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Sample records for adenovirus based vaccine

  1. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    2013-01-01

    The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC...... class II-associated invariant chain (Ii) greatly enhances both the presentation of most target Ags, as well as overall protection against viral infection, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The present study extends this vaccination concept to include protection against intracellular...... bacteria, using Listeria monocytogenes as a model organism. Protection in C57BL/6 mice against recombinant L. monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant epitope of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP33) was greatly accelerated, augmented, and prolonged following vaccination with an adenoviral vaccine encoding GP...

  2. The "STEP-wise" future of adenovirus-based HIV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, L J

    2011-01-01

    The HIV pandemic continues to be a public health crisis with over 30 million people currently living with the disease and, depending on the estimate, another 2 - 2.8 million infected annually. The disappointing results of the first Phase II study of a highly immunogenic adenovirus-vectored vaccine, named the STEP trial, was a wake up call to both the clinical and preclinical HIV vaccine fields. A vaccine designed only to elicit T cells and including a single HIV gene insert, will not be sufficient to reduce transmission or lower viremia in people. Additionally, future use of adenovirus-based vectored vaccines needs to be carefully planned with respect to vector type, gene inserts, route of immunization and risk factors among subject volunteers. The initial observation of a transient, increased risk of infection in Ad5 seropositive, uncircumcised men who have sex with men (MSM) is still unexplained, and may yet be considered simply a random event. The vaccine field has not given up on adenoviruses and there is continued interest in pursuing these highly immunogenic vectors, either in combination approaches with DNA, use of rare serotypes with low seroprevalence, or those derived from simian origin. Finally, evaluation of replicating adenovirus vectors known to be capable of inducing potent cellular, humoral, and mucosal immunity will be vital to meeting our future goal of an effective HIV vaccine.

  3. High prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV) type 2 in domestic dog populations in South Africa precludes the use of CAV-based recombinant rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, N; Jackson, F R; Niezgoda, M; Ellison, J A; Rupprecht, C E; Nel, L H

    2013-08-28

    Rabies in dogs can be controlled through mass vaccination. Oral vaccination of domestic dogs would be useful in the developing world, where greater vaccination coverage is needed especially in inaccessible areas or places with large numbers of free-roaming dogs. From this perspective, recent research has focused on development of new recombinant vaccines that can be administered orally in a bait to be used as adjunct for parenteral vaccination. One such candidate, a recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (CAV2-RG), is considered a promising option for dogs, given host specificity and safety. To assess the potential use of this vaccine in domestic dog populations, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus type 2 in South African dogs. Blood was collected from 241 dogs from the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Sampled dogs had not previously been vaccinated against canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV1) or canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Animals from both provinces had a high percentage of seropositivity (45% and 62%), suggesting that CAV2 circulates extensively among domestic dog populations in South Africa. Given this finding, we evaluated the effect of pre-existing CAV-specific antibodies on the efficacy of the CAV2-RG vaccine delivered via the oral route in dogs. Purpose-bred Beagle dogs, which received prior vaccination against canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and CAV, were immunized by oral administration of CAV2-RG. After rabies virus (RABV) infection all animals, except one vaccinated dog, developed rabies. This study demonstrated that pre-existing antibodies against CAV, such as naturally occurs in South African dogs, inhibits the development of neutralizing antibodies against RABV when immunized with a CAV-based rabies recombinant vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Future prospects for the development of cost-effective Adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fougeroux, Cyrielle; Holst, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    -vectored vaccine technology with a focus on adenoviral-based vaccines. Adenovirus (Ad) vaccines have proven to be efficient in military vaccinations against Ad4 and Ad7 and as highly efficient vectored vaccines against rabies. The question of how other adenovirus-based vaccines can become as efficient...... as the rabies vaccine is the underlying theme in this review. Here, we will first give an overview of the basic properties of vectored vaccines, followed by an introduction to the characteristics of adenoviral vectors and previously tested modifications of the vector backbone and expression cassettes...

  5. Sublingual immunization with adenovirus F protein-based vaccines stimulates protective immunity against botulinum neurotoxin A intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, SangMu; Clapp, Beata; Zlotkowska, Dagmara; Hoyt, Teri; Holderness, Kathryn; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Sublingual (s.l.) vaccination is an efficient way to induce elevated levels of systemic and mucosal immune responses. To mediate mucosal uptake, ovalbumin (OVA) was genetically fused to adenovirus 2 fiber protein (OVA-Ad2F) to assess whether s.l. immunization was as effective as an alternative route of vaccination. Ad2F-delivered vaccines were efficiently taken up by dendritic cells and migrated mostly to submaxillary gland lymph nodes, which could readily stimulate OVA-specific CD4+ T cells....

  6. A human type 5 adenovirus-based Trypanosoma cruzi therapeutic vaccine re-programs immune response and reverses chronic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Resende Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a prototypical neglected tropical disease. Specific immunity promotes acute phase survival. Nevertheless, one-third of CD patients develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC associated with parasite persistence and immunological unbalance. Currently, the therapeutic management of patients only mitigates CCC symptoms. Therefore, a vaccine arises as an alternative to stimulate protective immunity and thereby prevent, delay progression and even reverse CCC. We examined this hypothesis by vaccinating mice with replication-defective human Type 5 recombinant adenoviruses (rAd carrying sequences of amastigote surface protein-2 (rAdASP2 and trans-sialidase (rAdTS T. cruzi antigens. For prophylactic vaccination, naïve C57BL/6 mice were immunized with rAdASP2+rAdTS (rAdVax using a homologous prime/boost protocol before challenge with the Colombian strain. For therapeutic vaccination, rAdVax administration was initiated at 120 days post-infection (dpi, when mice were afflicted by CCC. Mice were analyzed for electrical abnormalities, immune response and cardiac parasitism and tissue damage. Prophylactic immunization with rAdVax induced antibodies and H-2Kb-restricted cytotoxic and interferon (IFNγ-producing CD8+ T-cells, reduced acute heart parasitism and electrical abnormalities in the chronic phase. Therapeutic vaccination increased survival and reduced electrical abnormalities after the prime (analysis at 160 dpi and the boost (analysis at 180 and 230 dpi. Post-therapy mice exhibited less heart injury and electrical abnormalities compared with pre-therapy mice. rAdVax therapeutic vaccination preserved specific IFNγ-mediated immunity but reduced the response to polyclonal stimuli (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, CD107a+ CD8+ T-cell frequency and plasma nitric oxide (NO levels. Moreover, therapeutic rAdVax reshaped immunity in the heart tissue as reduced the number of perforin+ cells

  7. Nasal delivery of an adenovirus-based vaccine bypasses pre-existing immunity to the vaccine carrier and improves the immune response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Croyle

    Full Text Available Pre-existing immunity to human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 is common in the general population. Bypassing pre-existing immunity could maximize Ad5 vaccine efficacy. Vaccination by the intramuscular (I.M., nasal (I.N. or oral (P.O. route with Ad5 expressing Ebola Zaire glycoprotein (Ad5-ZGP fully protected naïve mice against lethal challenge with Ebola. In the presence of pre-existing immunity, only mice vaccinated I.N. survived. The frequency of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells was reduced by 80% and by 15% in animals vaccinated by the I.M. and P.O. routes respectively. Neutralizing antibodies could not be detected in serum from either treatment group. Pre-existing immunity did not compromise the frequency of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells (3.9+/-1% naïve vs. 3.6+/-1% pre-existing immunity, PEI nor anti-Ebola neutralizing antibody (NAB, 40+/-10 reciprocal dilution, both groups. The number of INF-gamma+ CD8+ cells detected in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BAL after I.N. immunization was not compromised by pre-existing immunity to Ad5 (146+/-14, naïve vs. 120+/-16 SFC/million MNCs, PEI. However, pre-existing immunity reduced NAB levels in BAL by approximately 25% in this group. To improve the immune response after oral vaccination, the Ad5-based vaccine was PEGylated. Mice given the modified vaccine did not survive challenge and had reduced levels of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells 10 days after administration (0.3+/-0.3% PEG vs. 1.7+/-0.5% unmodified. PEGylation did increase NAB levels 2-fold. These results provide some insight about the degree of T and B cell mediated immunity necessary for protection against Ebola virus and suggest that modification of the virus capsid can influence the type of immune response elicited by an Ad5-based vaccine.

  8. Sublingual immunization with adenovirus F protein-based vaccines stimulates protective immunity against botulinum neurotoxin A intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, SangMu; Clapp, Beata; Zlotkowska, Dagmara; Hoyt, Teri; Holderness, Kathryn; Maddaloni, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Sublingual (s.l.) vaccination is an efficient way to induce elevated levels of systemic and mucosal immune responses. To mediate mucosal uptake, ovalbumin (OVA) was genetically fused to adenovirus 2 fiber protein (OVA-Ad2F) to assess whether s.l. immunization was as effective as an alternative route of vaccination. Ad2F-delivered vaccines were efficiently taken up by dendritic cells and migrated mostly to submaxillary gland lymph nodes, which could readily stimulate OVA-specific CD4+ T cells. OVA-Ad2F + cholera toxin (CT)-immunized mice elicited significantly higher OVA-specific serum IgG, IgA and mucosal IgA antibodies among the tested immunization groups. These were supported by elevated OVA-specific IgG and IgA antibody-forming cells. A mixed Th-cell response was induced as evident by the enhanced IL-4, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF-α-specific cytokine-forming cells. To assess whether this approach can stimulate neutralizing antibodies, immunizations were performed with the protein encumbering the β-trefoil domain of C-terminus heavy chain (Hcβtre) from botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) as well as when fused to Ad2F. Hcβtre-Ad2F + CT-dosed mice showed the greatest serum IgG, IgA and mucosal IgA titers among the immunization groups. Hcβtre-Ad2F alone also induced elevated antibody production in contrast to Hcβtre alone. Plasma from Hcβtre + CT- and Hcβtre-Ad2F + CT-immunized groups neutralized BoNT/A and protected mice from BoNT/A intoxication. Most importantly, Hcβtre-Ad2F + CT-immunized mice were protected from BoNT/A intoxication relative to Hcβtre + CT-immunized mice, which only showed ∼60% protection. This study shows that s.l. immunization with Ad2F-based vaccines is effective in conferring protective immunity. PMID:22207133

  9. Adenovirus vector-based multi-epitope vaccine provides partial protection against H5, H7, and H9 avian influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed O Hassan

    Full Text Available The emergence of H5, H7, and H9 avian influenza virus subtypes in humans reveals their pandemic potential. Although human-to-human transmission has been limited, the genetic reassortment of the avian and human/porcine influenza viruses or mutations in some of the genes resulting in virus replication in the upper respiratory tract of humans could generate novel pandemic influenza viruses. Current vaccines do not provide cross protection against antigenically distinct strains of the H5, H7, and H9 influenza viruses. Therefore, newer vaccine approaches are needed to overcome these potential threats. We developed an egg-independent, adenovirus vector-based, multi-epitope (ME vaccine approach using the relatively conserved immunogenic domains of the H5N1 influenza virus [M2 ectodomain (M2e, hemagglutinin (HA fusion domain (HFD, T-cell epitope of nucleoprotein (TNP. and HA α-helix domain (HαD]. Our ME vaccine induced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and caused a significant reduction in the viral loads in the lungs of vaccinated mice that were challenged with antigenically distinct H5, H7, or H9 avian influenza viruses. These results suggest that our ME vaccine approach provided broad protection against the avian influenza viruses. Further improvement of this vaccine will lead to a pre-pandemic vaccine that may lower morbidity, hinder transmission, and prevent mortality in a pandemic situation before a strain-matched vaccine becomes available.

  10. A Single Dose Respiratory Recombinant Adenovirus-Based Vaccine Provides Long-Term Protection for Non-Human Primates from Lethal Ebola Infection.

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    Choi, Jin Huk; Jonsson-Schmunk, Kristina; Qiu, Xiangguo; Shedlock, Devon J; Strong, Jim; Xu, Jason X; Michie, Kelly L; Audet, Jonathan; Fernando, Lisa; Myers, Mark J; Weiner, David; Bajrovic, Irnela; Tran, Lilian Q; Wong, Gary; Bello, Alexander; Kobinger, Gary P; Schafer, Stephen C; Croyle, Maria A

    2015-08-03

    As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues and cases appear in the United States and other countries, the need for long-lasting vaccines to preserve global health is imminent. Here, we evaluate the long-term efficacy of a respiratory and sublingual (SL) adenovirus-based vaccine in non-human primates in two phases. In the first, a single respiratory dose of 1.4×10(9) infectious virus particles (ivp)/kg of Ad-CAGoptZGP induced strong Ebola glycoprotein (GP) specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and Ebola GP-specific antibodies in systemic and mucosal compartments and was partially (67%) protective from challenge 62 days after immunization. The same dose given by the SL route induced Ebola GP-specific CD8+ T cell responses similar to that of intramuscular (IM) injection, however, the Ebola GP-specific antibody response was low. All primates succumbed to infection. Three primates were then given the vaccine in a formulation that improved the immune response to Ebola in rodents. Three primates were immunized with 2.0×10(10) ivp/kg of vaccine by the SL route. Diverse populations of polyfunctional Ebola GP-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and significant anti-Ebola GP antibodies were present in samples collected 150 days after respiratory immunization. The formulated vaccine was fully protective against challenge 21 weeks after immunization. While diverse populations of Ebola GP-specific CD4+ T cells were produced after SL immunization, antibodies were not neutralizing and the vaccine was unprotective. To our knowledge, this is the first time that durable protection from a single dose respiratory adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine has been demonstrated in primates.

  11. A prime-boost immunization regimen based on a simian adenovirus 36 vectored multi-stage malaria vaccine induces protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jairo A; McCaffery, Jessica N; Kashentseva, Elena; Singh, Balwan; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Moreno, Alberto

    2017-05-31

    Malaria remains a considerable burden on public health. In 2015, the WHO estimates there were 212 million malaria cases causing nearly 429,000 deaths globally. A highly effective malaria vaccine is needed to reduce the burden of this disease. We have developed an experimental vaccine candidate (PyCMP) based on pre-erythrocytic (CSP) and erythrocytic (MSP1) stage antigens derived from the rodent malaria parasite P. yoelii. Our protein-based vaccine construct induces protective antibodies and CD4 + T cell responses. Based on evidence that viral vectors increase CD8 + T cell-mediated immunity, we also have tested heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens that included human adenovirus serotype 5 vector (Ad5), obtaining protective CD8 + T cell responses. While Ad5 is commonly used for vaccine studies, the high prevalence of pre-existing immunity to Ad5 severely compromises its utility. Here, we report the use of the novel simian adenovirus 36 (SAd36) as a candidate for a vectored malaria vaccine since this virus is not known to infect humans, and it is not neutralized by anti-Ad5 antibodies. Our study shows that the recombinant SAd36PyCMP can enhance specific CD8 + T cell response and elicit similar antibody titers when compared to an immunization regimen including the recombinant Ad5PyCMP. The robust immune responses induced by SAd36PyCMP are translated into a lower parasite load following P. yoelii infectious challenge when compared to mice immunized with Ad5PyCMP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of replication-deficient adenovirus malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Michael R; Sedegah, Martha; Limbach, Keith

    2017-03-01

    Malaria remains a major threat to endemic populations and travelers, including military personnel to these areas. A malaria vaccine is feasible, as radiation attenuated sporozoites induce nearly 100% efficacy. Areas covered: This review covers current malaria clinical trials using adenoviruses and pre-clinical research. Heterologous prime-boost regimens, including replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 (HuAd5) carrying malaria antigens, are efficacious. However, efficacy appears to be adversely affected by pre-existing anti-HuAd5 antibodies. Current strategies focus on replacing HuAd5 with rarer human adenoviruses or adenoviruses isolated from non-human primates (NHPs). The chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 is undergoing evaluation in clinical trials including infants in malaria-endemic areas. Key antigens have been identified and are being used alone, in combination, or with protein subunit vaccines. Gorilla adenoviruses carrying malaria antigens are also currently being evaluated in preclinical models. These replacement adenovirus vectors will be successfully used to develop vaccines against malaria, as well as other infectious diseases. Expert commentary: Simplified prime-boost single shot regimens, dry-coated live vector vaccines or silicon microneedle arrays could be developed for malaria or other vaccines. Replacement vectors with similar or superior immunogenicity have rapidly advanced, and several are now in extensive Phase 2 and beyond in malaria as well as other diseases, notably Ebola.

  13. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S. M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  14. A new adenovirus based vaccine vector expressing an Eimeria tenella derived TLR agonist improves cellular immune responses to an antigenic target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Appledorn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviral based vectors remain promising vaccine platforms for use against numerous pathogens, including HIV. Recent vaccine trials utilizing Adenovirus based vaccines expressing HIV antigens confirmed induction of cellular immune responses, but these responses failed to prevent HIV infections in vaccinees. This illustrates the need to develop vaccine formulations capable of generating more potent T-cell responses to HIV antigens, such as HIV-Gag, since robust immune responses to this antigen correlate with improved outcomes in long-term non-progressor HIV infected individuals.In this study we designed a novel vaccine strategy utilizing an Ad-based vector expressing a potent TLR agonist derived from Eimeria tenella as an adjuvant to improve immune responses from a [E1-]Ad-based HIV-Gag vaccine. Our results confirm that expression of rEA elicits significantly increased TLR mediated innate immune responses as measured by the influx of plasma cytokines and chemokines, and activation of innate immune responding cells. Furthermore, our data show that the quantity and quality of HIV-Gag specific CD8(+ and CD8(- T-cell responses were significantly improved when coupled with rEA expression. These responses also correlated with a significantly increased number of HIV-Gag derived epitopes being recognized by host T cells. Finally, functional assays confirmed that rEA expression significantly improved antigen specific CTL responses, in vivo. Moreover, we show that these improved responses were dependent upon improved TLR pathway interactions.The data presented in this study illustrate the potential utility of Ad-based vectors expressing TLR agonists to improve clinical outcomes dependent upon induction of robust, antigen specific immune responses.

  15. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Z.Q. [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ertl, H.C., E-mail: ertl@wistar.upenn.edu [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rupprecht, C.E. [The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  16. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  17. Novel chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored respiratory mucosal tuberculosis vaccine: overcoming local anti-human adenovirus immunity for potent TB protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyanathan, M; Thanthrige-Don, N; Afkhami, S; Lai, R; Damjanovic, D; Zganiacz, A; Feng, X; Yao, X-D; Rosenthal, K L; Medina, M Fe; Gauldie, J; Ertl, H C; Xing, Z

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) remains to be a major global health problem despite many decades of parenteral use of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Developing safe and effective respiratory mucosal TB vaccines represents a unique challenge. Over the past decade or so, the human serotype 5 adenovirus (AdHu5)-based TB vaccine has emerged as one of the most promising candidates based on a plethora of preclinical and early clinical studies. However, anti-AdHu5 immunity widely present in the lung of humans poses a serious gap and limitation to its real-world applications. In this study we have developed a novel chimpanzee adenovirus 68 (AdCh68)-vectored TB vaccine amenable to the respiratory route of vaccination. We have evaluated AdCh68-based TB vaccine for its safety, T-cell immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in relevant animal models of human pulmonary TB with or without parenteral BCG priming. We have also compared AdCh68-based TB vaccine with its AdHu5 counterpart in both naive animals and those with preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity in the lung. We provide compelling evidence that AdCh68-based TB vaccine is not only safe when delivered to the respiratory tract but, importantly, is also superior to its AdHu5 counterpart in induction of T-cell responses and immune protection, and limiting lung immunopathology in the presence of preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity in the lung. Our findings thus suggest AdCh68-based TB vaccine to be an ideal candidate for respiratory mucosal immunization, endorsing its further clinical development in humans.

  18. Adenovirus-based HIV-1 vaccine candidates tested in efficacy trials elicit CD8+ T cells with limited breadth of HIV-1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Peter J; Cox, Josephine H; Coleman, Adam R; Fernandez, Natalia; Bergin, Philip J; Kopycinski, Jakub T; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttihum, Punnee; de Souza, Mark; Duerr, Ann; Morgan, Cecilia; Gilmour, Jill W

    2016-07-17

    The ability of HIV-1 vaccine candidates MRKAd5, VRC DNA/Ad5 and ALVAC/AIDSVAX to elicit CD8 T cells with direct antiviral function was assessed and compared with HIV-1-infected volunteers. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based regimens MRKAd5 and VRC DNA/Ad5, designed to elicit HIV-1-specific T cells, are immunogenic but failed to prevent infection or impact on viral loads in volunteers infected subsequently. Failure may be due in part to a lack of CD8 T cells with effective antiviral functions. An in-vitro viral inhibition assay tested the ability of bispecific antibody expanded CD8 T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells to inhibit replication of a multiclade panel of HIV-1 isolates in autologous CD4 T cells. HIV-1 proteins recognized by CD8 T cells were assessed by IFNγ enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Ad5-based regimens elicited CD8 T cells that inhibited replication of HIV-1 IIIB isolate with more limited inhibition of other isolates. IIIB isolate Gag and Pol genes have high sequence identities (>96%) to vector HIV-1 gene inserts, and these were the predominant HIV-1 proteins recognized by CD8 T cells. Virus inhibition breadth was greater in antiretroviral naïve HIV-1-infected volunteers naturally controlling viremia (plasma viral load elicited by the ALVAC/AIDSVAX regimen. The Ad5-based regimens, although immunogenic, elicited CD8 T cells with limited HIV-1-inhibition breadth. Effective T-cell-based vaccines should presumably elicit broader HIV-1-inhibition profiles. The viral inhibition assay can be used in vaccine design and to prioritize promising candidates with greater inhibition breadth for further clinical trials.

  19. A novel oncolytic adenovirus based on simian adenovirus serotype 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Song, Yufeng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Jieyun; Chi, Yudan; Zhou, Dongming

    2017-04-18

    Among the oncolytic virotherapy, an emerging treatment for tumor, adenoviruses are widely used at present in preclinical and clinical trials. Traditionally, oncolytic adenoviruses were developed based on the human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5). However, AdHu5 has the drawbacks of preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity in most populations, and extensive sequestration of Adhu5 by the liver through hexon, blood coagulation factor X (FX), and FX receptor interactions. To tackle these problems, we explored a novel oncolytic adenovirus AdC7-SP/E1A-ΔE3 for cancer treatment. AdC7-SP/E1A-ΔE3 was constructed by replacing the E1A promoter with tumor specific promoter survivin promoter and deleting E3 region using direct cloning methods based on simian adenovirus serotype 24 (namely AdC7). We showed that AdC7-SP/E1A-ΔE3 significantly killed tumor cell lines NCI-H508 and Huh7, and inhibited tumor growth in both NCI-H508 and Huh7 xenograft tumor models. Importantly, AdC7-SP/E1A-ΔE3 exhibited the antitumor efficacy via systemic administration. Mechanistically, infected cells were killed by AdC7-SP/E1A-ΔE3 via the p53-independent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in which phosphorylation of BAD markedly declined and the expresses of Bik significantly went up. Therefore, AdC7-SP/E1A-ΔE3 is a promising candidate for liver and colon tumor treatment.

  20. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Baze, Wallace B; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K; Lawrence, William S; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E; Andersson, Jourdan A; Kozlova, Elena V; Tiner, Bethany L; Peterson, Johnny W; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-07-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of an adenovirus type 35-based circumsporozoite malaria vaccine in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, C Buddy; Dekker, Cornelia L; Ho, Dora; Phillips, Shanda; Mackey, Sally; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Grazia Pau, Maria; Hendriks, Jenny; Brown, Valerie; Dally, Leonard G; Versteege, Isabella; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2013-12-01

    Malaria results in over 650,000 deaths each year; thus, there is an urgent need for an effective vaccine. Pre-clinical studies and recently reported human trials suggest that pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines can provide protection against infection. A Phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study was conducted with a vaccine composed of a replication-deficient adenovirus-35 backbone with P. falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) surface antigen (Ad35.CS.01). Healthy adult subjects received three doses of 10 (8), 10 (9), 10 (10), or 10 (11) vp/mL Ad35.CS.01 vaccine or saline placebo intramuscularly at 0, 1, and 6-mo intervals. Adverse events were assessed and anti-CS antibody responses were determined by ELISA. Seventy-two individuals were enrolled, with age, gender, and ethnicity similar across each study arm. While the vaccine was generally well tolerated, adverse events were more frequent in the highest dose groups (10 (10) and 10 (11) vp/mL). More robust humoral responses were also noted at the highest doses, with 73% developing a positive ELISA response after the three dose series of 10 (11) vp/mL. The Ad35.CS.01 vaccine was most immunogenic at the highest dosages (10 (10) and 10 (11) vp/mL). Reactogenicity findings were more common after the 10 (11) vp/mL dose, although most were mild or moderate in nature and resolved without therapy.

  2. An adenovirus-vectored nasal vaccine confers rapid and sustained protection against anthrax in a single-dose regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Jex, Edward; Feng, Tsungwei; Sivko, Gloria S; Baillie, Leslie W; Goldman, Stanley; Van Kampen, Kent R; Tang, De-chu C

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax, and its spores have been developed into lethal bioweapons. To mitigate an onslaught from airborne anthrax spores that are maliciously disseminated, it is of paramount importance to develop a rapid-response anthrax vaccine that can be mass administered by nonmedical personnel during a crisis. We report here that intranasal instillation of a nonreplicating adenovirus vector encoding B. anthracis protective antigen could confer rapid and sustained protection against inhalation anthrax in mice in a single-dose regimen in the presence of preexisting adenovirus immunity. The potency of the vaccine was greatly enhanced when codons of the antigen gene were optimized to match the tRNA pool found in human cells. In addition, an adenovirus vector encoding lethal factor can confer partial protection against inhalation anthrax and might be coadministered with a protective antigen-based vaccine.

  3. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Eric A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Camacho, Zenaido T. [Department of Cell Biology, Department of Natural Sciences, Western New Mexico University, Silver City, NM 88062 (United States); Hillestad, Matthew L. [Nephrology Training Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J. [Virology and Gene Therapy Graduate Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Mercier, George T. [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Barry, Michael A., E-mail: mab@mayo.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Department of Immunology and Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  4. Dramatic Decline of Respiratory Illness Among US Military Recruits After the Renewed Use of Adenovirus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    specimens were studied, yield- ing 37 048 adenovirus-positive cases, among which 64% were typed. Results. During the 2 years after reintroduction of the...following reintroduction of the vaccination, the actual number of cases decreased. We estimate that the vaccines prevent approximately 1 death, 1100...Results. During the 2 years after reintroduction of the vaccines, military trainees experienced a 100-fold decline in adenovirus disease burden (from

  5. Protective Efficacy of Adenovirus/Protein Vaccines Against SIV Challenges in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit; Broge, Thomas; Linde, Caitlyn; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Brown, Eric P.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Smith, Kaitlin M.; Nkolola, Joseph P.; Liu, Jinyan; Shields, Jennifer; Parenteau, Lily; Whitney, James B.; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Lavine, Christy L.; Perry, James R.; Li, Wenjun; Colantonio, Arnaud D.; Lewis, Mark G.; Chen, Bing; Wenschuh, Holger; Reimer, Ulf; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Handley, Scott A.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Lorin, Clarisse; Voss, Gerald; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies of viral vector-based HIV-1 vaccine candidates have previously shown partial protection against stringent virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) vector priming followed by boosting with a purified envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Rhesus monkeys primed with Ad26 vectors expressing SIVsmE543 Env/Gag/Pol antigens and boosted with AS01B-adjuvanted SIVmac32H Env gp140 demonstrated complete protection in 50% of vaccinated animals against a series of repetitive, heterologous, intrarectal SIVmac251 challenges that infected all controls. Protective efficacy correlated with the functionality of Env-specific antibody responses. Comparable protection was also observed with a similar Ad/Env vaccine against repetitive, heterologous, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. These data demonstrate robust protection by Ad/Env vaccines against acquisition of stringent virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. PMID:26138104

  6. Clinical Trials Using Adenovirus Encoding Tyrosinase/MART-1/MAGEA6-transduced Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying adenovirus encoding tyrosinase/mart-1/magea6-transduced autologous dendritic cell vaccine.

  7. Additives for vaccine storage to improve thermal stability of adenoviruses from hours to months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Maria; Andreozzi, Patrizia; Paulose, Jayson; D'Alicarnasso, Marco; Cagno, Valeria; Donalisio, Manuela; Civra, Andrea; Broeckel, Rebecca M.; Haese, Nicole; Jacob Silva, Paulo; Carney, Randy P.; Marjomäki, Varpu; Streblow, Daniel N.; Lembo, David; Stellacci, Francesco; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Krol, Silke

    2016-11-01

    Up to 80% of the cost of vaccination programmes is due to the cold chain problem (that is, keeping vaccines cold). Inexpensive, biocompatible additives to slow down the degradation of virus particles would address the problem. Here we propose and characterize additives that, already at very low concentrations, improve the storage time of adenovirus type 5. Anionic gold nanoparticles (10-8-10-6 M) or polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular weight ~8,000 Da, 10-7-10-4 M) increase the half-life of a green fluorescent protein expressing adenovirus from ~48 h to 21 days at 37 °C (from 7 to >30 days at room temperature). They replicate the known stabilizing effect of sucrose, but at several orders of magnitude lower concentrations. PEG and sucrose maintained immunogenicity in vivo for viruses stored for 10 days at 37 °C. To achieve rational design of viral-vaccine stabilizers, our approach is aided by simplified quantitative models based on a single rate-limiting step.

  8. Rapid and sustained CD4(+) T-cell-independent immunity from adenovirus-encoded vaccine antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Bartholdy, Christina; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2007-01-01

    Many novel vaccine strategies rely on recombinant viral vectors for antigen delivery, and adenovirus vectors have emerged among the most potent of these. In this report, we have compared the immune response induced through priming with adenovirus vector-encoded full-length viral protein to that e......Many novel vaccine strategies rely on recombinant viral vectors for antigen delivery, and adenovirus vectors have emerged among the most potent of these. In this report, we have compared the immune response induced through priming with adenovirus vector-encoded full-length viral protein...... to that elicited with an adenovirus-encoded minimal epitope covalently linked to beta(2)-microglobulin. We demonstrate that the beta(2)-microglobulin-linked epitope induced an accelerated and augmented CD8(+) T-cell response. Furthermore, the immunity conferred by vaccination with beta(2)-microglobulin...... in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help were sustained in the long term and able to expand and control a secondary challenge with LCMV. Our results demonstrate that modifications to the antigen used in adenovirus vaccines may be used to improve the induced T-cell response. Such a strategy for CD4(+) T...

  9. Human adenovirus-specific T cells modulate HIV-specific T cell responses to an Ad5-vectored HIV-1 vaccine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frahm, Nicole; DeCamp, Allan C; Friedrich, David P; Carter, Donald K; Defawe, Olivier D; Kublin, James G; Casimiro, Danilo R; Duerr, Ann; Robertson, Michael N; Buchbinder, Susan P; Huang, Yunda; Spies, Gregory A; De Rosa, Stephen C; McElrath, M Juliana

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we have identified and compared adenovirus-specific and HIV-specific T cell responses in subjects participating in two HIV-1 vaccine trials using a vaccine vectored by adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5...

  10. Comparison of the immunogenicity and protection against bovine tuberculosis following immunization by BCG-priming and boosting with adenovirus or protein based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, G; Whelan, A; Clifford, D; Salguero, F J; Xing, Z; Gilbert, S; McShane, H; Hewinson, R G; Vordermeier, M; Villarreal-Ramos, B

    2014-03-05

    There is a requirement for vaccines or vaccination strategies that confer better protection against TB than the current live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine for use in cattle. Boosting with recombinant viral vectors expressing mycobacterial proteins, such as Ag85A, has shown a degree of promise as a strategy for improving on the protection afforded by BCG. Experiments in small animal models have indicated that broadening the immune response to include mycobacterial antigens other than Ag85A, such as Rv0288, induced by boosting with Ad5 constructs has a direct effect on the protection afforded against TB. Here, we compared the immunogenicity and protection against challenge with M. bovis afforded by boosting BCG-vaccinated cattle with a human type 5 (Ad5)-based vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigens Ag85A (Ad5-85A); or Ag85A, Rv0251, Rv0287 and Rv0288 (Ad5-TBF); or with protein TBF emulsified in adjuvant (Adj-TBF). Boosting with TBF broaden the immune response. The kinetics of Ad5-TBF and Adj-TBF were shown to be different, with effector T cell responses from the latter developing more slowly but being more durable than those induced by Ad5-TBF. No increase in protection compared to BCG alone was afforded by Ad5-TBF or Adj-TBF by gross pathology or bacteriology. Using histopathology, as a novel parameter of protection, we show that boosting BCG vaccinated cattle with Ad5-85A induced significantly better protection than BCG alone. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutic vaccination with recombinant adenovirus reduces splenic parasite burden in experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroof, Asher; Brown, Najmeeyah; Smith, Barbara; Hodgkinson, Michael R; Maxwell, Alice; Losch, Florian O; Fritz, Ulrike; Walden, Peter; Lacey, Charles N J; Smith, Deborah F; Aebischer, Toni; Kaye, Paul M

    2012-03-01

    Therapeutic vaccines, when used alone or in combination therapy with antileishmanial drugs, may have an important place in the control of a variety of forms of human leishmaniasis. Here, we describe the development of an adenovirus-based vaccine (Ad5-KH) comprising a synthetic haspb gene linked to a kmp11 gene via a viral 2A sequence. In nonvaccinated Leishmania donovani-infected BALB/c mice, HASPB- and KMP11-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were undetectable, although IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies were evident. After therapeutic vaccination, antibody responses were boosted, and IFNγ(+)CD8(+) T cell responses, particularly to HASPB, became apparent. A single vaccination with Ad5-KH inhibited splenic parasite growth by ∼66%, a level of efficacy comparable to that observed in early stage testing of clinically approved antileishmanial drugs in this model. These studies indicate the usefulness of adenoviral vectors to deliver leishmanial antigens in a potent and host protective manner to animals with existing L. donovani infection.

  12. Therapeutic Vaccination With Recombinant Adenovirus Reduces Splenic Parasite Burden in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroof, Asher; Brown, Najmeeyah; Smith, Barbara; Hodgkinson, Michael R.; Maxwell, Alice; Losch, Florian O.; Fritz, Ulrike; Walden, Peter; Lacey, Charles N. J.; Smith, Deborah F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines, when used alone or in combination therapy with antileishmanial drugs, may have an important place in the control of a variety of forms of human leishmaniasis. Here, we describe the development of an adenovirus-based vaccine (Ad5-KH) comprising a synthetic haspb gene linked to a kmp11 gene via a viral 2A sequence. In nonvaccinated Leishmania donovani–infected BALB/c mice, HASPB- and KMP11-specific CD8+ T cell responses were undetectable, although IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies were evident. After therapeutic vaccination, antibody responses were boosted, and IFNγ+CD8+ T cell responses, particularly to HASPB, became apparent. A single vaccination with Ad5-KH inhibited splenic parasite growth by ∼66%, a level of efficacy comparable to that observed in early stage testing of clinically approved antileishmanial drugs in this model. These studies indicate the usefulness of adenoviral vectors to deliver leishmanial antigens in a potent and host protective manner to animals with existing L. donovani infection. PMID:22301630

  13. Oral vaccination and protection of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) against rabies using ONRAB, an adenovirus-rabies recombinant vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L J; Rosatte, R C; Fehlner-Gardiner, C; Bachmann, P; Ellison, J A; Jackson, F R; Taylor, J S; Davies, C; Donovan, D

    2014-02-12

    Twenty-seven red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were each offered a bait containing ONRAB, a recombinant oral rabies vaccine that uses a human adenovirus vector to express the immunogenic rabies virus glycoprotein; 10 controls received no vaccine baits. Serum samples collected from all foxes before treatment, and each week post-treatment for 16 weeks, were tested for the presence of rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA). In the bait group, a fox was considered a responder to vaccination if serum samples from 3 or more consecutive weeks had RVNA ≥0.5 IU/ml. Using this criterion, 79% of adult foxes (11/14) and 46% of juveniles (6/13) responded to vaccination with ONRAB. Serum RVNA of adults first tested positive (≥0.5 IU/ml) between weeks 1 and 3, about 4 weeks earlier than in juveniles. Adults also responded with higher levels of RVNA and these levels were maintained longer. Serum samples from juveniles tested positive for 1-4 consecutive weeks; in adults the range was 2-15 weeks, with almost half of adults maintaining titres above 0.5 IU/ml for 9 or more consecutive weeks. Based on the kinetics of the antibody response to ONRAB, the best time to sample sera of wild adult foxes for evidence of vaccination is 7-11 weeks following bait distribution. Thirty-four foxes (25 ONRAB, 9 controls) were challenged with vulpine street virus 547 days post-vaccination. All controls developed rabies whereas eight of 13 adult vaccinates (62%) and four of 12 juvenile vaccinates (33%) survived. All foxes classed as non-responders to vaccination developed rabies. Of foxes considered responders to vaccination, 80% of adults (8/10) and 67% of juveniles (4/6) survived challenge. The duration of immunity conferred to foxes would appear adequate for bi-annual and annual bait distribution schedules as vaccinates were challenged 1.5 years post-vaccination. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. New gorilla adenovirus vaccine vectors induce potent immune responses and protection in a mouse malaria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Keith; Stefaniak, Maureen; Chen, Ping; Patterson, Noelle B; Liao, Grant; Weng, Shaojie; Krepkiy, Svetlana; Ekberg, Greg; Torano, Holly; Ettyreddy, Damodar; Gowda, Kalpana; Sonawane, Sharvari; Belmonte, Arnel; Abot, Esteban; Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Moormann, Ann; Vulule, John; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L; Brough, Douglas E; Bruder, Joseph T

    2017-07-03

    A DNA-human Ad5 (HuAd5) prime-boost malaria vaccine has been shown to protect volunteers against a controlled human malaria infection. The potency of this vaccine, however, appeared to be affected by the presence of pre-existing immunity against the HuAd5 vector. Since HuAd5 seroprevalence is very high in malaria-endemic areas of the world, HuAd5 may not be the most appropriate malaria vaccine vector. This report describes the evaluation of the seroprevalence, immunogenicity and efficacy of three newly identified gorilla adenoviruses, GC44, GC45 and GC46, as potential malaria vaccine vectors. The seroprevalence of GC44, GC45 and GC46 is very low, and the three vectors are not efficiently neutralized by human sera from Kenya and Ghana, two countries where malaria is endemic. In mice, a single administration of GC44, GC45 and GC46 vectors expressing a murine malaria gene, Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (PyCSP), induced robust PyCSP-specific T cell and antibody responses that were at least as high as a comparable HuAd5-PyCSP vector. Efficacy studies in a murine malaria model indicated that a prime-boost regimen with DNA-PyCSP and GC-PyCSP vectors can protect mice against a malaria challenge. Moreover, these studies indicated that a DNA-GC46-PyCSP vaccine regimen was significantly more efficacious than a DNA-HuAd5-PyCSP regimen. These data suggest that these gorilla-based adenovectors have key performance characteristics for an effective malaria vaccine. The superior performance of GC46 over HuAd5 highlights its potential for clinical development.

  15. Adenovirus-vectored drug-vaccine duo as a potential driver for conferring mass protection against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Tarbet, E Bart; Toro, Haroldo; Tang, De-chu C

    2011-11-01

    The disease-fighting power of vaccines has been a public health bonanza credited with the worldwide reduction of mortality and morbidity. The goal to further amplify its power by boosting vaccine coverage requires the development of a new generation of rapid-response vaccines that can be mass produced at low costs and mass administered by nonmedical personnel. The new vaccines also have to be endowed with a higher safety margin than that of conventional vaccines. The nonreplicating adenovirus-vectored vaccine holds promise in boosting vaccine coverage because the vector can be rapidly manufactured in serum-free suspension cells in response to a surge in demand, and noninvasively administered by nasal spray into human subjects in compliance with evolutionary medicine. In contrast to parenteral injection, noninvasive mucosal vaccination minimizes systemic inflammation. Moreover, pre-existing adenovirus immunity does not interfere appreciably with the potency of an adenovirus-vectored nasal vaccine. Nasal administration of adenovirus vectors encoding pathogen antigens is not only fear-free and painless, but also confers rapid and sustained protection against mucosal pathogens as a drug-vaccine duo since adenovirus particles alone without transgene expression can induce an anti-influenza state in the airway. In addition to human vaccination, animals can also be mass immunized by this class of vectored vaccines.

  16. Prime-boost immunization with poxvirus or adenovirus vectors as a strategy to develop a protective vaccine for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Robert M; Kim, Jerome H; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L

    2010-09-01

    Challenges in the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine are myriad with significant hurdles posed by viral diversity, the lack of a human correlate of protection and difficulty in creating immunogens capable of eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies. The implicit requirement for novel approaches to these problems has resulted in vaccine candidates designed to elicit cellular and/or humoral immune responses, to include recombinant DNA, viral and bacterial vectors, and subunit proteins. Here, we review data from clinical studies primarily of poxvirus and adenovirus vector vaccines, used in a heterologous prime-boost combination strategy. Currently, this strategy appears to hold the most promise for an effective vaccine based on results from immunogenicity testing and nonhuman primate challenge models, as well as the modest efficacy recently observed in the Thai prime-boost trial.

  17. CD46-mediated transduction of a species D adenovirus vaccine improves mucosal vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Zenaido T; Turner, Mallory A; Barry, Michael A; Weaver, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    The high levels of preexisting immunity against Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) have deemed Ad5 unusable for translation as a human vaccine vector. Low seroprevalent alternative viral vectors may be less impacted by preexisting immunity, but they may also have significantly different phenotypes from that of Ad5. In this study we compare species D Ads (26, 28, and 48) to the species C Ad5. In vitro transduction studies show striking differences between the species C and D viruses. Most notably, Ad26 transduced human dendritic cells much more effectively than Ad5. In vivo imaging studies showed strikingly different transgene expression profiles. The Ad5 virus was superior to the species D viruses in BALB/c mice when delivered intramuscularly. However, the inverse was true when the viruses were delivered mucosally via the intranasal epithelia. Intramuscular transduction was restored in mice that ubiquitously expressed human CD46, the primary receptor for species D viruses. We analyzed both species C and D Ads for their ability to induce prophylactic immunity against influenza in the CD46 transgenic mouse model. Surprisingly, the species D vaccines again failed to induce greater levels of protective immunity as compared with the species C Ad5 when delivered intramuscularly. However, the species D Ad vaccine vector, Ad48, induced significantly greater protection as compared with Ad5 when delivered mucosally via the intranasal route in CD46 transgenic mice. These data shed light on the complexities between the species and types of Ad. Our findings indicate that more research will be required to identify the mechanisms that play a key role in the induction of protective immunity induced by species D Ad vaccines.

  18. Acute Respiratory Disease in US Army Trainees 3 Years after Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Army Public Health Center (Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD), and the NHRC FRI program have provided...The Army Public Health Center collected weekly ARD-SP data from the Ar- my’s 4 IET sites (Fort Benning, GA; Fort Jackson, SC; Fort Leonard Wood...Disease in US Army Trainees 3 Years after Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine1 Author affiliations: US Army Public Health Center , Aberdeen

  19. Co-localization of a CD1d-binding glycolipid with an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine for a potent adjuvant effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Kawamura, Akira; Funakoshi, Ryota; Porcelli, Steven A; Tsuji, Moriya

    2017-05-31

    A CD1d-binding, invariant (i) natural killer T (NKT)-cell stimulatory glycolipid, α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer), has been shown to act as an adjuvant. We previously identified a fluorinated phenyl ring-modified αGalCer analog, 7DW8-5, displaying a higher binding affinity for CD1d molecule and more potent adjuvant activity than αGalCer. In the present study, 7DW8-5 co-administered intramuscularly (i.m.) with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (PyCSP), AdPyCS, has led to a co-localization of 7DW8-5 and a PyCSP in draining lymph nodes (dLNs), particularly in dendritic cells (DCs). This occurrence initiates a cascade of events, such as the recruitment of DCs to dLNs and their activation and maturation, and the enhancement of the ability of DCs to prime CD8+ T cells induced by AdPyCS and ultimately leading to a potent adjuvant effect and protection against malaria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel Cocaine Vaccine Linked to a Disrupted Adenovirus Gene Transfer Vector Blocks Cocaine Psychostimulant and Reinforcing Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Sunmee; Hicks, Martin J; De, Bishnu P; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Moreno, Amira Y; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Janda, Kim D; Crystal, Ronald G; Koob, George F

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising treatment for drug addiction. However, insufficient immune responses to vaccines in most subjects pose a challenge. In this study, we tested the efficacy of a new cocaine vaccine (dAd5GNE) in antagonizing cocaine addiction-related behaviors in rats. This vaccine used a disrupted serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vector coupled to a third-generation cocaine hapten, termed GNE (6-(2R,3S)-3-(benzoyloxy)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo [3.2.1] octane-2-carboxamido-hexanoic acid). Three groups of rats were immunized with dAd5GNE. One group was injected with 3H-cocaine, and radioactivity in the blood and brain was determined. A second group was tested for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. A third group was examined for cocaine self-administration, extinction, and reinstatement of responding for cocaine. Antibody titers were determined at various time-points. In each experiment, we added a control group that was immunized with dAd5 without a hapten. The vaccination with dAd5GNE produced long-lasting high titers (>105) of anti-cocaine antibodies in all of the rats. The vaccination inhibited cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity and sensitization. Vaccinated rats acquired cocaine self-administration, but they showed less motivation to self-administer cocaine under a progressive-ratio schedule than control rats. When cocaine was not available in a session, control rats exhibited ‘extinction burst' responding, whereas vaccinated rats did not. Moreover, when primed with cocaine, vaccinated rats did not reinstate responding, suggesting a blockade of cocaine-seeking behavior. These data strongly suggest that our dAd5GNE vector-based vaccine may be effective in treating cocaine abuse and addiction. PMID:21918504

  1. Recombinant Adenoviruses Displaying Matrix 2 Ectodomain Epitopes on Their Fiber Proteins as Universal Influenza Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinying; Yang, Yong; Xia, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Xi; Song, Yufeng; Dai, Xinyi; Wang, Min; Zhou, Dongming

    2017-04-01

    Influenza is a zoonotic disease that poses severe threats to public health and the global economy. Reemerging influenza pandemics highlight the demand for universal influenza vaccines. We developed a novel virus platform using extracellular domain IV of the matrix 2 protein (M2e), AdC68-F3M2e, by introducing three conserved M2e epitopes into the HI loop of the chimpanzee adenovirus (AdV) fiber protein. The M2e epitopes were expressed sufficiently on the AdV virion surface without affecting fiber trimerization. Additionally, one recombinant adenovirus, AdC68-F3M2e(H1-H5-H7), induced robust M2e-specific antibody responses in BALB/c mice after two sequential vaccinations and conferred efficient protection against homologous and heterologous influenza virus (IV) challenges. We found that the use of AdV with tandem M2e epitopes in fiber is a potential strategy for influenza prevention. IMPORTANCE Influenza epidemics and pandemics severely threaten public health. Universal influenza vaccines have increasingly attracted interest in recent years. Here, we describe a new strategy that incorporates triple M2e epitopes into the fiber protein of chimpanzee adenovirus 68. We optimized the process of inserting foreign genes into the AdC68 structural protein by one-step isothermal assembly and demonstrated that this 225-bp HI loop insertion could be well tolerated. Furthermore, two doses of adjuvant-free fiber-modified AdC68 could confer sufficient protection against homologous and heterologous influenza virus infections in mice. Our results show that AdC68-F3M2e could be pursued as a novel universal influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. In silico structure analysis and epitope prediction of E3 CR1-beta protein of Human Adenovirus E for vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwary, Noman Ibna Amin; Islam, Md Saiful; Sohel, Md; Ara, Ismot; Sikder, Mohd Omar Faruk; Shahik, Shah Md

    2016-12-01

    Human Adenoviruses are divided into 7 species of Human Adenovirus A to G based on DNA genome homology. The Human Adenovirus E (HAdVs-E) genome is a linear, double-stranded DNA containing 38 protein-coding genes. Wild-type adenoviruses type E, are linked to a number of slight illnesses. The most important part of HAdVs-E is E3 CR1-beta protein which controls the host immune response and viral attachment. We use numerous bio-informatics and immuno-informatics implements comprising sequence and construction tools for construction of 3D model and epitope prediction for HAdVs-E. The 3D structure of E3 CR1-beta protein was generated and total of ten antigenic B cell epitopes, 6 MHC class I and 11 MHC class II binding peptides were predicted. The study was carried out to predict antigenic determinants/epitopes of the E3 CR1-beta protein of Human Adenovirus E along with the 3D protein modeling. The study revealed potential T-cell and B-cell epitopes that can raise the desired immune response against E3 CR1-beta protein and useful in developing effective vaccines against HAdVs-E. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mucosal trafficking of vector-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes following vaccination of rhesus monkeys with adenovirus serotype 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Li, Hualin; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; La Porte, Annalena; O'Brien, Kara L; Whitney, James B; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G; Barouch, Dan H

    2010-10-01

    Post hoc analysis of the phase 2b Step study evaluating a recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5)-based HIV-1 vaccine candidate suggested a potential increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in subjects who were baseline Ad5 seropositive and uncircumcised. These concerns had a profound impact on the HIV-1 vaccine development field, although the mechanism underlying this observation remains unknown. It has been hypothesized that rAd5 vaccination of baseline Ad5-seropositive individuals may have resulted in anamnestic, vector-specific CD4(+) T lymphocytes that could have trafficked to mucosal sites and served as increased targets for HIV-1 infection. Here we show that Ad5-specific CD4(+) T lymphocyte responses at mucosal sites following rAd5-Gag/Pol/Nef vaccination were comparable in rhesus monkeys with and without baseline Ad5 immunity. Moreover, the total cellular inflammatory infiltrates and the CD3(+), CD4(+), HLA-DR(+), Ki67(+), and langerin(+) cellular subpopulations in colorectal and foreskin mucosa were similar in both groups. Thus, no greater trafficking of Ad5-specific CD4(+) T lymphocytes to mucosal target sites was observed following rAd5 vaccination of rhesus monkeys with baseline Ad5 immunity. These findings from this nonhuman primate model provide evidence against the hypothesis that recruitment of vector-specific target cells to mucosal sites led to increased HIV-1 acquisition in Ad5-seropositive, uncircumcised vaccinees in the Step study.

  4. Improving Adenovirus Based Gene Transfer: Strategies to Accomplish Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amalfitano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (Ad based gene transfer vectors continue to be the platform of choice for an increasing number of clinical trials worldwide. In fact, within the last five years, the number of clinical trials that utilize Ad based vectors has doubled, indicating growing enthusiasm for the numerous positive characteristics of this gene transfer platform. For example, Ad vectors can be easily and relatively inexpensively produced to high titers in a cGMP compliant manner, can be stably stored and transported, and have a broad applicability for a wide range of clinical conditions, including both gene therapy and vaccine applications. Ad vector based gene transfer will become more useful as strategies to counteract innate and/or pre-existing adaptive immune responses to Ads are developed and confirmed to be efficacious. The approaches attempting to overcome these limitations can be divided into two broad categories: pre-emptive immune modulation of the host, and selective modification of the Ad vector itself. The first category of methods includes the use of immunosuppressive drugs or specific compounds to block important immune pathways, which are known to be induced by Ads. The second category comprises several innovative strategies inclusive of: (1 Ad-capsid-display of specific inhibitors or ligands; (2 covalent modifications of the entire Ad vector capsid moiety; (3 the use of tissue specific promoters and local administration routes; (4 the use of genome modified Ads; and (5 the development of chimeric or alternative serotype Ads. This review article will focus on both the promise and the limitations of each of these immune evasion strategies, and in the process delineate future directions in developing safer and more efficacious Ad-based gene transfer strategies.

  5. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Z Q; Greenberg, L; Ertl, H C; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-02-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protection of Non-Human Primates against Rabies with an Adenovirus Recombinant Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H. C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  7. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant adenovirus encoding nucleoprotein provides potent protection against influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccines that target the highly variable surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase cause inconvenience of having vaccination every year. For this reason, development of universal vaccines targeting conserved viral components is needed. In this study, we generated recombinant adenovirus (rAd vaccine encoding nucleoprotein (NP of A/PR/8/34 influenza virus, designated rAd/NP. BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally or sublingually with rAd/NP vaccine and subsequently challenged with lethal doses of heterologous as well as homologous influenza viruses. We found that intranasal immunization of rAd/NP elicited strong mucosal IgA responses as well as stronger CD8 T-cell responses toward immunodominant K(d-restricted NP147-155 epitope than sublingual immunization. Importantly, only single intranasal but not sublingual immunization of rAd/NP provides potent protection against both homologous and heterologous influenza virus challenges. These results suggest that recombinant rAd/NP could be a universal vaccine candidate for mucosal administration against influenza virus.

  8. Protection against Mucosal SHIV Challenge by Peptide and Helper-Dependent Adenovirus Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jagannadha Sastry

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Groups of rhesus macaques that had previously been immunized with HIV-1 envelope (env peptides and first generation adenovirus serotype 5 (FG-Ad5 vaccines expressing the same peptides were immunized intramuscularly three times with helperdependent adenovirus (HD-Ad vaccines expressing only the HIV-1 envelope from JRFL. No gag, pol, or other SHIV genes were used for vaccination. One group of the FG-Ad5-immune animals was immunized three times with HD-Ad5 expressing env. One group was immunized by serotype-switching with HD-Ad6, HD-Ad1, and HD-Ad2 expressing env. Previous work demonstrated that serum antibody levels against env were significantly higher in the serotype-switched group than in the HD-Ad5 group. In this study, neutralizing antibody and T cell responses were compared between the groups before and after rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. When serum samples were assayed for neutralizing antibodies, only weak activity was observed. T cell responses against env epitopes were higher in the serotype-switched group. When these animals were challenged rectally with SHIV-SF162P3, both the Ad5 and serotype-switch groups significantly reduced peak viral loads 2 to 10-fold 2 weeks after infection. Peak viral loads were significantly lower for the serotype-switched group as compared to the HD-Ad5-immunized group. Viral loads declined over 18 weeks after infection with some animals viremia reducing nearly 4 logs from the peak. These data demonstrate significant mucosal vaccine effects after immunization with only env antigens. These data also demonstrate HD-Ad vectors are a robust platform for vaccination.

  9. Multiple efficacy studies of an adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A24 subunit vaccine in cattle using homologous challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutta, Christopher; Barrera, José; Pisano, Melia; Zsak, Laszlo; Grubman, Marvin J; Mayr, Gregory A; Moraes, Mauro P; Kamicker, Barbara J; Brake, David A; Ettyreddy, Damodar; Brough, Douglas E; Butman, Bryan T; Neilan, John G

    2016-06-08

    The safety and efficacy of an experimental, replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A24 Cruzeiro capsid-based subunit vaccine (AdtA24) was examined in eight independent cattle studies. AdtA24 non-adjuvanted vaccine was administered intramuscularly to a total of 150 steers in doses ranging from approximately 1.0×10(8) to 2.1×10(11) particle units per animal. No detectable local or systemic reactions were observed after vaccination. At 7 days post-vaccination (dpv), vaccinated and control animals were challenged with FMDV serotype A24 Cruzeiro via the intradermal lingual route. Vaccine efficacy was measured by FMDV A24 serum neutralizing titers and by protection from clinical disease and viremia after challenge. The results of eight studies demonstrated a strong correlation between AdtA24 vaccine dose and protection from clinical disease (R(2)=0.97) and viremia (R(2)=0.98). There was also a strong correlation between FMDV A24 neutralization titers on day of challenge and protection from clinical disease (R(2)=0.99). Vaccination with AdtA24 enabled differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) as demonstrated by the absence of antibodies to the FMDV nonstructural proteins in vaccinates prior to challenge. Lack of AdtA24 vaccine shedding after vaccination was indicated by the absence of neutralizing antibody titers to both the adenovector and FMDV A24 Cruzeiro in control animals after co-mingling with vaccinated cattle for three to four weeks. In summary, a non-adjuvanted AdtA24 experimental vaccine was shown to be safe, immunogenic, consistently protected cattle at 7 dpv against direct, homologous FMDV challenge, and enabled differentiation of infected from vaccinated cattle prior to challenge. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. HIV DNA-Adenovirus Multiclade Envelope Vaccine Induces gp41 Antibody Immunodominance in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qifeng; Williams, Wilton B; Saunders, Kevin O; Seaton, Kelly E; Wiehe, Kevin J; Vandergrift, Nathan; Von Holle, Tarra A; Trama, Ashley M; Parks, Robert J; Luo, Kan; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kepler, Thomas B; Marshall, Dawn J; Montefiori, David C; Sutherland, Laura L; Alam, Munir S; Whitesides, John F; Bowman, Cindy M; Permar, Sallie R; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Seed, Patrick C; Van Rompay, Koen K A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Moody, M Anthony; Haynes, Barton F

    2017-11-01

    Dominant antibody responses in vaccinees who received the HIV-1 multiclade (A, B, and C) envelope (Env) DNA/recombinant adenovirus virus type 5 (rAd5) vaccine studied in HIV-1 Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) efficacy trial 505 (HVTN 505) targeted Env gp41 and cross-reacted with microbial antigens. In this study, we asked if the DNA/rAd5 vaccine induced a similar antibody response in rhesus macaques (RMs), which are commonly used as an animal model for human HIV-1 infections and for testing candidate HIV-1 vaccines. We also asked if gp41 immunodominance could be avoided by immunization of neonatal RMs during the early stages of microbial colonization. We found that the DNA/rAd5 vaccine elicited a higher frequency of gp41-reactive memory B cells than gp120-memory B cells in adult and neonatal RMs. Analysis of the vaccine-induced Env-reactive B cell repertoire revealed that the majority of HIV-1 Env-reactive antibodies in both adult and neonatal RMs were targeted to gp41. Interestingly, a subset of gp41-reactive antibodies isolated from RMs cross-reacted with host antigens, including autologous intestinal microbiota. Thus, gp41-containing DNA/rAd5 vaccine induced dominant gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies derived from blood memory B cells in RMs as observed in the HVTN 505 vaccine efficacy trial. These data demonstrated that RMs can be used to investigate gp41 immunodominance in candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Moreover, colonization of neonatal RMs occurred within the first week of life, and immunization of neonatal RMs during this time also induced a dominant gp41-reactive antibody response.IMPORTANCE Our results are critical to current work in the HIV-1 vaccine field evaluating the phenomenon of gp41 immunodominance induced by HIV-1 Env gp140 in RMs and humans. Our data demonstrate that RMs are an appropriate animal model to study this phenomenon and to determine the immunogenicity in new HIV-1 Env trimer vaccine designs. The demonstration of gp41 immunodominance in

  11. Clinical and parasitological protection in a Leishmania infantum-macaque model vaccinated with adenovirus and the recombinant A2 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Gabriel; Teva, Antonio; Porrozzi, Renato; Pinto, Marcelo A; Marchevsky, Renato S; Rocha, Maria Gabrielle L; Dutra, Miriam S; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fernandes, Ana-Paula; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2014-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe vector-born disease of humans and dogs caused by Leishmania donovani complex parasites. Approximately 0.2 to 0.4 million new human VL cases occur annually worldwide. In the new world, these alarming numbers are primarily due to the impracticality of current control methods based on vector reduction and dog euthanasia. Thus, a prophylactic vaccine appears to be essential for VL control. The current efforts to develop an efficacious vaccine include the use of animal models that are as close to human VL. We have previously reported a L. infantum-macaque infection model that is reliable to determine which vaccine candidates are most worthy for further development. Among the few amastigote antigens tested so far, one of specific interest is the recombinant A2 (rA2) protein that protects against experimental L. infantum infections in mice and dogs. Primates were vaccinated using three rA2-based prime-boost immunization regimes: three doses of rA2 plus recombinant human interleukin-12 (rhIL-12) adsorbed in alum (rA2/rhIL-12/alum); two doses of non-replicative adenovirus recombinant vector encoding A2 (Ad5-A2) followed by two boosts with rA2/rhIL-12/alum (Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum); and plasmid DNA encoding A2 gene (DNA-A2) boosted with two doses of Ad5-A2 (DNA-A2+Ad5-A2). Primates received a subsequent infectious challenge with L. infantum. Vaccines, apart from being safe, were immunogenic as animals responded with increased pre-challenge production of anti-A2-specific IgG antibodies, though with some variability in the response, depending on the vaccine formulation/protocol. The relative parasite load in the liver was significantly lower in immunized macaques as compared to controls. Protection correlated with hepatic granuloma resolution, and reduction of clinical symptoms, particularly when primates were vaccinated with the Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum protocol. The remarkable clinical protection induced by A2 in an animal model that is

  12. Clinical and parasitological protection in a Leishmania infantum-macaque model vaccinated with adenovirus and the recombinant A2 antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Grimaldi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a severe vector-born disease of humans and dogs caused by Leishmania donovani complex parasites. Approximately 0.2 to 0.4 million new human VL cases occur annually worldwide. In the new world, these alarming numbers are primarily due to the impracticality of current control methods based on vector reduction and dog euthanasia. Thus, a prophylactic vaccine appears to be essential for VL control. The current efforts to develop an efficacious vaccine include the use of animal models that are as close to human VL. We have previously reported a L. infantum-macaque infection model that is reliable to determine which vaccine candidates are most worthy for further development. Among the few amastigote antigens tested so far, one of specific interest is the recombinant A2 (rA2 protein that protects against experimental L. infantum infections in mice and dogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primates were vaccinated using three rA2-based prime-boost immunization regimes: three doses of rA2 plus recombinant human interleukin-12 (rhIL-12 adsorbed in alum (rA2/rhIL-12/alum; two doses of non-replicative adenovirus recombinant vector encoding A2 (Ad5-A2 followed by two boosts with rA2/rhIL-12/alum (Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum; and plasmid DNA encoding A2 gene (DNA-A2 boosted with two doses of Ad5-A2 (DNA-A2+Ad5-A2. Primates received a subsequent infectious challenge with L. infantum. Vaccines, apart from being safe, were immunogenic as animals responded with increased pre-challenge production of anti-A2-specific IgG antibodies, though with some variability in the response, depending on the vaccine formulation/protocol. The relative parasite load in the liver was significantly lower in immunized macaques as compared to controls. Protection correlated with hepatic granuloma resolution, and reduction of clinical symptoms, particularly when primates were vaccinated with the Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum protocol. CONCLUSIONS

  13. MHC class II-associated invariant chain linkage of antigen dramatically improves cell-mediated immunity induced by adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria; Orskov, Cathrine

    2008-01-01

    The ideal vaccine induces a potent protective immune response, which should be rapidly induced, long-standing, and of broad specificity. Recombinant adenoviral vectors induce potent Ab and CD8+ T cell responses against transgenic Ags within weeks of administration, and they are among the most...... potent and versatile Ag delivery vehicles available. However, the impact of chronic infections like HIV and hepatitis C virus underscore the need for further improvements. In this study, we show that the protective immune response to an adenovirus-encoded vaccine Ag can be accelerated, enhanced......, broadened, and prolonged by tethering of the rAg to the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, adenovirus-vectored vaccines expressing lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-derived glycoprotein linked to Ii increased the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell stimulatory capacity in vitro and in vivo...

  14. Increased immunogenicity of recombinant Ad35-based malaria vaccine through formulation with aluminium phosphate adjuvant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ophorst, Olga J. A. E.; Radosevic, Katarina; Klap, Jaco M.; Sijtsma, Jeroen; Gillissen, Gert; Mintardjo, Ratna; van Ooij, Mark J. M.; Holterman, Lennart; Companjen, Arjen; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we have shown the potency of recombinant Adenovirus serotype 35 viral vaccines (rAd35) to induce strong immune response against the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of the plasmodium parasite. To further optimize immunogenicity of Ad35-based malaria vaccines we formulated rAd35.CS vaccine

  15. Antigen capsid-display on human adenovirus 35 via pIX fusion is a potent vaccine platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Vorthoren, Lars; Serroyen, Jan; Kuipers, Harmjan; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Zahn, Roland; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort

    2017-01-01

    Durable protection against complex pathogens is likely to require immunity that comprises both humoral and cellular responses. While heterologous prime-boost regimens based on recombinant, replication-incompetent Adenoviral vectors (AdV) and adjuvanted protein have been able to induce high levels of concomitant humoral and cellular responses, complex manufacturing and handling in the field may limit their success. To combine the benefits of genetic and protein-based vaccination within one vaccine construct and to facilitate their use, we generated Human Adenovirus 35 (HAdV35) vectors genetically encoding a model antigen based on the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) circumsporozoite (CS) protein and displaying a truncated version of the same antigen (CSshort) via protein IX on the capsid, with or without a flexible glycine-linker and/or a 45Å-spacer. The four tested pIX-antigen display variants were efficiently incorporated and presented on the HAdV35 capsid irrespective of whether a transgene was encoded or not. Transgene-expression and producibility of the display-/expression vectors were not impeded by the pIX-display. In mice, the pIX-modified vectors induced strong humoral antigen-specific immunity that increased with the inclusion of the linker-/spacer molecules, exceeded the responses induced by the genetic, transgene-expressing HAdV35 vector, and surpassed recombinant protein in potency. In addition, the pIX- display/expression vectors elicited high antigen-specific cellular immune responses that matched those of the genetic HAdV35 vector expressing CS. pIX-modified display-/expression HAdV vectors may therefore be a valuable technology for the development of vaccines against complex pathogens, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:28362809

  16. Safety and Tolerability of Conserved Region Vaccines Vectored by Plasmid DNA, Simian Adenovirus and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Administered to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Uninfected Adults in a Randomized, Single-Blind Phase I Trial: e101591

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emma-Jo Hayton; Annie Rose; Umar Ibrahimsa; Mariarosaria Del Sorbo; Stefania Capone; Alison Crook; Antony P Black; Lucy Dorrell; Tomás Hanke

    2014-01-01

      Trial Design HIV-1 vaccine development has advanced slowly due to viral antigenic diversity, poor immunogenicity and recently, safety concerns associated with human adenovirus serotype-5 vectors...

  17. Stabilizing formulations for inhalable powders of an adenovirus 35-vectored tuberculosis (TB) vaccine (AERAS-402)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Tom H.; Tsao, Eric; Goudsmit, Jaap; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Sadoff, Jerald

    2010-01-01

    A powder vaccine intended for aerosol delivery was formulated by spray drying the Ad35-vectored tuberculosis (TB) AERAS-402 vaccine with mannitol-based stabilizers. Thermodynamic properties, water absorption, particle size distribution and morphology of the powders were evaluated. Virus survival

  18. Comparison of systemic and mucosal immunization with helper-dependent adenoviruses for vaccination against mucosal challenge with SHIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Eric A; Nehete, Pramod N; Nehete, Bharti P; Yang, Guojun; Buchl, Stephanie J; Hanley, Patrick W; Palmer, Donna; Montefiori, David C; Ferrari, Guido; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m.) or intravaginal (ivag.) routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination.

  19. Comparison of Systemic and Mucosal Immunization with Helper-Dependent Adenoviruses for Vaccination against Mucosal Challenge with SHIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, Bharti P.; Yang, Guojun; Buchl, Stephanie J.; Hanley, Patrick W.; Palmer, Donna; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m.) or intravaginal (ivag.) routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination. PMID:23844034

  20. Protective Efficacy in Sheep of Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccines against Bluetongue Virus Is Associated with Specific T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Verónica; Pascual, Elena; Avia, Miguel; Peña, Lourdes; Valcárcel, Félix; Sevilla, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that causes a hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Its control has been achieved by inactivated-vaccines that have proven to protect against homologous BTV challenge although unable to induce long-term immunity. Therefore, a more efficient control strategy needs to be developed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors are lead vaccine candidates for protection of several diseases, mainly because of their potency to induce potent T cell immunity. Here we report the induction of humoral and T-cell mediated responses able to protect animals against BTV challenge by recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either VP7, VP2 or NS3 BTV proteins. First we used the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and afterwards we assayed the protective efficacy in sheep, the natural host of BTV. Mice were completely protected against BTV challenge, developing humoral and BTV-specific CD8+- and CD4+-T cell responses by vaccination with the different rAd5. Sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP2 and Ad5-BTV-VP7 or only with Ad5-BTV-VP7 and challenged with BTV showed mild disease symptoms and reduced viremia. This partial protection was achieved in the absence of neutralizing antibodies but strong BTV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in those sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP7. These data indicate that rAd5 is a suitable vaccine vector to induce T cell immunity during BTV vaccination and provide new data regarding the relevance of T cell responses in protection during BTV infection. PMID:26619062

  1. Vaccination of rabbits with an adenovirus vector expressing the papillomavirus E2 protein leads to clearance of papillomas and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Janet L; Shlyankevich, Mark; Zhang, Lixin; Slade, Martin D; Goodwin, Edward C; Peh, Woei; Deisseroth, Albert B

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer arises from lesions caused by infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV). Therefore, vaccination against HPV could prevent carcinogenesis by preventing HPV infection or inducing lesion regression. HPV E2 protein is an attractive candidate for vaccine development because it is required for papilloma formation, is involved in all stages of the virus life cycle, and is expressed in all premalignant lesions as well as some cancers. This study reports vaccination against E2 protein using a rabbit model of papillomavirus infection. A recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vector expressing the E2 protein of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) was tested for therapeutic efficacy in CRPV-infected rabbits. Primary immunization with the Ad-E2 vaccine, compared to immunization with a control Ad vector, reduced the number of papilloma-forming sites from 17 of 45 to 4 of 45. After booster immunization, vaccinated rabbits formed no new papillomas versus an additional 23 papillomas in rabbits that received the control vector. Papillomas in the Ad-E2 vaccinees were significantly smaller than those in the control rabbits, and all four papillomas in the Ad-E2 vaccinated rabbits regressed. No CRPV DNA was detected either in the regression sites or in sites that did not form papillomas, indicating that the vaccination led to clearance of CRPV from all infected sites.

  2. Oncolytic Adenovirus and Tumor-Targeting Immune Modulatory Therapy Improve Autologous Cancer Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Rivera-Molina, Yisel; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Bover, Laura; Vence, Luis M; Yuan, Ying; Lang, Frederick F; Toniatti, Carlo; Hossain, Mohammad B; Fueyo, Juan

    2017-07-15

    Oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumor cells, disrupt immunosuppression within the tumor, and reactivate antitumor immunity, but they have yet to live up to their therapeutic potential. Immune checkpoint modulation has been efficacious in a variety of cancer with an immunogenic microenvironment, but is associated with toxicity due to nonspecific T-cell activation. Therefore, combining these two strategies would likely result in both effective and specific cancer therapy. To test the hypothesis, we first constructed oncolytic adenovirus Delta-24-RGDOX expressing the immune costimulator OX40 ligand (OX40L). Like its predecessor Delta-24-RGD, Delta-24-RGDOX induced immunogenic cell death and recruit lymphocytes to the tumor site. Compared with Delta-24-RGD, Delta-24-RGDOX exhibited superior tumor-specific activation of lymphocytes and proliferation of CD8+ T cells specific to tumor-associated antigens, resulting in cancer-specific immunity. Delta-24-RGDOX mediated more potent antiglioma activity in immunocompetent C57BL/6 but not immunodeficient athymic mice, leading to specific immune memory against the tumor. To further overcome the immune suppression mediated by programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression on cancer cells accompanied with virotherapy, intratumoral injection of Delta-24-RGDOX and an anti-PD-L1 antibody showed synergistic inhibition of gliomas and significantly increased survival in mice. Our data demonstrate that combining an oncolytic virus with tumor-targeting immune checkpoint modulators elicits potent in situ autologous cancer vaccination, resulting in an efficacious, tumor-specific, and long-lasting therapeutic effect. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3894-907. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Increased immunogenicity of recombinant Ad35-based malaria vaccine through formulation with aluminium phosphate adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophorst, Olga J A E; Radosević, Katarina; Klap, Jaco M; Sijtsma, Jeroen; Gillissen, Gert; Mintardjo, Ratna; van Ooij, Mark J M; Holterman, Lennart; Companjen, Arjen; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo J E

    2007-08-29

    Previously, we have shown the potency of recombinant Adenovirus serotype 35 viral vaccines (rAd35) to induce strong immune response against the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of the plasmodium parasite. To further optimize immunogenicity of Ad35-based malaria vaccines we formulated rAd35.CS vaccine with aluminium phosphate adjuvant (AlPO(4)). In contrast to the conventional protein based vaccines no absorption to aluminium adjuvant was observed and rAd35 viral in vitro infectivity in mammalian cells was preserved. Immunization with Ad35.CS formulated with AlPO(4) resulted in significantly higher CS specific T and B cell responses in mice upon either single or prime-boost vaccination regimens as compared to rAd35.CS alone. With these results we report for the first time the feasibility of using an AlPO(4) adjuvant to increase the potency of a live adenovirus serotype 35-based vaccine.

  4. Vaccination with recombinant adenovirus expressing peste des petits ruminants virus-F or -H proteins elicits T cell responses to epitopes that arises during PPRV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, José Manuel; Avia, Miguel; Pascual, Elena; Sevilla, Noemí; Martín, Verónica

    2017-11-21

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) causes an economically important disease that limits productivity in small domestic ruminants and often affects the livestock of the poorest populations in developing countries. Animals that survive PPRV develop strong cellular and humoral responses, which are probably necessary for protection. Vaccination should thus aim at mimicking these natural responses. Immunization strategies against this morbillivirus using recombinant adenoviruses expressing PPRV-F or -H proteins can protect PPRV-challenged animals and permit differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals. Little is known of the T cell repertoire these recombinant vaccines induce. In the present work, we identified several CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes in sheep infected with PPRV. We also show that recombinant adenovirus vaccination induced T cell responses to the same epitopes, and led to memory T cell differentiation. T cells primed by these recombinant adenovirus vaccines expanded after PPRV challenge and probably contributed to protection. These data validate the use of recombinant adenovirus expressing PPRV genes as DIVA strategies to control this highly contagious disease.

  5. HIV antigen incorporation within adenovirus hexon hypervariable 2 for a novel HIV vaccine approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiana L Matthews

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviral (Ad vectors have been used for a variety of vaccine applications including cancer and infectious diseases. Traditionally, Ad-based vaccines are designed to express antigens through transgene expression of a given antigen. However, in some cases these conventional Ad-based vaccines have had sub-optimal clinical results. These sub-optimal results are attributed in part to pre-existing Ad serotype 5 (Ad5 immunity. In order to circumvent the need for antigen expression via transgene incorporation, the "antigen capsid-incorporation" strategy has been developed and used for Ad-based vaccine development in the context of a few diseases. This strategy embodies the incorporation of antigenic peptides within the capsid structure of viral vectors. The major capsid protein hexon has been utilized for these capsid incorporation strategies due to hexon's natural role in the generation of anti-Ad immune response and its numerical representation within the Ad virion. Using this strategy, we have developed the means to incorporate heterologous peptide epitopes specifically within the major surface-exposed domains of the Ad capsid protein hexon. Our study herein focuses on generation of multivalent vaccine vectors presenting HIV antigens within the Ad capsid protein hexon, as well as expressing an HIV antigen as a transgene. These novel vectors utilize HVR2 as an incorporation site for a twenty-four amino acid region of the HIV membrane proximal ectodomain region (MPER, derived from HIV glycoprotein gp41 (gp41. Our study herein illustrates that our multivalent anti-HIV vectors elicit a cellular anti-HIV response. Furthermore, vaccinations with these vectors, which present HIV antigens at HVR2, elicit a HIV epitope-specific humoral immune response.

  6. T Helper 17 Promotes Induction of Antigen-Specific Gut-Mucosal Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes following Adenovirus Vector Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahisa Hemmi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Few current vaccines can establish antigen (Ag-specific immune responses in both mucosal and systemic compartments. Therefore, development of vaccines providing defense against diverse infectious agents in both compartments is of high priority in global health. Intramuscular vaccination of an adenovirus vector (Adv has been shown to induce Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs in both systemic and gut-mucosal compartments. We previously found that type I interferon (IFN signaling is required for induction of gut-mucosal, but not systemic, CTLs following vaccination; however, the molecular mechanism involving type I IFN signaling remains unknown. Here, we found that T helper 17 (Th17-polarizing cytokine expression was down-regulated in the inguinal lymph nodes (iLNs of Ifnar2−/− mice, resulting in the reduction of Ag-specific Th17 cells in the iLNs and gut mucosa of the mice. We also found that prior transfer of Th17 cells reversed the decrease in the number of Ag-specific gut-mucosal CTLs in Ifnar2−/− mice following Adv vaccination. Additionally, prior transfer of Th17 cells into wild-type mice enhanced the induction of Ag-specific CTLs in the gut mucosa, but not in systemic compartments, suggesting a gut mucosa-specific mechanism where Th17 cells regulate the magnitude of vaccine-elicited Ag-specific CTL responses. These data suggest that Th17 cells translate systemic type I IFN signaling into a gut-mucosal CTL response following vaccination, which could promote the development of promising Adv vaccines capable of establishing both systemic and gut-mucosal protective immunity.

  7. Vaccination to conserved influenza antigens in mice using a novel Simian adenovirus vector, PanAd3, derived from the bonobo Pan paniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitelli, Alessandra; Quirion, Mary R; Lo, Chia-Yun; Misplon, Julia A; Grabowska, Agnieszka K; Pierantoni, Angiolo; Ammendola, Virginia; Price, Graeme E; Soboleski, Mark R; Cortese, Riccardo; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Epstein, Suzanne L

    2013-01-01

    Among approximately 1000 adenoviruses from chimpanzees and bonobos studied recently, the Pan Adenovirus type 3 (PanAd3, isolated from a bonobo, Pan paniscus) has one of the best profiles for a vaccine vector, combining potent transgene immunogenicity with minimal pre-existing immunity in the human population. In this study, we inserted into a replication defective PanAd3 a transgene expressing a fusion protein of conserved influenza antigens nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 (M1). We then studied antibody and T cell responses as well as protection from challenge infection in a mouse model. A single intranasal administration of PanAd3-NPM1 vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses, and protected against high dose lethal influenza virus challenge. Thus PanAd3 is a promising candidate vector for vaccines, including universal influenza vaccines.

  8. Vaccination to conserved influenza antigens in mice using a novel Simian adenovirus vector, PanAd3, derived from the bonobo Pan paniscus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Vitelli

    Full Text Available Among approximately 1000 adenoviruses from chimpanzees and bonobos studied recently, the Pan Adenovirus type 3 (PanAd3, isolated from a bonobo, Pan paniscus has one of the best profiles for a vaccine vector, combining potent transgene immunogenicity with minimal pre-existing immunity in the human population. In this study, we inserted into a replication defective PanAd3 a transgene expressing a fusion protein of conserved influenza antigens nucleoprotein (NP and matrix 1 (M1. We then studied antibody and T cell responses as well as protection from challenge infection in a mouse model. A single intranasal administration of PanAd3-NPM1 vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses, and protected against high dose lethal influenza virus challenge. Thus PanAd3 is a promising candidate vector for vaccines, including universal influenza vaccines.

  9. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O,A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutral...

  10. The use of an E1-deleted, replication-defective adenovirus recombinant expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein for early vaccination of mice against rabies virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y.; Xiang, Z.; Pasquini, S; Ertl, H C

    1997-01-01

    An E1-deleted, replication-defective adenovirus recombinant of the human strain 5 expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, termed Adrab.gp, was tested in young mice. Mice immunized at birth with the Adrab.gp construct developed antibodies to rabies virus and cytokine-secreting lymphocytes and were protected against subsequent challenge. Maternal immunity to rabies virus strongly interferes with vaccination of the offspring with a traditional inactivated rabies virus vaccine. The immune respo...

  11. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors based on Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus have been widely applied for vaccine development. Naked RNA replicons, recombinant viral particles, and layered DNA vectors have been subjected to immunization in preclinical animal models with antigens for viral targets and tumor antigens. Moreover, a limited number of clinical trials have been conducted in humans. Vaccination with alphavirus vectors has demonstrated efficient immune responses and has showed protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus and tumor cells, respectively. Moreover, vaccines have been developed against alphaviruses causing epidemics such as Chikungunya virus.

  12. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, O; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  13. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Met, Ö; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... to transiently affect in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  14. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... established as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall... used for vaccine production shall be tested for immunogenicity by one or both of the following methods... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...

  15. DNA prime/Adenovirus boost malaria vaccine encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 induces sterile protection associated with cell-mediated immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin Chuang

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection.The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad. The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1. The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea, possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3, preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27% were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44-817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5-102 and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13-408; AMA1 348, range 88-1270 and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019. Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant.The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%. Protection was associated with cell-mediated immunity to AMA1, with CSP

  16. Immune control of an SIV challenge by a T-cell-based vaccine in rhesus monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; O'Brien, K.L.; Lynch, D.M.; Simmons, N.L.; Porte, A. La; Riggs, A.M.; Abbink, P.; Coffey, R.T.; Grandpre, L.E.; Seaman, M.S.; Landucci, G.; Forthal, D.N.; Montefiori, D.C.; Carville, A.; Mansfield, K.G.; Havenga, M.J.; Pau, M.G.; Goudsmit, J.; Barouch, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    A recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) vector-based vaccine for HIV-1 has recently failed in a phase 2b efficacy study in humans. Consistent with these results, preclinical studies have demonstrated that rAd5 vectors expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag failed to reduce peak or

  17. Adenovirus-vectored drug-vaccine duo as a rapid-response tool for conferring seamless protection against influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhang

    Full Text Available Few other diseases exert such a huge toll of suffering as influenza. We report here that intranasal (i.n. administration of E1/E3-defective (ΔE1E3 adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 particles rapidly induced an anti-influenza state as a means of prophylactic therapy which persisted for several weeks in mice. By encoding an influenza virus (IFV hemagglutinin (HA HA1 domain, an Ad5-HA1 vector conferred rapid protection as a prophylactic drug followed by elicitation of sustained protective immunity as a vaccine for inducing seamless protection against influenza as a drug-vaccine duo (DVD in a single package. Since Ad5 particles induce a complex web of host responses, which could arrest influenza by activating a specific arm of innate immunity to impede IFV growth in the airway, it is conceivable that this multi-pronged influenza DVD may escape the fate of drug resistance that impairs the current influenza drugs.

  18. In silico structure analysis and epitope prediction of E3 CR1-beta protein of Human Adenovirus E for vaccine design

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    Noman Ibna Amin Patwary

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The study was carried out to predict antigenic determinants/epitopes of the E3 CR1-beta protein of Human Adenovirus E along with the 3D protein modeling. The study revealed potential T-cell and B-cell epitopes that can raise the desired immune response against E3 CR1-beta protein and useful in developing effective vaccines against HAdVs-E.

  19. Chikungunya Virus Vaccines: Viral Vector-Based Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsauer, Katrin; Tangy, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    In 2013, a major chikungunya virus (CHIKV) epidemic reached the Americas. In the past 2 years, >1.7 million people have been infected. In light of the current epidemic, with millions of people in North and South America at risk, efforts to rapidly develop effective vaccines have increased. Here, we focus on CHIKV vaccines that use viral-vector technologies. This group of vaccine candidates shares an ability to potently induce humoral and cellular immune responses by use of highly attenuated and safe vaccine backbones. So far, well-described vectors such as modified vaccinia virus Ankara, complex adenovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, alphavirus-based chimeras, and measles vaccine Schwarz strain (MV/Schw) have been described as potential vaccines. We summarize here the recent data on these experimental vaccines, with a focus on the preclinical and clinical activities on the MV/Schw-based candidate, which is the first CHIKV-vectored vaccine that has completed a clinical trial. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Immunodominance of Adenovirus-Derived CD8+ T Cell Epitopes Interferes with the Induction of Transgene-Specific Immunity in Adenovirus-Based Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Dominik; Hrycak, Camilla Patrizia; Windmann, Sonja; Lapuente, Dennis; Dittmer, Ulf; Tenbusch, Matthias; Bayer, Wibke

    2017-10-15

    Adenovirus (Ad)-based immunization is a popular approach in vaccine development, and Ad-based vectors are renowned for their potential to induce strong CD8+ T cell responses to the encoded transgene. Surprisingly, we previously found in the mouse Friend retrovirus (FV) model that Ad-based immunization did not induce CD8+ T cell responses to the FV Leader-Gag-derived immunodominant epitope GagL85-93 We show now that induction of GagL85-93-specific CD8+ T cells was highly effective when leader-Gag was delivered by plasmid DNA immunization, implying a role for Ad-derived epitopes in mediating unresponsiveness. By immunizing with DNA constructs encoding strings of GagL85-93 and the two Ad-derived epitopes DNA-binding protein418-426 (DBP418-426) and hexon486-494, we confirmed that Ad epitopes prevent induction of GagL85-93-specific CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, while DBP418-426 did not interfere with GagL85-93-specific CD8+ T cell induction, the H-2Dd-restricted hexon486-494 suppressed the CD8+ T cell response to the H-2Db-restricted GagL85-93 strongly in H-2b/d mice but not in H-2b/b mice. This finding indicates that competition occurs at the level of responding CD8+ T cells, and we could indeed demonstrate that coimmunization with an interleukin 2 (IL-2)-encoding plasmid restored GagL85-93-specific CD8+ T cell responses to epitope strings in the presence of hexon486-494 IL-2 codelivery did not restore GagL85-93 responsiveness in Ad-based immunization, however, likely due to the presence of further epitopes in the Ad vector. Our findings show that seemingly immunodominant transgene epitopes can be dominated by Ad-derived epitopes. These findings underline the importance of thorough characterization of vaccine vectors, and modifications of vectors or immunogens may be required to prevent impaired transgene-specific immune responses.IMPORTANCE Ad-based vectors are widely used in experimental preclinical and clinical immunization studies against numerous infectious agents

  1. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses and dendritic cells expressing prostate-specific antigens is effective in eliciting CTL and suppresses tumor growth in the experimental prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sol; Lee, Jee-Boong; Lee, Geon Kook; Chang, Jun

    2009-06-15

    Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men in the US. Immunological approaches may provide an alternative option for prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. To develop vaccine against prostate cancer using mouse model, we constructed three recombinant adenoviruses expressing prostate-specific membrane antigen (rAd/PSMA), prostate stem cell antigen (rAd/PSCA) and six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate (rAd/STEAP), that were specifically up-regulated in the transgenic murine prostate cancer. Male C57BL/6 mice were immunized by intravenous injection of these recombinant adenoviruses and subsequently by subcutaneous injection of dendritic cells pulsed with TRAMP-C1 tumor lysate. After subcutaneous challenge with TRAMP-C1 cells, tumor growth was significantly delayed in the immunized mice compared to the control group. Surprisingly, significant numbers of STEAP-specific CD8 T cells were detected in the peripheral blood and the spleen of immune mice using MHC I tetramers, and injection of rAd/STEAP alone followed by pulsed DC was sufficient to inhibit tumor growth. Therapeutic vaccination also significantly delayed the growth of pre-established tumors. Our results suggest that STEAP is a good immunologic target antigen against prostate cancer and our vaccination regimen successfully elicits anti-tumor CTL responses and suppresses tumor growth. More studies will expedite the development of this vaccine toward clinical application.

  2. The role of human adenoviruses type 41 in acute diarrheal disease in Minas Gerais after rotavirus vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Aparecida Vieira Reis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human adenovirus species F (HAdV-F type 40 and 41 are commonly associated with acute diarrheal disease (ADD across the world. Despite being the largest state in southeastern Brazil and having the second largest number of inhabitants, there is no information in the State of Minas Gerais regarding the role of HAdV-F in the etiology of ADD. This study was performed to determine the prevalence, to verify the epidemiological aspects of infection, and to characterize the strains of human adenoviruses (HAdV detected. A total of 377 diarrheal fecal samples were obtained between January 2007 and August 2011 from inpatient and outpatient children of age ranging from 0 to 12 years. All samples were previously tested for rotavirus, norovirus, and astrovirus, and 314 of 377 were negative. The viral DNA was extracted, amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the HAdV-positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using the Chi-square test (p < 0.05, considering two conditions: the total of samples tested (377 and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (314. The overall prevalence of HAdV was 12.47% (47/377; and in 76.60% (36/47 of the positive samples, this virus was the only infectious agent detected. The phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of 32 positive samples revealed that they all clustered with the HAdV-F type 41. The statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between the onset of the HAdV infection and the origin of the samples (inpatients or outpatients in the two conditions tested: the total of samples tested (p = 0.598 and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (p = 0.614. There was a significant association in the occurrence of infection in children aged 0–12 months for the condition 1 (p = 0.030 as well as condition 2 (p = 0.019. The occurrence of infections due to HAdV did not coincide with a pattern of

  3. Overcoming maternal antibody interference by vaccination with human adenovirus 5 recombinant viruses expressing the hemagglutinin and the nucleoprotein of swine influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Ronald D; Lager, Kelly M

    2006-11-26

    Sows and gilts lack immunity to human adenovirus 5 (Ad-5) vectored vaccines so immunogens of swine pathogens can be expressed with these vaccines in order to immunize suckling piglets that have interfering, maternally derived antibodies. In this study 7-day-old piglets, that had suckled H3N2 infected gilts, were sham-inoculated with a non-expressing Ad-5 vector or given a primary vaccination with replication-defective Ad-5 viruses expressed the H3 hemagglutinin and the nucleoprotein of swine influenza virus (SIV) subtype H3N2. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer of the sham-inoculated group (n = 12) showed continued antibody decay whereas piglets vaccinated with Ad-5 SIV (n = 23) developed an active immune response by the second week post-vaccination. At 4 weeks-of-age when the HI titer of the sham-inoculated group had decayed to 45, the sham-inoculated group and half of the Ad-5 SIV vaccinated pigs were boosted with a commercial inactivated SIV vaccine. The boosted pigs that had been primed in the presence of maternal interfering antibodies had a strong anamnestic response while sham-inoculated pigs did not respond to the commercial vaccine. Two weeks after the booster vaccination the pigs were challenged with a non-homologous H3N2 virulent SIV. The efficacy of the vaccination protocol was demonstrated by abrogation of clinical signs, by clearance of challenge virus from pulmonary lavage fluids, by markedly reduced virus shedding in nasal secretions, and by the absence of moderate or severe SIV-induced lung lesions. These recombinant Ad-5 SIV vaccines are useful for priming the immune system to override the effects of maternally derived antibodies which interfere with conventional SIV vaccines.

  4. Highly Sensitive Method for Titration of Adenovirus Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Hildegund Ertl, ZhiQuan Xiang, Yan Li, Dongming Zhou, Xiangyang Zhou, Wynetta Giles-Davis & Yi-lin E. Liu ### Abstract Clinical development of vaccines based on adenovirus (Ad) vectors requires accurate techniques to determine vector doses including contents of infectious particles. For vectors derived from Ad virus of human serotype 5 content of infectious particles can readily be determined by plaque assays. Vaccine vectors based on alternative Ad serotypes such as thos...

  5. One single, fast and robust capillary electrophoresis method for the direct quantification of intact adenovirus particles in upstream and downstream processing samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tricht, Ewoud; Geurink, Lars; Backus, Harold; Germano, Marta; Somsen, Govert W.; Sänger–van de Griend, Cari E.

    2017-01-01

    During development of adenovirus-based vaccines, samples have to be analyzed in order to either monitor the production process or control the quality and safety of the product. An important quality attribute is the total concentration of intact adenoviruses, which currently is determined by

  6. rBCG induces strong antigen-specific T cell responses in rhesus macaques in a prime-boost setting with an adenovirus 35 tuberculosis vaccine vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Magalhaes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCG vaccination, combined with adenoviral-delivered boosts, represents a reasonable strategy to augment, broaden and prolong immune protection against tuberculosis (TB. We tested BCG (SSI1331 (in 6 animals, delivered intradermally and a recombinant (rBCG AFRO-1 expressing perfringolysin (in 6 animals followed by two boosts (delivered intramuscullary with non-replicating adenovirus 35 (rAd35 expressing a fusion protein composed of Ag85A, Ag85B and TB10.4, for the capacity to induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Control animals received diluent (3 animals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cellular immune responses were analyzed longitudinally (12 blood draws for each animal using intracellular cytokine staining (TNF-alpha, IL-2 and IFN-gamma, T cell proliferation was measured in CD4(+, CD8alpha/beta(+, and CD8alpha/alpha(+ T cell subsets and IFN-gamma production was tested in 7 day PBMC cultures (whole blood cell assay, WBA using Ag85A, Ag85B, TB10.4 recombinant proteins, PPD or BCG as stimuli. Animals primed with AFRO-1 showed i increased Ag85B-specific IFN-gamma production in the WBA assay (median >400 pg/ml for 6 animals one week after the first boost with adenoviral-delivered TB-antigens as compared to animals primed with BCG (<200 pg/ml, ii stronger T cell proliferation in the CD8alpha/alpha(+ T cell subset (proliferative index 17% as compared to BCG-primed animals (proliferative index 5% in CD8alpha/alpha(+ T cells. Polyfunctional T cells, defined by IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-2 production were detected in 2/6 animals primed with AFRO-1 directed against Ag85A/b and TB10.4; 4/6 animals primed with BCG showed a Ag85A/b responses, yet only a single animal exhibited Ag85A/b and TB10.4 reactivity. CONCLUSION: AFRO-1 induces qualitatively and quantitatively different cellular immune responses as compared with BCG in rhesus macaques. Increased IFN-gamma-responses and antigen-specific T cell

  7. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasa, B P; Mohapatra, J K; Pauszek, S J; Koster, M; Dhanya, V C; Tamil Selvan, R P; Hosamani, M; Saravanan, P; Basagoudanavar, Suresh H; de Los Santos, T; Venkataramanan, R; Rodriguez, L L; Grubman, M J

    2017-05-01

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O, A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutralizing antibody response in indigenous cattle (Bos indicus). Purified Ad5-FMD viruses were inoculated in cattle as monovalent (5×109 pfu/animal) or trivalent (5×109 pfu/animal per serotype) vaccines. Animals vaccinated with monovalent Ad5-FMD vaccines were boosted 63days later with the same dose. After primary immunization, virus neutralization tests (VNT) showed seroconversion in 83, 67 and 33% of animals vaccinated with Ad5-FMD O, A and Asia 1, respectively. Booster immunization elicited seroconversion in all of the animals (100%) in the monovalent groups. When used in a trivalent form, the Ad5-FMD vaccine induced neutralizing antibodies in only 33, 50 and 16% of animals against serotypes O, A and Asia 1, respectively on primo-vaccination, and titers were significantly lower than when the same vectors were used in monovalent form. Neutralizing antibody titers differed by serotype for both Ad5-FMD monovalent and trivalent vaccines, with Asia 1 serotype inducing the lowest titers. Antibody response to Ad5 vector in immunized cattle was also assessed by VNT. It appeared that the vector immunity did not impact the recall responses to expressed FMDV antigens on booster immunization. In summary, the study suggested that the recombinant Ad5-FMD vaccine has a potential use in monovalent form, while its application in multivalent form is not currently encouraging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine confers early and full protection against FMDV O1 Manisa in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Sainz, Ignacio; Medina, Gisselle N; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Koster, Marla J; Grubman, Marvin J; de Los Santos, Teresa

    2017-02-01

    A human adenovirus (Ad5) vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O1-Manisa subunit vaccine (Ad5-O1Man) was engineered to deliver FMDV O1-Manisa capsid and capsid-processing proteins. Swine inoculated with Ad5-O1Man developed an FMDV-specific humoral response as compared to animals inoculated with an empty Ad5-vector. Vaccinated animals were completely protected against homologous challenge at 7 or 21 days post-vaccination. Potency studies exhibited a PD50 of about 107 pfu/animal while a dose of 4×107pfu/animal fully protected swine against FMDV intradermal challenge. In-vitro cross-neutralization analysis distinctly predicted that swine vaccinated with Ad5-O1Man would be protected against challenge with homologous FMDV O1Man Middle East-South Asia (ME-SA) topotype and also against recent outbreak strains of Mya-98 South East Asia (SEA) lineage including O1-UK-2001 and O1-South Korea-2010. These results indicate that recombinant Ad5-O1Man is an effective, safe and cross-reacting vaccine that could potentially be used preventively and in outbreak situations, to control FMDV O Mya-98 lineage in swine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes S Gach

    Full Text Available Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5 boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART. Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir.

  10. Adenovirus type 35-vectored tuberculosis vaccine has an acceptable safety and tolerability profile in healthy, BCG-vaccinated, QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold (+) Kenyan adults without evidence of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Douglas S; Owira, Victorine; Polhemus, Mark; Otieno, Lucas; Andagalu, Ben; Ogutu, Bernhards; Waitumbi, John; Hawkridge, Anthony; Shepherd, Barbara; Pau, Maria Grazia; Sadoff, Jerald; Douoguih, Macaya; McClain, J Bruce

    2016-05-05

    In a Phase 1 trial, we evaluated the safety of AERAS-402, an adenovirus 35-vectored TB vaccine candidate expressing 3 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) immunodominant antigens, in subjects with and without latent Mtb infection. HIV-negative, BCG-vaccinated Kenyan adults without evidence of tuberculosis, 10 QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-G)(-) and 10 QFT-G(+), were randomized 4:1 to receive AERAS-402 or placebo as two doses, on Days 0 and 56, with follow up to Day 182. There were no deaths, serious adverse events or withdrawals. For 1 AERAS-402 QFT-G(-) and 1 AERAS-402 QFT-G(+) subject, there were 3 self-limiting severe AEs of injection site pain: 1 after the first vaccination and 1 after each vaccination, respectively. Two additional severe AEs considered vaccine-related were reported after the first vaccination in AERAS-402 QFT-G(+) subjects: elevated blood creatine phosphokinase and neutropenia, the latter slowly improving but remaining abnormal until study end. AERAS-402 was not detected in urine or throat cultures for any subject. In intracellular cytokine staining studies, curtailed by technical issues, we saw modest CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to Mtb Ag85A/b peptide pools among both QFT-G(-) and (+) subjects, with trends in the CD4+ T cells suggestive of boosting after the second vaccine dose, slightly more so in QFT-G(+) subjects. CD4+ and CD8+ responses to Mtb antigen TB10.4 were minimal. Increases in Adenovirus 35 neutralizing antibodies from screening to end of study, seen in 50% of AERAS-402 recipients, were mostly minimal. This small study confirms acceptable safety and tolerability profiles for AERAS-402, in line with other Phase 1 studies of AERAS-402, now to include QFT-G(+) subjects. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Long-term follow up of human T-cell responses to conserved HIV-1 regions elicited by DNA/simian adenovirus/MVA vaccine regimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathifa Moyo

    Full Text Available Durability of vaccine-elicited immune responses is one of the key determinants for vaccine success. Our aim is to develop a vaccination strategy against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, which induces protective and durable CD8+ T-cell responses. The central theorem of our approach is to focus T cells on highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome and this is achieved through the use of the first-generation conserved vaccine immunogen HIVconsv. This immunogen vectored by plasmid DNA, simian adenovirus and poxvirus MVA was tested in healthy, HIV-1-negative adults in UK and induced high magnitudes of HIVconsv-specific plurifunctional CD8+ T cells capable of in vitro HIV-1 inhibition. Here, we assessed the durability of these responses.Vaccine recipients in trial HIV-CORE 002 were invited to provide a blood sample at 1 and 2 years after vaccination. Their PBMCs were tested in IFN-γ ELISPOT, 25-analyte Luminex, CFSE proliferation and intracellular cytokine staining assays, the last enhanced by HLA-peptide dextramer analysis.12/12 (1 year and 8/8 (2 years returning subjects had median (range of 990 (150-2495 and 763 (70-1745 IFN-γ SFU/106 PBMC specific for HIVconsv, respectively, and recognized 5 (1-6 out of 6 peptide pools at 2 years. Over one-half of the HIVconsv-specific cells expressed at least 3 functions IFN-γ, TNF-α and CD107a, and were capable of proliferation. Among dextramer-reactive cells, naïve, transitional, effector and terminally differentiated memory subsets were similarly represented.First generation HIVconsv vaccine induced human T cells, which were plurifunctional and persisted for at least 2 years.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01151319.

  12. Flagellin FljB as an adjuvant to the recombinant adenovirus rabies glycoprotein vaccine increases immune responses against rabies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xingxing; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Qiaolin; Yin, Xiangping

    2017-09-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) causes an acute progressive viral encephalitis. Although currently licensed vaccines have an excellent safety and efficacy record, the development of a safer and more cost-effective vaccine is still being sought. An E1-deleted, replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5) vector expressing RABV glycoprotein (HAd5-G) is thought to be a promising candidate vaccine for immune prophylaxis against rabies. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) flagellin is a well-known immune adjuvant. In this work, we have researched the adjuvant effect of flagellins (FljB and FliC) for HAd5 in mice for the first time. We found that the recombinant HAd5 expressing RABV glycoprotein and FljB (HAd5-GB), if administered intramuscularly, but not orally, could induce stronger immune responses and provide better protection against rabies than HAd5-G or the recombinant HAd5 expressing glycoprotein and FliC (HAd5-GC). These results suggest that the recombinant HAd5-GB has potential for development as a promising rabies vaccine.

  13. The Early Activation of CD8+ T Cells Is Dependent on Type I IFN Signaling following Intramuscular Vaccination of Adenovirus Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahisa Hemmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Few of the vaccines in current use can induce antigen- (Ag- specific immunity in both mucosal and systemic compartments. Hence, the development of vaccines that realize both mucosal and systemic protection against various pathogens is a high priority in global health. Recently, it has been reported that intramuscular (i.m. vaccination of an adenovirus vector (Adv can induce Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs in both systemic and gut mucosal compartments. We previously revealed that type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of gut mucosal CTLs, not systemic CTLs. However, the molecular mechanism via type I IFN signaling is largely unknown. Here, we report that type I IFN signaling following i.m. Adv vaccination is required for the expression of type I IFN in the inguinal lymph nodes (iLNs, which are the draining lymph nodes of the administration site. We also showed that the type I IFN signaling is indispensable for the early activation of CTLs in iLNs. These data suggested that type I IFN signaling has an important role in the translation of systemic innate immune response into mucosal adaptive immunity by amplifying the innate immune signaling and activating CTLs in the iLN.

  14. Safety and High Level Efficacy of the Combination Malaria Vaccine Regimen of RTS,S/AS01B With Chimpanzee Adenovirus 63 and Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vectored Vaccines Expressing ME-TRAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampling, Tommy; Ewer, Katie J; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly M; Edwards, Nick J; Wright, Danny; Payne, Ruth O; Venkatraman, Navin; de Barra, Eoghan; Snudden, Claudia M; Poulton, Ian D; de Graaf, Hans; Sukhtankar, Priya; Roberts, Rachel; Ivinson, Karen; Weltzin, Rich; Rajkumar, Bebi-Yassin; Wille-Reece, Ulrike; Lee, Cynthia K; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Sinden, Robert E; Gerry, Stephen; Lawrie, Alison M; Vekemans, Johan; Morelle, Danielle; Lievens, Marc; Ballou, Ripley W; Cooke, Graham S; Faust, Saul N; Gilbert, Sarah; Hill, Adrian V S

    2016-09-01

    The need for a highly efficacious vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum remains pressing. In this controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) study, we assessed the safety, efficacy and immunogenicity of a schedule combining 2 distinct vaccine types in a staggered immunization regimen: one inducing high-titer antibodies to circumsporozoite protein (RTS,S/AS01B) and the other inducing potent T-cell responses to thrombospondin-related adhesion protein (TRAP) by using a viral vector. Thirty-seven healthy malaria-naive adults were vaccinated with either a chimpanzee adenovirus 63 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara-vectored vaccine expressing a multiepitope string fused to TRAP and 3 doses of RTS,S/AS01B (group 1; n = 20) or 3 doses of RTS,S/AS01B alone (group 2; n = 17). CHMI was delivered by mosquito bites to 33 vaccinated subjects at week 12 after the first vaccination and to 6 unvaccinated controls. No suspected unexpected serious adverse reactions or severe adverse events related to vaccination were reported. Protective vaccine efficacy was observed in 14 of 17 subjects (82.4%) in group 1 and 12 of 16 subjects (75%) in group 2. All control subjects received a diagnosis of blood-stage malaria parasite infection. Both vaccination regimens were immunogenic. Fourteen protected subjects underwent repeat CHMI 6 months after initial CHMI; 7 of 8 (87.5%) in group 1 and 5 of 6 (83.3%) in group 2 remained protected. The high level of sterile efficacy observed in this trial is encouraging for further evaluation of combination approaches using these vaccine types. NCT01883609. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  15. Induction of CD8(+) T cell responses and protective efficacy following microneedle-mediated delivery of a live adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Frances E; O'Mahony, Conor; Moore, Anne C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2015-06-22

    There is an urgent need for improvements in vaccine delivery technologies. This is particularly pertinent for vaccination programmes within regions of limited resources, such as those required for adequate provision for disposal of used needles. Microneedles are micron-sized structures that penetrate the stratum corneum of the skin, creating temporary conduits for the needle-free delivery of drugs or vaccines. Here, we aimed to investigate immunity induced by the recombinant simian adenovirus-vectored vaccine ChAd63.ME-TRAP; currently undergoing clinical assessment as a candidate malaria vaccine, when delivered percutaneously by silicon microneedle arrays. In mice, we demonstrate that microneedle-mediated delivery of ChAd63.ME-TRAP induced similar numbers of transgene-specific CD8(+) T cells compared to intradermal (ID) administration with needle-and-syringe, following a single immunisation and after a ChAd63/MVA heterologous prime-boost schedule. When mice immunised with ChAd63/MVA were challenged with live Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, microneedle-mediated ChAd63.ME-TRAP priming demonstrated equivalent protective efficacy as did ID immunisation. Furthermore, responses following ChAd63/MVA immunisation correlated with a specific design parameter of the array used ('total array volume'). The level of transgene expression at the immunisation site and skin-draining lymph node (dLN) was also linked to total array volume. These findings have implications for defining silicon microneedle array design for use with live, vectored vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of virus-like particles and recombinant fiber proteins in broiler-breeder vaccination against fowl adenovirus (FAdV)-8b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashish; Ahmed, Khawaja Ashfaque; Ayalew, Lisanework E; Popowich, Shelly; Kurukulasuriya, Shanika; Goonewardene, Kalhari; Gunawardana, Thushari; Karunarathna, Ruwani; Ojkic, Davor; Tikoo, Suresh K; Willson, Philip; Gomis, Susantha

    2017-05-09

    Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) is an economically important diseases in broiler chicken industry. Several serotypes of fowl adenovirus (FAdV) can cause IBH, among them, serotype FAdV-8b is associated with the majority of the IBH cases in Canada. Here, we evaluated FAdV-8b virus-like particles (VLPs) and recombinant FAdV-8b fiber proteins (expressed in E. coli) as potential broiler-breeder vaccines against IBH. For assessing the immunogenicity of vaccines, we investigated both humoral and cellular immunity. The humoral immune response was evaluated by determining total IgY and virus-neutralizing antibody in serum at 14, 28, 35 and 60days post-immunization (dpi). We examined cellular immunity using flow cytometry by determining CD4:CD8 ratio change in peripheral blood after the booster vaccination. The protective effect of vaccines was tested by challenging 14day-old progeny (n=30/group) carrying maternal antibodies (MtAb) by challenging with virulent FAdV-8b virus (1×107 TCID50, FAdV-8b-SK). Although total IgY levels were comparable in all groups, the neutralizing antibody response in broiler-breeders at 35 and 60 dpi was significantly (pbroiler-breeders four days after the booster vaccination. Unlike FAdV-8b fiber-knob, FAdV-8b VLPs, and FAdV-8b fiber vaccinated broiler-breeders were able to transfer a substantial amount (28.4±9%) of MtAb to their progeny. Challenge revealed that MtAb provided 100% and 82.7% protection in progeny hatched from FAdV-8b VLPs, and FAdV-8b fiber vaccinated broiler-breeders, respectively. Collectively, our data suggest that FAdV-8b subunit vaccine-induced MtAb efficiently protected progeny against clinical IBH and broiler-breeder vaccination with subunit vaccines is a potential approach to protect against IBH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extended Follow-up Confirms Early Vaccine-Enhanced Risk of HIV Acquisition and Demonstrates Waning Effect Over Time Among Participants in a Randomized Trial of Recombinant Adenovirus HIV Vaccine (Step Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, Ann; Huang, Yunda; Buchbinder, Susan; Coombs, Robert W.; Sanchez, Jorge; del Rio, Carlos; Casapia, Martin; Santiago, Steven; Gilbert, Peter; Corey, Lawrence; Robertson, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The Step Study tested whether an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)–vectored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine could prevent HIV acquisition and/or reduce viral load set-point after infection. At the first interim analysis, nonefficacy criteria were met. Vaccinations were halted; participants were unblinded. In post hoc analyses, more HIV infections occurred in vaccinees vs placebo recipients in men who had Ad5-neutralizing antibodies and/or were uncircumcised. Follow-up was extended to assess relative risk of HIV acquisition in vaccinees vs placebo recipients over time. Methods. We used Cox proportional hazard models for analyses of vaccine effect on HIV acquisition and vaccine effect modifiers, and nonparametric and semiparametric methods for analysis of constancy of relative risk over time. Results. One hundred seventy-two of 1836 men were infected. The adjusted vaccinees vs placebo recipients hazard ratio (HR) for all follow-up time was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.92; P = .03). Vaccine effect differed by baseline Ad5 or circumcision status during first 18 months, but neither was significant for all follow-up time. The HR among uncircumcised and/or Ad5-seropositive men waned with time since vaccination. No significant vaccine-associated risk was seen among circumcised, Ad5-negative men (HR, 0.97; P = 1.0) over all follow-up time. Conclusions. The vaccine-associated risk seen in interim analysis was confirmed but waned with time from vaccination. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00095576. PMID:22561365

  18. A broadly applicable method to characterize large DNA viruses and adenoviruses based on the DNA polymerase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery Roy D

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many viral pathogens are poorly characterized, are difficult to culture or reagents are lacking for confirmatory diagnoses. We have developed and tested a robust assay for detecting and characterizing large DNA viruses and adenoviruses. The assay is based on the use of degenerate PCR to target a gene common to these viruses, the DNA polymerase, and sequencing the products. Results We evaluated our method by applying it to fowl adenovirus isolates, catfish herpesvirus isolates, and largemouth bass ranavirus (iridovirus from cell culture and lymphocystis disease virus (iridovirus and avian poxvirus from tissue. All viruses with the exception of avian poxvirus produced the expected product. After optimization of extraction procedures, and after designing and applying an additional primer we were able to produce polymerase gene product from the avian poxvirus genome. The sequence data that we obtained demonstrated the simplicity and potential of the method for routine use in characterizing large DNA viruses. The adenovirus samples were demonstrated to represent 2 types of fowl adenovirus, fowl adenovirus 1 and an uncharacterized avian adenovirus most similar to fowl adenovirus 9. The herpesvirus isolate from blue catfish was shown to be similar to channel catfish virus (Ictalurid herpesvirus 1. The case isolate of largemouth bass ranavirus was shown to exactly match the type specimen and both were similar to tiger frog virus and frog virus 3. The lymphocystis disease virus isolate from largemouth bass was shown to be related but distinct from the two previously characterized lymphocystis disease virus isolates suggesting that it may represent a distinct lymphocystis disease virus species. Conclusion The method developed is rapid and broadly applicable to cell culture isolates and infected tissues. Targeting a specific gene for in the large DNA viruses and adenoviruses provide a common reference for grouping the newly identified

  19. Inactivation of adenovirus types 5 and 6 by Virkon S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Lisa; Maheshwari, Gargi

    2004-10-01

    Throughout the pharmaceutical industry, adenovirus-based products are being developed for human use as vaccine vectors and gene therapy delivery vehicles. The implementation of effective decontamination procedures is critical to the successful manufacture of these products to minimize the risk of personnel exposure and prevent product cross-contamination in the manufacturing facility. In this investigation, we have conducted small-scale decontamination studies to determine the efficacy of Virkon S on the inactivation of adenovirus types 5 and 6 in suspension. Virkon S is a commercially available oxidative disinfectant used against a variety of bacteria, spores, fungi, and viruses. A cytotoxicity-based endpoint dilution assay was used to quantify adenovirus potency before and after Virkon S treatment. We show that the level of organic content in the inactivation sample matrix has a significant impact on Virkon S activity. The potency of adenovirus types 5 and 6 was reduced by greater than six logs upon a five minute exposure to the appropriate concentration of Virkon S. Based on these results, we propose that Virkon S liquid decontamination procedures for adenovirus types 5 and 6 use 0.9% Virkon S for contact times greater than five minutes.

  20. Effects of body weight on antibody titers against canine parvovirus type 2, canine distemper virus, and canine adenovirus type 1 in vaccinated domestic adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Masayuki; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Maruo, Takuya; Saito, Miyoko; Lynch, Jonathan; Sahara, Hiroeki

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether post-vaccination antibody titers vary according to body weight in adult dogs. Antibody titers against canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV), and canine adenovirus type 1 (CAdV-1) were measured for 978 domestic adult dogs from 2 to 6 y of age. The dogs had been vaccinated approximately 12 mo earlier with a commercial combination vaccine. The dogs were divided into groups according to their weight. It was found that mean antibody titers in all weight groups were sufficient to prevent infection. Intergroup comparison, however, revealed that CPV-2 antibody titers were significantly higher in the Super Light ( 20 kg) groups and were also significantly higher in the Light (5 to 9.9 kg) group than in the Heavy group. Antibody titers against CDV were significantly higher in the Super Light, Light, and Medium groups than in the Heavy group. There were no significant differences among the groups for the CAdV-1 antibody titers.

  1. Novel transgenic rice-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. To control rampant mucosal infectious diseases, the development of new effective oral vaccines is needed. Plant-based vaccines are new candidates for oral vaccines, and have some advantages over the traditional vaccines in cost, safety, and scalability. Rice seeds are attractive for vaccine production because of their stability and resistance to digestion in the stomach. The efficacy of some rice-based vaccines for infectious, autoimmune, and other diseases has been already demonstrated in animal models. We reported the efficacy in mice, safety, and stability of a rice-based cholera toxin B subunit vaccine called MucoRice-CTB. To advance MucoRice-CTB for use in humans, we also examined its efficacy and safety in primates. The potential of transgenic rice production as a new mucosal vaccine delivery system is reviewed from the perspective of future development of effective oral vaccines.

  2. Vaccination with recombinant adenovirus expressing multi-stage antigens of Toxoplasma gondii by the mucosal route induces higher systemic cellular and local mucosal immune responses than with other vaccination routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ting

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan, is a cause of congenital disease and abortion in humans and animals. Various vaccination strategies against toxoplasmosis in rodent models have been used in the past few decades; however, effective vaccines remain a challenge. A recombinant adenovirus vaccine expressing ubiquitin-conjugated multi-stage antigen segments (Ad-UMAS derived from different life-cycle stages of T. gondii was constructed previously. Here, we compared the immune responses and protection effects in vaccination of mice with Ad-UMAS by five vaccination routes including intramuscular (i.m., intravenous (i.v., subcutaneous (s.c., intraoral (i.o., and intranasal (i.n.. Much higher levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were detected in the sera of the intraoral and intranasal vaccination groups on day 49 compared with controls (p < 0.05. The percentages of CD8+ T-cells in mice immunized intranasally and intraorally were larger than in mice immunized intramuscularly (p < 0.05. The highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ was detected in the group with nasal immunization, and splenocyte proliferation activity was significantly enhanced in mice immunized via the oral and nasal routes. Furthermore, the higher survival rate (50% and lower cyst numbers observed in the intraoral and intranasal groups all indicate that Ad-UMAS is far more effective in protecting mice against T. gondii infection via the mucosal route. Ad-UMAS could be an effective and safe mucosal candidate vaccine to protect animals and humans against T. gondii infection.

  3. A Phase I Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Adjuvanted HIV-1 Gag-Pol-Nef Fusion Protein and Adenovirus 35 Gag-RT-Int-Nef Vaccine in Healthy HIV-Uninfected African Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Omosa-Manyonyi

    Full Text Available Sequential prime-boost or co-administration of HIV vaccine candidates based on an adjuvanted clade B p24, RT, Nef, p17 fusion protein (F4/AS01 plus a non-replicating adenovirus 35 expressing clade A Gag, RT, Int and Nef (Ad35-GRIN may lead to a unique immune profile, inducing both strong T-cell and antibody responses.In a phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 146 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to one of four regimens: heterologous prime-boost with two doses of F4/AS01E or F4/AS01B followed by Ad35-GRIN; Ad35-GRIN followed by two doses of F4/AS01B; or three co-administrations of Ad35-GRIN and F4/AS01B. T cell and antibody responses were measured.The vaccines were generally well-tolerated, and did not cause serious adverse events. The response rate, by IFN-γ ELISPOT, was greater when Ad35-GRIN was the priming vaccine and in the co-administration groups. F4/AS01 induced CD4+ T-cells expressing primarily CD40L and IL2 +/- TNF-α, while Ad35-GRIN induced predominantly CD8+ T-cells expressing IFN-γ +/- IL2 or TNF-α. Viral inhibition was induced after Ad35-GRIN vaccination, regardless of the regimen. Strong F4-specific antibody responses were induced. Immune responses persisted at least a year after the last vaccination. The complementary response profiles, characteristic of each vaccine, were both expressed after co-administration.Co-administration of an adjuvanted protein and an adenovirus vector showed an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile and resulted in strong, multifunctional and complementary HIV-specific immune responses.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01264445.

  4. The safety and immunogenicity of an adenovirus type 35-vectored TB vaccine in HIV-infected, BCG-vaccinated adults with CD4(+) T cell counts >350 cells/mm(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchyard, Gavin John; Snowden, Margaret Ann; Hokey, David; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; McClain, J Bruce; Douoguih, Macaya; Pau, Maria Grazia; Sadoff, Jerry; Landry, Bernard

    2015-04-08

    The safety and immunogenicity of a replication deficient adenovirus serotype 35 tuberculosis (TB) vaccine containing gene inserts for Antigens (Ag) 85A, Ag85B and TB10.4 (AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S) was evaluated in previously BCG vaccinated, HIV-infected South African adults with baseline CD4 counts >350 cells/mm(3). Subjects were randomized (1:1) to receive two doses of either intramuscular AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S or placebo at month 0 and at month 1. Participants were monitored for adverse events 28 days after each vaccination and for serious adverse events over 12 months. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell and antibody responses to vaccine antigens were evaluated post first and second vaccination. 26 subjects were randomly assigned to receive AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S (N=13) or placebo (N=13). The mean age was 29.0 years, all were Black-African, 88.5% were female, 46.2% were QuantiFERON Test (QFT) positive at baseline, and the median CD4 count was 559.5 cells/mm(3), all similar by treatment group. All subjects received their first vaccination and 24 subjects received their second vaccination. Injection site reactions and some systemic reactions were reported more commonly in the AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S versus placebo recipients. AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S did not appear to influence CD4 counts and HIV-1 viral load over the course of study follow-up. AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S induced a mixed CD4(+) T-cell and CD8(+) T-cell responses to Ag85B. The CD4(+) T-cell responses peaked to Ag85A and Ag85B 14 days after the second vaccination and had declined by Day 182. AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S predominantly induced CD4(+) T-cells expressing three (IFN-γ, TNF, IL-2) or two (IL-2 and TNF) cytokines, two weeks after the last vaccination, which did not differ by baseline Quantiferon test status. AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S induced strong Ag85A and Ag85B specific antibody responses, particularly after the second vaccination. AERAS-402/AD35.TB-S was well tolerated, safe and induced predominantly polyfunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T

  5. Optimization and scale-up of cell culture and purification processes for production of an adenovirus-vectored tuberculosis vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun Fang; Jacob, Danielle; Zhu, Tao; Bernier, Alice; Shao, Zhongqi; Yu, Xuefeng; Patel, Mehul; Lanthier, Stephane; Kamen, Amine

    2016-06-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading cause of death by infectious disease worldwide. The only available TB vaccine is the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG). However, parenterally administered Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine confers only limited immune protection from pulmonary tuberculosis in humans. There is a need for developing effective boosting vaccination strategies. AdAg85A, an adenoviral vector expressing the mycobacterial protein Ag85A, is a new tuberculosis vaccine candidate, and has shown promising results in pre-clinical studies and phase I trial. This adenovirus vectored vaccine is produced using HEK 293 cell culture. Here we report on the optimization of cell culture conditions, scale-up of production and purification of the AdAg85A at different scales. Four commercial serum-free media were evaluated under various conditions for supporting the growth of HEK293 cell and production of AdAg85A. A culturing strategy was employed to take advantages of two culture media with respective strengths in supporting the cell growth and virus production, which enabled to maintain virus productivity at higher cell densities and resulted in more than two folds of increases in culture titer. The production of AdAg85A was successfully scaled up and validated at 60L bioreactor under the optimal conditions. The AdAg85A generated from the 3L and 60L bioreactor runs was purified through several purification steps. More than 98% of total cellular proteins was removed, over 60% of viral particles was recovered after the purification process, and purity of AdAg85A was similar to that of the ATCC VR-1516 Ad5 standard. Vaccination of mice with the purified AdAg85A demonstrated a very good level of Ag85A-specific antibody responses. The optimized production and purification conditions were transferred to a GMP facility for manufacturing of AdAg85A for generation of clinical grade material to support clinical trials. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Evaluation of a prime-boost vaccine schedule with distinct adenovirus vectors against malaria in rhesus monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Ariane; Mintardjo, Ratna; Tax, Dennis; Gillissen, Gert; Custers, Jerome; Pau, Maria Grazia; Klap, Jaco; Santra, Sampa; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Letvin, Norman L.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Radosević, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    A vaccine that elicits both specific antibodies and IFN-gamma-producing T cells is required to protect against pre-erythrocytic malaria. Among the most promising approaches to induce such complex immunity are heterologous prime-boost vaccination regiments, in particular ones containing liver viral

  7. Cell-culture derived fowl adenovirus serotype 4 inactivated vaccine provides complete protection for virus infection on SPF chickens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Du, Dongying; Zhang, Pantao; Li, Xiangdong; Tian, Hui; Cheng, Yi; Sheng, Dongbei; Han, Xueying; Shan, Yihong; Li, Xuefeng; Yuan, Yue; Zhang, Haiyang; Xue, Jingjing; Liu, Wujie; Tian, Kegong

    2017-01-01

    .... So far, there is no commercial vaccine available to control this disease. In this study, we reported the development of both embryo-adapted and cell-culture derived inactivated FAdV-4 vaccines and evaluated their efficacies in chicken...

  8. Genetic stability of a recombinant adenovirus vaccine vector seed library expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Chen, Ke-DA; Gao, Meng; Chen, Gang; Jin, Su-Feng; Zhuang, Fang-Cheng; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Yun-Shui; Li, Jian-Bo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to understand the genetic stability of a master seed bank (MSB) and a working seed bank (WSB) of an adenovirus vector vaccine expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 and E7 fusion proteins (Ad-HPV16E6E7). Microscopic examination and viral infectious efficacy were used to measure the infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB. Polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the stability of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target gene insertion, while western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression levels of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target protein. A C57BL/6 mouse TC-1 tumor cell growth inhibition model was used to evaluate the biological effect of Ad-HPV16E6E7 administration. The infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 6.31×109 IU/ml and 3.0×109 IU/ml, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of the inserted target genes and target proteins were found to be stable. In the mouse TC-1 tumor inhibition analysis, when the virus titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 109 IU/ml, the tumor inhibition rate was 100%, which was significantly different when compared with the control group (χ2MSB=20.00 and χ2WSB=20.00; P<0.01). Therefore, the Ad-HPV16E6E7 vaccine seed bank is genetically stable and meets the requirements for vaccine development.

  9. Expanding specificity of class I restricted CD8+ T cells for viral epitopes following multiple inoculations of swine with a human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse E.; Patch, Jared R; Kenney, Mary

    2016-01-01

    class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramer staining. We also showed that a modified replication defective human adenovirus 5 vector expressing the FMDV structural proteins (Ad5-FMDV-T vaccine) targets the induction of a CD8(+) CTL response with a minimal humoral response. In this report, we...... show that the specificity of the CD8(+) T cell response to Ad5-FMDV-T varies between cohorts of genetically identical animals. Further, we demonstrate epitope specificity of CD8(+) T cells expands following multiple immunizations with this vaccine....

  10. iTRAQ-Based and Label-Free Proteomics Approaches for Studies of Human Adenovirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung V. Trinh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and label-free methods are widely used for quantitative proteomics. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of these proteomics approaches based on large datasets from biological samples. iTRAQ-label-based and label-free quantitations were compared using protein lysate samples from noninfected human lung epithelial A549 cells and from cells infected for 24 h with human adenovirus type 3 or type 5. Either iTRAQ-label-based or label-free methods were used, and the resulting samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. To reduce a possible bias from quantitation software, we applied several software packages for each procedure. ProteinPilot and Scaffold Q+ software were used for iTRAQ-labeled samples, while Progenesis LC-MS and ProgenesisF-T2PQ/T3PQ were employed for label-free analyses. R2 correlation coefficients correlated well between two software packages applied to the same datasets with values between 0.48 and 0.78 for iTRAQ-label-based quantitations and 0.5 and 0.86 for label-free quantitations. Analyses of label-free samples showed higher levels of protein up- or downregulation in comparison to iTRAQ-labeled samples. The concentration differences were further evaluated by Western blotting for four downregulated proteins. These data suggested that the label-free method was more accurate than the iTRAQ method.

  11. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  12. Adolescent Attitudes toward Influenza Vaccination and Vaccine Uptake in a School-Based Influenza Vaccination Intervention: A Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Pazol, Karen; Wingood, Gina M.; Windle, Michael; Orenstein, Walter A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: School-based vaccination programs may provide an effective strategy to immunize adolescents against influenza. This study examined whether adolescent attitudes toward influenza vaccination mediated the relationship between receipt of a school-based influenza vaccination intervention and vaccine uptake. Methods: Participants were…

  13. Safety and tolerability of conserved region vaccines vectored by plasmid DNA, simian adenovirus and modified vaccinia virus ankara administered to human immunodeficiency virus type 1-uninfected adults in a randomized, single-blind phase I trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma-Jo Hayton

    Full Text Available HIV-1 vaccine development has advanced slowly due to viral antigenic diversity, poor immunogenicity and recently, safety concerns associated with human adenovirus serotype-5 vectors. To tackle HIV-1 variation, we designed a unique T-cell immunogen HIVconsv from functionally conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, which were presented to the immune system using a heterologous prime-boost combination of plasmid DNA, a non-replicating simian (chimpanzee adenovirus ChAdV-63 and a non-replicating poxvirus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara. A block-randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled phase I trial HIV-CORE 002 administered for the first time candidate HIV-1- vaccines or placebo to 32 healthy HIV-1/2-uninfected adults in Oxford, UK and elicited high frequencies of HIV-1-specific T cells capable of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in vitro. Here, detail safety and tolerability of these vaccines are reported.Local and systemic reactogenicity data were collected using structured interviews and study-specific diary cards. Data on all other adverse events were collected using open questions. Serum neutralizing antibody titres to ChAdV-63 were determined before and after vaccination.Two volunteers withdrew for vaccine-unrelated reasons. No vaccine-related serious adverse events or reactions occurred during 190 person-months of follow-up. Local and systemic events after vaccination occurred in 27/32 individuals and most were mild (severity grade 1 and predominantly transient (<48 hours. Myalgia and flu-like symptoms were more strongly associated with MVA than ChAdV63 or DNA vectors and more common in vaccine recipients than in placebo. There were no intercurrent HIV-1 infections during follow-up. 2/24 volunteers had low ChAdV-63-neutralizing titres at baseline and 7 increased their titres to over 200 with a median (range of 633 (231-1533 post-vaccination, which is of no safety concern.These data demonstrate safety and good tolerability of the pSG2

  14. Low-dose adenovirus vaccine encoding chimeric hepatitis B virus surface antigen-human papillomavirus type 16 E7 proteins induces enhanced E7-specific antibody and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Astúa, Andrés; Herráez-Hernández, Elsa; Garbi, Natalio; Pasolli, Hilda A; Juárez, Victoria; Zur Hausen, Harald; Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2005-10-01

    Induction of effective immune responses may help prevent cancer progression. Tumor-specific antigens, such as those of human papillomaviruses involved in cervical cancer, are targets with limited intrinsic immunogenicity. Here we show that immunization with low doses (10(6) infectious units/dose) of a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 encoding a fusion of the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus type 16 to the carboxyl terminus of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) induces remarkable E7-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The HBsAg/E7 fusion protein assembled efficiently into virus-like particles, which stimulated antibody responses against both carrier and foreign antigens, and evoked antigen-specific kill of an indicator cell population in vivo. Antibody and T-cell responses were significantly higher than those induced by a control adenovirus vector expressing wild-type E7. Such responses were not affected by preexisting immunity against either HBsAg or adenovirus. These data demonstrate that the presence of E7 on HBsAg particles does not interfere with particle secretion, as it occurs with bigger proteins fused to the C terminus of HBsAg, and results in enhancement of CD8(+)-mediated T-cell responses to E7. Thus, fusion to HBsAg is a convenient strategy for developing cervical cancer therapeutic vaccines, since it enhances the immunogenicity of E7 while turning it into an innocuous secreted fusion protein.

  15. Safety and immunogenicity of novel respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines based on the RSV viral proteins F, N and M2-1 encoded by simian adenovirus (PanAd3-RSV) and MVA (MVA-RSV); protocol for an open-label, dose-escalation, single-centre, phase 1 clinical trial in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C A; Scarselli, E; Voysey, M; Capone, S; Vitelli, A; Nicosia, A; Cortese, R; Thompson, A J; Sande, C S; de Lara, Catherine; Klenerman, P; Pollard, A J

    2015-10-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection causes respiratory disease throughout life, with infants and the elderly at risk of severe disease and death. RSV001 is a phase 1 (first-in-man), open-label, dose-escalation, clinical trial of novel genetic viral-vectored vaccine candidates PanAd3-RSV and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-RSV. The objective of RSV001 is to characterise the (primary objective) safety and (secondary objective) immunogenicity of these vaccines in healthy younger and older adults. Heterologous and homologous 'prime'/boost combinations of PanAd3-RSV and single-dose MVA-RSV are evaluated in healthy adults. 40 healthy adults aged 18-50 years test one of four combinations of intramuscular (IM) or intranasal (IN) PanAd3-RSV prime and IM PanAd3 or IM MVA-RSV boost vaccination, starting at a low dose for safety. The following year an additional 30 healthy adults aged 60-75 years test either a single dose of IM MVA-RSV, one of three combinations of IN or IM PanAd3-RSV prime and PanAd3-RSV or MVA-RSV boost vaccination used in younger volunteers, and a non-vaccinated control group. Study participants are self-selected volunteers who satisfy the eligibility criteria and are assigned to study groups by sequential allocation. Safety assessment includes the daily recording of solicited and unsolicited adverse events for 1 week after vaccination, as well as visit (nursing) observations and safety bloods obtained at all scheduled attendances. Laboratory measures of RSV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses after vaccination will address the secondary end points. All study procedures are performed at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine (CCVTM), Oxford, UK. RSV001 has clinical trial authorisation from the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and ethics approval from NRES Berkshire (reference 13/SC/0023). All study procedures adhere to International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) Good Clinical

  16. Particulate based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosalia, Rodney Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe our studies aimed at optimizing the efficacy of synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccines via the encapsulation in Poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)particles. Immunotherapy based on SLP-vaccines has resulted in strong tumor specific immune response and importantly,

  17. In silico identification of potential epitopes present in human adenovirus proteins for vaccine design and of putative drugs for treatment against viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Rafeka; Yasmin, Tahirah; Hosen, Md Ismail; Nurun Nabi, A H M

    2018-01-22

    In silico approach using computational biology to design best probable epitopes and/or drug target(s) has given an edge to foresee active components for the treatment of many infectious diseases. This study aims to investigate the best probable epitopes from fiber, hexon and penton base proteins as well as probable drug targets to prevent and to cure adenovirus infection, respectively. After retrieving protein sequences, analysis of selection pressure; prediction of continuous/discontinuous B cell epitopes along with their antigenicity, immunogenicity, allergenicity; T cell epitopes along with their population coverage and echelon of conservancy were performed. Out of three proteins, fiber protein underwent the highest degree of selection pressure. Five peptides from fiber C-5, hexon C-5 and D-8, penton base B-3 and C-5 proteins were considered as the best potential B cell epitopes. Further analyses revealed that peptides present in fiber C-5, hexon C-5, penton base B-3 and C-5 proteins fulfilled the criteria of having surface accessibility, hydrophilicity, flexibility, antigenicity and beta turn. Several regions of proteins were identified as discontinuous B cell epitopes. Interestingly, a peptide present in 692-699 region of hexon C-5 and six amino acids at positions 100, 102, 105, 108, 112 and 114 of penton base B-3 proteins were recognized both as continuous and discontinuous B cell epitopes. Of all the predicted T cell epitopes, three nonamers from hexon C-5, D-8 and penton base C-5 proteins may elicit strong immune response by activating both humoral and cellular immunity as these were found to overlap with those of B cell epitopic peptides. Considering non-allergen, conservancy and population coverage properties, "SGYDPYYTY" of hexon protein C-5 was further validated using in silico docking study for its interaction with the HLA allele. This study also demonstrated the possibility of compounds like 3-(azepan-1-ium-1-yl) propane-1-sulfonate and E-5842 as the

  18. A Dual-Modality Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Vaccine for Preventing Genital Herpes by Using Glycoprotein C and D Subunit Antigens To Induce Potent Antibody Responses and Adenovirus Vectors Containing Capsid and Tegument Proteins as T Cell Immunogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita; Mahairas, Gregory G; Shaw, Carolyn E; Huang, Meei-Li; Koelle, David M; Posavad, Christine; Corey, Lawrence; Friedman, Harvey M

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated a genital herpes prophylactic vaccine containing herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoproteins C (gC2) and D (gD2) to stimulate humoral immunity and UL19 (capsid protein VP5) and UL47 (tegument protein VP13/14) as T cell immunogens. The HSV-2 gC2 and gD2 proteins were expressed in baculovirus, while the UL19 and UL47 genes were expressed from replication-defective adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors containing UL19 and UL47 stimulated human and murine CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. Guinea pigs were either (i) mock immunized; (ii) immunized with gC2/gD2, with CpG and alum as adjuvants; (iii) immunized with the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors; or (iv) immunized with the combination of gC2/gD2-CpG/alum and the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors. Immunization with gC2/gD2 produced potent neutralizing antibodies, while UL19 and UL47 also stimulated antibody responses. After intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, the mock and UL19/UL47 adenovirus groups developed severe acute disease, while 2/8 animals in the gC2/gD2-only group and none in the combined group developed acute disease. No animals in the gC2/gD2 or combined group developed recurrent disease; however, 5/8 animals in each group had subclinical shedding of HSV-2 DNA, on 15/168 days for the gC2/gD2 group and 13/168 days for the combined group. Lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia were positive for HSV-2 DNA and latency-associated transcripts for 5/8 animals in the gC2/gD2 group and 2/8 animals in the combined group. None of the differences comparing the gC2/gD2-only group and the combined group were statistically significant. Therefore, adding the T cell immunogens UL19 and UL47 to the gC2/gD2 vaccine did not significantly reduce genital disease and vaginal HSV-2 DNA shedding compared with the excellent protection provided by gC2/gD2 in the guinea pig model. HSV-2 infection is a common cause of genital ulcer disease and a significant public health concern. Genital herpes increases the risk of transmission and

  19. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Specht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for molecular pharming in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae are poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, and they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally-delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and system immune reactivity.

  20. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elizabeth A.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for “molecular pharming” in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity. PMID:24596570

  1. Viruses - from pathogens to vaccine carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Juliana C; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2011-10-01

    Vaccination is mankind's greatest public health success story. By now vaccines to many of the viruses that once caused fatal childhood diseases are routinely used throughout the world. Traditional methods of vaccine development through inactivation or attenuation of viruses have failed for some of the most deadly human pathogens, necessitating new approaches. Genetic modification of viruses not only allows for their attenuation but also for incorporation of sequences from other viruses, turning one pathogen into a vaccine carrier for another. Recombinant viruses have pros and cons as vaccine carriers, as discussed below using vectors based on adenovirus, herpesvirus, flavivirus, and rhabdovirus as examples.

  2. Targeting the genital tract mucosa with a lipopeptide/recombinant adenovirus prime/boost vaccine induces potent and long-lasting CD8+ T cell immunity against herpes: importance of MyD88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; Benmohamed, Lbachir

    2012-11-01

    Targeting of the mucosal immune system of the genital tract with subunit vaccines has failed to induce potent and durable local CD8(+) T cell immunity, which is crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral pathogens, including HSV type 2 (HSV-2), which causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8(+) T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide vaccine and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8(+) T cell epitope (gB(498-505)), and both were delivered intravaginally in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared with mice immunized with the homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo) vaccine, the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice 1) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells, detected in both the genital tract draining nodes and in the vaginal mucosa; 2) had significantly lower virus titers; 3) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and 4) did not succumb to lethal infection (p herpes infection and disease.

  3. Mucosal Vaccine Development Based on Liposome Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Valentina; Norling, Karin; Bally, Marta; Höök, Fredrik; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-01-01

    Immune protection against infectious diseases is most effective if located at the portal of entry of the pathogen. Hence, there is an increasing demand for vaccine formulations that can induce strong protective immunity following oral, respiratory, or genital tract administration. At present, only few mucosal vaccines are found on the market, but recent technological advancements and a better understanding of the principles that govern priming of mucosal immune responses have contributed to a more optimistic view on the future of mucosal vaccines. Compared to live attenuated vaccines, subcomponent vaccines, most often protein-based, are considered safer, more stable, and less complicated to manufacture, but they require the addition of nontoxic and clinically safe adjuvants to be effective. In addition, another limiting factor is the large antigen dose that usually is required for mucosal vaccines. Therefore, the combination of mucosal adjuvants with the recent progress in nanoparticle technology provides an attractive solution to these problems. In particular, the liposome technology is ideal for combining protein antigen and adjuvant into an effective mucosal vaccine. Here, we describe and discuss recent progress in nanoparticle formulations using various types of liposomes that convey strong promise for the successful development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines.

  4. Adenovirus-associated health risks for recreational activities in a multi-use coastal watershed based on site-specific quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Arti; McBride, Graham; Wuertz, Stefan

    2013-10-15

    We used site-specific quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to assess the probability of adenovirus illness for three groups of swimmers: adults with primary contact, children with primary contact, and secondary contact regardless of age. Human enteroviruses and adenoviruses were monitored by qPCR in a multi-use watershed and Adenovirus type 40/41 was detected in 11% of 73 samples, ranging from 147 to 4117 genomes per liter. Enterovirus was detected only once (32 genomes per liter). Seven of eight virus detections occurred when E. coli concentrations were below the single sample maximum water quality criterion for contact recreation, and five of eight virus detections occurred when fecal coliforms were below the corresponding criterion. We employed dose-harmonization to convert viral genome measurements to TCID50 values needed for dose-response curves. The three scenarios considered different amounts of water ingestion and Monte Carlo simulation was used to account for the variability associated with the doses. The mean illness risk in children based on adenovirus measurements obtained over 11 months was estimated to be 3.5%, which is below the 3.6% risk considered tolerable by the current United States EPA recreational criteria for gastrointestinal illnesses (GI). The mean risks of GI illness for adults and secondary contact were 1.9% and 1.0%, respectively. These risks changed appreciably when different distributions were fitted to the data as determined by Monte Carlo simulations. In general, risk was at a maximum for the log-logistic distribution and lowest for the hockey stick distribution in all three selected scenarios. Also, under default assumptions, the risk was lowered considerably when assuming that only a small proportion of Adenovirus 40/41 (3%) was as infectious as Adenovirus type 4, compared to the assumption that all genomes were Adenovirus 4. In conclusion, site-specific QMRA on water-borne adenoviruses in this watershed provided a similar

  5. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    next 5 years, based on gender, blood pressure, body mass index, smoking history and presence or absence of diabetes [29]. This was done to avoid the...lacking effective vaccines, such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Adeno- vectors have proven especially effective at inducing robust CD8+ T cell...infectious diseases particularly tuberculosis [50] and HIV [51,52,53] where CMI is likely important. Limitations The main finding of this study that CD8+ T

  6. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  7. Co-vaccination with adeno-associated virus vectors encoding human papillomavirus 16 L1 proteins and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF can elicit strong and prolonged neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dai-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Huang, Chien-Wei; Kuo, Shu-Wen; Chen, Show-Li

    2005-01-01

    Non-infectious human papillomavirus-like particles (VLPs), encoded by the major capsid gene L1, have been shown to be effective as vaccines to prevent cervical cancer. We have developed the genetic immunization of the L1 gene to induce a neutralizing antibody. We constructed and generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 L1 protein that could form virus-like particles in transduced cells. Previous reports have demonstrated that the formation of VLP is necessary to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies to protect an animal from viral challenge. Therefore, we carried out a single intramuscular (i.m.) injection with recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding HPV-16 L1 protein (rAAV-16L1) in BALB/c mice, which ultimately produced stronger and more prolonged neutralizing L1 antibodies, when compared to the DNA vaccine. Immunohistochemistry showed that the accumulation of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, in rAAV-16L1 and L1 DNA-injected muscle fibers may be due to the L1 protein expression, but not to AAV infection. When compared to the L1 VLP vaccine, however, the titers of neutralizing L1 antibodies induced by VLP were higher than those induced by rAAV-16L1. Co-vaccinating with rAAV-16L1 and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF (rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF) induced comparable higher levels of neutralizing L1 antibodies with those of VLP. This implies that a single i.m. co-injection with rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF can achieve the same vaccine effect as a VLP vaccine requiring 3 booster injections.

  8. Recombinant adenovirus type 5 HIV gag/pol/nef vaccine in South Africa: unblinded, long-term follow-up of the phase 2b HVTN 503/Phambili study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Glenda E; Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Gilbert, Peter B; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; McElrath, M Julie; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    The HVTN 503/Phambili study, which assessed the efficacy of the Merck Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine in South Africa, was stopped when futility criteria in the Step study (assessing the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia) were met. Here we report long-term follow-up data. HVTN 503/Phambili was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised trial that recruited HIV-1 uninfected, sexually active adults aged 18-35 years from five sites in South Africa. Eligible participants were randomly assigned (1:1) by computer-generated random numbers to either vaccine or placebo, stratified by site and sex. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HIV-1 infection in the modified intention-to-treat cohort, all of whom were unmasked early in follow-up. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00413725 and the South African National Health Research Database, number DOH-27-0207-1539. Between Jan 24, 2007, and Sept 19, 2007, 801 participants (26·7%) of a planned 3000 were randomly assigned (400 to vaccine, 401 to placebo); 216 (27%) received only one injection, 529 (66%) received only two injections, and 56 (7%) received three injections. At a median follow-up of 42 months (IQR 31-42), 63 vaccine recipients (16%) had HIV-1 infection compared with 37 placebo recipients (9%; adjusted HR 1·70, 95% CI 1·13-2·55; p=0·01). Risk for HIV-1 infection did not differ according to the number of vaccinations received, sex, circumcision, or adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) serostatus. Differences in risk behaviour at baseline or during the study, or annualised dropout rate (7·7% [95% CI 6·2-9·5] for vaccine recipients vs 8·8% [7·1-10·7] for placebo recipients; p=0·40) are unlikely explanations for the increased rate of HIV-1 infections seen in vaccine recipients. The increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in vaccine recipients, irrespective of number of doses received, warrants further investigation to understand the biological

  9. Inactivated and live bivalent fowl adenovirus (FAdV8b + FAdV11) breeder vaccines provide broad-spectrum protection in chicks against inclusion body hepatitis (IBH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashish; Popowich, Shelly; Ojkic, Davor; Kurukulasuriya, Shanika; Chow-Lockerbie, Betty; Gunawardana, Thushari; Goonewardene, Kalhari; Karunarathna, Ruwani; Ayalew, Lisanework E; Ahmed, Khawaja Ashfaque; Tikoo, Suresh K; Willson, Philip; Gomis, Susantha

    2018-01-29

    Fowl adenovirus (FAdV) is comprised of five species (A to E) and 12 serotypes (1-7, 8a, 8b, 9-11). Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) is caused by FAdV-7, 8a, 8b (species E) and FAdV-2 and 11 (species D). Commercial vaccines against IBH are not available in Canada. Autogenous FAdV broiler breeder vaccines are now used in some areas where outbreaks of IBH are occurring. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a bivalent (species D and E) live and an inactivated FAdV broiler breeder vaccine in protecting broiler chicks against IBH through maternal antibody (MtAb) transfer. FAdV seronegative broiler breeders (n = 300/group) received either a live or inactivated bivalent (FAdV-8b-SK + FAdV-11-1047) vaccine. The live vaccine (1 × 104 TCID50 of each virus/bird) was given orally once at 16 weeks of age and the inactivated vaccine (1 × 106TCID50 of each virus + 20% Emulsigen D) was given intramuscularly at 16 and 19 weeks of age. Controls (n = 150) were given saline orally. The inactivated vaccine group was boosted 3 weeks later with the same vaccine. Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) in sera (n = 10) were detected at 19, 22, 30 and 48 weeks of age. NAb were able to neutralize various FAdV serotypes within species D and E. Mean NAb were similar in the both live and killed vaccine groups at 19, 30 and 48 weeks and ranged from 2.4 to 3.7 log10. Approximately 26 ± 7% of MtAbs were passively transferred through eggs to day-old chicks. Progeny challenged with a lethal dose (1 × 107 TCID50/bird intramuscularly) of FAdV-8b-SK, FAdV-11-1047, or FAdV-2-685 (n = 90/group) at 14 days post-hatch (dph) showed 98-100% protection in broiler chicks to homologous or heterologous FAdV challenges. Our data suggests that a bivalent live and an inactivated FAdV vaccine are equally effective and have the potential for the control of IBH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting the Genital Tract Mucosa with a Lipopeptide/Recombinant Adenovirus Prime/Boost Vaccine Induces Potent and Long-Lasting CD8+ T Cell Immunity Against Herpes: Importance of Myeloid Differentiation Factor 881

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the mucosal immune system of the genital tract (GT) with subunit vaccines failed to induce potent and durable local CD8+ T cell immunity, crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral (STV) pathogens, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) that causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8+ T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8+ T cell epitope (gB498-505) and both were delivered intravaginally (IVAG) in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared to its homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo); the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice: (i) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8+ T cells, detected in both the GT draining nodes (GT-DLN) and in the vaginal mucosa (VM); (ii) had significantly lower virus titers; (iii) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and (iv) did not succumb to lethal infection (p herpes infection and disease. PMID:23018456

  11. Priming with an adenovirus 35-circumsporozoite protein (CS) vaccine followed by RTS,S/AS01B boosting significantly improves immunogenicity to Plasmodium falciparum CS compared to that with either malaria vaccine alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, V. Ann; McGrath, Shannon M.; Dubois, Patrice M.; Pau, Maria G.; Mettens, Pascal; Shott, Joseph; Cobb, Michelle; Burge, J. Robert; Larson, David; Ware, Lisa A.; Demoitie, Marie-Ange; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Bayat, Babak; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Dubois, Marie-Claude; Cohen, Joe; Goudsmit, Jaap; Heppner, D. Gray

    2007-01-01

    The RTS,S/AS02A protein-based vaccine consistently demonstrates significant protection against infection with Plasmodium falciparum malaria and also against clinical malaria and severe disease in children in areas of endemicity. Here we demonstrate with rhesus macaques that priming with a

  12. Current Ebola vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ebolaviruses cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, neither a specific treatment nor a vaccine licensed for use in humans is available. However, a number of vaccine candidates have been developed in the last decade that are highly protective in non-human primates, the gold standard animal model for Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Areas covered This review analyzes a number of scenarios for the use of ebolavirus vaccines, discusses the requirements for ebolavirus vaccines in these scenarios, and describes current ebolavirus vaccines. Among these vaccines are recombinant Adenoviruses, recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis viruses, recombinant Human Parainfluenza viruses and virus-like particles. Interestingly, one of these vaccine platforms, based on recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis viruses, has also demonstrated post-exposure protection in non-human primates. Expert opinion The most pressing remaining challenge is now to move these vaccine candidates forward into human trials and towards licensure. In order to achieve this, it will be necessary to establish the mechanisms and correlates of protection for these vaccines, and to continue to demonstrate their safety, particularly in potentially immunocompromised populations. However, already now there is sufficient evidence that, from a scientific perspective, a vaccine protective against ebolaviruses is possible. PMID:22559078

  13. Isolation and characterization of adenoviruses persistently shed from the gastrointestinal tract of non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitra Roy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are important human pathogens that have been developed as vectors for gene therapies and genetic vaccines. Previous studies indicated that human infections with adenoviruses are self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts with evidence of some persistence in adenoid tissue. We sought to better understand the natural history of adenovirus infections in various non-human primates and discovered that healthy populations of great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans and macaques shed substantial quantities of infectious adenoviruses in stool. Shedding in stools from asymptomatic humans was found to be much less frequent, comparable to frequencies reported before. We purified and fully sequenced 30 novel adenoviruses from apes and 3 novel adenoviruses from macaques. Analyses of the new ape adenovirus sequences (as well as the 4 chimpanzee adenovirus sequences we have previously reported together with 22 complete adenovirus genomes available from GenBank revealed that (a the ape adenoviruses could clearly be classified into species corresponding to human adenovirus species B, C, and E, (b there was evidence for intraspecies recombination between adenoviruses, and (c the high degree of phylogenetic relatedness of adenoviruses across their various primate hosts provided evidence for cross species transmission events to have occurred in the natural history of B and E viruses. The high degree of asymptomatic shedding of live adenovirus in non-human primates and evidence for zoonotic transmissions warrants caution for primate handling and housing. Furthermore, the presence of persistent and/or latent adenovirus infections in the gut should be considered in the design and interpretation of human and non-human primate studies with adenovirus vectors.

  14. Immune response and protection in raccoons (Procyon lotor) following consumption of baits containing ONRAB®, a human adenovirus rabies glycoprotein recombinant vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L J; Rosatte, R C; Fehlner-Gardiner, C; Taylor, J S; Davies, J C; Donovan, D

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the immune response and protection conferred in raccoons (Procyon lotor) following consumption of ONRAB(®) oral rabies vaccine baits. Forty-two wild-caught, captive raccoons were each offered an ONRAB vaccine bait; 21 controls received no vaccine baits. Blood samples collected from all raccoons before treatment, and each week posttreatment for 16 wk, were assessed for the presence of rabies virus antibody. In the bait group, an individual was considered to have responded to vaccination if serum samples from three or more consecutive weeks were antibody-positive. Using this criterion, 77% (20/26) of raccoons that consumed ONRAB baits with no observed vaccine spillage (full dose) demonstrated a humoral immune response. In the group that received a partial dose (0.05-0.90 mL vaccine recovered), 50% (8/16) of raccoons responded to vaccination. Regardless of the vaccine dose received, among the 28 raccoons that responded to vaccination 18 had antibody initially detectable at week 2 and 22 remained antibody-positive for at least 10 consecutive weeks. Kinetics of the humoral immune response suggest that the best time to conduct postbaiting surveillance for evidence of vaccination would be 6-13 wk following bait deployment, with the highest antibody prevalence expected between weeks 8-10. A sub-sample of 29 raccoons (20 ONRAB, 9 controls) was challenged with raccoon rabies virus variant 350 days posttreatment. Eight of nine controls (89%) developed rabies whereas 15/20 vaccinates (75%) survived. Survival following rabies challenge was significantly higher in raccoons presented ONRAB vaccine baits.

  15. School-Based Influenza Vaccination: Parents’ Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Candace; Russell, Margaret L.; MacDonald, Judy; Collins, Ramona; Frank, Christine J.; Davis, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. Purpose We explored parents’ perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. Participants Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. Findings Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV), Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support), families (e.g. convenience), the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities), the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness) and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles). Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized), families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions) and the education sector (loss of instructional time). Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. Conclusions Parents perceived advantages and

  16. School-based influenza vaccination: parents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Candace; Russell, Margaret L; MacDonald, Judy; Collins, Ramona; Frank, Christine J; Davis, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. We explored parents' perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV), Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support), families (e.g. convenience), the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities), the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness) and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles). Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized), families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions) and the education sector (loss of instructional time). Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. Parents perceived advantages and disadvantages to delivering annual seasonal influenza

  17. School-based influenza vaccination: parents' perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Lind

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. PURPOSE: We explored parents' perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. FINDINGS: Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV, Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support, families (e.g. convenience, the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities, the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles. Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized, families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions and the education sector (loss of instructional time. Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. CONCLUSIONS: Parents perceived

  18. Effect of School-based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Technology for Health (PATH) to evaluate different HPV vaccine delivery strategies. A school-based HPV vaccine delivery strategy was adopted in Ibanda targeting girls enrolled in primary grade five (P5). In Nakasongola, the HPV vaccine was delivered during the routine Child. Days Plus (CDP) program, targeting girls of at.

  19. Ebolavirus Vaccines: Progress in the Fight Against Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Xin; Yao, Hang-Ping; Wu, Nan-Ping; Gao, Hai-Nv; Wu, Hai-Bo; Jin, Chang-Zhong; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Xie, Tian-Shen; Li, Lan-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly infectious pathogens that cause lethal Ebola virus disease (EVD) in humans and non-human primates (NHPs). Due to their high pathogenicity and transmissibility, as well as the potential to be misused as a bioterrorism agent, ebolaviruses would threaten the health of global populations if not controlled. In this review, we describe the origin and structure of ebolaviruses and the development of vaccines from the beginning of the 1980s, including conventional ebolavirus vaccines, DNA vaccines, Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), vaccinia virus-based vaccines, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-like replicon particles, Kunjin virus-based vaccine, recombinant Zaire Ebolavirusx2206;VP30, recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccines, recombinant rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccines, recombinant paramyxovirus-based vaccines, adenovirus-based vaccines and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based vaccines. No licensed vaccine or specific treatment is currently available to counteract ebolavirus infection, although DNA plasmids and several viral vector approaches have been evaluated as promising vaccine platforms. These vaccine candidates have been confirmed to be successful in protecting NHPs against lethal infection. Moreover, these vaccine candidates were successfully advanced to clinical trials. The present review provides an update of the current research on Ebola vaccines, with the aim of providing an overview on current prospects in the fight against EVD. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Vaxjo: A Web-Based Vaccine Adjuvant Database and Its Application for Analysis of Vaccine Adjuvants and Their Uses in Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Sayers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine adjuvants are compounds that enhance host immune responses to co-administered antigens in vaccines. Vaxjo is a web-based central database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes vaccine adjuvants and their usages in vaccine development. Basic information of a vaccine adjuvant stored in Vaxjo includes adjuvant name, components, structure, appearance, storage, preparation, function, safety, and vaccines that use this adjuvant. Reliable references are curated and cited. Bioinformatics scripts are developed and used to link vaccine adjuvants to different adjuvanted vaccines stored in the general VIOLIN vaccine database. Presently, 103 vaccine adjuvants have been curated in Vaxjo. Among these adjuvants, 98 have been used in 384 vaccines stored in VIOLIN against over 81 pathogens, cancers, or allergies. All these vaccine adjuvants are categorized and analyzed based on adjuvant types, pathogens used, and vaccine types. As a use case study of vaccine adjuvants in infectious disease vaccines, the adjuvants used in Brucella vaccines are specifically analyzed. A user-friendly web query and visualization interface is developed for interactive vaccine adjuvant search. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine adjuvants is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO in the Web Ontology Language (OWL format.

  1. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated that previous vaccination with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based Lassa virus vaccine does not alter protective efficacy of subsequent vaccination with a VSV-based Ebola virus vaccine. These findings demonstrate the utility of VSV-based vaccines against divergent viral pathogens, even when preexisting immunity to the vaccine vector is present.

  2. Adenovirus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affects the lower respiratory tract as well, causing bronchiolitis , croup , or viral pneumonia, which is less common but can cause serious illness in infants. Adenovirus can also produce a dry, harsh cough ...

  3. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO) is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of vaccine-gene interaction networks. As a test case, we have examined vaccines for Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in humans and animals. Results The VO-based SciMiner (VO-SciMiner) was developed to incorporate a total of 67 Brucella vaccine terms. A set of rules for term expansion of VO terms were learned from training data, consisting of 90 biomedical articles related to Brucella vaccine terms. VO-SciMiner demonstrated high recall (91%) and precision (99%) from testing a separate set of 100 manually selected biomedical articles. VO-SciMiner indexing exhibited superior performance in retrieving Brucella vaccine-related papers over that obtained with MeSH-based PubMed literature search. For example, a VO-SciMiner search of "live attenuated Brucella vaccine" returned 922 hits as of April 20, 2011, while a PubMed search of the same query resulted in only 74 hits. Using the abstracts of 14,947 Brucella-related papers, VO-SciMiner identified 140 Brucella genes associated with Brucella vaccines. These genes included known protective antigens, virulence factors, and genes closely related to Brucella vaccines. These VO-interacting Brucella genes were significantly over-represented in biological functional categories, including metabolite transport and metabolism, replication and repair, cell wall biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and secretion, posttranslational modification, and chaperones. Furthermore, a comprehensive interaction network of Brucella vaccines and genes were

  4. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Junguk; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Feldman, Eva L; He, Yongqun

    2011-08-26

    Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO) is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of vaccine-gene interaction networks. As a test case, we have examined vaccines for Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in humans and animals. The VO-based SciMiner (VO-SciMiner) was developed to incorporate a total of 67 Brucella vaccine terms. A set of rules for term expansion of VO terms were learned from training data, consisting of 90 biomedical articles related to Brucella vaccine terms. VO-SciMiner demonstrated high recall (91%) and precision (99%) from testing a separate set of 100 manually selected biomedical articles. VO-SciMiner indexing exhibited superior performance in retrieving Brucella vaccine-related papers over that obtained with MeSH-based PubMed literature search. For example, a VO-SciMiner search of "live attenuated Brucella vaccine" returned 922 hits as of April 20, 2011, while a PubMed search of the same query resulted in only 74 hits. Using the abstracts of 14,947 Brucella-related papers, VO-SciMiner identified 140 Brucella genes associated with Brucella vaccines. These genes included known protective antigens, virulence factors, and genes closely related to Brucella vaccines. These VO-interacting Brucella genes were significantly over-represented in biological functional categories, including metabolite transport and metabolism, replication and repair, cell wall biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and secretion, posttranslational modification, and chaperones. Furthermore, a comprehensive interaction network of Brucella vaccines and genes were identified. The asserted

  5. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zuoshuang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of vaccine-gene interaction networks. As a test case, we have examined vaccines for Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in humans and animals. Results The VO-based SciMiner (VO-SciMiner was developed to incorporate a total of 67 Brucella vaccine terms. A set of rules for term expansion of VO terms were learned from training data, consisting of 90 biomedical articles related to Brucella vaccine terms. VO-SciMiner demonstrated high recall (91% and precision (99% from testing a separate set of 100 manually selected biomedical articles. VO-SciMiner indexing exhibited superior performance in retrieving Brucella vaccine-related papers over that obtained with MeSH-based PubMed literature search. For example, a VO-SciMiner search of "live attenuated Brucella vaccine" returned 922 hits as of April 20, 2011, while a PubMed search of the same query resulted in only 74 hits. Using the abstracts of 14,947 Brucella-related papers, VO-SciMiner identified 140 Brucella genes associated with Brucella vaccines. These genes included known protective antigens, virulence factors, and genes closely related to Brucella vaccines. These VO-interacting Brucella genes were significantly over-represented in biological functional categories, including metabolite transport and metabolism, replication and repair, cell wall biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and secretion, posttranslational modification, and chaperones. Furthermore, a comprehensive interaction network of Brucella

  6. Pre-existing adenovirus immunity modifies a complex mixed Th1 and Th2 cytokine response to an Ad5/HIV-1 vaccine candidate in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O Pine

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of the recent Step Study highlight a need to clarify the effects of pre-existing natural immunity to a vaccine vector on vaccine-induced T-cell responses. To investigate this interaction, we examined the relationship between pre-existing Ad5 immunity and T-cell cytokine response profiles in healthy, HIV-uninfected recipients of MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag vaccine (HVTN 050, ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00849732. Participants were grouped by baseline Ad5 neutralizing antibody titer as either Ad5-seronegative (titer ≤18; n = 36 or Ad5-seropositive (titer >200; n = 34. Samples from vaccine recipients were analyzed for immune responses to either HIV-1 Gag peptide pools or Ad5 empty vector using an ex vivo assay that measures thirty cytokines in the absence of long-term culture. The overall profiles of cytokine responses to Gag and Ad5 had similar combinations of induced Th1- and Th2-type cytokines, including IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IP-10, IL-13, and IL-10, although the Ad5-specific responses were uniformly higher than the Gag-specific responses (p<0.0001 for 9 out of 11 significantly expressed analytes. At the peak response time point, PBMC from Ad5-seronegative vaccinees secreted significantly more IP-10 in response to Gag (p = 0.008, and significantly more IP-10 (p = 0.0009, IL-2 (p = 0.006 and IL-10 (p = 0.05 in response to Ad5 empty vector than PBMC from Ad5-seropositive vaccinees. Additionally, similar responses to the Ad5 vector prior to vaccination were observed in almost all subjects, regardless of Ad5 neutralizing antibody status, and the levels of secreted IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1Ra and GM-CSF were blunted following vaccination. The cytokine response profile of Gag-specific T cells mirrored the Ad5-specific response present in all subjects before vaccination, and included a number of Th1- and Th2-associated cytokines not routinely assessed in current vaccine trials, such as IP-10, IL-10, IL-13, and GM-CSF. Together, these

  7. CD154 and IL-2 signaling of CD4+ T cells play a critical role in multiple phases of CD8+ CTL responses following adenovirus vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channakeshava Sokke Umeshappa

    Full Text Available Adenoviral (AdV vectors represent most commonly utilized viral vaccines in clinical studies. While the role of CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses in mediating AdV-induced protection is well understood, the involvement of CD4(+ T cell-provided signals in the development of functional CD8(+ CTL responses remain unclear. To explore CD4(+ T helper signals required for AdVova-stimulated CTL responses, we established an adoptive transfer system by transferring CD4(+ T cells derived from various knock out and transgenic mice into wild-type and/or CD4-deficient animals, followed by immunizing with recombinant ovalbumin (OVA-expressing AdVova vector. Without CD4(+ T help, both primary and memory CTL responses were greatly reduced in this model, and were associated with increased PD-1 expression. The provision of OVA-specific CD4(+ T help in CD4(+ T cell-deficient mice restored AdVova-induced primary CTL responses, and supported survival and recall responses of AdVova-stimulated memory CTLs. These effects were specifically mediated by CD4(+ T cell-produced IL-2 and CD154 signals. Adoptive transfer of "helped" or "unhelped" effector and memory CTLs into naïve CD4(+ T cell-deficient or -sufficient mice also revealed an additional role for polyclonal CD4(+ T cell environment in the survival of AdVova-stimulated CTLs, partially explaining the extension of CTL contraction phase. Finally, during recall responses, CD4(+ T cell environment, particularly involving memory CD4(+ T cells, greatly enhanced expansion of memory CTLs. Collectively, our data strongly suggest a critical role for CD4(+ T help in multiple phases of AdV-stimulated CTL responses, and could partially explain certain failures in AdV-based immunization trials targeting malignant tumors and chronic diseases that are often associated with compromised CD4(+ T cell population and function.

  8. Protection Induced by Simultaneous Subcutaneous and Endobronchial Vaccination with BCG/BCG and BCG/Adenovirus Expressing Antigen 85A against Mycobacterium bovis in Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian S Dean

    Full Text Available The incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB in the GB has been increasing since the 1980s. Immunisation, alongside current control measures, has been proposed as a sustainable measure to control bTB. Immunisation with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG has been shown to protect against bTB. Furthermore, much experimental data indicates that pulmonary local immunity is important for protection against respiratory infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that pulmonary immunisation is highly effective. Here, we evaluated protection against M. bovis, the main causative agent of bTB, conferred by BCG delivered subcutaneously, endobronchially or by the new strategy of simultaneous immunisation by both routes. We also tested simultaneous subcutaneous immunisation with BCG and endobronchial delivery of a recombinant type 5 adenovirus expressing mycobacterial antigen 85A. There was significantly reduced visible pathology in animals receiving the simultaneous BCG/BCG or BCG/Ad85 treatment compared to naïve controls. Furthermore, there were significantly fewer advanced microscopic granulomata in animals receiving BCG/Ad85A compared to naive controls. Thus, combining local and systemic immunisation limits the development of pathology, which in turn could decrease bTB transmission.

  9. rBCG Induces Strong Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses in Rhesus Macaques in a Prime-Boost Setting with an Adenovirus 35 Tuberculosis Vaccine Vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magalhaes, Isabelle; Sizemore, Donata R.; Ahmed, Raija K.; Mueller, Stefanie; Wehlin, Lena; Scanga, Charles; Weichold, Frank; Schirru, Giulia; Pau, Maria Grazia; Goudsmit, Jaap; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Spångberg, Mats; Andersson, Jan; Gaines, Hans; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Skeiky, Yasir A. W.; Sadoff, Jerry; Maeurer, Markus

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BCG vaccination, combined with adenoviral-delivered boosts, represents a reasonable strategy to augment, broaden and prolong immune protection against tuberculosis (TB). We tested BCG (SSI1331) (in 6 animals, delivered intradermally) and a recombinant (rBCG) AFRO-1 expressing

  10. Outpatient-based pneumococcal vaccine campaign and survey of perceptions about pneumococcal vaccination in patients and doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Heo, Jung Yeon; Noh, Ji Yun; Seo, Yu Bin; Kim, In Seon; Choi, Won Suk; Kim, Woo Joo

    2013-03-01

    Despite the ready availability of pneumococcal vaccine, vaccination rates are quite low in South Korea. This study was designed to assess perceptions and awareness about pneumococcal vaccines among subjects at risk and find strategies to increases vaccine coverage rates. A cross sectional, community-based survey was conducted to assess perceptions about the pneumococcal vaccine at a local public health center. In a tertiary hospital, an outpatient- based pneumococcal vaccine campaign was carried out for the elderly and individuals with chronic co-morbidities from May to July of 2007. Based on the survey, only 7.6% were ever informed about pneumococcal vaccination. The coverage rates of the pneumococcal vaccine before and after the hospital campaign showed an increased annual rate from 3.39% to 5.91%. The most common reason for vaccination was "doctor's advice" (53.3%). As for the reasons for not receiving vaccination, about 75% of high risk patients were not aware of the pneumococcal vaccine, which was the most important barrier to vaccination. Negative clinician's attitude was the second most common cause of non-vaccination. Annual outpatient-based campaigns early in the influenza season may improve pneumococcal vaccine coverage rates. Doctor's advice was the most important encouraging factor for vaccination.

  11. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang Zuoshuang; Hur Junguk; Feldman Eva L; He Yongqun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO) is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of va...

  12. Structure of human adenovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Reddy, Vijay S. (Scripps); (Vanderbilt)

    2012-07-11

    A detailed structural analysis of the entire human adenovirus capsid has been stymied by the complexity and size of this 150 MDa macromolecular complex. Over the past 10 years, the steady improvements in viral genome manipulation concomitant with advances in crystallographic techniques and data processing software has allowed structure determination of this virus by X-ray diffraction at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution. The virus structure revealed the location, folds, and interactions of major and minor (cement proteins) on the inner and outer capsid surface. This new structural information sheds further light on the process of adenovirus capsid assembly and virus-host cell interactions.

  13. A thermostable messenger RNA based vaccine against rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitz, Lothar; Vogel, Annette; Schnee, Margit; Voss, Daniel; Rauch, Susanne; Mutzke, Thorsten; Ketterer, Thomas; Kramps, Thomas; Petsch, Benjamin

    2017-12-01

    Although effective rabies virus vaccines have been existing for decades, each year, rabies virus infections still cause around 50.000 fatalities worldwide. Most of these cases occur in developing countries, where these vaccines are not available. The reasons for this are the prohibitive high costs of cell culture or egg grown rabies virus vaccines and the lack of a functional cold chain in many regions in which rabies virus is endemic. Here, we describe the excellent temperature resistance of a non-replicating mRNA based rabies virus vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G). Prolonged storage of the vaccine from -80°C to up to +70°C for several months did not impact the protective capacity of the mRNA vaccine. Efficacy after storage was demonstrated by the induction of rabies specific virus neutralizing antibodies and protection in mice against lethal rabies infection. Moreover, storing the vaccine at oscillating temperatures between +4° and +56°C for 20 cycles in order to simulate interruptions of the cold chain during vaccine transport, did not affect the vaccine's immunogenicity and protective characteristics, indicating that maintenance of a cold chain is not essential for this vaccine.

  14. A thermostable messenger RNA based vaccine against rabies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lothar Stitz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although effective rabies virus vaccines have been existing for decades, each year, rabies virus infections still cause around 50.000 fatalities worldwide. Most of these cases occur in developing countries, where these vaccines are not available. The reasons for this are the prohibitive high costs of cell culture or egg grown rabies virus vaccines and the lack of a functional cold chain in many regions in which rabies virus is endemic. Here, we describe the excellent temperature resistance of a non-replicating mRNA based rabies virus vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G. Prolonged storage of the vaccine from -80°C to up to +70°C for several months did not impact the protective capacity of the mRNA vaccine. Efficacy after storage was demonstrated by the induction of rabies specific virus neutralizing antibodies and protection in mice against lethal rabies infection. Moreover, storing the vaccine at oscillating temperatures between +4° and +56°C for 20 cycles in order to simulate interruptions of the cold chain during vaccine transport, did not affect the vaccine's immunogenicity and protective characteristics, indicating that maintenance of a cold chain is not essential for this vaccine.

  15. A Novel Adenovirus in Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Young Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica, collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1, showed nucleotide (amino acid sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5% with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1, 71% (70% with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1, 71.4% (67.6% with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3 and 61% (61.6% with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1. Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™ cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins.

  16. Incorporation of porcine adenovirus 4 fiber protein enhances infectivity of adenovirus vector on dendritic cells: implications for immune-mediated cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Wilkinson-Ryan

    Full Text Available One strategy in cancer immunotherapy is to capitalize on the key immunoregulatory and antigen presenting capabilities of dendritic cells (DCs. This approach is dependent on efficient delivery of tumor specific antigens to DCs, which subsequently induce an anti-tumor T-cell mediated immune response. Human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5 has been used in human studies for gene delivery, but has limited infection in DCs, which lack the proper receptors. Addition of the porcine fiber knob (PK from porcine adenovirus type 4 to HAdV5 allows the virus to deliver genetic material via binding to glycosylated surface proteins and bypasses the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor required by wild-type HAdV5. In this study we explored the potential therapeutic applications of an adenovirus with PK-based tropism against cancers expressing mesothelin. Infectivity and gene transfer assays were used to compare Ad5-PK to wild-type HAdV5. Mouse models were used to demonstrate peptide specificity and T-cell responses. We show that the PK modification highly augmented infection of DCs, including the CD141+ DC subset, a key subset for activation of naïve CD8+ T-cells. We also show that Ad5-PK increases DC infectivity and tumor specific antigen expression. Finally, vaccination of mice with the Ad5-PK vector resulted in enhanced T-cell-mediated interferon gamma (IFN-γ release in response to both mesothelin peptide and a tumor line expressing mesothelin. Ad5-PK is a promising tool for cancer immunotherapy as it improves infectivity, gene transfer, protein expression, and subsequent T-cell activation in DCs compared to wild-type HAdV5 viruses.

  17. DNA-based influenza vaccines as immunoprophylactic agents toward universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an illness of global public health concern. Influenza viruses have been responsible for several pandemics affecting humans. Current influenza vaccines have proved satisfactory safety; however, they have limitations and do not provide protection against unexpected emerging influenza virus strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative approaches to conventional influenza vaccines. The development of universal influenza vaccines will help alleviate the severity of influenza pandemics. Influenza DNA vaccines have been the subject of many studies over the past decades due to their ability to induce broad-based protective immune responses in various animal models. The present review highlights the recent advances in influenza DNA vaccine research and its potential as an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  18. Coinfections of Multiple Virulent Adenoviral Species in Previously Vaccinated Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vora, Gary J; Lin, Baochuan; Gratwick, Kevin; Meador, Carolyn; Seto, Donald; Purkayastha, Anjan; Freed, Nikki E; Russell, Kevin; Metzgar, David

    2004-01-01

    .... Despite the general success of the vaccination program, surveillance still detected breakthrough infections cases of acute respiratory disease associated with the adenovirus serotypes (4 and 7...

  19. Viral Booster Vaccines Improve Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Induced Protection Against Bovine Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous work in small animal laboratory models of tuberculosis have shown that vaccination strategies based on heterologous prime-boost protocols using Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) to prime and Modified Vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA85A) or recombinant attenuated adenoviruses (Ad8...

  20. M2e-Based Universal Influenza A Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Cho, Ki Joon; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The successful isolation of a human influenza virus in 1933 was soon followed by the first attempts to develop an influenza vaccine. Nowadays, vaccination is still the most effective method to prevent human influenza disease. However, licensed influenza vaccines offer protection against antigenically matching viruses, and the composition of these vaccines needs to be updated nearly every year. Vaccines that target conserved epitopes of influenza viruses would in principle not require such updating and would probably have a considerable positive impact on global human health in case of a pandemic outbreak. The extracellular domain of Matrix 2 (M2e) protein is an evolutionarily conserved region in influenza A viruses and a promising epitope for designing a universal influenza vaccine. Here we review the seminal and recent studies that focused on M2e as a vaccine antigen. We address the mechanism of action and the clinical development of M2e-vaccines. Finally, we try to foresee how M2e-based vaccines could be implemented clinically in the future. PMID:26344949

  1. A thermostable messenger RNA based vaccine against rabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitz, Lothar; Vogel, Annette; Schnee, Margit; Voss, Daniel; Rauch, Susanne; Mutzke, Thorsten; Ketterer, Thomas; Kramps, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Although effective rabies virus vaccines have been existing for decades, each year, rabies virus infections still cause around 50.000 fatalities worldwide. Most of these cases occur in developing countries, where these vaccines are not available. The reasons for this are the prohibitive high costs of cell culture or egg grown rabies virus vaccines and the lack of a functional cold chain in many regions in which rabies virus is endemic. Here, we describe the excellent temperature resistance of a non-replicating mRNA based rabies virus vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G). Prolonged storage of the vaccine from -80°C to up to +70°C for several months did not impact the protective capacity of the mRNA vaccine. Efficacy after storage was demonstrated by the induction of rabies specific virus neutralizing antibodies and protection in mice against lethal rabies infection. Moreover, storing the vaccine at oscillating temperatures between +4° and +56°C for 20 cycles in order to simulate interruptions of the cold chain during vaccine transport, did not affect the vaccine’s immunogenicity and protective characteristics, indicating that maintenance of a cold chain is not essential for this vaccine. PMID:29216187

  2. M2-based influenza vaccines: recent advances and clinical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpe, Annasaheb; Schepens, Bert; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2017-02-01

    Current influenza vaccines can prevent disease caused by influenza viruses but require annual administration and almost yearly reformulation. An attractive alternative approach would be to use a vaccine that provides broad and, ideally, lifelong protection against all influenza A and B virus strains. The extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) of influenza A viruses is conserved and thus fits well in such a broadly protective vaccine. Areas covered: Recent advances in M2e vaccine design, the mode of action of M2e-based immunity and clinical progress of M2-based influenza vaccines. Expert commentary: Many M2e vaccine have been successfully tested for efficacy against a panel of divergent influenza viruses in animal models. More recently, clinical studies have been conducted with M2e vaccine candidates, which demonstrated their safety and immunogenicity in humans. Efficacy studies in humans are still needed to provide evidence that an M2e-based vaccine can protect against human influenza.

  3. Dendritic cell-based vaccine efficacy: aiming for hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Andrea Pizzurro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many approaches for cancer immunotherapy have targeted dendritic cells (DC, directly or indirectly, for the induction of antitumor immune responses. DC-based vaccines have been developed using a wide variety of ex vivo DC culture conditions, antigen source and loading strategies, maturation agents and routes of vaccination. Adjuvants are used to activate innate immune cells at the vaccine injection site, to promote antigen transport to the draining lymph nodes (LNs and to model adaptive immune responses. Despite years of effort, the effective induction of strong and durable antitumor T cell responses in vaccinated patients remains a challenge. The study of vaccine interactions with other immune cells in the LNs and, more recently, in the injection site has opened new doors for understanding antitumor effector T cell licensing and function. In this review, we will briefly discuss the relevant sites and up-to-date facts regarding possible targets for antitumor vaccine refinement. We will focus on the processes taking place at the injection site, adjuvant combinations and their role in DC-based vaccines LN homing and modeling vaccine-induced immune responses capable of controlling tumor growth and generating immune memory.

  4. A plant‐based system for rapid production of influenza vaccine antigens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoji, Yoko; Farrance, Christine E; Bautista, James; Bi, Hong; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Horsey, April; Park, HeeWoo; Jaje, Jennifer; Green, Brian J; Shamloul, Moneim; Sharma, Satish; Chichester, Jessica A; Mett, Vadim; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2012-01-01

    ... the regular seasonal influenza vaccine capacity. Current, egg‐based, influenza vaccine production is well established and provides an effective product, but has limited capacity and speed. Objectives...

  5. Prospects of HA-Based Universal Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar M. Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines afford substantial protection in humans by inducing strain-specific neutralizing antibodies (Abs. Most of these Abs target highly variable immunodominant epitopes in the globular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (HA. Therefore, current vaccines may not be able to induce heterosubtypic immunity against the divergent influenza subtypes. The identification of broadly neutralizing Abs (BnAbs against influenza HA using recent technological advancements in antibody libraries, hybridoma, and isolation of single Ab-secreting plasma cells has increased the interest in developing a universal influenza vaccine as it could provide life-long protection. While these BnAbs can serve as a source for passive immunotherapy, their identification represents an important step towards the design of such a universal vaccine. This review describes the recent advances and approaches used in the development of universal influenza vaccine based on highly conserved HA regions identified by BnAbs.

  6. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  7. A Plasmodium Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Delivered within the Ad5 Hexon Protein Enhances the Protective Efficacy of a Protein Based Malaria Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Kashentseva, Elena A; Villegas, John Paul; Fernandez, Alejandra; Van Pelt, Amelia; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Moreno, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A malaria vaccine is a public health priority. In order to produce an effective vaccine, a multistage approach targeting both the blood and the liver stage infection is desirable. The vaccine candidates also need to induce balanced immune responses including antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Protein-based subunit vaccines like RTS,S are able to induce strong antibody response but poor cellular reactivity. Adenoviral vectors have been effective inducing protective CD8+ T cell responses in several models including malaria; nonetheless this vaccine platform exhibits a limited induction of humoral immune responses. Two approaches have been used to improve the humoral immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus vectors, the use of heterologous prime-boost regimens with recombinant proteins or the genetic modification of the hypervariable regions (HVR) of the capsid protein hexon to express B cell epitopes of interest. In this study, we describe the development of capsid modified Ad5 vectors that express a promiscuous Plasmodium yoelii T helper epitope denominated PyT53 within the hexon HVR2 region. Several regimens were tested in mice to determine the relevance of the hexon modification in enhancing protective immune responses induced by the previously described protein-based multi-stage experimental vaccine PyCMP. A heterologous prime-boost immunization regime that combines a hexon modified vector with transgenic expression of PyCMP followed by protein immunizations resulted in the induction of robust antibody and cellular immune responses in comparison to a similar regimen that includes a vector with unmodified hexon. These differences in immunogenicity translated into a better protective efficacy against both the hepatic and red blood cell stages of P. yoelii. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a hexon modification is used to deliver a promiscuous T cell epitope. Our data support the use of such modification to enhance the immunogenicity and protective

  8. Construction and characterization of recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strain, O/IND/R2/75

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Generation of recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV capsid protein genes along with full-length 2B, 3B and 3Cpro and its characterization. Materials and Methods: FMD viral RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to synthesize expression cassettes (P1-2AB3BCwt and P1-2AB3BCm followed by cloning in pShuttle-CMV vector. Chemically competent BJ5183-AD-1 cells were transformed with the recombinant pShuttle-CMV to produce recombinant adenoviral plasmids. HEK-293 cells were transfected with the recombinant adenoviral plasmids to generate recombinant adenoviruses (hAd5/P1-2AB3BCwt and hAd5/P1-2AB3BCm. Expression of the target proteins was analyzed by sandwich ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The recombinant adenoviruses were purified and concentrated by CsCl density gradient ultracentrifugation. Growth kinetics and thermostability of the recombinant adenoviruses were compared with that of non-recombinant replication-defective adenovirus (dAd5. Results: The recombinant adenoviruses containing capsid protein genes of the FMDV O/IND/R2/75 were generated and amplified in HEK-293 cells. The titer of the recombinant adenoviruses was approximately 108, 109.5 and 1011 TCID50/ml in supernatant media, cell lysate and CsCl purified preparation, respectively. Expression of the FMDV capsid protein was detectable in sandwich ELISA and confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. Growth kinetics of the recombinant adenoviruses did not reveal a significant difference when compared with that of dAd5. A decrement of up to 10-fold at 4°C and 21-fold at 37°C was recorded in the virus titers during 60 h incubation period and found to be statistically significant (p<0.01. Conclusion: Recombinant adenoviruses expressing capsid proteins of the FMDV O/IND/R2/75 were constructed and produced in high titers. In vitro expression of the target proteins in the adenovirus vector system was

  9. Adenovirus F protein as a delivery vehicle for botulinum B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staats Herman F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization with recombinant carboxyl-terminal domain of the heavy chain (Hc domain of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT stimulates protective immunity against native BoNT challenge. Most studies developing a botulism vaccine have focused on the whole Hc; however, since the principal protective epitopes are located within β-trefoil domain (Hcβtre, we hypothesize that immunization with the Hcβtre domain is sufficient to confer protective immunity. In addition, enhancing its uptake subsequent to nasal delivery prompted development of an alternative vaccine strategy, and we hypothesize that the addition of targeting moiety adenovirus 2 fiber protein (Ad2F may enhance such uptake during vaccination. Results The Hcβtre serotype B immunogen was genetically fused to Ad2F (Hcβtre/B-Ad2F, and its immunogenicity was tested in mice. In combination with the mucosal adjuvant, cholera toxin (CT, enhanced mucosal IgA and serum IgG Ab titers were induced by nasal Hcβtre-Ad2F relative to Hcβtre alone; however, similar Ab titers were obtained upon intramuscular immunization. These BoNT/B-specific Abs induced by nasal immunization were generally supported in large part by Th2 cells, as opposed to Hcβtre-immunized mice that showed more mixed Th1 and Th2 cells. Using a mouse neutralization assay, sera from animals immunized with Hcβtre and Hcβtre-Ad2F protected mice against 2.0 LD50. Conclusion These results demonstrate that Hcβtre-based immunogens are highly immunogenic, especially when genetically fused to Ad2F, and Ad2F can be exploited as a vaccine delivery platform to the mucosa.

  10. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-finding trial of the novel tuberculosis vaccine AERAS-402, an adenovirus-vectored fusion protein, in healthy, BCG-vaccinated infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tameris, M; Hokey, D A; Nduba, V; Sacarlal, J; Laher, F; Kiringa, G; Gondo, K; Lazarus, E M; Gray, G E; Nachman, S; Mahomed, H; Downing, K; Abel, B; Scriba, T J; McClain, J B; Pau, M G; Hendriks, J; Dheenadhayalan, V; Ishmukhamedov, S; Luabeya, A K K; Geldenhuys, H; Shepherd, B; Blatner, G; Cardenas, V; Walker, R; Hanekom, W A; Sadoff, J; Douoguih, M; Barker, L; Hatherill, M

    2015-06-09

    Several novel tuberculosis vaccines are currently in clinical trials, including AERAS-402, an adenovector encoding a fusion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens 85A, 85B, and TB10.4. A multicentred trial of AERAS-402 safety and immunogenicity in healthy infants was conducted in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa, using an adaptive design. In a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-finding trial, we enrolled BCG-vaccinated, HIV-uninfected infants aged 16-26 weeks. Infants in the safety/dose-finding phase received two doses of AERAS-402 across three dose levels, or placebo, intramuscularly on days 0 and 28. Infants in the expanded safety phase received three doses of the highest dose level, with the 3rd dose at day 280. Follow up for safety and immunogenicity was for up to two years. We enrolled 206 infants (52 placebo and 154 AERAS-402 recipients) into the dose-finding phase and 281 (141 placebo and 140 AERAS-402 recipients) into the expanded safety phase. Safety data were acceptable across all dose levels. No vaccine-related deaths were recorded. A single serious adverse event of tachypnoea was deemed related to study vaccine. Antibodies directed largely against Ag85A and Ag85B were detected. Low magnitude CD4+ and CD8+ polyfunctional T cell responses were observed at all dose levels. The addition of a third dose of AERAS-402 at the highest dose level did not increase frequency or magnitude of antibody or CD8+ T cell responses. AERAS-402 has an acceptable safety profile in infants and was well tolerated at all dose levels. Response rate was lower than previously seen in BCG vaccinated adults, and frequency and magnitude of antigen-specific T cells were not increased by a third dose of vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Virus-based nanoparticles as platform technologies for modern vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karin L.; Twyman, Richard M.; Fiering, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale engineering is revolutionizing the development of vaccines and immunotherapies. Viruses have played a key role in this field because they can function as prefabricated nanoscaffolds with unique properties that are easy to modify. Viruses are immunogenic through multiple pathways, and antigens displayed naturally or by engineering on the surface can be used to create vaccines against the cognate virus, other pathogens, specific molecules or cellular targets such as tumors. This review focuses on the development of virus-based nanoparticle systems as vaccines indicated for the prevention or treatment of infectious diseases, chronic diseases, cancer, and addiction. PMID:26782096

  12. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  13. A history of adolescent school based vaccination in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kirsten; Quinn, Helen; Menzies, Robert; McIntyre, Peter

    2013-06-30

    As adolescents have become an increasingly prominent target group for vaccination, school-based vaccination has emerged as an efficient and effective method of delivering nationally recommended vaccines to this often hard to reach group. School-based delivery of vaccines has occurred in Australia for over 80 years and has demonstrated advantages over primary care delivery for this part of the population. In the last decade school-based vaccination programs have become routine practice across all Australian states and territories. Using existing records and the recollection of experts we have compiled a history of school-based vaccination in Australia, primarily focusing on adolescents. This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission from the Commonwealth. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Commonwealth Copyright Administration, Attorney General's Department, Robert Garran Offices, National Circuit, Barton ACT 2600 or posted at http://www.ag.gov.au/cca.

  14. Enhanced protection against FMDV in cattle after prime- boost vaccination based on mucosal and inactivated FMD vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Manar E; El-Deeb, Ayman H; Zeidan, Sayed M; Hussein, Hussein A; Abu-El-Naga, Hany I

    2017-10-01

    Improved immunization and control strategies and platforms are greatly needed for foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and mucosal vaccines propose an effective strategy for the control FMDV by blocking viral entry. In this study, several immunization strategies, using two FMDV vaccine formulations, including Montanide ISA 206 oil-based FMD inactivated vaccine and Montanide IMS 1313 VG N PR-based concentrated semi-purified FMD mucosal vaccine, were applied. Results of intranasal immunization with the prepared FMD mucosal vaccine, given once or twice, induced IgA levels in both nasal and salivary secretions besides a high response of lymphocyte proliferation with protection levels reaching 20% and 40%, respectively, in a challenge trial in cattle. Immunization with Montanide 206 inactivated FMD vaccine was capable of inducing 80% protection whereas prime-boost strategy based on the administration of mucosal vaccine followed by inactivated vaccine appeared to be the most potent strategy by achieving 100% protection against an FMDV challenge. Indeed, the study reports the efficacy of the prepared IMS 1313 FMD mucosal vaccine and the possible use of this vaccine in the context of different vaccination strategies to control FMDV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficient Vaccine Distribution Based on a Hybrid Compartmental Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Yu

    Full Text Available To effectively and efficiently reduce the morbidity and mortality that may be caused by outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, it is very important for public health agencies to make informed decisions for controlling the spread of the disease. Such decisions must incorporate various kinds of intervention strategies, such as vaccinations, school closures and border restrictions. Recently, researchers have paid increased attention to searching for effective vaccine distribution strategies for reducing the effects of pandemic outbreaks when resources are limited. Most of the existing research work has been focused on how to design an effective age-structured epidemic model and to select a suitable vaccine distribution strategy to prevent the propagation of an infectious virus. Models that evaluate age structure effects are common, but models that additionally evaluate geographical effects are less common. In this paper, we propose a new SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infectious šC recovered model, named the hybrid SEIR-V model (HSEIR-V, which considers not only the dynamics of infection prevalence in several age-specific host populations, but also seeks to characterize the dynamics by which a virus spreads in various geographic districts. Several vaccination strategies such as different kinds of vaccine coverage, different vaccine releasing times and different vaccine deployment methods are incorporated into the HSEIR-V compartmental model. We also design four hybrid vaccination distribution strategies (based on population size, contact pattern matrix, infection rate and infectious risk for controlling the spread of viral infections. Based on data from the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza epidemic, we evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed HSEIR-V model and study the effects of different types of human behaviour in responding to epidemics.

  16. Molecular evolution of human species D adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christopher M; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S; Dyer, David W; Chodosh, James

    2011-08-01

    Adenoviruses are medium-sized double stranded DNA viruses that infect vertebrates. Human adenoviruses cause an array of diseases. Currently there are 56 human adenovirus types recognized and characterized within seven species (A-G). Of those types, a majority belongs to species D. In this review, the genomic conservation and diversity are examined among human adenoviruses within species D, particularly in contrast to other human adenovirus species. Specifically, homologous recombination is presented as a driving force for the molecular evolution of human adenoviruses and the emergence of new adenovirus pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optoelectronic fowl adenovirus detection based on local electric field enhancement on graphene quantum dots and gold nanobundle hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Mogus, Jack; Chand, Rohit; Nagy, Eva; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2018-04-30

    An optoelectronic sensor is a rapid diagnostic tool that allows for an accurate, reliable, field-portable, low-cost device for practical applications. In this study, template-free In situ gold nanobundles (Au NBs) were fabricated on an electrode for optoelectronic sensing of fowl adenoviruses (FAdVs). Au NB film was fabricated on carbon electrodes working area using L(+) ascorbic acid, gold chroloauric acid and poly-l-lysine (PLL) through modified layer-by-layer (LbL) method. A scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image of the Au NBs revealed a NB-shaped Au structure with many kinks on its surface, which allow local electric field enhancement through light-matter interaction with graphene quantum dots (GQDs). Here, GQDs were synthesized through an autoclave-assisted method. Characterization experiments revealed blue-emissive, well-dispersed GQDs that were 2-3nm in size with the fluorescence emission peak of GQDs located at 405nm. Both Au NBs and GQDs were conjugated with target FAdVs specific antibodies that bring them close to each other with the addition of target FAdVs through antibody-antigen interaction. At close proximity, light-matter interaction between Au NBs and QDs produces a local electric signal enhancement under Ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) light irradiation that allows the detection of very low concentrations of target virus even in complex biological media. A proposed optoelectronic sensor showed a linear relationship between the target FAdVs and the electric signal up to 10 Plaque forming unit (PFU)/mL with a limit of detection (LOD) of 8.75 PFU/mL. The proposed sensing strategy was 100 times more sensitive than conventional ELISA method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Improved NYVAC-based vaccine vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen V Kibler

    Full Text Available While as yet there is no vaccine against HIV/AIDS, the results of the phase III Thai trial (RV144 have been encouraging and suggest that further improvements of the prime/boost vaccine combination of a poxvirus and protein are needed. With this aim, in this investigation we have generated derivatives of the candidate vaccinia virus vaccine vector NYVAC with potentially improved functions. This has been achieved by the re-incorporation into the virus genome of two host range genes, K1L and C7L, in conjunction with the removal of the immunomodulatory viral molecule B19, an antagonist of type I interferon action. These novel virus vectors, referred to as NYVAC-C-KC and NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R, have acquired relevant biological characteristics, giving higher levels of antigen expression in infected cells, replication-competency in human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts, activation of selective host cell signal transduction pathways, and limited virus spread in tissues. Importantly, these replication-competent viruses have been demonstrated to maintain a highly attenuated phenotype.

  19. Trial Watch: Peptide-based anticancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Malignant cells express antigens that can be harnessed to elicit anticancer immune responses. One approach to achieve such goal consists in the administration of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) or peptides thereof as recombinant proteins in the presence of adequate adjuvants. Throughout the past decade, peptide vaccines have been shown to mediate antineoplastic effects in various murine tumor models, especially when administered in the context of potent immunostimulatory regimens. In spite of multiple limitations, first of all the fact that anticancer vaccines are often employed as therapeutic (rather than prophylactic) agents, this immunotherapeutic paradigm has been intensively investigated in clinical scenarios, with promising results. Currently, both experimentalists and clinicians are focusing their efforts on the identification of so-called tumor rejection antigens, i.e., TAAs that can elicit an immune response leading to disease eradication, as well as to combinatorial immunostimulatory interventions with superior adjuvant activity in patients. Here, we summarize the latest advances in the development of peptide vaccines for cancer therapy.

  20. Immune complex-based vaccine for pig protection against parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roić, B; Cajavec, S; Ergotić, N; Lipej, Z; Madić, J; Lojkić, M; Pokrić, B

    2006-02-01

    generated by the IC containing the allogeneic antibodies were higher than that generated by the ICs containing the xenogeneic pig antibodies. It was similar to that generated by two-times higher content of the virus material administered by a commercially available vaccine. The IC-based vaccines belong to non-replicating, subunit vaccines, which are both ecologically convenient and the safest vaccines of all.

  1. Antigen Gene Transfer to Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Using Recombinant Adenovirus and Vaccinia Virus Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetty J. Bontkes

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant adenoviruses (RAd and recombinant vaccinia viruses (RVV expressing tumour-associated antigens (TAA are used as anti-tumour vaccines. It is important that these vaccines deliver the TAA to dendritic cells (DC for the induction of a strong immune response. Infection of myeloid DC (MDC with RAd alone is relatively inefficient but CD40 retargeting significantly increases transduction efficiency and DC maturation. Infection with RVV is efficient without DC maturation. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC play a role in the innate immune response to viral infections through the secretion of IFNα but may also play a role in specific T-cell induction. The aim of our study was to investigate whether PDC are better targets for RAd and RVV based vaccines. RAd alone hardly infected PDC (2% while CD40 retargeting did not improve transduction efficiency, but it did increase PDC maturation (25% CD83 positive cells. Accordingly, specific CTL activation by RAd infected PDC was limited (the number of IFNγ producing CTL was reduced by 75% compared to stimulation with peptide loaded PDC. RVV infected PDC specifically stimulated CTL but PDC were not activated. These Results indicate that PDC are not ideal targets for RAd and RVV based vaccines. However, PDC induced specific CTL activation after pulsing with recombinant protein, indicating that PDC can also cross-present antigens released from surrounding infected cells.

  2. Structure-based high-throughput epitope analysis of hexon proteins in B and C species human adenoviruses (HAdVs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hui Yuan

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses (HAdVs are the etiologic agent of many human infectious diseases. The existence of at least 54 different serotypes of HAdVs has resulted in difficulties in clinical diagnosis. Acute respiratory tract disease (ARD caused by some serotypes from B and C species is particularly serious. Hexon, the main coat protein of HAdV, contains the major serotype-specific B cell epitopes; however, few studies have addressed epitope mapping in most HAdV serotypes. In this study, we utilized a novel and rapid method for the modeling of homologous proteins based on the phylogenetic tree of protein families and built three-dimensional (3D models of hexon proteins in B and C species HAdVs. Based on refined hexon structures, we used reverse evolutionary trace (RET bioinformatics analysis combined with a specially designed hexon epitope screening algorithm to achieve high-throughput epitope mapping of all 13 hexon proteins in B and C species HAdVs. This study has demonstrated that all of the epitopes from the 13 hexon proteins are located in the proteins' tower regions; however, the exact number, location, and size of the epitopes differ among the HAdV serotypes.

  3. Recent advances in recombinant protein-based malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Simon J; Angov, Evelina; Horii, Toshihiro; Miller, Louis H; Srinivasan, Prakash; Theisen, Michael; Biswas, Sumi

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium parasites are the causative agent of human malaria, and the development of a highly effective vaccine against infection, disease and transmission remains a key priority. It is widely established that multiple stages of the parasite's complex lifecycle within the human host and mosquito vector are susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. The mainstay approach to antibody induction by subunit vaccination has been the delivery of protein antigen formulated in adjuvant. Extensive efforts have been made in this endeavor with respect to malaria vaccine development, especially with regard to target antigen discovery, protein expression platforms, adjuvant testing, and development of soluble and virus-like particle (VLP) delivery platforms. The breadth of approaches to protein-based vaccines is continuing to expand as innovative new concepts in next-generation subunit design are explored, with the prospects for the development of a highly effective multi-component/multi-stage/multi-antigen formulation seeming ever more likely. This review will focus on recent progress in protein vaccine design, development and/or clinical testing for a number of leading malaria antigens from the sporozoite-, merozoite- and sexual-stages of the parasite's lifecycle-including PfCelTOS, PfMSP1, PfAMA1, PfRH5, PfSERA5, PfGLURP, PfMSP3, Pfs48/45 and Pfs25. Future prospects and challenges for the development, production, human delivery and assessment of protein-based malaria vaccines are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Ontology-Based Vaccine Adverse Event Representation and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangan; He, Yongqun

    2017-01-01

    Vaccine is the one of the greatest inventions of modern medicine that has contributed most to the relief of human misery and the exciting increase in life expectancy. In 1796, an English country physician, Edward Jenner, discovered that inoculating mankind with cowpox can protect them from smallpox (Riedel S, Edward Jenner and the history of smallpox and vaccination. Proceedings (Baylor University. Medical Center) 18(1):21, 2005). Based on the vaccination worldwide, we finally succeeded in the eradication of smallpox in 1977 (Henderson, Vaccine 29:D7-D9, 2011). Other disabling and lethal diseases, like poliomyelitis and measles, are targeted for eradication (Bonanni, Vaccine 17:S120-S125, 1999).Although vaccine development and administration are tremendously successful and cost-effective practices to human health, no vaccine is 100% safe for everyone because each person reacts to vaccinations differently given different genetic background and health conditions. Although all licensed vaccines are generally safe for the majority of people, vaccinees may still suffer adverse events (AEs) in reaction to various vaccines, some of which can be serious or even fatal (Haber et al., Drug Saf 32(4):309-323, 2009). Hence, the double-edged sword of vaccination remains a concern.To support integrative AE data collection and analysis, it is critical to adopt an AE normalization strategy. In the past decades, different controlled terminologies, including the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) (Brown EG, Wood L, Wood S, et al., Drug Saf 20(2):109-117, 1999), the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) (NCI, The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Available from: http://evs.nci.nih.gov/ftp1/CTCAE/About.html . Access on 7 Oct 2015), and the World Health Organization (WHO) Adverse Reactions Terminology (WHO-ART) (WHO, The WHO Adverse Reaction Terminology - WHO-ART. Available from: https://www.umc-products.com/graphics/28010.pdf

  5. Updates on the web-based VIOLIN vaccine database and analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongqun; Racz, Rebecca; Sayers, Samantha; Lin, Yu; Todd, Thomas; Hur, Junguk; Li, Xinna; Patel, Mukti; Zhao, Boyang; Chung, Monica; Ostrow, Joseph; Sylora, Andrew; Dungarani, Priya; Ulysse, Guerlain; Kochhar, Kanika; Vidri, Boris; Strait, Kelsey; Jourdian, George W; Xiang, Zuoshuang

    2014-01-01

    The integrative Vaccine Investigation and Online Information Network (VIOLIN) vaccine research database and analysis system (http://www.violinet.org) curates, stores, analyses and integrates various vaccine-associated research data. Since its first publication in NAR in 2008, significant updates have been made. Starting from 211 vaccines annotated at the end of 2007, VIOLIN now includes over 3240 vaccines for 192 infectious diseases and eight noninfectious diseases (e.g. cancers and allergies). Under the umbrella of VIOLIN, >10 relatively independent programs are developed. For example, Protegen stores over 800 protective antigens experimentally proven valid for vaccine development. VirmugenDB annotated over 200 'virmugens', a term coined by us to represent those virulence factor genes that can be mutated to generate successful live attenuated vaccines. Specific patterns were identified from the genes collected in Protegen and VirmugenDB. VIOLIN also includes Vaxign, the first web-based vaccine candidate prediction program based on reverse vaccinology. VIOLIN collects and analyzes different vaccine components including vaccine adjuvants (Vaxjo) and DNA vaccine plasmids (DNAVaxDB). VIOLIN includes licensed human vaccines (Huvax) and veterinary vaccines (Vevax). The Vaccine Ontology is applied to standardize and integrate various data in VIOLIN. VIOLIN also hosts the Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events (OVAE) that logically represents adverse events associated with licensed human vaccines.

  6. Introducing the ESAT-6 free IGRA, a companion diagnostic for TB vaccines based on ESAT-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhwald, Morten; de Thurah, Lena; Kuchaka, Davis

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for an improved vaccine for tuberculosis. ESAT-6 is a cardinal vaccine antigen with unique properties and is included in several vaccine candidates in development. ESAT-6 is also the core antigen in the IFN-γ release assays (IGRA) used to diagnose latent infection, rendering IGRA...... tests unspecific after vaccination. This challenge has prompted the development of a companion diagnostic for ESAT-6 based vaccines, an ESAT-6 free IGRA. We screened a panel of seven potential new diagnostic antigens not recognized in BCG vaccinated individuals. Three highly recognized antigens Esp...... containing vaccines and as adjunct test for latent infection....

  7. Whole-cell cancer vaccination: from autologous to allogeneic tumor- and dendritic cell-based vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruijl, de Tanja; Eertwegh, van den Alfons; Pinedo, Herbert; Scheper, Rik

    2008-01-01

    The Weld of tumor vaccination is currently undergoing a shift in focus, from individualized tailor-made vaccines to more generally applicable vaccine formulations. Although primarily predicated by Wnancial and logistic considerations, stemming from a growing awareness that clinical development

  8. Production of oncolytic adenovirus and human mesenchymal stem cells in a single-use, Vertical-Wheel bioreactor system: Impact of bioreactor design on performance of microcarrier-based cell culture processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marcos F Q; Silva, Marta M; Giroux, Daniel; Hashimura, Yas; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Lee, Brian; Roldão, António; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Serra, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cell cultures are used for the production of viruses, viral vectors, and vaccines, as well as for various cell therapies and tissue engineering applications. Most of these applications currently rely on planar technologies for the generation of biological products. However, as new cell therapy product candidates move from clinical trials towards potential commercialization, planar platforms have proven to be inadequate to meet large-scale manufacturing demand. Therefore, a new scalable platform for culturing anchorage-dependent cells at high cell volumetric concentrations is urgently needed. One promising solution is to grow cells on microcarriers suspended in single-use bioreactors. Toward this goal, a novel bioreactor system utilizing an innovative Vertical-Wheel™ technology was evaluated for its potential to support scalable cell culture process development. Two anchorage-dependent human cell types were used: human lung carcinoma cells (A549 cell line) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Key hydrodynamic parameters such as power input, mixing time, Kolmogorov length scale, and shear stress were estimated. The performance of Vertical-Wheel bioreactors (PBS-VW) was then evaluated for A549 cell growth and oncolytic adenovirus type 5 production as well as for hMSC expansion. Regarding the first cell model, higher cell growth and number of infectious viruses per cell were achieved when compared with stirred tank (ST) bioreactors. For the hMSC model, although higher percentages of proliferative cells could be reached in the PBS-VW compared with ST bioreactors, no significant differences in the cell volumetric concentration and expansion factor were observed. Noteworthy, the hMSC population generated in the PBS-VW showed a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells as well as reduced levels of HLA-DR positive cells. Overall, these results showed that process transfer from ST bioreactor to PBS-VW, and scale-up was

  9. A potential disruptive technology in vaccine development: gene-based vaccines and their application to infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, David C

    2004-10-01

    Vaccine development requires an amalgamation of disparate disciplines and has unique economic and regulatory drivers. Non-viral gene-based delivery systems, such as formulated plasmid DNA, are new and potentially disruptive technologies capable of providing 'cheaper, simpler, and more convenient-to-use' vaccines. Typically and somewhat ironically, disruptive technologies have poorer product performance, at least in the near-term, compared with the existing conventional technologies. Because successful product development requires that the product's performance must meet or exceed the efficacy threshold for a desired application, the appropriate selection of the initial product applications for a disruptive technology is critical for its successful evolution. In this regard, the near-term successes of gene-based vaccines will likely be for protection against bacterial toxins and acute viral and bacterial infections. Recent breakthroughs, however, herald increasing rather than languishing performance improvements in the efficacy of gene-based vaccines. Whether gene-based vaccines ultimately succeed in eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed, remains to be determined. A success against any one of the persistent intracellular pathogens would be sufficient proof that gene-based vaccines represent a disruptive technology against which future vaccine technologies will be measured.

  10. Migration of dendritic cell based cancer vaccines: in vivo veritas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Gosse J.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Figdor, Carl G.

    2005-01-01

    Ex vivo generated cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) are currently applied in the clinic. The migration of DCs from the tissues to the lymph nodes is tightly controlled and involves many different mediators and their receptors. A recent study demonstrated that the rate of migration of

  11. Development of lactococcal GEM-based pneumococcal vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audouy, Sandrine A. L.; van Selm, Saskia; van Roosmalen, Maarten L.; Post, Eduard; Kanninga, Rolf; Neef, Jolanda; Estevao, Silvia; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Adrian, Peter V.; Leenhouts, Kees; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the development of a novel protein-based nasal vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which three pneumococcal proteins were displayed on the surface of a non-recombinant, killed Lactococcus lactis-derived delivery system, called Gram-positive Enhancer Matrix (GEM). The GEM particles

  12. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease — reinforcing the importance of vaccines in your pet's preventive health care program. Are there risks? Any treatment carries some risk, but these risks should be weighed against the benefits of protecting your pet from potentially fatal diseases. ...

  13. Are Clade Specific HIV Vaccines a Necessity? An Analysis Based on Mathematical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobromir Dimitrov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As HIV-1 envelope immune responses are critical to vaccine related protection, most candidate HIV vaccines entering efficacy trials are based upon a clade specific design. This need for clade specific vaccine prototypes markedly reduces the implementation of potentially effective HIV vaccines. We utilized a mathematical model to determine the effectiveness of immediate roll-out of a non-clade matched vaccine with reduced efficacy compared to constructing clade specific vaccines, which would take considerable time to manufacture and test in safety and efficacy trials. We simulated the HIV epidemic in San Francisco (SF and South Africa (SA and projected effectiveness of three vaccination strategies: i immediate intervention with a 20–40% vaccine efficacy (VE non-matched vaccine, ii delayed intervention by developing a 50% VE clade-specific vaccine, and iii immediate intervention with a non-matched vaccine replaced by a clade-specific vaccine when developed. Immediate vaccination with a non-clade matched vaccine, even with reduced efficacy, would prevent thousands of new infections in SF and millions in SA over 30 years. Vaccination with 50% VE delayed for five years needs six and 12 years in SA to break-even with immediate 20 and 30% VE vaccination, respectively, while not able to surpass the impact of immediate 40% VE vaccination over 30 years. Replacing a 30% VE with a 50% VE vaccine after 5 years reduces the HIV acquisition by 5% compared to delayed vaccination. The immediate use of an HIV vaccine with reduced VE in high risk communities appears desirable over a short time line but higher VE should be the pursued to achieve strong long-term impact. Our analysis illustrates the importance of developing surrogate markers (correlates of protection to allow bridging types of immunogenicity studies to support more rapid assessment of clade specific vaccines.

  14. Recombinant and epitope-based vaccines on the road to the market and implications for vaccine design and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Patricio; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-03-03

    Novel vaccination approaches based on rational design of B- and T-cell epitopes - epitope-based vaccines - are making progress in the clinical trial pipeline. The epitope-focused recombinant protein-based malaria vaccine (termed RTS,S) is a next-generation approach that successfully reached phase-III trials, and will potentially become the first commercial vaccine against a human parasitic disease. Progress made on methods such as recombinant DNA technology, advanced cell-culture techniques, immunoinformatics and rational design of immunogens are driving the development of these novel concepts. Synthetic recombinant proteins comprising both B- and T-cell epitopes can be efficiently produced through modern biotechnology and bioprocessing methods, and can enable the induction of large repertoires of immune specificities. In particular, the inclusion of appropriate CD4+ T-cell epitopes is increasingly considered a key vaccine component to elicit robust immune responses, as suggested by results coming from HIV-1 clinical trials. In silico strategies for vaccine design are under active development to address genetic variation in pathogens and several broadly protective "universal" influenza and HIV-1 vaccines are currently at different stages of clinical trials. Other methods focus on improving population coverage in target populations by rationally considering specificity and prevalence of the HLA proteins, though a proof-of-concept in humans has not been demonstrated yet. Overall, we expect immunoinformatics and bioprocessing methods to become a central part of the next-generation epitope-based vaccine development and production process.

  15. Macropinocytotic uptake and infection of human epithelial cells with species B2 adenovirus type 35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kälin, S.; Amstutz, B.; Gastaldelli, M.; Wolfrum, N.; Boucke, K.; Havenga, M.; DiGennaro, F.; Liska, N.; Hemmi, S.; Greber, U.F.

    2010-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 35 (HAdV-35; here referred to as Ad35) causes kidney and urinary tract infections and infects respiratory organs of immunocompromised individuals. Unlike other adenoviruses, Ad35 has a low seroprevalence, which makes Ad35-based vectors promising candidates for gene therapy.

  16. An Overview on the Field of Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Synthetic Peptide-Based Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiala Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of synthetic peptide-based vaccines has many advantages in comparison with vaccines based on live attenuated organisms, inactivated or killed organism, or toxins. Peptide-based vaccines cannot revert to a virulent form, allow a better conservation, and are produced more easily and safely. However, they generate a weaker immune response than other vaccines, and the inclusion of adjuvants and/or the use of vaccine delivery systems is almost always needed. Among vaccine delivery systems, micro- and nanoparticulated ones are attractive, because their particulate nature can increase cross-presentation of the peptide. In addition, they can be passively or actively targeted to antigen presenting cells. Furthermore, particulate adjuvants are able to directly activate innate immune system in vivo. Here, we summarize micro- and nanoparticulated vaccine delivery systems used in the field of synthetic peptide-based vaccines as well as strategies to increase their immunogenicity.

  17. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Krömmelbein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production.

  18. Is an HIV vaccine possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A. Wilson

    Full Text Available The road to the discovery of a vaccine for HIV has been arduous and will continue to be difficult over the ensuing twenty years. Most vaccines are developed by inducing neutralizing antibodies against the target pathogen or by using attenuated strains of the particular pathogen to engender a variety of protective immune responses. Unfortunately, simple methods of generating anti-HIV antibodies have already failed in a phase III clinical trial. While attenuated SIV variants work well against homologous challenges in non-human primates, the potential for reversion to a more pathogenic virus and recombination with challenge viruses will preclude the use of attenuated HIV in the field. It has been exceedingly frustrating to vaccinate for HIV-specific neutralizing antibodies given the enormous diversity of the Envelope (Env glycoprotein and its well-developed glycan shield. However, there are several antibodies that will neutralize many different strains of HIV and inducing these types of antibodies in vaccinees remains the goal of a vigorous effort to develop a vaccine for HIV based on neutralizing antibodies. Given the difficulty in generating broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies, the HIV vaccine field has turned its attention to inducing T cell responses against the virus using a variety of vectors. Unfortunately, the results from Merck's phase IIb STEP trial proved to be disappointing. Vaccinees received Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 expressing Gag, Pol, and Nef of HIV. This vaccine regimen failed to either prevent infection or reduce the level of HIV replication after challenge. These results mirrored those in non-human primate testing of Ad5 using rigorous SIV challenge models. This review will focus on recent developments in HIV vaccine development. We will deal largely with attempts to develop a T cell-based vaccine using the non-human primate SIV challenge model.

  19. Pre-vaccination care-seeking in females reporting severe adverse reactions to HPV vaccine. A registry based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, Kåre; Hansen, Niels Dalum; Valentiner-Branth, Palle

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 2013 the number of suspected adverse reactions to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine reported to the Danish Medicines Agency (DMA) has increased. Due to the resulting public concerns about vaccine safety, the coverage of HPV vaccinations in the childhood...... vaccination programme has declined. The aim of the present study was to determine health care-seeking prior to the first HPV vaccination among females who suspected adverse reactions to HPV vaccine. Methods In this registry-based case-control study, we included as cases vaccinated females with reports...... to the DMA of suspected severe adverse reactions.We selected controls without reports of adverse reactions from the Danish vaccination registry and matched by year of vaccination, age of vaccination, and municipality, and obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry and The National Health Insurance...

  20. Novel Vaccine Against Mycoplasma Hyosynoviae: The Immunogenic Effect of Iscom-Based Vaccines in Swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll; Vinther Heydenreich, Annette; Riber, Ulla

    Arthritis in swine is frequently caused by Mycoplasma hyosynoviae (Mhs). For the development of an effective vaccine we investigated the immunogenic effect of three vaccine preparations with the ISCOM adjuvant Posintro™ from Nordic Vaccine. A: formalin fixed whole-cells Mhs (300 µg/dose) mixed...... with Posintro, B: Deoxycholate extracted lipoproteins from Mhs organisms (DOC-antigen, 300 μg/dose) in Posintro and C: DOC-antigen (50 μg/dose) in Posintro. Each vaccine-group contained three pigs. Vaccinations (i.m.) were performed at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The development of specific IgG and secretion...... of IFNγ were measured. Three weeks after the second vaccination, pigs were euthanised and autopsied. Vaccine B induced a high level of specific serum IgG in all pigs a week after boost. Vaccine C gave a variable response after boost, with two pigs seroconverting, while no response was seen by vaccine A...

  1. Genetic vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus provides protection without disease potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Teresa R; Rangel, David; Graham, Barney S; Brough, Douglas E; Gall, Jason G

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of infectious lower respiratory disease in infants and the elderly. As there is no vaccine for RSV, we developed a genetic vaccine approach that induced protection of the entire respiratory tract from a single parenteral administration. The approach was based on adenovirus vectors derived from newly isolated nonhuman primate viruses with low seroprevalence. We show for the first time that a single intramuscular (IM) injection of the replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing the RSV fusion (F0) glycoprotein induced immune responses that protected both the lungs and noses of cotton rats and mice even at low doses and for several months postimmunization. The immune response included high titers of neutralizing antibody that were maintained ≥ 24 weeks and RSV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The vectors were as potently immunogenic as a human adenovirus 5 vector in these two key respiratory pathogen animal models. Importantly, there was minimal alveolitis and granulocytic infiltrates in the lung, and type 2 cytokines were not produced after RSV challenge even under conditions of partial protection. Overall, this genetic vaccine is highly effective without potentiating immunopathology, and the results support development of the vaccine candidate for human testing.

  2. Improving influenza vaccination in chronically ill children using a tertiary-care based vaccination clinic: Is there a role for the live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckx, Joanna; McCormack, Deirdre; Quach, Caroline

    2016-02-03

    Children with underlying medical conditions should receive influenza vaccine (IV) yearly; yet this remains sub-optimal. We aimed to describe our experience with a tertiary-care hospital-based influenza vaccination clinic for this at-risk population. From October to December 2012, 2013, and 2014, we ran an influenza vaccination clinic at the Montreal Children's Hospital, where children with high-risk conditions come for their follow-up. Both injectable IV (IIV) and live-attenuated IV (LAIV) were offered free of charge to patients and their household contacts. Upon vaccination, parents were asked to fill a pre-piloted questionnaire. We vaccinated a total of 2640 high-risk children and 1912 household members during the three influenza vaccination seasons. In 2012 and 2013, 631 and 630 patients with chronic illnesses were vaccinated, compared to 1379 in 2014. Caregivers preferred LAIV primarily because no needle was involved (49.0%) and because it was perceived as less painful (46.9%). LAIV was administered to 69% (2012), 55% (2013) and 47% (2014) of high-risk children. The main reason for not receiving LAIV was because it was contra-indicated. A small fraction of children previously vaccinated with LAIV who did not present any contraindication to LAIV opted for IIV: 12/101 (11.8%) in 2013 and 16/272 (5.9%) in 2014. In 2014, this was mainly due to a previous negative experience with LAIV (11/16). Having an influenza vaccination clinic on site at a tertiary care hospital, where children come for their scheduled visits, facilitates yearly influenza vaccination in children with chronic illnesses. LAIV is preferred by caregivers and patients, when not contraindicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Strengthening vaccination policies in Latin America: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Betancourt-Cravioto, Miguel; Saucedo-Martínez, Rodrigo; Motta-Murguía, Lourdes; Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor

    2013-08-20

    Despite many successes in the region, Latin American vaccination policies have significant shortcomings, and further work is needed to maintain progress and prepare for the introduction of newly available vaccines. In order to address the challenges facing Latin America, the Commission for the Future of Vaccines in Latin America (COFVAL) has made recommendations for strengthening evidence-based policy-making and reducing regional inequalities in immunisation. We have conducted a comprehensive literature review to assess the feasibility of these recommendations. Standardisation of performance indicators for disease burden, vaccine coverage, epidemiological surveillance and national health resourcing can ensure comparability of the data used to assess vaccination programmes, allowing deeper analysis of how best to provide services. Regional vaccination reference schemes, as used in Europe, can be used to develop best practice models for vaccine introduction and scheduling. Successful models exist for the continuous training of vaccination providers and decision-makers, with a new Latin American diploma aiming to contribute to the successful implementation of vaccination programmes. Permanent, independent vaccine advisory committees, based on the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), could facilitate the uptake of new vaccines and support evidence-based decision-making in the administration of national immunisation programmes. Innovative financing mechanisms for the purchase of new vaccines, such as advance market commitments and cost front-loading, have shown potential for improving vaccine coverage. A common regulatory framework for vaccine approval is needed to accelerate delivery and pool human, technological and scientific resources in the region. Finally, public-private partnerships between industry, government, academia and non-profit sectors could provide new investment to stimulate vaccine development in the region, reducing prices in the

  4. Co-administration of the Campylobacter jejuni N-glycan based vaccine with probiotics improves vaccine performance in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothaft, H; Perez-Muñoz, M E; Gouveia, G J; Duar, R M; Wanford, J J; Lango-Scholey, L; Panagos, C G; Srithayakumar, V; Plastow, G S; Coros, C; Bayliss, C D; Edison, A S; Walter, J; Szymanski, C M

    2017-09-22

    Source attribution studies report that consumption of contaminated poultry is the primary source for acquiring human campylobacteriosis. Oral administration of an engineered Escherichia coli strain expressing the Campylobacter jejuni N-glycan reduces bacterial colonization in specific-pathogen-free leghorn chickens, but only a fraction of birds respond to vaccination. Optimizing the vaccine for commercial broiler chickens has great potential to prevent pathogen entry into the food chain. Here, we tested the same vaccination approach in broilers and observed similar efficacy in pathogen load reduction, stimulation of host IgY response, lack of C. jejuni resistance development, uniformity in microbial gut composition, and bimodal response to treatment. Gut microbiota analysis of leghorn and broiler vaccine responders identified one member of the Clostridiales XIVa cluster, Anaerosporobacter mobilis, significantly more abundant in responder birds. In broilers, co-administration of the live vaccine with A. mobilis or Lactobacillus reuteri, a commonly used probiotic, resulted in increased vaccine efficacy, antibody response, and weight gain. To investigate whether the responder/non-responder effect was due to selection of a C. jejuni 'super colonizer mutant' with altered phase-variable genes, we analysed all polyG-containing loci of the input strain compared to non-responder colony isolates and found no evidence of phase state selection. However, untargeted NMR-based metabolomics identified a potential biomarker negatively correlated with C. jejuni colonization levels possibly linked to the increased microbial diversity in this subgroup. The comprehensive methods used to examine the vaccine response bimodality provide several opportunities to improve the C. jejuni vaccine and the efficacy of any vaccination strategy.ImportanceCampylobacter jejuni is a common cause of human diarrheal disease worldwide and listed by the World Health Organization as a high priority

  5. Adenoviral vectors targeted to CD40 enhance the efficacy of dendritic cell-based vaccination against human papillomavirus 16-induced tumor cells in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, B W; Hayes, T L; DeGruijl, T D; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D T

    2000-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a unique junction from which to initiate antigen-specific immunity. One of the most challenging obstacles for DC-based immunotherapy has been the means by which to convey tumor antigen-encoding genes to DCs. In this study, we show that adenoviral (or adenovirus, Ad) vectors targeted to CD40 by means of bispecific antibodies can enhance gene transfer to murine DCs. Moreover, we illustrate that this vector initiates phenotypic changes characteristic of DC maturation. To explore the in vivo potential of this strategy, we coupled this targeting approach with an Ad vector carrying the gene for a tumor antigen. In particular, the human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 antigen represents an attractive target for antigen-specific immunity of cervical cancer. Relative to DCs infected by untargeted Ad, DCs infected by AdE7 targeted to the receptor CD40 enhanced protection against HPV-16-induced tumor cells in a murine model. We have further established that this protection was both antigen specific and CD8+ T-cell dependent. Illustrating that Ad-modified DCs may be used in repeated vaccination, we report that preimmunization of animals with Ad infected DCs prior to E7 vaccination only moderately reduced vaccine efficacy. Finally, we have observed that CD40-targeted AdE7 can initiate partial therapeutic immunity in mice bearing established tumors. These findings suggest that gene-based vaccination of DCs with tumor antigens can elicit productive antitumoral immunity and that enhancements in gene transfer efficacy and/or DC maturation may facilitate this process.

  6. A Population-Based Evaluation of a Publicly Funded, School-Based HPV Vaccine Program in British Columbia, Canada: Parental Factors Associated with HPV Vaccine Receipt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gina; Anderson, Maureen; Marra, Fawziah; McNeil, Shelly; Pielak, Karen; Dawar, Meena; McIvor, Marilyn; Ehlen, Thomas; Dobson, Simon; Money, Deborah; Patrick, David M.; Naus, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Background Information on factors that influence parental decisions for actual human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine receipt in publicly funded, school-based HPV vaccine programs for girls is limited. We report on the level of uptake of the first dose of the HPV vaccine, and determine parental factors associated with receipt of the HPV vaccine, in a publicly funded school-based HPV vaccine program in British Columbia, Canada. Methods and Findings All parents of girls enrolled in grade 6 during the academic year of September 2008–June 2009 in the province of British Columbia were eligible to participate. Eligible households identified through the provincial public health information system were randomly selected and those who consented completed a validated survey exploring factors associated with HPV vaccine uptake. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to calculate adjusted odds ratios to identify the factors that were associated with parents' decision to vaccinate their daughter(s) against HPV. 2,025 parents agreed to complete the survey, and 65.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.1–67.1) of parents in the survey reported that their daughters received the first dose of the HPV vaccine. In the same school-based vaccine program, 88.4% (95% CI 87.1–89.7) consented to the hepatitis B vaccine, and 86.5% (95% CI 85.1–87.9) consented to the meningococcal C vaccine. The main reasons for having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were the effectiveness of the vaccine (47.9%), advice from a physician (8.7%), and concerns about daughter's health (8.4%). The main reasons for not having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were concerns about HPV vaccine safety (29.2%), preference to wait until the daughter is older (15.6%), and not enough information to make an informed decision (12.6%). In multivariate analysis, overall attitudes to vaccines, the impact of the HPV vaccine on sexual practices, and childhood vaccine history were predictive of parents having a

  7. A population-based evaluation of a publicly funded, school-based HPV vaccine program in British Columbia, Canada: parental factors associated with HPV vaccine receipt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ogilvie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Information on factors that influence parental decisions for actual human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine receipt in publicly funded, school-based HPV vaccine programs for girls is limited. We report on the level of uptake of the first dose of the HPV vaccine, and determine parental factors associated with receipt of the HPV vaccine, in a publicly funded school-based HPV vaccine program in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All parents of girls enrolled in grade 6 during the academic year of September 2008-June 2009 in the province of British Columbia were eligible to participate. Eligible households identified through the provincial public health information system were randomly selected and those who consented completed a validated survey exploring factors associated with HPV vaccine uptake. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to calculate adjusted odds ratios to identify the factors that were associated with parents' decision to vaccinate their daughter(s against HPV. 2,025 parents agreed to complete the survey, and 65.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.1-67.1 of parents in the survey reported that their daughters received the first dose of the HPV vaccine. In the same school-based vaccine program, 88.4% (95% CI 87.1-89.7 consented to the hepatitis B vaccine, and 86.5% (95% CI 85.1-87.9 consented to the meningococcal C vaccine. The main reasons for having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were the effectiveness of the vaccine (47.9%, advice from a physician (8.7%, and concerns about daughter's health (8.4%. The main reasons for not having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were concerns about HPV vaccine safety (29.2%, preference to wait until the daughter is older (15.6%, and not enough information to make an informed decision (12.6%. In multivariate analysis, overall attitudes to vaccines, the impact of the HPV vaccine on sexual practices, and childhood vaccine history were predictive of parents having

  8. Learning from Successful School-based Vaccination Clinics during 2009 pH1N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar; O'Connell, Katherine; Stoto, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was the largest in US history. State health departments received vaccines from the federal government and sent them to local health departments (LHDs) who were responsible for getting vaccines to the public. Many LHD's used school-based clinics to ensure children were the first to receive limited…

  9. HIV vaccines: progress to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, C Mee Ling; Andersen, Christopher R; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2011-03-05

    The quest for an effective and safe HIV-1 vaccine has been and still is the aspiration of many scientists and clinicians worldwide. Until recently, the hopes for an effective vaccine were thwarted by the disappointing results and early termination in September 2007 of the STEP study, which saw a subgroup of male vaccine recipients at an increased risk of HIV-1 infection, and the failure of earlier trials of vaccines based on recombinant envelope proteins to provide any level of protection. The results of the STEP study raised important questions in the field of HIV vaccines, including the use of recombinant adenovirus vectors as immunogens, the rationale for the development of T-cell-based vaccines and the development pathway for these vaccines, in terms of assessment of immunogenicity and the challenge models used. The study of neutralizing antibodies has demonstrated that the induction of high-titre, broadly neutralizing antibodies in the majority of recipients is likely to be highly problematic. However, the results of the RV144 Thai trial released in September 2009 have brought new optimism to the field. This study employed envelope-based immunogens delivered as a priming vaccination with a recombinant poxvirus vector and boosting with recombinant proteins. This regimen provided modest protection to HIV-1 infection in a low-risk population. Although the correlates of protection are currently unknown, extensive studies are underway to try to determine these. Neutralizing antibodies were not induced in the RV144 study; however, considerable titres of binding antibodies to HIV-1 viral envelope (Env) were. It is speculated that these antibodies may have provided a means of protection by a mechanism such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In addition, no CD8+ T-cell responses were induced, but robust CD4+ T-cell responses were, and correlates of protection are being sought by analysing the quality of this aspect of the vaccine-induced immune response

  10. Engineering adenovirus genome by bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzsics, Zsolt; Lemnitzer, Frederic; Thirion, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are recombinant DNA molecules designed for propagation of large and instable foreign DNA fragment in Escherichia coli. BACs are used in genetics of large DNA viruses such as herpes and baculoviruses for propagation and manipulation of complex genomic regions or even entire viral genomes in one piece. Viral genomes in BACs are ready for the advanced tools of E. coli genetics. These techniques based on homologous or site-specific recombination allow engineering of virtually any kind of genetic changes. In the recent years, BAC technology was also adapted to manipulation of adenovirus genomes and became an effective alternative to traditional genetic engineering of recombinant adenoviruses.

  11. A duplex real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology for simultaneous detection and differentiation of canine adenovirus types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowgier, Giulia; Mari, Viviana; Losurdo, Michele; Larocca, Vittorio; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Cirone, Francesco; Lucente, Maria Stella; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio; Decaro, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Canine adenoviruses are a major cause of disease in dogs, coyotes, red foxes and wolves, as well as in other carnivores and marine mammals. Canine adenovirus type 1 (CAdV-1) and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2) cause infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) and infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB), respectively. In this study, a duplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection and characterisation of CAdV-1 and CAdV-2 was developed by using a single primer pair and virus-specific probes. The assay was validated testing standard DNAs produced on purpose and clinical samples of various matrices known to be positive for CAdV-1, CAdV-2 or both viruses. Precise calculation of DNA loads in samples containing a wide range of viral amounts was allowed by generating a standard curve for absolute quantification. The assay was proven to be highly specific, since no cross-reactions with the different CAdV type was observed, and sensitive, being able to detect less than 10 copies of CAdV-1/CAdV-2 DNA. The low intra-assay and interassay coefficient of variations demonstrated a high repeatability, thus confirming the potential use of this assay for quantitative detection of CAdV-1 and CAdV-2 for rapid diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurisicchio, Luigi, E-mail: aurisicchio@takis-it.it [Takis, via di Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy); BIOGEM scarl, via Camporeale, 83031 Ariano Irpino (AV) (Italy); Ciliberto, Gennaro [Takis, via di Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Università degli studi di Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy)

    2011-09-22

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost.

  13. Side-by-side comparison of gene-based smallpox vaccine with MVA in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W Golden

    Full Text Available Orthopoxviruses remain a threat as biological weapons and zoonoses. The licensed live-virus vaccine is associated with serious health risks, making its general usage unacceptable. Attenuated vaccines are being developed as alternatives, the most advanced of which is modified-vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA. We previously developed a gene-based vaccine, termed 4pox, which targets four orthopoxvirus antigens, A33, B5, A27 and L1. This vaccine protects mice and non-human primates from lethal orthopoxvirus disease. Here, we investigated the capacity of the molecular adjuvants GM-CSF and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT to enhance the efficacy of the 4pox gene-based vaccine. Both adjuvants significantly increased protective antibody responses in mice. We directly compared the 4pox plus LT vaccine against MVA in a monkeypox virus (MPXV nonhuman primate (NHP challenge model. NHPs were vaccinated twice with MVA by intramuscular injection or the 4pox/LT vaccine delivered using a disposable gene gun device. As a positive control, one NHP was vaccinated with ACAM2000. NHPs vaccinated with each vaccine developed anti-orthopoxvirus antibody responses, including those against the 4pox antigens. After MPXV intravenous challenge, all control NHPs developed severe disease, while the ACAM2000 vaccinated animal was well protected. All NHPs vaccinated with MVA were protected from lethality, but three of five developed severe disease and all animals shed virus. All five NHPs vaccinated with 4pox/LT survived and only one developed severe disease. None of the 4pox/LT-vaccinated animals shed virus. Our findings show, for the first time, that a subunit orthopoxvirus vaccine delivered by the same schedule can provide a degree of protection at least as high as that of MVA.

  14. Canine recombinant adenovirus vector induces an immunogenicity-related gene expression profile in skin-migrated CD11b⁺ -type DCs.

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    Vanessa Contreras

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling of the blood cell response induced early after vaccination has previously been demonstrated to predict the immunogenicity of vaccines. In this study, we evaluated whether the analysis of the gene expression profile of skin-migrated dendritic cells (DCs could be informative for the in vitro prediction of immunogenicity of vaccine, using canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV2 as vaccine vector. CAV2 has been shown to induce immunity to transgenes in several species including sheep and is an interesting alternative to human adenovirus-based vectors, based on the safety records of the parental strain in dogs and the lack of pre-existing immunity in non-host species. Skin-migrated DCs were collected from pseudo-afferent lymph in sheep. Both the CD11b(+ -type and CD103(+ -type skin-migrated DCs were transduced by CAV2. An analysis of the global gene response to CAV2 in the two skin DC subsets showed that the gene response in CD11b(+ -type DCs was far higher and broader than in the CD103(+ -type DCs. A newly released integrative analytic tool from Ingenuity systems revealed that the CAV2-modulated genes in the CD11b(+ -type DCs clustered in several activated immunogenicity-related functions, such as immune response, immune cell trafficking and inflammation. Thus gene profiling in skin-migrated DC in vitro indicates that the CD11b(+ DC type is more responsive to CAV2 than the CD103(+ DC type, and provides valuable information to help in evaluating and possibly improving viral vector vaccine effectiveness.

  15. An Update on Canine Adenovirus Type 2 and Its Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Kremer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus vectors have significant potential for long- or short-term gene transfer. Preclinical and clinical studies using human derived adenoviruses (HAd have demonstrated the feasibility of flexible hybrid vector designs, robust expression and induction of protective immunity. However, clinical use of HAd vectors can, under some conditions, be limited by pre-existing vector immunity. Pre-existing humoral and cellular anti-capsid immunity limits the efficacy and duration of transgene expression and is poorly circumvented by injections of larger doses and immuno-suppressing drugs. This review updates canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV-2, also known as CAdV-2 biology and gives an overview of the generation of early region 1 (E1-deleted to helper-dependent (HD CAV-2 vectors. We also summarize the essential characteristics concerning their interaction with the anti-HAd memory immune responses in humans, the preferential transduction of neurons, and its high level of retrograde axonal transport in the central and peripheral nervous system. CAV-2 vectors are particularly interesting tools to study the pathophysiology and potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as anti-tumoral and anti-viral vaccines, tracer of synaptic junctions, oncolytic virus and as a platform to generate chimeric vectors.

  16. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines protect nonhuman primates against Bundibugyo ebolavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics for human use. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV-based vaccine vectors, which encode an EBOV glycoprotein in place of the VSV glycoprotein, have shown 100% efficacy against homologous Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV or Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV challenge in NHPs. In addition, a single injection of a blend of three rVSV vectors completely protected NHPs against challenge with SEBOV, ZEBOV, the former Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus, and Marburg virus. However, recent studies suggest that complete protection against the newly discovered Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BEBOV using several different heterologous filovirus vaccines is more difficult and presents a new challenge. As BEBOV caused nearly 50% mortality in a recent outbreak any filovirus vaccine advanced for human use must be able to protect against this new species. Here, we evaluated several different strategies against BEBOV using rVSV-based vaccines. Groups of cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated with a single injection of a homologous BEBOV vaccine, a single injection of a blended heterologous vaccine (SEBOV/ZEBOV, or a prime-boost using heterologous SEBOV and ZEBOV vectors. Animals were challenged with BEBOV 29-36 days after initial vaccination. Macaques vaccinated with the homologous BEBOV vaccine or the prime-boost showed no overt signs of illness and survived challenge. In contrast, animals vaccinated with the heterologous blended vaccine and unvaccinated control animals developed severe clinical symptoms consistent with BEBOV infection with 2 of 3 animals in each group succumbing. These data show that complete protection against BEBOV will likely require incorporation of BEBOV glycoprotein into the vaccine or employment of a prime-boost regimen. Fortunately, our results demonstrate that heterologous rVSV-based filovirus vaccine

  17. Development of cross-protective influenza A vaccines based on cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Christiaan Soema

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza vaccines provide protection against matching influenza A virus (IAV strains mainly through the induction of neutralizing serum IgG antibodies. However, these antibodies fail to confer a protective effect against mismatched IAV. This lack of efficacy against heterologous influenza strains has spurred the vaccine development community to look for other influenza vaccine concepts, which have the ability to elicit cross-protective immune responses.One of the concepts that is currently been worked on are influenza vaccines inducing influenza-specific T cell responses. T cells are able to lyse infected host cells, thereby clearing the virus. More interestingly, these T cells can recognize highly conserved epitopes of internal influenza proteins, making cellular responses less vulnerable to antigenic variability. T cells are therefore cross-reactive against many influenza strains, and thus are a promising concept for future influenza vaccines. Despite their potential, there are currently no T cell based IAV vaccines on the market. Selection of the proper antigen, appropriate vaccine formulation and evaluation of the efficacy of T cell vaccines remains challenging, both in preclinical and clinical settings.In this review, we will discuss the current developments in influenza T cell vaccines, focusing on existing protein-based and novel peptide-based vaccine formulations. Furthermore, we will discuss the feasibility of influenza T cell vaccines and their possible use in the future.

  18. Ovarian dysfunction associated with zona pellucida-based immunocontraceptive vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joonè, Carolynne J; Schulman, Martin L; Bertschinger, Henk J

    2017-02-01

    Despite more than 40 years of research into zona pellucida (ZP)-based vaccines, relatively little is known about their mechanism of action. Early research demonstrated precipitation of ZP glycoproteins by antiovarian antiserum, rendering oocytes resistant to sperm binding in vitro. Subsequent work showed significantly decreased fertilization rates following passive immunization, sparking interest in anti-ZP immunocontraception for human and animal use. The primary mechanism of action of ZP vaccines is generally considered to be an antibody-mediated interference with sperm-oocyte binding and/or fertilization. However, this mechanism of action excludes the potential for ovarian dysfunction associated with anti-ZP treatment in some species. A review of relevant literature in pertinent model, domestic and wildlife species reveals a variety of previous and current hypotheses for ovarian effects following ZP-based immunization. Ovarian dysfunction has been suggested to be a species-specific response. In addition, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and the use of Freund's adjuvants have been suggested to play a role. Finally, the type and extent of glycosylation of ZP antigens have been proposed to influence ovarian effects. The validity of these hypotheses is re-examined in the light of current knowledge. Further investigation of ovarian function in species believed to be resistant to the ovarian effects of anti-ZP vaccines is warranted. To this end, anti-Müllerian hormone may provide a novel tool for the assessment of ovarian function during ZP-based immunocontraception, particularly in wildlife species not amenable to frequent clinical examination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Whole-cell cancer vaccination: from autologous to allogeneic tumor- and dendritic cell-based vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Gruijl, de, T.D.; Eertwegh, van den, A.J.M.; Pinedo, Herbert; Scheper, Rik

    2008-01-01

    The field of tumor vaccination is currently undergoing a shift in focus, from individualized tailor-made vaccines to more generally applicable vaccine formulations. Although primarily predicated by financial and logistic considerations, stemming from a growing awareness that clinical development for wide-scale application can only be achieved through backing from major pharmaceutical companies, these new approaches are also supported by a growing knowledge of the intricacies and minutiae of a...

  20. Influence of maternally-derived antibodies in 6-week old dogs for the efficacy of a new vaccine to protect dogs against virulent challenge with canine distemper virus, adenovirus or parvovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wilson

    2014-01-01

    In conclusion, two doses of the DHPPi/L4R vaccine administered to dogs from six weeks of age in the presence of maternal antibodies aided in the protection against virulent challenge with CDV, CAV-1 or CPV.

  1. Hexavalent IPV-based combination vaccines for public-sector markets of low-resource countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Kutub; Pelkowski, Sonia; Atherly, Deborah; Sitrin, Robert D; Donnelly, John J

    2013-09-01

    In anticipation of the successful eradication of wild polio virus, alternative vaccination strategies for public-sector markets of low-resource countries are extremely important, but are still under development. Following polio eradication, inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) would be the only polio vaccine available, and would be needed for early childhood immunization for several years, as maintenance of herd immunity will be important for sustaining polio eradication. Low-cost combination vaccines containing IPV could provide reliable and continuous immunization in the post-polio eradication period. Combination vaccines can potentially simplify complex pediatric routine immunization schedules, improve compliance, and reduce costs. Hexavalent vaccines containing Diphtheria (D), Tetanus (T), whole cell pertussis (wP), Hepatitis B (HBV), Haemophilus b (Hib) and the three IPV serotype antigens have been considered as the ultimate combination vaccine for routine immunization. This product review evaluates potential hexavalent vaccine candidates by composition, probable time to market, expected cost of goods, presentation, and technical feasibility and offers suggestions for development of low-cost hexavalent combination vaccines. Because there are significant technical challenges facing wP-based hexavalent vaccine development, this review also discusses other alternative approaches to hexavalent that could also ensure a timely and reliable supply of low-cost IPV based combination vaccines.

  2. [Construction of genetically modified dendritic cell vaccine expressing bcr/abl fusion gene and inducing specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill K562 cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Wen; Huang, Ren-Wei; Hu, Yuan; Li, Xu-Dong; Wang, Dong-Ning; He, Yi; Liu, Jia-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Specific immunological effect mediated by T lymphocytes plays an important role in treating chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML). Dendritic cells (DCs)-based immunotherapy has become popular in treating tumors. This study was to construct DC vaccines by transducing with replication-defective recombinant adenoviruses expressing bcr/abl fusion gene of CML, observe the lethal effects of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) triggered by genetically modified DC vaccines expressing bcr/abl fusion gene against K562 cells in vitro. DNA fragment of bcr/abl fusion gene was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to construct a recombinant adenovirus vector and produce recombinant adenoviruses. DCs were induced from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro, and transfected with recombinant adenoviruses or pulsed with peptide to induce specific CTLs. The lethal effect of CTLs against leukemic K562 cells in vitro was observed. We successfully constructed the replication-defective recombinant adenoviral vector expressing bcr/abl fusion gene. The recombinant adenoviruses we produced had a high virus titer of 2.0 x 10(10) pfu/mL. Transfection efficiency of DCs in vitro was 50%-60%. DC vaccines expressing bcr/abl fusion gene were successfully prepared and used to induce specific CTLs. With effector:target cell ratios of 40:1 and 20:1, the killing rates of K562 cells by CTLs were (47.6+/-4.7)% and (47.5+/-1.6)% in genetically modified DCs group, (25.8+/-4.4)% and (24.6+/-6.3)% in peptide-pulsed DCs group, and were (5.7+/-1.3)% and (4.5+/-1.6)% in control DCs group. The differences between every two groups were significant (all P<0.05). Genetically modified DC vaccine expressing bcr/abl fusion gene has a stronger contribution than peptide-pulsed DCs in triggering specific CTLs against K562 cells.

  3. Coated microneedle arrays for transcutaneous delivery of live virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrdoljak, Anto; McGrath, Marie G; Carey, John B; Draper, Simon J; Hill, Adrian V S; O'Mahony, Conor; Crean, Abina M; Moore, Anne C

    2012-04-10

    Vaccines are sensitive biologics that require continuous refrigerated storage to maintain their viability. The vast majority of vaccines are also administered using needles and syringes. The need for cold chain storage and the significant logistics surrounding needle-and-syringe vaccination is constraining the success of immunization programs. Recombinant live viral vectors are a promising platform for the development of vaccines against a number of infectious diseases, however these viruses must retain infectivity to be effective. Microneedles offer an effective and painless method for delivery of vaccines directly into skin that in the future could provide solutions to current vaccination issues. Here we investigated methods of coating live recombinant adenovirus and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors onto solid microneedle arrays. An effective spray-coating method, using conventional pharmaceutical processes, was developed, in tandem with suitable sugar-based formulations, which produces arrays with a unique coating of viable virus in a dry form around the shaft of each microneedle on the array. Administration of live virus-coated microneedle arrays successfully resulted in virus delivery, transcutaneous infection and induced an antibody or CD8(+) T cell response in mice that was comparable to that obtained by needle-and-syringe intradermal immunization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful vaccination with recombinant live viral vectored vaccines coated on microneedle delivery devices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. GET POKED: Comparing an Incentive-Based Flu Campaign with Vaccinate-or-Mask Policies to Boost Influenza Vaccination Rates Among Healthcare Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwaha, Seema; Lorv, Bailey; Henseleit, Susanne; Iroanyah, Ngozi

    2016-01-01

    The median influenza vaccination rate for Toronto acute care facilities in 2013/14 was only 44%, well below the target rate of 90%. While many Toronto hospitals adopted a vaccinate-or-mask policy, Trillium Health Partners (THP) opted to create a multimodal incentives-based flu campaign entitled GET POKED. This campaign, which required significant additional resourcing, only increased our vaccination rate by 10%. While having some modest success, we believe it is unlikely that non-policy based interventions will efficiently and sustainably raise flu vaccine rates. Vaccinate-or-mask policies, while having some inherent challenges, may be worth exploring as part of THP's larger flu-prevention strategy.

  5. Health care utilization in general practice after HPV vaccination-A Danish nationwide register-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Wulff Krogsgaard

    Full Text Available The Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccine has increasingly been suspected of adverse effects in Denmark since 2013. By using consultations with the general practitioner (GP as an indicator for morbidity, this study aims to examine the association between HPV vaccination and morbidity in girls in the Danish childhood immunization program.The study is a nationwide register-based cohort study. Both the HPV and the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR vaccines were offered to 12-year-old girls in Denmark in the study period (2008-2015. Therefore, both vaccines were included as exposures to allow differentiation between potential effects. This resulted in four exposure groups: HPV only vaccinated, HPV+MMR vaccinated, MMR only vaccinated, and Non-vaccinated girls. Outcomes were: daytime consultation rates and frequent GP attendance (> 7 annual GP consultations. We estimated consultation rates by negative binomial regressions analysis and frequent GP attendance by logistic regression analysis. Both analyses were stratified on the years 2008-2013 versus 2014.The study included 214,240 girls born in 1996-2002. All vaccinated groups consulted the GP more often than the non-vaccinated group, both before and after the vaccination. After the vaccination, an increase in consultations was observed for all three vaccinated groups; most distinct for girls vaccinated in 2014. For girls vaccinated before 2014, we found a slightly higher risk of frequent GP attendance after vaccination in the HPV only group compared to the non-vaccinated group, whereas in 2014, frequent GP attendance was seen for all three vaccinated groups; most substantial for the MMR only vaccinated group.In this study, no exclusive increase in health care utilization was detected after HPV vaccination. However, a general difference in the health care utilization pattern was found between vaccinated and non-vaccinated girls, which increased after the time of vaccination, primarily for girls vaccinated

  6. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens...... for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce...... been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly...

  7. Effect of School-based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From 2008 to 2011, schoolgirls were vaccinated against HPV in two districts in Uganda following sensitization. This study assessed girls' knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV vaccine, and their acceptance of future vaccination of friends and hypothetical daughters. The cross-sectional, mixed methods comparative study ...

  8. A Web-Based Platform for Designing Vaccines against Existing and Emerging Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Vir, Pooja; Singla, Deepak; Gupta, Sudheer; Kumar, Shailesh; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is crucial for saving millions of premature deaths every year due to tuberculosis. This paper describes a web portal developed for assisting researchers in designing vaccines against emerging Mtb strains using traditional and modern approaches. Firstly, we annotated 59 genomes of Mycobacterium species to understand similarity/dissimilarity between tuberculoid, non-tuberculoid and vaccine strains at genome level. Secondly, antigen-based vaccine candidates have been predicted in each Mtb strain. Thirdly, epitopes-based vaccine candidates were predicted/discovered in above antigen-based vaccine candidates that can stimulate all arms of immune system. Finally, a database of predicted vaccine candidates at epitopes as well at antigen level has been developed for above strains. In order to design vaccine against a newly sequenced genome of Mtb strain, server integrates three modules for identification of strain-, antigen-, epitope-specific vaccine candidates. We observed that 103,522 unique peptides (9mers) had the potential to induce an antibody response and/or promiscuous binder to MHC alleles and/or have the capability to stimulate T lymphocytes. In summary, this web-portal will be useful for researchers working on designing vaccines against Mtb including drug-resistant strains. The database is available freely at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/mtbveb/.

  9. Vaccines for the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Franco, Juan Va; Guerra, Claudia V; Felix, Maria L; Hidalgo, Ricardo; Martinez-Zapata, Maria José

    2017-05-18

    The common cold is a spontaneously remitting infection of the upper respiratory tract, characterised by a runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing, cough, malaise, sore throat, and fever (usually common cold worldwide is related to its ubiquitousness rather than its severity. The development of vaccines for the common cold has been difficult because of antigenic variability of the common cold virus and the indistinguishable multiple other viruses and even bacteria acting as infective agents. There is uncertainty regarding the efficacy and safety of interventions for preventing the common cold in healthy people. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2011 and previously updated in 2013. To assess the clinical effectiveness and safety of vaccines for preventing the common cold in healthy people. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (September 2016), MEDLINE (1948 to September 2016), Embase (1974 to September 2016), CINAHL (1981 to September 2016), and LILACS (1982 to September 2016). We also searched three trials registers for ongoing studies and four websites for additional trials (February 2017). We included no language or date restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any virus vaccines compared with placebo to prevent the common cold in healthy people. Two review authors independently evaluated methodological quality and extracted trial data. We resolved disagreements by discussion or by consulting a third review author. We found no additional RCTs for inclusion in this update. This review includes one RCT dating from the 1960s with an overall high risk of bias. The RCT included 2307 healthy participants, all of whom were included in analyses. This trial compared the effect of an adenovirus vaccine against placebo. No statistically significant difference in common cold incidence was found: there were 13 (1.14%) events in 1139 participants in the vaccines group and 14 (1.19%) events in 1168

  10. In silico-based vaccine design against Ebola virus glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash R

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Raju Dash,1 Rasel Das,2 Md Junaid,3 Md Forhad Chowdhury Akash,4 Ashekul Islam,5 SM Zahid Hosen1 1Molecular Modeling and Drug Design Laboratory (MMDDL, Pharmacology Research Division, Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (BCSIR, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 2Nanotechnology and Catalysis Research Center, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 4Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University Bangladesh, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Bangladesh Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV is one of the lethal viruses, causing more than 24 epidemic outbreaks to date. Despite having available molecular knowledge of this virus, no definite vaccine or other remedial agents have been developed yet for the management and avoidance of EBOV infections in humans. Disclosing this, the present study described an epitope-based peptide vaccine against EBOV, using a combination of B-cell and T-cell epitope predictions, followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation approach. Here, protein sequences of all glycoproteins of EBOV were collected and examined via in silico methods to determine the most immunogenic protein. From the identified antigenic protein, the peptide region ranging from 186 to 220 and the sequence HKEGAFFLY from the positions of 154–162 were considered the most potential B-cell and T-cell epitopes, correspondingly. Moreover, this peptide (HKEGAFFLY interacted with HLA-A*32:15 with the highest binding energy and stability, and also a good conservancy of 83.85% with maximum population coverage. The results imply that the designed epitopes could manifest vigorous enduring defensive immunity against EBOV. Keywords: Ebola virus, epitope, glycoprotein, vaccine design

  11. Cancer-targeted oncolytic adenoviruses for modulation of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Capasso, Cristian; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Otto; Hemminki, Akseli

    2017-05-02

    Adenovirus is one of the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy and it is the first approved virus-derived drug for treatment of cancer. As an oncolytic agent, it can induce lysis of infected cells, but it can also engage the immune system, promoting activation and maturation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). In essence, oncolysis combined with the associated immunostimulatory actions result in a "personalized in situ vaccine" for each patient. In order to take full advantage of these features, we should try to understand how adenovirus interacts with the immune system, what are the receptors involved in triggering subsequent signals and which kind of responses they elicit. Tackling these questions will give us further insight in how to manipulate adenovirus-mediated immune responses for enhancement of anti-tumor efficacy. In this review, we first highlight how oncolytic adenovirus interacts with the innate immune system and its receptors such as Toll-like receptors, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors and other immune sensors. Then we describe the effect of these interactions on the adaptive immune system and its cells, especially B and T lymphocytes. Finally, we summarize the most significant preclinical and clinical results in the field of gene therapy where researchers have engineered adenovirus to manipulate the host immune system by expressing cytokines and signaling mediators. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Highest Vaccine Uptake after School-Based Delivery - A County-Level Evaluation of the Implementation Strategies for HPV Catch-Up Vaccination in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Moa; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Wallensten, Anders; Sparén, Pär; Netterlid, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The Swedish school-based vaccination programme offers HPV vaccine to girls born ≥1999 in 5-6th grade. In 2012, all counties introduced free-of-charge catch-up vaccination campaigns targeting girls born 1993-1998. Varying vaccine uptake in the catch-up group by December 2012 suggested that some implementation strategies were more successful than others. In order to inform future vaccination campaigns, we assessed the impact of different implementation strategies on the county-level catch-up vaccine uptake. We conducted an ecological study including all Swedish counties (n = 21), asking regional health offices about the information channels they used and where vaccination of the catch-up target group took place in their counties. The uptake of ≥1 dose by 30 September 2014 was estimated using data from the voluntary national vaccination register. We investigated associations between counties' catch-up vaccine uptake, information channels and vaccination settings by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using negative binomial regression models. County level catch-up vaccine uptake varied between 49-84%. All counties offered vaccination through primary health care settings. Apart from this eight (34%) also offered the vaccine in some of their schools, four (19%) in all their schools, and two (10%) in other health care centres. The information channels most frequently used were: information at the national on-line health care consulting web-page (100%), letter/invitations (90%), and advertisement (81%). Counties offering vaccination to girls in all schools and counties offering vaccination in some of their schools, reached higher vaccine uptake compared to counties not offering vaccination in any of their schools (all schools adjusted IRR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5, some schools adjusted IRR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3). Counties offering HPV vaccination to catch-up groups in schools reached the highest vaccine uptake. No information

  13. Highest Vaccine Uptake after School-Based Delivery - A County-Level Evaluation of the Implementation Strategies for HPV Catch-Up Vaccination in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moa Rehn

    Full Text Available The Swedish school-based vaccination programme offers HPV vaccine to girls born ≥1999 in 5-6th grade. In 2012, all counties introduced free-of-charge catch-up vaccination campaigns targeting girls born 1993-1998. Varying vaccine uptake in the catch-up group by December 2012 suggested that some implementation strategies were more successful than others. In order to inform future vaccination campaigns, we assessed the impact of different implementation strategies on the county-level catch-up vaccine uptake.We conducted an ecological study including all Swedish counties (n = 21, asking regional health offices about the information channels they used and where vaccination of the catch-up target group took place in their counties. The uptake of ≥1 dose by 30 September 2014 was estimated using data from the voluntary national vaccination register. We investigated associations between counties' catch-up vaccine uptake, information channels and vaccination settings by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, using negative binomial regression models.County level catch-up vaccine uptake varied between 49-84%. All counties offered vaccination through primary health care settings. Apart from this eight (34% also offered the vaccine in some of their schools, four (19% in all their schools, and two (10% in other health care centres. The information channels most frequently used were: information at the national on-line health care consulting web-page (100%, letter/invitations (90%, and advertisement (81%. Counties offering vaccination to girls in all schools and counties offering vaccination in some of their schools, reached higher vaccine uptake compared to counties not offering vaccination in any of their schools (all schools adjusted IRR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5, some schools adjusted IRR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3.Counties offering HPV vaccination to catch-up groups in schools reached the highest vaccine uptake. No information

  14. Engineering intravaginal vaccines to overcome mucosal and epithelial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhonghua; Xie, Zhaolu; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2017-06-01

    The mucosal surface of the vagina is a primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry portal, making it an attractive site for HIV vaccination. However, HIV vaccines based on recombinant adenovirus (rAd) do not efficiently cross the mucus layers or underlying epithelium of the vagina. Here we designed nanocomplexes of rAd particles coated with (1) the polyethylene glycol derivative APS to provide a hydrophilic surface that would prevent entrapment in the hydrophobic mucus, and (2) the cell-penetrating peptide TAT to improve transduction efficiency. The optimized rAd-TAT-APS nanocomplexes could achieve the balance of effective mucus-penetrating and cellular transduction. Intravaginal delivery of rAd-TAT-APS encoding HIVgag p24 into mice strongly enhanced HIVgag-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. This rAd-TAT-APS system may allow effective vaginal delivery of vaccines against HIV and other infectious agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA-based vaccines: the future of multiple sclerosis therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüve, Olaf; Cravens, Petra D; Eagar, Todd N

    2008-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common human inflammatory, demyelinating and degenerative disorder of the CNS. Based mostly on work in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CD4(+) T cells were long thought to play the crucial role in MS pathogenesis. Only more recently has it been recognized that other effector cell types, including CD8(+) T cells, gammadelta-T cells and B lymphocytes may also have an important role in disease initiation and perpetuation. The expression of soluble inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and free radicals, may be one of the late pathways mediating CNS tissue damage. In addition, in virtually all patients with MS, an oligoclonal banding pattern of antibodies can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, the cause of MS still remains unknown. Specifically, no single foreign or self antigen has been identified to account for clinical disease activity or the presence of surrogate disease markers. All approved pharmacotherapies have anti-inflammatory or immunoregulatory properties and work in early stages of the disease. In a recent clinical trial, BHT-3009, a DNA vaccine encoding full-length human myelin basic protein, was tested in patient with MS. BHT-3009 was safe and well tolerated. In addition, immunization with BHT-3009 induced anti-inflammatory antigen-specific immune changes consisting of a marked decrease in T-cell proliferation of IFN gamma production and a reduction in titers of myelin-specific autoantibodies in the CSF. This review will discuss these intriguing observations and the overall potential of DNA vaccination in MS.

  16. Investigating Stakeholder Attitudes and Opinions on School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Starling, Randall; Kong, Alberta S.; Buller, David B.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background: In several countries worldwide, school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs have been successful; however, little research has explored US stakeholders' acceptance toward school-based HPV vaccination programs. Methods: A total of 13 focus groups and 12 key informant interviews (N?=?117; 85% females; 66% racial/ethnic…

  17. Correlates of HPV vaccine uptake in school-based routine vaccination of preadolescent girls in Norway: A register-based study of 90,000 girls and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bo Terning; Campbell, Suzanne; Burger, Emily; Nygård, Mari

    2015-08-01

    To assess demographic, socioeconomic and behavioural correlates of HPV vaccination of preadolescent girls in a publicly funded, school-based vaccination programme. Data for all Norwegian girls born 1997-1999, eligible for routine school-based HPV vaccination in 2009-2011 (n=90,842), and their registered mother and father, were merged from national registries. Correlates of girl vaccination status were analysed by unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression. In total, 78.2% of the girls received the first dose of the HPV vaccine, 74.6% received three doses, and 94.8% received the MMR vaccine. Correlates associated with initiation of HPV vaccination included parental age, income and education, maternal occupational status and cervical screening attendance, and girl receipt of the MMR vaccine. Rates of completion of HPV vaccination among initiators were high, and disparities in completion were negligible. Maternal and paternal correlates of daughter HPV vaccination status were similar. Routine school-based vaccination generally provides equitable delivery, yet some disparities exist. Information campaigns designed to reach the sub-groups with relatively low vaccine uptake could reduce disparities. In none of the sub-groups investigated did uptake of the HPV vaccine approach that of the MMR vaccine, further demonstrating a general potential for improvement in HPV vaccine uptake. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The administration of a single dose of a multivalent (DHPPiL4R vaccine prevents clinical signs and mortality following virulent challenge with canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus or canine parvovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wilson

    2014-01-01

    In conclusion, we demonstrated that a single administration of a minimum titre, multivalent vaccine to dogs of six weeks of age is efficacious and prevents clinical signs and mortality caused by CAV-1 and CDV; prevents clinical signs and significantly reduces virus shedding caused by CAV-2; and prevents clinical signs, leucopoenia and viral excretion caused by CPV.

  19. Protection of guinea pigs and swine by a recombinant adenovirus expressing O serotype of foot-and-mouth disease virus whole capsid and 3C protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zengjun; Bao, Huifang; Cao, Yimei; Sun, Pu; Guo, Jianhun; Li, Pinghua; Bai, Xingwen; Chen, Yingli; Xie, Baoxia; Li, Dong; Liu, Zaixin; Xie, Qingge

    2008-12-19

    Two recombinant adenoviruses were constructed expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and 3C/3CD proteins in replicative deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector. Guinea pigs vaccinated with 1-3 x 10(8)TCID(50) Ad-P12x3C recombinant adenovirus were completely protected against 10,000GID(50) homologous virulent FMDV challenge 25 days post vaccination (dpv). Ad-P12x3CD vaccinated guinea pigs were only partially protected. Swine were vaccinated once with 1x10(9)TCID(50) Ad-P12x3C hybrid virus and challenged 28 days later. Three of four vaccinated swine were completely protected against 200 pig 50% infectious doses (ID(50)) of homologous FMDV challenge, and vaccinated pigs developed specific cellular and humoral immune responses. The immune effect of Ad-P12x3C in swine further indicated that the recombinant adenovirus was highly efficient in transferring the foreign gene. This approach may thus be a very hopeful tool for developing FMD live virus vector vaccine.

  20. Clarification of vaccines: An overview of filter based technology trends and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Lise; Fabre, Virginie; Fettig, Michael; Gousseinov, Elina; Kawakami, Yasuhiro; Laroudie, Nicolas; Scanlan, Claire; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines are derived from a variety of sources including tissue extracts, bacterial cells, virus particles, recombinant mammalian, yeast and insect cell produced proteins and nucleic acids. The most common method of vaccine production is based on an initial fermentation process followed by purification. Production of vaccines is a complex process involving many different steps and processes. Selection of the appropriate purification method is critical to achieving desired purity of the final product. Clarification of vaccines is a critical step that strongly impacts product recovery and subsequent downstream purification. There are several technologies that can be applied for vaccine clarification. Selection of a harvesting method and equipment depends on the type of cells, product being harvested, and properties of the process fluids. These techniques include membrane filtration (microfiltration, tangential-flow filtration), centrifugation, and depth filtration (normal flow filtration). Historically vaccine harvest clarification was usually achieved by centrifugation followed by depth filtration. Recently membrane based technologies have gained prominence in vaccine clarification. The increasing use of single-use technologies in upstream processes necessitated a shift in harvest strategies. This review offers a comprehensive view on different membrane based technologies and their application in vaccine clarification, outlines the challenges involved and presents the current state of best practices in the clarification of vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Khurana

    Full Text Available A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR. Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1 and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1 HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2 and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  2. Characterization nanoparticles-based vaccines and vaccine candidates: a Transmission Electron Microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Menéndez I

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM is a valuable tool for the biotech industry. This paper summarizes some of the contributions of MET in the characterization of the recombinant antigens are part of vaccines or vaccine candidates obtained in the CIGB. It mentions the use of complementary techniques MET (Negative staining, and immunoelectron that enhance visualization and ultrastructural characterization of the recombinant proteins obtained by Genetic Engineering.

  3. Timeliness of childhood vaccinations in Kampala Uganda: a community-based cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet N Babirye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Child survival is dependent on several factors including high vaccination coverage. Timely receipt of vaccines ensures optimal immune response to the vaccines. Yet timeliness is not usually emphasized in estimating population immunity. In addition to examining timeliness of the recommended Expanded Programme for Immunisation (EPI vaccines, this paper identifies predictors of untimely vaccination among children aged 10 to 23 months in Kampala. METHODS: In addition to the household survey interview questions, additional data sources for variables included data collection of child's weight and length. Vaccination dates were obtained from child health cards. Timeliness of vaccinations were assessed with Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis for each vaccine based on the following time ranges (lowest-highest target age: BCG (birth-8 weeks, polio 0 (birth-4 weeks, three polio and three pentavalent vaccines (4 weeks-2 months; 8 weeks-4 months; 12 weeks-6 months and measles vaccine (38 weeks-12 months. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with vaccination timeliness. RESULTS: About half of 821 children received all vaccines within the recommended time ranges (45.6%; 95% CI 39.8-51.2. Timely receipt of vaccinations was lowest for measles (67.5%; 95% CI 60.5-73.8 and highest for BCG vaccine (92.7%: 95% CI 88.1-95.6. For measles, 10.7% (95% CI 6.8-16.4 of the vaccinations were administered earlier than the recommended time. Vaccinations that were not received within the recommended age ranges were associated with increasing number of children per woman (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR; 1.84, 95% CI 1.29-2.64, non-delivery at health facilities (AHR 1.58, 95% CI 1.02-2.46, being unmarried (AHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.15-1.94 or being in the lowest wealth quintile (AHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.11-1.72. CONCLUSIONS: Strategies to improve vaccination practices among the poorest, single, multiparous women and among mothers who do not deliver at

  4. Timeliness of childhood vaccinations in Kampala Uganda: a community-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babirye, Juliet N; Engebretsen, Ingunn M S; Makumbi, Frederick; Fadnes, Lars T; Wamani, Henry; Tylleskar, Thorkild; Nuwaha, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Child survival is dependent on several factors including high vaccination coverage. Timely receipt of vaccines ensures optimal immune response to the vaccines. Yet timeliness is not usually emphasized in estimating population immunity. In addition to examining timeliness of the recommended Expanded Programme for Immunisation (EPI) vaccines, this paper identifies predictors of untimely vaccination among children aged 10 to 23 months in Kampala. In addition to the household survey interview questions, additional data sources for variables included data collection of child's weight and length. Vaccination dates were obtained from child health cards. Timeliness of vaccinations were assessed with Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis for each vaccine based on the following time ranges (lowest-highest target age): BCG (birth-8 weeks), polio 0 (birth-4 weeks), three polio and three pentavalent vaccines (4 weeks-2 months; 8 weeks-4 months; 12 weeks-6 months) and measles vaccine (38 weeks-12 months). Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with vaccination timeliness. About half of 821 children received all vaccines within the recommended time ranges (45.6%; 95% CI 39.8-51.2). Timely receipt of vaccinations was lowest for measles (67.5%; 95% CI 60.5-73.8) and highest for BCG vaccine (92.7%: 95% CI 88.1-95.6). For measles, 10.7% (95% CI 6.8-16.4) of the vaccinations were administered earlier than the recommended time. Vaccinations that were not received within the recommended age ranges were associated with increasing number of children per woman (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR); 1.84, 95% CI 1.29-2.64), non-delivery at health facilities (AHR 1.58, 95% CI 1.02-2.46), being unmarried (AHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.15-1.94) or being in the lowest wealth quintile (AHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.11-1.72). Strategies to improve vaccination practices among the poorest, single, multiparous women and among mothers who do not deliver at health facilities are necessary to improve

  5. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Giles

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals.

  6. Mitigating the looming vaccine crisis: production and delivery of plasmid-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkudon, Clarence M; Ho, Jenny; Danquah, Michael K

    2011-03-01

    The exponentially growing human population and the emergence of new diseases are clear indications that the world can no longer depend solely on conventional vaccine technologies and production schemes. The race to find a new vaccine technology is crucial to help speed up and complement the World Health Organization (WHO) disease elimination program. The ultimate goal is to uncover fast and efficient production schemes in the event of a pandemic, and also to effectively fight deadly diseases such as malaria, bird flu, hepatitis, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Plasmid DNA vaccines, if properly formulated, offer specific priming of the immune system and similar or even better prophylactic effects than conventional vaccines. This article discusses many of the critical issues that need to be considered when developing fast, effective, and reliable plasmid DNA vaccine manufacturing processes. Different modes of plasmid production via bacterial fermentation are compared. Plasmid purification by chromatography is specifically discussed as it is the most commercially viable bioprocess engineering technique for continuous purification of supercoiled plasmid DNA. Current techniques and progress covering the area of plasmid DNA vaccine design, formulation, and delivery are also put forward.

  7. Generation of recombinant adenovirus vectors with modified fibers for altering viral tropism.

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnykh, V N; Mikheeva, G V; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D.T.

    1996-01-01

    To expand the utility of recombinant adenovirus vectors for gene therapy applications, methods to alter native viral tropism to achieve cell-specific transduction would be beneficial. To this end, we are pursuing genetic methods to alter the cell recognition domain of the adenovirus fiber. To incorporate these modified fibers into mature virions, we have developed a method based on homologous DNA recombination between two plasmids. A fiber-deleted, propagation-defective rescue plasmid has bee...

  8. Prophylactic effect of a therapeutic vaccine against TB based on fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vilaplana

    Full Text Available The prophylactic capacity of the RUTI® vaccine, based on fragmented cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has been evaluated in respect to aerosol challenge with virulent bacilli. Subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced viable bacterial counts in both lungs and spleens of C57Bl mice, when challenged 4 weeks after vaccination. RUTI® protected the spleen less than BCG. Following a 9 month vaccination-challenge interval, protection was observed for the lungs, but not for the spleen. Survival of infected guinea pigs was prolonged by vaccination given 5 weeks before challenge. Inoculations of RUTI® shortly after infection significantly reduced the viable bacterial counts in the lungs, when compared with infected control mice. Thus, vaccination by RUTI® has potential for both the prophylaxis and immunotherapy of tuberculosis.

  9. Durability of a vesicular stomatitis virus-based marburg virus vaccine in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. A promising filovirus vaccine under development is based on a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses individual filovirus glycoproteins (GPs in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. These vaccines have shown 100% efficacy against filovirus infection in nonhuman primates when challenge occurs 28-35 days after a single injection immunization. Here, we examined the ability of a rVSV MARV-GP vaccine to provide protection when challenge occurs more than a year after vaccination. Cynomolgus macaques were immunized with rVSV-MARV-GP and challenged with MARV approximately 14 months after vaccination. Immunization resulted in the vaccine cohort of six animals having anti-MARV GP IgG throughout the pre-challenge period. Following MARV challenge none of the vaccinated animals showed any signs of clinical disease or viremia and all were completely protected from MARV infection. Two unvaccinated control animals exhibited signs consistent with MARV infection and both succumbed. Importantly, these data are the first to show 100% protective efficacy against any high dose filovirus challenge beyond 8 weeks after final vaccination. These findings demonstrate the durability of VSV-based filovirus vaccines.

  10. Network-based vaccination improves prospects for disease control in wild chimpanzees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushmore, Julie; Caillaud, Damien; Hall, Richard J.; Stumpf, Rebecca M.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Altizer, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Many endangered wildlife populations are vulnerable to infectious diseases for which vaccines exist; yet, pragmatic considerations often preclude large-scale vaccination efforts. These barriers could be reduced by focusing on individuals with the highest contact rates. However, the question then becomes whether targeted vaccination is sufficient to prevent large outbreaks. To evaluate the efficacy of targeted wildlife vaccinations, we simulate pathogen transmission and control on monthly association networks informed by behavioural data from a wild chimpanzee community (Kanyawara N = 37, Kibale National Park, Uganda). Despite considerable variation across monthly networks, our simulations indicate that targeting the most connected individuals can prevent large outbreaks with up to 35% fewer vaccines than random vaccination. Transmission heterogeneities might be attributed to biological differences among individuals (e.g. sex, age, dominance and family size). Thus, we also evaluate the effectiveness of a trait-based vaccination strategy, as trait data are often easier to collect than interaction data. Our simulations indicate that a trait-based strategy can prevent large outbreaks with up to 18% fewer vaccines than random vaccination, demonstrating that individual traits can serve as effective estimates of connectivity. Overall, these results suggest that fine-scale behavioural data can help optimize pathogen control efforts for endangered wildlife. PMID:24872503

  11. Logistical and fiscal sustainability of a school-based, pharmacist-administered influenza vaccination program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanesi, John; Jue-Leong, Sierra

    2012-01-01

    To assess the fiscal and logistical viability of school-based, pharmacist-administered influenza vaccination programs. Econometric observational study. Nine schools in the Rincon Unified School District, Santa Rosa, CA. Safeway Pharmacies; Rincon Unified School District; California Department of Public Health, Immunization Branch; and University of California, San Diego. Assessment of direct workflow observations and administrative data. Unit costs, productivity, and effectiveness of school-based, pharmacist-administered influenza vaccination programs. The results showed a unit cost of $23.63 (compared with $25.60 for mass vaccination and $39.79 for walk-in shot-only vaccination clinics). The productivity index ($0.88) and efficiency index ($1.12) were better compared with data reported for comparable vaccination programs. School-based, pharmacist-administered vaccination programs are fiscally and logistically self-sustaining, viable alternatives to medical office-based or community-based mass vaccination clinics, and may offer a practical strategy for vaccinating children and adolescents.

  12. Evaluation of different heterologous prime-boost immunization strategies against Babesia bovis using viral vectored and protein-adjuvant vaccines based on a chimeric multi-antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Paoletta, Martina Soledad; Montenegro, Valeria Noely; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2016-07-19

    Protection against the intraerythrocytic bovine parasite Babesia bovis requires both humoral and cellular immune responses. Therefore, tailored combinations of immunogens targeted at both arms of the immune system are strategies of choice to pursue sterilizing immunity. In this study, different heterologous prime-boost vaccination schemes were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by a recombinant adenovirus, a modified vaccinia Ankara vector or a subunit vaccine all expressing a chimeric multi-antigen. This multi-antigen includes the immunodominant B and T cell epitopes of three B. bovis proteins: Merozoite Surface Antigen - 2c (MSA-2c), Rhoptry Associated Protein - 1 (RAP-1) and Heat Shock Protein 20 (HSP20). Both priming with the adenovirus or recombinant multi-antigen and boosting with the modified vaccinia Ankara vector achieved a high degree of activation of TNFα and IFNγ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells 60days after the first immunization. High titers of specific IgG antibodies were also detected at the same time point and lasted up to day 120 of the first immunization. Only the adenovirus - MVA combination triggered a marked isotype skew for the IgG2a antibody subclass meanwhile for the other immune traits analyzed here, both vaccination schemes showed similar performances. The immunological characterization in the murine model of these rationally designed immunogens led us to propose that adenoviruses as well as the bacterially expressed multi-antigen are highly reliable primer candidates to be considered in future experiments in cattle to test protection against bovine babesiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Capsid Engineering of Adenovirus Vectors: Overcoming Early Vector-Host Interactions for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Kreppel, Florian

    2017-10-01

    Adenovirus-based vectors comprise the most frequently used vector type in clinical studies to date. Both intense lab research and insights from the clinical trials reveal the importance of a comprehensive understanding of vector-host interactions. Especially for systemic intravenous adenovirus vector delivery, it is paramount to develop safe and efficacious vectors. Very early vector-host interactions that take place in blood long before the first cell is being transduced are phenomena triggered by the surface, shape, and size of the adenovirus vector particles. Not surprisingly, a multitude of different technologies ranging from genetics to chemistry has been developed to alter the adenovirus vector surface. In this review, we discuss the most important technologies and evaluate them for their suitability to overcome hurdles imposed by early vector-host interactions.

  14. Construction of Metabolically Biotinylated Adenovirus with Deleted Fiber Knob as Targeting Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnitzer Jan E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene delivery vectors based on adenovirus, particularly human adenovirus serotype 5 (hAd5 have great potential for the treatment of variety of diseases. However, the tropism of hAd5 needs to be modified to achieve tissue- or cell- specific therapies for the successful application of this vector system to clinic. Here, we modified hAd5 tropism by replacing the fiber knob which contains the coxsackievirus B and adenovirus receptor (CAR-binding sites with a biotin acceptor peptide, a truncated form of Propionibacterium shermanii 1.3 S transcarboxylase domain (PSTCD, to enable metabolically biotinylation of the virus. We demonstrate here that the new adenovirus no longer shows CAR-dependent cell uptake and transduction. When metabolically biotinylated and avidin-coated, it forms a nano-complex that can be retargeted to distinct cells using biotinylated antibodies. This vector may prove useful in the path towards achieving targeted gene delivery.

  15. Evaluation of the efficacy of a new oil-based adjuvant ISA 61 VG FMD vaccine as a potential vaccine for cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, A; Madadgar, O; Soleimanjahi, H; Keyvanfar, H; Mahravani, H

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an important viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. Inactivated whole particle virus vaccines are still widely used in prophylactic vaccination campaigns. The choice of adjuvant is a very important factor in enhancing immune responses and the efficacy of inactivated vaccines. Montanide ISA 61 VG is a new ready-to-use mineral oil-based adjuvant developed by SEPPIC Inc. (SEPPIC, France) with high-potential immune responses needed for clinical protection against FMD infection. In this study, we compared the efficacy of two FMD vaccines either formulated with the new oil-based adjuvant ISA 61 VG and saponin, or with aluminum hydroxide gel and saponin. Both vaccines contained the same antigen payloads of O2010/IR. Two groups of 15 naive cattle received a single vaccination with different doses (full dose, 1/3 dose and 1/9 dose) to calculate their PD50 (50% protective dose) after being challenged with the homologous virulent virus. The mean neutralizing antibody titer was determined at 0, 7, 14 and 21 days after vaccination, measured by a micro neutralization test. The new vaccine improved humoral immune responses by 19%, while inducing a higher geometric mean. The titer for neutralizing antibodies was 2.91 log10 compared to the alum-gel based adjuvant vaccine which was 2.44 log10 (P-value=0.1782). The new vaccine showed a PD50 value of 10.05 as compared to a PD50 value of 4.171, respectively. According to the results, the FMD vaccine formulated with the new oil adjuvant, ISA 61 VG, shows potential as an alternative vaccine for routine and emergency vaccinations in the FMD enzootic region.

  16. Antigen design enhances the immunogenicity of Semliki Forest virus-based therapeutic human papillomavirus vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, P. P.; Boerma, A.; Walczak, M.; Oosterhuis, K.; Haanen, J. B.; Schumacher, T. N.; Nijman, H. W.; Daemen, T.

    Cellular immunity against cancer can be achieved with viral vector-and DNA-based immunizations. In preclinical studies, cancer vaccines are very potent, but in clinical trials these potencies are not achieved yet. Thus, a rational approach to improve cancer vaccines is warranted. We previously

  17. Analysis of genetic heterogeneity in the HCAR adenovirus-binding Ig1 domain in a Caucasian Flemish population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoelen, Inge; Duson, Griet; Wollants, Elke; Van Ranst, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms in the gene that encodes the human cellular receptor for group B coxsackieviruses and adenoviruses (HCAR) could be responsible for differences in susceptibility to infections with these pathogens. Moreover, adenovirus subgroup C-mediated gene therapy could be influenced by mutations in the coding exons for the aminoterminal immunoglobulin-like 1 (Ig1) domain, which is the essential component for adenovirus fiber knob binding. Results Using two primersets in the adjacent intron sequences, HCAR exons 2 and 3, which comprise the full-length Ig1 domain, were amplified by polymerase chain reactions in 108 unselected and unrelated healthy Belgian volunteers. After nucleotide sequencing, no polymorphisms could be demonstrated in the adenovirus-binding Ig1 exons 2 and 3 of the HCAR gene. Conclusions The adenovirus-binding Ig1 domain seems to be a highly conserved region in the Caucasian population which is a reassuring finding regarding adenovector-based gene therapy. PMID:11806754

  18. Analysis of genetic heterogeneity in the HCAR adenovirus-binding Ig1 domain in a Caucasian Flemish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollants Elke

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms in the gene that encodes the human cellular receptor for group B coxsackieviruses and adenoviruses (HCAR could be responsible for differences in susceptibility to infections with these pathogens. Moreover, adenovirus subgroup C-mediated gene therapy could be influenced by mutations in the coding exons for the aminoterminal immunoglobulin-like 1 (Ig1 domain, which is the essential component for adenovirus fiber knob binding. Results Using two primersets in the adjacent intron sequences, HCAR exons 2 and 3, which comprise the full-length Ig1 domain, were amplified by polymerase chain reactions in 108 unselected and unrelated healthy Belgian volunteers. After nucleotide sequencing, no polymorphisms could be demonstrated in the adenovirus-binding Ig1 exons 2 and 3 of the HCAR gene. Conclusions The adenovirus-binding Ig1 domain seems to be a highly conserved region in the Caucasian population which is a reassuring finding regarding adenovector-based gene therapy.

  19. [Real-time monitoring of anti-influenza vaccination in the 65 and over population in France based on vaccine sales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivette, M; Auvigne, V; Guérin, P; Mueller, J E

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a tool based on vaccine sales to estimate vaccination coverage against seasonal influenza in near real-time in the French population aged 65 and over. Vaccine sales data available on sale-day +1 came from a stratified sample of 3004 pharmacies in metropolitan France. Vaccination coverage rates were estimated between 2009 and 2014 and compared with those obtained based on vaccination refund data from the general health insurance scheme. The seasonal vaccination coverage estimates were highly correlated with those obtained from refund data. They were also slightly higher, which can be explained by the inclusion of non-reimbursed vaccines and the consideration of all individuals aged 65 and over. We have developed an online tool that provides estimates of daily vaccination coverage during each vaccination campaign. The developed tool provides a reliable and near real-time estimation of vaccination coverage among people aged 65 and over. It can be used to evaluate and adjust public health messages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of factors required to increase uptake of influenza vaccination among hospital-based healthcare workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, C.E.; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J.; Looijmans-van den Akker, I; Frijstein, G.; Van der Geest-Blankert, A.D.; Danhof-Pont, M.B.; De Jager, H.J.; Bos, A.A.; Smeets, E.; De Vries, M.J.; Gallee, P.M.; Lenderink, A.F.; Hak, E.

    A questionnaire study was performed in all eight University Medical Centers in The Netherlands to determine the predictors of influenza vaccination compliance in hospital-based healthcare workers (HCWs). Demographical, behavioural and organisational determinants were assessed based on behavioural

  1. Determination of factors required to increase uptake of influenza vaccination among hospital-based healthcare workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, C. E.; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J.; Looijmans-van den Akker, I.; Frijstein, G.; van der Geest-Blankert, A. D. J.; Danhof-Pont, M. B.; de Jager, H. J.; Bos, A. A.; Smeets, E.; de Vries, M. J. T.; Gallee, P. M. M.; Lenderink, A. F.; Hak, E.

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire study was performed in all eight University Medical Centers in The Netherlands to determine the predictors of influenza vaccination compliance in hospital-based healthcare workers (HCWs). Demographical, behavioural and organisational determinants were assessed based on behavioural

  2. One-prime multi-boost strategy immunization with recombinant DNA, adenovirus, and MVA vector vaccines expressing HPV16 L1 induces potent, sustained, and specific immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, He-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Yi; Luo, Jing; Xiao, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with various human diseases, including cancer, and developing vaccines is a cost-efficient strategy to prevent HPV-related disease. The major capsid protein L1, which an increasing number of studies have confirmed is typically expressed early in infection, is a promising antigen for such a vaccine, although the E6 and E7 proteins have been characterized more extensively. Thus, the L1 gene from HPV16 was inserted into a recombinant vector, AdHu5, and MVA viral vectors, and administered by prime-boost immunization. Virus-like particles were used as control antigens. Our results indicate that prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines induced robust and sustained cellular and humoral response specific to HPV16 L1. In particular, sera obtained from mice immunized with DNA + DNA + Ad + MVA had excellent antitumor activity in vivo. However, the data also confirm that virus-like particles can only elicit low levels cellular immunity and not be long-lasting, and are therefore unsuitable for treatment of existing HPV infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Current Regulatory Status for Gene-Based Vaccines in the U.S., Europe and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Nakayama

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccines as typified by plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant viral-vectored vaccines are expected as promising solutions against infectious diseases for which no effective prophylactic vaccines exist such as HIV, dengue virus, Ebola virus and malaria, and for which more improved vaccines are needed such as tuberculosis and influenza virus. Although many preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted to date, no DNA vaccines or recombinant viral-vectored vaccines expressing heterologous antigens for human use have yet been licensed in the U.S., Europe or Japan. In this research, we describe the current regulatory context for gene-based prophylactic vaccines against infectious disease in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. We identify the important considerations, in particular, on the preclinical assessments that would allow these vaccines to proceed to clinical trials, and the differences on the regulatory pathway for the marketing authorization in each region.

  4. Comparison of Current Regulatory Status for Gene-Based Vaccines in the U.S., Europe and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Aruga, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Gene-based vaccines as typified by plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant viral-vectored vaccines are expected as promising solutions against infectious diseases for which no effective prophylactic vaccines exist such as HIV, dengue virus, Ebola virus and malaria, and for which more improved vaccines are needed such as tuberculosis and influenza virus. Although many preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted to date, no DNA vaccines or recombinant viral-vectored vaccines expressing heterologous antigens for human use have yet been licensed in the U.S., Europe or Japan. In this research, we describe the current regulatory context for gene-based prophylactic vaccines against infectious disease in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. We identify the important considerations, in particular, on the preclinical assessments that would allow these vaccines to proceed to clinical trials, and the differences on the regulatory pathway for the marketing authorization in each region. PMID:26344953

  5. Cell culture based production of avian influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielink, van R.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination of poultry can be used as a tool to control outbreaks of avian influenza, including that of highly pathogenic H5 and H7 strains. Influenza vaccines are traditionally produced in embryonated chicken eggs. Continuous cell lines have been suggested as an alternative substrate to produce

  6. A Novel Rabies Vaccine Based on a Recombinant Parainfluenza Virus 5 Expressing Rabies Virus Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhai; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Xiudan; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated rabies virus (RABV) infection leads to death. Vaccine and postexposure treatment have been effective in preventing RABV infection. However, due to cost, rabies vaccination and treatment have not been widely used in developing countries. There are 55,000 human death caused by rabies annually. An efficacious and cost-effective rabies vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is thought to contribute to kennel cough, and kennel cough vaccines containing live PIV5 have been used in dogs for many years. In this work, a PIV5-vectored rabies vaccine was tested in mice. A recombinant PIV5 encoding RABV glycoprotein (G) (rPIV5-RV-G) was administered to mice via intranasal (i.n.), intramuscular (i.m.), and oral inoculation. The vaccinated mice were challenged with a 50% lethal challenge dose (LD50) of RABV challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24) intracerebrally. A single dose of 106 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G was sufficient for 100% protection when administered via the i.n. route. The mice vaccinated with a single dose of 108 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G via the i.m. route showed very robust protection (90% to 100%). Intriguingly, the mice vaccinated orally with a single dose of 108 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G showed a 50% survival rate, which is comparable to the 60% survival rate among mice inoculated with an attenuated rabies vaccine strain, recombinant LBNSE. This is first report of an orally effective rabies vaccine candidate in animals based on PIV5 as a vector. These results indicate that rPIV5-RV-G is an excellent candidate for a new generation of recombinant rabies vaccine for humans and animals and PIV5 is a potential vector for oral vaccines. PMID:23269806

  7. A novel rabies vaccine based on a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 expressing rabies virus glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhai; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Xiudan; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W; Fu, Zhen F; He, Biao

    2013-03-01

    Untreated rabies virus (RABV) infection leads to death. Vaccine and postexposure treatment have been effective in preventing RABV infection. However, due to cost, rabies vaccination and treatment have not been widely used in developing countries. There are 55,000 human death caused by rabies annually. An efficacious and cost-effective rabies vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is thought to contribute to kennel cough, and kennel cough vaccines containing live PIV5 have been used in dogs for many years. In this work, a PIV5-vectored rabies vaccine was tested in mice. A recombinant PIV5 encoding RABV glycoprotein (G) (rPIV5-RV-G) was administered to mice via intranasal (i.n.), intramuscular (i.m.), and oral inoculation. The vaccinated mice were challenged with a 50% lethal challenge dose (LD(50)) of RABV challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24) intracerebrally. A single dose of 10(6) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G was sufficient for 100% protection when administered via the i.n. route. The mice vaccinated with a single dose of 10(8) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G via the i.m. route showed very robust protection (90% to 100%). Intriguingly, the mice vaccinated orally with a single dose of 10(8) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G showed a 50% survival rate, which is comparable to the 60% survival rate among mice inoculated with an attenuated rabies vaccine strain, recombinant LBNSE. This is first report of an orally effective rabies vaccine candidate in animals based on PIV5 as a vector. These results indicate that rPIV5-RV-G is an excellent candidate for a new generation of recombinant rabies vaccine for humans and animals and PIV5 is a potential vector for oral vaccines.

  8. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis onset: evaluation based on vaccine adverse events reporting systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Pellegrino

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate epidemiological features of post vaccine acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM by considering data from different pharmacovigilance surveillance systems. METHODS: The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS database and the EudraVigilance post-authorisation module (EVPM were searched to identify post vaccine ADEM cases. Epidemiological features including sex and related vaccines were analysed. RESULTS: We retrieved 205 and 236 ADEM cases from the EVPM and VAERS databases, respectively, of which 404 were considered for epidemiological analysis following verification and causality assessment. Half of the patients had less than 18 years and with a slight male predominance. The time interval from vaccination to ADEM onset was 2-30 days in 61% of the cases. Vaccine against seasonal flu and human papilloma virus vaccine were those most frequently associated with ADEM, accounting for almost 30% of the total cases. Mean number of reports per year between 2005 and 2012 in VAERS database was 40±21.7, decreasing after 2010 mainly because of a reduction of reports associated with human papilloma virus and Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio and Haemophilus Influentiae type B vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: This study has a high epidemiological power as it is based on information on adverse events having occurred in over one billion people. It suffers from lack of rigorous case verification due to the weakness intrinsic to the surveillance databases used. At variance with previous reports on a prevalence of ADEM in childhood we demonstrate that it may occur at any age when post vaccination. This study also shows that the diminishing trend in post vaccine ADEM reporting related to Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio and Haemophilus Influentiae type B and human papilloma virus vaccine groups is most likely not [corrected] due to a decline in vaccine coverage indicative of a reduced attention to this adverse drug reaction.

  9. Comparing human T cell and NK cell responses in viral-based malaria vaccine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoud, Tamara K; Fletcher, Helen; Porter, David; Thompson, Fiona; Hill, Adrian V S; Todryk, Stephen M

    2009-12-10

    Vaccination with viral-based vaccines continues to hold promise for the prevention of malaria. Whilst antigen-specific T cell responses are considered a major aim of such an approach, a role for induced NK cells as anti-malarial effector cells, or in shaping T cell responses, has received less attention. In this study naïve human volunteers were vaccinated in a prime-boost vaccination regimen comprising recombinant viral vectors fowlpox (FP9) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) encoding liver-stage antigens, or a virosome vaccine. Significant T cell responses specific for the vectored vaccine antigens were demonstrated by IFNgamma ELISPOT and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) for IFNgamma and IL-2, the ICS being associated with increased time to parasitaemia following subsequent challenge. Numbers of CD56(bright) lymphocytes increased significantly following vaccination, as did CD3(+) CD56(+) lymphocytes, whilst CD56(dim) cells did not. No such increases were seen with the virosome vaccine. There was no significant correlation of these CD56(+) populations with the antigen-specific T cell responses nor time to parasitaemia. To investigate pathways of immune activation that could contribute to these lymphocyte responses, viral vectors were shown in vitro to efficiently infect APCs but not lymphocytes, and stimulated inflammatory cytokines such as type I interferons. In conclusion, measuring antigen-specific T cells is more meaningful than NK cells in these vaccination regimens.

  10. HPV vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Alcina F; de Andrade, Cecilia V; Russomano, Fabio B; Rodrigues, Luana S L; Oliveira, Nathalia S; Provance, David William; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine illustrates the power of in situ-based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The 2 available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, health care officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. The aims of the study were to discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine and review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. The strong type-specific immunity against HPV in humans has been known for more than 25 years. Multiple studies confirm the positive risk benefit of HPV vaccination with minimal documented adverse effects. The most common adverse effect, injection site pain, occurred in about 10% of girls and was less than the rate reported for other vaccines. Use of HPV vaccine should be expanded into more diverse populations, mainly in low-resource settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nucleic acid-based vaccines targeting respiratory syncytial virus: Delivering the goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Trevor R F; Schultheis, Katherine; Broderick, Kate E

    2017-11-02

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a massive medical burden on a global scale. Infants, children and the elderly represent the vulnerable populations. Currently there is no approved vaccine to protect against the disease. Vaccine development has been hindered by several factors including vaccine enhanced disease (VED) associated with formalin-inactivated RSV vaccines, inability of target populations to raise protective immune responses after vaccination or natural viral infection, and a lack of consensus concerning the most appropriate virus-associated target antigen. However, with recent advances in the molecular understanding of the virus, and design of highly characterized vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity there is new belief a RSV vaccine is possible. One promising approach is nucleic acid-based vaccinology. Both DNA and mRNA RSV vaccines are showing promising results in clinically relevant animal models, supporting their transition into humans. Here we will discuss this strategy to target RSV, and the ongoing studies to advance the nucleic acid vaccine platform as a viable option to protect vulnerable populations from this important disease.

  12. Recent advances in recombinant protein-based malaria vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draper, Simon J; Angov, Evelina; Horii, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites are the causative agent of human malaria, and the development of a highly effective vaccine against infection, disease and transmission remains a key priority. It is widely established that multiple stages of the parasite's complex lifecycle within the human host and mosquito...... vector are susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. The mainstay approach to antibody induction by subunit vaccination has been the delivery of protein antigen formulated in adjuvant. Extensive efforts have been made in this endeavor with respect to malaria vaccine development, especially with regard......, with the prospects for the development of a highly effective multi-component/multi-stage/multi-antigen formulation seeming ever more likely. This review will focus on recent progress in protein vaccine design, development and/or clinical testing for a number of leading malaria antigens from the sporozoite...

  13. Vaccines based on the cell surface carbohydrates of pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugate vaccines, in which a cell surface carbohydrate from a micro-organism is covalently attached to an appropriate carrier protein are proving to be the most effective means to generate protective immune responses to prevent a wide range of diseases. The technology appears to be generic and applicable to a wide range of pathogens, as long as antibodies against surface carbohydrates help protect against infection. Three such vaccines, against Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis Group C and seven serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae, have already been licensed and many others are in development. This article discusses the rationale for the development and use of glycoconjugate vaccines, the mechanisms by which they elicit T cell-dependent immune responses and the implications of this for vaccine development, the role of physicochemical methods in the characterisation and quality control of these vaccines, and the novel products which are under development.

  14. Single-dose protection against Plasmodium berghei by a simian adenovirus vector using a human cytomegalovirus promoter containing intron A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S; Reyes-Sandoval, A; Draper, S J; Moore, A C; Gilbert, S C; Gao, G P; Wilson, J M; Hill, A V S

    2008-04-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdH5) vector vaccines elicit strong immune responses to the encoded antigen and have been used in various disease models. We designed AdH5 vectors expressing antigen under the control of a human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early promoter containing its intron A sequence. The transcriptional levels of antigen and immune responses to antigen for vectors with the HCMV promoter with the intron A sequence (LP) were greater than those for AdH5 vectors using the HCMV promoter sequence without intron A (SP). We compared an E1E3-deleted AdH5 adenoviral vector, which affords more space for insertion of foreign sequences, and showed it to be as immunogenic as an E1-deleted AdH5 vector. Neutralizing antibodies to AdH5 limit the efficacy of vaccines based on the AdH5 serotype, and simian adenoviral vectors offer an attractive option to overcome this problem. We constructed E1E3-deleted human and simian adenoviral vectors encoding the pre-erythrocytic-stage malarial antigen Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein. We compared the immunogenicity and efficacy of AdC6, a recombinant simian adenovirus serotype 6 vector, in a murine malaria model to those of AdH5 and the poxviral vectors MVA and FP9. AdC6 induced sterile protection from a single dose in 90% of mice, in contrast to AdH5 (25%) and poxviral vectors MVA and FP9 (0%). Adenoviral vectors maintained potent CD8(+) T-cell responses for a longer period after immunization than did poxviral vectors and mainly induced an effector memory phenotype of cells. Significantly, AdC6 was able to maintain protection in the presence of preexisting immunity to AdH5.

  15. Zika virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boigard, Hélène; Alimova, Alexandra; Martin, George R.; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The newly emerged mosquito-borne Zika virus poses a major public challenge due to its ability to cause significant birth defects and neurological disorders. The impact of sexual transmission is unclear but raises further concerns about virus dissemination. No specific treatment or vaccine is currently available, thus the development of a safe and effective vaccine is paramount. Here we describe a novel strategy to assemble Zika virus-like particles (VLPs) by co-expressing the structural (CprME) and non-structural (NS2B/NS3) proteins, and demonstrate their effectiveness as vaccines. VLPs are produced in a suspension culture of mammalian cells and self-assembled into particles closely resembling Zika viruses as shown by electron microscopy studies. We tested various VLP vaccines and compared them to analogous compositions of an inactivated Zika virus (In-ZIKV) used as a reference. VLP immunizations elicited high titers of antibodies, as did the In-ZIKV controls. However, in mice the VLP vaccine stimulated significantly higher virus neutralizing antibody titers than comparable formulations of the In-ZIKV vaccine. The serum neutralizing activity elicited by the VLP vaccine was enhanced using a higher VLP dose and with the addition of an adjuvant, reaching neutralizing titers greater than those detected in the serum of a patient who recovered from a Zika infection in Brazil in 2015. Discrepancies in neutralization levels between the VLP vaccine and the In-ZIKV suggest that chemical inactivation has deleterious effects on neutralizing epitopes within the E protein. This along with the inability of a VLP vaccine to cause infection makes it a preferable candidate for vaccine development. PMID:28481898

  16. Immunogenicity of multi-epitope-based vaccine candidates administered with the adjuvant Gp96 against rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yange; Liu, Ye; Yang, Limin; Qu, Hongren; Zhao, Jingyi; Hu, Rongliang; Li, Jing; Liu, Wenjun

    2016-04-01

    Rabies, a zoonotic disease, causes > 55,000 human deaths globally and results in at least 500 million dollars in losses every year. The currently available rabies vaccines are mainly inactivated and attenuated vaccines, which have been linked with clinical diseases in animals. Thus, a rabies vaccine with high safety and efficacy is urgently needed. Peptide vaccines are known for their low cost, simple production procedures and high safety. Therefore, in this study, we examined the efficacy of multi-epitope-based vaccine candidates against rabies virus. The ability of various peptides to induce epitope-specific responses was examined, and the two peptides that possessed the highest antigenicity and conservation, i.e., AR16 and hPAB, were coated with adjuvant canine-Gp96 and used to prepare vaccines. The peptides were prepared as an emulsion of oil in water (O/W) to create three batches of bivalent vaccine products. The vaccine candidates possessed high safety. Virus neutralizing antibodies were detected on the day 14 after the first immunization in mice and beagles, reaching 5-6 IU/mL in mice and 7-9 IU/mL in beagles by day 28. The protective efficacy of the vaccine candidates was about 70%-80% in mice challenged by a virulent strain of rabies virus. Thus, a novel multi-epitope-based rabies vaccine with Gp96 as an adjuvant was developed and validated in mice and dogs. Our results suggest that synthetic peptides hold promise for the development of novel vaccines against rabies.

  17. Economic modelling assessment of the HPV quadrivalent vaccine in Brazil: a dynamic individual-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, Tazio; Luz, Paula Mendes; Foss, Anna; Mesa-Frias, Marco; Legood, Rosa

    2012-07-06

    We examined the cost-effectiveness of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine for the pre-adolescent female population of Brazil. Using demographic, epidemiological and cancer data, we developed a dynamic individual-based model representing the natural history of HPV/cervical cancer as well as the impact of screening and vaccination programmes. Assuming the current screening strategies, we calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for cohorts with and without vaccination taking into account different combinations of vaccination coverage (50%, 70%, 90%) and cost per vaccinated woman (US$25, US$55, US$125, US$556). The results varied from cost-saving (coverage 50% or 70% and cost per vaccinated woman US$25) to 5950 US$/QALY (coverage 90% and cost per vaccinated 556 US$). In a scenario in which a booster shot was needed after 10 years in order to secure lifelong protection, the ICER resulted in 13,576 US$/QALY. Considering the very cost-effective and cost-effective thresholds based on Brazil's GDP per capita, apart from the booster scenario which would be deemed cost-effective, all the other scenarios would be deemed very cost-effective. Both the cost per dose of vaccine and discount rate (5%) had an important impact on the results. Vaccination in addition to the current screening programme is likely to save years of life and, depending on the cost of vaccination, may even save resources. Price negotiations between governments and manufacturers will be paramount in determining that the vaccine not only represents good value for money, but is also affordable in middle-income countries like Brazil. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Immunogenicity in Rhesus Monkeys of DNA Plasmid, Recombinant Vaccinia Virus, and Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Minchun; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Freed, Daniel C.; Wilson, Keith A.; Dubey, Sheri; Zhu, De-Min; Nawrocki, Denise; Mach, Henryk; Troutman, Robert; Isopi, Lynne; Williams, Donna; Hurni, William; Xu, Zheng; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Wang, Su; Liu, Xu; Guan, Liming; Long, Romnie; Trigona, Wendy; Heidecker, Gwendolyn J.; Perry, Helen C.; Persaud, Natasha; Toner, Timothy J.; Su, Qin; Liang, Xiaoping; Youil, Rima; Chastain, Michael; Bett, Andrew J.; Volkin, David B.; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Cellular immune responses, particularly those associated with CD3+ CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), play a primary role in controlling viral infection, including persistent infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Accordingly, recent HIV-1 vaccine research efforts have focused on establishing the optimal means of eliciting such antiviral CTL immune responses. We evaluated several DNA vaccine formulations, a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector, and a replication-defective adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector, each expressing the same codon-optimized HIV-1 gag gene for immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys. The DNA vaccines were formulated with and without one of two chemical adjuvants (aluminum phosphate and CRL1005). The Ad5-gag vector was the most effective in eliciting anti-Gag CTL. The vaccine produced both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, with the latter consistently being the dominant component. To determine the effect of existing antiadenovirus immunity on Ad5-gag-induced immune responses, monkeys were exposed to adenovirus subtype 5 that did not encode antigen prior to immunization with Ad5-gag. The resulting anti-Gag T-cell responses were attenuated but not abolished. Regimens that involved priming with different DNA vaccine formulations followed by boosting with the adenovirus vector were also compared. Of the formulations tested, the DNA-CRL1005 vaccine primed T-cell responses most effectively and provided the best overall immune responses after boosting with Ad5-gag. These results are suggestive of an immunization strategy for humans that are centered on use of the adenovirus vector and in which existing adenovirus immunity may be overcome by combined immunization with adjuvanted DNA and adenovirus vector boosting. PMID:12743287

  19. Acceptability of School-Based Health Centers for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Visits: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Caitlin E.; Okoloko, Edirin; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; North, Anna; Niccolai, Linda M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Countries with high human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates have achieved this success largely through school-based vaccination. Using school-based health centers (SBHCs) in the United States, where HPV vaccine remains underutilized, could improve uptake. In this mixed-methods study, we examined acceptability, facilitators, and…

  20. Improved vaccine protection against retrovirus infection after co-administration of adenoviral vectors encoding viral antigens and type I interferon subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groitl Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type I interferons (IFNs exhibit direct antiviral effects, but also distinct immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we analyzed type I IFN subtypes for their effect on prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccination of mice against Friend retrovirus (FV or HIV. Results Mice were vaccinated with adenoviral vectors encoding FV Env and Gag proteins alone or in combination with vectors encoding IFNα1, IFNα2, IFNα4, IFNα5, IFNα6, IFNα9 or IFNβ. Only the co-administration of adenoviral vectors encoding IFNα2, IFNα4, IFNα6 and IFNα9 resulted in strongly improved immune protection of vaccinated mice from subsequent FV challenge infection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. The level of protection correlated with augmented virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses and enhanced antibody titers. Similar results were obtained when mice were vaccinated against HIV with adenoviral vectors encoding HIV Env and Gag-Pol in combination with various type I IFN encoding vectors. Here mainly CD4+ T cell responses were enhanced by IFNα subtypes. Conclusions Our results indicate that certain IFNα subtypes have the potential to improve the protective effect of adenovirus-based vaccines against retroviruses. This correlated with augmented virus-specific CD4+ T cell and antibody responses. Thus, co-expression of select type I IFNs may be a valuable tool for the development of anti-retroviral vaccines.

  1. A Plasmodium vivax Plasmid DNA- and Adenovirus-Vectored Malaria Vaccine Encoding Blood-Stage Antigens AMA1 and MSP142in a Prime/Boost Heterologous Immunization Regimen Partially Protects Aotus Monkeys against Blood-Stage Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-04-01

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium , which are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum , it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against P. vivax malaria. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the 42-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 42 ) in a plasmid recombinant DNA prime/adenoviral (Ad) vector boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with plasmid DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens with each antigen, prime/boost regimens with both antigens, and empty vector controls and then subjected to blood-stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, on the basis of their ability to induce the longest prepatent period and the longest time to the peak level of parasitemia, the lowest peak and mean levels of parasitemia, the smallest area under the parasitemia curve, and the highest self-cure rate. Overall, prechallenge MSP1 42 antibody titers strongly correlated with a decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, the P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad serotype 5 vaccine encoding blood-stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP1 42 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and this regimen for further development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Genome-based vaccine design: the promise for malaria and other infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan, Denise L; Apte, Simon H; Proietti, Carla

    2014-10-15

    Vaccines are one of the most effective interventions to improve public health, however, the generation of highly effective vaccines for many diseases has remained difficult. Three chronic diseases that characterise these difficulties include malaria, tuberculosis and HIV, and they alone account for half of the global infectious disease burden. The whole organism vaccine approach pioneered by Jenner in 1796 and refined by Pasteur in 1857 with the "isolate, inactivate and inject" paradigm has proved highly successful for many viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute disease but has failed with respect to malaria, tuberculosis and HIV as well as many other diseases. A significant advance of the past decade has been the elucidation of the genomes, proteomes and transcriptomes of many pathogens. This information provides the foundation for new 21st Century approaches to identify target antigens for the development of vaccines, drugs and diagnostic tests. Innovative genome-based vaccine strategies have shown potential for a number of challenging pathogens, including malaria. We advocate that genome-based rational vaccine design will overcome the problem of poorly immunogenic, poorly protective vaccines that has plagued vaccine developers for many years. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenovirus hexon modifications influence in vitro properties of pseudotyped human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Jing, Liu; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used human adenovirus (HAdV)-5-based vectors are restricted by their tropism and pre-existing immunity. Here, we characterized novel HAdV-5 vectors pseudotyped with hypervariable regions (HVRs) and surface domains (SDs) of other HAdV types. Hexon-modified HAdV-5 vectors (HV-HVR5, HV-HVR12, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4) could be reconstituted and amplified in human embryonic kidney cells. After infection of various cell lines, we measured transgene expression levels by performing luciferase reporter assays or coagulation factor IX (FIX) ELISA. Dose-dependent studies revealed that luciferase expression levels were comparable for HV-HVR5, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4, whereas HV-HVR12 expression levels were significantly lower. Vector genome copy numbers (VCNs) from genomic DNA and nuclear extracts were then determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Surprisingly, determination of cell- and nuclear fraction-associated VCNs revealed increased VCNs for HV-HVR12 compared with HV-SD12 and HV-HVR5. Increased nuclear fraction-associated HV-HVR12 DNA molecules and decreased transgene expression levels were independent of the cell line used, and we observed the same effect for a hexon-modified high-capacity adenoviral vector encoding canine FIX. In conclusion, studying hexon-modified adenoviruses in vitro demonstrated that HVRs but also flanking hexon regions influence uptake and transgene expression of adenoviral vectors.

  4. Implementation of a national school-based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine campaign in Fiji: knowledge, vaccine acceptability and information needs of parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vincente, S F; Mielnik, D; Jenkins, K; Bingwor, F; Volavola, L; Marshall, H; Druavesi, P; Russell, F M; Lokuge, K; Mulholland, E K

    2015-12-18

    In 2008 Fiji implemented a nationwide Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine campaign targeting all girls aged 9-12 years through the existing school-based immunisation program. Parents of vaccine-eligible girls were asked to provide written consent for vaccination. The purpose of this study was to describe parents' knowledge, experiences and satisfaction with the campaign, the extent to which information needs for vaccine decision-making were met, and what factors were associated with vaccine consent. Following vaccine introduction, a cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted with parents of vaccine-eligible girls from randomly selected schools, stratified by educational district. Factors related to vaccine consent were explored using Generalised Estimating Equations. There were 560 vaccine-eligible girls attending the participating 19 schools at the time of the campaign. Among these, 313 parents could be contacted, with 293 agreeing to participate (93.6%). Almost 80% of participants reported having consented to HPV vaccination (230/293, 78.5%). Reported knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV prior to the campaign was very low. Most respondents reported that they were satisfied with their access to information to make an informed decision about HPV vaccination (196/293, 66.9%). and this was very strongly associated with provision of consent. Despite their young age, the vaccine-eligible girls were often involved in the discussion and decision-making. Most consenting parents were satisfied with the campaign and their decision to vaccinate, with almost 90% indicating they would consent to future HPV vaccination. However, negative media reports about the vaccine campaign created confusion and concern. Local health staff were cited as a trusted source of information to guide decision-making. Just over half of the participants who withheld consent cited vaccine safety fears as the primary reason (23/44, 52.3%). This is the first reported experience of HPV introduction

  5. Low prevalence of vaccine-type HPV infections in young women following the implementation of a school-based and catch-up vaccination in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, P; Sauvageau, C; Gilca, V; Defay, F; Lambert, G; Mathieu-C, S; Guenoun, J; Comète, E; Coutlée, F

    2017-10-19

    In Quebec, Canada, a school-based HPV vaccination for girls has been offered since 2008. The vaccine used in the program targets HPV16/18, responsible for ∼70% of cervical cancers and HPV6/11, responsible for the majority of anogenital warts. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of HPV in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Women aged 17-29 years were eligible to participate. Participants' age, vaccination status and diverse risk factors were assessed by a computer-assisted questionnaire. Biological specimens were obtained by self-sampling. HPV genotyping was performed by Linear Array. A total of 2,118 women were recruited. 2,042 completed the questionnaire and 1,937 provided a vaginal sample. Vaccination coverage varied from 83.5% in women aged 17-19 to 19.1% in those aged 23-29. The overall prevalence of HPV in sexually active women was 39.4% (95%CI: 37.0-41.7) and 56.7% of infected women had multiple type infections. The prevalence of vaccine HPV types varied by age and vaccination status except for women aged 23-29 for whom similar results were observed. Vaccine HPV types were detected in 0.3%, 1.4% and 10.5% of vaccinated women aged 17-19, 20-23, and 23-29 (pHPV16 or HPV18 were detected in 10 women having received at least one dose of vaccine. Nine of these women were already sexually active at the time of vaccination. Infections with HPV types included in the vaccine are rare in women aged less than 23 years and are virtually absent in those who received at least one dose of vaccine before sexual debut.

  6. 75 FR 54589 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine, Live Adenovirus Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... purpose of field testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed foot-and-mouth disease vaccine, live... field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary vaccine...

  7. How the research-based industry approaches vaccine development and establishes priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, F E

    2002-01-01

    Over the past two decades, progress in immunology, molecular biology and genomics as well as some technological breakthroughs in computer science has opened the way to the development of prophylactic vaccines against most acute infectious diseases. Therapeutic vaccines against chronic infections, allergic conditions, auto-immune diseases and cancer have also come into the realm of possibility. It is estimated that wordwide there are about 400 vaccine projects in R&D laboratories of academic institutions, research institutes and vaccine manufacturers. Most of these projects will not yield a licensed vaccine for routine or even targeted immunisation. This is mostly not because of scientific barriers but due to financial and politicoeconomic obstades that make their development feasible only by the handful of major research-based vaccine manufacturers that nowadays all form part of large global pharmaceutical corporations. Such enterprises have to be profitable to survive and priority setting, when it comes to R&D projects, has to take into account potential return on all investments, particularly as it currently costs between 200 and 500 million US dollars to bring a new vaccine from the concept stage to market. Factors that influence the decision to embark upon an R&D project on a new vaccine include the medical need for the vaccine, gauged by the global burden of the targeted disease, potential and probable market size - judged on volume (number of doses required) and value (total sales) -, probability of success and expertise of the company in the field (both R&D and marketing) as well as the likelihood of competitors taking a large part of the market. Moral imperatives such as the urgent need for vaccines against HIV/AIDS, malaria and an improved vaccine against tuberculosis to save the several millions of lives claimed each year by these diseases also play a role. However, for such investments to be sustainable other sources of financing than the commercial

  8. Explanations for Not Receiving the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine: An Ontario Canada Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Samantha B; Lum, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Despite evidence of the importance of the seasonal influenza vaccine for both individual and population health, only a third of the Ontario population received the vaccine in 2013/2014. The objective of this study was to identify why Ontarians are not getting the seasonal influenza vaccine. Written responses to the question "Why didn't you get the seasonal flu vaccine in the last flu season?" were deductively analyzed using the Conceptual Model of Vaccine Hesitancy. Inductive coding was also conducted to identify explanations that fall outside of the present model and may be unique to the seasonal influenza vaccine. Data were collected between August and early September, 2014 through a survey in the Region of Waterloo, Ontario. Overall, 91.4% of responses could be explained using the conceptual model and specifically relate to perceived importance of vaccination (46.8%), moral convictions (19.4%), and past experiences with vaccinations services (14.5%). Notably, explanations related to healthcare professional attitudes, risk perceptions and trust, and subjective norms were identified to a much lesser extent than those discussed above. The remaining 8.6% of responses cannot be explained by the model because they do not relate to hesitancy. Our data contribute to the minimal body of Canadian research investigating low uptake of the seasonal flu vaccine, adding to an evidence-base upon which to inform promotional campaigns. Our data also highlight the utility of the Conceptual Model of Vaccine Hesitancy for the design and analysis of research investigating seasonal flu vaccine refusal or delay.

  9. What you always needed to know about electroporation based DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Anita Birgitte; Gehl, Julie

    2012-01-01

    , and it is foreseen that future DNA vaccination may to a large extent be coupled with and dependent upon electroporation based delivery. Understanding the basic science of electroporation and exploiting knowledge obtained on optimization of DNA electrotransfer to muscle and skin, may greatly augment efforts......Vaccinations are increasingly used to fight infectious disease, and DNA vaccines offer considerable advantages, including broader possibilities for vaccination and lack of need for cold storage. It has been amply demonstrated, that electroporation augments uptake of DNA in both skin and muscle...... on vaccine development. The purpose of this review is to give a succinct but comprehensive overview of electroporation as a delivery modality including electrotransfer to skin and muscle. As well, this review will speculate and discuss future uses for this powerful electrotransfer technology....

  10. Vaccine-based clinical trials in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Daemen, Toos; Boezen, H. Marike; Melief, Kees J. M.; Nijman, Hans W.

    Ovarian cancer vaccines are one of the new treatment strategies under investigation in epithelial ovarian cancer. This article discusses the results of different immunization strategies, points out potential pitfalls in study designs and provides possible solutions for augmentation of clinical

  11. Developments in L2-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenbacher, Christina; Roden, Richard B S; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2017-03-02

    Infections with sexually transmitted high-risk Human Papillomavirus (hrHPV), of which there are at least 15 genotypes, are responsible for a tremendous disease burden by causing cervical, and subsets of other ano-genital and oro-pharyngeal carcinomas, together representing 5% of all cancer cases worldwide. HPV subunit vaccines consisting of virus-like particles (VLP) self-assembled from major capsid protein L1 plus adjuvant have been licensed. Prophylactic vaccinations with the 2-valent (HPV16/18), 4-valent (HPV6/11/16/18), or 9-valent (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccine induce high-titer neutralizing antibodies restricted to the vaccine types that cause up to 90% of cervical carcinomas, a subset of other ano-genital and oro-pharyngeal cancers and 90% of benign ano-genital warts (condylomata). The complexity of manufacturing multivalent L1-VLP vaccines limits the number of included VLP types and thus the vaccines' spectrum of protection, leaving a panel of oncogenic mucosal HPV unaddressed. In addition, current vaccines do not protect against cutaneous HPV types causing benign skin warts, or against beta-papillomavirus (betaPV) types implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in immunosuppressed patients. In contrast with L1-VLP, the minor capsid protein L2 contains type-common epitopes that induce low-titer yet broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies to heterologous PV types and provide cross-protection in animal challenge models. Efforts to increase the low immunogenicity of L2 (poly)-peptides and thereby to develop broader-spectrum HPV vaccines are the focus of this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization on machine learning based approaches for sentiment analysis on HPV vaccines related tweets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jingcheng; Xu, Jun; Song, Hsingyi; Liu, Xiangyu; Tao, Cui

    2017-03-03

    Analysing public opinions on HPV vaccines on social media using machine learning based approaches will help us understand the reasons behind the low vaccine coverage and come up with corresponding strategies to improve vaccine uptake. To propose a machine learning system that is able to extract comprehensive public sentiment on HPV vaccines on Twitter with satisfying performance. We collected and manually annotated 6,000 HPV vaccines related tweets as a gold standard. SVM model was chosen and a hierarchical classification method was proposed and evaluated. Additional feature sets evaluation and model parameters optimization was done to maximize the machine learning model performance. A hierarchical classification scheme that contains 10 categories was built to access public opinions toward HPV vaccines comprehensively. A 6,000 annotated tweets gold corpus with Kappa annotation agreement at 0.851 was created and made public available. The hierarchical classification model with optimized feature sets and model parameters has increased the micro-averaging and macro-averaging F score from 0.6732 and 0.3967 to 0.7442 and 0.5883 respectively, compared with baseline model. Our work provides a systematical way to improve the machine learning model performance on the highly unbalanced HPV vaccines related tweets corpus. Our system can be further applied on a large tweets corpus to extract large-scale public opinion towards HPV vaccines.

  13. Dendritic cell-based in vitro assays for vaccine immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandebriel, Rob; Hoefnagel, Marcel M N

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal in the induction of adaptive immune responses because they can activate naive T-cells. Moreover, they steer these adaptive immune responses by integrating various stimuli, such as from different pathogen associated molecular patterns and the cytokine milieu. Immature DC are very well capable of ingesting protein antigens, whereas mature DC are efficient presenters of peptides to naive T cells. Human DC can be readily cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which are isolated from human blood. There is a strong need to monitor in a high-throughput fashion the immunogenicity of candidate vaccines during the process of vaccine development. Furthermore, regulators require efficacy and safety testing for batch release. For some vaccines, these tests require animal testing, causing pain and discomfort, which cannot be contested because it would interfere with the test results. With the aims of promoting vaccine development and reducing the number of animals for batch release testing, we propose to use more broadly human DC for vaccine immunogenicity testing. In this commentary, this proposition is illustrated by several examples in which the maturation of human DC was successfully used to test for vaccine and adjuvant immunogenicity.

  14. Farming of Plant-Based Veterinary Vaccines and Their Applications for Disease Prevention in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pit Sze Liew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants have been studied for the production of pharmaceutical compounds for more than two decades now. Ever since the plant-made poultry vaccine against Newcastle disease virus made a breakthrough and went all the way to obtain regulatory approval, research to use plants for expression and delivery of vaccine proteins for animals was intensified. Indeed, in view of the high production costs of veterinary vaccines, plants represent attractive biofactories and offer many promising advantages in the production of recombinant vaccine proteins. Furthermore, the possibility of conducting immunogenicity and challenge studies in target animals has greatly exaggerated the progress. Although there are no edible plant-produced animal vaccines in the market, plant-based vaccine technology has great potentials. In this review, development, uses, and advantages of plant-based recombinant protein production in various expression platforms are discussed. In addition, examples of plant-based veterinary vaccines showing strong indication in terms of efficacy in animal disease prevention are also described.

  15. Parents' views of including young boys in the Swedish national school-based HPV vaccination programme: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottvall, Maria; Stenhammar, Christina; Grandahl, Maria

    2017-02-28

    To explore parents' views of extending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme to also include boys. Explorative qualitative design using individual, face-to-face, interviews and inductive thematic analysis. 11 strategically chosen municipalities in central Sweden. Parents (n=42) who were offered HPV vaccination for their 11-12 years old daughter in the national school-based vaccination programme. The key themes were: equality from a public health perspective and perception of risk for disease. Parents expressed low knowledge and awareness about the health benefits of male HPV vaccination, and they perceived low risk for boys to get HPV. Some parents could not see any reason for vaccinating boys. However, many parents preferred gender-neutral vaccination, and some of the parents who had not accepted HPV vaccination for their daughter expressed that they would be willing to accept vaccination for their son, if it was offered. It was evident that there was both trust and distrust in authorities' decision to only vaccinate girls. Parents expressed a preference for increased sexual and reproductive health promotion such as more information about condom use. Some parents shared that it was more important to vaccinate girls than boys since they believed girls face a higher risk of deadly diseases associated with HPV, but some also believed girls might be more vulnerable to side effects of the vaccine. A vaccine offered only to girls may cause parents to be hesitant to vaccinate, while also including boys in the national vaccination programme might improve parents' trust in the vaccine. More information about the health benefits of HPV vaccination for males is necessary to increase HPV vaccination among boys. This may eventually lead to increased HPV vaccine coverage among both girls and boys. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-08-01

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Content of web-based continuing medical education about HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornides, Melanie L; Garrell, Jacob M; Gilkey, Melissa B

    2017-08-16

    Addressing low HPV vaccination coverage will require U.S. health care providers to improve their recommendation practices and vaccine delivery systems. Because readily available continuing medical education (CME) could be an important tool for supporting providers in this process, we sought to assess the content of web-based CME activities related to HPV vaccination. We conducted a content analysis of web-based CME activities about HPV vaccination available to U.S. primary care providers in May-September 2016. Using search engines, educational clearinghouses, and our professional networks, we identified 15 activities eligible for study inclusion. Through a process of open coding, we identified 45 commonly occurring messages in the CME activities, which we organized into five topic areas: delivering recommendations for HPV vaccination, addressing common parent concerns, implementing office-based strategies to increase HPV vaccination coverage, HPV epidemiology, and guidelines for HPV vaccine administration and safety. Using a standardized abstraction form, two coders then independently assessed which of the 45 messages each CME activity included. CME activities varied in the amount of content they delivered, with inclusion of the 45 messages ranging from 17% to 86%. Across activities, the most commonly included messages were related to guidelines for HPV vaccine administration and safety. For example, all activities (100%) specified that routine administration is recommended for ages 11 and 12. Most activities (73%) also noted that provider recommendations are highly influential. Fewer activities modeled examples of effective recommendations (47%), gave specific approaches to addressing common parent concerns (47%), or included guidance on office-based strategies to increase coverage (40%). Given that many existing CME activities lack substantive content on how to change provider practice, future activities should focus on the practical application of interpersonal

  18. Defining epitope coverage requirements for T cell-based HIV vaccines: Theoretical considerations and practical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV vaccine development must address the genetic diversity and plasticity of the virus that permits the presentation of diverse genetic forms to the immune system and subsequent escape from immune pressure. Assessment of potential HIV strain coverage by candidate T cell-based vaccines (whether natural sequence or computationally optimized products) is now a critical component in interpreting candidate vaccine suitability. Methods We have utilized an N-mer identity algorithm to represent T cell epitopes and explore potential coverage of the global HIV pandemic using natural sequences derived from candidate HIV vaccines. Breadth (the number of T cell epitopes generated) and depth (the variant coverage within a T cell epitope) analyses have been incorporated into the model to explore vaccine coverage requirements in terms of the number of discrete T cell epitopes generated. Results We show that when multiple epitope generation by a vaccine product is considered a far more nuanced appraisal of the potential HIV strain coverage of the vaccine product emerges. By considering epitope breadth and depth several important observations were made: (1) epitope breadth requirements to reach particular levels of vaccine coverage, even for natural sequence-based vaccine products is not necessarily an intractable problem for the immune system; (2) increasing the valency (number of T cell epitope variants present) of vaccine products dramatically decreases the epitope requirements to reach particular coverage levels for any epidemic; (3) considering multiple-hit models (more than one exact epitope match with an incoming HIV strain) places a significantly higher requirement upon epitope breadth in order to reach a given level of coverage, to the point where low valency natural sequence based products would not practically be able to generate sufficient epitopes. Conclusions When HIV vaccine sequences are compared against datasets of potential incoming viruses important

  19. Defining epitope coverage requirements for T cell-based HIV vaccines: Theoretical considerations and practical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currier Jeffrey R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV vaccine development must address the genetic diversity and plasticity of the virus that permits the presentation of diverse genetic forms to the immune system and subsequent escape from immune pressure. Assessment of potential HIV strain coverage by candidate T cell-based vaccines (whether natural sequence or computationally optimized products is now a critical component in interpreting candidate vaccine suitability. Methods We have utilized an N-mer identity algorithm to represent T cell epitopes and explore potential coverage of the global HIV pandemic using natural sequences derived from candidate HIV vaccines. Breadth (the number of T cell epitopes generated and depth (the variant coverage within a T cell epitope analyses have been incorporated into the model to explore vaccine coverage requirements in terms of the number of discrete T cell epitopes generated. Results We show that when multiple epitope generation by a vaccine product is considered a far more nuanced appraisal of the potential HIV strain coverage of the vaccine product emerges. By considering epitope breadth and depth several important observations were made: (1 epitope breadth requirements to reach particular levels of vaccine coverage, even for natural sequence-based vaccine products is not necessarily an intractable problem for the immune system; (2 increasing the valency (number of T cell epitope variants present of vaccine products dramatically decreases the epitope requirements to reach particular coverage levels for any epidemic; (3 considering multiple-hit models (more than one exact epitope match with an incoming HIV strain places a significantly higher requirement upon epitope breadth in order to reach a given level of coverage, to the point where low valency natural sequence based products would not practically be able to generate sufficient epitopes. Conclusions When HIV vaccine sequences are compared against datasets of potential incoming

  20. Nuclear Actin and Myosins in Adenovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host’s transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  1. In Vivo Delivery of Antigens by Adenovirus Dodecahedron Induces Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses to Elicit Antitumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Mendez, Ana; Garin, Marina I; Pineda-Molina, Estela; Veratti, Eugenia; Bueren, Juan A; Fender, Pascal; Lenormand, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Cancer vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) vectors may offer many advantages over other antigen-delivery systems and represent an alternative to the ex vivo cell therapy approach. In this study, we describe the use of penton-dodecahedron (Pt-Dd) VLPs from human adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) as cancer vaccine vehicle for specific antigens, based on its unique cellular internalization properties. WW domains from the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 serve as an adapter to bind the antigen to Pt-Dd. By engineering fusion partners of WW with the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), Pt-Dd can efficiently deliver WW-OVA in vitro and the Pt-Dd/WW complex can be readily internalized by dendritic cells (DCs). Immunization with WW-OVA/Pt-Dd results in 90% protection against B16-OVA melanoma implantation in syngeneic mice. This high level of protection correlates with the development of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, vaccination with WW-OVA Pt-Dd induces robust humoral responses in mice as shown by the high levels of anti-OVA antibodies (Abs) detected in serum. Importantly, treatment of mice bearing B16-OVA tumors with WW-OVA/Pt-Dd results in complete tumor regression in 100% of cases. Thus, our data supports a dual role of Pt-Dd as antigen-delivery vector and natural adjuvant, able to generate integrated cellular and humoral responses of broad immunogenic complexity to elicit specific antitumor immunity. Antigen delivery by Pt-Dd vector is a promising novel strategy for development of cancer vaccines with important clinical applications. PMID:20179681

  2. Type I Interferons are essential for the efficacy of replicase-based DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Wolfgang W; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Hwang, Leroy N; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2006-06-12

    The immunogenicity and efficacy of nucleic acid vaccines can be greatly enhanced when antigen production is under the control of an alphaviral replicase enzyme. However, replicase-mediated mRNA overproduction does not necessarily result in enhanced antigen level. Instead, the strong adaptive immune response of alphavirus replicon-based vectors is due to their production of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) intermediates, which trigger innate immunity. Because viral infections are known to trigger innate immune responses that lead to the rapid production of Type I Interferons (IFNs), namely IFN-alpha and IFN-beta, we investigated the role of Type I IFNs in the enhanced immunogenicity of replicase-based DNA vaccines. In vitro, cells transfected with replicase-based plasmids produce significantly more Type I IFNs than cells transfected with a conventional DNA plasmid. In vivo, replicase-based DNA vaccines yield stronger humoral responses in the absence of Type I IFN signaling but the lack of this signaling pathway in IFN-alphabeta receptor-/- (knockout) mice abolishes T cell mediated efficacy against tumors of both conventional and alphavirus replicase-based DNA vaccines. Moreover, the co-delivery of an IFNalpha-encoding plasmid significantly improved the efficacy of a weakly immunogenic conventional plasmid. These results suggest a central role for Type I IFNs in the mechanism of replicase-based DNA vaccines and indicate that vaccines can be enhanced by enabling their capacity to triggering innate anti-viral defense pathways.

  3. Risk Factors and Utility of a Risk-Based Algorithm for Monitoring Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections in Pediatric Recipients after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustia, Evelyn; Violago, Leah; Jin, Zhezhen; Foca, Marc D.; Kahn, Justine M.; Arnold, Staci; Sosna, Jean; Bhatia, Monica; Kung, Andrew L.; George, Diane; Garvin, James H.; Satwani, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Infectious complications, particularly viral infections, remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Only a handful of studies in children have analyzed the risks for and impact of viremia on alloHCT-related outcomes. We conducted a retrospective study of 140 pediatric patients undergoing alloHCT to investigate the incidence of and risk factors for cytomegalovirus (CMV), adenovirus (ADV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia and viral disease after alloHCT. Furthermore, we assessed the impact of viremia on days of hospitalization and develop an algorithm for routine monitoring of viremia. Patients were monitored before alloHCT and then weekly for 180 days after alloHCT. Patients were considered to have viremia if CMV were > 600 copies/mL, EBV were > 1000 copies/mL, or ADV were > 1000 copies/mL on 2 consecutive PCRs. The overall incidences of viremia and viral disease in all patients from day 0 to +180 after alloHCT were 41.4% (n = 58) and 17% (n = 24), respectively. The overall survival for patients with viremia and viral disease was significantly lower compared with those without viremia (58% versus 74.2%, P = .03) and viral disease (48.2% versus 71.2%, P = .024). We identified that pretransplantation CMV risk status, pre-alloHCT viremia, and use of alemtuzumab were associated with the risk of post-alloHCT viremia. The average hospitalization days in patients with CMV risk (P = .011), viremia (P = .024), and viral disease (P = .002) were significantly higher. The algorithm developed from our data can potentially reduce viral PCR testing by 50% and is being studied prospectively at our center. Improved preventative treatment strategies for children at risk of viremia after alloHCT are needed. PMID:27252110

  4. Towards the knowledge-based design of universal influenza epitope ensemble vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Qamar M; Gatherer, Derek; Reche, Pedro A; Flower, Darren R

    2016-11-01

    Influenza A viral heterogeneity remains a significant threat due to unpredictable antigenic drift in seasonal influenza and antigenic shifts caused by the emergence of novel subtypes. Annual review of multivalent influenza vaccines targets strains of influenza A and B likely to be predominant in future influenza seasons. This does not induce broad, cross protective immunity against emergent subtypes. Better strategies are needed to prevent future pandemics. Cross-protection can be achieved by activating CD8+ and CD4+ T cells against highly conserved regions of the influenza genome. We combine available experimental data with informatics-based immunological predictions to help design vaccines potentially able to induce cross-protective T-cells against multiple influenza subtypes. To exemplify our approach we designed two epitope ensemble vaccines comprising highly conserved and experimentally verified immunogenic influenza A epitopes as putative non-seasonal influenza vaccines; one specifically targets the US population and the other is a universal vaccine. The USA-specific vaccine comprised 6 CD8+ T cell epitopes (GILGFVFTL, FMYSDFHFI, GMDPRMCSL, SVKEKDMTK, FYIQMCTEL, DTVNRTHQY) and 3 CD4+ epitopes (KGILGFVFTLTVPSE, EYIMKGVYINTALLN, ILGFVFTLTVPSERG). The universal vaccine comprised 8 CD8+ epitopes: (FMYSDFHFI, GILGFVFTL, ILRGSVAHK, FYIQMCTEL, ILKGKFQTA, YYLEKANKI, VSDGGPNLY, YSHGTGTGY) and the same 3 CD4+ epitopes. Our USA-specific vaccine has a population protection coverage (portion of the population potentially responsive to one or more component epitopes of the vaccine, PPC) of over 96 and 95% coverage of observed influenza subtypes. The universal vaccine has a PPC value of over 97 and 88% coverage of observed subtypes. http://imed.med.ucm.es/Tools/episopt.html CONTACT: d.r.flower@aston.ac.uk. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. A novel M2e based flu vaccine formulation for dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Leclerc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The USA 2004 influenza virus outbreak H3N8 in dogs heralded the emergence of a new disease in this species. A new inactivated H3N8 vaccine was developed to control the spread of the disease but, as in humans and swine, it is anticipated that the virus will mutate shift and drift in the dog population. Therefore, there is a need for a vaccine that can trigger a broad protection to prevent the spread of the virus and the emergence of new strains. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The universal M2e peptide is identical in almost all the H3N8 influenza strains sequenced to date and known to infect dogs. This epitope is therefore a good choice for development of a vaccine to provide broad protection. Malva mosaic virus (MaMV nanoparticles were chosen as a vaccine platform to improve the stability of the M2e peptide and increase its immunogenicity in animals. The addition of an adjuvant (OmpC purified from Salmonella typhi membrane in the vaccine formulation increased the immune response directed to the M2e peptide significantly and enlarged the protection to include the heterosubtypic strain of influenza in a mouse model. An optimal vaccine formulation was also shown to be immunogenic in dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The MaMV vaccine platform triggered an improved immune response directed towards the universal M2e peptide. The adjuvant OmpC increased the immune response to the M2e peptide and protection to a heterosubtypic influenza strain that harbors a different M2e peptide in a mouse model. Antibodies generated by the vaccine formulation showed cross-reactivity with M2e peptides derived from influenza strains H9N2, H5N1 and H1N1. The vaccine formulation shows a potential for commercialization of a new M2e based vaccine in dogs.

  6. Active SMS-based influenza vaccine safety surveillance in Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillsbury, Alexis; Quinn, Helen; Cashman, Patrick; Leeb, Alan; Macartney, Kristine

    2017-12-18

    Australia's novel, active surveillance system, AusVaxSafety, monitors the post-market safety of vaccines in near real time. We analysed cumulative surveillance data for children aged 6 months to 4 years who received seasonal influenza vaccine in 2015 and/or 2016 to determine: adverse event following immunisation (AEFI) rates by vaccine brand, age and concomitant vaccine administration. Parent/carer reports of AEFI occurring within 3 days of their child receiving an influenza vaccine in sentinel immunisation clinics were solicited by Short Message Service (SMS) and/or email-based survey. Retrospective data from 2 years were combined to examine specific AEFI rates, particularly fever and medical attendance as a proxy for serious adverse events (SAE), with and without concomitant vaccine administration. As trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV) were funded in Australia's National Immunisation Program (NIP) in 2015 and quadrivalent (QIV) in 2016, respectively, we compared their safety profiles. 7402 children were included. Data were reported weekly through each vaccination season; no safety signals or excess of adverse events were detected. More children who received a concomitant vaccine had fever (7.5% versus 2.8%; p attendance (OR: 42.6; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 25.6-71.0). TIV and QIV safety profiles included low and expected AEFI rates (fever: 4.3% for TIV compared with 3.2% for QIV (p = .015); injection site reaction: 1.9% for TIV compared with 3.0% for QIV (p system has particular utility in monitoring the safety of influenza vaccines, given that they may vary in composition annually. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Developing a vaccination evaluation model to support evidence-based decision making on national immunization programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimman, Tjeerd G; Boot, Hein J; Berbers, Guy A M; Vermeer-de Bondt, Patricia E; Ardine de Wit, G; de Melker, Hester E

    2006-05-29

    Among all public health provisions national immunization programs (NIPs) are beyond doubt one of the most effective in reducing mortality, morbidity, and costs associated with major infectious diseases. To maintain their success, NIPs have to modernize in response to many new and old demands regarding efficacy, safety, availability of new vaccines, emerging and evolving pathogens, waning immunity, altered epidemiological situations, and the public's trust in the program. In this paper we present an evaluation model in the form of a checklist that may help in collecting relevant scientific information that is necessary for evaluation and decision making when considering changes in a NIP. Such a checklist points to relevant information on the vaccine-preventable disease, the pathogen causing it, the vaccine, and the cost-effectiveness ratio of the vaccine. However, the final judgment on a potential change in the NIP cannot be based on a simple algorithm, as the relevant information reflects factors of a very different kind and magnitude, to which different value judgements may be added, and which may have certain degrees of uncertainty. Because any change in the NIP may be accompanied by more or less unforeseen changes in the vaccine's efficacy, evolutionary consequences, including the antigenic composition of the pathogen, and the vaccine's safety profile, an intensive surveillance program should accompany any NIP. Elements thereof include clinical-epidemiological surveillance, surveillance of vaccination coverage, immune surveillance, surveillance of microbial population dynamics, and surveillance of adverse events and safety issues. We emphasize that the decision to introduce a vaccine in the NIP should be taken as seriously, both scientifically and ethically, as the decision to withhold a vaccine from the NIP. In the latter case one might be responsible for vaccine-preventable disease and mortality.

  8. Ontology-based combinatorial comparative analysis of adverse events associated with killed and live influenza vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirarat Sarntivijai

    Full Text Available Vaccine adverse events (VAEs are adverse bodily changes occurring after vaccination. Understanding the adverse event (AE profiles is a crucial step to identify serious AEs. Two different types of seasonal influenza vaccines have been used on the market: trivalent (killed inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV and trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV. Different adverse event profiles induced by these two groups of seasonal influenza vaccines were studied based on the data drawn from the CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Report System (VAERS. Extracted from VAERS were 37,621 AE reports for four TIVs (Afluria, Fluarix, Fluvirin, and Fluzone and 3,707 AE reports for the only LAIV (FluMist. The AE report data were analyzed by a novel combinatorial, ontology-based detection of AE method (CODAE. CODAE detects AEs using Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR, Chi-square significance test, and base level filtration, and groups identified AEs by ontology-based hierarchical classification. In total, 48 TIV-enriched and 68 LAIV-enriched AEs were identified (PRR>2, Chi-square score >4, and the number of cases >0.2% of total reports. These AE terms were classified using the Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE, MedDRA, and SNOMED-CT. The OAE method provided better classification results than the two other methods. Thirteen out of 48 TIV-enriched AEs were related to neurological and muscular processing such as paralysis, movement disorders, and muscular weakness. In contrast, 15 out of 68 LAIV-enriched AEs were associated with inflammatory response and respiratory system disorders. There were evidences of two severe adverse events (Guillain-Barre Syndrome and paralysis present in TIV. Although these severe adverse events were at low incidence rate, they were found to be more significantly enriched in TIV-vaccinated patients than LAIV-vaccinated patients. Therefore, our novel combinatorial bioinformatics analysis discovered that LAIV had lower chance of inducing these

  9. Early childhood measles vaccinations are not associated with paediatric IBD: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Souradet Y; Blanchard, James F; Bernstein, Charles N

    2015-04-01

    Early childhood vaccinations have been hypothesized to contribute to the emergence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] in developed countries. Using linked population-based administrative databases, we aimed to explore the association between vaccination with measles-containing vaccines and the risk for IBD. This was a case-control study using the University of Manitoba IBD Epidemiology Database [UMIBDED]. The UMIBDED was linked to the Manitoba Immunization Monitoring System [MIMS], a population-based database of immunizations administered in Manitoba. All paediatric IBD cases in Manitoba, born after 1989 and diagnosed before March 31, 2008, were included. Controls were matched to cases on the basis of age, sex, and region of residence at time of diagnosis. Measles-containing vaccinations received in the first 2 years of life were documented, with vaccinations categorized as 'None' or 'Complete', with completeness defined according to Manitoba's vaccination schedule. Conditional logistic regression models were fitted to the data, with models adjusted for physician visits in the first 2 years of life and area-level socioeconomic status at case date. A total of 951 individuals [117 cases and 834 controls] met eligibility criteria, with average age of diagnosis among cases at 11 years. The proportion of IBD cases with completed vaccinations was 97%, compared with 94% of controls. In models adjusted for physician visits and area-level socioeconomic status, no statistically significant association was detected between completed measles vaccinations and the risk of IBD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5-4.4; p = 0.419]. No significant association between completed measles-containing vaccination in the first 2 years of life and paediatric IBD could be demonstrated in this population-based study. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  10. G-protein based ELISA as a potency test for rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabaud-Riou, Martine; Moreno, Nadège; Guinchard, Fabien; Nicolai, Marie Claire; Niogret-Siohan, Elisabeth; Sève, Nicolas; Manin, Catherine; Guinet-Morlot, Françoise; Riou, Patrice

    2017-03-01

    The NIH test is currently used to assess the potency of rabies vaccine, a key criterion for vaccine release. This test is based on mice immunization followed by intracerebral viral challenge. As part of global efforts to reduce animal experimentation and in the framework of the development of Sanofi Pasteur next generation, highly-purified vaccine, produced without any material of human or animal origin, we developed an ELISA as an alternative to the NIH test. This ELISA is based on monoclonal antibodies recognizing specifically the native form of the viral G-protein, the major antigen that induces neutralizing antibody response to rabies virus. We show here that our ELISA is able to distinguish between potent and different types of sub-potent vaccine lots. Satisfactory agreement was observed between the ELISA and the NIH test in the determination of the vaccine titer and their capacity to discern conform from non-conform batches. Our ELISA meets the criteria for a stability-indicating assay and has been successfully used to develop the new generation of rabies vaccine candidates. After an EPAA international pre-collaborative study, this ELISA was selected as the assay of choice for the EDQM collaborative study aimed at replacing the rabies vaccine NIH in vivo potency test. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of factors required to increase uptake of influenza vaccination among hospital-based healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, C E; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J; Looijmans-van den Akker, I; Frijstein, G; Van der Geest-Blankert, A D J; Danhof-Pont, M B; De Jager, H J; Bos, A A; Smeets, E; De Vries, M J T; Gallee, P M M; Lenderink, A F; Hak, E

    2011-04-01

    A questionnaire study was performed in all eight University Medical Centers in The Netherlands to determine the predictors of influenza vaccination compliance in hospital-based healthcare workers (HCWs). Demographical, behavioural and organisational determinants were assessed based on behavioural and implementation models. Multivariable regression analysis was applied to assess the independent predictors for influenza vaccine uptake. Age >40 years, the presence of a chronic illness, awareness of personal risk and awareness of risk of infecting patients, trust in the effectiveness of the vaccine to reduce the risk of infecting patients, the HCWs' duty to do no harm and their duty to ensure continuity of care, finding vaccination useful despite the constant flow of visitors and having knowledge of the Health Council's advice, social influence and convenient time for vaccination were all independently associated with vaccine uptake. The accuracy of the prediction model was very high (area under the receiver operating curve: 0.95). Intervention programmes to increase influenza vaccine uptake among HCWs should target the relevant determinants identified in this study. Copyright © 2010 the Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microneedle arrays delivery of the conventional vaccines based on nonvirulent viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Ning; Wang, Xueting; Zhen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ting

    2016-11-01

    Recently, microneedle arrays (MAs) have been developed for painless inoculation of vaccines and possess many prominent advantages, including convenience for inoculation, and exact delivery of vaccine to the exact epidermal and dermal or mucosal compartments which teem with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Among different types of MAs, while the micro-environmental stimulus-responsive MAs represent one of the developmental trends in the field, the MAs combined with the conventional vaccines that are based on nonvirulent viruses, such as live attenuated or whole inactivated viruses, and antigen-encoding DNA viral vectors, have developed rapidly into the advanced stages, with certain products already on clinical trials. The pre- and clinical research outcomes showed that the painless MA delivery of the conventional vaccines through mammalian skin or mucosa can not only elicit robust systemic and even mucosal immunity to pathogens but also, in certain circumstances, redirect the immune response toward a specific Th1 pathway, resulting in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to erase the cell-hidden pathogens, thanks to the robust adjuvant function of MAs exerted through damaging the contacted cells to release dangerous signals. This paper focuses on reviewing the latest research and advancements in MA delivery of the conventional vaccines that are based on nonvirulent viruses, underlining MA enhancement of the overall vaccine performance and the most advanced MA vaccine products that are relatively close to markets.

  13. Live virus vaccines based on a yellow fever vaccine backbone: standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P; Seligman, Stephen J; Robertson, James S; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were exchanged for the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  14. Human Papillomavirus vaccination in general practice in France, three years after the implementation of a targeted vaccine recommendation based on age and sexual history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Pascale; Lasserre, Andrea; Rossignol, Louise; Kernéis, Solen; Blaizeau, Fanette; Stheneur, Chantal; Blanchon, Thierry; Levy-Bruhl, Daniel; Hanslik, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In France, vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) was recommended in 2007 for all 14-year-old girls as well as "catch-up" vaccination for girls between 15-23 y of age either before or within one year of becoming sexually active. We evaluated the vaccine coverage according to the eligibility for vaccination in a sample of young girls aged 14 to 23 years, who were seen in general practices. A survey was proposed to 706 general practitioners (GPs) and carried out from July to September 2010. GPs, also called "family doctor," are physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of medicine but instead covers a variety of medical problems in patients of all ages. Each participating GP included, retrospectively, the last female patient aged 14-17 y and the last female patient aged 18-23 y whom he had seen. A questionnaire collected information regarding the GP and the patients' characteristics. The vaccine coverage was determined according to the eligibility for vaccination, i.e. the coverage among younger women (14-17) and among those sexually active in the second age range (18-23). Sexual activity status was assessed by GP, according to information stated in the medical record. The 363 participating physicians (response rate 51.4%) included 712 patients (357 in the 14- to 17-year-old group and 355 in the 15- to 23-year-old group) in their responses. The rate of the vaccination coverage in the 14- to 17-year-old group was 55%. Among the girls in the 18- to 23-year-old group, 126 were eligible, and their vaccination coverage rate was 82%. The evaluation of the eligibility by the GPs was incorrect in 36% of the cases. Of the 712 patients, 6% of the girls had been vaccinated without a need for the vaccination, and 26% of the girls had not been vaccinated, although they needed to be vaccinated. Regarding the vaccine uptake, vaccination at the age of 14 was not as effective as vaccinating the older population for which vaccination was indicated as a

  15. Human Papillomavirus vaccination in general practice in France, three years after the implementation of a targeted vaccine recommendation based on age and sexual history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Pascale; Lasserre, Andrea; Rossignol, Louise; Kernéis, Solen; Blaizeau, Fanette; Stheneur, Chantal; Blanchon, Thierry; Levy-Bruhl, Daniel; Hanslik, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In France, vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) was recommended in 2007 for all 14-year-old girls as well as “catch-up” vaccination for girls between 15–23 y of age either before or within one year of becoming sexually active. We evaluated the vaccine coverage according to the eligibility for vaccination in a sample of young girls aged 14 to 23 years, who were seen in general practices. A survey was proposed to 706 general practitioners (GPs) and carried out from July to September 2010. GPs, also called “family doctor,” are physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of medicine but instead covers a variety of medical problems in patients of all ages. Each participating GP included, retrospectively, the last female patient aged 14–17 y and the last female patient aged 18–23 y whom he had seen. A questionnaire collected information regarding the GP and the patients' characteristics. The vaccine coverage was determined according to the eligibility for vaccination, i.e. the coverage among younger women (14–17) and among those sexually active in the second age range (18–23). Sexual activity status was assessed by GP, according to information stated in the medical record. The 363 participating physicians (response rate 51.4%) included 712 patients (357 in the 14- to 17-year-old group and 355 in the 15- to 23-year-old group) in their responses. The rate of the vaccination coverage in the 14- to 17-year-old group was 55%. Among the girls in the 18- to 23-year-old group, 126 were eligible, and their vaccination coverage rate was 82%. The evaluation of the eligibility by the GPs was incorrect in 36% of the cases. Of the 712 patients, 6% of the girls had been vaccinated without a need for the vaccination, and 26% of the girls had not been vaccinated, although they needed to be vaccinated. Regarding the vaccine uptake, vaccination at the age of 14 was not as effective as vaccinating the older population for which vaccination

  16. Enfermedad neurologica por adenovirus Neurologic disease due to adenovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L. Lema

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de adenovirus (ADV en las infecciones del sistema nervioso central (SNC. Se analizaron 108 muestras de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR provenientes de 79 casos de encefalitis, 7 meningitis y 22 de otras patologías neurológicas, recibidas en el período 2000-2002. Cuarenta y nueve (47.35% se obtuvieron de pacientes inmunocomprometidos. La presencia de ADV se investigó mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa en formato anidado (Nested-PCR. La identificación del genogrupo se realizó mediante análisis filogenético de la secuencia nucleotídica parcial de la región que codifica para la proteína del hexón. Se detectó la presencia de ADV en 6 de 108 (5.5% muestras de LCR analizadas. Todos los casos positivos pertenecieron a pacientes con encefalitis que fueron 79, (6/79, 7.6%. No se observó diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los casos de infección por ADV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos e inmunocompetentes (p>0.05. Las cepas de ADV detectadas se agruparon en los genogrupos B1 y C. En conclusión, nuestros resultados describen el rol de los ADV en las infecciones neurológicas en Argentina. La información presentada contribuye al conocimiento de su epidemiología, en particular en casos de encefalitis.The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of adenovirusm (ADV infections in neurological disorders. A total of 108 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 79 encephalitis cases, 7 meningitis and 22 other neurological diseases analysed in our laboratory between 2000 and 2002 were studied. Forty nine (47.4% belonged to immunocompromised patients. Viral genome was detected using nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR and ADV genotypes were identified using partial gene sequence analysis of hexon gene. Adenovirus were detected in 6 of 108 (5.5% CSF samples tested. All of these were from encephalitis cases, 6/79, representing 7.6% of them. No statistically

  17. Overview of dendritic cell-based vaccine development for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagirova, M; Allahverdiyev, A M; Abamor, E S; Ullah, I; Cosar, G; Aydogdu, M; Senturk, H; Ergenoglu, B

    2016-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most serious vector-borne diseases in the world and is distributed over 98 countries. It is estimated that 350 million people are at risk for leishmaniasis. There are three different generation of vaccines that have been developed to provide immunity and protection against leishmaniasis. However, their use has been limited due to undesired side effects. These vaccines have also failed to provide effective and reliable protection and, as such, currently, there is no safe and effective vaccine for leishmaniasis. Dendritic cells (DCs) are a unique population of cells that come from bone marrow and become specialized to take up, process and present antigens to helper T cells in a mechanism similar to macrophages. By considering these significant features, DCs stimulated with different kinds of Leishmania antigens have been used in recent vaccine studies for leishmaniasis with promising results so far. In this review, we aim to review and combine the latest studies about this issue after defining potential problems in vaccine development for leishmaniasis and considering the importance of DCs in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Progress and challenges in the vaccine-based treatment of head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venuti Aldo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Head and neck (HN cancer represents one of the most challenging diseases because the mortality remains high despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment. Although vaccine-based approaches for the treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck have achieved limited clinical success, advances in cancer immunology provide a strong foundation and powerful new tools to guide current attempts to develop effective cancer vaccines. This article reviews what has to be rather what has been done in the field for the development of future vaccines in HN tumours.

  19. Health care utilization in general practice after HPV vaccination-A Danish nationwide register-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Lene Wulff; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has increasingly been suspected of adverse effects in Denmark since 2013. By using consultations with the general practitioner (GP) as an indicator for morbidity, this study aims to examine the association between HPV vaccination and morbidity...... in girls in the Danish childhood immunization program. METHODS: The study is a nationwide register-based cohort study. Both the HPV and the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccines were offered to 12-year-old girls in Denmark in the study period (2008-2015). Therefore, both vaccines were included...... as exposures to allow differentiation between potential effects. This resulted in four exposure groups: HPV only vaccinated, HPV+MMR vaccinated, MMR only vaccinated, and Non-vaccinated girls. Outcomes were: daytime consultation rates and frequent GP attendance (> 7 annual GP consultations). We estimated...

  20. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  1. Novel protein and poxvirus-based vaccine combinations for simultaneous induction of humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Claire L; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S; Moore, Anne C

    2005-07-01

    The presence of both cell-mediated and humoral immunity is important in protection from and clearance of a number of infectious pathogens. We describe novel vaccine regimens using combinations of plasmid DNA, poxvirus and protein to induce strong Ag-specific T cell and Ab responses simultaneously in a murine model. Intramuscular (i.m.) immunization with plasmid DNA encoding the middle Ag of hepatitis B (DNA) concurrently with a commercial hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine (Engerix-B) followed by boosting immunizations with both modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) encoding the middle Ag of HBV and Engerix-B induced high levels of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and high titer Ab responses to hepatitis B surface Ag (HbsAg). Substitution of Engerix-B with adjuvant-free rHBsAg induced similar T cell responses and greatly enhanced Ab levels. Repeated immunizations with recombinant or nonrecombinant MVA mixed with Ag induced higher titers of Abs compared with immunization with either Ag or Engerix-B further demonstrating this novel adjuvant effect of MVA. The poxviruses NYVAC, fowlpox (FP9) and ALVAC, and to a lesser extent, adenovirus, also displayed similar adjuvant properties when used in combination with rHBsAg. The use of poxviruses as an adjuvant for protein to concurrently induce Ag-specific T cells and Abs could be applied to the development of vaccines for many diseases, including HIV and malaria, where both cell mediated and humoral immunity may be important for protection.

  2. Rotavirus vaccination and herd immunity: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seybolt LM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorna M Seybolt, Rodolfo E BéguéDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Until recently, rotavirus was the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and young children with over 100 million cases and 400,000 deaths every year worldwide. Yet, its epidemiology is changing rapidly with the introduction of two rotavirus vaccines in the mid 2000s. Both vaccines were shown to be highly efficacious in prelicensure studies to reduce severe rotavirus disease; the efficacy being more pronounced in high- and middle-income countries than in low-income countries. Herd immunity – the indirect protection of unimmunized individuals as a result of others being immunized – was not expected to be a benefit of rotavirus vaccination programs since the vaccines were thought to reduce severe disease but not to decrease virus transmission significantly. Postlicensure studies, however, have suggested that this assumption may need reassessment. Studies in a variety of settings have shown evidence of greater than expected declines in rotavirus disease. While these studies were not designed specifically to detect herd immunity – and few failed to detect this phenomenon – the consistency of the evidence is compelling. These studies are reviewed and described here. While further work is needed, clarifying the presence of herd immunity is not just an academic exercise but an important issue for rotavirus control, especially in lower income countries where the incidence of the disease is highest and the direct protection of the vaccines is lower.Keywords: rotavirus, vaccine, herd immunity, efficacy

  3. A rapid Q-PCR titration protocol for adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus vectors that produces biologically relevant results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaher, Sean D.; Berk, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses are employed in the study of cellular processes and as expression vectors used in gene therapy. The success and reproducibility of these studies is dependent in part on having accurate and meaningful titers of replication competent and helper-dependent adenovirus stocks, which is problematic due to the use of varied and divergent titration protocols. Physical titration methods, which quantify the total number of viral particles, are used by many, but are poor at estimating activity. Biological titration methods, such as plaque assays, are more biologically relevant, but are time consuming and not applicable to helper-dependent gene therapy vectors. To address this, a protocol was developed called “infectious genome titration” in which viral DNA is isolated from the nuclei of cells ~3 h post-infection, and then quantified by Q-PCR. This approach ensures that only biologically active virions are counted as part of the titer determination. This approach is rapid, robust, sensitive, reproducible, and applicable to all forms of adenovirus. Unlike other Q-PCR-based methods, titers determined by this protocol are well correlated with biological activity. PMID:23624118

  4. Towards functional antibody-based vaccines to prevent pre-erythrocytic malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Brandon; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sather, D Noah

    2017-05-01

    An effective malaria vaccine would be considered a milestone of modern medicine, yet has so far eluded research and development efforts. This can be attributed to the extreme complexity of the malaria parasites, presenting with a multi-stage life cycle, high genome complexity and the parasite's sophisticated immune evasion measures, particularly antigenic variation during pathogenic blood stage infection. However, the pre-erythrocytic (PE) early infection forms of the parasite exhibit relatively invariant proteomes, and are attractive vaccine targets as they offer multiple points of immune system attack. Areas covered: We cover the current state of and roadblocks to the development of an effective, antibody-based PE vaccine, including current vaccine candidates, limited biological knowledge, genetic heterogeneity, parasite complexity, and suboptimal preclinical models as well as the power of early stage clinical models. Expert commentary: PE vaccines will need to elicit broad and durable immunity to prevent infection. This could be achievable if recent innovations in studying the parasites' infection biology, rational vaccine selection and design as well as adjuvant formulation are combined in a synergistic and multipronged approach. Improved preclinical assays as well as the iterative testing of vaccine candidates in controlled human malaria infection trials will further accelerate this effort.

  5. Live Virus Vaccines Based on a Yellow Fever Vaccine Backbone: Standardized Template with Key Considerations for a Risk/Benefit Assessment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P.; Seligman, Stephen J.; Robertson, James S.; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B.; Condit, Richard C.; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called “chimeric virus vaccines”). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were replaced by the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  6. Rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Maureen; Bresee, Joseph S.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Glass, Roger I.

    2000-10-01

    The past few years have seen important developments in understanding the epidemiological and virological characteristics of rotaviruses, and rapid progress has been made in rotavirus vaccine development, but further challenges remain before a vaccine is introduced into widespread use. The licensure of the first rotavirus vaccine, a tetravalent rhesus-based rotavirus vaccine, in the United States in 1998, marked a significant advance in preventing the morbidity associated with rotavirus diarrhea. The association between the tetravalent rhesus-based rotavirus vaccine and intussusception has created significant hurdles as well as new opportunities to study the pathogenesis of rotavirus and rotavirus vaccine infection. Several other rotavirus vaccine candidates are in late stages of development, and results from trials have been encouraging.

  7. Two initial vaccinations with the Bm86-based Gavacplus vaccine against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus induce similar reproductive suppression to three initial vaccinations under production conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Erlinda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, affects livestock production in many regions of the world. Up to now, the widespread use of chemical acaricides has led to the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and to environmental contamination. Gavacplus is a subunit vaccine based on the recombinant Bm86 tick antigen expressed in yeast, capable to control infestations of R. microplus under controlled and production conditions. The vaccine constitutes the core element of broad control programs against this ectoparasite, in which acquired immunity in cattle to Bm86 is combined with a rational use of acaricides. At present, the conventional vaccine scheme consists of three doses that should be administered at weeks 0, 4 and 7, followed by a booster every six months. Results In this study we assayed a reduction in the number of the initial doses of Gavacplus, evaluated the time course and the level of bovine anti-Bm86 antibodies elicited, and analyzed the vaccine effect on ticks engorging on immunized cattle under production conditions. Following three different immunization schemes, the bovines developed a strong and specific immune response characterized by elevated anti-Bm86 IgG titers. A reduction in the weight of engorging female ticks, in the weight of the eggs laid and also in R. microplus viable eggs percentage was obtained by using only two doses of Gavacplus administered at weeks 0 and 4, followed by a booster six months later. This reduction did not differ from the results obtained on ticks engorging on cattle immunized at weeks 0, 4 and 7. It was also demonstrated that anti-Bm86 antibody titers over 1:640, measured in bovines immunized at weeks 0 and 4, were sufficient to affect weight and reproductive potential of female ticks as compared with ticks engorging on unvaccinated animals. In addition, no statistically significant differences were detected in the average weight of eggs laid by ticks engorged on

  8. Immunogenicity and protection efficacy of subunit-based smallpox vaccines using variola major antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chuanyou; Chou, Te-Hui; Kishko, Michael; Lu, Shan

    2008-02-05

    The viral strain responsible for smallpox infection is variola major (VARV). As a result of the successful eradication of smallpox with the vaccinia virus (VACV), the general population is no longer required to receive a smallpox vaccine, and will have no protection against smallpox. This lack of immunity is a concern due to the potential for use of smallpox as a biological weapon. Considerable progress has been made in the development of subunit-based smallpox vaccines resulting from the identification of VACV protective antigens. It also offers the possibility of using antigens from VARV to formulate the next generation subunit-based smallpox vaccines. Here, we show that codon-optimized DNA vaccines expressing three VARV antigens (A30, B7 and F8) and their recombinant protein counterparts elicited high-titer, cross-reactive, VACV neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Vaccinated mice were protected from intraperitoneal and intranasal challenges with VACV. These results suggest the feasibility of a subunit smallpox vaccine based on VARV antigen sequences to induce immunity against poxvirus infection.

  9. Leveraging machine learning-based approaches to assess human papillomavirus vaccination sentiment trends with Twitter data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jingcheng; Xu, Jun; Song, Hsing-Yi; Tao, Cui

    2017-07-05

    As one of the serious public health issues, vaccination refusal has been attracting more and more attention, especially for newly approved human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Understanding public opinion towards HPV vaccines, especially concerns on social media, is of significant importance for HPV vaccination promotion. In this study, we leveraged a hierarchical machine learning based sentiment analysis system to extract public opinions towards HPV vaccines from Twitter. English tweets containing HPV vaccines-related keywords were collected from November 2, 2015 to March 28, 2016. Manual annotation was done to evaluate the performance of the system on the unannotated tweets corpus. Followed time series analysis was applied to this corpus to track the trends of machine-deduced sentiments and their associations with different days of the week. The evaluation of the unannotated tweets corpus showed that the micro-averaging F scores have reached 0.786. The learning system deduced the sentiment labels for 184,214 tweets in the collected unannotated tweets corpus. Time series analysis identified a coincidence between mainstream outcome and Twitter contents. A weak trend was found for "Negative" tweets that decreased firstly and began to increase later; an opposite trend was identified for "Positive" tweets. Tweets that contain the worries on efficacy for HPV vaccines showed a relative significant decreasing trend. Strong associations were found between some sentiments ("Positive", "Negative", "Negative-Safety" and "Negative-Others") with different days of the week. Our efforts on sentiment analysis for newly approved HPV vaccines provide us an automatic and instant way to extract public opinion and understand the concerns on Twitter. Our approaches can provide a feedback to public health professionals to monitor online public response, examine the effectiveness of their HPV vaccination promotion strategies and adjust their promotion plans.

  10. Human papillomavirus vaccine uptake in boys and girls in a school-based vaccine delivery program in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Carol A; MacSwain, Mary-Ann; Morrison, Heather; Sanford, Carolyn J

    2015-04-08

    In 2013, Prince Edward Island was the first province to introduce HPV vaccine universally to grade six boys in a school-based program. Because uptake rates in boys are unknown in this type of vaccination program, uptake of HPV vaccination in boys was measured and compared with uptake rates in girls and then analyzed with factors such as county, urban-rural location of the school, and school board to identify where the vaccine program could be improved. HPV vaccination records from the provincial childhood immunization registry in PEI were merged with Department of Education data containing all grade six girls and boys in PEI. Vaccine uptakes between years and between sexes were compared using two sample tests of proportions. Logistic regression modeling which accounted for the hierarchical nature of the data was used to analyze associations between factors and uptake rates. Although uptake was high in boys and girls, a significantly greater proportion of girls (85%) received all three doses of the HPV vaccine compared to boys (79%; p=0.004). The odds of grade six girls being fully vaccinated for HPV were 1.5 times greater than of grade six boys, and the odds of students in the English Language School Board receiving all three doses were more than twice as great as the odds of French Language School Board students. HPV vaccination for boys in PEI has had a successful launch, almost reaching the Canadian Immunization Committee recommendations of >80% for the early years of a program. PEI has a highly organized Public Health Nursing program that is involved in all childhood and school-based vaccinations in PEI and in this context very high coverage rates were obtained. Areas to target for improving uptake include the boys and the students in the French Language School Board. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Liposome-based synthetic long peptide vaccines for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varypataki, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic long peptides (SLP) derived from cancer-associated antigens hold great promise as well-defined antigens for cancer immunotherapy. Clinical studies showed that SLP vaccines have functional potency when applied to pre-malignant stage patients, but need to be improved for use as a therapeutic

  12. Development of Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara-based Influenza Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Altenburg (Arwen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza viruses continuously circulate in the human population and are estimated to cause 3-5 million cases of severe respiratory illness annually worldwide of which 250.000-500.000 have a fatal outcome. Vaccination is the most efficient measure to control infectious diseases,

  13. based polypeptide vaccine against cow mastitis induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use against viruses and bacteria and in cancer immunotherapy [3,4]. To date, research has shown that many proteins are good candidates for mastitis vaccine, including clumping factor A (ClfA) and elastin binding protein (EbpS) of S. aureus [5,6], outer membrane protein C (OmpC) and outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of ...

  14. Adenovirus vectors can induce activation of endothelial cells: CD40 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenovirus vectors can induce activation of endothelial cells: CD40-CD40L interactions partly participate in the endothelial cells activation induced by adenovirus vectors in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

  15. prevalence of rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus infection in young

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-12-12

    Dec 12, 2003 ... PREVALENCE OF ROTAVIRUS, ADENOVIRUS AND ASTROVIRUS INFECTION IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH GASTROENTERITIS IN GABORONE,. BOTSWANA. G. Basu, BSc ... been firmly established as aetiological agents of acute gastroenteritis .... systemic infection, respiratory adenoviruses may also.

  16. Contraceptive Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Supotnitsky

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches to develop vaccines with contraceptive effect are being carried out since the 1920s. Since 1972, the contraceptive vaccines are one of the priority programs of the World Health Organization (WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Rockefeller Foundation participates in implementing the program. Openly declared objective of creating such vaccines — the regulation of the population in the Third World countries. There are currently three main directions of contraceptive vaccine design: 1 vaccines targeted at blocking the production of gametes; 2 impairing their function; 3 violating the fertilization process. Contraceptive vaccines for more than 10 years are widely used to reduce fertility and castration of wild and domestic animals. In the commercial realization there are veterinary vaccines Equity®, Improvac®, GonaCon®, Repro-BLOC (based on gonadotropin-releasing hormone; SpayVac™ and IVT-PZP® (based on zona pellucida antigens. Clinical studies have shown effective contraceptive action (in women of vaccines, in which human chorionic gonadotropin is used as an antigen. At the same time, there are found the side effects of such vaccines: for vaccines containing gonadotropin-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone as antigenic components — castration, impotence; for vaccines containing follicle stimulating hormone — oligospermia; zona pellucida antigens — irreversible oophoritis. This paper discusses approaches to detection of sterilizing components in vaccines intended for mass prevention of infectious diseases, not reported by manufacturers, and the consequences of their use. Hidden use of contraceptive vaccines, which already took place, can be detected: 1 by the presence of antibodies to their antigenic components (in unvaccinated by contraceptive vaccines people such antibodies do not exist, except infertility cases; 2 by change in the hormonal levels of the

  17. Plant-based oral vaccines against zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Naila; Daniell, Henry

    2016-11-01

    The shared diseases between animals and humans are known as zoonotic diseases and spread infectious diseases among humans. Zoonotic diseases are not only a major burden to livestock industry but also threaten humans accounting for >60% cases of human illness. About 75% of emerging infectious diseases in humans have been reported to originate from zoonotic pathogens. Because antibiotics are frequently used to protect livestock from bacterial diseases, the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of epidemic and zoonotic pathogens is now a major concern. Live attenuated and killed vaccines are the only option to control these infectious diseases and this approach has been used since 1890. However, major problems with this approach include high cost and injectable vaccines is impractical for >20 billion poultry animals or fish in aquaculture. Plants offer an attractive and affordable platform for vaccines against animal diseases because of their low cost, and they are free of attenuated pathogens and cold chain requirement. Therefore, several plant-based vaccines against human and animals diseases have been developed recently that undergo clinical and regulatory approval. Plant-based vaccines serve as ideal booster vaccines that could eliminate multiple boosters of attenuated bacteria or viruses, but requirement of injectable priming with adjuvant is a current limitation. So, new approaches like oral vaccines are needed to overcome this challenge. In this review, we discuss the progress made in plant-based vaccines against zoonotic or other animal diseases and future challenges in advancing this field. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Characterization of fowl adenoviruses isolated between 2007 and 2014 in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changjing, Li; Haiying, Li; Dongdong, Wang; Jingjing, Wang; Youming, Wang; Shouchun, Wang; Jida, Li; Ping, Liu; Jianlin, Wang; Shouzhen, Xu; Shangjin, Cui; Yi, Zhang; Yanbo, Yin

    2016-12-25

    Forty-three fowl adenovirus (FAdV) strains were isolated in China from 2007 to 2014 from poultry and ostriches with inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) and hydropericardium syndrome (HPS). Phylogenetic analysis showed that 28/43 strains clustered into Fowl aviadenovirus D (FAdV-D) and 9/43 strains clustered into FAdV-E. FAdV-C included three isolates of ostrich origin, one of goose origin and two of chicken origin. Based on hexon loop 1 gene sequencing analysis, these viruses were genetically related to FAdV-4, FAdV-8a, FAdV-8b and FAdV-11, of which FAdV-11 was dominant. The isolation in 2014 of three FAdV strains belonging to serotype 4 from ostrich flocks is to our knowledge the first finding of FAdV-4 infection and HPS cases in ostriches. Epidemiological analysis showed that FAdV has been circulating in northern and eastern China, where more than 50% of layers and broilers are raised. The hosts of this pathogen included broilers, layers, geese and ostriches. IBH and HPS cases had a sporadic or cluster distribution from 2007 to 2013; however, since 2014 the number of cases has increased sharply. To control FAdV, strict biosecurity protection measures are necessary and a multivalent vaccine may be needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A retrospective investigation of canine adenovirus (CAV infection in adult dogs in Turkey : article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gur

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine adenovirus (CAV type 1 and 2, respectively, cause infectious canine hepatitis and infectious canine laryngotracheitis in members of the families Canidae and Ursidae worldwide. Both of these infections are acute diseases, especially in young dogs. The aim of this study was to conduct a serological investigation of canine adenovirus infection. For this purpose, serumsamples were collected from native pure-bred Kangal (n = 11, and Akbash dogs (n = 17 and Turkish Greyhounds (n=15 in Eskisehir and Konya provinces. None ofthe dogs were previously vaccinated against CAV types. Indirect ELISA detected 88.2 %, 93.3 % and 100 % prevalences in Akbash, Greyhound and Kangal dogs, respectively. The remainder of the samples (n = 51 were collected at the Afyonkarahisar Municipality Shelter. Fourty-two of these dogs (82.3 % were detected as seropositive. In total, 82 of 94 dogs (87.2 % were found to be positive for CAV serum antibodies.

  20. A retrospective investigation of canine adenovirus (CAV) infection in adult dogs in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, S; Acar, A

    2009-06-01

    Canine adenovirus (CAV) type 1 and 2, respectively, cause infectious canine hepatitis and infectious canine laryngotracheitis in members of the families Canidae and Ursidae worldwide. Both of these infections are acute diseases, especially in young dogs. The aim of this study was to conduct a serological investigation of canine adenovirus infection. For this purpose, serum samples were collected from native pure-bred Kangal(n = 11), and Akbash dogs (n = 17) and Turkish Greyhounds (n = 15) in Eskişehir and Konya provinces. None of the dogs were previously vaccinated against CAV types. Indirect ELISA detected 88.2%, 93.3% and 100% prevalences in Akbash, Greyhound and Kangal dogs, respectively. The remainder of the samples (n = 51) were collected at the Afyonkarahisar Municipality Shelter. Fourty-two of these dogs (82.3%) were detected as seropositive. In total, 82 of 94 dogs (87.2%) were found to be positive for CAV serum antibodies.

  1. Patient and clinic factors associated with adolescent human papillomavirus vaccine utilization within a university-based health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Amanda; Cohn, Lisa; Dalton, Vanessa; Ruffin, Mack

    2010-01-22

    We reviewed clinical and billing data from a university-based health system to assess HPV vaccine utilization among 9-18-year-old girls by individual, visit and medical specialty characteristics. Our sample included 10,082 adolescent patients with 27,928 visits to outpatient family medicine (FM), pediatric and gynecology clinics between January 2007 and March 2008. Vaccine series completion was low among eligible adolescents (15%), with important disparities in vaccine utilization by medical specialty, age, race and insurance status. Missed opportunities for vaccination were common. Our findings may help to target future interventions aimed at increasing adolescent HPV vaccine utilization.

  2. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

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    Shu Ki Tsoi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates.

  3. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeesters, Pierre R.; Frost, Hannah R. C.; Steer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates. PMID:26101780

  4. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

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    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal adjuvant candidates when compared with other substances that can be used as mucosal adjuvants. The strategy of a DNA-based mucosal adjuvant facilitates the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells, and thus is an effective and safe approach. It would also provide great flexibility for the development of effective vaccines for various mucosal pathogens. PMID:19722892

  5. Ontology-based literature mining of E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; He, Yongqun

    2017-03-14

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli infections cause various diseases in humans and many animal species. However, with extensive E. coli vaccine research, we are still unable to fully protect ourselves against E. coli infections. To more rational development of effective and safe E. coli vaccine, it is important to better understand E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks. In this study, we first extended the Vaccine Ontology (VO) to semantically represent various E. coli vaccines and genes used in the vaccine development. We also normalized E. coli gene names compiled from the annotations of various E. coli strains using a pan-genome-based annotation strategy. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) includes a hierarchy of various interaction-related keywords useful for literature mining. Using VO, INO, and normalized E. coli gene names, we applied an ontology-based SciMiner literature mining strategy to mine all PubMed abstracts and retrieve E. coli vaccine-associated E. coli gene interactions. Four centrality metrics (i.e., degree, eigenvector, closeness, and betweenness) were calculated for identifying highly ranked genes and interaction types. Using vaccine-related PubMed abstracts, our study identified 11,350 sentences that contain 88 unique INO interactions types and 1,781 unique E. coli genes. Each sentence contained at least one interaction type and two unique E. coli genes. An E. coli gene interaction network of genes and INO interaction types was created. From this big network, a sub-network consisting of 5 E. coli vaccine genes, including carA, carB, fimH, fepA, and vat, and 62 other E. coli genes, and 25 INO interaction types was identified. While many interaction types represent direct interactions between two indicated genes, our study has also shown that many of these retrieved interaction types are indirect in that the two genes participated in the specified interaction process in a required but indirect process. Our centrality analysis of

  6. Universal or Specific? A Modeling-Based Comparison of Broad-Spectrum Influenza Vaccines against Conventional, Strain-Matched Vaccines.

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    Rahul Subramanian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza remains a major public health challenge. A key reason is the virus capacity for immune escape: ongoing evolution allows the continual circulation of seasonal influenza, while novel influenza viruses invade the human population to cause a pandemic every few decades. Current vaccines have to be updated continually to keep up to date with this antigenic change, but emerging 'universal' vaccines-targeting more conserved components of the influenza virus-offer the potential to act across all influenza A strains and subtypes. Influenza vaccination programmes around the world are steadily increasing in their population coverage. In future, how might intensive, routine immunization with novel vaccines compare against similar mass programmes utilizing conventional vaccines? Specifically, how might novel and conventional vaccines compare, in terms of cumulative incidence and rates of antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza? What are their potential implications for the impact of pandemic emergence? Here we present a new mathematical model, capturing both transmission dynamics and antigenic evolution of influenza in a simple framework, to explore these questions. We find that, even when matched by per-dose efficacy, universal vaccines could dampen population-level transmission over several seasons to a greater extent than conventional vaccines. Moreover, by lowering opportunities for cross-protective immunity in the population, conventional vaccines could allow the increased spread of a novel pandemic strain. Conversely, universal vaccines could mitigate both seasonal and pandemic spread. However, where it is not possible to maintain annual, intensive vaccination coverage, the duration and breadth of immunity raised by universal vaccines are critical determinants of their performance relative to conventional vaccines. In future, conventional and novel vaccines are likely to play complementary roles in

  7. Polymer nanotechnology based approaches in mucosal vaccine delivery: challenges and opportunities.

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    Sharma, Rajeev; Agrawal, Udita; Mody, Nishi; Vyas, Suresh P

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal sites serve as the main portal for the entry of pathogens and thus immunization through mucosal routes can greatly improve the immunity. Researchers are continuously exploring the vaccination strategies to engender protective mucosal immune responses. Unearthing of mucosal adjuvants, that are safe and effective, is enhancing the magnitude and quality of the protective immune response. Use of nanotechnology based polymeric nanocarrier systems which encapsulate vaccine components for protection of sensitive payload, incorporate mucosal adjuvants to maximize the immune responses and target the mucosal immune system is a key strategy to improve the effectiveness of mucosal vaccines. These advances promise to accelerate the development and testing of new mucosal vaccines against many human diseases. This review focuses on the need for the development of nanocarrier based mucosal vaccines with emphases on the polymeric nanoparticles, their clinical status and future perspectives. This review focuses on the need and new insights for the development of nanoarchitecture governed mucosal vaccination with emphases on the various polymeric nanoparticles, their clinical status and future perspectives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

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    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  9. Development of a Multivalent Subunit Vaccine against Tularemia Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV Based Delivery System.

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    Sukalyani Banik

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, and is the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia. F. tularensis is classified as a Category A Biothreat agent by the CDC based on its use in bioweapon programs by several countries in the past and its potential to be used as an agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of tularemia. In this study, we used a novel approach for development of a multivalent subunit vaccine against tularemia by using an efficient tobacco mosaic virus (TMV based delivery platform. The multivalent subunit vaccine was formulated to contain a combination of F. tularensis protective antigens: OmpA-like protein (OmpA, chaperone protein DnaK and lipoprotein Tul4 from the highly virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 strain. Two different vaccine formulations and immunization schedules were used. The immunized mice were challenged with lethal (10xLD100 doses of F. tularensis LVS on day 28 of the primary immunization and observed daily for morbidity and mortality. Results from this study demonstrate that TMV can be used as a carrier for effective delivery of multiple F. tularensis antigens. TMV-conjugate vaccine formulations are safe and multiple doses can be administered without causing any adverse reactions in immunized mice. Immunization with TMV-conjugated F. tularensis proteins induced a strong humoral immune response and protected mice against respiratory challenges with very high doses of F. tularensis LVS. This study provides a proof-of-concept that TMV can serve as a suitable platform for simultaneous delivery of multiple protective antigens of F. tularensis. Refinement of vaccine formulations coupled with TMV-targeting strategies developed in this study will provide a platform for development of an effective tularemia subunit vaccine as well as a vaccination approach that may broadly be applicable to many other bacterial pathogens.

  10. Economic studies applied to vaccines against invasive diseases: An updated budget impact analysis of age-based pneumococcal vaccination strategies in the elderly in Italy.

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    Boccalini, Sara; Bechini, Angela; Gasparini, Roberto; Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Bonanni, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Many evaluations have been performed on the economic impact of pneumococcal vaccination in older adults (>64 y of age) in several countries, including Italy. However, these studies did not include the new data on the effectiveness of 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) in the elderly reported by the CAPiTA Study. The aim of the present study was to update our previous budget impact analysis of multi-cohort PCV13 vaccination in adults in Italy by including new scientific evidence. We also compared single-cohort vaccination strategies per year, in order to identify the cohort with the most favorable economic profile, in the event of the multi-cohort approach not being economically sustainable for the National Health System (NHS). The new impact analysis highlights that the vaccination of one, two or three adult cohorts per year in Italy would lead to a considerable reduction in pneumococcal disease and its related costs over 5 y. The strategies proved cost-effective (ICERs ranging from €14,605 to €15,412/QALY), i.e. well below the threshold of €50,000/QALY. The ICERs were slightly lower than those calculated in the first published analysis and vaccination continued to be economically favorable. In the case of a mono-cohort strategy, the vaccination of 65-year-old subjects, albeit more expensive, proved to be more favorable than the vaccination of 70- or 75-year-old cohorts. Finally, after the inclusion of the recent clinical evidence, the age-based PCV13 vaccination of the elderly in Italy continued to be economically justified from the NHS perspective in the short period. Vaccination of the elderly should therefore be strongly recommended nationwide in Italy.

  11. Suppression of RNA interference by adenovirus virus-associated RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, M. Gunnar; Haasnoot, P. C. Joost; Xu, Ning; Berenjian, Saideh; Berkhout, Ben; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2005-01-01

    We show that human adenovirus inhibits RNA interference (RNAi) at late times of infection by suppressing the activity of two key enzyme systems involved, Dicer and RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). To define the mechanisms by which adenovirus blocks RNAi, we used a panel of mutant adenoviruses

  12. A national examination of pharmacy-based immunization statutes and their association with influenza vaccinations and preventive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConeghy, Kevin W; Wing, Coady

    2016-06-24

    A series of state-level statute changes have allowed pharmacists to provide influenza vaccinations in community pharmacies. The study aim was to estimate the effects of pharmacy-based immunization statutes changes on per capita influenza vaccine prescriptions, adult vaccination rates, and the utilization of other preventive health services. A quasi-experimental study that compares vaccination outcomes over time before and after states allowed pharmacy-based immunization. Measures of per capita pharmacy prescriptions for influenza vaccines in each state came from a proprietary pharmacy prescription database. Data on adult vaccination rates and preventive health utilization were studied using multiple waves of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The primary outcomes were changes in per capita influenza vaccine pharmacy prescriptions, adult vaccination rates, and preventive health interventions following changes. Between 2007 and 2013, the number of influenza vaccinations dispensed in community pharmacies increased from 3.2 to 20.9 million. After one year, adopting pharmacist immunization statutes increased per capita influenza vaccine prescriptions by an absolute difference (AD) of 2.6% (95% CI: 1.1-4.2). Adopting statutes did not lead to a significant absolute increase in adult vaccination rates (AD 0.9%, 95% CI: -0.3, 2.2). There also was no observed difference in adult vaccination rates among adults at high-risk of influenza complications (AD 0.8%, 95% CI: -0.2, 1.8) or among standard demographic subgroups. There also was no observed difference in the receipt of preventive health services, including routine physician office visits (AD -1.9%, 95% CI: -4.9, 1.1). Pharmacists are providing millions of influenza vaccines as a consequence of immunization statutes, but we do not observe significant differences in adult influenza vaccination rates. The main gains from pharmacy-based immunization may be in providing a more convenient way to obtain an

  13. Antibody Persistence in Young Children 5 Years after Vaccination with a Combined Haemophilus influenzae Type b-Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Conjugate Vaccine Coadministered with Diphtheria-Tetanus-Acellular Pertussis-Based and Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Juan Carlos; Brzostek, Jerzy; Konior, Ryszard; Grunert, Detlef; Kolhe, Devayani; Baine, Yaela; Van Der Wielen, Marie

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated antibody persistence in children up to 5 years after administration of a combined Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)-Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (MenC)-tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine coadministered with a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. This is the follow-up study of a randomized trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT00334334/00463437) in which healthy children were vaccinated (primary vaccinations at 2, 4, and 6 months of age and booster vaccination at 11 to 18 months of age) with Hib-MenC-TT or a control MenC conjugate vaccine, coadministered with diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa)-based combination vaccines (DTPa/Hib for control groups) and a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine [PHiD-CV] or 7-valent cross-reacting material 197 [CRM197] conjugate vaccine [7vCRM]). MenC antibody titers were measured with a serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay using rabbit complement (i.e., rabbit SBA [rSBA]), and antibodies against Hib polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody persistence up to 5 years after booster vaccination is reported for 530 children ∼6 years of age. The percentages of children with seroprotective rSBA-MenC titers were between 24.2% and 40.1% in all groups approximately 5 years after booster vaccination. More than 98.5% of children in each group retained seroprotective anti-PRP concentrations. No vaccine-related serious adverse events and no events related to a lack of vaccine efficacy were reported. Approximately 5 years after booster vaccination, the majority of children retained seroprotective anti-PRP antibody concentrations. The percentage of children retaining seroprotective rSBA-MenC titers was low (≤40%), suggesting that a significant proportion of children may be unprotected against MenC disease. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under

  14. Development of Cytomegalovirus-Based Vaccines Against Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    cells are crucial in the defense against cancer, thus vaccination aimed at generating a large number of functional effector and memory CD8 T cells...annually. Because C. difficile forms spores that are extremely difficult to remove from institutional settings such as hospitals and nursing homes, a...the intradermal model were also disseminated in a research poster at the National MD/PhD Student Conference in July 2015. What do you plan to do

  15. Development of a VLP-based HCV vaccine candidate

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Marina Isabel Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Biologia Molecular e Genética, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2016 The Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% of the world population, being one of the major causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The development of safe, effective and affordable prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against HCV has become an important medical priority; however, there are many obstacles to its development. In recent years, strategies of viral ant...

  16. Blocking Pathogen Transmission at the Source: Reservoir Targeted OspA-Based Vaccines Against Borrelia burgdorferi

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    Maria eGomes-Solecki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Control strategies are especially challenging for microbial diseases caused by pathogens that persist in wildlife reservoirs and use arthropod vectors to cycle amongst those species. One of the most relevant illnesses that pose a direct human health risk is Lyme disease; in the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC recently revised the probable number of cases by 10 fold, to 300,000 cases per year. Caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, Lyme disease can affect the nervous system, joints and heart. No human vaccine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. In addition to novel human vaccines, new strategies for prevention of Lyme disease consist of pest management interventions, vector-targeted vaccines and reservoir-targeted vaccines. However, even the most efficacious human vaccines can not prevent Lyme disease expansion into other geographical areas. The other strategies aim indirectly at reducing tick density and at disrupting the transmission of B. burgdorferi by targeting one or more key elements that maintain the enzootic cycle: the reservoir host and/or the tick vector. Here, I provide a brief overview of the application of an OspA-based wildlife reservoir targeted vaccine aimed at reducing transmission of B. burgdorferi and present it as a strategy for reducing Lyme disease risk to humans.

  17. Using magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate dendritic cell-based vaccination.

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    Peter M Ferguson

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy with antigen-loaded dendritic cell-based vaccines can induce clinical responses in some patients, but further optimization is required to unlock the full potential of this strategy in the clinic. Optimization is dependent on being able to monitor the cellular events that take place once the dendritic cells have been injected in vivo, and to establish whether antigen-specific immune responses to the tumour have been induced. Here we describe the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a simple, non-invasive approach to evaluate vaccine success. By loading the dendritic cells with highly magnetic iron nanoparticles it is possible to assess whether the injected cells drain to the lymph nodes. It is also possible to establish whether an antigen-specific response is initiated by assessing migration of successive rounds of antigen-loaded dendritic cells; in the face of a successfully primed cytotoxic response, the bulk of antigen-loaded cells are eradicated on-route to the node, whereas cells without antigen can reach the node unchecked. It is also possible to verify the induction of a vaccine-induced response by simply monitoring increases in draining lymph node size as a consequence of vaccine-induced lymphocyte trapping, which is an antigen-specific response that becomes more pronounced with repeated vaccination. Overall, these MRI techniques can provide useful early feedback on vaccination strategies, and could also be used in decision making to select responders from non-responders early in therapy.

  18. Novel Injectable Pentablock Copolymer Based Thermoresponsive Hydrogels for Sustained Release Vaccines.

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    Bobbala, Sharan; Tamboli, Viral; McDowell, Arlene; Mitra, Ashim K; Hook, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The need for multiple vaccinations to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines may be reduced by delivering the vaccine over an extended period of time. Here, we report two novel injectable pentablock copolymer based thermoresponsive hydrogels made of polyethyleneglycol-polycaprolactone-polylactide-polycaprolactone-polyethyleneglycol (PEG-PCL-PLA-PCL-PEG) with varying ratios of polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactide (PLA), as single shot sustained release vaccines. Pentablock copolymer hydrogels were loaded with vaccine-encapsulated poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGA-NP) or with the soluble vaccine components. Incorporation of PLGA-NP into the thermoresponsive hydrogels increased the complex viscosity of the gels, lowered the gelation temperature, and minimized the burst release of antigen and adjuvants. The two pentablock hydrogels stimulated both cellular and humoral responses. The addition of PLGA-NP to the hydrogels sustained immune responses for up to 49 days. The polymer with a higher ratio of PCL to PLA formed a more rigid gel, induced stronger immune responses, and stimulated effective anti-tumor responses in a prophylactic melanoma tumor model.

  19. Preclinical Development of Inactivated Rabies Virus–Based Polyvalent Vaccine Against Rabies and Filoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willet, Mallory; Kurup, Drishya; Papaneri, Amy; Wirblich, Christoph; Hooper, Jay W.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Keshwara, Rohan; Hudacek, Andrew; Beilfuss, Stefanie; Rudolph, Grit; Pommerening, Elke; Vos, Adriaan; Neubert, Andreas; Jahrling, Peter; Blaney, Joseph E.; Johnson, Reed F.; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2015-01-01

    We previously described the generation of a novel Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine based on inactivated rabies virus (RABV) containing EBOV glycoprotein (GP) incorporated in the RABV virion. Our results demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). Protection against viral challenge depended largely on the quality of the humoral immune response against EBOV GP. Here we present the extension and improvement of this vaccine by increasing the amount of GP incorporation into virions via GP codon-optimization as well as the addition of Sudan virus (SUDV) and Marburg virus (MARV) GP containing virions. Immunogenicity studies in mice indicate similar immune responses for both SUDV GP and MARV GP compared to EBOV GP. Immunizing mice with multiple antigens resulted in immune responses similar to immunization with a single antigen. Moreover, immunization of NHP with the new inactivated RABV EBOV vaccine resulted in high titer neutralizing antibody levels and 100% protection against lethal EBOV challenge when applied with adjuvant. Our results indicate that an inactivated polyvalent vaccine against RABV filoviruses is achievable. Finally, the novel vaccines are produced on approved VERO cells and a clinical grade RABV/EBOV vaccine for human trials has been produced. PMID:26063224

  20. Preclinical Development of Inactivated Rabies Virus-Based Polyvalent Vaccine Against Rabies and Filoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willet, Mallory; Kurup, Drishya; Papaneri, Amy; Wirblich, Christoph; Hooper, Jay W; Kwilas, Steve A; Keshwara, Rohan; Hudacek, Andrew; Beilfuss, Stefanie; Rudolph, Grit; Pommerening, Elke; Vos, Adriaan; Neubert, Andreas; Jahrling, Peter; Blaney, Joseph E; Johnson, Reed F; Schnell, Matthias J

    2015-10-01

    We previously described the generation of a novel Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine based on inactivated rabies virus (RABV) containing EBOV glycoprotein (GP) incorporated in the RABV virion. Our results demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). Protection against viral challenge depended largely on the quality of the humoral immune response against EBOV GP.Here we present the extension and improvement of this vaccine by increasing the amount of GP incorporation into virions via GP codon-optimization as well as the addition of Sudan virus (SUDV) and Marburg virus (MARV) GP containing virions. Immunogenicity studies in mice indicate similar immune responses for both SUDV GP and MARV GP compared to EBOV GP. Immunizing mice with multiple antigens resulted in immune responses similar to immunization with a single antigen. Moreover, immunization of NHP with the new inactivated RABV EBOV vaccine resulted in high titer neutralizing antibody levels and 100% protection against lethal EBOV challenge when applied with adjuvant.Our results indicate that an inactivated polyvalent vaccine against RABV filoviruses is achievable. Finally, the novel vaccines are produced on approved VERO cells and a clinical grade RABV/EBOV vaccine for human trials has been produced. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF VACCINES BASED ON ADENOVIRAL VECTORS: A REVIEW OF FOREIGN CLINICAL STUDIES (PART 2

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    L. V. Cherenova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many human infectious diseases do not developed effective methods of treatment and prevention. One of the latest successes of biotechnology is the use of adenoviral vectors carrying immunodominant antigens  of various pathogens as genetically engineered vaccines  both  preventive and therapeutic. The use of genetic  engineering technologies allows not  to use in the  manufacture of vaccines  live viruses and  bacteria, reduces  the  time  needed for vaccine  creation and  production of new vaccines.  Adenoviral vectors  naturally penetrate into human cells, causing a rather  long and significant  both humoral and cellular immune response. In the second  part of review, we provide  information about  the ongoing  worldwide  clinical  trials of adenoviral vector-based vaccines against various infectious diseases such as influenza, malaria, Ebola haemorrhagic fever, tuberculosis, hepatitis and  several others, like as to consider selection parameters of volunteers, vaccination schedule, doses of drug administration, results of completed experiments, and preliminary data  on currently ongoing  research.

  2. Design and implementation of a children vaccination reminder system based on short message service

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    Marjan Ghazisaeedi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most problems related to quality of care and patient safety are related to human negligence. One of the causes of these problems is forgetting to do something. This problem can be avoided with information technology in many cases. Some forgotten are very important. Among these is failure to comply with vaccination schedule by parents that can result in inappropriate outcomes. In this study, we developed and evaluated a SMS reminder system for regular and timely vaccination of children. Methods: In this developmental-applied research, firstly, a child vaccination reminder system was designed and implemented to help parents reduce the forgetfulness. This system based on the child's vaccination history and the date of birth, offer time and type of future vaccines. Then the parents of 27 children, that their vaccination was between 22 June and 21 August 2015, referred to Children's Medical Center, were sent text messages by using this system. We evaluated the accuracy of the system logic by using some scenarios. In addition, we evaluated parents' satisfaction with the system using a questionnaire. Results: In all cases but one, the system proposed the type and date of future children vaccines correctly. All the parents who have received text messages had good perception and satisfaction on the majority of questions (total mean score of 4.15 out of 5. Most parents (4.92 out of 5 stated that using the system to remind their visit for child immunization was helpful and willing to offer the system to their friends and other families. Conclusion: Using the short message system is beneficial for parents to remind their children’s vaccination time and increases their satisfaction. So, it can be considered as an important and essential tool in providing healthcare services. SMS is an easy, cheap and effective way to improve the quality of care services.

  3. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

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    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  4. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

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    Vogel, B.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options.Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM. Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic.Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives.Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in

  5. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, B; Reuter, S; Taverna, M; Fischer, M R; Schelling, J

    2016-01-01

    In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options. AIM OF THE PROJECT: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM). Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic. According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives. These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in regular teaching courses by the Medical Faculty

  6. Web-based Social Media Intervention to Increase Vaccine Acceptance: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Jason M; Wagner, Nicole M; Narwaney, Komal J; Kraus, Courtney R; Shoup, Jo Ann; Xu, Stanley; O'Leary, Sean T; Omer, Saad B; Gleason, Kathy S; Daley, Matthew F

    2017-12-01

    Interventions to address vaccine hesitancy and increase vaccine acceptance are needed. This study sought to determine if a Web-based, social media intervention increases early childhood immunization. A 3-arm, randomized controlled trial was conducted in Colorado from September 2013 to July 2016. Participants were pregnant women, randomly assigned (3:2:1) to a Web site with vaccine information and interactive social media components (VSM), a Web site with vaccine information (VI), or usual care (UC). Vaccination was assessed in infants of participants from birth to age 200 days. The primary outcome was days undervaccinated, measured as a continuous and dichotomous variable. Infants of 888 participants were managed for 200 days. By using a nonparametric rank-based analysis, mean ranks for days undervaccinated were significantly lower in the VSM arm versus UC (P = .02) but not statistically different between the VI and UC (P = .08) or between VSM and VI arms (P = .63). The proportions of infants up-to-date at age 200 days were 92.5, 91.3, and 86.6 in the VSM, VI, and UC arms, respectively. Infants in the VSM arm were more likely to be up-to-date than infants in the UC arm (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-3.47). Up-to-date status was not statistically different between VI and UC arms (OR = 1.62; 95% CI, 0.87-3.00) or between the VSM and VI arms (OR = 1.19, 95% CI, 0.70-2.03). Providing Web-based vaccine information with social media applications during pregnancy can positively influence parental vaccine behaviors. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. The novel tuberculosis vaccine, AERAS-402, is safe in healthy infants previously vaccinated with BCG, and induces dose-dependent CD4 and CD8T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagina, Benjamin M N; Tameris, Michele D; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Hatherill, Mark; Abel, Brian; Hussey, Gregory D; Scriba, Thomas J; Mahomed, Hassan; Sadoff, Jerald C; Hanekom, Willem A; Mansoor, Nazma; Hughes, Jane; de Kock, Marwou; Whatney, Wendy; Africa, Hadn; Krohn, Colleen; Veldsman, Ashley; Kany, Angelique Luabeya Kany; Douoguih, Macaya; Pau, Maria Grazia; Hendriks, Jenny; McClainc, Bruce; Benko, Jacqueline; Snowden, Margaret A; Hokey, David A

    2014-10-14

    Efforts to reduce risk of tuberculosis disease in children include development of effective vaccines. Our aim was to test safety and immunogenicity of the new adenovirus 35-vectored tuberculosis vaccine candidate AERAS-402 in infants, administered as a boost following a prime with the Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccine. In a phase 1 randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial, BCG-vaccinated infants aged 6-9 months were sequentially assigned to four study groups, then randomized to receive an increasing dose-strength of AERAS-402, or placebo. The highest dose group received a second dose of vaccine or placebo 56 days after the first. The primary study outcome was safety. Whole blood intracellular cytokine staining assessed immunogenicity. Forty-two infants received AERAS-402 and 15 infants received placebo. During follow-up of 182 days, an acceptable safety profile was shown with no serious adverse events or discontinuations related to the vaccine. AERAS-402 induced a specific T cell response. A single dose of AERAS-402 induced CD4T cells predominantly expressing single IFN-γ whereas two doses induced CD4T cells predominantly expressing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 together. CD8T cells were induced and were more likely to be present after 2 doses of AERAS-402. AERAS-402 was safe and immunogenic in healthy infants previously vaccinated with BCG at birth. Administration of the highest dose twice may be the most optimal vaccination strategy, based on the induced immunity. Multiple differences in T cell responses when infants are compared with adults vaccinated with AERAS-402, in the same setting and using the same whole blood intracellular cytokine assay, suggest specific strategies may be important for vaccination for each population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody-Guided Carbohydrate-Based HIV Vaccine Design: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Cheng; Zheng, Xiu-Jing; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2016-02-17

    The HIV envelope (Env) is heavily glycosylated, facilitating the spread and survival of HIV in many ways. Some potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) such as 2G12, PG9, PG16, and PGTs can recognize the conserved glycan residues on Env. The bnAbs, which often emerge after many years of chronic infection, provide insight into the vulnerability of HIV and can therefore guide the design of vaccines. Many carbohydrate-conjugated vaccines have been designed to induce bnAb-like antibodies, but none have yet been successful. The low antigenicity of these vaccines is one possible explanation. New strategies have been applied to obtain high-affinity antigens of glycan-dependent and other bnAbs. However, when used as immunogens in vivo, high-affinity antigens are still insufficient in eliciting bnAb-like antibodies. bnAbs generally possess some unusual features and may therefore be suppressed by the host immune system. In view of this situation, some immunization regimens based on the affinity maturation of antibodies have been tested. Herein we summarize recent studies into the design of carbohydrate-based HIV vaccines and some valuable experiences gained in work with other bnAb-based HIV vaccines. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Crystal Structure of Human Adenovirus at 3.5 Å Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Vijay S.; Natchiar, S. Kundhavai; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Nemerow, Glen R. (Scripps); (Vanderbilt)

    2010-09-27

    Rational development of adenovirus vectors for therapeutic gene transfer is hampered by the lack of accurate structural information. Here, we report the x-ray structure at 3.5 angstrom resolution of the 150-megadalton adenovirus capsid containing nearly 1 million amino acids. We describe interactions between the major capsid protein (hexon) and several accessory molecules that stabilize the capsid. The virus structure also reveals an altered association between the penton base and the trimeric fiber protein, perhaps reflecting an early event in cell entry. The high-resolution structure provides a substantial advance toward understanding the assembly and cell entry mechanisms of a large double-stranded DNA virus and provides new opportunities for improving adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

  10. Analysis of hepatitis B vaccination behavior and vaccination willingness among migrant workers from rural China based on protection motivation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rugang; Li, Youwei; Wangen, Knut R; Maitland, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Stephen; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-03

    With China's accelerating urbanization, migrant workers comprise up to 40% of the urban population of China's largest cities. More mobile than non-migrant urban dwellers, migrants are more likely to contract and spread hepatitis B (HB) than non-migrants. Due to the mandatory system of household registration (hukou), migrants are less likely to be covered by national HB immunization programs and also to have more limited access to public health services where they work than non-migrants. Migrants form a significant sub-group in all Chinese cities posing unique public policy vaccination challenges. Using protection motivation theory (PMT), we developed and measured HB cognitive variables and analyze the factors affecting HB vaccination behavior and willingness to vaccinate by migrant workers. We propose public policy interventions to increase HB vaccination rates of migrant workers. We developed a questionnaire to collect information on the HB vaccination characteristics of 1684 respondents from 6 provinces and Beijing. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create PMT variables and a binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the factors affecting migrant workers' HB vaccination behavior and willingness to vaccinate. Vulnerability and response-efficacy were significant PMT cognition factors determining HB vaccination behavior. The HB vaccination rate for migrants decreased with increasing age and was smaller for the primary education than the high education group. The vaccination rate of the medical insurance group was significantly greater than the non-insured group, and the vaccination probability was significantly higher for the self-rated good health compared to the self-rated poor health group. Geographical birth location mattered: the vaccination rate for Beijing city and Ningxia province migrants were higher than for Hebei province and the vaccination rate was lower for migrants born far from health facilities compared to those located middle

  11. Peptide-based anti-PCSK9 vaccines - an approach for long-term LDLc management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergana Galabova

    Full Text Available Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL hypercholesterolemia, and its associated cardiovascular diseases, are some of the leading causes of death worldwide. The ability of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9 to modulate circulating LDL cholesterol (LDLc concentrations made it a very attractive target for LDLc management. To date, the most advanced approaches for PCSK9 inhibition are monoclonal antibody (mAb therapies. Although shown to lower LDLc significantly, mAbs face functional limitations because of their relatively short in vivo half-lives necessitating frequent administration. Here, we evaluated the long-term efficacy and safety of PCSK9-specific active vaccines in different preclinical models.PCSK9 peptide-based vaccines were successfully selected by our proprietary technology. To test their efficacy, wild-type (wt mice, Ldlr+/- mice, and rats were immunized with highly immunogenic vaccine candidates. Vaccines induced generation of high-affine PCSK9-specific antibodies in all species. Group mean total cholesterol (TC concentration was reduced by up to 30%, and LDLc up to 50% in treated animals. Moreover, the PCSK9 vaccine-induced humoral immune response persisted for up to one year in mice, and reduced cholesterol levels significantly throughout the study. Finally, the vaccines were well tolerated in all species tested.Peptide-based anti-PCSK9 vaccines induce the generation of antibodies that are persistent, high-affine, and functional for up to one year. They are powerful and safe tools for long-term LDLc management, and thus may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the prevention and/or treatment of LDL hypercholesterolemia-related cardiovascular diseases in humans.

  12. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  14. Dendritic cell based vaccines for HIV infection: The way ahead

    OpenAIRE

    García, Felipe; Plana, Montserrat; Climent, Nuria; León, Agathe; Gatell, Jose M.; Gallart, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells have a central role in HIV infection. On one hand, they are essential to induce strong HIV-specific CD4+ helper T-cell responses that are crucial to achieve a sustained and effective HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte able to control HIV replication. On the other hand, DCs contribute to virus dissemination and HIV itself could avoid a correct antigen presentation. As the efficacy of immune therapy and therapeutic vaccines against HIV infection has been modest in the best...

  15. An update on safety and immunogenicity of vaccines containing emulsion-based adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher B; Haensler, Jean

    2013-07-01

    With the exception of alum, emulsion-based vaccine adjuvants have been administered to far more people than any other adjuvant, especially since the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The number of clinical safety and immunogenicity evaluations of vaccines containing emulsion adjuvants has correspondingly mushroomed. In this review, the authors introduce emulsion adjuvant composition and history before detailing the most recent findings from clinical and postmarketing data regarding the effects of emulsion adjuvants on vaccine immunogenicity and safety, with emphasis on the most widely distributed emulsion adjuvants, MF59® and AS03. The authors also present a summary of other emulsion adjuvants in clinical development and indicate promising avenues for future emulsion-based adjuvant development. Overall, emulsion adjuvants have demonstrated potent adjuvant activity across a number of disease indications along with acceptable safety profiles.

  16. Saponins from the Spanish saffron Crocus sativus are efficient adjuvants for protein-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Díaz, Nathaly; Salaun, Bruno; Perret, Rachel; Sierro, Sophie; Romero, Jackeline F; Fernández, Jose-Antonio; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Romero, Pedro

    2012-01-05

    Protein and peptide-based vaccines provide rigorously formulated antigens. However, these purified products are only weakly immunogenic by themselves and therefore require the addition of immunostimulatory components or adjuvants in the vaccine formulation. Various compounds derived from pathogens, minerals or plants, possess pro-inflammatory properties which allow them to act as adjuvants and contribute to the induction of an effective immune response. The results presented here demonstrate the adjuvant properties of novel saponins derived from the Spanish saffron Crocus sativus. In vivo immunization studies and tumor protection experiments unambiguously establish the value of saffron saponins as candidate adjuvants. These saponins were indeed able to increase both humoral and cellular immune responses to protein-based vaccines, ultimately providing a significant degree of protection against tumor challenge when administered in combination with a tumor antigen. This preclinical study provides an in depth immunological characterization of a new saponin as a vaccine adjuvant, and encourages its further development for use in vaccine formulations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of synergistic effect of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles and aluminum based adjuvant for improving vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vivek; Kumar, Manoj; Dalela, Manu; Brahmne, H G; Singh, Harpal

    2014-08-25

    Aluminum based adjuvants have been used widely to induce long lasting protective immunity through vaccination. But reported incidences of toxicity and side effects of aluminum have raised concerns regarding their safety in childhood vaccines. The present study demonstrates the synergistic effect of admixture of polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG) based biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) and aluminum phosphate as a potential adjuvant system using tetanus toxoid (TT) as a model antigen. The immunological activity of the admixture formulation was maintained up to 180 days of storage at 5 °C±3 °C. Percent adsorption/encapsulation of tetanus toxoid increased to nearly 90% in admixture formulation as compared to 55% in conventional vaccine. Admixture preparation (PLA-PEG-Al 0.2 mg-TT and PLA-Al 0.2 mg-TT) showed 80% and 50% survival respectively, even at 180 days as compared to 30% survival observed in the conventional tetanus vaccine. The present study established the feasibility to formulate a dosage form with improved efficacy and reduced aluminum concentration for vaccination. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Deaths from Adenovirus in the US Military

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-26

    Dr. Joel Gaydos, science advisor for the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, and Dr. Robert Potter, a research associate for the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, discuss deaths from adenovirus in the US military.  Created: 3/26/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/29/2012.

  19. Porcine rotavirus strain Gottfried-based human rotavirus candidate vaccines: construction and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Yasutaka; Jones, Ronald W; Ross, Jerri; Kapikian, Albert Z

    2005-05-31

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis remains the leading cause of severe diarrheal disease in infants and young children worldwide, and thus, a safe and effective rotavirus vaccine is urgently needed in both developing and developed countries. Various candidate rotavirus vaccines that were developed by us and others have been or are being evaluated in different populations in various parts of the world. We have recently confirmed that a porcine rotavirus Gottfried strain bears a P (VP4) serotype (P2B[6]) closely related to human rotavirus P serotype 2A[6] which is of epidemiologic importance in some regions of the world. Based on the modified Jennerian approach to immunization, we have constructed 11 Gottfried-based single VP7 or VP4 gene substitution reassortant vaccine candidates which could provide: (i) an attenuation phenotype of a porcine rotavirus in humans; and (ii) antigenic coverage for G serotypes 1-6 and 8-10 and P serotype 1A[8], 1B[4] and 2A[6]. In addition, following immunization of guinea pigs with Gottfried VP4, we found low but consistent levels of neutralizing antibodies to VP4 with P1A[8] or P1B[4] specificity, both of which are of global epidemiologic importance. Thus, porcine-based VP7 reassortant rotavirus vaccines may provide an advantage over rhesus- or bovine-based VP7 reassortant vaccines since the VP4s of the latter vaccines do not evoke antibodies capable of neutralizing the viruses bearing P1A[8], P1B[4] or P2A[6] VP4.

  20. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based ebola vaccine is well-tolerated and protects immunocompromised nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Geisbert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatment. A concern that has been raised regarding the replication-competent VSV vectors that express EBOV glycoproteins is how these vectors would be tolerated by individuals with altered or compromised immune systems such as patients infected with HIV. This is especially important as all EBOV outbreaks to date have occurred in areas of Central and Western Africa with high HIV incidence rates in the population. In order to address this concern, we evaluated the safety of the recombinant VSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP in six rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV. All six animals showed no evidence of illness associated with the VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP vaccine, suggesting that this vaccine may be safe in immunocompromised populations. While one goal of the study was to evaluate the safety of the candidate vaccine platform, it was also of interest to determine if altered immune status would affect vaccine efficacy. The vaccine protected 4 of 6 SHIV-infected macaques from death following ZEBOV challenge. Evaluation of CD4+ T cells in all animals showed that the animals that succumbed to lethal ZEBOV challenge had the lowest CD4+ counts, suggesting that CD4+ T cells may play a role in mediating protection against ZEBOV.

  1. Strain Selection for Generation of O-Antigen-Based Glycoconjugate Vaccines against Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Lanzilao

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, are a major cause of invasive bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa with no vaccine currently available. Conjugation of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to a carrier protein constitutes a promising vaccination strategy. Here we describe a rational process to select the most appropriate isolates of Salmonella as source of O-antigen for developing a bivalent glycoconjugate vaccine. We screened a library of 30 S. Typhimurium and 21 S. Enteritidis in order to identify the most suitable strains for large scale O-antigen production and generation of conjugate vaccines. Initial screening was based on growth characteristics, safety profile of the isolates, O-antigen production, and O-antigen characteristics in terms of molecular size, O-acetylation and glucosylation level and position, as determined by phenol sulfuric assay, NMR, HPLC-SEC and HPAEC-PAD. Three animal isolates for each serovar were identified and used to synthesize candidate glycoconjugate vaccines, using CRM197 as carrier protein. The immunogenicity of these conjugates and the functional activity of the induced antibodies was investigated by ELISA, serum bactericidal assay and flow cytometry. S. Typhimurium O-antigen showed high structural diversity, including O-acetylation of rhamnose in a Malawian invasive strain generating a specific immunodominant epitope. S. Typhimurium conjugates provoked an anti-O-antigen response primarily against the O:5 determinant. O-antigen from S. Enteritidis was structurally more homogeneous than from S. Typhimurium, and no idiosyncratic antibody responses were detected for the S. Enteritidis conjugates. Of the three initially selected isolates, two S. Typhimurium (1418 and 2189 and two S. Enteritidis (502 and 618 strains generated glycoconjugates able to induce high specific antibody levels with high breadth of serovar-specific strain coverage, and were selected for use in vaccine

  2. Parents' views of including young boys in the Swedish national school-based HPV vaccination programme : a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Gottvall, Maria; Stenhammar, Christina; Grandahl, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore parents' views of extending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme to also include boys. Design: Explorative qualitative design using individual, face-to-face, interviews and inductive thematic analysis. Setting: 11 strategically chosen municipalities in central Sweden. Participants: Parents (n= 42) who were offered HPV vaccination for their 11-12 years old daughter in the national school-based vaccination programme. Results: The key themes were: equality f...

  3. Preparation of mucosal nanoparticles and polymer-based inactivated vaccine for Newcastle disease and H9N2 AI viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Heba M. El Naggar; Mohamed Sayed Madkour; Hussein Ali Hussein

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To develop a mucosal inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease (ND) and H9N2 viruses to protect against these viruses at sites of infections through mucosal immunity. Materials and Methods: In this study, we prepared two new formulations for mucosal bivalent inactivated vaccine formulations for Newcastle and Avian Influenza (H9N2) based on the use of nanoparticles and polymer adjuvants. The prepared vaccines were delivered via intranasal and spray routes of administration in specific...

  4. Effect of route of delivery on heterologous protection against HCV induced by an adenovirus vector carrying HCV structural genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Jie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective vaccine and new therapeutic methods for hepatitis C virus (HCV are needed, and a potent HCV vaccine must induce robust and sustained cellular-mediated immunity (CMI. Research has indicated that adenoviral and vaccinia vectors may have the ability to elicit strong B and T cell immune responses to target antigens. Results A recombinant replication-defective adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5 vector, rAd5-CE1E2, and a recombinant Tian Tan vaccinia vector, rTTV-CE1E2, were constructed to express the HCV CE1E2 gene (1-746 amino acid HCV 1b subtype. Mice were prime-immunised with rAd5-CE1E2 delivered via intramuscular injection (i.m., intranasal injection (i.n., or intradermal injection (i.d. and boosted using a different combination of injection routes. CMI was evaluated via IFN-γ ELISPOT and ICS 2 weeks after immunisation, or 16 weeks after boost for long-term responses. The humoral response was analysed by ELISA. With the exception of priming by i.n. injection, a robust CMI response against multiple HCV antigens (core, E1, E2 was elicited and remained at a high level for a long period (16 weeks post-vaccination in mice. However, i.n. priming elicited the highest anti-core antibody levels. Priming with i.d. rAd5-CE1E2 and boosting with i.d. rTTV-CE1E2 carried out simultaneously enhanced CMI and the humoral immune response, compared to the homologous rAd5-CE1E2 immune groups. All regimens demonstrated equivalent cross-protective potency in a heterologous surrogate challenge assay based on a recombinant HCV (JFH1, 2a vaccinia virus. Conclusions Our data suggest that a rAd5-CE1E2-based HCV vaccine would be capable of eliciting an effective immune response and cross-protection. These findings have important implications for the development of T cell-based HCV vaccine candidates.

  5. A highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus candidate vaccine based on Japanese encephalitis virus replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pingsheng; Chen, Xiaoming; Huang, Lihong; Liu, Shukai; Zang, Fuyu; Xing, Jinchao; Zhang, Youyue; Liang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Guihong; Liao, Ming; Qi, Wenbao

    2017-01-01

    In the swine industry, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a highly contagious disease which causes heavy economic losses worldwide. Effective prevention and disease control is an important issue. In this study, we described the construction of a Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) DNA-based replicon with a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter based on the genome of Japanese encephalitis live vaccine virus SA14-14-2, which is capable of offering a potentially novel way to develop and produce vaccines against a major pathogen of global health. This JEV DNA-based replicon contains a large deletion in the structural genes (C-prM-E). A PRRSV GP5/M was inserted into the deletion position of JEV DNA-based replicons to develop a chimeric replicon vaccine candidate for PRRSV. The results showed that BALB/c mice models with the replicon vaccines pJEV-REP-G-2A-M-IRES and pJEV-REP-G-2A-M stimulated antibody responses and induced a cellular immune response. Analysis of ELSA data showed that vaccination with the replicon vaccine expressing GP5/M induced a better antibodies response than traditional DNA vaccines. Therefore, the results suggested that this ectopic expression system based on JEV DNA-based replicons may represent a useful molecular platform for various biological applications, and the JEV DNA-based replicons expressing GP5/M can be further developed into a novel, safe vaccine candidate for PRRS.

  6. From non school-based, co-payment to school-based, free Human Papillomavirus vaccination in Flanders (Belgium): a retrospective cohort study describing vaccination coverage, age-specific coverage and socio-economic inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevere, Eva; Theeten, Heidi; Hens, Niel; De Smet, Frank; Top, Geert; Van Damme, Pierre

    2015-09-22

    School-based, free HPV vaccination for girls in the first year of secondary school was introduced in Flanders (Belgium) in 2010. Before that, non school-based, co-payment vaccination for girls aged 12-18 was in place. We compared vaccination coverage, age-specific coverage and socio-economic inequalities in coverage - 3 important parameters contributing to the effectiveness of the vaccination programs - under both vaccination systems. We used retrospective administrative data from different sources. Our sample consisted of all female members of the National Alliance of Christian Mutualities born in 1995, 1996, 1998 or 1999 (N=66,664). For each vaccination system we described the cumulative proportion HPV vaccination initiation and completion over time. We used life table analysis to calculate age-specific rates of HPV vaccination initiation and completion. Analyses were done separately for higher income and low income groups. Under non school-based, co-payment vaccination the proportions HPV vaccination initiation and completion slowly rose over time. By age 17, the proportion HPV vaccination initiation/completion was 0.75 (95% CI 0.74-076)/0.66 (95% CI 0.65-0.67). The median age at vaccination initiation/completion was 14.4 years (95% CI 14.4-14.5)/15.4 years (95% CI 15.3-15.4). Socio-economic inequalities in coverage widened over time and with age. Under school-based, free vaccination rates of HPV vaccination initiation were substantially higher. By age 14,the proportion HPV vaccination initiation/completion was 0.90 (95% CI 0.90-0.90)/0.87 (95% CI 0.87-0.88). The median age at vaccination initiation/completion was 12.7 years (95% CI 12.7-12.7)/13.3 years (95% CI 13.3-13.3). Socio-economic inequalities in coverage and in age-specific coverage were substantially smaller. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  8. Labeling of Adenovirus Particles with PARACEST Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasalatiy, Olga; Gerard, Robert D; Zhao, Piyu; Sun, Xiankai; Sherry, A. Dean

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus type 5 particles (AdCMVLuc) were labeled with two different bifunctional ligands capable of forming stable complexes with paramagnetic lanthanide ions. The number of covalently attached ligands varied between 630 and 1960 per adenovirus particle depending upon the chemical reactivity of the bifunctional ligand (NHS ester versus isothiocyanide), the amount of excess ligand added, and the reaction time. The bioactivity of each labeled adenovirus derivative, as measured by the ability of the virus to infect cells and express luciferase, was shown to be highly dependent upon the number of covalently attached ligands. This indicates that certain amino groups, likely on the surface of the adenovirus fiber protein where cell binding is known to occur, are critical for viral attachment and infection. Addition of 177Lu3+ to chemically modified versus control viruses demonstrated a significant amount of nonspecific binding of 177Lu3+ to the virus particles that could not be sequestered by addition of excess DTPA. Thus, it became necessary to implement a prelabeling strategy for conjugation of preformed lanthanide ligand chelates to adenovirus particles. Using preformed Tm3+-L2, a large number of chelates having chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) properties were attached to the surface residues of AdCMVLuc without nonspecific binding of metal ions elsewhere on the virus particle. The potential of such conjugates to act as PARACEST imaging agents was tested using an on-resonance WALTZ sequence for CEST activation. A 12% decrease in bulk water signal intensity was observed relative to controls. This demonstrates that viral particles labeled with PARACEST-type imaging agents can potentially serve as targeted agents for molecular imaging. PMID:18254605

  9. Evaluation of various adjuvant nanoparticulate formulations for meningococcal capsular polysaccharide-based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Rikhav P; D'Souza, Martin; Zughaier, Susu M

    2016-06-14

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and sepsis and its capsular polysaccharides (CPS) are a major virulence factor in meningococcal infections and form the basis for serogroup designation and preventive vaccines. We have formulated a novel meningococcal nanoparticulate vaccine formulation that does not require chemical conjugation, but encapsulates meningococcal CPS polymers in a biodegradable material that slowly release antigens, thereby has antigen depot effect to enhance antigenicity. The novel vaccine formulation is inexpensive and can be stored as a dry powder with extended shelf life that does not require the cold-chain which facilitates storage and distribution. In order to enhance the antigenicity of meningococcal nanoparticulate vaccine, we screened various adjuvants formulated in nanoparticles, for their ability to potentiate antigen presentation by dendritic cells. Here, we report that MF59 and Alum are superior to TLR-based adjuvants in enhancing dendritic cell maturation and antigen presentation markers MHC I, MHC II, CD40, CD80 and CD86 in dendritic cells pulsed with meningococcal CPS nanoparticulate vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Parental knowledge, attitudes and perception of pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Singapore: a questionnaire-based assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon How How

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under the National Childhood Immunisation Schedule (NCIS in Singapore most vaccines are provided free while some, including pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV, added to the NCIS in October 2009, are not free. In contrast to ≥95 % coverage achieved for recommended childhood vaccines that are free, 2013 coverage of the PCV booster dose was 58.9 % (for unclear reasons. To date, no population impact on pneumococcal disease (PD has been observed. We conducted a questionnaire-based study of parents of young children to assess the value of PCV to parents, and to quantify the extent to which vaccine cost is a barrier to PCV uptake in Singapore. Methods A single, trained interviewer administered a questionnaire to 200 parents ≥21 years of age with young children attending the Singapore Sengkang Polyclinic. The questionnaire asked closed-ended questions on parents’ knowledge about PD and PCV. A 5-point Likert scale measured perceived benefits and barriers to PCV vaccination. Results There were 162 parents whose children were either PCV-vaccinated or who intended to vaccinate their child with PCV (Vaccinated group, and 38 whose children were non-PCV vaccinated or who did not intend to vaccinate (Unvaccinated group. The odds ratio for PCV vaccination among parents who perceived cost as a barrier was 0.16 (95%CI 0.02–1.23. Compared to the Vaccinated group, parents in the Unvaccinated group were less willing to pay for PCV (50.0 %/94.4 %. Compared to the Vaccinated group, fewer parents in the Unvaccinated group had heard about PD (34.2 %/82.1 % or PCV (36.8 %/69.1 %, or perceived that PD was a threat to their child. Fewer parents in the Unvaccinated group knew that vaccination could prevent PD (28.9 %/77.8 %, or reported that PCV vaccination was recommended to them by any source (63.2 % had no PCV recommendation, versus 20.4 %. When informed that PCV is included in the NCIS only 65.8 % of parents in the Unvaccinated

  11. A school-based human papillomavirus vaccination program in barretos, Brazil: final results of a demonstrative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro Fregnani

    Full Text Available The implementation of a public HPV vaccination program in several developing countries, especially in Latin America, is a great challenge for health care specialists.To evaluate the uptake and the three-dose completion rates of a school-based HPV vaccination program in Barretos (Brazil.THE STUDY INCLUDED GIRLS WHO WERE ENROLLED IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS AND WHO REGULARLY ATTENDED THE SIXTH AND SEVENTH GRADES OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (MEAN AGE: 11.9 years. A meeting with the parents or guardians occurred approximately one week before the vaccination in order to explain the project and clarify the doubts. The quadrivalent vaccine was administered using the same schedule as in the product package (0-2-6 months. The school visits for regular vaccination occurred on previously scheduled dates. The vaccine was also made available at Barretos Cancer Hospital for the girls who could not be vaccinated on the day when the team visited the school.Among the potential candidates for vaccination (n = 1,574, the parents or guardians of 1,513 girls (96.1% responded to the invitation to participate in the study. A total of 1,389 parents or guardians agreed to participate in the program (acceptance rate = 91.8%. The main reason for refusing to participate in the vaccination program was fear of adverse events. The vaccine uptake rates for the first, second, and third doses were 87.5%, 86.3% and 85.0%, respectively. The three-dose completion rate was 97.2%.This demonstrative study achieved high rates of vaccination uptake and completion of three vaccine doses in children 10-16 years old from Brazil. The feasibility and success of an HPV vaccination program for adolescents in a developing country may depend on the integration between the public health and schooling systems.

  12. A history of fish vaccination: science-based disease prevention in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudding, Roar; Van Muiswinkel, Willem B

    2013-12-01

    Disease prevention and control are crucial in order to maintain a sustainable aquaculture, both economically and environmentally. Prophylactic measures based on stimulation of the immune system of the fish have been an effective measure for achieving this goal. Immunoprophylaxis has become an important part in the successful development of the fish-farming industry. The first vaccine for aquaculture, a vaccine for prevention of yersiniosis in salmonid fish, was licensed in USA in 1976. Since then the use of vaccines has expanded to new countries and new species simultaneous with the growth of the aquaculture industry. This paper gives an overview of the achievements in fish vaccinology with particular emphasis on immunoprophylaxis as a practical tool for a successful development of bioproduction of aquatic animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Toolbox for non-intrusive structural and functional analysis of recombinant VLP based vaccines: a case study with hepatitis B vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke M Mulder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fundamental to vaccine development, manufacturing consistency, and product stability is an understanding of the vaccine structure-activity relationship. With the virus-like particle (VLP approach for recombinant vaccines gaining popularity, there is growing demand for tools that define their key characteristics. We assessed a suite of non-intrusive VLP epitope structure and function characterization tools by application to the Hepatitis B surface antigen (rHBsAg VLP-based vaccine. METHODOLOGY: The epitope-specific immune reactivity of rHBsAg epitopes to a given monoclonal antibody was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR and quantitatively analyzed on rHBsAg VLPs in-solution or bound to adjuvant with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The structure of recombinant rHBsAg particles was examined by cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM and in-solution atomic force microscopy (AFM. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SPR and competitive ELISA determined relative antigenicity in solution, in real time, with rapid turn-around, and without the need of dissolving the particulate aluminum based adjuvant. These methods demonstrated the nature of the clinically relevant epitopes of HBsAg as being responsive to heat and/or redox treatment. In-solution AFM and cryoTEM determined vaccine particle size distribution, shape, and morphology. Redox-treated rHBsAg enabled 3D reconstruction from CryoTEM images--confirming the previously proposed octahedral structure and the established lipid-to-protein ratio of HBsAg particles. Results from these non-intrusive biophysical and immunochemical analyses coalesced into a comprehensive understanding of rHBsAg vaccine epitope structure and function that was important for assuring the desired epitope formation, determinants for vaccine potency, and particle stability during vaccine design, development, and manufacturing. SIGNIFICANCE: Together, the methods presented here comprise a novel

  14. Toolbox for non-intrusive structural and functional analysis of recombinant VLP based vaccines: a case study with hepatitis B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Anke M; Carragher, Bridget; Towne, Victoria; Meng, Yuan; Wang, Yang; Dieter, Lance; Potter, Clinton S; Washabaugh, Michael W; Sitrin, Robert D; Zhao, Qinjian

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental to vaccine development, manufacturing consistency, and product stability is an understanding of the vaccine structure-activity relationship. With the virus-like particle (VLP) approach for recombinant vaccines gaining popularity, there is growing demand for tools that define their key characteristics. We assessed a suite of non-intrusive VLP epitope structure and function characterization tools by application to the Hepatitis B surface antigen (rHBsAg) VLP-based vaccine. The epitope-specific immune reactivity of rHBsAg epitopes to a given monoclonal antibody was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quantitatively analyzed on rHBsAg VLPs in-solution or bound to adjuvant with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The structure of recombinant rHBsAg particles was examined by cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) and in-solution atomic force microscopy (AFM). SPR and competitive ELISA determined relative antigenicity in solution, in real time, with rapid turn-around, and without the need of dissolving the particulate aluminum based adjuvant. These methods demonstrated the nature of the clinically relevant epitopes of HBsAg as being responsive to heat and/or redox treatment. In-solution AFM and cryoTEM determined vaccine particle size distribution, shape, and morphology. Redox-treated rHBsAg enabled 3D reconstruction from CryoTEM images--confirming the previously proposed octahedral structure and the established lipid-to-protein ratio of HBsAg particles. Results from these non-intrusive biophysical and immunochemical analyses coalesced into a comprehensive understanding of rHBsAg vaccine epitope structure and function that was important for assuring the desired epitope formation, determinants for vaccine potency, and particle stability during vaccine design, development, and manufacturing. Together, the methods presented here comprise a novel suite of non-intrusive VLP structural and functional characterization tools

  15. Clinical development of a VAR2CSA-based placental malaria vaccine PAMVAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gbédandé, Komi; Fievet, Nadine; Viwami, Firmine

    2017-01-01

    Background  The antigen VAR2CSA plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) caused by Plasmodium falciparum. A VAR2CSA-based vaccine candidate, PAMVAC, is under development by an EU-funded multi-country consortium (PlacMalVac project). As part of PAMVAC...

  16. Imitation dynamics of vaccine decision-making behaviours based on the game theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyuan; Martcheva, Maia; Chen, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    Based on game theory, we propose an age-structured model to investigate the imitation dynamics of vaccine uptake. We first obtain the existence and local stability of equilibria. We show that Hopf bifurcation can occur. We also establish the global stability of the boundary equilibria and persistence of the disease. The theoretical results are supported by numerical simulations.

  17. Print News Coverage of School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Mandates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding…

  18. Food-Based Newcastle Disease V 4 Vaccine In Guinea Fowl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy trial of the feed-based Newcastle disease V4 (NDV4HR) vaccine was carried out on guinea fowl (Numida meleagris galeata, Pallas) in Maiduguri, Nigeria between December 2000 and March 2001. Eighty-five guinea fowls divided into 17 experimental groups of 5 birds per group were used in the study. The trial ...

  19. An Adenovirus Vector Incorporating Carbohydrate Binding Domains Utilizes Glycans for Gene Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Julius W.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Ak, Ferhat; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene

  20. Effect of neutralizing sera on factor X-mediated adenovirus serotype 5 gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, A.L.; Waddington, S.N.; Buckley, S.M.K.; Custers, J.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Rooijen, N. van; Goudsmit, J.; McVey, J.H.; Nicklin, S.A.; Baker, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The deployment of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors is hampered by preexisting immunity. When such vectors are delivered intravenously, hepatocyte transduction is mediated by the hexon-coagulation factor X (FX) interaction. Here, we demonstrate that human sera efficiently block FX-mediated

  1. The cleaved N-terminus of pVI binds peripentonal hexons in mature adenovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Joost; Benevento, Marco; Moyer, Crystal L; Reddy, Vijay; Nemerow, Glen R; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-01-01

    Mature human adenovirus particles contain four minor capsid proteins, in addition to the three major capsid proteins (penton base, hexon and fiber) and several proteins associated with the genomic core of the virion. Of the minor capsid proteins, VI plays several crucial roles in the infection cycle

  2. A mosaic adenovirus possessing serotype Ad5 and serotype Ad3 knobs exhibits expanded tropism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takayama, K; Reynolds, PN; Short, JS; Kawakami, Y; Adachi, Y; Glasgow, JN; Rots, MG; Krasnykh, VN; Douglas, JT; Curiel, DT

    2003-01-01

    The efficiency of cancer gene therapy with recombinant adenoviruses based on serotype 5 (Ad5) has been limited partly because of variable, and often low, expression by human primary cancer cells of the primary cellular-receptor which recognizes the knob domain of the fiber protein, the coxsackie and

  3. Development of a prototype immunochromatographic test for rapid diagnosis of respiratory adenovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inarei Paulini

    2017-09-01

    The immunochromatographic assay prototype was sufficiently sensitive to detect B (3, C (2 and 5, and F (41 adenovirus samples. Although based on preliminary data, the test demonstrated the same performance as direct immunofluorescence, but with the advantage of being a point-of-care test. Further studies are still needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

  4. Setting up a platform for plant-based influenza virus vaccine production in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortimer Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During a global influenza pandemic, the vaccine requirements of developing countries can surpass their supply capabilities, if these exist at all, compelling them to rely on developed countries for stocks that may not be available in time. There is thus a need for developing countries in general to produce their own pandemic and possibly seasonal influenza vaccines. Here we describe the development of a plant-based platform for producing influenza vaccines locally, in South Africa. Plant-produced influenza vaccine candidates are quicker to develop and potentially cheaper than egg-produced influenza vaccines, and their production can be rapidly upscaled. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of producing a vaccine to the highly pathogenic avian influenza A subtype H5N1 virus, the most generally virulent influenza virus identified to date. Two variants of the haemagglutinin (HA surface glycoprotein gene were synthesised for optimum expression in plants: these were the full-length HA gene (H5 and a truncated form lacking the transmembrane domain (H5tr. The genes were cloned into a panel of Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary plant expression vectors in order to test HA accumulation in different cell compartments. The constructs were transiently expressed in tobacco by means of agroinfiltration. Stable transgenic tobacco plants were also generated to provide seed for stable storage of the material as a pre-pandemic strategy. Results For both transient and transgenic expression systems the highest accumulation of full-length H5 protein occurred in the apoplastic spaces, while the highest accumulation of H5tr was in the endoplasmic reticulum. The H5 proteins were produced at relatively high concentrations in both systems. Following partial purification, haemagglutination and haemagglutination inhibition tests indicated that the conformation of the plant-produced HA variants was correct and the proteins were functional. The

  5. Optimization of a Der p 2-based prophylactic DNA vaccine against house dust mite allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsawat, Pinya; Pitakpolrat, Patrawadee; Prompetchara, Eakachai; Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Hannaman, Drew; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Jacquet, Alain

    2013-03-01

    DNA vaccines encoding allergens are promising immunotherapeutics to prevent or to treat allergy through induction of allergen-specific Th1 responses. Despite anti-allergy effects observed in small rodents, DNA-based vaccines are weak immunogens in primates and humans and particularly when administered by conventional injection. The goal of the present study was to improve the immunogenicity of a prophylactic vaccine encoding the major house dust mite allergen Der p 2. In this context, we evaluated the influence of different DNA backbones including notably intron and CpG enriched sequence, the DNA dose, the in vivo delivery by electroporation as well as the heterologous prime boost regimen on the vaccine efficiency. We found that a minimal allergen expression level threshold must be reached to induce the production of specific antibodies but beyond this limit, the intensity of the immune response was independent on the DNA dose and allergen expression. The in vivo DNA delivery by electroporation drastically enhanced the production of specific antibodies but not the IFNg secretion. Vaccination of naïve mice with DNA encoding Der p 2 delivered by electroporation even at very low dose (2μg) prevented the development of house dust mite allergy through Th1-skewed immune response characterized by the drastic reduction of allergen-specific IgE, IL-5 and lung inflammation together with the induction of strong specific IgG2a titers and IFNg secretion. CpG cassette in the DNA backbone does not play a critical role in the efficient prophylaxis. Finally, comparable protective immune responses were observed when using heterologous DNA prime/protein boost or homologous DNA prime/boost. Taken together, these data suggest that the potent Th1 response induced by DNA-based vaccine encoding allergens through electroporation provides the rationale for the evaluation of DNA encoding Der p 2 into HDM allergy clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety and serological response to a matrix gene-deleted rabies virus-based vaccine vector in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, James P; David, Frederic; Figueiredo, Monica Dias; Minke, Jules; Mebatsion, Teshome; Schnell, Matthias J

    2014-03-26

    Dogs account for the majority of human exposures and deaths due to rabies virus (RABV) worldwide. In this report, we show that a replication-deficient RABV-based vaccine in which the matrix gene is deleted (RABV-ΔM) is safe and induces rapid and potent VNA titers after a single inoculation in dogs. Average VNA titers peaked at 3.02 or 5.11 international units (IU/ml) by 14 days post-immunization with a single dose of 10(6) or 10(7) focus forming units (ffu), respectively, of RABV-ΔM. By day 70 post immunization, all dogs immunized with either dose of vaccine showed VNA titers >0.5IU/ml, the level indicative of a satisfactory immunization. Importantly, no systemic or local reactions were noted in any dog immunized with RABV-ΔM. The elimination of dog rabies through mass vaccination is hindered by limited resources, requirement for repeat vaccinations often for the life of a dog, and in some parts of the world, inferior vaccine quality. Our preliminary safety and immunogenicity data in dogs suggest that RABV-ΔM might complement currently used inactivated RABV-based vaccines in vaccination campaigns by helping to obtain 100% response in vaccinated dogs, thereby increasing overall vaccination coverage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The HPV vaccine: knowledge and attitudes among public health nurses and general practitioners in Northern Norway after introduction of the vaccine in the school-based vaccination programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Karin; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw; Klouman, Elise

    2017-09-21

    To investigate knowledge of and attitudes to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV vaccination, cervical cancer, related sources of information and factors associated with willingness to vaccinate one's own daughter among primary health care (PHC) personnel. Cross-sectional study. PHC. All public health nurses (PHNs) and general practitioners (GPs) in Northern Norway were invited to answer a structured electronic questionnaire; 31% participated (N = 220). Self-reported and actual knowledge, information sources, attitudes and willingness to vaccinate their (tentative) daughter. 47% of respondents knew that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. PHNs had higher self-reported and actual knowledge about HPV vaccination and cervical cancer than GPs. PHNs used the Norwegian Institute of Public Health's numerous information sources on HPV, while GPs had a low user rate. 88% of PHNs and 50% of GPs acquired information from the pharmaceutical industry. 93% PHNs and 68% of GPs would vaccinate their 12-year-old daughter. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, willingness to vaccinate one's daughter was positively associated with younger age, being PHN (OR = 5.26, 95%CI 1.74-15.94), little concern about vaccine side effects (OR = 3.61, 95%CI 1.10-11.81) and disagreement among experts (OR = 7.31, 95%CI 2.73-19.60). Increased knowledge about HPV infection and vaccination is needed, particularly among GPs. Those least concerned about side effects and disagreements among experts were most likely to vaccinate their daughter. These findings are of interest for public health authorities responsible for the Norwegian vaccination and cervix cancer screening programmes, and providers of training of PHC personnel. Key points One year after introduction of HPV vaccination among 12-year-old schoolgirls in Norway, a cross-sectional study in Northern Norway among general practitioners (GPs) and public health nurses (PHNs) showed that

  8. How to Meet the Last OIE Expert Surveillance Panel Recommendations on Equine Influenza (EI) Vaccine Composition: A Review of the Process Required for the Recombinant Canarypox-Based EI Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillot, Romain; Rash, Nicola L; Garrett, Dion; Prowse-Davis, Leah; Montesso, Fernando; Cullinane, Ann; Lemaitre, Laurent; Thibault, Jean-Christophe; Wittreck, Sonia; Dancer, Agnes

    2016-11-25

    Vaccination is highly effective to prevent, control, and limit the impact of equine influenza (EI), a major respiratory disease of horses. However, EI vaccines should contain relevant equine influenza virus (EIV) strains for optimal protection. The OIE expert surveillance panel annually reviews EIV evolution and, since 2010, the use of Florida clade 1 and 2 sub-lineages representative vaccine strains is recommended. This report summarises the development process of a fully- updated recombinant canarypox-based EI vaccine in order to meet the last OIE recommendations, including the vaccine mode of action, production steps and schedule. The EI vaccine ProteqFlu contains 2 recombinant canarypox viruses expressing the haemagglutinin of the A/equine/Ohio/03 and A/equine/Richmond/1/07 isolates (Florida clade 1 and 2 sub-lineages, respectively). The updated EI vaccine was tested for efficacy against the representative Florida clade 2 EIV strain A/equine/Richmond/1/07 in the Welsh mountain pony model. Protective antibody response, clinical signs of disease and virus shedding were compared with unvaccinated control ponies. Significant protection was measured in vaccinated ponies, which supports the vaccine registration. The recombinant canarypox-based EI vaccine was the first fully updated EI vaccine available in the EU, which will help to minimise the increasing risk of vaccine breakdown due to constant EIV evolution through antigenic drift.

  9. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all-or a part of

  10. A corn-based delivery system for animal vaccines: an oral transmissible gastroenteritis virus vaccine boosts lactogenic immunity in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamphear, Barry J; Jilka, Joseph M; Kesl, Lyle; Welter, Mark; Howard, John A; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2004-06-23

    Recombinant plant expression systems offer a means to produce large quantities of selected antigens for subunit vaccines. Cereals are particularly well-suited expression vehicles since the expressed proteins can be stored at relatively high concentrations for extended periods of time without degradation and dry seed can be formulated into oral vaccines suitable for commercial applications. A subunit vaccine candidate directed against porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus and expressed in corn seed has been developed for oral delivery to swine. Here, we show that this vaccine, when administered to previously sensitized gilts, can boost neutralizing antibody levels in the animals' serum, colostrum and milk. Thus, this vaccine candidate is effective at boosting lactogenic immunity and is appropriate to pursue through large-scale field trials preceding commercialization.

  11. PERSPECTIVES OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF MUCOSAL VACCINES AGAINST DANGEROUS INFECTIONS ON THE BASE OF TRANSGENIC PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Tretyakova

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccines created on the base of transgenic plants reacting with mucosal layers of the intestines and other organs are considered to be the perspective method of the vaccination. These vaccines induce both mucosal and general humoral immunogenicity after the peroral administration. The folding of antigenic proteins synthesizing in plants occurs via eukaryotic type and has advantages before yeast and prokaryotic platforms. This feature results to more adequate synthesis of antibodies against pathogens and to the interaction with effector molecules of complement. Earlier we together with The State Scientific Center “Vector”, Institute of chemical biology and fundamental medicine SB RAS and Dr R.Hammond from Laboratory of Plant Pathology (Maryland, USA created two candidate vaccines : one of them against AIDS (HIV-1 and hepatitis B on the base of the chimeric gene TBI-HBS, encoding simultaneously 9 antigenic determinants of HIV-1 and the main surface antigen of hepatitis B (HBsAg. The second candidate vaccine was created against hepatitis B on the base of the genetic construct with the gene preS2-S encoding the synthesis of two subunits of the main surface antigen of hepatitis B and the signal peptide HDEL which directed antigens for the accumulation on ER. Both vaccines were tested on mice and confirmed their immunogenicity as the pronounced antibodies response. Twice vaccinated mice maintained the antibodies response during 11 months after there was little tendency to lowering. It was established that transgenic plants – vaccines (tomato kept the capability to the synthesis of antigenic determinants in seven seed generations during 7 years. The results of the development of the mucosal vaccine against cervical carcinoma (carcinoma of uterine cervix evoked by human papillomaviruses of high oncogenic risks were presented in this report. We created the genetic construct consisting of 35S CaMV promoter, Ώ (omega leader of TMV, the

  12. Literature review of HPV vaccine delivery strategies: considerations for school- and non-school based immunization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Proma; Fabio, Anthony

    2014-01-09

    School-based vaccination is becoming a more widely considered method of delivering HPV immunizations to an adolescent population; however, many countries do not have experience with delivering adolescent vaccines or school-based programs. This literature review will summarize the experiences from countries implementing non-health facility-based and health facility-based vaccination programs and assess HPV vaccine coverage. In October 2012, a systematic search in PubMed for studies related to the evaluation of national/regional, pilot, or demonstration HPV immunization programs that worked within existing health system yielded nine articles, representing seventeen countries. School-based programs achieved high HPV vaccination coverage rates in 9 to 13-year-old girls across the different studies and geographic locations, suggesting non-health facility-based programs are possible for HPV vaccine introduction. Grade-based, compared to age-based, eligibility criteria may be easier to implement in school settings. More studies are needed to explore the methods to standardize estimates for HPV vaccine coverage so that programs can be appropriately evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of the Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine, SEL-068, on Nicotine Discrimination in Squirrel Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rajeev I; Bergman, Jack

    2015-08-01

    A key feature of addiction to nicotine likely resides in its ability to produce subjective effects that, in turn, may be reflected in its discriminative-stimulus properties. Vaccination against such effects of nicotine offers an intriguing therapeutic approach for smoking cessation, but a reliably effective and immunologically safe vaccine remains to be identified. Here we report on the ability of SEL-068, a nanoparticle-based vaccine that targets nicotine, to modify the discriminative-stimulus effects of nicotine in a primate species. Results indicate that squirrel monkeys vaccinated with SEL-068 failed to acquire 0.1 mg/kg nicotine discrimination but readily learned to discriminate 0.001 mg/kg of the nicotinic full agonist (+)-epibatidine ((+)-EPI). After (+)-EPI training, doses of nicotine ⩾ 0.32 mg/kg, which produced behaviorally adverse actions, still failed to substitute for the (+)-EPI training stimulus in immunized monkeys, whereas (+)-EPI and the partial agonist varenicline engendered, respectively, complete and partial substitution in all monkeys with potency comparable to their potency in non-immunized subjects. In other subjects, nicotine was trained as a discriminative-stimulus and then replaced by (+)-EPI. Subsequent vaccination with SEL-068 led to a threefold and long-lasting (>30 weeks) decrease in the potency of nicotine but not (+)-EPI or varenicline. Collectively, our results show that SEL-068 can block the development of nicotine discrimination and attenuate nicotine's effects in nicotine-experienced monkeys without altering the discriminative-stimulus properties of other nicotinic drugs. The difference in the vaccine's effects in naive and nicotine-experienced subjects provides important insight into the conditions under which immunotherapy may be effective in combating nicotine addiction.

  14. Targeting pediatric versus elderly populations for norovirus vaccines: a model-based analysis of mass vaccination options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Molly K.; Remais, Justin V.; Gambhir, Manoj; Glasser, John W.; Handel, Andreas; Parashar, Umesh D.; Lopman, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis and foodborne diarrheal disease in the United States. Norovirus vaccine development has progressed in recent years, but critical questions remain regarding which age groups should be vaccinated to maximize population impact. Methods We developed a deterministic, age-structured compartmental model of norovirus transmission and immunity in the U.S. population. The model was fit to age-specific monthly U.S. hospitalizations between 1996 and 2007. We simulated mass immunization of both pediatric and elderly populations assuming realistic coverages of 90% and 65%, respectively. We considered two mechanism of vaccine action, resulting in lower vaccine efficacy (lVE) between 22% and 43% and higher VE (hVE) of 50%. Results Pediatric vaccination was predicted to avert 33% (95% CI: 27%, 40%) and 60% (95% CI: 49%, 71%) of norovirus episodes among children under five years for lVE and hVE, respectively. Vaccinating the elderly averted 17% (95% CI: 12%, 20%) and 38% (95% CI: 34%, 42%) of cases in 65+ year olds for lVE and hVE, respectively. At a population level, pediatric vaccination was predicted to avert 18–21 times more cases and twice as many deaths per vaccinee compared to elderly vaccination. Conclusions The potential benefits are likely greater for a pediatric program, both via direct protection of vaccinated children and indirect protection of unvaccinated individuals, including adults and the elderly. These findings argue for a clinical development plan that will deliver a vaccine with a safety and efficacy profile suitable for use in children. PMID:27821278

  15. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery: Potential applications for gene and cell-based therapies in the new era of personalized medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cody S. Lee; Elliot S. Bishop; Ruyi Zhang; Xinyi Yu; Evan M. Farina; Shujuan Yan; Chen Zhao; Zongyue Zeng; Yi Shu; Xingye Wu; Jiayan Lei; Yasha Li; Wenwen Zhang; Chao Yang; Ke Wu; Ying Wu; Sherwin Ho; Aravind Athiviraham; Michael J. Lee; Jennifer Moriatis Wolf; Russell R. Reid; Tong-Chuan He

    2017-01-01

    ... or targets will become available for targeted therapies. Despite numerous setbacks, efficacious gene and/or cell-based therapies still hold the great promise to revolutionize the clinical management of human diseases...

  16. History of vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  17. History of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-08-26

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  18. Ontology-based time information representation of vaccine adverse events in VAERS for temporal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. FDA/CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS provides a valuable data source for post-vaccination adverse event analyses. The structured data in the system has been widely used, but the information in the write-up narratives is rarely included in these kinds of analyses. In fact, the unstructured nature of the narratives makes the data embedded in them difficult to be used for any further studies. Results We developed an ontology-based approach to represent the data in the narratives in a “machine-understandable” way, so that it can be easily queried and further analyzed. Our focus is the time aspect in the data for time trending analysis. The Time Event Ontology (TEO, Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE, and Vaccine Ontology (VO are leveraged for the semantic representation of this purpose. A VAERS case report is presented as a use case for the ontological representations. The advantages of using our ontology-based Semantic web representation and data analysis are emphasized. Conclusions We believe that representing both the structured data and the data from write-up narratives in an integrated, unified, and “machine-understandable” way can improve research for vaccine safety analyses, causality assessments, and retrospective studies.

  19. Entirely Carbohydrate-Based Vaccines: An Emerging Field for Specific and Selective Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmeen Nishat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are regarded as promising targets for vaccine development against infectious disease because cell surface glycans on many infectious agents are attributed to playing an important role in pathogenesis. In addition, oncogenic transformation of normal cells, in many cases, is associated with aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycan generating tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs. Technological advances in glycobiology have added a new dimension to immunotherapy when considering carbohydrates as key targets in developing safe and effective vaccines to combat cancer, bacterial infections, viral infections, etc. Many consider effective vaccines induce T-cell dependent immunity with satisfactory levels of immunological memory that preclude recurrence. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone are poorly immunogenic as they do not bind strongly to the MHCII complex and thus fail to elicit T-cell immunity. To increase immunogenicity, carbohydrates have been conjugated to carrier proteins, which sometimes can impede carbohydrate specific immunity as peptide-based immune responses can negate antibodies directed at the targeted carbohydrate antigens. To overcome many challenges in using carbohydrate-based vaccine design and development approaches targeting cancer and other diseases, zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs, isolated from the capsule of commensal anaerobic bacteria, will be discussed as promising carriers of carbohydrate antigens to achieve desired immunological responses.

  20. Evaluation of peptide selection approaches for epitope‐based vaccine design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, B.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in epitope-based vaccine (EV) design stems from the vast genomic variation of pathogens and the diversity of the host cellular immune system. Several computational approaches have been published to assist the selection of potential T cell epitopes for EV design. So far, no thoro......A major challenge in epitope-based vaccine (EV) design stems from the vast genomic variation of pathogens and the diversity of the host cellular immune system. Several computational approaches have been published to assist the selection of potential T cell epitopes for EV design. So far...... in terms of in silico measurements simulating important vaccine properties like the ability of inducing protection against a multivariant pathogen in a population; the predicted immunogenicity; pathogen, allele, and population coverage; as well as the conservation of selected epitopes. Additionally, we...... evaluate the use of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes with regards to their applicability for population-spanning vaccine design. The results showed that in terms of induced protection methods that simultaneously aim to optimize pathogen and HLA coverage significantly outperform methods focusing...

  1. Clearance of Tritrichomonas foetus in experimentally infected heifers protected with vaccines based on killed-T. foetus with different adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Lumila I; Fort, Marcelo C; Cano, Dora; Bonetti, Carina M; Giménez, Hugo D; Vázquez, Pablo M; Bacigalupe, Diana; Breccia, Javier D; Campero, Carlos M; Oyhenart, Jorge A

    2017-03-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a flagellated protozoan that causes a sexually transmitted disease in cattle. Trichomonosis is characterized by early abortions, subfertility and a significant decrease in productivity. Vaccine preparations containing whole T. foetus can reduce the time of residence of the pathogen in the host cervix after experimental infection. Here, T. foetus vaccines prepared with different adjuvants were tested, in parallel with a commercial vaccine, for their efficacy to clear the infection. The median time for clearance of infection was 69days in non-immunized animals, 55days in animals treated with aluminum hydroxide, 41days with oil-in-water or saponin based vaccines or with a commercial vaccine and 27days in animals treated with saponin plus aluminum hydroxide. A slight increase in the risk of T. foetus clearance from the genital tract was found with the saponin based vaccine (hazard ratio, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-6.17) or the commercial vaccine (hazard ratio, 2.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-6.38). A significant increase in the risk of T. foetus clearance was found with the combination of saponin plus aluminum hydroxide based vaccine (hazard ratio, 5.12; 95% confidence interval, 2.04-12.83). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral Cholera Vaccination Delivery Cost in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: An Analysis Based on Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogasale, Vittal; Ramani, Enusa; Wee, Hyeseung; Kim, Jerome H

    2016-12-01

    Use of the oral cholera vaccine (OCV) is a vital short-term strategy to control cholera in endemic areas with poor water and sanitation infrastructure. Identifying, estimating, and categorizing the delivery costs of OCV campaigns are useful in analyzing cost-effectiveness, understanding vaccine affordability, and in planning and decision making by program managers and policy makers. To review and re-estimate oral cholera vaccination program costs and propose a new standardized categorization that can help in collation, analysis, and comparison of delivery costs across countries. Peer reviewed publications listed in PubMed database, Google Scholar and World Health Organization (WHO) websites and unpublished data from organizations involved in oral cholera vaccination. The publications and reports containing oral cholera vaccination delivery costs, conducted in low- and middle-income countries based on World Bank Classification. Limits are humans and publication date before December 31st, 2014. No participants are involved, only costs are collected. Oral cholera vaccination and cost estimation. A systematic review was conducted using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cost items were categorized into four main cost groups: vaccination program preparation, vaccine administration, adverse events following immunization and vaccine procurement; the first three groups constituting the vaccine delivery costs. The costs were re-estimated in 2014 US dollars (US$) and in international dollar (I$). Ten studies were identified and included in the analysis. The vaccine delivery costs ranged from US$0.36 to US$ 6.32 (in US$2014) which was equivalent to I$ 0.99 to I$ 16.81 (in I$2014). The vaccine procurement costs ranged from US$ 0.29 to US$ 29.70 (in US$2014), which was equivalent to I$ 0.72 to I$ 78.96 (in I$2014). The delivery costs in routine immunization systems were lowest from US$ 0.36 (in US$2014) equivalent to I$ 0.99 (in I$2014). The reported cost categories

  3. Phase II Study of HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant is to determine the overall survival benefit in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients vaccinated with a HER2 ICD peptide-based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab...

  4. Phase II Study of HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant is to determine the overall survival benefit in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients vaccinated with a HER2 ICD peptide-based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab...

  5. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-02

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  6. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  7. Novel adenovirus encoded virus-like particles displaying the placental malaria associated VAR2CSA antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne-Marie C; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; Salanti, Ali

    2017-01-01

    and the CSA binding region of VAR2CSA has been identified as a promising vaccine target against placental malaria. Here we designed adenovirus encoded virus-like particles (VLP) by co-encoding Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) gag and VAR2CSA. The VAR2CSA antigen was fused to the transmembrane (TM......The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum presents antigens on the infected erythrocyte surface that bind human receptors expressed on the vascular endothelium. The VAR2CSA mediated binding to a distinct chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) is a crucial step in the pathophysiology of placental malaria......CSA fused to HA TM-CT was significantly superior in inducing ID1-ID2a specific antibodies after the first immunization. A sequential study was performed to include a comparison to the soluble VAR2CSA protein vaccine, which has entered a phase I clinical trial (NCT02647489). The results revealed...

  8. Adenovirus platform enhances transduction efficiency of human mesenchymal stem cells: An opportunity for cellular carriers of targeted TRAIL-based TR3 biologics in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M Kuroki

    Full Text Available Clinical application of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-based cancer therapeutics has not reached optimal potencies in part due to inadequate drug stability and inefficiencies in cancer-selective drug delivery. As such, innovative strategies regarding drug design and delivery are of utmost importance to achieve improved treatment results. With our current study, we aimed at exploring the groundwork for a two-stage targeting concept, which is based on the intrinsic tumor homing capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as cellular drug factories for the in situ production of our newly designed and biomarker-targeted TRAIL-based TR3 therapeutics. Since MSCs are primary cells, capable in vitro of only a limited number of cell divisions, identification of suitable strategies for their efficient genetic manipulation is of critical importance. We chose adenoviral (Ad vectors as a transduction vehicle due to its ability to infect dividing and non-dividing cells and because of their limited restrictions regarding the packaging capacity of their genetic payload. In order to enhance the transduction efficacy of MSCs using Ad5 wild-type-based vectors, we tested a variety of fiber knob modifications on a panel of patient-derived MSC lines established from adipose tissue. We identified Ad5pK7, an Ad5 vector containing a polylysine fiber knob modification, exhibiting the highest transduction rates across a panel of 16 patient-derived MSC lines. We further demonstrated that MSCs could be efficiently transduced with an Ad5pK7 vector containing membrane-anchored and secreted TR3 expression units, including the MUC16 (CA125-targeted variant Meso64-TR3. In both in vitro and in vivo experiments, MSC-derived Meso64-TR3 was far more potent on MUC16-expressing ovarian cancer compared to its non-targeted TR3 counterpart. Our findings thus provide the foundation to initiate further preclinical investigations on MSC-mediated treatment

  9. Recent advances in the development of vaccines for Ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohimain, Elijah Ige

    2016-01-04

    Ebola virus is one of the most dangerous microorganisms in the world causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans and non-human primates. Ebola virus (EBOV) is a zoonotic infection, which emerges and re-emerges in human populations. The 2014 outbreak was caused by the Zaire strain, which has a kill rate of up to 90%, though 40% was recorded in the current outbreak. The 2014 outbreak is larger than all 20 outbreaks that have occurred since 1976, when the virus was first discovered. It is the first time that the virus was sustained in urban centers and spread beyond Africa into Europe and USA. Thus far, over 22,000 cases have been reported with about 50% mortality in one year. There are currently no approved therapeutics and preventive vaccines against Ebola virus disease (EVD). Responding to the devastating effe1cts of the 2014 outbreak and the potential risk of global spread, has spurred research for the development of therapeutics and vaccines. This review is therefore aimed at presenting the progress of vaccine development. Results showed that conventional inactivated vaccines produced from EBOV by heat, formalin or gamma irradiation appear to be ineffective. However, novel vaccines production techniques have emerged leading to the production of candidate vaccines that have been demonstrated to be effective in preclinical trials using small animal and non-human primates (NHP) models. Some of the promising vaccines have undergone phase 1 clinical trials, which demonstrated their safety and immunogenicity. Many of the candidate vaccines are vector based such as Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Rabies Virus (RABV), Adenovirus (Ad), Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). Other platforms include virus like particle (VLP), DNA and subunit vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Novel Virus-Like Particle Based Vaccine Platform Displaying the Placental Malaria Antigen VAR2CSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Thrane

    Full Text Available Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Clinical testing of a soluble protein-based vaccine containing the parasite ligand, VAR2CSA, has been initiated. VAR2CSA binds to the human receptor chondroitin sulphate A (CSA and is responsible for sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in the placenta. It is imperative that a vaccine against malaria in pregnancy, if administered to women before they become pregnant, can induce a strong and long lasting immune response. While most soluble protein-based vaccines have failed during clinical testing, virus-like particle (VLP based vaccines (e.g., the licensed human papillomavirus vaccines have demonstrated high efficacy, suggesting that the spatial assembly of the vaccine antigen is a critical parameter for inducing an optimal long-lasting protective immune response. We have developed a VLP vaccine display platform by identifying regions of the HPV16 L1 coat protein where a biotin acceptor site (AviTagTM can be inserted without compromising VLP-assembly. Subsequent biotinylation of Avi-L1 VLPs allow us to anchor monovalent streptavidin (mSA-fused proteins to the biotin, thereby obtaining a dense and repetitive VLP-display of the vaccine antigen. The mSA-VAR2CSA antigen was delivered on the Avi-L1 VLP platform and tested in C57BL/6 mice in comparison to two soluble protein-based vaccines consisting of naked VAR2CSA and mSA-VAR2CSA. The mSA-VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP and soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccines induced higher antibody titers than the soluble naked VAR2CSA vaccine after three immunizations. The VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP vaccine induced statistically significantly higher endpoint titres compared to the soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccine, after 1st and 2nd immunization; however, this difference was not statistically significant after 3rd immunization. Importantly, the VLP-VAR2CSA induced antibodies were functional in inhibiting the binding of

  11. A Model International Partnership for Community-based Research on Vaccine-preventable Diseases: the Kamphaeng Phet-AFRIMS Virology Research Unit (KAVRU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    group that invented an inactivated cell culture JEV vaccine produced in vero cells that became licensed in the US based on demonstration of...proposed hepatitis E vaccine efficacy trial in Nepal, and organized team at WRAIR to invent replacement JEV vaccine produced in vero cells Rapin Snitbahn...ScienceDirect Vaccine jou rn al hom ep age: www.elsev ier .com/ locat e/vacc ine eview model international partnership for community-based research on

  12. Novel in silico tools for designing peptide-based subunit vaccines and immunotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Agrawal, Piyush; Nagpal, Gandharva; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2017-05-01

    The conventional approach for designing vaccine against a particular disease involves stimulation of the immune system using the whole pathogen responsible for the disease. In the post-genomic era, a major challenge is to identify antigenic regions or epitopes that can stimulate different arms of the immune system. In the past two decades, numerous methods and databases have been developed for designing vaccine or immunotherapy against various pathogen-causing diseases. This review describes various computational resources important for designing subunit vaccines or epitope-based immunotherapy. First, different immunological databases are described that maintain epitopes, antigens and vaccine targets. This is followed by in silico tools used for predicting linear and conformational B-cell epitopes required for activating humoral immunity. Finally, information on T-cell epitope prediction methods is provided that includes indirect methods like prediction of Major Histocompatibility Complex and transporter-associated protein binders. Different studies for validating the predicted epitopes are also examined critically. This review enlists novel in silico resources and tools available for predicting humoral and cell-mediated immune potential. These predicted epitopes could be used for designing epitope-based vaccines or immunotherapy as they may activate the adaptive immunity. Authors emphasized the need to develop tools for the prediction of adjuvants to activate innate and adaptive immune system simultaneously. In addition, attention has also been given to novel prediction methods to predict general therapeutic properties of peptides like half-life, cytotoxicity and immune toxicity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  14. Novel Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccines: evidence-based searching for variant surface antigens as candidates for vaccination against pregnancy-associated malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Jensen, Anja T R; Theander, Thor G

    2002-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has traditionally concentrated on careful molecular, biochemical, and immunological characterisation of candidate antigens. In contrast, evidence of the importance of identified antigens in immunity to human infection and disease has generally been limited......) in particular, to provide robust evidence of a causal link between the two in order to allow efficient and evidence-based identification of candidate antigens for malaria vaccine development....... to statistically significant co-variation with protection rather than on demonstration of causal relationships. We have studied the relationship between variant surface antigen-specific antibodies and clinical protection from Plasmodium falciparum malaria in general, and from pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM...

  15. Towards clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based transmission blocking malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Michael; Jore, Matthijs M; Sauerwein, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Malaria is a devastating vector-borne disease caused by the Plasmodium parasite, resulting in almost 0.5 million casualties per year. The parasite has a complex life-cycle that includes asexual replication in human red blood cells, causing symptomatic malaria, and sexual stages which are essential for the transmission to the mosquito vector. A vaccine targeting the sexual stages of the parasite and thus blocking transmission will be instrumental for the eradication of malaria. One of the leading transmission blocking vaccine candidates is the sexual stage antigen Pfs48/45. Areas covered: PubMed was searched to review the progress and future prospects for clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based subunit vaccine. We will focus on biological function, naturally acquired immunity, functional activity of specific antibodies, sequence diversity, production of recombinant protein and preclinical studies. Expert commentary: Pfs48/45 is one of the lead-candidates for a transmission blocking vaccine and should be further explored in clinical trials.

  16. Designing a VAR2CSA-based vaccine to prevent placental malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Michal; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-12-22

    Placental malaria (PM) due to Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of maternal, fetal and infant mortality, but the mechanisms of pathogenesis and protective immunity are relatively well-understood for this condition, providing a path for vaccine development. P. falciparum parasites bind to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) to sequester in the placenta, and women become resistant over 1-2 pregnancies as they acquire antibodies that block adhesion to CSA. The protein VAR2CSA, a member of the PfEMP1 variant surface antigen family, mediates parasite adhesion to CSA, and is the leading target for a vaccine to prevent PM. Obstacles to PM vaccine development include the large size (∼ 350 kD), high cysteine content, and sequence variation of VAR2CSA. A number of approaches have been taken to identify the combination of VAR2CSA domains and alleles that can induce broadly active antibodies that block adhesion of heterologous parasite isolates to CSA. This review summarizes these approaches, which have examined VAR2CSA fragments for binding activity, antigenicity with naturally acquired antibodies, and immunogenicity in animals for inducing anti-adhesion or surface-reactive antibodies. Two products are expected to enter human clinical studies in the near future based on N-terminal VAR2CSA fragments that have high binding affinity for CSA, and additional proteins preferentially expressed by placental parasites are also being examined for their potential contribution to a PM vaccine. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Public acceptance of a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine in Aceh, Indonesia: A hospital-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harapan Harapan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the acceptance towards a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine (EVV and associated factors in a non-affected country, Indonesia. Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in four regencies of Aceh, Indonesia. A set of pre-tested questionnaires was used to obtain information on acceptance towards EVV and a range of explanatory variables. Associations between EVV acceptance and explanatory variables were tested using multi-steps logistic regression analysis and the Spearman's rank correlation. Results: Participants who had knowledge on Ebola virus disease (EVD were 45.3% (192/424 and none of the participants achieved 80% correct answers on the knowledge regarding to EVD. About 73% of participants expressed their willingness to receive the EVV. Education attainment, occupation, monthly income, have heard regarding to EVD previously, socioeconomic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were associated significantly with acceptance towards EVV in univariate analysis (P < 0.05. In the final multivariate model, socio-economic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were the independent explanatory variables for EVV acceptance. Conclusions: The knowledge of EVD was low, but this minimally affected the acceptance towards EVV. However, to facilitate optimal uptake of EVV, dissemination of vaccine-related information prior to its introduction is required.

  18. Evidence-based decision making for vaccines: the need for an ethical foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert I; Caplan, Arthur L

    2012-02-01

    Evidence-based decision making (EBDM) is a tool to assess the value of medical interventions by weighing costs and health outcomes that has increasingly been applied to vaccines. However, many of the ethical considerations that support EBDM when used to evaluate therapeutic care do not readily translate to prevention. This mismatch can result in policy decisions that produce unanticipated negative consequences, including public resistance. In its emphasis on quantifiable outcomes, EBDM invokes the ethical principle of rule-utilitarianism, which values the optimal long-run balance of benefit over harm. Vaccines raise a number of competing ethical concerns in ways that individual medical treatments do not. They rely on widespread compliance for effectiveness, which can limit individual autonomy, emphasize population over individual effects, which can obscure the imperative of beneficence to help the vulnerable, require a just allocation process within populations, and sometimes challenge strong social norms. For EBDM to effectively guide vaccine policy makers, such as the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) in the United States, an ethical foundation is needed that systematically considers all relevant values and transparently places vaccination recommendations in the context of social norms and individual concerns. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Future of an “Asymptomatic” T-cell Epitope-Based Therapeutic Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervillez, Xavier; Gottimukkala, Chetan; Kabbara, Khaled W.; Nguyen, Chelsea; Badakhshan, Tina; Kim, Sarah M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Considering the limited success of the recent herpes clinical vaccine trial [1], new vaccine strategies are needed. Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) in the majority of men and women are usually asymptomatic and results in lifelong viral latency in neurons of sensory ganglia (SG). However, in a minority of men and women HSV spontaneous reactivation can cause recurrent disease (i.e., symptomatic individuals). Our recent findings show that T cells from symptomatic and asymptomatic men and women (i.e. those with and without recurrences, respectively) recognize different herpes epitopes. This finding breaks new ground and opens new doors to assess a new vaccine strategy: mucosal immunization with HSV-1 & HSV-2 epitopes that induce strong in vitro CD4 and CD8 T cell responses from PBMC derived from asymptomatic men and women (designated here as “asymptomatic” protective epitopes”) could boost local and systemic “natural” protective immunity, induced by wild-type infection. Here we highlight the rationale and the future of our emerging “asymptomatic” T cell epitope-based mucosal vaccine strategy to decrease recurrent herpetic disease. PMID:22701511

  20. Shikonin enhances efficacy of a gene-based cancer vaccine via induction of RANTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hui-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shikonin, a phytochemical purified from Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been shown to confer diverse pharmacological activities, including accelerating granuloma formation, wound healing, anti-inflammation and others, and is explored for immune-modifier activities for vaccination in this study. Transdermal gene-based vaccine is an attractive approach for delivery of DNA transgenes encoding specific tumor antigens to host skin tissues. Skin dendritic cells (DCs, a potent antigen-presenting cell type, is known to play a critical role in transmitting and orchestrating tumor antigen-specific immunities against cancers. The present study hence employs these various components for experimentation. Method The mRNA and protein expression of RANTES were detected by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The regional expression of RANTES and tissue damage in test skin were evaluated via immunohistochemistry assay. Fluorescein isothiocyanate sensitization assay was performed to trace the trafficking of DCs from the skin vaccination site to draining lymph nodes. Adjuvantic effect of shikonin on gene gun-delivered human gp100 (hgp100 DNA cancer vaccine was studied in a human gp100-transfected B16 (B16/hgp100 tumor model. Results Among various phytochemicals tested, shikonin induced the highest level of expression of RANTES in normal skin tissues. In comparison, mouse RANTES cDNA gene transfection induced a higher level of mRANTES expression for a longer period, but caused more extensive skin damage. Topical application of shikonin onto the immunization site before gene gun-mediated vaccination augmented the population of skin DCs migrating into the draining lymph nodes. A hgp100 cDNA gene vaccination regimen with shikonin pretreatment as an adjuvant in a B16/hgp100 tumor model increased cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities in splenocytes and lymph node cells on target tumor cells. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that shikonin can

  1. Efficacy of a non-updated, Matrix-C-based equine influenza subunit-tetanus vaccine following Florida sublineage clade 2 challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Pouwels, H. G. W.; Van de Zande, S. M. A.; Horspool, L. J. I.; Hoeijmakers, M. J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the ability of current equine influenza vaccines to provide cross-protection against emerging strains is important. Horses not vaccinated previously and seronegative for equine influenza based on haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay were assigned at random to vaccinated (n=7) or non-vaccinated (control, n=5) groups. Vaccination was performed twice four weeks apart with a 1 ml influenza subunit (A/eq/Prague/1/56, A/eq/Newmarket/1/93, A/eq/Newmarket/2/93), tetanus toxoid vaccine wi...

  2. HIV-1 vaccines based on replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia protected Chinese rhesus macaques from simian HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Li, Yue; Luo, Zhenwu; Yang, Guibo; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Sun, Maosheng; Dai, Jiejie; Li, Qihan; Qin, Chuan; Shao, Yiming

    2015-03-27

    To assess the efficacy of HIV vaccines constructed from replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia virus (rTV) alone or combined with DNA in protecting Chinese rhesus macaques from homologous Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV)-CN97001 challenge. The nef, gag, pol, and gp140 genes from strain CRF07_BC HIV-1 CN54 were selected to construct an HIV vaccine using the rTV or rTV/DNA vaccine. After vaccination, the vaccine and control groups were intravenously challenged with SHIV-CN97001 (32 MID50). HIV-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, gp70 V1V2 binding antibodies, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses were measured prospectively after vaccination with an ELISA, a virus infectivity assay in TZM-bl cells, and ELISPOT assays, respectively. Viral RNA was quantified after challenge with real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and protection efficacy was determined with an analysis of CD8 lymphocyte depletion in vivo. Both rTV and DNA/rTV vaccine groups developed strong cellular and humoral responses against HIV-1 CN54 antigens, including Gag and Env, and also developed significant and persistent anti-Env antibodies and neutralizing antibodies after immunization. Both the rTV and DNA/rTV groups were significantly protected against SHIV-CN97001 or displayed lower viremia than the controls. After CD8 lymphocyte depletion, no viremia was detectable in the vaccinated monkeys, but rebounded rapidly in the control animals. Protection against infection correlated with vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies specific for homologous HIV-1 viruses. An rTV-based HIV-1 vaccine, with or without a DNA primer, provided protection from SHIV challenge in a macaque model. Replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia is a promising vector and should enable advances in HIV-1 vaccine development.

  3. An LASV GPC pseudotyped virus based reporter system enables evaluation of vaccines in mice under non-BSL-4 conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianqian; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Wu, Jiajing; Nie, Jianhui; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Chenyan; Zhang, Li; Wang, Youchun

    2017-09-12

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever endemic throughout western Africa. Because of the ability to cause lethal disease in humans, limited treatment options, and potential as a bioweapon, the need for vaccines to prevent LASV epidemic is urgent. However, LASV vaccine development has been hindered by the lack of appropriate small animal models for efficacy evaluation independent of biosafety level four (BSL-4) facilities. Here we generated an LASV-glycoprotein precursor (GPC)-pseudotyped Human immunodeficiency virus containing firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter gene as surrogate to develop a bioluminescent-imaging-based BALB/c mouse model for one-round infection under non-BSL-4 conditions, in which the bioluminescent intensity of Fluc was utilized as endpoint when evaluating vaccine efficacy. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that LASV GPC pseudotyped virus appeared structurally similar to native virion. Meanwhile, we constructed DNA vaccine (pSV1.0-LASVGPC) and pseudoparticle-based vaccine (LASVpp) that displayed conformational GPC protein of LASV strain Josiah to vaccinate BALB/c mice using intramuscular electroporation and by intraperitoneal routes, respectively. Vaccinated mice in LASVpp alone and DNA prime+LASVpp boost schedules were protected against 100 AID50 of LASV pseudovirus challenge, and it was found that in vivo efficiencies correlated with their anti-LASV neutralizing activities and MCP-1 cytokine levels in serum sampled before infection. The bioluminescence pseudovirus infection model can be useful tool for the preliminary evaluation of immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccine candidates against LASV outside of BSL-4 containments, and the results with pseudoparticle-based vaccine provided very helpful information for LASV vaccine design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influenza during pregnancy: Incidence, vaccination coverage and attitudes toward vaccination in the French web-based cohort G-GrippeNet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubet, Paul; Guerrisi, Caroline; Turbelin, Clément; Blondel, Béatrice; Launay, Odile; Bardou, Marc; Goffinet, François; Colizza, Vittoria; Hanslik, Thomas; Kernéis, Solen

    2016-04-29

    Pregnancy is a risk factor for severe influenza. However, data on influenza incidence during pregnancy are scarce. Likewise, no data are available on influenza vaccine coverage in France since national recommendation in 2012. We aimed to assess these points using a novel nationwide web-based surveillance system, G-GrippeNet. During the 2014/2015 influenza season, pregnant women living in metropolitan France were enrolled through a web platform (https://www.grippenet.fr/). Throughout the season, participants were asked to report, on a weekly basis, if they had experienced symptoms of influenza-like-illness (ILI). ILI episodes reported were used to calculate incidence density rates based on period of participation from each participant. Vaccination coverage was estimated after weighing on age and education level from national data on pregnant women. Factors associated with higher vaccination coverage were obtained through a logistic regression with Odds Ratio (OR) corrected with the Zhang and Yu method. A total of 153 women were enrolled. ILI incidence density rate was 1.8 per 100 person-week (95% CI, 1.5-2.1). This rate was higher in women older than 40 years (RR = 3.0, 95% CI [1.1-8.3], p = 0.03) and during first/second trimesters compared to third trimester (RR = 4.0, 95% CI [1.4-12.0], p = 0.01). Crude vaccination coverage was 39% (95% CI, 31-47) and weighted vaccination coverage was estimated at 26% (95% CI, 20-34). Health care provider recommendation for vaccination (corrected OR = 7.8; 95% CI [3.0-17.1]) and non-smoking status (cOR = 2.1; 95% CI [1.2-6.9]) were associated with higher vaccine uptake. This original web based longitudinal surveillance study design proved feasible in pregnant women population. First results are of interest and underline that public health policies should emphasize the vaccination promotion through health care providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein and modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based influenza virus nucleoprotein vaccines are differentially immunogenic in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburg, A F; Magnusson, S E; Bosman, F; Stertman, L; de Vries, R D; Rimmelzwaan, G F

    2017-10-01

    Because of the high variability of seasonal influenza viruses and the eminent threat of influenza viruses with pandemic potential, there is great interest in the development of vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity. Most probably, broadly protective influenza vaccines are based on conserved proteins, such as nucleoprotein (NP). NP is a vaccine target of interest as it has been shown to induce cross-reactive antibody and T cell responses. Here we tested and compared various NP-based vaccine preparations for their capacity to induce humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza virus NP. The immunogenicity of protein-based vaccine preparations with Matrix-M™ adjuvant as well as recombinant viral vaccine vector modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the influenza virus NP gene, with or without modifications that aim at optimization of CD8 + T cell responses, was addressed in BALB/c mi