus DNA in spleen, and adenovirus DNA in multiple tissues (spleen, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph node, lung, and liver). This study describes the virome in tissues of a threatened species and shows that stranded SSO are frequently infected with multiple viruses, warranting future research to investigate associations between these infections and observed lesions.

  7. Epidemiology of adenovirus respiratory infections among hospitalized children in Seremban, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong Ng, Khuen; Kee Tan, Kah; Hong Ng, Boon; Nair, Pritiss; Ying Gan, Wan

    2015-07-01

    There is scarcity of data regarding epidemiology and clinical aspects of human adenovirus acute respiratory infection (ARI) among children in developing countries. Retrospective data on demographics, clinical presentation, outcomes and laboratory findings of 116 children admitted into Tuanku Jaafar Hospital in Seremban, Malaysia from 2012 to 2013 with documented diagnosis of community-acquired adenovirus ARI were collected and analyzed. Male to female ratio was 1.70. Median age was 14 (1-107) months. The commonest symptoms were fever (94.8%; 110/116), cough (82.8%, 96), rhinorrhea (63.8%; 74), interrupted feeding (66.4%; 77), diarrhea (33.6%; 39) and conjunctivitis (21.6%; 25). Mean temperature on admission was 38.4°C±0.9°C. Among all 116 subjects, 20.7% (24) needed oxygen supplementation, 57.8% (67) required intravenous hydration, 11.2% (13) were admitted into the pediatric intensive care unit and 6.9% (8) required mechanical ventilation. Only 1% (1/87) had positive blood culture (Streptococcus pneumoniae) among 87 who received antibiotic treatment. Case fatality rate was 2.6% (3/116) and 1.7% (2/116) developed bronchiolitis obliterans. Median length of hospital stay was 4 (1-50) days. Adenovirus ARI caused significant morbidity and substantial resource utilization among hospitalized Malaysian children. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants below two years presenting with ARI associated with high fever. Antibiotics should not be prescribed as secondary bacterial infections are uncommon. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Avian Adenoviruses Infections with Special Attention to Inclusion Body Hepatitis/ Hydropericardium Syndrome and Egg Drop Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafez Mohamed Hafez*

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The first avian adenovirus (AAV associated with clinical disease was isolated from an outbreak of respiratory disease in quail in 1950 (Olson, 1950. Since that time, AAVs have been found in all types and breeds of chickens and from a variety of other avian species. The infections may be asymptomatic or associated with several clinical and pathological conditions. Vertical transmission via the egg is the most common way of transmission. Also horizontal transmission through faeces, contaminated egg trays, crates and trucks play a role in the infection route. Studies have demonstrated the presence of antibodies in healthy poultry, and viruses have been isolated from normal birds. Avian adenoviruses in chickens are the etiological agents of 2 diseases known as inclusion body hepatitis (IBH and hydropericardium syndrome (HP. In some cases each condition is observed separately, however, recently the 2 conditions have frequently been observed as a single entity; therefore, the name hepatitis hydropericardium has been widely used to describe the pathologic condition. The syndrome is an acute disease of young chickens associated with anemia, haemorrhagic disorders, hydropericardium and high mortality. Egg-Drop-Syndrome (EDS is caused also by an adenovirus. The disease is characterised by a severe drop in egg production as well as the production of shell-less, thin-shelled, discoloured or misshapen eggs in apparently healthy birds. Ducks and geese are the natural host of the EDS virus. It was first described in chickens in the 1970s and spread to several countries world wide. The birds usually do not show any other signs of disease, and mortality is not expected. There is no specific treatment of the AAV infections. Active immunization by vaccination using an inactivated is wide spread.

  9. Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor expression in human endometrial adenocarcinoma: possible clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Costas T; Zarros, Apostolos C; Papaefthymiou, Maria A; Papadopouli, Aikaterini E; Sfiniadakis, Ioannis K; Theocharis, Stamatios E

    2008-01-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a crucial receptor for the entry of both coxsackie B viruses and adenoviruses into host cells. CAR expression on tumor cells was reported to be associated with their sensitivity to adenoviral infection, while it was considered as a surrogate marker for monitoring and/or predicting the outcome of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of CAR expression in endometrial adenocarcinoma. CAR expression was assessed immunohistochemically in tumoral samples of 41 endometrial adenocarcinoma patients and was statistically analyzed in relation to various clinicopathological parameters, tumor proliferative capacity and patient survival. CAR positivity was noted in 23 out of 41 (56%) endometrial adenocarcinoma cases, while high CAR expression in 8 out of 23 (35%) positive ones. CAR intensity of immunostaining was classified as mild in 11 (48%), moderate in 10 (43%) and intense in 2 (9%) out of the 23 positive cases. CAR positivity was significantly associated with tumor histological grade (p = 0.036), as well differentiated tumors more frequently demonstrating no CAR expression. CAR staining intensity was significantly associated with tumor histological type (p = 0.016), as tumors possessing squamous elements presented more frequently intense CAR immunostaining. High CAR expression showed a trend to be correlated with increased tumor proliferative capacity (p = 0.057). Patients with tumors presenting moderate or intense CAR staining intensity were characterized by longer survival times than those with mild one; however, this difference did not reach statistical significance. These data reveal, for the first time, the expression of CAR in clinical material obtained from patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma in relation to important clinicopathological parameters for their management. As CAR appears to modulate the proliferation and characteristics of cancer

  10. Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor expression in human endometrial adenocarcinoma: possible clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sfiniadakis Ioannis K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR is a crucial receptor for the entry of both coxsackie B viruses and adenoviruses into host cells. CAR expression on tumor cells was reported to be associated with their sensitivity to adenoviral infection, while it was considered as a surrogate marker for monitoring and/or predicting the outcome of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of CAR expression in endometrial adenocarcinoma. CAR expression was assessed immunohistochemically in tumoral samples of 41 endometrial adenocarcinoma patients and was statistically analyzed in relation to various clinicopathological parameters, tumor proliferative capacity and patient survival. CAR positivity was noted in 23 out of 41 (56% endometrial adenocarcinoma cases, while high CAR expression in 8 out of 23 (35% positive ones. CAR intensity of immunostaining was classified as mild in 11 (48%, moderate in 10 (43% and intense in 2 (9% out of the 23 positive cases. CAR positivity was significantly associated with tumor histological grade (p = 0.036, as well differentiated tumors more frequently demonstrating no CAR expression. CAR staining intensity was significantly associated with tumor histological type (p = 0.016, as tumors possessing squamous elements presented more frequently intense CAR immunostaining. High CAR expression showed a trend to be correlated with increased tumor proliferative capacity (p = 0.057. Patients with tumors presenting moderate or intense CAR staining intensity were characterized by longer survival times than those with mild one; however, this difference did not reach statistical significance. These data reveal, for the first time, the expression of CAR in clinical material obtained from patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma in relation to important clinicopathological parameters for their management. As CAR appears to modulate the proliferation and

  11. [A recombinant adenovirus vector carrying murine interleukin-21 gene controls chronic HBV infection in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue-Ping; Zhou, Yang; Zheng, Xin-Chun; Yi, Xuan; Tang, Li-Bo; Hou, Jin-Lin; Li, Yong-Yin

    2017-11-20

    To investigate the effect of an adenovirus vector containing murine interleukin-21 gene (Ad-GFP-mIL-21) in virus clearance and on the production of HBV-specific antibodies in mice with persistent HBV infection. ELISA and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of mIL-21 in the supernatant and cytoplasm of cultured HepG2.2.15 cells after infection by Ad-GFP-mIL-21. Mouse models of chronic HBV infection established by in vivo transduction with rAAV8-1.3HBV were divided into 3 groups for treatment 12 weeks later with injection of Ad-GFP-mIL-21, GFP recombinant adenovirus or PBS via the tail vein. Serum levels of HBsAg, HBsAb, HBcAb, and mIL-21 in the mice were detected using ELISA, and the expression of Ad-GFP-mIL-21 in the organs was observed by fluorescent microscopy at different time points after the injection. Ad-GFP-mIL-21 was capable of infecting HepG2.2.15 cells in vitro, and the levels of mIL-21 in the supernatant were correlated with the titers of adenovirus administered and the infection time. In the mice with persistent HBV infection, green fluorescence expression was observed almost exclusively in the liver on day 4 after injection of Ad-GFP-mIL21, and serum levels of IL-21 increased significantly compared with the level before treatment (PHBcAb was detected in the mice with Ad-GFP-mIL21 injection (PHBcAb production, suggesting its efficacy in controlling chronic HBV infection.

  12. Synergistic cytotoxicity against human tumor cell lines by oncolytic adenovirus dl1520 (ONYX-015) and melphalan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Peter J; Sykelyk, Alexander; Figueredo, Rene; Koropatnick, James

    2016-01-01

    In light of the need for more selective anticancer therapy, much work has been directed at developing compounds or biological agents that target functions specific to cancer cells. To this end, numerous viruses have been engineered to exploit the dependence of cancer cells on particular anomalies that contribute to their rogue proliferative activity, such as dysfunctional p53, overactive mitogenic signaling, or a defective interferon response. The oncolytic human adenovirus dl1520 (ONYX-015) was engineered to propagate specifically in p53-deficient tumors, which comprise over half of all tumors. Based on successes in clinical trials, the full potential of dl1520 and other oncolytic viruses may be even better realized by using them in combination with conventional chemotherapy drugs. As a model system in which to test this potential, representative cell lines from 2 common cancer types, oral squamous cell carcinoma (HN-5a) and colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29), were chosen, as well as platinum-drug-resistant variants of each. Following preliminary screening of virus and drug combinations, dl1520 and melphalan were found to synergistically inhibit proliferation of all the cancer cell lines. Melphalan pretreatment or cotreatment with dl1520 enhanced inhibition of proliferation by dl1520 by up to 60% and increased apoptosis by up to 25%. The tight-junction protein CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus receptor), via which adenovirus enters cells, was not upregulated by treatment with melphalan, suggesting that other mechanisms contribute to synergy. The synergy between melphalan and dl1520 suggests that tumor-selective cell killing by oncolytic viruses may be augmented by combining with cytotoxic drugs.

  13. Linker insertion mutations in the adenovirus preterminal protein that affect DNA replication activity in vivo and in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Fredman, J N; Pettit, S C; Horwitz, M S; Engler, J A

    1991-01-01

    Eighteen linker insertion mutants with mutations in the adenovirus precursor to terminal protein (pTP), which were originally constructed and tested in virions by Freimuth and Ginsberg (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:7816-7820, 1986), were transferred to expression plasmids for assay of the various functions of the isolated pTP. Function was measured by the ability of individual pTP mutant proteins to participate in the initiation of replication from an adenovirus DNA end, by their activity in...

  14. Severe conjunctivitis due to multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae and adenovirus 53 coinfection in a traveler returning from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Dennis; Mueller, Andreas; Weißbrich, Benedikt; Schubert, Jörg; Schargus, Marc; Stich, August

    2013-01-01

    A male traveler returning from Thailand with severe bilateral conjunctivitis was tested for causative pathogens by culture and polymerase chain reaction in late 2010. The culturally grown Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain was resistant against penicillin, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. The patient was also found to have an eye infection with the unusual and likely recombinant adenovirus type 53. Besides multidrug-resistant gonococcal strains the unusual adenovirus strain is found circulating in Asia and both pathogens may be a risk for travelers. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  15. The Arabic Diatessaron Project: Digitalizing, Encoding, Lemmatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Lancioni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arabic Diatessaron Project (henceforth ADP is an international research project in Digital Humanities that aims to collect, digitalise and encode all known manuscripts of the Arabic Diatessaron (henceforth AD, a text that has been relatively neglected in scholarly research. ADP’s final goal is to provide a number of tools that can enable scholars to effectively query, compare and investigate all known variants of the text that will be encoded as far as possible in compliance with the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI guidelines. The paper addresses a number of issues involved in the process of digitalising manuscripts included in the two existing editions (Ciasca 1888 and Marmardji 1935, adding variants in unedited manuscripts, encoding and lemmatising the text. Issues involved in the design of the ADP include presentation of variants, choice of the standard text, applicability of TEI guidelines, automatic translation between different encodings, cross-edition concordances and principles of lemmatisation.

  16. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Z Q; Greenberg, L; Ertl, H C; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-02-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The presence of enterovirus, adenovirus, and parvovirus B19 in myocardial tissue samples from autopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Hansen, Jakob; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-01-01

    of adenovirus, enterovirus, and parvovirus B19 (PVB) in myocardial autopsy samples from myocarditis related deaths and in non-inflamed control hearts in an effort to clarify their significance as the causes of myocarditis in a forensic material. METHODS: We collected all autopsy cases diagnosed with myocarditis...... of myocarditis. The detection of PVB in myocardial autopsy samples most likely represents a persistent infection with no or limited association with myocardial inflammation. The forensic investigation of myocardial inflammation demands a thorough examination, including special attention to non-viral causes...

  18. Isolation, identification, and complete genome sequence of a bovine adenovirus type 3 from cattle in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yuan-Mao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3 belongs to the Mastadenovirus genus of the family Adenoviridae and is involved in respiratory and enteric infections of calves. The isolation of BAV-3 has not been reported prior to this study in China. In 2009, there were many cases in cattle showing similar clinical signs to BAV-3 infection and a virus strain, showing cytopathic effect in Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells, was isolated from a bovine nasal swab collected from feedlot cattle in Heilongjiang Province, China. The isolate was confirmed as a bovine adenovirus type 3 by PCR and immunofluorescence assay, and named as HLJ0955. So far only the complete genome sequence of prototype of BAV-3 WBR-1 strain has been reported. In order to further characterize the Chinese isolate HLJ0955, the complete genome sequence of HLJ0955 was determined. Results The size of the genome of the Chinese isolate HLJ0955 is 34,132 nucleotides in length with a G+C content of 53.6%. The coding sequences for gene regions of HLJ0955 isolate were similar to the prototype of BAV-3 WBR-1 strain, with 80.0-98.6% nucleotide and 87.5-98.8% amino acid identities. The genome of HLJ0955 strain contains 16 regions and four deletions in inverted terminal repeats, E1B region and E4 region, respectively. The complete genome and DNA binding protein gene based phylogenetic analysis with other adenoviruses were performed and the results showed that HLJ0955 isolate belonged to BAV-3 and clustered within the Mastadenovirus genus of the family Adenoviridae. Conclusions This is the first study to report the isolation and molecular characterization of BAV-3 from cattle in China. The phylogenetic analysis performed in this study supported the use of the DNA binding protein gene of adenovirus as an appropriate subgenomic target for the classification of different genuses of the family Adenoviridae on the molecular basis. Meanwhile, a large-scale pathogen and serological epidemiological

  19. iTRAQ-Based and Label-Free Proteomics Approaches for Studies of Human Adenovirus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Trinh, Hung V.; Grossmann, Jonas; Gehrig, Peter; Roschitzki, Bernd; Schlapbach, Ralph; Greber, Urs F.; Hemmi, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Both isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and label-free methods are widely used for quantitative proteomics. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of these proteomics approaches based on large datasets from biological samples. iTRAQ-label-based and label-free quantitations were compared using protein lysate samples from noninfected human lung epithelial A549 cells and from cells infected for 24 h with human adenovirus type 3 or type 5. Either iTRAQ-label-based or lab...

  20. Respiratory disease caused by a species B2 adenovirus in a military camp in Turkey.

    OpenAIRE

    Chmielewicz, Barbara; Benzler, Justus; Pauli, Georg; Krause, Gérard; Bergmann, Frank; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2005-01-01

    In April 2004, two patients were admitted to hospital in Berlin, Germany, with clinical signs of acute respiratory infection after returning from a military exercise in their home country of Turkey. They were admitted to a high security infectious disease unit as epidemiological data pointed to an outbreak of unknown etiology. Samples taken at the time of admission proved to be strongly positive for Adenovirus by PCR, but negative for Influenza A/H1N1 virus, Influenza A/H3N2 virus, Influenza ...

  1. Hyperthermia enhances the reactivation of irradiated adenovirus in HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Piperakis, S. M.; McLennan, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The reactivation of U.V.-irradiated adenovirus 2 in HeLa cells is enhanced 8-9 fold if the cells are given a brief hyperthermic shock before infection. Maximum reactivation is achieved by heating for 10 min at 45.5 degrees C and with a delay of 36 h between heating and infection. The induction process requires protein synthesis only during the 3 h period immediately following heating; cycloheximide does not prevent the expression of enhanced reactivation if added to the cells after this time....

  2. Protection of Non-Human Primates against Rabies with an Adenovirus Recombinant Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H. C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  3. Comparative Studies on the Structure of Human Adenovirus Genomes 4, 7 and 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    8217 ends of Ad DNA most likely through a phosphodiester bond. Ambros and Baltimore and Rothberg et al. have shown that the 5’ end of poliovirus RNA is...V. Padmanabhan for growing the Adenovirus types 2 and 7. REFERENCES 1. Robinson, A.J., Younghusband, H.B. and Bellett, A.J.D. (1973) Violg 56, 54-69...all initiation events during Ad DNA replication. Initiation at the 3’ terminus of a displaced We thank Rai V. Padmanaban for growing the Ad7 and Adl2

  4. Multiple phenotypes in adult mice following inactivation of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (Car gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Pazirandeh

    Full Text Available To determine the normal function of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR, a protein found in tight junctions and other intercellular complexes, we constructed a mouse line in which the CAR gene could be disrupted at any chosen time point in a broad spectrum of cell types and tissues. All knockouts examined displayed a dilated intestinal tract and atrophy of the exocrine pancreas with appearance of tubular complexes characteristic of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The mice also exhibited a complete atrio-ventricular block and abnormal thymopoiesis. These results demonstrate that CAR exerts important functions in the physiology of several organs in vivo.

  5. Multiple phenotypes in adult mice following inactivation of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (Car) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazirandeh, Ahmad; Sultana, Taranum; Mirza, Momina; Rozell, Björn; Hultenby, Kjell; Wallis, Karin; Vennström, Björn; Davis, Ben; Arner, Anders; Heuchel, Rainer; Löhr, Matthias; Philipson, Lennart; Sollerbrant, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    To determine the normal function of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), a protein found in tight junctions and other intercellular complexes, we constructed a mouse line in which the CAR gene could be disrupted at any chosen time point in a broad spectrum of cell types and tissues. All knockouts examined displayed a dilated intestinal tract and atrophy of the exocrine pancreas with appearance of tubular complexes characteristic of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The mice also exhibited a complete atrio-ventricular block and abnormal thymopoiesis. These results demonstrate that CAR exerts important functions in the physiology of several organs in vivo.

  6. Isolation, identification, and complete genome sequence of a bovine adenovirus type 3 from cattle in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3) belongs to the Mastadenovirus genus of the family Adenoviridae and is involved in respiratory and enteric infections of calves. The isolation of BAV-3 has not been reported prior to this study in China. In 2009, there were many cases in cattle showing similar clinical signs to BAV-3 infection and a virus strain, showing cytopathic effect in Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells, was isolated from a bovine nasal swab collected from feedlot cattle in Heilongjiang Province, China. The isolate was confirmed as a bovine adenovirus type 3 by PCR and immunofluorescence assay, and named as HLJ0955. So far only the complete genome sequence of prototype of BAV-3 WBR-1 strain has been reported. In order to further characterize the Chinese isolate HLJ0955, the complete genome sequence of HLJ0955 was determined. Results The size of the genome of the Chinese isolate HLJ0955 is 34,132 nucleotides in length with a G+C content of 53.6%. The coding sequences for gene regions of HLJ0955 isolate were similar to the prototype of BAV-3 WBR-1 strain, with 80.0-98.6% nucleotide and 87.5-98.8% amino acid identities. The genome of HLJ0955 strain contains 16 regions and four deletions in inverted terminal repeats, E1B region and E4 region, respectively. The complete genome and DNA binding protein gene based phylogenetic analysis with other adenoviruses were performed and the results showed that HLJ0955 isolate belonged to BAV-3 and clustered within the Mastadenovirus genus of the family Adenoviridae. Conclusions This is the first study to report the isolation and molecular characterization of BAV-3 from cattle in China. The phylogenetic analysis performed in this study supported the use of the DNA binding protein gene of adenovirus as an appropriate subgenomic target for the classification of different genuses of the family Adenoviridae on the molecular basis. Meanwhile, a large-scale pathogen and serological epidemiological investigations for BVA-3

  7. ZEB1 limits adenoviral infectability by transcriptionally repressing the coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacher, Markus D; Shiina, Marisa; Chang, Peter; Keller, Debora; Tiirikainen, Maarit I; Korn, W Michael

    2011-07-27

    We have previously reported that RAS-MEK (Cancer Res. 2003 May 1;63(9):2088-95) and TGF-β (Cancer Res. 2006 Feb 1;66(3):1648-57) signaling negatively regulate coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) cell-surface expression and adenovirus uptake. In the case of TGF-β, down-regulation of CAR occurred in context of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process associated with transcriptional repression of E-cadherin by, for instance, the E2 box-binding factors Snail, Slug, SIP1 or ZEB1. While EMT is crucial in embryonic development, it has been proposed to contribute to the formation of invasive and metastatic carcinomas by reducing cell-cell contacts and increasing cell migration. Here, we show that ZEB1 represses CAR expression in both PANC-1 (pancreatic) and MDA-MB-231 (breast) human cancer cells. We demonstrate that ZEB1 physically associates with at least one of two closely spaced and conserved E2 boxes within the minimal CAR promoter here defined as genomic region -291 to -1 relative to the translational start ATG. In agreement with ZEB1's established role as a negative regulator of the epithelial phenotype, silencing its expression in MDA-MB-231 cells induced a partial Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition (MET) characterized by increased levels of E-cadherin and CAR, and decreased expression of fibronectin. Conversely, knockdown of ZEB1 in PANC-1 cells antagonized both the TGF-β-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and CAR and the reduction of adenovirus uptake. Interestingly, even though ZEB1 clearly contributes to the TGF-β-induced mesenchymal phenotype of PANC-1 cells, TGF-β did not seem to affect ZEB1's protein levels or subcellular localization. These findings suggest that TGF-β may inhibit CAR expression by regulating factor(s) that cooperate with ZEB1 to repress the CAR promoter, rather than by regulating ZEB1 expression levels. In addition to the negative E2 box-mediated regulation the minimal CAR promoter is positively regulated

  8. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Nenert

    Full Text Available Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA. All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN. Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  9. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2014-01-01

    Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA) with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA). All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions) and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN). Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s) of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  10. Encoding of coordination complexes with XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth, P; Sankar, P

    2017-09-01

    An in-silico system to encode structure, bonding and properties of coordination complexes is developed. The encoding is achieved through a semantic XML markup frame. Composition of the coordination complexes is captured in terms of central atom and ligands. Structural information of central atom is detailed in terms of electron status of valence electron orbitals. The ligands are encoded with specific reference to the electron environment of ligand centre atoms. Behaviour of ligands to form low or high spin complexes is accomplished by assigning a Ligand Centre Value to every ligand based on the electronic environment of ligand centre atom. Chemical ontologies are used for categorization purpose and to control different hybridization schemes. Complexes formed by the central atoms of transition metal, non-transition elements belonging to s-block, p-block and f-block are encoded with a generic encoding platform. Complexes of homoleptic, heteroleptic and bridged types are also covered by this encoding system. Utility of the encoded system to predict redox electron transfer reaction in the coordination complexes is demonstrated with a simple application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficient reverse time migration with amplitude encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Huazhong; Zhao, Lei; Shao, Yu; Wang, Meixia; Osen, Are

    2015-08-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is an accurate seismic imaging method for imaging the complex subsurface structure. Traditional common shot RTM suffers from low efficiency due to the large number of single shot gathers, especially for marine seismic data. Phase encoding is commonly used to reduce the computational cost of RTM. Phase encoding in the frequency domain is usually related to time shift in the time domain. Therefore, phase-encoding-based RTM needs time padding to avoid information loss which degrades the efficiency of the time-domain wavefield extrapolator. In this paper, an efficient time-domain RTM scheme based on the amplitude encoding is proposed. This scheme uses the orthogonal cosine basis as the encoding function, which has similar physical meaning to plane wave encoding (i.e. plane-wave components with different surface shooting angles). The proposed scheme can generate a qualified imaging result as well as common shot RTM but with less computational cost. Since this scheme does not need time padding, it is more efficient than the phase encoding schemes and can be conveniently implemented in the time domain. Numerical examples on the Sigsbee2a synthetic dataset demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  12. Immunoglobulin superfamily members encoded by viruses and their multiple roles in immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Domènec; Martínez-Vicente, Pablo; Engel, Pablo; Angulo, Ana

    2017-05-01

    Pathogens have developed a plethora of strategies to undermine host immune defenses in order to guarantee their survival. For large DNA viruses, these immune evasion mechanisms frequently rely on the expression of genes acquired from host genomes. Horizontally transferred genes include members of the immunoglobulin superfamily, whose products constitute the most diverse group of proteins of vertebrate genomes. Their promiscuous immunoglobulin domains, which comprise the building blocks of these molecules, are involved in a large variety of functions mediated by ligand-binding interactions. The flexible structural nature of the immunoglobulin domains makes them appealing targets for viral capture due to their capacity to generate high functional diversity. Here, we present an up-to-date review of immunoglobulin superfamily gene homologs encoded by herpesviruses, poxviruses, and adenoviruses, that include CD200, CD47, Fc receptors, interleukin-1 receptor 2, interleukin-18 binding protein, CD80, carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules, and signaling lymphocyte activation molecules. We discuss their distinct structural attributes, binding properties, and functions, shaped by evolutionary pressures to disarm specific immune pathways. We include several novel genes identified from extensive genome database surveys. An understanding of the properties and modes of action of these viral proteins may guide the development of novel immune-modulatory therapeutic tools. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Krömmelbein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production.

  14. Preclinical Safety Studies of Enadenotucirev, a Chimeric Group B Human-Specific Oncolytic Adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Illingworth

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Enadenotucirev is an oncolytic group B adenovirus identified by a process of bio-selection for the ability to selectively propagate in and rapidly kill carcinoma cells. It is resistant to inactivation by human blood components, potentially enabling intravenous dosing in patients with metastatic cancer. However, there are no known permissive animal models described for group B adenoviruses that could facilitate a conventional approach to preclinical safety studies. In this manuscript, we describe our tailored preclinical strategy designed to evaluate the key biological properties of enadenotucirev. As enadenotucirev does not replicate in animal cells, a panel of primary human cells was used to evaluate enadenotucirev replication selectivity in vitro, demonstrating that virus genome levels were >100-fold lower in normal cells relative to tumor cells. Acute intravenous tolerability in mice was used to assess virus particle-mediated toxicology and effects on innate immunity. These studies showed that particle toxicity could be ameliorated by dose fractionation, using an initial dose of virus to condition the host such that cytokine responses to subsequent doses were significantly attenuated. This, in turn, supported the initiation of a phase I intravenous clinical trial with a starting dose of 1 × 1010 virus particles given on days 1, 3, and 5.

  15. Comparison of Liver Detargeting Strategies for Systemic Therapy with Oncolytic Adenovirus Serotype 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien V. Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses would ideally be of use for systemic therapy to treat disseminated cancer. To do this safely, this may require multiple layers of cancer specificity. The pharmacology and specificity of oncolytic adenoviruses can be modified by (1 physical retargeting, (2 physical detargeting, (3 chemical shielding, or (4 by modifying the ability of viral early gene products to selectively activate in cancer versus normal cells. We explored the utility of these approaches with oncolytic adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 in immunocompetent Syrian hamsters bearing subcutaneous HaK tumors. After a single intravenous injection to reach the distant tumors, the physically hepatocyte-detargeted virus Ad5-hexon-BAP was more effective than conditionally replicating Ad5-dl1101/07 with mutations in its E1A protein. When these control or Ad5 treated animals were treated a second time by intratumoral injection, prior exposure to Ad5 did not affect tumor growth, suggesting that anti-Ad immunity neither prevented treatment nor amplified anti-tumor immune responses. Ad5-dl1101/07 was next chemically shielded with polyethylene glycol (PEG. While 5 kDa of PEG blunted pro-inflammatory IL-6 production induced by Ad5-dl1101/07, this shielding reduced Ad oncolytic activity.

  16. A recombinant E1-deleted porcine adenovirus-3 as an expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhartchouk, Alexander; Zhou Yan; Tikoo, Suresh Kumar

    2003-01-01

    Replication-defective E1-deleted porcine adenoviruses (PAVs) are attractive vectors for vaccination. As a prerequisite for generating PAV-3 vectors containing complete deletion of E1, we transfected VIDO R1 cells (fetal porcine retina cells transformed with E1 region of human adenovirus 5) with a construct containing PAV-3 E1B large coding sequences under the control of HCMV promoter. A cell line named VR1BL could be isolated that expressed E1B large of PAV-3 and also complemented PAV214 (E1A+E1B small deleted). The VR1BL cells could be efficiently transfected with DNA and allowed the rescue and propagation of recombinant PAV507 containing a triple stop codon inserted in the E1B large coding sequence. In addition, recombinant PAV227 containing complete deletion of E1 (E1A+E1B small + E1B large ) could be successfully rescued using VR1BL cell line. Recombinant PAV227 replicated as efficiently as wild-type in VR1BL cells but not in VIDO R1 cells, suggesting that E1B large was essential for replication of PAV-3. Next, we constructed recombinant PAV219 by inserting green fluorescent (GFP) protein gene flanked by a promoter and a poly(A) in the E1 region of the PAV227 genome. We demonstrated that PAV219 was able to transduce and direct expression of GFP in some human cell lines

  17. Detection and molecular identification of human adenoviruses and enteroviruses in wastewater from Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdiouni, H; Faouzi, A; Fariat, N; Hassar, M; Soukri, A; Nourlil, J

    2012-04-01

    Reclaimed wastewater is a considerable water resource in Morocco. Its agricultural reuse requires an assessment of viral contamination. The aim of this study was to detect both infectious and noninfectious human adenoviruses (HAdV) and enteroviruses (EV) in raw wastewater and treat effluent from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and domestic sewage in Morocco. A total of 22 samples were analysed. A polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation method was used, followed by integrated cell culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) using two cell lines: human rhabdomyosarcoma tumour tissue and laryngeal carcinoma cells (RD and Hep2 cells). Furthermore, viral genome amplification was confirmed by sequencing. HAdV were detected in 10 (45·5%) of the 22 samples involving two species: HAdV-B and HAdV-D. EV was detected in 5 (23%) samples belonging to Coxsackievirus B5 and poliovirus vaccine strain (Sabin 2). Human adenoviruses and EV were detected in the analysed samples from two WWTPs and HAdV in domestic sewage. This work is the first study in Morocco using cell culture, PCR and sequencing of enteric viruses from wastewater. The presence of infectious HAdV and EV in treated effluent emphasizes the need of wastewater treatment surveillance. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Novel coronaviruses, astroviruses, adenoviruses and circoviruses in insectivorous bats from northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H-J; Wen, H-L; Zhao, L; Liu, J-W; Luo, L-M; Zhou, C-M; Qin, X-R; Zhu, Y-L; Liu, M-M; Qi, R; Li, W-Q; Yu, H; Yu, X-J

    2017-12-01

    Bats are considered as the reservoirs of several emerging infectious disease, and novel viruses are continually found in bats all around the world. Studies conducted in southern China found that bats carried a variety of viruses. However, few studies have been conducted on bats in northern China, which harbours a diversity of endemic insectivorous bats. It is important to understand the prevalence and diversity of viruses circulating in bats in northern China. In this study, a total of 145 insectivorous bats representing six species were collected from northern China and screened with degenerate primers for viruses belonging to six families, including coronaviruses, astroviruses, hantaviruses, paramyxoviruses, adenoviruses and circoviruses. Our study found that four of the viruses screened for were positive and the overall detection rates for astroviruses, coronaviruses, adenoviruses and circoviruses in bats were 21.4%, 15.9%, 20% and 37.2%, respectively. In addition, we found that bats in northern China harboured a diversity of novel viruses. Common Serotine (Eptesicus serotinu), Fringed long-footed Myotis (Myotis fimriatus) and Peking Myotis (Myotis pequinius) were investigated in China for the first time. Our study provided new information on the ecology and phylogeny of bat-borne viruses. © 2017 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. An epidemic of adenovirus 7a infection in a neonatal nursery: course, morbidity, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, A; Anday, E; Talbot, G H

    1988-09-01

    An epidemic of adenovirus 7a in our neonatal intensive care nursery and intermediate care nursery in July and August 1987 caused the death of two patients. Significant symptomatic infection possibly due to the virus occurred in nine patients, ten staff, and three parents, of whom three patients, three staff, and one parent were positive by culture. As a direct consequence of the outbreak, 58 staff days of work were lost; the intensive care nursery had to be closed to admissions for 19 days and the intermediate care nursery for 14 days. Seventeen newborns were transferred to other hospitals and four mothers were sent elsewhere for delivery. Control measures, which included cohorting of patients, use of gloves, gowns and goggles, and exclusion of symptomatic staff from the unit, appeared effective. Rapid immunofluorescence testing of virological specimens was of little use in monitoring the outbreak, largely because of poor specimen quality. This outbreak further underlines the ease of transmission and high morbidity of neonatal adenovirus infection.

  20. Generation of an adenovirus-parvovirus chimera with enhanced oncolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Bonifati, Serena; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Mailly, Laurent; Daeffler, Laurent; Deryckère, François; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    In this study, our goal was to generate a chimeric adenovirus-parvovirus (Ad-PV) vector that combines the high-titer and efficient gene transfer of adenovirus with the anticancer potential of rodent parvovirus. To this end, the entire oncolytic PV genome was inserted into a replication-defective E1- and E3-deleted Ad5 vector genome. As we found that parvoviral NS expression inhibited Ad-PV chimera production, we engineered the parvoviral P4 early promoter, which governs NS expression, by inserting into its sequence tetracycline operator elements. As a result of these modifications, P4-driven expression was blocked in the packaging T-REx-293 cells, which constitutively express the tetracycline repressor, allowing high-yield chimera production. The chimera effectively delivered the PV genome into cancer cells, from which fully infectious replication-competent parvovirus particles were generated. Remarkably, the Ad-PV chimera exerted stronger cytotoxic activities against various cancer cell lines, compared with the PV and Ad parental viruses, while being still innocuous to a panel of tested healthy primary human cells. This Ad-PV chimera represents a novel versatile anticancer agent which can be subjected to further genetic manipulations in order to reinforce its enhanced oncolytic capacity through arming with transgenes or retargeting into tumor cells.

  1. Adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy for murine liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Daoyan; Dai Bingbing; Wang Zhonghe; Chen Shishu

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the synergistic antitumor effects of adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy in mice bearing liver cancer. Methods: Balb/c mice bearing liver cancer received the treatment at day 1 with tumor local irradiation (TLI) of 20 Gy or mask irradiation when tumor size reached 0.6-1.0 cm. Within 1 hour after irradiation, adenovirus containing IL-12 gene or PBS was intra-tumor injected once a week. Forty-eight hours after the second injection, IFN-γ levels in sera and the supernatant of cultured spleen cells were assayed by ELISA, CTL activity of spleen cells was measured by 3 H-TdR release assay, and phenotypes of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were analysed by immunohistochemical staining. Results: The growth of tumors in animals treated with a combination of IL-12 gene therapy and TLI was inhibited more significantly than those with either single treatment (P + and CD8 + lymphocyte infiltration and tumor-specific cytolytic activities, and the levels of IFN-γ in sera were higher in IL-12 gene therapy and IL-12 gene therapy combined with TLI groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that IL-12 gene therapy combined with radiotherapy is more effective than both single treatment modalities and can induce specific antitumor immuno-response greatly

  2. Cryo-EM structures of two bovine adenovirus type 3 intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lingpeng; Huang, Xiaoxing; Li, Xiaomin [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Xiong, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Luo-jia-shan, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Sun, Wei; Yang, Chongwen; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ying [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu, Hongrong [College of Physics and Information Science, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Huang, Xiaojun; Ji, Gang; Sun, Fei [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zheng, Congyi, E-mail: cctcc202@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Luo-jia-shan, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Zhu, Ping, E-mail: zhup@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Adenoviruses (Ads) infect hosts from all vertebrate species and have been investigated as vaccine vectors. We report here near-atomic structures of two bovine Ad type 3 (BAd3) intermediates obtained by cryo-electron microscopy. A comparison between the two intermediate structures reveals that the differences are localized in the fivefold vertex region, while their facet structures are identical. The overall facet structure of BAd3 exhibits a similar structure to human Ads; however, BAd3 protein IX has a unique conformation. Mass spectrometry and cryo-electron tomography analyses indicate that one intermediate structure represents the stage during DNA encapsidation, whilst the other intermediate structure represents a later stage. These results also suggest that cleavage of precursor protein VI occurs during, rather than after, the DNA encapsidation process. Overall, our results provide insights into the mechanism of Ad assembly, and allow the first structural comparison between human and nonhuman Ads at backbone level. - Highlights: • First structure of bovine adenovirus type 3. • Some channels are located at the vertex of intermediate during DNA encapsidation. • Protein IX exhibits a unique conformation of trimeric coiled–coiled structure. • Cleavage of precursor protein VI occurs during the DNA encapsidation process.

  3. Adenovirus-like inclusion body hepatitis in a flock of broiler chickens in Kermanshah province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Morad; Minoosh Siavosh Haghighi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) has been reported in many countries in the world. The IBH or similar cases characterized by hepatitis and presence of intra-nuclear inclusion bodies in hepatocytes have not been reported in broiler chickens in Iran. This is the first report on outbreak of adenovirus-like inclusion body hepatitis in Iran. On October 2012, an onset of high acute mortality in a flock of 2 day-old broiler chickens was reported to the Veterinary Clinic, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Razi University, Kermanshah, Iran. The birds showed lethargy, huddling, ruffled feathers, and inappetence. At necropsy the livers were the primary organ affected which were enlarged, pale yellow with necrotic foci and multiple petechial hemorrhages. Tissue samples of liver, kidneys and heart were fixed in 10% buffered formalin. They were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathological studies. Significant microscopic lesions were seen in the livers. Large eosinophilic intra-nuclear inclusion bodies were seen in hepatocytes. Based on the acute high mortality, age of the broilers, gross lesions and histopathological findings (especially intra-nuclear inclusion bodies), the condition was diagnosed as adenovirus-like inclusion body hepatitis.

  4. Additives for vaccine storage to improve thermal stability of adenoviruses from hours to months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Maria; Andreozzi, Patrizia; Paulose, Jayson; D'Alicarnasso, Marco; Cagno, Valeria; Donalisio, Manuela; Civra, Andrea; Broeckel, Rebecca M; Haese, Nicole; Jacob Silva, Paulo; Carney, Randy P; Marjomäki, Varpu; Streblow, Daniel N; Lembo, David; Stellacci, Francesco; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Krol, Silke

    2016-11-30

    Up to 80% of the cost of vaccination programmes is due to the cold chain problem (that is, keeping vaccines cold). Inexpensive, biocompatible additives to slow down the degradation of virus particles would address the problem. Here we propose and characterize additives that, already at very low concentrations, improve the storage time of adenovirus type 5. Anionic gold nanoparticles (10 -8 -10 -6  M) or polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular weight ∼8,000 Da, 10 -7 -10 -4  M) increase the half-life of a green fluorescent protein expressing adenovirus from ∼48 h to 21 days at 37 °C (from 7 to >30 days at room temperature). They replicate the known stabilizing effect of sucrose, but at several orders of magnitude lower concentrations. PEG and sucrose maintained immunogenicity in vivo for viruses stored for 10 days at 37 °C. To achieve rational design of viral-vaccine stabilizers, our approach is aided by simplified quantitative models based on a single rate-limiting step.

  5. Eight Year Prospective Study of Adenoviruses Infections in Hospitalized Children. Comparison with Other Respiratory Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Calvo

    Full Text Available Human adenovirus (HAdV cause upper and lower respiratory tract infections. However, there are few large prospective studies focused on HAdVs acute infections requiring hospitalization. From 2005 to 2013 a prospective study was conducted on children admitted with acute respiratory infections. Specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirate were taken for virological study by PCR and clinical data was recorded. HAdV specimens were genotyped. Frequency and clinical course of HAdV infections were compared with RSV, rhinovirus (RV, human bocavirus (HBoV and influenza in the same population. HAdV was detected in 403 cases of 2371 confirmed viral infections (17.2% , of which 154 were single virus infections (38%. We genotyped 154 HAdVs. The most frequent genotypes were HAdV-3 (24%, HAdV-6 (21%, and HAdV-5 (20%. A total of 262 children had fever (64.9%; 194 suffered hypoxia (48%, and 147 presented infiltrate in chest x-rays (36.4%. The most frequent diagnoses were recurrent wheezing or asthma (51.7%, bronchiolitis (18.3 %, and pneumonia (11.9%, and 46 (11.4% episodes required prolonged hospitalization (>7 days due to the severity. Adenovirus single infections were compared with single infections of 598 RSV, 494 RV, 83 influenza and 78 HBoV. Significant clinical differences were found between HAdV, RSV and RV infections.

  6. Limited effects of Muc1 deficiency on mouse adenovirus type 1 respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Y; Procario, Megan C; Ashley, Shanna L; O'Neal, Wanda K; Pickles, Raymond J; Weinberg, Jason B

    2011-09-01

    Muc1 (MUC1 in humans) is a membrane-tethered mucin that exerts anti-inflammatory effects in the lung during bacterial infection. Muc1 and other mucins are also likely to form a protective barrier in the lung. We used mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1, also known as MAdV-1) to determine the role of Muc1 in the pathogenesis of an adenovirus in its natural host. Following intranasal inoculation of wild type mice, we detected increased TNF-α, a cytokine linked to Muc1 production, but no consistent changes in the production of lung Muc1, Muc5ac or overall lung mucus production. Viral loads were modestly higher in the lungs of Muc1(-/-) mice compared to Muc1(+/+) mice at several early time points but decreased to similar levels by 14 days post infection in both groups. However, cellular inflammation and the expression of CXCL1, CCL5, and CCL2 did not significantly differ between Muc1(-/-) and Muc1(+/+) mice. Our data therefore suggest that Muc1 may contribute to a physical barrier that protects against MAV-1 respiratory infection. However, our data do not reveal an anti-inflammatory effect of Muc1 that contributes to MAV-1 pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Loss of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor contributes to gastric cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, M; Vieth, M; Röcken, C; Ebert, M; Pross, M; Gretschel, S; Schlag, P M; Wiedenmann, B; Kemmner, W; Höcker, M

    2009-01-27

    Loss of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has previously been observed in gastric cancer. The role of CAR in gastric cancer pathobiology, however, is unclear. We therefore analysed CAR in 196 R(0)-resected gastric adenocarcinomas and non-cancerous gastric mucosa samples using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor was found at the surface and foveolar epithelium of all non-neoplastic gastric mucosa samples (n=175), whereas only 56% of gastric cancer specimens showed CAR positivity (P<0.0001). Loss of CAR correlated significantly with decreased differentiation, increased infiltrative depths, presence of distant metastases, and was also associated with reduced carcinoma-specific survival. To clarify whether CAR impacts the tumorbiologic properties of gastric cancer, we subsequently determined the role of CAR in proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines by application of specific CAR siRNA or ectopic expression of a human full-length CAR cDNA. These experiments showed that RNAi-mediated CAR knock down resulted in increased proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines, whereas enforced ectopic CAR expression led to opposite effects. We conclude that the association of reduced presence of CAR in more severe disease states, together with our findings in gastric cancer cell lines, suggests that CAR functionally contributes to gastric cancer pathogenesis, showing features of a tumour suppressor.

  8. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor is a target and a mediator of estrogen action in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindrieux, David; Le Corre, Ludovic; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Métivier, Raphaël; Escobar, Pauline; Caicedo, Andrès; Brigitte, Madly; Lazennec, Gwendal

    2011-06-01

    The involvement of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), an adhesion molecule known to be the main determinant of adenovirus transduction of the cells, in cancer is currently under investigation. Recent reports suggest that CAR levels are elevated in breast cancer, and this may have an impact on its use as means of delivery for gene therapy. In this study, we show that estradiol (E(2)) treatment of the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell MCF-7 increases CAR levels and, in turn, enhances adenoviral transduction. Employing the transfection of CAR promoters in breast cancer cells, we show that this regulation of CAR expression occurs at the transcriptional level. In addition, and by chromatin immunoprecipitation, we have identified a crucial region of CAR promoter that controls E(2) responsiveness of CAR gene through the recruitment of ER. Moreover, utilizing CAR antibodies or CAR silencing by RNA interference repressed the estrogen-dependent growth of breast cancer cells, whereas the stable expression of CAR in MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cells led to an increased proliferation. Altogether, our data suggest that CAR is a novel estrogen-responsive gene, which is involved in the E(2)-dependent proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  9. Derivation of a myeloid cell-binding adenovirus for gene therapy of inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O Alberti

    Full Text Available The gene therapy field is currently limited by the lack of vehicles that permit efficient gene delivery to specific cell or tissue subsets. Native viral vector tropisms offer a powerful platform for transgene delivery but remain nonspecific, requiring elevated viral doses to achieve efficacy. In order to improve upon these strategies, our group has focused on genetically engineering targeting domains into viral capsid proteins, particularly those based on adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5. Our primary strategy is based on deletion of the fiber knob domain, to eliminate broad tissue specificity through the human coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (hCAR, with seamless incorporation of ligands to re-direct Ad tropism to cell types that express the cognate receptors. Previously, our group and others have demonstrated successful implementation of this strategy in order to specifically target Ad to a number of surface molecules expressed on immortalized cell lines. Here, we utilized phage biopanning to identify a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP, with the sequence WTLDRGY, and demonstrated that MBP can be successfully incorporated into a knob-deleted Ad5. The resulting virus, Ad.MBP, results in specific binding to primary myeloid cell types, as well as significantly higher transduction of these target populations ex vivo, compared to unmodified Ad5. These data are the first step in demonstrating Ad targeting to cell types associated with inflammatory disease.

  10. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of BMP-2 and BFGF in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Combined with Demineralized Bone Matrix For Repair of Femoral Head Osteonecrosis in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Xun Peng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigated the effect of using adenovirus-mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Ad-BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs in combination with a demineralized bone matrix (DBM to repair osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH in Beagle dogs. Methods: A total of 30 Beagle dogs were selected for the isolation of BMSCs, which were cultured and transfected with the recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-BMP2-bFGF-GFP (carrying BMP-2 and bFGF or a control adenovirus plasmid (encoding green fluorescent protein (Ad-GFP. The expression of the transfected BMP-2 and bFGF proteins was detected by Western blotting. After transfection, the BMSCs were induced to undergo osteoblastic differentiation. The DBM was prepared to construct a DBM/BMSC complex. Beagle models of canine femoral head defects and necrosis were established and divided into control, DBM, DBM/BMSC, vector Ad-BMP2-bFGF-GFP and Ad-GFP groups. The composite graft was then implanted, and new bone morphology was visualized via X-ray at 3, 6 and 12 weeks after the operation. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining and Masson’s trichrome staining were used to identify new bone formation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to calculate the density of new blood vessels. The compressive and bending strength of the BMSCs was evaluated at 12 weeks after the operation. Results: BMSCs were successfully isolated. The protein expression of BMP-2 and bFGF was significantly higher in the Ad-BMP-2/bFGF group than the normal and Ad-GFP groups. Compared with the control group, at 12 weeks after the operation, the DBM, DBM/BMSC, vector Ad-BMP2-bFGF-GFP and Ad-GFP groups showed a larger area of new bone, higher X-ray scores, greater neovascularization density, and increased compressive and bending strength. The most significant modifications occurred in thevector Ad-BMP2-bFGF-GFP group. Conclusion: The results indicate that the use

  11. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of BMP-2 and BFGF in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Combined with Demineralized Bone Matrix For Repair of Femoral Head Osteonecrosis in Beagle Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wu-Xun; Wang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using adenovirus-mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Ad-BMP-2) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in combination with a demineralized bone matrix (DBM) to repair osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in Beagle dogs. A total of 30 Beagle dogs were selected for the isolation of BMSCs, which were cultured and transfected with the recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-BMP2-bFGF-GFP (carrying BMP-2 and bFGF) or a control adenovirus plasmid (encoding green fluorescent protein (Ad-GFP)). The expression of the transfected BMP-2 and bFGF proteins was detected by Western blotting. After transfection, the BMSCs were induced to undergo osteoblastic differentiation. The DBM was prepared to construct a DBM/BMSC complex. Beagle models of canine femoral head defects and necrosis were established and divided into control, DBM, DBM/BMSC, vector Ad-BMP2-bFGF-GFP and Ad-GFP groups. The composite graft was then implanted, and new bone morphology was visualized via X-ray at 3, 6 and 12 weeks after the operation. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and Masson's trichrome staining were used to identify new bone formation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to calculate the density of new blood vessels. The compressive and bending strength of the BMSCs was evaluated at 12 weeks after the operation. BMSCs were successfully isolated. The protein expression of BMP-2 and bFGF was significantly higher in the Ad-BMP-2/bFGF group than the normal and Ad-GFP groups. Compared with the control group, at 12 weeks after the operation, the DBM, DBM/BMSC, vector Ad-BMP2-bFGF-GFP and Ad-GFP groups showed a larger area of new bone, higher X-ray scores, greater neovascularization density, and increased compressive and bending strength. The most significant modifications occurred in thevector Ad-BMP2-bFGF-GFP group. The results indicate that the use of Ad-BMP-2/bFGF-modified BMSCs in conjunction with DBM

  12. Adenovirus E1B 19-kilodalton protein modulates innate immunity through apoptotic mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Jay R; Grigera, Fernando; Ucker, David S; Cook, James L

    2014-03-01

    Cells that undergo apoptosis in response to chemical or physical stimuli repress inflammatory reactions, but cells that undergo nonapoptotic death in response to such stimuli lack this activity. Whether cells dying from viral infection exhibit a cell death-type modulatory effect on inflammatory reactions is unknown. We compared the effects on macrophage inflammatory responses of cells dying an apoptotic or a nonapoptotic death as a result of adenoviral infection. The results were exactly opposite to the predictions from the conventional paradigm. Cells dying by apoptosis induced by infection with an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 19-kilodalton (E1B 19K) gene deletion mutant did not repress macrophage NF-κB activation or cytokine responses to proinflammatory stimuli, whereas cells dying a nonapoptotic death from infection with E1B 19K-competent, wild-type Ad5 repressed these macrophage inflammatory responses as well as cells undergoing classical apoptosis in response to chemical injury. The immunorepressive, E1B 19K-related cell death activity depended upon direct contact of the virally infected corpses with responder macrophages. Replacement of the viral E1B 19K gene with the mammalian Bcl-2 gene in cis restored the nonapoptotic, immunorepressive cell death activity of virally infected cells. These results define a novel function of the antiapoptotic, adenoviral E1B 19K protein that may limit local host innate immune inflammation during accumulation of virally infected cells at sites of infection and suggest that E1B 19K-deleted, replicating adenoviral vectors might induce greater inflammatory responses to virally infected cells than E1B 19K-positive vectors, because of the net effect of their loss-of-function mutation. We observed that cells dying a nonapoptotic cell death induced by adenovirus infection repressed macrophage proinflammatory responses while cells dying by apoptosis induced by infection with an E1B 19K deletion mutant virus did not repress macrophage

  13. The binding of in vitro synthesized adenovirus DNA binding protein to single-stranded DNA is stimulated by zinc ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, H.L.; Lee, F.M. van der; Sussenbach, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    We have synthesized wild type DNA binding protein (DBP) of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) and several truncated forms of this protein by a combination of in vitro transcription and translation. The proteins obtained were tested for binding to a single-stranded DNA-cellulose column. It could be shown that

  14. Potentiation of radiation therapy by the oncolytic adenovirus dl1520 (ONYX-015) in human malignant glioma xenografts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geoerger, B; Grill, J; Opolon, P; Morizet, J; Aubert, G; Lecluse, Y; Beusechem-Kaptein, van V.W.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Kirn, DH; Vassal, G

    2003-01-01

    In spite of aggressive surgery, irradiation and/or chemotherapy, treatment of malignant gliomas remains a major challenge in adults and children due to high treatment failure. We have demonstrated significant cell lysis and antitumour activity of the E1B-55 kDa-gene-deleted adenovirus ONYX-015

  15. Adenovirus Entry From the Apical Surface of Polarized Epithelia Is Facilitated by the Host Innate Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Poornima L. N.; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O.; Yan, Ran; Alghamri, Mahmoud S.; Brockman, Trisha L.; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian; Excoffon, Katherine J. D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of viral-induced respiratory disease begins with an understanding of the factors that increase or decrease susceptibility to viral infection. The primary receptor for most adenoviruses is the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a cell-cell adhesion protein normally localized at the basolateral surface of polarized epithelia and involved in neutrophil transepithelial migration. Recently, an alternate isoform of CAR, CAREx8, has been identified at the apical surface of polarized airway epithelia and is implicated in viral infection from the apical surface. We hypothesized that the endogenous role of CAREx8 may be to facilitate host innate immunity. We show that IL-8, a proinflammatory cytokine and a neutrophil chemoattractant, stimulates the protein expression and apical localization of CAREx8 via activation of AKT/S6K and inhibition of GSK3β. Apical CAREx8 tethers infiltrating neutrophils at the apical surface of a polarized epithelium. Moreover, neutrophils present on the apical-epithelial surface enhance adenovirus entry into the epithelium. These findings suggest that adenovirus evolved to co-opt an innate immune response pathway that stimulates the expression of its primary receptor, apical CAREx8, to allow the initial infection the intact epithelium. In addition, CAREx8 is a new target for the development of novel therapeutics for both respiratory inflammatory disease and adenoviral infection. PMID:25768646

  16. Adenovirus 2, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Parainfluenza Molecular Diagnostic Assay Results in Puppies After vaccination with Modified Live Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch-Gallie, R; Moroff, S; Lappin, M R

    2016-01-01

    Canine adenovirus 2, parainfluenza, and Bordetella bronchiseptica cause respiratory disease in dogs, and each has a modified live intranasal vaccine available. Molecular diagnostic assays to amplify specific nucleic acids are available for each of these agents. If positive molecular diagnostic assay results are common after vaccination, the positive predictive value of the diagnostic assays for disease would be decreased. To determine the impact of administration of commercially available modified live topical adenovirus 2, B. bronchiseptica, and parainfluenza vaccine has on the results of a commercially available PCR panel. Eight puppies from a research breeding facility negative for these pathogens. Blinded prospective pilot study. Puppies were vaccinated with a single dose of modified live topical adenovirus 2, B. bronchiseptica, and parainfluenza and parenteral dose of adenovirus 2, canine distemper virus, and parvovirus. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected on multiple days and submitted for PCR assay. Nucleic acids of all 3 organisms contained in the topical vaccine were detected from both samples multiple times through 28 days after vaccination with higher numbers of positive samples detected between days 3 and 10 after vaccination. Vaccine status should be considered when interpreting respiratory agent PCR results if modified live vaccines have been used. Development of quantitative PCR and wild-type sequencing are necessary to improve positive predictive value of these assays by distinguishing vaccinate from natural infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. Tropism ablation and stealthing of oncolytic adenovirus enhances systemic delivery to tumors and improves virotherapy of cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Green, N. K.; Hale, A.; Cawood, R.; Illingworth, S.; Herbert, C.; Hermiston, T.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; van Rooijen, N.; Seymour, L. W.; Fisher, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 11 (2012), s. 1683-1695 ISSN 1743-5889 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00500803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : clodronate liposomes * polymer-coated adenovirus * predosing strategy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.260, year: 2012

  18. Significant inhibition of Tembusu virus envelope and NS5 gene using an adenovirus-mediated short hairpin RNA delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Feng, Qiang; Wei, Lei; Zhuo, Liling; Chen, Hao; Diao, Youxiang; Tang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, which was first isolated in the tropics during the 1970s. Recently, a disease characterized by ovarian haemorrhage and neurological symptoms was observed in ducks in China, which threatens poultry production. However, there is no suitable vaccination strategy or effective antiviral drugs to combat TMUV infections. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a new anti-TMUV therapy. In this study, we report an efficient short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery strategy for the inhibition of TMUV production using an adenovirus vector system. Using specifically designed shRNAs based on the E and NS5 protein genes of TMUV, the vector-expressed viral genes, TMUV RNA replication and infectious virus production were downregulated at different levels in Vero cells, where the shRNA (NS52) was highly effective in inhibiting TMUV. Using the human adenovirus type 5 shRNA delivery system, the recombinant adenovirus (rAd-NS52) inhibited TMUV multiplication with high efficiency. Furthermore, the significant dose-dependent inhibition of viral RNA copies induced by rAd-NS52 was found in TMUV-infected cells, which could last for at least 96h post infection. Our results indicated that the adenovirus-mediated delivery of shRNAs could play an active role in future TMUV antiviral therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic assessment of the impact of adenovirus infection on a captive reintroduction project for red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everest, D J; Shuttleworth, C M; Grierson, S S; Duff, J P; Jackson, N; Litherland, P; Kenward, R E; Stidworthy, M F

    2012-08-18

    PCR was used to amplify adenoviral DNA, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to detect adenovirus particles in tissue and intestinal content samples from red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) associated with a reintroduction study on Anglesey (North Wales), from other populations on the island and from stock held at the Welsh Mountain Zoo, 38 km to the east. Samples were collected during the routine surveillance postmortem examinations of all 60 red squirrels with carcases retrieved in a suitable condition between 2004 and 2010, including 29 captive and 31 free-living animals. Following significant clusters of mortality in captive red squirrels, adenovirus was identified retrospectively in faecal material from 12 of 13 (92 per cent) examined carcases from squirrels captive on Anglesey, and 14 of 16 (88 per cent) from the Welsh Mountain Zoo. Virus was identified in 13 of 31 (42 per cent) free-living wild animals, with evidence of both subclinical and clinically significant enteric adenoviral infections in wild squirrels. Without ancillary PCR and TEM testing, the extent of adenovirus infection in such populations would have been underestimated. Screening protocols that include examinations for adenovirus should, therefore, be part of the routine biosecurity measures protecting reintroduction or captive breeding programmes for red squirrels.

  20. Multiple Cross-Species Transmission Events of Human/nAdenoviruses (HAdV) during Hominine Evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoppe, E.; Pauly, M.; Gillespie, T. R.; Akoua-Koffi, C.; Hohmann, G.; Fruth, B.; Karhemere, S.; Madinda, N. F.; Mugisha, L.; Muyembe, J.-J.; Todd, A.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Gray, M.; Robbins, M.; Bergl, R. A.; Wittig, R. M.; Zuberbühler, K.; Boesch, C.; Schubert, G.; Leendertz, F. H.; Ehlers, B.; Calvignac-Spencer, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 8 (2015), s. 2072-2084 ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adenovirus * African great apes * zoonosis Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 13.649, year: 2015