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Sample records for adenoviral gene therapy

  1. Adenoviral Vectors for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited blood clotting disorder resulting from deficiency of blood coagulation factors. Current standard of care for hemophilia patients is frequent intravenous infusions of the missing coagulation factor. Gene therapy for hemophilia involves the introduction of a normal copy of the deficient coagulation factor gene thereby potentially offering a definitive cure for the bleeding disorder. A variety of approaches have been pursued for hemophilia gene therapy and this review article focuses on those that use adenoviral vectors. PMID:24883229

  2. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  3. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer efficienc

  4. Adenoviral gene therapy in gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nima Khalighinejad; Hesammodin Hariri; Omid Behnamfar; Arash Yousefi; Amir Momeni

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. With current therapeutic approaches the prognosis of gastric cancer is very poor, as gastric cancer accounts for the second most common cause of death in cancer related deaths. Gastric cancer like almost all other cancers has a molecular genetic basis which relies on disruption in normal cellular regulatory mechanisms regarding cell growth, apoptosis and cell division. Thus novel therapeutic approaches such as gene therapy promise to become the alternative choice of treatment in gastric cancer. In gene therapy, suicide genes, tumor suppressor genes and anti-angiogenesis genes among many others are introduced to cancer cells via vectors.Some of the vectors widely used in gene therapy are Adenoviral vectors. This review provides an update of the new developments in adenoviral cancer gene therapy including strategies for inducing apoptosis, inhibiting metastasis and targeting the cancer cells.

  5. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors in experimental gene therapy*

    OpenAIRE

    Józkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Józef

    2005-01-01

    In the majority of potential applications gene therapy will require an effective transfer of a transgene in vivo resulting in high-level and long-term transgene expression, all in the absence of significant toxicity or inflammatory responses. The most efficient vehicles for delivery of foreign genes to the target tissues are modified adenoviruses. Adenoviral vectors of the first generation, despite the high infection efficacy, have an essential drawback: they induce strong immune response, wh...

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeting enhances adenoviral vector based suicide gene therapy of osteosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witlox, M.A.; van Beusechem, V.W.; Grill, J.; Haisma, H.J.; Schaap, G.; Bras, J.; Van Diest, P.; De Gast, A.; Curiel, D.T.; Pinedo, H.M.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Wuisman, P.I.

    2002-01-01

    Background Despite improvements in the treatment of osteosarcoma (OS) there are still too many patients who cannot benefit from current treatment modalities. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are warranted. Here we explore the efficacy of targeted adenoviral based suicide gene therapy. Methods a

  7. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors devoid of all viral-coding sequences are promising non-integrating vectors for liver-directed gene therapy because they have a large cloning capacity, can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types from various species independent of the cell cycle and can result in long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. The main obstacle preventing clinical applications of HDAd for liver-directed gene therapy is the host innate inflammatory...

  8. Challenges and Prospects for Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquale Piccolo; Nicola Brunetti-Pierri

    2014-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors that are devoid of all viral coding sequences are promising non-integrating vectors for gene therapy because they efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vivo, have a large cloning capacity, and drive long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. The main obstacle preventing clinical applications of HDAd vectors is the host innate inflammatory response against the vector capsid proteins that occurs shortly after intravascular vect...

  9. Adenoviral gene therapy in gastric cancer: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Khalighinejad, Nima; Hariri, Hesammodin; Behnamfar, Omid; Yousefi, Arash; Momeni, Amir

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. With current therapeutic approaches the prognosis of gastric cancer is very poor, as gastric cancer accounts for the second most common cause of death in cancer related deaths. Gastric cancer like almost all other cancers has a molecular genetic basis which relies on disruption in normal cellular regulatory mechanisms regarding cell growth, apoptosis and cell division. Thus novel therapeutic approaches such as gene therapy promi...

  10. Gene Therapy with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors: Current Advances and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Ng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant Adenoviral vectors represent one of the best gene transfer platforms due to their ability to efficiently transduce a wide range of quiescent and proliferating cell types from various tissues and species. The activation of an adaptive immune response against the transduced cells is one of the major drawbacks of first generation Adenovirus vectors and has been overcome by the latest generation of recombinant Adenovirus, the Helper-Dependent Adenoviral (HDAd vectors. HDAds have innovative features including the complete absence of viral coding sequences and the ability to mediate high level transgene expression with negligible chronic toxicity. This review summarizes the many aspects of HDAd biology and structure with a major focus on in vivo gene therapy application and with an emphasis on the unsolved issues that these vectors still presents toward clinical application.

  11. Challenges and Prospects for Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Piccolo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd vectors that are devoid of all viral coding sequences are promising non-integrating vectors for gene therapy because they efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vivo, have a large cloning capacity, and drive long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. The main obstacle preventing clinical applications of HDAd vectors is the host innate inflammatory response against the vector capsid proteins that occurs shortly after intravascular vector administration and result in acute toxicity, the severity of which is dose dependent. Intense efforts have been focused on elucidating adenoviral vector–host interactions and the factors involved in the acute toxicity. This review focuses on the recent acquisition of data on such interactions and on strategies investigated to improve the therapeutic index of HDAd vectors.

  12. Clinical utility of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene therapy: current perspectives

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    Chen GX

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Guang-xia Chen,1,* Shu Zhang,2–4,* Xiao-hua He,1 Shi-yu Liu,1 Chao Ma,2–4 Xiao-Ping Zou2–4 1Department of Gastroenterology, First People’s Hospital of Xuzhou, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Gastroenterology, Drum Tower Hospital, 3Medical School of Nanjing University, 4Jiangsu Clinical Medical Center of Digestive Disease, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors have contributed equally to the paperAbstract: Gene therapy has promised to be a highly effective antitumor treatment by introducing a tumor suppressor gene or the abrogation of an oncogene. Among the potential therapeutic transgenes, the tumor suppressor gene p53 serves as an attractive target. Restoration of wild-type p53 function in tumors can be achieved by introduction of an intact complementary deoxyribonucleic acid copy of the p53 gene using a suitable viral vector, in most cases an adenoviral vector (Adp53. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that Adp53 triggers a dramatic tumor regression response in various cancers. These viruses are engineered to lack certain early proteins and are thus replication defective, including Gendicine, SCH-58500, and Advexin. Several types of tumor-specific p53-expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus vectors (known as replication-competent CRAdp53 vectors have been developed, such as ONYX 015, AdDelta24-p53, SG600-p53, OBP-702, and H101. Various clinical trials have been conducted to investigate the safety and efficiency of these adenoviral vectors. In this review we will talk about the biological mechanisms, clinical utility, and therapeutic potentials of the replication-deficient Adp53-based and replication-competent CRAdp53-based gene therapy.Keywords: adenovirus, Adp53, CRAdp53

  13. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Raffaele; Borzone, Roberta; D’Aria, Stefania; Annunziata, Patrizia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate which ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Towards this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared to saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with Ethylene Glycol (EG), a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy. PMID:26609667

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27245510

  15. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumov, Inna [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Kazanov, Dina [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lisiansky, Victoria [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Starr, Alex [Lung and Allergy Institute, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Arber, Nadir, E-mail: narber@post.tau.ac.il [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  16. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35–40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our “gene therapy” approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce ∼ 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by ∼ 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  17. Loss of Endothelial Barrier in Marfan Mice (mgR/mgR Results in Severe Inflammation after Adenoviral Gene Therapy.

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    Philipp Christian Seppelt

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue. The vascular complications of Marfan syndrome have the biggest impact on life expectancy. The aorta of Marfan patients reveals degradation of elastin layers caused by increased proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. In this study we performed adenoviral gene transfer of human tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (hTIMP-1 in aortic grafts of fibrillin-1 deficient Marfan mice (mgR/mgR in order to reduce elastolysis.We performed heterotopic infrarenal transplantation of the thoracic aorta in female mice (n = 7 per group. Before implantation, mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas (WT, C57BL/6 were transduced ex vivo with an adenoviral vector coding for human TIMP-1 (Ad.hTIMP-1 or β-galactosidase (Ad.β-Gal. As control mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas received no gene therapy. Thirty days after surgery, overexpression of the transgene was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC and collagen in situ zymography. Histologic staining was performed to investigate inflammation, the neointimal index (NI, and elastin breaks. Endothelial barrier function of native not virus-exposed aortas was evaluated by perfusion of fluorescent albumin and examinations of virus-exposed tissue were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM.IHC and ISZ revealed sufficient expression of the transgene. Severe cellular inflammation and intima hyperplasia were seen only in adenovirus treated mgR/mgR aortas (Ad.β-Gal, Ad.hTIMP-1 NI: 0.23; 0.43, but not in native and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT (NI: 0.01; 0.00. Compared to native mgR/mgR and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT aorta, the NI is highly significant greater in Ad.hTIMP-1 transduced mgR/mgR aorta (p = 0.001; p = 0.001. As expected, untreated Marfan grafts showed significant more elastolysis compared to WT (p = 0.001. However, elastolysis in Marfan aortas was not reduced by adenoviral overexpression of hTIMP-1 (compared to untreated

  18. Peri- and Postnatal Effects of Prenatal Adenoviral VEGF Gene Therapy in Growth-Restricted Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, David J; Wallace, Jacqueline M; Aitken, Raymond P; Milne, John S; Martin, John F; Zachary, Ian C; Peebles, Donald M; David, Anna L

    2016-06-01

    Uterine artery (UtA) adenovirus (Ad) vector-mediated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances uterine blood flow in normal sheep pregnancy and increases fetal growth in the overnourished adolescent sheep model of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Herein, we examined its impact on gestation length, neonatal survival, early postnatal growth and metabolism. Singleton-bearing ewes were evenly allocated to receive Ad.VEGF-A165 (5 × 10(10) particles/ml, 10 ml, n = 17) or saline (10 ml, n = 16) injected into each UtA at laparotomy (0.6 gestation). Fetal growth was serially monitored (blind) by ultrasound until delivery. Lambs were weighed and blood was sampled weekly and a glucose tolerance test performed (68-day postnatal age). Hepatic DNA/RNA was extracted at necropsy (83-day postnatal age) to examine methylation status of eight somatotropic axis genes. IGF1 mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, respectively. All pregnancies remained viable following Ad.VEGF-A165 treatment. Fetal abdominal circumference and renal volume were greater in the Ad.VEGF-A165 group compared with the saline group at 21/28 days (P ≤ 0.04) postinjection. At delivery, gestation length (P = 0.07), lamb birthweight (P = 0.08), umbilical girth (P = 0.06), and plasma glucose (P = 0.09) tended to be greater in Ad.VEGF-A165-treated lambs. Levels of neonatal intervention required to ensure survival was equivalent between groups. Absolute postnatal growth rate (P = 0.02), insulin area under the curve (P = 0.04) and carcass weight at necropsy (P = 0.04) were increased by Ad.VEGF-A165 treatment. There was no impact on markers of insulin sensitivity or methylation/expression of key genes involved in somatic growth. Ad.VEGF-A165 gene therapy increased fetal growth in a sheep FGR model, and lambs continued to thrive during the neonatal and early postnatal period. PMID:27103444

  19. Infectivity enhanced adenoviral-mediated mda-7/IL-24 gene therapy for ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leath, CA; Kataram, M; Bhagavatula, P; Gopalkrishnan, RV; Dent, P; Fisher, PB; Pereboev, A; Carey, D; Lebedeva, [No Value; Haisma, HJ; Alvarez, RD; Curiel, DT; Mahasreshti, PJ

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 [mda-7/interleukin (IL)-24] has been identified as a novel anti-cancer agent, which specifically induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal epithelial, endothelial and fibroblast cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ant

  20. Negative Regulation-Resistant p53 Variant Enhances Oncolytic Adenoviral Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Taeyoung; Choi, Il-Kyu; Kim, Minjung; Lee, Jung-Sun; Oh, Eonju; Kim, Jungho; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2012-01-01

    Intact p53 function is essential for responsiveness to cancer therapy. However, p53 activity is attenuated by the proto-oncoprotein Mdm2, the adenovirus protein E1B 55kD, and the p53 C-terminal domain. To confer resistance to Mdm2, E1B 55kD, and C-terminal negative regulation, we generated a p53 variant (p53VPΔ30) by deleting the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of wild-type p53 and inserting the transcriptional activation domain of herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. The oncolytic adenovirus...

  1. Comparison of osteogenic potentials of human rat BMP4 and BMP6 gene therapy using [E1-] and [E1-,E2b-] adenoviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Li, Jin Zhong Li, Debra D. Pittman, Andy Amalfitano, Gerald R. Hankins, Gregory A. Helm

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenic potentials of some recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP first-generation adenoviral vectors (ADhBMPs are significantly limited in immunocompetent animals. It is unclear what role expression of viral proteins and foreign proteins transduced by adenoviral vectors play in the host immune response and in ectopic bone formation. In this study two sets of experiments were designed and performed. First, rat BMP6 cDNA were amplified, sequenced, and recombined in first-generation adenoviral vector (ADrBMP6. A comparison of human and rat BMP6 adenoviral vectors demonstrated identical osteogenic activities in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent rats. Second, the activities of recombinant human BMP6 in E1- (ADhBMP6 and [E1-,E2b-] ( [E1-,E2b-]ADGFP&hBMP6, and [E1-,E2b-]ADhBMP6 adenoviral vectors were compared in both in vitro and in vivo models. Similar activities of these two generations of BMP adenoviral vectors were found in all models. These results indicate that the amount of viral gene expression and the source of the BMP cDNA are not major factors in the interruption of osteogenic potentials of recombinant BMP6 adenoviral vectors in immunocompetent animals.

  2. Anti-viral state segregates two molecular phenotypes of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: potential relevance for adenoviral gene therapy

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    Chiorini Jay A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC remains a leading cause of cancer mortality for which novel gene therapy approaches relying on tumor-tropic adenoviruses are being tested. Methods We obtained the global transcriptional profiling of primary PDAC using RNA from eight xenografted primary PDAC, three primary PDAC bulk tissues, three chronic pancreatitis and three normal pancreatic tissues. The Affymetrix GeneChip HG-U133A was used. The results of the expression profiles were validated applying immunohistochemical and western blot analysis on a set of 34 primary PDAC and 10 established PDAC cell lines. Permissivity to viral vectors used for gene therapy, Adenovirus 5 and Adeno-Associated Viruses 5 and 6, was assessed on PDAC cell lines. Results The analysis of the expression profiles allowed the identification of two clearly distinguishable phenotypes according to the expression of interferon-stimulated genes. The two phenotypes could be readily recognized by immunohistochemical detection of the Myxovirus-resistance A protein, whose expression reflects the activation of interferon dependent pathways. The two molecular phenotypes discovered in primary carcinomas were also observed among established pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, suggesting that these phenotypes are an intrinsic characteristic of cancer cells independent of their interaction with the host's microenvironment. The two pancreatic cancer phenotypes are characterized by different permissivity to viral vectors used for gene therapy, as cell lines expressing interferon stimulated genes resisted to Adenovirus 5 mediated lysis in vitro. Similar results were observed when cells were transduced with Adeno-Associated Viruses 5 and 6. Conclusion Our study identified two molecular phenotypes of pancreatic cancer, characterized by a differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes and easily recognized by the expression of the Myxovirus-resistance A protein. We

  3. Efficient and selective gene transfer into primary human brain tumors by using single-chain antibody-targeted adenoviral vectors with native tropism abolished

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusechem, VW; Grill, J; Mastenbroek, DCJ; Wickham, TJ; Roelvink, PW; Haisma, HJ; Lamfers, MLM; Dirven, CMF; Pinedo, HM; Gerritsen, WR

    2002-01-01

    The application of adenoviral vectors in cancer gene therapy is hampered by low receptor expression on tumor cells and high receptor expression on normal epithelial cells. Targeting adenoviral vectors toward tumor cells may improve cancer gene therapy procedures by providing augmented tumor transduc

  4. Tropism-modification strategies for targeted gene delivery using adenoviral vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Andrew H; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; McNeish, Iain A; Raul Alba; Lynda Coughlan

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in...

  5. Evaluation of signal transduction pathways after transient cutaneous adenoviral gene delivery

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    Steinau Hans-Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenoviral vectors have provided effective methods for in vivo gene delivery in therapeutic applications. However, these vectors can induce immune responses that may severely affect the ability of vector re-application. There is limited information about the mechanisms and signal transduction pathways involved in adenoviral recognition. For optimization of cutaneous gene therapy it is necessary to investigate molecular mechanisms of virus recognition in epidermal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the signal transduction of the innate immunity after adenoviral DNA internalization in keratinocytes. Methods In vitro, keratinocytes were transfected with DNA, in the presence and absence of inhibitors for signalling molecules. In vivo, immunocompetent and athymic mice (n = 3 per group were twice transduced with an Ad-vector. Results The results show an acute induction of type-I-interferon after in vitro transfection. Inhibition of PI3K, p38 MAPK, JNK and NFkappaB resulted in a decreased expression of type-I-interferon. In contrast to immunocompetent mice, athymic mice demonstrated a constant transgene expression and reduced inflammatory response in vivo. Conclusion The results suggest an induction of the innate immunity triggered by cytoplasm localised DNA which is mediated by PI3K-, p38 MAPK-, JNK-, NFkappaB-, JAK/STAT- and ERK1/2-dependent pathways. A stable transgene expression and a reduced inflammatory response in immunodeficient mice have been observed. These results provide potential for an effective adenoviral gene delivery into immunosupressed skin.

  6. Comparison of osteogenic potentials of human rat BMP4 and BMP6 gene therapy using [E1-] and [E1-,E2b-] adenoviral vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongwei; Li, Jin Zhong; D. Pittman, Debra; Amalfitano, Andy; Hankins, Gerald R.; Helm, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Osteogenic potentials of some recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) first-generation adenoviral vectors (ADhBMPs) are significantly limited in immunocompetent animals. It is unclear what role expression of viral proteins and foreign proteins transduced by adenoviral vectors play in the host immune response and in ectopic bone formation. In this study two sets of experiments were designed and performed. First, rat BMP6 cDNA were amplified, sequenced, and recombined in first-genera...

  7. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models. PMID:27274908

  8. Transduction of Brain Dopamine Neurons by Adenoviral Vectors Is Modulated by CAR Expression: Rationale for Tropism Modified Vectors in PD Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Travis B.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Glandon, Anya M.; Curiel, David T.; Standaert, David G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD) and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad) vector ove...

  9. Adenoviral delivery of the EMX2 gene suppresses growth in human gastric cancer.

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    Jie Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: EMX2 is a human orthologue of the Drosophila empty spiracles homeobox gene that has been implicated in embryogenesis. Recent studies suggest possible involvement of EMX2 in human cancers; however, the role of EMX2 in carcinogenesis needs further exploration. RESULTS: In this study, we reported that down-regulation of EMX2 expression was significantly correlated with EMX2 promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer. Restoring EMX2 expression using an adenovirus delivery system in gastric cancer cell lines lacking endogenous EMX2 expression led to inhibition of cell proliferation and Wnt signaling pathway both in vitro and in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo. In addition, we observed that animals treated with the adenoviral EMX2 expression vector had significantly better survival than those treated with empty adenoviral vector. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that EMX2 is a putative tumor suppressor in human gastric cancer. The adenoviral-EMX2 may have potential as a novel gene therapy for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

  10. Adenoviral Delivery of the EMX2 Gene Suppresses Growth in Human Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Mo, Minli; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Zhe; Sheng, Qing; Mu, Hang; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Li, Hui; He, Biao; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2012-01-01

    Background EMX2 is a human orthologue of the Drosophila empty spiracles homeobox gene that has been implicated in embryogenesis. Recent studies suggest possible involvement of EMX2 in human cancers; however, the role of EMX2 in carcinogenesis needs further exploration. Results In this study, we reported that down-regulation of EMX2 expression was significantly correlated with EMX2 promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer. Restoring EMX2 expression using an adenovirus delivery system in gastric cancer cell lines lacking endogenous EMX2 expression led to inhibition of cell proliferation and Wnt signaling pathway both in vitro and in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo. In addition, we observed that animals treated with the adenoviral EMX2 expression vector had significantly better survival than those treated with empty adenoviral vector. Conclusion Our study suggests that EMX2 is a putative tumor suppressor in human gastric cancer. The adenoviral-EMX2 may have potential as a novel gene therapy for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:23029345

  11. Adenoviral delivery of pan-caspase inhibitor p35 enhances bystander killing by P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy using cyclophosphamide+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytochrome P450-based suicide gene therapy for cancer using prodrugs such as cyclophosphamide (CPA) increases anti-tumor activity, both directly and via a bystander killing mechanism. Bystander cell killing is essential for the clinical success of this treatment strategy, given the difficulty of achieving 100% efficient gene delivery in vivo using current technologies. Previous studies have shown that the pan-caspase inhibitor p35 significantly increases CPA-induced bystander killing by tumor cells that stably express P450 enzyme CYP2B6 (Schwartz et al, (2002) Cancer Res. 62: 6928-37). To further develop this approach, we constructed and characterized a replication-defective adenovirus, Adeno-2B6/p35, which expresses p35 in combination with CYP2B6 and its electron transfer partner, P450 reductase. The expression of p35 in Adeno-2B6/p35-infected tumor cells inhibited caspase activation, delaying the death of the CYP2B6 'factory' cells that produce active CPA metabolites, and increased bystander tumor cell killing compared to that achieved in the absence of p35. Tumor cells infected with Adeno-2B6/p35 were readily killed by cisplatin and doxorubicin, indicating that p35 expression is not associated with acquisition of general drug resistance. Finally, p35 did not inhibit viral release when the replication-competent adenovirus ONYX-017 was used as a helper virus to facilitate co-replication and spread of Adeno-2B6/p35 and further increase CPA-induced bystander cell killing. The introduction of p35 into gene therapeutic regimens constitutes an effective approach to increase bystander killing by cytochrome P450 gene therapy. This strategy may also be used to enhance other bystander cytotoxic therapies, including those involving the production of tumor cell toxic protein products

  12. Adenoviral transfer of human interleukin-10 gene in lethal pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Qian Chen; Yao-Qing Tang; Yi Zhang; Zhi-Hong Jiang; En-Qiang Mao; Wei-Guo Zou; Ruo-Qing Lei; Tian-Quan Han; Sheng-Dao Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of adenoviral-vectordelivered human interleukin-10 (hIL-10) gene on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats.METHODS: Healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were intraperitoneally injected with adenoviral IL-10 gene (AdvhIL-10), empty vector (Adv0) or PBS solution. Blood,liver, pancreas and lung were harvested on the second day to examine hIL-10 level by ELISA and serum amylase by enzymatic assay. A SAP model was induced by retrograde injection of sodium taurocholate through pancreatic duct.SAP rats were then administered with AdvhIL-10, Adv0 and PBS solution by a single intraperitoneal injection 20 min after SAP induction. In addition to serum amylase assay,levels of hIL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were detected by RT-PCR, ELISA and histological study. The mortality rate was studied and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and log rank analysis.RESULTS: The levels of hIL-10 in the pancreas, liver and lung of healthy rats increased significantly after AdvhIL-10injection (1.42 ng/g in liver, 0.91 ng/g in pancreas); while there was no significant change of hIL-10 in the other two control groups. The concentration of hIL-10 was increased significantly in the SAP rats after AdvhIL-10 injection (1.68 ng/g in liver, 1.12 ng/g in pancreas) compared to the other two SAP groups with blank vector or PBS treatment (P<0.05). The serum amylase levels remained normal in the AdvhIL-10 transfected healthy rats. However,the serum amylase level was significantly elevated in the other two control SAP rats. In contrast, serum amylase was down-regulated in the AdvhIL-10 treated SAP groups.The TNF-α expression in the AdvhIL-10 treated SAP rats was significantly lower compared to the other two control SAP groups. The pathohistological changes in the AdvhIL-10 treated group were better than those in the other two control groups. Furthermore, the mortality of the AdvhIL-10 treated group was significantly reduced compared to the other two control groups (P

  13. Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, E N; Trinh, V T; Hogg, R T; Gerard, R D

    2012-07-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 remains one of the most promising vectors for delivering genetic material to cancer cells for imaging or therapy, but optimization of these agents to selectively promote tumor cell infection is needed to further their clinical development. Peptide sequences that bind to specific cell surface receptors have been inserted into adenoviral capsid proteins to improve tumor targeting, often in the background of mutations designed to ablate normal ligand:receptor interactions and thereby reduce off target effects and toxicities in non-target tissues. Different tumor types also express highly variable complements of cell surface receptors, so a customized targeting strategy using a particular peptide in the context of specific adenoviral mutations may be needed to achieve optimal efficacy. To further investigate peptide targeting strategies in adenoviral vectors, we used a set of peptide motifs originally isolated using phage display technology that evince tumor specificity in vivo. To demonstrate their abilities as targeting motifs, we genetically incorporated these peptides into a surface loop of the fiber capsid protein to construct targeted adenovirus vectors. We then systematically evaluated the ability of these peptide targeted vectors to infect several tumor cell types, both in vitro and in vivo, in a variety of mutational backgrounds designed to reduce CAR and/or HSG-mediated binding. Results from this study support previous observations that peptide insertions in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain are generally ineffective when used in combination with HSG detargeting mutations. The evidence also suggests that this strategy can attenuate other fiber knob interactions, such as CAR-mediated binding, and reduce overall viral infectivity. The insertion of peptides into fiber proved more effective for targeting tumor cell types expressing low levels of CAR receptor, as this strategy can partially compensate for the very low infectivity of wild

  14. Transduction of brain dopamine neurons by adenoviral vectors is modulated by CAR expression: rationale for tropism modified vectors in PD gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad vector overcomes limitations in payload size and targeting. The cellular tropism of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5-based vectors is regulated by the Ad attachment protein binding to its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR. Many clinically relevant tissues are refractory to Ad5 infection due to negligible CAR levels but can be targeted by tropism-modified, CAR-independent forms of Ad. Our objective was to evaluate the role of CAR protein in transduction of dopamine (DA neurons in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ad5 was delivered to the substantia nigra (SN in wild type (wt and CAR transgenic animals. Cellular tropism was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC in the SN and striatal terminals. CAR expression was assessed by western blot and IHC. We found in wt animals, Ad5 results in robust transgene expression in astrocytes and other non-neuronal cells but poor infection of DA neurons. In contrast, in transgenic animals, Ad5 infects SNc neurons resulting in expression of transduced protein in their striatal terminals. Western blot showed low CAR expression in the ventral midbrain of wt animals compared to transgenic animals. Interestingly, hCAR protein localizes with markers of post-synaptic structures, suggesting synapses are the point of entry into dopaminergic neurons in transgenic animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate that CAR deficiency limits infection of wild type DA neurons by Ad5 and provide a rationale for the

  15. Adenoviral vector-mediated insulin gene transfer in the mouse pancreas corrects streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrin, A L; Auricchio, A; Yu, Q C; Wilson, J; Raper, S E

    2001-10-01

    Therapy for type 1 diabetes consists of tight blood glucose (BG) control to minimize complications. Current treatment relies on multiple insulin injections or an insulin pump placement, beta-cell or whole pancreas transplantation. All approaches have significant limitations and have led to the realization that novel treatment strategies are needed. Pancreatic acinar cells have features that make them a good target for insulin gene transfer. They are not subject to autoimmune attack, a problem with pancreas or islets transplantation, they are avidly transduced by recombinant adenoviral vectors, and capable of exporting a variety of peptides into the portal circulation. Recombinant adenoviral vectors were engineered to express either wild-type or furin-modified human insulin cDNA (AdCMVhInsM). Immunodeficient mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin and injected intrapancreatically with the vectors. BG and blood insulin levels have normalized after administration of AdCMVhInsM. Immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy showed the presence of insulin in acinar cells throughout the pancreas and localization of insulin molecules to acinar cell vesicles. The data clearly establish a relationship between intrapancreatic vector administration, decreased BG and elevated blood insulin levels. The findings support the use of pancreatic acinar cells to express and secrete insulin into the blood stream. PMID:11593361

  16. Dual-expressing adenoviral vectors encoding the sodium iodide symporter for use in noninvasive radiological imaging of therapeutic gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Noninvasive analysis of therapeutic transgene expression is important for the development of clinical translational gene therapy strategies against cancer. To image p53 and MnSOD gene transfer noninvasively, we used radiologically detectable dual-expressing adenoviral vectors with the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) as the reporter gene. Methods: Dual-expressing adenoviral vectors were constructed with hNIS cloned into E3 region and therapeutic genes, either MnSOD or p53, recombined into the E1 region. Steady-state mRNA levels of hNIS were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. hNIS function was determined by iodide uptake assay and MnSOD, and p53 protein levels were assessed by Western blots. Results: 125I- accumulation resulting from hNIS expression in both Ad-p53-hNIS- and Ad-MnSOD-hNIS-infected MDA-MB-435 cells could be visualized clearly on phosphorimaging autoradiograph. Iodide accumulation increased with increasing adenovirus titer, and there was a linear correlation between iodide uptake and dose. p53 and MnSOD protein levels increased as a function of adenovirus titer, and there was a direct positive correlation between p53 and MnSOD expression and hNIS function. P53 and MnSOD overexpression inhibited cell growth in the dual-expressing adenoviral vector-infected cells. Conclusions: Radiological detection of hNIS derived from dual-expressing adenoviral vectors is a highly effective method to monitor therapeutic gene transfer and expression in a noninvasive manner

  17. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  18. Viral vectors for vascular gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Lukas; Preis, Meir; Weisz, Anat; Koren, Belly; Lewis, Basil S; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2002-01-01

    Vascular gene therapy is the focus of multiple experimental and clinical research efforts. While several genes with therapeutic potential have been identified, the best method of gene delivery is unknown. Viral vectors have the capacity to transfer genes at high efficiency rates. Several viral-based vectors have been used in experimental vascular gene therapy for in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer. Adenoviral-based vectors are being used for the induction of angiogenesis in phase 1 and 2 clini...

  19. Efficiency of adenoviral vector mediated CTLA4Ig gene delivery into mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓宇斌; 郭小荑; 原清涛; 李树浓

    2003-01-01

    Objective To prevent Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in rat model, we evaluated the feasibility of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a gene transfer target and studied the efficiency of recombinant adenovirus mediated gene therapy. Methods We constructed the recombinant adenovirus containing CTLA4Ig gene. Rat MSCs of passages 3-5 were infected by the adenovirus, and the transfection efficiency was monitored by GFP markers. We performed flow cytometric analysis, immunohistochemical and Western blotting analysis to identify the CTLA4Ig expression. The gene transferred MSCs were tested for their ability to inhibit the allogeneic lymphocyte response in vitro and to prevent GVHD in a rat model. Results Recombinant adenovirus pAd-CTLA4Ig was correctly constructed and confirmed. After MSCs were infected by the adenovirus, the CTLA4Ig protein was detected not only in transgenic MSCs, but also in the culture medium. In a mixed lymphocytes response (MLR) test, the transgenic MSCs could significantly inhibit the allogeneic lymphocyte response compared with the control groups (P<0.05). A model of GVHD was developed by transplanting bone marrow cells and spleen lymphocytes of F344 rats to lethally irradiated SD rats. The onset of GVHD could be ameliorated or prevented by co-administration of transgenic MSCs. All the rats in the control groups suffered severe acute GVHD. CTLA4Ig expression was observed in the liver, intestine, kidney and spleen 30 days post- transplantation. Conclusions Our results indicate that adenoviral vectors could efficiently transfer CTLA4Ig gene into MSCs and sustain long-term stable expression in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Usefulness of intra-arterial embolization method using gelfoam particles in effective gene transduction of adenoviral vector for liver-directed gene therapy: an preliminary animal study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being actively pursued and developed as a method of treating various liver diseases. A number of aspects, including gene intervention, an efficient gene delivery system, and stable transgene expression are key to the success of the chosen strategy, and to overcome problems in these areas, several tactics can be used. In this study, we assess the utility of transarterial embolization using gelfoam particles soaked in an adenovirus vector as a gene-delivery method. Using the angiographic approach, three dogs each weighing 9.5-11kg were superselectively catheterized at the left hepatic artery using a 3-F microcatheter and the coaxial method. Two of the dogs were embolized at the left hepatic artery using 3x2x2-mm and 2x1x1-mm gelfoam particles soaked in 2x1011 particles/kg of recombinant adv. CMV.LacZ(LacZ-adv). The left hepatic artery of the remaining animal, used as a control, was infused with the same dose of lacZ-adv in the same way as before but without embolization of the left hepatic artery. Three days after embolization or the infusion of LacZ-adv, the dogs were sacrificed prior to harvest of the entire liver for the evaluation of gene transduction. X-gal staining of the liver tissue obtained was positive for hepatocytes, but the pattern and degree of gene transduction differed according to gelfoam particle size. Where this was 3x2x2 mm, gene transduction along the liver hilum varied, but where 2x1x1-mm particles were used, transduction was more even. No pathologic hepatic tissue injury or inflammation was apparent, and control liver tissue was not stained by X-gal. Serum SGOT and SGPT levels were slightly higher one day after the procedure, but had normalized by day 3. Intrahepatic transarterial embolization using gelfoam particles soaked in LacZ-adv appears to be a good method for effective liver-targed gene therapy

  1. The effects of combining ionizing radiation and adenoviral p53 therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant disease of the head/neck region, with a 5-year survival level of approximately 65%. To explore gene therapy as a novel approach which might improve outcome, we have shown previously that introduction of human recombinant wild-type p53 mediated by the adenoviral vector (Ad5CMV-p53) was cytotoxic in two human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines (CNE-1 and CNE-2Z). The current work was designed to determine whether this strategy, combined with ionizing radiation (XRT), was more effective than either treatment alone. Methods and Materials: CNE-1, CNE-2Z, and a normal human nasopharyngeal fibroblast strain, KS1, were infected with 2- and 6-plaque-forming units (pfu)/cell of Ad5CMV-p53, respectively. These doses were iso-effective for β-galactosidase activity in the CNE-1 and CNE-2Z cells. XRT was administered 24 h post-infection, and Western blot analyses were conducted for p53, p21WAF1/CIP1, bax, and bcl-2 2 days after XRT. Cell survival was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Presence of DNA ladders reflecting apoptosis was detected using DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, and cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometry. Results: The combination of Ad5CMV-p53 plus XRT (2, 4, and 6 Gy) resulted in an approximately 1-log greater level of cytotoxicity compared to that observed with XRT alone for both NPC cell lines. The two modalities appear to be interacting in a synergistic manner in cancer cells, but not in KS1 fibroblasts. XRT alone stimulated minimal p53 expression in control cells; Ad5CMV-p53 alone induced significant recombinant p53 expression, which was not further enhanced by the addition of XRT. Similar observations were made for p21WAF1/CIP1expression. No changes were observed for bax or bcl-2 expression with any of these treatments. Apoptosis was induced following 4 Gy of XRT alone, but was observed after only 2 Gy when combined with Ad5CMV-p53. Cell cycle analysis indicated that Ad5CMV-p53 infection

  2. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  3. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H. Baker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX, which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon, pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX, or alternatively, through the use of polymer

  4. Radiosensitization effect of recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene on pancreatic carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of PUMA gene mediated by recombinant adenovirus vector combined with radiation on the pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: The PANC-1 cells were infected with Ad- PUMA (MOI=10, 50 and 100, respectively) for 48 h. The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. PANC-1 cells were divided into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. The cell growth inhibition rate and apoptotic rate of PANC-1 cells were assessed by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Human pancreatic carcinomas were transplanted subcutaneously in nude mice, which were randomized into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. Tumor growth rate and apoptotic index at different time points were recorded in 35 days. Results: The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was increased with the increase of MOI of Ad-PUMA, which was does-dependant (MOI=10, mRNA=0.46± 0.02, protein=0.75± 0.09; MOI=50, mRNA=1.12±0.09, protein=1.01±0.18; MOI=100, mRNA=1.50±0.08, protein= 1.80±0.15; P3, (39.5±9.23)mm3, (33.6±10.3)mm3 and (52.0±11.43)mm3, respectively, P<0.05]. And the apoptotic index was increased in the same manner (AI=0.43±0.05, 0.29±0.10, 0.24±0.05 and 0.00±0.00, respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions: Recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene combined with irradiation could increase the cell-killing effect on pancreatic carcinoma. It is better than that of either one kind of therapy. (authors)

  5. In the rat liver, Adenoviral gene transfer efficiency is comparable to AAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Miranda, P S; Pichard, V; Aubert, D; Ten Bloemendaal, L; Duijst, S; de Waart, D R; Ferry, N; Bosma, P J

    2014-02-01

    Adenoviral (AdV) and Adenovirus-associated viral (AAV) vectors both are used for in vivo gene therapy of inherited liver disorders, such as Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1. In a relevant animal model, the Gunn rat, both vectors efficiently correct the severe hyperbilirubinemia characteristic of this liver disorder. Although the clinical use of AAV is more advanced, as demonstrated by the successful phase 1 trial in hemophilia B patients, because of its large cloning capacity AdV remains an attractive option. A direct comparison of the efficacy of these two vectors in the liver in a relevant disease model has not been reported. Aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of clinically applicable doses of both vectors in the Gunn rat. AdV or scAAV (self-complimentary AAV) ferrying identical liver-specific expression cassettes of the therapeutic gene, UGT1A1, were injected into the tail vein. As the titration methods of these two vectors are very different, a comparison based on vector titers is not valid. Therefore, their efficacy was compared by determining the amount of vector genomes delivered to the liver required for therapeutic correction of serum bilirubin. Like AAV, the liver-specific first-generation AdV also provided sustained correction in this relevant disease model. UGT1A1 mRNA expression provided per genome was comparable for both vectors. Flanking the expression cassette in AdV with AAV-ITRs (inverted terminal repeats), increased UGT1A1 mRNA expression eightfold which resulted in a significant improvement of efficacy. Compared with AAV, less AdV genomes were needed for complete correction of hyperbilirubinemia.

  6. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  7. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Soliymani, Rabah [Protein Chemistry Unit, Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki (Finland); Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Radiation and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Ahtiainen, Laura [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Hemminki, Akseli, E-mail: akseli.hemminki@helsinki.fi [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  8. Gene therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mota Biosca, Anna

    1992-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases.

  9. Induction of fibroblasts to neurons through adenoviral gene delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengxi Meng; Siye Chen; Qinglong Miao; Kechun Zhou; Qicheng Lao; Xiaohui Zhang; Wenyi Guo; Jianwei Jiao

    2012-01-01

    Dear Editor,The direct conversion of mouse fibroblasts to neurons [1] was developed while many scientists were interested in neuronal differentiation using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) [2].This direct reprogramming skips a pluripotent state,making patient- and/or disease-specific cell therapy much faster and more feasible.Recent reports have indicated that mouse or human fibroblasts could be directly converted to a number of different cell types,such as cardiomyocytes,blood progenitor cells,hepatocyte-like cells,neural progenitors and specific dopaminergic neurons [3-9].However,all of the studies in this field have employed the retroviral or lentiviral vector delivery system.

  10. Gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005147 CNHK200-hA-a gene-viral therapeutic system and its antitumor effect on lung cancer. WANG Wei-guo(王伟国),et al. Viral & Gene Ther Center, Eastern Hepatobilli Surg Instit 2nd Milit Univ, Shanghai 200438. Chin J Oncol,2005:27(2):69-72. Objective: To develop a novel vector system, which combines the advantages of the gene therapy,

  11. Specific Targeting of Gene Therapy to Prostate Cancer Using a Two-step Transcriptional Amplification System

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Marxa L.; Sato, Makoto; Johnson, Mai; Wu, Lily

    2006-01-01

    Significant advances in gene therapy have been made as a result of the improvement of gene delivery systems, discovery of new therapeutic genes, better understanding of mechanisms of disease progression, exploration and improvement of tissue-specific gene regulatory sequences, and development of better prodrug/enzyme systems. We will discuss adenoviral-based and prostate-specific cancer gene therapy, emphasizing tissue-specific promoter choices to increase gene therapy safety and specificity,...

  12. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  13. Ex Vivo Adenoviral Vector Gene Delivery Results in Decreased Vector-associated Inflammation Pre- and Post–lung Transplantation in the Pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  14. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives.The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of 123I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with 123I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). 123I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with 123I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after 123I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with the transgene in the former E1 region

  15. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmistrova, Daria A; Tillib, Sergey V; Shcheblyakov, Dmitry V; Dolzhikova, Inna V; Shcherbinin, Dmitry N; Zubkova, Olga V; Ivanova, Tatiana I; Tukhvatulin, Amir I; Shmarov, Maxim M; Logunov, Denis Y; Naroditsky, Boris S; Gintsburg, Aleksandr L

    2016-01-01

    Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies) is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh), for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection. PMID:26962869

  16. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A Burmistrova

    Full Text Available Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh, for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection.

  17. Fetal muscle gene transfer is not enhanced by an RGD capsid modification to high-capacity adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Hughes, T; Biermann, V; Volpers, C; Goldberg, L; Bergelson, J; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2003-10-01

    High levels of alpha(v) integrin expression by fetal muscle suggested that vector re-targeting to integrins could enhance adenoviral vector-mediated transduction, thereby increasing safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer in utero. High-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors modified by an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide motif in the HI loop of the adenoviral fiber (RGD-HC-Ad) have demonstrated efficient gene transfer through binding to alpha(v) integrins. To test integrin targeting of HC-Ad vectors for fetal muscle gene transfer, we compared unmodified and RGD-modified HC-Ad vectors. In vivo, unmodified HC-Ad vector transduced fetal mouse muscle with four-fold higher efficiency compared to RGD-HC-Ad vector. Confirming that the difference was due to muscle cell autonomous factors and not mechanical barriers, transduction of primary myogenic cells isolated from murine fetal muscle in vitro demonstrated a three-fold better transduction by HC-Ad vector than by RGD-HC-Ad vector. We hypothesized that the high expression level of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), demonstrated in fetal muscle cells both in vitro and in vivo, was the crucial variable influencing the relative transduction efficiencies of HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors. To explore this further, we studied transduction by HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors in paired cell lines that expressed alpha(v) integrins and differed only by the presence or absence of CAR expression. The results increase our understanding of factors that will be important for retargeting HC-Ad vectors to enhance gene transfer to fetal muscle.

  18. Generation and characterization of novel adenoviral vectors for hybrid nuclease-mediated gene targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Sara Filipa Dias

    2013-01-01

    Tese de mestrado [versão pública]. Biologia (Biologia Humana e Ambiente). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2013 Adenovirus-based vectors are among the most efficient and disseminated gene transfer vehicles currently in use in a broad range of basic and applied research applications including the testing of gene therapy. As a gene therapy modality, gene targeting relies on the site-specific genome modification based on “integrases” or on the error-free homologous recombination...

  19. Adenoviral gene delivery of elafin and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor attenuates NF-kappa B-dependent inflammatory responses of human endothelial cells and macrophages to atherogenic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Peter A; Hitt, Mary; Xing, Zhou; Wang, Jun; Haslett, Chris; Riemersma, Rudolph A; Webb, David J; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2004-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting arterial vessels. Strategies to reduce the inflammatory responses of endothelial cells and macrophages may slow lesion development and prevent complications such as plaque rupture. The human protease human neutrophil elastase (HNE), oxidized low density lipoprotein, LPS, and TNF-alpha were chosen as model stimuli of arterial wall inflammation and led to production of the chemokine IL-8 in endothelial cells. To counteract the activity of HNE, we have examined the effects of adenoviral gene delivery of the anti-elastases elafin, previously demonstrated within human atheroma, and murine secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a related molecule, on the inflammatory responses of human endothelial cells and macrophages to atherogenic stimuli. We developed a technique of precomplexing adenovirus with cationic lipid to augment adenoviral infection efficiency in endothelial cells and to facilitate infection in macrophages. Elafin overexpression protected endothelial cells from HNE-induced IL-8 production and cytotoxicity. Elafin and murine SLPI also reduced endothelial IL-8 release in response to oxidized low density lipoprotein, LPS, and TNF-alpha and macrophage TNF-alpha production in response to LPS. This effect was associated with reduced activation of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB, through up-regulation of IkappaBalpha, in both cell types. Our work suggests a novel and extended anti-inflammatory role for these HNE inhibitors working as effectors of innate immunity to protect tissues against maladaptive inflammatory responses. Our findings indicate that elafin and SLPI may be gene therapy targets for the treatment of atheroma. PMID:15034071

  20. Adenoviral Delivery of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-2 Enables Successful Adoptive Cell Therapy of Immunosuppressive Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siurala, Mikko; Havunen, Riikka; Saha, Dipongkor; Lumen, Dave; Airaksinen, Anu J; Tähtinen, Siri; Cervera-Carrascon, Víctor; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer is a promising treatment approach for metastatic cancer, but efficacy in solid tumors has only been achieved with toxic pre- and postconditioning regimens. Thus, adoptive T-cell therapies would benefit from complementary modalities that enable their full potential without excessive toxicity. We aimed to improve the efficacy and safety of adoptive T-cell transfer by using adenoviral vectors for direct delivery of immunomodulatory murine cytokines into B16.OVA melanoma tumors with concomitant T-cell receptor transgenic OT-I T-cell transfer. Armed adenoviruses expressed high local and low systemic levels of cytokine when injected into B16.OVA tumors, suggesting safety of virus-mediated cytokine delivery. Antitumor efficacy was significantly enhanced with adenoviruses coding for murine interleukin-2 (mIL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (mTNFα) when compared with T-cell transfer alone or viruses alone. Further improvement in efficacy was achieved with a triple combination of mIL-2, mTNFα, and OT-I T-cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that mIL-2 has an important role in activating T-cells at the tumor, while mTNFα induces chemokine expression. Furthermore, adenovirus treatments enhanced tumor-infiltration of OT-I T-cells as demonstrated by SPECT/CT imaging of (111)In-labeled cells. Our results suggest the utility of cytokine-coding adenoviruses for improving the efficacy of adoptive T-cell therapies.

  1. Principles of gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mammen Biju; Ramakrishnan T; Sudhakar Uma; Vijayalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics an...

  2. Principles of gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammen Biju

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics and future percepts and the technical and ethical issues of using gene therapy.

  3. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lustig, Lawrence R.; Akil, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  4. Adenoviral-mediated localized CTLA-4Ig gene expression induces long-term allograft pancreas survival and donor-specific immune tolerance in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    T cell activation following alloantigen recognition plays a critical role in the development of the rejection in all solid organ, tissue and cell transplantation. A recombinant molecule, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 antibody (CTLA-4Ig), is known to induce to T-cell into "anergy" by blocking the costimulatory B7-CD28 interaction. Either systemic or localized administration of CTLA-Ig has been shown to prolong allograft survival and induce donor-specific tolerance in some transplant models. In this study, we characterized the expression and immunosuppressive effectiveness of adenoviral-mediated CTLA-4Ig gene transfer. We demonstrated transduction of the allografts with AdCTLA-41g resulted in localized expression, permanent graft survival and stable donor-specific tolerance. In addition, by performing simultaneous dual-organ transplantation, we targeted on immunosuppression through a local expression of CTLA-4Ig via adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into pancreatic allografts.

  5. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Surgery: Clinical Trials, Challenges, and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael G; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Kendle, Andrew P; Hajjar, Roger J; Bridges, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    The concept of gene therapy was introduced in the 1970s after the development of recombinant DNA technology. Despite the initial great expectations, this field experienced early setbacks. Recent years have seen a revival of clinical programs of gene therapy in different fields of medicine. There are many promising targets for genetic therapy as an adjunct to cardiac surgery. The first positive long-term results were published for adenoviral administration of vascular endothelial growth factor with coronary artery bypass grafting. In this review we analyze the past, present, and future of gene therapy in cardiac surgery. The articles discussed were collected through PubMed and from author experience. The clinical trials referenced were found through the Wiley clinical trial database (http://www.wiley.com/legacy/wileychi/genmed/clinical/) as well as the National Institutes of Health clinical trial database (Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26801060

  6. Quality of the transgene-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by adenoviral vector immunization is critically influenced by virus dose and route of vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Ørskov, Cathrine; Thomsen, Allan Randrup;

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been widely used for experimental gene therapy and vaccination, yet there is a surprising lack of knowledge connecting the route and dose of adenovirus administration to the induced transgene-specific immune response. We have recently demonstrated polyfunctional CD8(+) T c...... effector functions, accumulated in the spleen. These findings indicate that the localization of the adenoviral inoculum and not the total Ag load determines the quality of the CD8(+) T cell response induced with adenoviral vaccines.......Adenoviral vectors have been widely used for experimental gene therapy and vaccination, yet there is a surprising lack of knowledge connecting the route and dose of adenovirus administration to the induced transgene-specific immune response. We have recently demonstrated polyfunctional CD8(+) T...

  7. Effects of recombinant adenoviral vector containing IRE1α gene on proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-zhu LI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct the recombinant adenoviral vector containing human IRE1α (type I transmembrane protein kinase/endoribonucleasegene, and investigate its effects on proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 stem cells. Methods  By using pAdEasyTM adenovirus vector system, the recombinant shuttle vectors of IRE1α full-length gene(pAdTrack-IRE1αand RNase+Kinasedomain(pAdTrack-R+Kwere constructed, and then transferred with pAdEasy-1 to generate recombinant adenovirus plasmid pAd-IRE1α and pAd-R+K by electroporation method. Subsequently, the plasmids were transfected into HEK-293 cells to pack and amplify the recombinant adenovirus Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K. The expression of recombinant adenovirus was detected by PCR. The ATDC5 cells wereinfected in vitro by recombinant adenovirus Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K, the infection efficiency of green fluorescent protein(GFPwas observed, and the influence of Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K on the proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress(ERS or non-ERS was detected by flow cytometry(FCM. Results Restriction endonuclease digestion analysis and PCR indicated that the recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-IRE1α andAd-R+K was successfully constructed. FCM detection showed that under ERS conditions, the G1 phasedcreased and S phase increased in ATDC5 cells after transfected by Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K, meanwhile the apoptosis rate increased significantly(P<0.05. Conclusion Infection of recombinant adenovirus containing IRE1α gene may promote the proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5cells.

  8. Cell and gene therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J E

    1994-02-01

    Experiments in mice have supported the idea of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by implanting normal muscle precursor cells into dystrophin-deficient muscles. However, similar experiments on DMD patients have had little success. Gene therapy for DMD, by introducing dystrophin constructs via retroviral or adenoviral vectors, has been shown to be possible in the mouse, but the efficiency and safety aspects of this technique will have to be carefully examined before similar experiments can be attempted in man. Direct injection of dystrophin cDNA constructs into mdx muscles has given rise to very low levels of dystrophin and this may be a possibility for the treatment of heart muscle. PMID:7514447

  9. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  10. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  11. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  12. Gene therapy in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Anirban Chatterjee; Nidhi Singh; Mini Saluja

    2013-01-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person′s genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is ′the use of genes as medicine′. It...

  13. Protection of rat islet viability following heme oxygenase-1 gene transfection via adenoviral vector in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Chen; Yongxiang Li; Weiping Dong; Yang Jiao; Jianming Tan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene transfection on the viability of cultured rat islets, and to explore the potential value of HO-1 gene in islet transplantation. Methods:Recombinant adenovirus vector containing human HO-1 gene(Ad-HO-1 ) or enhanced green fluorescent protein gene(Ad-EGFP) was generated by using AdEasy system respectively.The rat islets were transfected with Ad-HO-1, Ad-EGFP or blank vector and then cultured for 7 days. Transfection was confirmed by expression of EGFP and human HO-1 protein detected by fluorescence photographs and western blot, respectively. The insulin release upon different concentration of glucose stimulation was detected using insulin radioimmunoassay kit, and stimulation index (SI) was calculated. Glucose-stimulated insulin release was usedto assess islet viability. Results:Adenovirus vector successfully transferred HO-1 gene to rat islet cells in vitro, and the insulin release upon high level of glucose stimulation and stimulation index(SI) of Ad-HO-1-infected islets were significantly higher than those of Ad-EGFP-infected islets and control islets(P < 0.05).Conclusion: Adenovirus-mediated HO-1 gene transfection is a feasible strategy to confer cytoprotection and therefore protect the viability of cultured rat islets.

  14. Treatment of colorectal and hepatocellular carcinomas by adenoviral mediated gene transfer of endostatin and angiostatin-like molecule in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, V; Wang, L.; Barajas, M. (Miguel); Gomar, C.; Prieto, J.; Qian, C

    2004-01-01

    Aim and method: In this study, we explored the responsiveness of different tumour entities (colorectal carcinoma (CRC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and the murine Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC)) to angiostatic antitumour treatment with two recombinant adenoviral vectors encoding angiostatin-like molecule (AdK1-3) and endostatin (Adendo).

  15. Testing gene therapy vectors in human primary nasal epithelial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huibi; Ouyang, Hong; Ip, Wan; Du, Kai; Duan, Wenming; Avolio, Julie; Wu, Jing; Duan, Cathleen; Yeger, Herman; Bear, Christine E; Gonska, Tanja; Hu, Jim; Moraes, Theo J

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which codes for a chloride/bicarbonate channel in the apical epithelial membranes. CFTR dysfunction results in a multisystem disease including the development of life limiting lung disease. The possibility of a cure for CF by replacing defective CFTR has led to different approaches for CF gene therapy; all of which ultimately have to be tested in preclinical model systems. Primary human nasal epithelial cultures (HNECs) derived from nasal turbinate brushing were used to test the efficiency of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector expressing CFTR. HD-Ad-CFTR transduction resulted in functional expression of CFTR at the apical membrane in nasal epithelial cells obtained from CF patients. These results suggest that HNECs can be used for preclinical testing of gene therapy vectors in CF. PMID:26730394

  16. Lifetime correction of genetic deficiency in mice with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, In-Hoo; Józkowicz, Alicja; Piedra, Pedro A.; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence

    2001-01-01

    Ideally, somatic gene therapy should result in lifetime reversal of genetic deficiencies. However, to date, phenotypic correction of monogenic hyperlipidemia in mouse models by in vivo gene therapy has been short-lived and associated with substantial toxicity. We have developed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HD-Ad) containing the apolipoprotein (apo) E gene. A single i.v. injection of this vector completely and stably corrected the hypercholesterolemia in apoE-deficient mice, an effect...

  17. Gene therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy for thyroid cancer include immunotherapy, suicide gene therapy, tumor suppressor replacement, 131I therapy by sodium/iodide symporter and antisense therapy and so on. Gene therapy has wide perspectives, but there are many problems need to be solved for clinical application

  18. Preparation of a recombinant adenoviral encoding human NIS gene and its specific expression in cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector containing the human NIS gene with the myosin light chain-2(MLC-2v) gene as the promoter and evaluate its specific expression and feasibility as a reporter gene in cardiomyocytes. Methods: MLC-2v promoter and NIS were subcloned into an adenovirus shuttle vector, and forwarded by homologous recombination in the bacteria BJ5183 containing AdEasy-1 plasmid. Positive recombinant adenovirus vector was selected, packaged and amplified in the HEK293 cells to obtain recombinant adenovirus Ad-MLC-NIS. Ad-cytomegalovirus (CMV)-NIS with cytomegalovirus as the promoter, Ad-MLC without NIS and Ad-NIS without promoter were constructed as the controls. Cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes were then infected by the adenovirus. The protein expression was tested by Western blot analysis. The function and features of NIS protein were evaluated by dynamic iodide uptake and NaClO4 iodine uptake inhibition test in vitro. The viability and proliferation of cardiomyocytes after adenovirus transfection and radioiodine incubation were checked by trypan blue staining. Results: Recombinant NIS adenovirus was successfully constructed. Western blot analysis showed that the NIS protein was highly expressed in cardiomyocytes transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS, and all cells transfected with Ad-CMV-NIS. However, in non-cardiomyocytes transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS, little NIS protein was detected. Dynamic iodine uptake tests showed that the peaks of iodide uptake of the three different cell lines (H9C2, A549, U87 cell) transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS were 5844.0, 833.6 and 846.0 counts · min-1, respectively. The iodide uptake function of H9C2 was inhibited by NaClO4. There was almost no change in cell viability and proliferation when the MOI was 100. Conclusions: Ad-MLC-NIS allows myocardial specific expression of an external gene, and the cardiomyocytes with NIS expression are capable of iodine uptake. Further research of NIS as a reporter gene in

  19. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene therapy ameliorates chronic hyperprolactinemia in senile rats

    OpenAIRE

    Morel, Gustavo R.; Sosa, Yolanda E.; Bellini, Maria J.; Carri, Nestor G.; Rodriguez, Silvia S.; Bohn, Martha C.; Goya, Rodolfo G.

    2010-01-01

    Progressive dysfunction of hypothalamic tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurons during normal aging is associated in the female rat with chronic hyperprolactinemia. We assessed the effectiveness of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene therapy to restore TIDA neuron function in senile female rats and reverse their chronic hyperprolactinemia. Young (2.5 months) and senile (29 months) rats received a bilateral intrahypothalamic injection (1010 pfu) of either an adenovir...

  20. Gene therapy for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, K; Engelhard, H H

    2000-09-01

    "Gene therapy" can be defined as the transfer of genetic material into a patient's cells for therapeutic purposes. To date, a diverse and creative assortment of treatment strategies utilizing gene therapy have been devised, including gene transfer for modulating the immune system, enzyme prodrug ("suicide gene") therapy, oncolytic therapy, replacement/therapeutic gene transfer, and antisense therapy. For malignant glioma, gene-directed prodrug therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene was the first gene therapy attempted clinically. A variety of different strategies have now been pursued experimentally and in clinical trials. Although, to date, gene therapy for brain tumors has been found to be reasonably safe, concerns still exist regarding issues related to viral delivery, transduction efficiency, potential pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Improved viral vectors are being sought, and potential use of gene therapy in combination with other treatments is being investigated.

  1. Delivery Systems in Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hu; Anas El-Aneed; Cui Guohui

    2005-01-01

    1 Gene therapy Gene therapy includes the treatment of both genetically based and infectious diseases by introducing genetic materials which have therapeutic effects[1~3]. In its simplest terms, a wild type gene (which is non-functional in the cell leading to disease development) is introduced into the somatic cell lacking this gene to restore the normal gene function in this cell. Many gene therapy strategies, however, utilize genes to destroy specific cells.

  2. Adenoviral gene transfer of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) partially restores normal pulmonary arterial pressure in eNOS-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Hunter C.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Greenberg, Stanley S.; Giles, Thomas D.; Hyman, Albert L.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that mice deficient in the gene coding for endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) have increased pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. In the present study, the effect of transfer to the lung of an adenoviral vector encoding the eNOS gene (AdCMVeNOS) on pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance was investigated in eNOS-deficient mice. One day after intratracheal administration of AdCMVeNOS to eNOS−/− mice, there was an increase in eNOS protein, cGMP levels, and calcium-dependent conversion of l-arginine to l-citrulline in the lung. The increase in eNOS protein and activity in eNOS−/− mice was associated with a reduction in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance when compared with values in eNOS-deficient mice treated with vehicle or a control adenoviral vector coding for β-galactosidase, AdCMVβgal. These data suggest that in vivo gene transfer of eNOS to the lung in eNOS−/− mice can increase eNOS staining, eNOS protein, calcium-dependent NOS activity, and cGMP levels and partially restore pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance to near levels measured in eNOS+/+ mice. Thus, the major finding in this study is that in vivo gene transfer of eNOS to the lung in large part corrects a genetic deficiency resulting from eNOS deletion and may be a useful therapeutic intervention for the treatment of pulmonary hypertensive disorders in which eNOS activity is reduced. PMID:12237402

  3. Current status of gene therapy for motor neuron disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingkai An; Rong Peng; Shanshan Zhao

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although the etiology and pathogenesis of motor neuron disease is still unknown, there are many hypotheses on motor neuron mitochondrion, cytoskeleton structure and functional injuries. Thus, gene therapy of motor neuron disease has become a hot topic to apply in viral vector, gene delivery and basic gene techniques.DATA SOURCES: The related articles published between January 2000 and October 2006 were searched in Medline database and ISl database by computer using the keywords "motor neuron disease, gene therapy", and the language is limited to English. Meanwhile, the related references of review were also searched by handiwork. STUDY SELECTION: Original articles and referred articles in review were chosen after first hearing, then the full text which had new ideas were found, and when refer to the similar study in the recent years were considered first.DATA EXTRACTION: Among the 92 related articles, 40 ones were accepted, and 52 were excluded because of repetitive study or reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS: The viral vectors of gene therapy for motor neuron disease include adenoviral, adeno-associated viral vectors, herpes simplex virus type 1 vectors and lentiviral vectors. The delivery of them can be achieved by direct injection into the brain, or by remote delivery after injection vectors into muscle or peripheral nerves, or by ex vivo gene transfer. The viral vectors of gene therapy for motor neuron disease have been successfully developed, but the gene delivery of them is hampered by some difficulties. The RNA interference and neuroprotection are the main technologies for gene-based therapy in motor neuron disease. CONCLUSION : The RNA interference for motor neuron disease has succeeded in animal models, and the neuroprotection also does. But, there are still a lot of questions for gene therapy in the clinical treatment of motor neuron disease.

  4. Gene therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ponder, Katherine P.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are due to deficiencies in activities of lysosomal enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans. Some attempts at gene therapy for MPS in animal models have involved intravenous injection of vectors derived from an adeno-associated virus (AAV), adenovirus, retrovirus or a plasmid, which primarily results in expression in liver and secretion of the relevant enzyme into blood. Most vectors can correct disease in liver and spleen, although correction in other organs includ...

  5. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); B. Sangro; Prieto, J.

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/pro-drug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition, gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy. These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reac...

  6. nanosheets for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  7. Lifelong elimination of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    OpenAIRE

    Toietta, Gabriele; Mane, Viraj P.; Norona, Wilma S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Ng, Philip; McDonagh, Antony F.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lee, Brendan

    2005-01-01

    Crigler–Najjar syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. Current therapy relies on phototherapy to prevent kernicterus, but liver transplantation presently is the only permanent cure. Gene therapy is a potential alternative, and recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors, devoid of all viral coding sequences, induce prolonged transgen...

  8. An adenoviral vector regulated by hypoxia for the treatment of ischaemic disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, K; Iqball, S; Kingsman, A; Kingsman, S; Naylor, S

    1999-10-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have a number of advantages for gene therapy, including transduction of a range of dividing and non-dividing cell types. However, this broad range may be a disadvantage if non-target cells are transduced and are adversely affected by expression of the transferred gene. Here we describe a novel adenoviral vector in which transcription of the transgene is restricted to the patho-physiological condition of low oxygen tension (hypoxia). Hypoxia activates the expression of a number of genes, principally via the stabilisation of members of the bHLH/PAS family of transcription factors that bind to a con- sensus DNA sequence, the hypoxia response element (HRE). We have configured an optimised HRE expression cassette into an adenoviral vector, AdOBHRE. A range of cell types, including primary human skeletal muscle, when transduced with AdOBHRE display a low basal level of transgene expression that is highly induced in hypoxia to levels equivalent to that obtained from the CMV promoter. The AdOBHRE vector could be exploited for transcriptionally targeted gene therapy for the treatment of diseases such as cancer, peripheral arterial disease, arthritis and anaemia where tissue hypoxia is a cardinal feature. PMID:10516721

  9. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruben Hernandez-Alcoceba; Bruno Sangro; Jesus Prieto

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition,gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy.These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reached clinical phases. We present a review on the basis and the actual status of gene therapy approaches applied to liver cancer.

  10. Adenoviral gene transfer corrects the ion transport defect in the sinus epithelia of a porcine CF model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Andrea E; Wallen, Tanner J; Karp, Philip H; Ernst, Sarah; Moninger, Thomas O; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Stoltz, David A; Zabner, Joseph; Chang, Eugene H

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs spontaneously develop sinus and lung disease resembling human CF. The CF pig presents a unique opportunity to use gene transfer to test hypotheses to further understand the pathogenesis of CF sinus disease. In this study, we investigated the ion transport defect in the CF sinus and found that CF porcine sinus epithelia lack cyclic AMP (cAMP)-stimulated anion transport. We asked whether we could restore CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) current in the porcine CF sinus epithelia by gene transfer. We quantified CFTR transduction using an adenovirus expressing CFTR and green fluorescent protein (GFP). We found that as little as 7% of transduced cells restored 6% of CFTR current with 17-28% of transduced cells increasing CFTR current to 50% of non-CF levels. We also found that we could overcorrect cAMP-mediated current in non-CF epithelia. Our findings indicate that CF porcine sinus epithelia lack anion transport, and a relatively small number of cells expressing CFTR are required to rescue the ion transport phenotype. These studies support the use of the CF pig as a preclinical model for future gene therapy trials in CF sinusitis. PMID:23511247

  11. IL-12 based gene therapy in veterinary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlin Darja

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of large animals as an experimental model for novel treatment techniques has many advantages over the use of laboratory animals, so veterinary medicine is becoming an increasingly important translational bridge between preclinical studies and human medicine. The results of preclinical studies show that gene therapy with therapeutic gene encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12 displays pronounced antitumor effects in various tumor models. A number of different studies employing this therapeutic plasmid, delivered by either viral or non-viral methods, have also been undertaken in veterinary oncology. In cats, adenoviral delivery into soft tissue sarcomas has been employed. In horses, naked plasmid DNA has been delivered by direct intratumoral injection into nodules of metastatic melanoma. In dogs, various types of tumors have been treated with either local or systemic IL-12 electrogene therapy. The results of these studies show that IL-12 based gene therapy elicits a good antitumor effect on spontaneously occurring tumors in large animals, while being safe and well tolerated by the animals. Hopefully, such results will lead to further investigation of this therapy in veterinary medicine and successful translation into human clinical trials.

  12. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna C. Tylka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU in four children’s hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58% did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p=0.015, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p=0.001, requirement of renal replacement therapy (p=0.01, ICU admission severity of illness score (p=0.011, and treatment with cidofovir (p=0.005. Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p=0.01, require renal replacement therapy (p=0.02, and not survive to hospital discharge (p=0.004. One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children.

  13. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  14. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy ... that don't respond to conventional therapies. About Genes Our genes help make us unique. Inherited from ...

  15. Gene therapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chang-tai; Guo Xue-gang; Pan Bo-rong

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction We have reviewed the gene therapy in gastrointestinal diseases[1]. Gastric cancer is common in China[2~20] ,and its early diagnosis andtreatment are still difficult up to now[13~36]. The expression of anexogenous gene introduced by gene therapy into patients with gliomascan be monitored non- invasively by positron- emission tomography[4]. In recent years, gene study in cancer is a hotspot, and great progress hasbeen achieved[33~41].

  16. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k+) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k+ gene expression where the H S V-1 t k+ gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([18 F]F H P G; [18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([123/131 I]I V R F U; [124/131I]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [123/131I]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k+ reporter gene will be presented

  17. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  18. Prevention of beta cell dysfunction and apoptosis by adenoviral gene transfer of rat insulin-like growth factor 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-hong; LI Tang; CHEN Zong-bo; LUO Bing; SUN Ruo-peng

    2009-01-01

    Background Islet β-cells are almost completely destroyed when patients with type 1 diabete are diagnosed. To date, insulin substitute therapy is still one of the main treatments. The cure of type 1 diabetes requires β-cell regeneration from islet cell precursors and prevention of recurring autoimmunity, Therefore, β-cell regeneration and proliferation emerge as a new research focus on therapy for type 1 diabetes. Islet β-cell regeneration and development are controlled by many growth factors, especially insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).Methods Recombinant adenovirus encoding rat IGF-1 (rlGF-1) was constructed and transduced into rat β-cells, RINm5F cells. Western blotting analysis and ELISA were used to detect rlGF-1 protein. Streptozotocin (STZ) was used to induce RINm5F cell destruction. The level of nitric oxide (NO) was detected in cell culture supernatants by the Griess reaction. Islet cell function was evaluated by glucose-stimulated insulin production. Flow cytometry analysis was further used to investigate the apoptosis of RINm5F cells. Thiaoollyl blue viability assay was applied to determine cell viability.Results The recombined adenovirus-rlGF-1 was successfully constructed and the titer was 4.0×108pfu/ml. The rlGF-1 protein was effectively expressed in the RINm5F cells and cell culture supernatants, rlGF-1 expression remarkably inhibited STZ-induced islet cell apoptosis and significantly decreased the level of NO. Furthermore, IGF-1 expression also significantly protected insulin secretion and cell proliferation in a time-dependent manner.Conclusions Our study suggests that locally produced rlGF-1 from RINm5F cells may be beneficial in maintaining β-cell function, protecting β-cells from the destruction of apoptosis factors and promoting β-cell survival and proliferation. IGF-1 might be considered as a candidate gene in gene therapy for type 1 diabetes. In addition, it appears that the apoptosis induced by STZ may be NO-dependent.

  19. A study of gene transfer and expression of human clotting factor IX in Hemophilia B mice mediated by mini-adenoviral vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Xiaobo; (高啸波); YE; Chenbo; (叶晨波); SHI; Ding; (侍鼎); CHEN; Li; (陈立); QIU; Xinfang; (邱信芳); XUE; Jinglun; (薛京伦)

    2003-01-01

    Vector Gti'IX containing human clotting factor IX cDNA with intron 1 (hFIX mini-gene or Fi'IX) driven by CMV promoter was constructed based on the mini-adenoviral vector GT2073 (mini-Ad vector) with all viral protein coding sequences deleted. Mini-Ad packaging cell 293Cre4 was first transduced with Gti'IX, and then was transfected with helper-adenovirus AdLC8, thus mini-Ad virions AdGTi'IX were obtained. At the same time, previous normal adenoviral vector pAdSPi'IX containing viral genome and hFIX mini-gene was constructed, and then previous adenovirus (pre-Ad) AdSPi'IX was obtained as control. The ratio of helper-adenovirus among purified virons AdGTi'IX was less than 0.8%. 3T3 cells were transfected with AdGTi'IX and AdSPi'IX at a MOI of 50 per cell and ELISA result showed that transient expression level in vitro was 1.4±0.2 μg /106@24 h and 1.6±0.3 μg/106@24 h respectively. Each hemophilia B (FIX knock-out) mouse received celiac injection of 1×1010pfu AdGTi'IX or AdSPi'IX. The highest expression level of hFIX in mouse plasma was 590 ng/mL and 690 ng/mL respectively, and the expression time lasted for 16 weeks and 9 weeks respectively. The bleeding time reduced from over 30 min to 7.5 min, and 5-min blood lost reduced from 430 μL to 60 μL. The results of anti-Ad IgG assays indicated that immune response triggered by AdGTi'IX was obviously weaker than that triggered by AdSPi'IX. These results indicated that, compared with previous adenovirus (pre-Ad), the mini-Ad vector system prolonged the expression time of hFIX and reduced immune response, thus offering a promising result for further pre-clinical study.

  20. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC...

  1. Gene therapy: progress and predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of ...

  2. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mentor Submit Your Press Release Donate Home ASGCT Gene Therapy for Diseases Gene Therapy has made important ... Among the most notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency ( ...

  3. Capsid modification strategies for detargeting adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alan L; Bradshaw, Angela C; Alba, Raul; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors hold immense potential for a wide variety of gene therapy based applications; however, their efficacy and toxicity is dictated by "off target" interactions that preclude cell specific targeting to sites of disease. A number of "off target" interactions have been described in the literature that occur between the three major capsid proteins (hexon, penton, and fiber) and components of the circulatory system, including cells such as erythrocytes, white blood cells, and platelets, as well as circulatory proteins including complement proteins, coagulation factors, von Willebrand Factor, p-selectin as well as neutralizing antibodies. Thus, to improve efficacious targeting to sites of disease and limit nonspecific uptake of virus to non-target tissues, specifically the liver and the spleen, it is necessary to develop suitable strategies for genetically modifying the capsid proteins to preclude these interactions. To this end we have developed versatile systems based on homologous recombination for modification of each of the major capsid proteins, which are described herein. PMID:24132476

  4. Reduced inflammation and improved airway expression using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with a K18 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toietta, Gabriele; Koehler, David R; Finegold, Milton J; Lee, Brendan; Hu, Jim; Beaudet, Arthur L

    2003-05-01

    Efforts have been made to deliver transgenes to the airway epithelia of laboratory animals and humans to develop gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. These investigations have been disappointing due to combinations of transient and low-level gene expression, acute toxicity, and inflammation. We have developed new helper-dependent adenoviral vectors to deliver an epithelial cell-specific keratin 18 expression cassette driving the beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) or human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) reporter genes. Following intranasal administration to mice, we found that the reporter genes were widely expressed in airway epithelial and submucosal cells, and secreted human AFP was also detectable in serum. In contrast to a first-generation adenoviral vector, inflammation was negligible at doses providing efficient transduction, and expression lasted longer than typically reported-up to 28 days with beta-gal and up to 15 weeks with human AFP. These results suggest that delivery to the airway of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors utilizing a tissue-specific promoter could be a significant advance in the development of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. PMID:12718908

  5. Adenoviral gene transfer into the normal and injured spinal cord: enhanced transgene stability by combined administration of temperature-sensitive virus and transient immune blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, M I; Smith, G M

    1998-12-01

    This study characterized gene transfer into both normal and injured adult rat dorsal spinal cord using first (E1-/E3-) or second (E1-/E2A125/E3-, temperature-sensitive; ts) generation of replication-defective adenoviral (Ad) vectors. A novel immunosuppressive regimen aimed at blocking CD4/CD45 lymphocytic receptors was tested for improving transgene persistence. In addition, the effect of gene transfer on nociception was also evaluated. Seven days after treatment, numerous LacZ-positive cells were observed after transfection with either viral vector. By 21 days after transfection, beta-galactosidase staining was reduced and suggestive of ongoing cytopathology in both Ad-treated groups, despite the fact that the immunogenicity of LacZ/Adts appeared less when compared with that elicited by the LacZ/Ad vector. In contrast, immunosuppressed animals showed a significant (P < or = 0.05) increase in the number of LacZ-positive cells not displaying cytopathology. In these animals, a concomitant reduction in numbers of macrophages/microglia and CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes was observed. Only animals that received LacZ/Adts and immunosuppression showed transgene expression after 60 days. Similar results were observed in animals in which the L4-L5 dorsal roots were lesioned before transfection. Gene transfer into the dorsal spinal cord did not affect nociception, independent of the adenovirus vector. These results indicate that immune blockade of the CD4/CD45 lymphocytic receptors enhanced transgene stability in adult animals with normal or injured spinal cords and that persistent transgene expression in the spinal cord does not interfere with normal neural function. PMID:10023440

  6. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  7. Peri- and Postnatal Effects of Prenatal Adenoviral VEGF Gene Therapy in Growth-Restricted Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, D. J.; J. M. Wallace; Aitken, R. P.; Milne, J. S.; Martin, J. F.; Zachary, I. C.; Peebles, D. M.; David, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine artery (UtA) adenovirus vector (Ad)-mediated over-expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances uterine blood flow in normal sheep pregnancy and increases fetal growth in the overnourished adolescent sheep model of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Herein we examined its impact on gestation length, neonatal survival, early postnatal growth and metabolism. Singleton-bearing ewes were evenly allocated to receive Ad.VEGF-A165(5 x 10(10)particles/ml, 10 ml, n =17) or Sali...

  8. Gene therapy in clinical medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Selkirk, S

    2004-01-01

    Although the field of gene therapy has experienced significant setbacks and limited success, it is one of the most promising and active research fields in medicine. Interest in this therapeutic modality is based on the potential for treatment and cure of some of the most malignant and devastating diseases affecting humans. Over the next decade, the relevance of gene therapy to medical practices will increase and it will become important for physicians to understand the basic principles and st...

  9. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  10. The macrophage - a novel system to deliver gene therapy to pathological hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, L; Binley, K; Iqball, S; Kan, O; Maxwell, P; Ratcliffe, P; Lewis, C; Harris, A; Kingsman, S; Naylor, S

    2000-02-01

    The use of activated macrophages in the treatment of cancer has been largely ineffectual. By 'arming' these cells with the ability to express a therapeutic gene we demonstrate significant advances in the efficacy of this approach. We have used a hypoxia-regulated adenoviral vector to transduce human macrophages with either a reporter or a therapeutic gene encoding human cytochrome P4502B6 (CYP2B6). Infiltration of transduced macrophages into a tumour spheroid results in induction of gene expression. We demonstrate significant tumour cell killing only in the presence of cyclophosphamide via activation by P4502B6 and show that this can be further targeted to tumours through hypoxia regulated gene expression. Gene Therapy (2000) 7, 255-262. PMID:10694803

  11. Expression of Mouse SCP2 Gene Adenoviral Vector Carrying Albumin Promoter in Hepa1-6 Cells%固醇携带蛋白2腺病毒载体的构建与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾岩峰; 崔云峰; 崔乃强; 彭雁飞; 宁召臣; 张琚

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To construct the replication defective adenoviral vector of SCP2 gene carrying murine albumin promoter, and study the relations between SCP2 gene and the formation of cholesterol calculus. Methods The cDNA of SCP2 gene was cloned by using RT-PCR technique. The albumin promoter was linked to SCP2 gene's upstream, and the EGFP gene lied in its downstream. The plasmid pDC312-ALB-SCP2-IRES2 -EGFP was constructed by the gene recombination technique. The Admax Adenoviral Vector System was used to generate the replication defective adenoviral vectors, which were purified by CsCl method. The processes of TCID50 were applied to detect the titers of the adenoviral vectors. The RNA and protein were respectively extracted from the infected Hepal-6 cells by the adenoviral vector. The real-time quantitative PCR was employed to detect the mRNA expression levels, and the Western blotting analysis was used to measure the SCP2 protein levels. Result We constructed successfully the replication defective adenoviral vector of SCP2 gene carrying murine albumin promoter. When the mRNA levels of SCP2 gene were overexpressed, CYP7al mRNA levels were down-regulated (t=3.97,p<0.05); and the mRNA levels of HMGCR were up-regulated (t=3.23,p<0.05). Conclusions The SCP2 gene overexpression may affect cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, which could promote the formation of cholesterol calculus.%目的:构建携带白蛋白启动子SCP2 基因腺病毒载体,研究其与胆固醇结石形成的关系.方法:(1)利用RT-PCR技术克隆小鼠SCP2基因,在其上游接入白蛋白(ALB)启动子,下游连接绿色荧光报告基因(EGFP),构建穿梭质粒pDC312-ALB-SCP2-IRES2-EGFP;(2)采用Ad Max TM Adenoviru5 Vector系统包装病毒,CsCl法纯化病毒、TCID50法测定滴度;(3)重组腺病毒感染小鼠hepa-1-6细胞,实时定量PCR检测mRNA的表达;Western印迹检测SCP2蛋白表达情况;结果:成功构建携带白蛋白启动子SCP2基因腺病毒载体;当SCP2

  12. Gene Therapy Used in Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Wirth; Seppo Ylä-Herttuala

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has been, from the beginning, a target of intense research for gene therapy approaches. Currently, more than 60% of all on-going clinical gene therapy trials worldwide are targeting cancer. Indeed, there is a clear unmet medical need for novel therapies. This is further urged by the fact that current conventional cancer therapies are frequently troubled by their toxicities. Different gene therapy strategies have been employed for cancer, such as pro-drug activating suicide gene therapy...

  13. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Koert FD Kuhlmann; Conny T Bakker; Fibo JW ten Kate; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions.METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices.Tissue slices were cultured ex vivo for 1-6 d in an incubator using 95% O2. Slices were subsequently analyzed for viability and morphology. In addition the slices were incubated with different viral vectors expressing the repor ter genes GFP or DsRed.Expression of these reporter genes was measured at 72 h after infection.RESULTS: With the Krumdieck tissue slicer, uniform slices could be generated from pancreatic tissue but only upon embedding the tissue in 3% low melting agarose. Immunohistological examination showed the presence of all pancreatic cell types. Pancreatic normal and cancer tissue slices could be cultured for up to 6 d, while retaining viability and a moderate to good morphology. Reporter gene expression indicated that the slices could be infected and transduced efficiently by adenoviral vectors and by adeno associated viral vectors, whereas transduction with lentiviral vectors was limited. For the adenoviral vector, the transduction seemed limited to the peripheral layers of the explants.CONCLUSION: The presented sys tem al lows reproducible processing of minimal amounts of pancreatic tissue into slices uniform in size, suitable for pre-clinical evaluation of gene therapy vectors.

  14. Effects of adenoviral gene transfer of mutated IкBα, a novel inhibitor of NF-кb, on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-fu ZHOU; Ming-shun ZHANG; Kai-sheng YIN; Yong JI; Wei-ping XIE; Xue-fan GUI; Xiao-hui JI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of adenoviral gene transfer of IкBα mutant (IкBαM), a novel inhibitor of nuclear factor кB (NF- кB), on apoptosis, phenotype and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). Methods: Monocytes, cocultured with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 900 ng/mL) and interleukin (IL)-4 (300 ng/mL) for 5 d, followed by stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 ng/mL) for 2 d differentiated into mature DC. Monocytes were either left untransfected or were transfected with Ad IкBαM or AdLacZ. The transcription and expression of the IкBαM gene, and the inhibitory effect of IкBαM on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced NF-кB activation in mature DC were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot analysis, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, respectively. The phenotype, apoptosis, IL-12 secretion level of DC, and ability to stimulate the proliferation of T cells were determined by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and mixed leukocyte reaction. Results: PCR and RT-PCR were used to detect a unique 801 bp band in Ad IкBαM-transfected mature DC, and also a dose- and time-dependent expression of the IкBαM gene, which peaked at a multiplicity of infection of 100 pfu/cell and at 48 h. Furthermore, Ad IкBαM significantly suppressed the TNF-α-induced NF- кB activation, augmented apoptosis, downregulated CD80, CD83, and CD86 surface molecules, IL-12 secretion levels and the ability to stimulate the proliferation of T cells in mature DC. Conclusion: Ad IкBαM effectively transfected and potently inhibited NF-кB activation in monocyte-derived mature DC. Overexpression of the IкBαM gene in mature DC may contribute to T-cell immunosuppression through induction of DC apoptosis and downregulation of B7 molecules, providing a potential strategy for future DC-based immunotherapy of asthma.

  15. Delivery systems for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of DNA was unraveled by Watson and Crick in 1953, and two decades later Arber, Nathans and Smith discovered DNA restriction enzymes, which led to the rapid growth in the field of recombinant DNA technology. From expressing cloned genes in bacteria to expressing foreign DNA in transgenic animals, DNA is now slated to be used as a therapeutic agent to replace defective genes in patients suffering from genetic disorders or to kill tumor cells in cancer patients. Gene therapy provides modern medicine with new perspectives that were unthinkable two decades ago. Progress in molecular biology and especially, molecular medicine is now changing the basics of clinical medicine. A variety of viral and non-viral possibilities are available for basic and clinical research. This review summarizes the delivery routes and methods for gene transfer used in gene therapy.

  16. Killing effect of adenoviral mediated cytosine deaminase gene on human pancreatic cancer cell line PaTu 8988

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xue; LI Zhao-shen; XU Guo-ming; CUI Long; ZHANG Su-zhen; GONG Yan-fang; TU Zhen-xing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in vitro killing effects of cytosine deaminase gene mediated by adenovirus vector on human pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: Cytosine Deaminase (CD) gene was cloned into pAdTrack-CMV-CD, pAdTrack-CMV-CD and pAdEasy-1 were recombined in bacteria, and the products containing green fluorescent protein (GFP)were propagated in 293 cells and purified by cesium chloride gradient centrifugation. Human pancreatic carcinoma cell line 8988 were infected with this virus, then 5-FC was added; XTT assay was used to estimate the relative numbers of viable cells. Results: The positive clones were confirmed by using endonuclease digestion, and the titer of the virus containing CD gene was 2 × 1011 pfu/ml. It was found that 5-FC possessed significant cytotoxic activities for CD gene transfected 8988cell line, but had little effects on non-transfected pancreatic carcinoma cells. Conclusion: CD gene mediated by adenovirus has a high infectivity and is efficient for killing cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells, indicating suicide gene may be effective for pancreatic cancer in furure.

  17. [Experimental gene therapy using p21/WAF1 gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma--adenovirus infection and gene gun technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Tanaka, Y; Tanaka, T; Matono, S; Sueyoshi, S; Fujita, H; Shirouzu, K; Kato, S; Yamana, H

    2001-10-01

    p21/WAF1 (p21) inhibits the activity of the cyclin/cdk complex and controls the G1 to S cell phase transition. In the present study, we used a recombinant adenoviral approach and gene gun technology to introduce p21 into esophageal cancer cells in order to assess the effect of p21 on cell growth. Infection with the p21 adenovirus (AdV) using gene gun technology resulted in inhibition of TE9 and KE3 cell growth. The levels of involucrin, which is a marker of squamous epithelium differentiation, markedly increased at 48 h and 72 h after p21 AdV infection in TE9 cells. These results indicate that p21 plays an important role in esophageal cancer cell proliferation. Overexpression of the p21 gene can inhibit cell growth and induce differentiation in esophageal cancer cells. p21 gene therapy may prove beneficial in the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  18. CD40-targeted adenoviral gene transfer to dendritic cells through the use of a novel bispecific single-chain Fv antibody enhances cytotoxic T cell activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandao, JG; Scheper, RJ; Lougheed, SM; Curiel, DT; Tillman, BW; Gerritsen, WR; van den Eertwegh, AJM; Pinedo, HM; Haisma, HJ; de Gruijl, TD

    2003-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) transduction of dendritic cells (DC) is a promising vaccination strategy. However, clinical applicability of Ad vectors is hampered by the necessity to use high titers of infectious Ad particles for efficient DC transduction. Here, we report on the production of a bacterially express

  19. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy in the News Position Statements Scientists & Clinicians Job Bank General Grant Information ASGCT Grants and Awards ASGCT ... Password New Investigator Resource Center Join ... American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy is the primary professional membership organization for gene and cell therapy. The Society's members ...

  20. Demonstration of feasibility of in vivo gene therapy for Gaucher disease using a chemically induced mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John; McEachern, Kerry Anne; Kyros, Julie A Cavanagh; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Budzinski, Tracey; Ziegler, Robin J; Yew, Nelson S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Scaria, Abraham; van Rooijen, Nico; Barranger, John A; Cheng, Seng H

    2002-08-01

    Progress towards developing gene therapy for Gaucher disease has been hindered by the lack of an animal model. Here we describe a mouse model of Gaucher disease which has a chemically induced deficiency of glucocerebrosidase and that accumulates elevated levels of glucosylceramide (GL-1) in the lysosomes of Kupffer cells. Administration of mannose-terminated glucocerebrosidase (Cerezyme) resulted in the reduction of GL-1 levels in the livers of these animals. Gene transduction of hepatocytes with a plasmid DNA vector encoding human glucocerebrosidase (pGZB-GC) generated high-level expression and secretion of the enzyme into systemic circulation with consequent normalization of Kupffer cell GL-1 levels. This suggested that the de novo synthesized and unmodified enzyme produced by hepatocyte transduction was also capable of being delivered to the cells that are primarily affected in Gaucher disease. Immunolocalization studies also revealed that preferential transduction and expression of human glucocerebrosidase in the Kupffer cells with subsequent reduction in the GL-1 levels could be attained with a low dose of a recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the human enzyme (Ad2/CMV-GC). This observation raises the possibility of gene therapy for Gaucher disease that involves directly transducing the affected histiocytes using recombinant adenoviral vectors. Together, these data demonstrate the potential for use of in vivo gene therapy vectors for treating Gaucher disease. PMID:12161184

  1. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    KamranAliAhmed; BrianJamesDavis; TorrenceMWilson; GregoryAWiseman; MarkJFederspiel; JohnCMorris

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our...

  2. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  3. The adenoviral E1A protein displaces corepressors and relieves gene repression by unliganded thyroid hormone receptors in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yukiyasu Sato; Andrew Ding; Rachel A Heimeier; Ahmed F Yousef; Joe S Mymryk; Paul G Walfish; Yun-Bo Shi

    2009-01-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 early region 1A (E1A) is one of two oncogenes present in the adenovirus genome and functions by interfering with the activities of cellular regulatory proteins. The E1A gene is alternatively spliced to yield five products. Earlier studies have revealed that E1A can regulate the function of thyroid hormone (T3) re-ceptors (TRs). However, analysis in yeast compared with transfection studies in mammalian cell cultures yields sur-prisingly different effects. Here, we have examined the effect of E1A on TR function by using the frog oocyte in vivo system, where the effects of E1A can be studied in the context of chromatin. We demonstrate that different isoforms of E1A have distinct effects on TR function. The two longest forms inhibit both the repression by unliganded TR and activation by T3-bound TR. We further show that E1A binds to unliganded TR to displace the endogenous corepres-sor nuclear receptor corepressor, thus relieving the repression by unliganded TR. On the other hand, in the presence of T3, E1A inhibits gene activation by T3-bound TR indirectly, through a mechanism that requires its binding do-main for the general coactivator p300. Taken together, our results thus indicate that E1A affects TR function through distinct mechanisms that are dependent upon the presence or absence of T3.

  4. Adenoviral-mediated Hath1-EGFP gene transfer into guinea pig cochlea through intact round window membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; HU Yin-yan; YANG Shi-ming; GUO Wei; SUN Jian-he; HAN Dong-yi; ZHAI Suo-qiang; YANG Wei-yan; David Z.Z.He

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study expression of adenovira1-mediated Hathl-EGFP gene in the guinea pig cochlea after transfer through intact round window membrane (RWM), and to assess its effects on hearing. Methods Twenty adult guinea pigs were used, of which: 12 were surgically inoculated with AdHath1-EGFP in the bony groove of round window niche, and 8 with artificial perilymph. Auditory brainstem response(ABR) thresholds were determined in all animals before and 5 days after surgery. On post-surgery day 5 and day 14, animals were sacrificed and whole mounts of cochlea and fro zensections were examined. Results ABR tests showed no significant change of hearing after the surgery.Strong fluorescence staining in the cochleae was seen in Ad-Hathl-EGFP groups. The highest levels of gene expression were seen in the post-surgery day 5 group with tittle decrease on post-surgery day 14.The contralateral cochlea and those in the control groups were free of fluorescence staining. Conclusion The transgenic Hath1-EGFP can be effectively delivered into the inner ear through intact RWM, in an atraumatic manner.

  5. Gene therapy in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masaaki; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2006-08-01

    Lung transplantation is effective life-saving therapy for the treatment of a variety of end-stage lung diseases. However, the application of lung transplantation is hindered by multiple factors such as the shortage of organ donors, early graft failure and chronic graft dysfunction. These problems are related to various lung injuries before and after transplantation including donor brain-death-related lung injury, ischemia, reperfusion and immune-mediated injuries. Gene transfection presents a potential molecular therapeutic solution to modify the transplanted organ such that it is better able to deal with these obstacles. In fact, in many ways lung transplantation is an ideal situation for gene therapy in that: 1) the targeted injuries are predictable (e.g. IR injury), 2) only transient gene expression is needed in many instances, 3) the immunosuppressive regimen necessary to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ attenuates vector-induced inflammation and the immune response to the vectors or the transgene products, and thus effectively augments and prolongs gene expression; 4) the anatomical structure of the lung enables trans-airway access and local gene delivery - as well as re-transfection. A number of issues need to be considered to develop a strategy of gene delivery in lung transplantation: administration route (intra-airway, trans-vascular, intravenous, intramuscular), timing (donor in-vivo, ex-vivo organ transfection or recipient), vector selection and gene selection. Based on our work and the work of others, over the last decade, we present the state of art of in gene therapy in lung transplantation and exciting future directions in the field. PMID:16918334

  6. Gene Therapy for Coagulation Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swystun, Laura L; Lillicrap, David

    2016-04-29

    Molecular genetic details of the human coagulation system were among the first successes of the genetic revolution in the 1980s. This information led to new molecular diagnostic strategies for inherited disorders of hemostasis and the development of recombinant clotting factors for the treatment of the common inherited bleeding disorders. A longer term goal of this knowledge has been the establishment of gene transfer to provide continuing access to missing or defective hemostatic proteins. Because of the relative infrequency of inherited coagulation factor disorders and the availability of safe and effective alternative means of management, the application of gene therapy for these conditions has been slow to realize clinical application. Nevertheless, the tools for effective and safe gene transfer are now much improved, and we have started to see examples of clinical gene therapy successes. Leading the way has been the use of adeno-associated virus-based strategies for factor IX gene transfer in hemophilia B. Several small phase 1/2 clinical studies using this approach have shown prolonged expression of therapeutically beneficial levels of factor IX. Nevertheless, before the application of gene therapy for coagulation disorders becomes widespread, several obstacles need to be overcome. Immunologic responses to the vector and transgenic protein need to be mitigated, and production strategies for clinical grade vectors require enhancements. There is little doubt that with the development of more efficient and facile strategies for genome editing and the application of other nucleic acid-based approaches to influence the coagulation system, the future of genetic therapies for hemostasis is bright. PMID:27126652

  7. Cytotoxic effect of replication-competent adenoviral vectors carrying L-plastin promoter regulated E1A and cytosine deaminase genes in cancers of the breast, ovary and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Hakan; Zhang, Lixin; Tang, Yucheng; Deisseroth, Albert

    2003-05-01

    Prodrug activating transcription unit gene therapy is one of several promising approaches to cancer gene therapy. Combining that approach with conditionally replication-competent viral vectors that are truly tumor specific has been an important objective of recent work. In this study, we report the construction of a new conditionally replication-competent bicistronic adenoviral vector in which the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the E1a gene are driven by the L-plastin tumor-specific promoter (AdLpCDIRESE1a). A similar vector driven by the CMV promoter has also been constructed (AdCMVCDIRESE1a) as a control. We have carried out in vitro cytotoxicity in carcinomas of the breast, ovary and colon, and in vivo efficacy studies with these vectors in an animal model of colon cancer. While the addition of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector to established cancer cell lines showed significant cytotoxicity in tumor cells derived from carcinomas of the breast (MCF-7), colon (HTB-38) and ovary (Ovcar 5), no significant toxicity was seen in explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) exposed to this vector. The addition of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) significantly increased the cytotoxicity in an additive fashion of both the AdLpCDIRESE1a and AdCMVCDIRESE1a vectors as well as that of the AdLpCD replication incompetent vector to established tumor cell lines. However, no significant cytotoxicity was observed with the addition of 5FC to explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells that had been exposed to the L-plastin-driven vectors. Studies with mixtures of infected and uninfected tumor cell lines showed that the established cancer cell lines infected with the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector generated significant toxicity to surrounding uninfected cells (the "bystander effect") even at a ratio of 0.25 of infected cells to infected + uninfected cells in the presence of 5FC. The injection of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector into subcutaneous deposits of human tumor nodules in the

  8. High-level recombinant protein production in CHO cells using an adenoviral vector and the cumate gene-switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillet, Bruno; Gilbert, Rénald; Amziani, Rachid; Guilbault, Claire; Gadoury, Christine; Caron, Antoine W; Mullick, Alaka; Garnier, Alain; Massie, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate and accelerate the production of eukaryotic proteins with correct post-translational modifications, we have developed a protein production system based on the transduction of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using adenovirus vectors (AdVs). We have engineered a CHO cell line (CHO-cTA) that stably expresses the transactivator (cTA) of our newly developed cumate gene-switch transcription system. This cell line is adapted to suspension culture and can grow in serum-free and protein-free medium. To increase the transduction level of AdVs, we have also generated a cell line (CHO-cTA-CAR) that expresses additional amounts of the coxackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on its surface. Recombinant protein production was tested using an AdV carrying the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the CR5 promoter, which is strongly and specifically activated by binding to cTA. The SEAP expression was linked to the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to facilitate titration of the AdV. We monitored SEAP expression on a daily basis for 9 days after transduction of CHO-cTA and CHO-cTA-CAR using different quantities of AdVs at 37 and 30 degrees C. Incubation at the latter temperature increased the production of SEAP at least 10-fold, and the presence of CAR increased the transduction level of the AdV. Maximum SEAP production (63 mg/L) was achieved at 6-7 days post-infection at 30 degrees C by transducing CHO-cTA-CAR with 500 infectious particles/cell. Because numerous AdVs can now be generated within a few weeks and large-scale production of AdVs is now a routine procedure, this system could be used to produce rapidly milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant proteins as well as for large-scale protein production.

  9. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Zhan-Kui Liu

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is common in China, and its early diagnosis and treatment are difficult. In recent years great progress has been achieved in gene therapy, and a wide array of gene therapy systems for gastric cancer has been investigated. The present article deals with the general principles of gene therapy and then focuses on how these principles may be applied to gastric cancer.

  10. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA inter...

  11. Gene Therapy : myth or reality ?

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Alain

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Gene therapy has become a reality, although still a fragile one. Clinical benefit has beenachieved over the last 17 years in a limited number of medical conditions for whichpathophysiological studies determined that they were favorable settings. They includeinherited disorders of the immune system, leukodystrophies, possibly hemoglobinopathies,hemophilia B, and retinal dystrophies. Advances in the treatment of B-cell leukemiasand lymphomas have also been achieved. Adva...

  12. Gene Therapy in Human Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abaan, Ogan D.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy, being a novel treatment for many diseases, is readily applicable for the treatment of cancer patients. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. There are many clinical protocols for the treatment of breast cancer, and gene therapy is now being considered within current protocols. This review will focus on the basic concepts of cancer gene therapy strategies (suicide gene, tumor suppressor gene, anti-angiogenesis, immunotherapy, oncolytic viruses and ribozyme/antisens...

  13. Induction of specific humoral and cellular immune responses in a mouse model following gene fusion of HSP70C and Hantaan virus Gn and S0.7 in an adenoviral vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Cheng

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs display adjuvant functions when given as fusion proteins to enhance vaccination efficiency. To evaluate enhanced potency of Hantaan virus (HTNV glycoprotein (GP and nucleocapsid protein (NP immunogenicity by heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, a recombinant adenovirus rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C expression vector was developed by genetically linking the HSP70 C-terminal gene (HSP70 359-610 aa, HSP70C to the Gn and 0.7 kb fragment of the NP (aa1-274-S0.7. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with these recombinant adenoviral vectors. A series of immunological assays determined the immunogenicity of the recombinant adenoviral vectors. The results showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C induced a stronger humoral and cellular immune response than other recombinant adenoviruses (rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG and rAd-GnS0.7 and the HFRS vaccine control. Animal protection experiments showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C was effective at protecting C57BL/6 mice from HTNV infection. The results of the immunological experiments showed that HSP70C lead to enhanced vaccine potency, and suggested significant potential in the development of genetically engineered vaccines against HTNV.

  14. Phoenix rising: gene therapy makes a comeback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria P.Limberis

    2012-01-01

    Despite the first application of gene therapy in 1990,gene therapy has until recently failed to meet the huge expectations set forth by researchers,clinicians,and patients,thus dampening enthusiasm for an imminent cure for many life-threatening genetic diseases.Nonetheless,in recent years we have witnessed a strong comeback for gene therapy,with clinical successes in young and adult subjects suffering from inherited forms of blindness or from X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease.In this review,various gene therapy vectors progressing into clinical development and pivotal advances in gene therapy trials will be discussed.

  15. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Qing-Tao Wang; He Liu; Zhen-Zhu Zhang; Wen-Lin Huang

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucieotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  16. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahale Swapna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense mechanism against infection by transfecting host cells with an antimicrobial peptide protein-encoding gene. -Periodontal vaccination. Gene therapy is one of the recent entrants and its applications in the field of periodontics are reviewed in general here.

  17. Gene therapy strategy to reduced bone marrow aplasia: evaluation in cynomolgus macaque exposed to a gamma total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to assess whether direct intra-marrow injection of an adeno-viral vector expressing human IL-1α gene stimulates hematopoiesis in healthy non-irradiated and gamma irradiated cynomolgus macaques. In the first hand, we have evaluated the feasibility of this gene therapy strategy in two healthy non-irradiated macaques. In this work, we have observed an increase of neutrophil, monocyte and platelets in the two animals treated with the therapeutic construct. This effect was associated with no abnormal clinical side effect. On the other hand, we have evaluated this strategy in non-human primate exposed to a sublethal gamma irradiation. Two of three animals treated by the therapeutic construct reduced significantly the neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and anemia radio-induced. In conclusion, this gene therapy strategy gave a similar clinical benefit comparatively to systemic administration of huIL-1α but without severe side effect. (author)

  18. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mahale Swapna; Dani Nitin; Ansari Shumaila; Kale Triveni

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense...

  19. Gensko zdravljenje raka: Cancer gene therapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Serša, Gregor; Čemažar, Maja; KOČEVAR, NINA

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy uses genes to treat diseases. Large amount of research is based on cancer because current methods for cancer treatment have limited efficiencyand unwanted side effects. In the following article we first presentthe basic principles of gene therapy. Next, we describe the main delivery systems, which are viral and non-viral, and then the main therapeuticstrategies of cancer gene therapy. These can be divided into immunological, where we take advantage of the immune system for cancer...

  20. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  1. Constructing recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vectors that express glucose transporter-1 through in vitro ligation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangcheng Li; Junliang Li; Ranyi Liu; Xinke Xu; Kaichang Yuan; Zhonghua Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We constructed a homologous recombination bacterial method based on the pAdEasy system, a widely used system, for generating recombinant adenoviral vectors that express glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) in rats.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of generating recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vectors that express GLUT1 in rats by in vitro ligation based on the Adeno-XTM system. DESIGN: An in vitro cell-based experiment. SETTING: This study was performed at the Linbaixin Medical Research Center of the Second Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and Central Laboratory for Prevention and Treatment of Tumor, Sun Yat-sen University between January and August 2004. MATERIALS: Male, adult, Sprague Dawley rats were used to extract total RNA from brain tissue. E. coli DH5?and human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293 cells) used in the present study were cryo-preserved by the Second Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University. Rabbit anti-rat GLUT1 polyclonal antibody (Chemicon, U.S.A.) and primers (Shanghai Boya Bioengineering Co., Ltd) were also used. METHODS: E1/E3-deleted replication-defective adenoviral vectors were used. Using in vitro ligation, the target gene was first sub-cloned into a shuttle vector plasmid to obtain the fragment containing target gene expression cassettes by enzyme digestion. Subsequently, the fragment was co-transformed with linearized adenoviral backbone vector into the E. coli strain. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid was transfected into HEK293 cells to assembly recombinant adenoviral vectors with replication capabilities. The procedure was repeated several times for recombinant adenoviral vectors amplification. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Efficiency of recombinant adenoviral vectors to express the target gene was measured by gene and protein expression through polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot assays, respectively.RESULTS: Results demonstrated that recombinant adenoviral

  2. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inubushi, Masayuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  3. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing Pan

    Full Text Available Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373. Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement.

  4. Viral and nonviral delivery systems for gene delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouri Nayerossadat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is the process of introducing foreign genomic materials into host cells to elicit a therapeutic benefit. Although initially the main focus of gene therapy was on special genetic disorders, now diverse diseases with different patterns of inheritance and acquired diseases are targets of gene therapy. There are 2 major categories of gene therapy, including germline gene therapy and somatic gene therapy. Although germline gene therapy may have great potential, because it is currently ethically forbidden, it cannot be used; however, to date human gene therapy has been limited to somatic cells. Although numerous viral and nonviral gene delivery systems have been developed in the last 3 decades, no delivery system has been designed that can be applied in gene therapy of all kinds of cell types in vitro and in vivo with no limitation and side effects. In this review we explain about the history of gene therapy, all types of gene delivery systems for germline (nuclei, egg cells, embryonic stem cells, pronuclear, microinjection, sperm cells and somatic cells by viral [retroviral, adenoviral, adeno association, helper-dependent adenoviral systems, hybrid adenoviral systems, herpes simplex, pox virus, lentivirus, Epstein-Barr virus] and nonviral systems (physical: Naked DNA, DNA bombardant, electroporation, hydrodynamic, ultrasound, magnetofection and (chemical: Cationic lipids, different cationic polymers, lipid polymers. In addition to the above-mentioned, advantages, disadvantages, and practical use of each system are discussed.

  5. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mostafa Elbadawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis.

  6. Ferret and pig models of cystic fibrosis: prospects and promise for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ziying; Stewart, Zoe A; Sinn, Patrick L; Olsen, John C; Hu, Jim; McCray, Paul B; Engelhardt, John F

    2015-03-01

    Large animal models of genetic diseases are rapidly becoming integral to biomedical research as technologies to manipulate the mammalian genome improve. The creation of cystic fibrosis (CF) ferrets and pigs is an example of such progress in animal modeling, with the disease phenotypes in the ferret and pig models more reflective of human CF disease than mouse models. The ferret and pig CF models also provide unique opportunities to develop and assess the effectiveness of gene and cell therapies to treat affected organs. In this review, we examine the organ disease phenotypes in these new CF models and the opportunities to test gene therapies at various stages of disease progression in affected organs. We then discuss the progress in developing recombinant replication-defective adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, and lentiviral vectors to target genes to the lung and pancreas in ferrets and pigs, the two most affected organs in CF. Through this review, we hope to convey the potential of these new animal models for developing CF gene and cell therapies. PMID:25675143

  7. Cardiac gene therapy: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkar, P N; Leong-Poi, H; Singh, K K

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing throughout the world and is associated with elevated morbidity and mortality. Gene therapy to treat cardiac dysfunction is gaining importance because of the limited therapeutic benefit offered by pharmacotherapies. The growing knowledge of the complex signaling pathways and the development of sophisticated vectors and delivery systems, are facilitating identification and targeting of specific molecular candidates involved in initiation and progression of CVDs. Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown the therapeutic efficiency of gene therapy in different disease models and patients. Hence, gene therapy might plausibly become an unconventional treatment modality for CVD patients. In this review, we summarize the gene delivery carriers, modes of delivery, recent preclinical/clinical studies and potential therapeutic targets. We also briefly discuss the existing limitations of gene therapy, technical challenges surrounding gene carriers and delivery systems, and some approaches to overcome these limitations for bringing CVD gene therapy one step closer to reality. PMID:27128687

  8. Up-regulation of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer impairs adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We previously reported that radiation enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene expression in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that adenoviral gene therapy might be more effective in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells. In the present study, we compared the transduction efficiency of adenovirus-delivered genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We used an adenovirus expressing the hepatocyte growth factor antagonist, NK4 (Ad-NK4), as a representative gene therapy. We established two radioresistant human pancreatic cancer cell lines using fractionated irradiation. Radiosensitive and radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells were infected with Ad-NK4, and NK4 levels in the cells were measured. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the differences in the transduction efficiency between these cells, we measured expression of the genes mediating adenovirus infection and endocytosis. The results revealed that NK4 levels in radioresistant cells were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those in radiosensitive cells, although there were no significant differences in adenovirus uptake between radiosensitive cells and radioresistant cells. Integrin β3 was up-regulated and the Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor was down-regulated in radioresistant cells, and inhibition of integrin β3 promoted adenovirus gene transfer. These results suggest that inhibition of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells could enhance adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. (author)

  9. Combination Gene Therapy for Liver Metastasis of Colon Carcinoma in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Hsai; Chen, X. H. Li; Wang, Yibin; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Finegold, Milton J.; Rich, Susan S.

    1995-03-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8^+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver.

  10. Gene Therapy in Oral Cancer: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, M. Sathish; Masthan, K.M.K.; Babu, N. Aravindha; Dash, Kailash Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the use of DNA as an agent to treat disease. Gene therapy aims at the insertion of a functional gene into the cells of a patient for the correction of an inborn error of metabolism, to alter or repair an acquired genetic abnormality, and to provide new function to the cell. Many experiments have been done with respect to its application in various diseases.Today, most of the gene therapy studies are aimed at cancer and hereditary diseases which are linked to genetic defects. C...

  11. [Gene therapy with cytokines against cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy is an excellent alternative for treatment of many diseases. Capacity to manipulate the DNA has allowed direct the gene therapy to correct the function of an altered gene, to increase the expression of a gene and to favour the activation of the immune response. This way, it can intend the use of the DNA like medication able to control, to correct or to cure many diseases. Gene therapy against cancer has an enormous potential, and actually the use of the DNA has increased to control diverse cancer in animal models, with very encouraging results that have allowed its applications in experimental protocols in human. This work concentrates a review of the foundations of the gene therapy and its application on cervical cancer, from the point of view of the alterations of the immune system focused on the tumour micro-environment, and the use of the cytokines as immunomodulators. PMID:16983992

  12. A short perspective on gene therapy: Clinical experience on gene therapy of gliomablastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Wirth, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    More than two decades have passed since the first gene therapy clinical trial was conducted. During this time, we have gained much knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the fear that persists in society. We have experienced drawbacks and successes. More than 1700 clinical trials have been conducted where gene therapy is used as a means for therapy. In the very first trial, patients with advanced melanoma were treated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes ge...

  13. Switching on the Lights for Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Winkeler; Miguel Sena-Esteves; Paulis, Leonie E.M.; Hongfeng Li; Yannic Waerzeggers; Benedikt Rückriem; Uwe Himmelreich; Markus Klein; Parisa Monfared; Rueger, Maria A.; Michael Heneka; Stefan Vollmar; Mathias Hoehn; Cornel Fraefel; Rudolf Graf

    2007-01-01

    Strategies for non-invasive and quantitative imaging of gene expression in vivo have been developed over the past decade. Non-invasive assessment of the dynamics of gene regulation is of interest for the detection of endogenous disease-specific biological alterations (e.g., signal transduction) and for monitoring the induction and regulation of therapeutic genes (e.g., gene therapy). To demonstrate that non-invasive imaging of regulated expression of any type of gene after in vivo transductio...

  14. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Bali; Deepika Bali; Ashutosh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction...

  15. GENE THERAPY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Vitošević

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the very successful Human Genome Project and the identification of genes involved in genetic disease, we now have the ability to treat many conditions. However, the identification of the genes which code certain phenotype characteristics has opened the way for abuse in the fields of sport and physical exercise. The principles of gene therapy and the ways in which genes are transferred have completely been copied from gene therapy and are now being used to increase the physical abilities of athletes. The genes most frequently used by athletes include: the the ACE gene, the ACTN3 gene, myostatin, the erythropoietin gene, PPAR-delta and the like. The misuse of these genes with the aim of increasing physical abilities has already become part of sport and is extremely difficult to identify, since genes and gene sequences entering the human body are proteins that are already struc-tural and functional parts of the organism. On the other hand, viral vectors as the instruments for gene transfer attack and destroy the human immune system, and the reaction of the human body can be negative, with a danger of insertional mutagenesis and the appearance of oncogenes. Gene ther-apy might actually be much more useful in treating sports injuries, but even these procedures are still far from clinical practice. There is a fine line between gene therapy and gene doping in athletes. A number of growth factors will enhance repair, but it happen that expression of these factors increase the strength of bones and tendons, so that giving an adventage to competitors. First of all, it is neces-sary to acquaint athletes as much as possible with the negative consequences of using gene therapy. However victory and glory may be strong achievements, the health of these young people, and respect for fundamental and ethical principles, humanity, and fair play game have a more lasting value and represent the heavier weight on the scales.

  16. Cancer Treatment with Gene Therapy and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy methods have evolved remarkably in recent years which have resulted in more effective local tumor control with negligible toxicity of surrounding normal tissues. However, local recurrence and distant metastasis often occur following radiation therapy mostly due to the development of radioresistance through the deregulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inhibition of DNA damage repair mechanisms. Over the last decade, extensive progress in radiotherapy and gene therapy co...

  17. Gene therapy in India: A focus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarvani Chodisetty; Everette Jacob Remington Nelson

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy refers to the treatment of genetic diseases using normal copies of the defective genes. It has the potential to cure any genetic disease with long-lasting therapeutic benefits. It remained an enigma for a long period of time, which was followed by a series of setbacks in the late 1990s. Gene therapy has re-emerged as a therapeutic option with reports of success from recent clinical studies. The United States and Europe has been pioneers in this field for over two decades. Recently, reports of gene therapy have started coming in from Asian countries like China, Japan and Korea. This review focuses on the current status of gene therapy in India.

  18. Immuno-gene therapy in hepatocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@Hepatocarcinoma is a disease that threatens human health. To date,the known etiology of hepatocarcinomahas not been narrowed down to just one factor. It is possible that there are their own causes in different areas.Thus, there are no absolute, but relative therapy to cure all kinds of hepatocarcinoma. Presently,there exists other treatment for the hepatocarcinoma which cannot be operated by surgery, such as cryosurgery,photodynamic therapy,immunotherapy,interventional radiotherapy and targeting therapy. With the development of molecular biology ,gene therapy offers new possibilities in the treatment of genetic diseases,tumors,AIDS and other gene defect disease.

  19. Translational Approaches towards Cancer Gene Therapy: Hurdles and Hopes

    OpenAIRE

    Yadollah Omidi; Jaleh Barar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Of the cancer gene therapy approaches, gene silencing, suicide/apoptosis inducing gene therapy, immunogene therapy and targeted gene therapy are deemed to sub­stantially control the biological consequences of genomic changes in cancerous cells. Thus, a large number of clinical trials have been conducted against various malignancies. In this review, we will discuss recent translational progresses of gene and cell therapy of cancer. Methods: Essential information on gene therapy o...

  20. 构建MYC反应元件修饰hTERT核心启动子引导荧光素酶表达的腺病毒载体%Construction of adenoviral vector for luciferase driven by hTERT core promoter modified with MYC-responsive elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨旻; 王臻; 李立文; 苏明权; 于文彬

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To construct adenoviral vectors for luciferase driven by human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT) core promoter with multimer of MYC responsive elements.METHODS:Multimer of MYC responsive elements was cloned into the upstream site of hTERT core promoter and the modified hTERT promoter and luciferase were cloned into the plasmid pDC316 to construct shuttle plasmids which cotransfected HEK 293 cells with rescue plasmid pBHGlox(delta)E1,3Cre to achieve recombinant adenoviral vectors.The cytopathic effects and PCR using primers specific for luciferase were used to identify the recombinant adenoviral vectors.RESULTS:Adenoviral vectors with luciferase driven by hTERT core promoter with none or positive and negative six copies of MYC responsive elements were constructed and amplified.The titer of the adenovirus were 3.5× 106 pfu/ml,2.5× 106 pfu/ml and 1.5× 106 pfu/ml respectively determined by plaque assay.CONCLUSION:The further research on transciriptional targeting in osteosarcoma gene therapy can be done using adenoviral vectors with luciferase driven by hTERT promoter with MYC responsive elements.

  1. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@mail.ntust.edu.tw; He, Wen-Jie [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Chiang, Chiao-Hsi [School of Pharmacy, National Defense Medical Center (China); Hong, Po-Da [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and The Alex Grass Center for Drug Design and Synthesis (Israel); Ou, Keng-Liang [College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production (China)

    2013-07-15

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  2. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes

  3. The effect of deafness duration on neurotrophin gene therapy for spiral ganglion neuron protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Andrew K; Tu, Tian; Atkinson, Patrick J; Flynn, Brianna O; Sgro, Beatrice E; Hume, Cliff; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K; Richardson, Rachael T

    2011-08-01

    A cochlear implant can restore hearing function by electrically exciting spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the deaf cochlea. However, following deafness SGNs undergo progressive degeneration ultimately leading to their death. One significant cause of SGN degeneration is the loss of neurotrophic support that is normally provided by cells within the organ of Corti (OC). The administration of exogenous neurotrophins (NTs) can protect SGNs from degeneration but the effects are short-lived once the source of NTs has been exhausted. NT gene therapy, whereby cells within the cochlea are transfected with genes enabling them to produce NTs, is one strategy for providing a cellular source of NTs that may provide long-term support for SGNs. As the SGNs normally innervate sensory cells within the OC, targeting residual OC cells for gene therapy in the deaf cochlea may provide a source of NTs for SGN protection and targeted regrowth of their peripheral fibers. However, the continual degeneration of the OC over extended periods of deafness may deplete the cellular targets for NT gene therapy and hence limit the effectiveness of this method in preventing SGN loss. This study examined the effects of deafness duration on the efficacy of NT gene therapy in preventing SGN loss in guinea pigs that were systemically deafened with aminoglycosides. Adenoviral vectors containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) with or without genes for Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3 (NT3) were injected into the scala media (SM) compartment of cochleae that had been deafened for one, four or eight weeks prior to the viral injection. The results showed that viral transfection of cells within the SM was still possible even after severe degeneration of the OC. Supporting cells (pillar and Deiters' cells), cells within the stria vascularis, the spiral ligament, endosteal cells lining the scala compartments and interdental cells in the spiral limbus were transfected. However, the

  4. Antiangiogenic gene therapy of cancer: recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    Libutti Steven K; Blazer Dan G; Tandle Anita

    2004-01-01

    Abstract With the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth and progression firmly established, considerable effort has been directed to antiangiogenic therapy as a new modality to treat human cancers. Antiangiogenic agents have recently received much widespread attention but strategies for their optimal use are still being developed. Gene therapy represents an attractive alternative to recombinant protein administration for several reasons. This review evaluates the potential advantages of gene t...

  5. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    Stoff-Khalili, MA; Dall, P.; Curiel, DT

    2006-01-01

    In view of the limited success of available treatment modalities for breast cancer, alternative and complementary strategies need to be developed. The delineation of the molecular basis of breast cancer provides the possibility of specific intervention by gene therapy through the introduction of genetic material for therapeutic purposes. In this regard, several gene therapy approaches for carcinoma of the breast have been developed. These approaches can be divided into six broad categories: (...

  6. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy

  7. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S., E-mail: mviapiano@partners.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy.

  8. Effects of adenoviral-mediated gene transduction of NK4 on proliferation, movement, and invasion of human colonic LS174T cancer cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Zheng Jie; Jian-Wei Wang; Jian-Guo Qu; Wei Wang; Tao Hung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of a recombinant adenovirus vector that expresses NK4,a truncated form of human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), on human colonic adenocarcinoma cells in vitro to establish a basis for future NK4 gene cancer therapy.METHODS: Cells from the LS174T human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line were infected with recombinant adenovirus rvAdCMV/NK4 and the effects of the manipulation on tumor cell proliferation, scatter,migration, and basement membrane invasion were assessed. Cells infected with a recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-LacZ) expressing β-galactosidase served as the controls.RESULTS: We found that rvAdCMV/NK4 expression attenuated HGF-induced tumor cell scatter, migration,and basement membrane invasion (P < 0.05), but did not inhibit tumor cell proliferation.CONCLUSION: HGF-induced LS174T tumor cell scatter,migration, and invasion can be antagonized by the recombinant NK4-expressing adenovirus.

  9. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART I. GENE DELIVERY TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy fina...

  10. Current gene therapy for stomach carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Tai Xu; Lian-Tian Huang; Bo-Rong Pan

    2001-01-01

    astric cancer is common in China [1-42],and its early diagnosis and treatment in advanced stage are difficult [31-50].In recent years ,gene study in cancer is a hotspot ,and great progress has been achieved [41-80] .Cancer gene therapy has shifted from the imagination into the laboratory and clinical trials.

  11. Adenoviral-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer has a protective effect on sciatic nerve following constriction-induced spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  12. Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, F D; McNamee, L M; Uzdil, V; Morgan, I W

    2014-02-01

    This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. We show that the field of gene therapy has matured steadily since the 1980s, with the congruent accumulation of >35 000 papers, >16 000 US patents, >1800 clinical trials and >$4.3 billion in capital investment in gene therapy companies. Gene therapy technologies comprise a series of dissimilar approaches for gene delivery, each of which has introduced a distinct product architecture. Using bibliometric methods, we quantify the maturation of each technology through a characteristic life cycle S-curve, from a Nascent stage, through a Growing stage of exponential advance, toward an Established stage and projected limit. Capital investment in gene therapy is shown to have occurred predominantly in Nascent stage technologies and to be negatively correlated with maturity. Gene therapy technologies are now achieving the level of maturity that innovation research and biotechnology experience suggest may be requisite for efficient product development. Asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and capital investment in development-focused business models may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy. PMID:24305420

  13. Gene Therapy and its Implications in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jibi M; Basappa, N

    2011-01-01

    Background The concept of transferring genes to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed for nearly half a century. The exponential increase in our ability to manipulate the genetic material of a cell via recombinant DNA technology has brought this goal closer to realization. The original perception that gene therapy should be considered only for a few major organs as a means of treating life-threatening disorders that are refractory to conventional treatment has changed. There are many non-life-threatening conditions that adversely affect a patient’s quality of life, for which there are no effective treatments. The lack of suitable treatment has permitted morbidity to become a rational basis for extending the scope of gene therapy. In the past few years, remarkable progress has been made in the field of gene therapy. While considerable problems remain, thus impeding the routine clinical use of gene transfer, gene therapy will have a pervasive and significant impact on areas that are based on biological science. Aim The purpose of this review is to examine the progress made in addressing gene transfer strategies for correcting various diseases and problems that are relevant to dental practice.

  14. 放射诱导调控腺病毒介导gfp报告基因在肿瘤细胞内的表达%The Expression of Adenoviral Mediated gfp Reporter Gene in Tumor Cells Induced and Regulated by Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏道严; 戴冰冰; 陈诗书; 王中和

    2001-01-01

    为建立放射诱导基因表达调控系统并用于肿瘤的基因治疗, 利用PCR技术克隆出放射诱导基因Egr-1基因启动子, 经测序证实后与报告基因gfp连接, 并利用新型、高效的细菌内同源重组腺病毒载体制备方法制备出重组腺病毒AdEgr-GFP。 感染腺病毒的肿瘤细胞给予不同剂量的γ射线照射, 体外采用FACS方法检测GFP的表达发现, 照射可明显提高GFP表达, 并呈剂量依赖性, Western印迹检测也显示类似的结果。 为进行体内实验, 瘤内注射AdEgr-GFP腺病毒后48 h, 肿瘤局部接受不同剂量的γ射线照射, 8 h后制备肿瘤组织标本用于分析GFP的表达。 肿瘤组织图像分析结果显示, γ射线照射可显著提高肿瘤组织中GFP的表达, 并呈剂量依赖性。 结果说明, 放射经Egr-1启动子可有效调控腺病毒介导gfp基因的肿瘤细胞内表达。%In order to establish a radiation inducible gene expression system for cancer gene therapy, the promoter sequence of radiation-inducible Egr-1 gene was amplified from genomic DNA of BALB/c mouse with PCR method, and linked to gfp reporter gene. Then the pEgr-gfp expression cassette was subcloned into an adenoviral shuttle plasmid to generate recombinant adenovirus of AdEgr-GFP by using a novel, high efficient method of homologous recombination in bacteria. After infection with AdEgr-GFP, MM45T.Li tumor cells were exposed to different doses of γ-irradiation from 0 Gy to 15 Gy in vitro. The percentage of GFP expression positive cells increased greatly in a dose-dependent manner as detected by FACS and Western blot analysis. For in vivo study, AdEgr-GFP were injected intratumorally, and tumor site received different doses of local γ-irradiation 48 h after injection, and after 8 h the tumor samples were biopsed for investigating the GFP expression. Tumor tissue image analysis revealed that γ-irradiation could markedly increase GFP expression in a dose-dependent manner as

  15. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  16. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  17. International perceptions and approval of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macer, D R; Akiyama, S; Alora, A T; Asada, Y; Azariah, J; Azariah, H; Boost, M V; Chatwachirawong, P; Kato, Y; Kaushik, V

    1995-06-01

    Gene therapy is in clinical trials in a number of countries, raising the question of whether different ethical standards can be justified in different countries. One key issue is how divergent are the perceptions and bioethical reasoning of peoples around the world. An International Bioethics Survey with 150 questions, including 35 open ones, was developed to look at how people think about diseases, life, nature, and selected issues of science and technology, biotechnology, genetic engineering, genetic screening, and gene therapy. The mail response survey was conducted in 1993 among the public in Australia, India, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, and Thailand, and the same written survey was conducted among university students in Australia, Hong Kong, India, Japan, New Zealand, The Philippines, Russia, Singapore, and Thailand. Similar questions were included in an international high school education bioethics survey among high school teachers in Australia, Japan, and New Zealand. Further international comparisons to the United States and Europe are made. About three-quarters of all samples supported personal use of gene therapy, with higher support for children's use of gene therapy. The diversity of views was generally similar within each country. The major reasons given were to save life and increase the quality of life. About 5-7% rejected gene therapy, considering it to be playing God, or unnatural. There was very little concern about eugenics (0.5-2%), and more respondents gave supportive reasons like "improving genes," especially in Thailand and India. Support for specific applications was significantly less for "improving physical characters," "improving intelligence," or "making people more ethical" than for curing diseases like cancer or diabetes, but there was little difference between inheritable or noninheritable gene therapy. PMID:7548279

  18. Targeting Gene-Virotherapy for Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yuan LIU; Jing-Fa GU; Wen-Fang SHI

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy and viral therapy for cancer have therapeutic effects, but there has been no significant breakthrough in these two forms of therapy. Therefore, a new strategy called "targeting genevirotherapy", which combines the advantages of gene therapy and viral therapy, has been formulated. This new therapy has stronger antitumor effects than either gene therapy or viral therapy. A tumor-specific replicative adenovirus vector ZD55 (E1B55KD deleted Adv.) was constructed and various single therapeutic genes were inserted into ZD55 to form ZD55-gene. These are the targeting gene-virotherapy genes. But experiments showed that a single gene was not effective in eliminating the tumor mass, and therefore two genes were separately inserted into ZD55. This strategy is called "targeting dual gene-virotherapy" (with PCT patent). Better results were obtained with this strategy, and all the xenograft tumor masses were completely eliminated in all mice when two suitable genes producing a synergetic or compensative effect were chosen. Twenty-six papers on these strategies have been published by researchers in our laboratory.Furthermore, an adenoviral vector with two targeting promoters harboring two antitumor genes has been constructed for cancer therapy. Promising results have been obtained with this adenoviral vectorand another patent has been applied for. This antitumor strategy can be used to kill tumor cells completely with minimum damage to normal cells.

  19. Gene and cell therapy for muscle regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Stilhano, Roberta Sessa; Martins, Leonardo; Ingham, Sheila Jean McNeill; Pesquero, João Bosco; Huard, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury and healing are multifactorial processes, involving three steps of healing: (1) degeneration and inflammation, (2) regeneration, and (3) fibrosis. Fibrous tissue hinders the muscle’s complete recovery and current therapies fail in achieving total muscle recovery. Gene and cell therapy (or both) are potential future treatments for severe muscular injuries. Stem cells’ properties associated with growth factors or/and cytokines can improve muscle healing and permit long-te...

  20. [Gene therapy in the Czech Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonka, V

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy represents one of the most promising applications of molecular biology and genetic engineering in medicine. At present its introduction meets series of problems which are of technical, methodological and ethical nature. Although the research in the field of gene therapy in the Czech Republic is on a good level, there is little hope that its achievements will be tested in clinical trials in the near future. In the Czech Republic a law enabling the use of preparations based on the newest biotechnologies in human medicine is missing. Similarly, a production unit capable of preparing the new gene-based drugs according to the Good Manufactory Praxis is not available and the State Institute for Control of Drugs has not any working group fully qualified for their control. The paper proposes actions aimed at solving the present unfavourable situation. The fact that the interest of clinicians in gene therapy is rapidly growing, and that there are signs of increasing interest of public in its achievements, gives good prospects for the introduction of gene therapy into medical praxis in this country in the not very distant future.

  1. Recombinant adenovirus vectors with knobless fibers for targeted gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusechem, VW; van Rijswijk, ALCT; van Es, HHG; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Gerritsen, WR

    2000-01-01

    Adenoviral vector systems for gene therapy can be much improved by targeting vectors to specific cell types. This requires both the complete ablation of native adenovirus tropism and the introduction of a novel binding affinity in the viral capsid. We reasoned that these requirements could be fulfil

  2. The Use of Viral Vectors in Gene Transfer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dziaková, A.; Valenčáková, A.; Hatalová, E.; J. Kalinová

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is strategy based on using genes as pharmaceuticals. Gene therapy is a treatment that involves altering the genes inside body's cells to stop disease. Genes contain DNA- the code controlling body form and function. Genes that do not work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new gene in an attempt to cure disease or improve the ability of the body to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, including canc...

  3. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  4. Moving forward: cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2013-10-15

    Since cloning of the CFTR gene more than 20 years ago a large number of pre-clinical and clinical CF gene therapy studies have been performed and a vast amount of information and know-how has been generated. Here, we will review key studies with a particular emphasis on clinical findings. We have learnt that the lung is a more difficult target than originally anticipated, and we describe the strength and weaknesses of the most commonly used airway gene transfer agents (GTAs). In our view, one of the most significant developments in recent years is the generation of lentiviral vectors, which efficiently transduce lung tissue. However, focused and co-ordinated efforts assessing lentiviral vector safety and scaling up of production will be required to move this vector into clinical lung gene therapy studies. PMID:23918661

  5. Multifunctional Delivery Systems for Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    McErlean, Emma M.; McCrudden, Cian M; McCarthy, Helen O.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines key concepts with respect to cancer gene therapy and the current issues with respect to non-viral delivery. The biological and molecular barriers that need to be overcome before effective non-viral delivery systems can be appropriately designed for oncology applications are highlighted and ways to overcome these are discussed. Strategies developed to evade the immune response are also described and targeted gene delivery is examined with the most effective strategies hig...

  6. Developments in gene therapy for muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD) presents significant challenges, including the large amount of muscle tissue in the body, the large size of many genes defective in different muscular dystrophies, and the possibility of a host immune response against the therapeutic gene. Overcoming these challenges requires the development and delivery of suitable gene transfer vectors. Encouraging progress has been made in modifying adenovirus (Ad) vectors to reduce immune response and increase capacity. Recently developed gutted Ad vectors can deliver full-length dystrophin cDNA expression vectors to muscle tissue. Using muscle-specific promoters to drive dystrophin expression, a strong immune response has not been observed in mdx mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can deliver small genes to muscle without provocation of a significant immune response, which should allow long-term expression of several MD genes. AAV vectors have also been used to deliver sarcoglycan genes to entire muscle groups. These advances and others reviewed here suggest that barriers to gene therapy for MD are surmountable. PMID:10679969

  7. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Merry Zc; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan Hl

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  8. Foamy Virus Vectors for HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant D. Trobridge

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has vastly improved outcomes for patients infected with HIV, yet it is a lifelong regimen that is expensive and has significant side effects. Retroviral gene therapy is a promising alternative treatment for HIV/AIDS; however, inefficient gene delivery to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs has so far limited the efficacy of this approach. Foamy virus (FV vectors are derived from non-pathogenic viruses that are not endemic to the human population. FV vectors have been used to deliver HIV-inhibiting transgenes to human HSCs, and they have several advantages relative to other retroviral vectors. These include an attractive safety profile, broad tropism, a large transgene capacity, and the ability to persist in quiescent cells. In addition, the titers of FV vectors are not reduced by anti-HIV transgenes that affect the production of lentivirus (LV vectors. Thus FV vectors are very promising for anti-HIV gene therapy. This review covers the advantages of FV vectors and describes their preclinical development for anti-HIV gene therapy.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-I gene therapy reverses morphologic changes and reduces hyperprolactinemia in experimental rat prolactinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracamonte Maria I

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The implementation of gene therapy for the treatment of pituitary tumors emerges as a promising complement to surgery and may have distinct advantages over radiotherapy for this type of tumors. Up to now, suicide gene therapy has been the main experimental approach explored to treat experimental pituitary tumors. In the present study we assessed the effectiveness of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I gene therapy for the treatment of estrogen-induced prolactinomas in rats. Results Female Sprague Dawley rats were subcutaneously implanted with silastic capsules filled with 17-β estradiol (E2 in order to induce pituitary prolactinomas. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals in order to measure serum prolactin (PRL. As expected, serum PRL increased progressively and 23 days after implanting the E2 capsules (Experimental day 0, circulating PRL had undergone a 3–4 fold increase. On Experimental day 0 part of the E2-implanted animals received a bilateral intrapituitary injection of either an adenoviral vector expressing the gene for rat IGF-I (RAd-IGFI, or a vector (RAd-GFP expressing the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP. Seven days post vector injection all animals were sacrificed and their pituitaries morphometrically analyzed to evaluate changes in the lactotroph population. RAd-IGFI but not RAd-GFP, induced a significant fall in serum PRL. Furthermore, RAd-IGFI but not RAd-GFP significantly reversed the increase in lactotroph size (CS and volume density (VD induced by E2 treatment. Conclusion We conclude that IGF-I gene therapy constitutes a potentially useful intervention for the treatment of prolactinomas and that bioactive peptide gene delivery may open novel therapeutic avenues for the treatment of pituitary tumors.

  10. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin-12 gene therapy for metastatic colon carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    M. CARUSO; Pham-Nguyen, K; Kwong, Y. L.; Xu, B; Kosai, K I; Finegold, M; Woo, S L; Chen, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral mediated delivery of suicide and cytokine genes has been investigated as a treatment for hepatic metastases of colon carcinoma in mice. Liver tumors were established by intrahepatic implantation of a poorly immunogenic colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26), which is syngeneic in BALB/c mice. Intratumoral transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and the murine interleukin (mIL)-2 genes resulted in substantial hepatic tumor regression, induced an...

  11. Switching on the lights for gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Winkeler

    Full Text Available Strategies for non-invasive and quantitative imaging of gene expression in vivo have been developed over the past decade. Non-invasive assessment of the dynamics of gene regulation is of interest for the detection of endogenous disease-specific biological alterations (e.g., signal transduction and for monitoring the induction and regulation of therapeutic genes (e.g., gene therapy. To demonstrate that non-invasive imaging of regulated expression of any type of gene after in vivo transduction by versatile vectors is feasible, we generated regulatable herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 amplicon vectors carrying hormone (mifepristone or antibiotic (tetracycline regulated promoters driving the proportional co-expression of two marker genes. Regulated gene expression was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in culture and by positron emission tomography (PET or bioluminescence (BLI in vivo. The induction levels evaluated in glioma models varied depending on the dose of inductor. With fluorescence microscopy and BLI being the tools for assessing gene expression in culture and animal models, and with PET being the technology for possible application in humans, the generated vectors may serve to non-invasively monitor the dynamics of any gene of interest which is proportionally co-expressed with the respective imaging marker gene in research applications aiming towards translation into clinical application.

  12. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  13. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing murine gammaherpesvirus-68 genes M2 and M3 can reduce latent viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P;

    2009-01-01

    of the gammaherpesvirinae speaks against using a similar approach in humans. DNA immunization with plasmids encoding the MHV-68 genes M2 or M3 caused a reduction in either acute or early latent viral load, respectively, but neither immunization had an effect at times later than 14 days post-infection. Adenovirus...

  14. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ...

  15. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter-driven expression of iodine pump genes for targeted radioiodine therapy of malignant glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Tan; Wei Li; Peng Wang

    2011-01-01

    Radioiodine is a routine therapy for differentiated thyroid cancers. Non-thyroid cancers can intake radioiodine after transfection of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter, an excellent tumor-specific promoter, has potential value for targeted gene therapy of glioma. We used the hTERT promoter to drive the expression of the hNIS and human thyroid peroxidase (hTPO) gene as a primary step for testing the effects of radioiodine therapy on malignant glioma. The U87 and U251 cells were co-transfected with two adenoviral vectors, in which the hNIS gene had been coupled to the hTERT promoter and the hTPO gene had been coupled to the CMV promoter, respectively. Then, we performed Western blot, 135l intake and efflux assays, and clonogenic assay with cancer cells. We also did 99mTc tumor imaging of nude mice models. After co-transfection with Ad-hTERT-hNIS and Ad-CMV-hTPO, glioma cells showed the 125l intake almost 1.5 times higher than cells transfected with Ad-hTERT-hNIS alone. Western blots revealed bands of approximately 70 kDa and 110 kDa, consistent with the hNIS and hTPO proteins. In clonogenic assay, approximately 90% of co transfected cells were killed, compared to 50% of control cells after incubated with 37 MBq of 131I. These results demonstrated that radioiodine therapy was effective in treating malignant glioma cell lines following induction of tumor-specific iodide intake by the hTERT promoter-directed hNIS expression in vitro. Co transfected hNIS and hTPO genes can result in increased intake and longer retention of radioiodine. Nude mice harboring xenografts transfected with Ad-hTERT-NIS can take 99mTc scans.

  16. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  17. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  18. AAV-Based Targeting Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfang Shi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first parvovirus serotype AAV2 was isolated from human and used as a vector for gene therapy application, there have been significant progresses in AAV vector development. AAV vectors have been extensively investigated in gene therapy for a broad application. AAV vectors have been considered as the first choice of vector due to efficient infectivity, stable expression and non-pathogenicity. However, the untoward events in AAV mediated in vivo gene therapy studies proposed the new challenges for their further applications. Deep understanding of the viral life cycle, viral structure and replication, infection mechanism and efficiency of AAV DNA integration, in terms of contributing viral, host-cell factors and circumstances would promote to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages and provide more insightful information for the possible clinical applications. In this review, main effort will be focused on the recent progresses in gene delivery to the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction and DNA specific integration regulation. Furthermore AAV receptor and virus particle intracellular trafficking are also discussed.

  19. Comparison of Human Sodium/Iodide Symporter (hNIS) Gene Expressions between Lentiviral and Adenoviral Vectors in Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirusmediated delivery systems has not been reported. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and transduction efficiency of Rad-hNIS into rMSC evaluated by Rad-GFP was 19.1±4.7%, 54.0±6.4%, 85.7±8.7%, and 98.4±1.3% at MOI 1, 5, 20, and 100, respectively. The hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC were assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analyses revealed that hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC were greater than those in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 20 but lower than at MOI 50. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (29,704±6,659 picomole/106 cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (6,168±2,134 picomole/106 cells). Despite lower amount of expressed protein, hNIS function in rMSC was greater by lentivirus than by adenovirus mediated expression. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative vector efficiency for transgene expression

  20. Comparison of human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression between lentiviral and adenoviral vectors in rat mesenchymal stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirus-mediated delivery systems has not been done. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated stably hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning the hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and Rad-hNIS transduced rMSC (adeno-hNIS-rMSC) was evaluated for the hNIS expression 48 hours post infection at MOI 1, 5, 20, 50, and 100. The hNIS expression in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC was assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry using mono-clonal anti-hNIS antibody revealed that intensity of hNIS immunoreactivity in lenti-hNIS-rMSC was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOl 20 but lower than that at MOl 50. Western blot analysis also showed that lenti-hNIS-rMSC was intermediate between adeno-hNIS-rMSCs at MOl 20 and 50 in hNIS expression. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (297046659 picomole/106 cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (61682134 picomole/106 cells). These results suggest that lentivirus mediated hNIS expression is greater in terms of hNIS function but lower in terms of hNIS protein amount than adenovirus mediated hNIS expression 48 hours post infection. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative viral efficiency of transgene expression

  1. Comparison of Human Sodium/Iodide Symporter (hNIS) Gene Expressions between Lentiviral and Adenoviral Vectors in Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Hyun Joo; Chung, June Key; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Heui Ran [Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirusmediated delivery systems has not been reported. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and transduction efficiency of Rad-hNIS into rMSC evaluated by Rad-GFP was 19.1{+-}4.7%, 54.0{+-}6.4%, 85.7{+-}8.7%, and 98.4{+-}1.3% at MOI 1, 5, 20, and 100, respectively. The hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC were assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analyses revealed that hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC were greater than those in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 20 but lower than at MOI 50. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (29,704{+-}6,659 picomole/10{sup 6} cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (6,168{+-}2,134 picomole/10{sup 6} cells). Despite lower amount of expressed protein, hNIS function in rMSC was greater by lentivirus than by adenovirus mediated expression. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative vector efficiency for transgene expression.

  2. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  3. [Cellular therapy and gene therapy: perspectives in neuromuscular pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardeau, M

    1993-10-01

    Identification of the gene coding for the protein (dystrophin) which is lacking or abnormal in Duchenne or Becker type human muscular dystrophies was a decisive turning point in neuro-muscular pathology. Since that time, a considerable number of gene abnormalities have been identified or at least localized. The severity of these diseases, their steady evolution and the absence of any efficient drug therapy, have lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches based on restoring the genetic capacities of the muscle cell. There are two possibilities for therapy. The first is based on the transfer of myogenic cells derived from the 'satellite' cells normally present at the periphery of muscle fibers. The results obtained from a murine model of Duchenne dystrophy ('mdx' mouse) were very promising. However, the results from application of the same techniques to the canine model (GRMDX) or to affected children are, at the present time, disappointing. A number of biological questions remain to be solved before this technique can be more extensively applied to humans. The second possibility is based on gene transfer, through a viral vector. The adenovirus is presently a possible vector. The first experimental results, on 'mdx' mice, are again very encouraging. Extension of these studies to the canine model is a necessary prerequisite for any human application. It should be noted that these two approaches are complementary. Their future applications may depend on the diffuse or selective nature of the skeletal muscle atrophy, and on whether cardiac and respiratory muscles are involved. PMID:8290312

  4. Gene Therapy: Implications for Craniofacial Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Scheller, Erica L.; Villa-Diaz, Luis G.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy in the craniofacial region provides a unique tool for delivery of DNA to coordinate protein production in both time and space. The drive to bring this technology to the clinic is derived from the fact that over 85% of the global population may at one time require repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. This need ranges from mild tooth decay and tooth loss to temporomandibular joint disorders and large-scale reconstructive surgery. Our ability to insert foreign DNA into...

  5. Gene therapy in glaucoma-3: Therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel-Monem Soliman Mahdy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, several promising genetic therapeutic approaches had been investigated. Some are either used to stop apoptosis and halt further glaucomatous damage, wound healing modulating effect or long lasting intraocular pressure lowering effects than the conventional commercially available antiglaucoma medications. Method of Literature Search The literature was searched on the Medline database using the PubMed interface. The key words for search were glaucoma, gene therapy, and genetic diagnosis of glaucoma.

  6. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy Robson; David G. Hirst

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these stra...

  7. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical s...

  8. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene th...

  9. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  10. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

  11. Functional repair of human donor lungs by IL-10 gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypel, Marcelo; Liu, Mingyao; Rubacha, Matt; Yeung, Jonathan C; Hirayama, Shin; Anraku, Masaki; Sato, Masaaki; Medin, Jeffrey; Davidson, Beverly L; de Perrot, Marc; Waddell, Thomas K; Slutsky, Arthur S; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2009-10-28

    More than 80% of potential donor lungs are injured during brain death of the donor and from complications experienced in the intensive care unit, and therefore cannot be used for transplantation. These lungs show inflammation and disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to poor gas exchange. Although the number of patients in need of lung transplantation is increasing, the number of donors is static. We investigated the potential to use gene therapy with an adenoviral vector encoding human interleukin-10 (AdhIL-10) to repair injured donor lungs ex vivo before transplantation. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that mainly exerts its suppressive functions by the inactivation of antigen-presenting cells with consequent inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In pigs, AdhIL-10-treated lungs exhibited attenuated inflammation and improved function after transplantation. Lungs from 10 human multiorgan donors that had suffered brain death were determined to be clinically unsuitable for transplantation. They were then maintained for 12 hours at body temperature in an ex vivo lung perfusion system with or without intra-airway delivery of AdhIL-10 gene therapy. AdhIL-10-treated lungs showed significant improvement in function (arterial oxygen pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance) when compared to controls, a favorable shift from proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, and recovery of alveolar-blood barrier integrity. Thus, treatment of injured human donor lungs with the cytokine IL-10 can improve lung function, potentially rendering injured lungs suitable for transplantation into patients. PMID:20368171

  12. The Use of Viral Vectors in Gene Transfer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dziaková

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is strategy based on using genes as pharmaceuticals. Gene therapy is a treatment that involves altering the genes inside body's cells to stop disease. Genes contain DNA- the code controlling body form and function. Genes that do not work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new gene in an attempt to cure disease or improve the ability of the body to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, hemophilia and AIDS. Various types of genetic material are used in gene therapy; double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, plasmid DNA and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASON. The success of gene therapy depends on assuring the entrance of the therapeutic gene to targeted cells without any form of biodegradation. Commonly used vectors in gene therapy are: adenoviruses (400 clinical studies; 23.8%, retroviruses (344 clinical studies; 20.5%, unenveloped/plasmid DNA (304 clinical studies, 17.7%, adeno-associated viruses (75 clinical studies; 4.5% and others. In this paper, we have reviewed the major gene delivery vectors and recent improvements made in their design meant to overcome the issues that commonly arise with the use of gene therapy vectors.

  13. Curing genetic disease with gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A

    2014-01-01

    Development of viral vectors that allow high efficiency gene transfer into mammalian cells in the early 1980s foresaw the treatment of severe monogenic diseases in humans. The application of gene transfer using viral vectors has been successful in diseases of the blood and immune systems, albeit with several curative studies also showing serious adverse events (SAEs). In children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, these SAEs were caused by inappropriate activation of oncogenes. Subsequent studies have defined the vector sequences responsible for these transforming events. Members of the Transatlantic Gene Therapy Consortium [TAGTC] have collaboratively developed new vectors that have proven safer in preclinical studies and used these vectors in new clinical trials in SCID-X1. These trials have shown evidence of early efficacy and preliminary integration analysis data from the SCID-X1 trial suggest an improved safety profile.

  14. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: Is it promising?

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter, Andreas P; Fechner, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. The therapeutic outcome of conventional therapies is inefficient. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a promising molecular alternative in the treatment of gastric cancer, including the replacement of defective tumor suppressor genes, the inactivation of oncogenes, the introduction of suicide genes, genetic immunotherapy, anti-angiogenetic gene therapy, and virotherapy. Improved molecular biological t...

  15. Challenges and opportunities in dystrophin-deficient cardiomyopathy gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has evidenced unprecedented progress in gene therapy of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD) skeletal muscle disease. Cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in both patients and carriers of DMD, BMD and X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. However, there is little advance in heart gene therapy. The gene, the vector, vector delivery, the target tissue and animal models are five fundamental components in developing an effective gene therapy. Int...

  16. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer

  17. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Haixi [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Lili [Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute (Hong Kong); Ren, Guosheng [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Xu, Yongzhu [Chongqing Health Service Center, Chongqing 400020 (China); Zhou, Xiangyang [The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiang, Tingxiu, E-mail: xiangtx1@gmail.com [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  18. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  19. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved ge

  20. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy was initially envisaged as a potential treatment for genetically inherited, monogenic disorders. The applications of gene therapy have now become wider, however, and include cardiovascular diseases, vaccination and cancers in which conventional therapies have failed. With regard to oncology, various gene therapy approaches have been developed. Among them, the use of genetic toxins to kill cancer cells selectively is emerging. Two different types of genetic toxins have been developed so far: the metabolic toxins and the dominant-negative class of toxins. This review describes these two different approaches, and discusses their potential applications in cancer gene therapy

  1. Gene Therapy of Cancer: Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChengQian; JesusPrieto

    2004-01-01

    Many malignancies lack satisfactory treatment and new therapeutic options are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a new modality to treat both inherited and acquired diseases based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. Different gene therapy strategies against cancers have been developed. A considerable number of preclinical studies indicate that a great variety of cancers are amenable to gene therapy. Among these strategies, induction of anti-tumor immunity is the most promising approach. Gene therapy with cytokines has reached unprecedented success in preclinical models of cancer. Synergistic rather than additive effects have been demonstrated by combination of gene transfer of cytokines/chemokines, costimulatory molecules or adoptive cell therapy. Recent progress in vector technology and in imaging techniques allowing in vivo assessment of gene expression will facilitate the development of clinical applications of gene therapy, a procedure which may have a notorious impact in the management of cancers lacking effective treatment. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):105-111.

  2. Gene Therapy of Cancer: Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Qian; Jesus Prieto

    2004-01-01

    Many malignancies lack satisfactory treatment and new therapeutic options are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a new modality to treat both inherited and acquired diseases based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. Different gene therapy strategies against cancers have been developed. A considerable number of preclinical studies indicate that a great variety of cancers are amenable to gene therapy. Among these strategies,induction of anti-tumorimmunity is the most promising approach. Gene therapy with cytokines has reached unprecedented success in preclinical models of cancer. Synergistic rather than additive effects have beendemonstrated by combination of gene transfer of cytokines/chemokines, costimulatory molecules or adoptive cell therapy. Recent progress in vector technology and in imaging techniques allowing in vivo assessment of gene expression will facilitate the development of clinical applications of gene therapy, a procedure which may have a notorious impact in the management of cancers lacking effective treatment.

  3. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  4. Gene therapy for lung inflammatory diseases: not so far away?

    OpenAIRE

    Sallenave, J M; Porteous, D. J.; Haslett, C

    1997-01-01

    The lung is a readily accessible target organ for gene therapy. To date, therapeutic gene delivery has largely focused on introducing functional, corrective genes in lung diseases arising from single gene defects such as cystic fibrosis. More recently interest has centred on gene therapy as a potential therapeutic tool in modulating complex pathological processes such as pulmonary inflammation. Genetic modification of critical components of the inflammatory process may be beneficial-for...

  5. Pharmacological Interventions for Improving Adenovirus Usage in Gene Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, Hidde J.; Bellu, Anna Rita

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy may be an innovative and promising new treatment strategy for cancer but is limited due to a low efficiency and specificity of gene delivery to the target cells. Adenovirus is the preferred gene therapy vector for systemic delivery because of its unparalleled in vivo transduction effici

  6. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Rowzee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 is a small peptide component of the prohormone, proglucagon, that is produced in the gut. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist originally isolated from the saliva of H. suspectum or Gila monster, is a peptide that shares sequence and functional homology with GLP-1. Both peptides have been demonstrated to stimulate insulin secretion, inhibit glucagon secretion, promote satiety and slow gastric emptying. As such, GLP-1 and Exendin-4 have become attractive pharmaceutical targets as an adjunctive therapy for individuals with type II diabetes mellitus, with several products currently available clinically. Herein we summarize the cell biology leading to GLP-1 production and secretion from intestinal L-cells and the endocrine functions of this peptide and Exendin-4 in humans. Additionally, gene therapeutic applications of GLP-1 and Exendin-4 are discussed with a focus on recent work using the salivary gland as a gene therapy target organ for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  7. Functional correction of adult mdx mouse muscle using gutted adenoviral vectors expressing full-length dystrophin

    OpenAIRE

    DelloRusso, Christiana; Scott, Jeannine M.; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis; Salvatori, Giovanni; Barjot, Catherine; Robinson, Ann S.; Robert W Crawford; Brooks, Susan V; Jeffrey S. Chamberlain

    2002-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Delivery of functionally effective levels of dystrophin to immunocompetent, adult mdx (dystrophin-deficient) mice has been challenging because of the size of the gene, immune responses against viral vectors, and inefficient infection of mature muscle. Here we show that high titer stocks of three different gutted adenoviral vectors carrying full-length, muscle-specific, dystrophin ex...

  8. Perspectives on best practices for gene therapy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheever, Thomas R; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H; Byrne, Barry J; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J; High, Katherine A; Kaspar, Brian K; Klinger, Katherine W; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H; Tagle, Danilo A; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J; Wilson, James M; Porter, John D; Gubitz, Amelie K

    2015-03-01

    With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on "Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs," with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  9. Improved Animal Models for Testing Gene Therapy for Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike le...

  10. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, Berit [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Thomas, Maria [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart (Germany); Pützer, Brigitte M. [Institute of Experimental Gene Therapy and Cancer Research, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg [Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine and Ageing Research, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Vollmar, Brigitte [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Abshagen, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.abshagen@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  11. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells

  12. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: Is it promising?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas P Sutter; Henry Fechner

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. The therapeutic outcome of conventional therapies is inefficient. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a promising molecular alternative in the treatment of gastric cancer,including the replacement of defective tumor suppressor genes, the inactivation of oncogenes, the introduction of suicide genes, genetic immunotherapy, anti-angiogenetic gene therapy, and virotherapy. Improved molecular biological techniques and a better understanding of gastric carcinogenesis have allowed us to validate a variety of genes as molecular targets for gene therapy.This review provides an update of the new developments in cancer gene therapy, new principles, techniques,strategies and vector systems, and shows how they may be applied in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  13. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Conese

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs.

  14. Improved animal models for testing gene therapy for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike lesions that develop rapidly in vessels that are amenable to efficient gene delivery. Moreover, because human atherosclerosis develops in normal vessels, gene therapy that prevents atherosclerosis is most logically tested in relatively normal arteries. Similarly, gene therapy that causes atherosclerosis regression requires gene delivery to an existing lesion. Here we report development of three new rabbit models for testing vessel-wall-directed gene therapy that either prevents or reverses atherosclerosis. Carotid artery intimal lesions in these new models develop within 2-7 months after initiation of a high-fat diet and are 20-80 times larger than lesions in a model we described previously. Individual models allow generation of lesions that are relatively rich in either macrophages or smooth muscle cells, permitting testing of gene therapy strategies targeted at either cell type. Two of the models include gene delivery to essentially normal arteries and will be useful for identifying strategies that prevent lesion development. The third model generates lesions rapidly in vector-naïve animals and can be used for testing gene therapy that promotes lesion regression. These models are optimized for testing helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated gene therapy; however, they could be easily adapted for testing of other vectors or of different types of molecular therapies, delivered directly to the blood vessel wall. Our data also supports the promise of HDAd to deliver long

  15. Enhancement of myoblast microencapsulation for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anna Aihua; Shen, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Cirone, Pasquale; Potter, Murray; Chang, Patricia L

    2006-05-01

    One method of nonviral-based gene therapy is to implant microencapsulated nonautologous cells genetically engineered to secrete the desired gene products. Encapsulating the cells within a biocompatible permselective hydrogel, such as alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA), protects the foreign cells from the host immune system while allowing diffusion of nutrients and the therapeutic gene products. An important consideration is which kind of cells is the best candidate for long-term implantation. Our previous work has shown that proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated C2C12 myoblasts in vitro are significantly improved by inclusion of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin growth factor II (IGF-II), and collagen within the microcapsules ("enhanced" capsules). However, the effects of such inclusions on the functional status of the microcapsules in vivo are unknown. Here we found that comparing the standard with the enhanced APA microcapsules; there was no difference in the rates of diffusion of recombinant products of different sizes, that is, human factor IX (FIX, 65 kDa), murine IgG (150 kDa), and a lysosomal enzyme, beta-glucuronidase (300 kDa), thus providing a key requirement of such an immunoprotective device. Furthermore, the creatine phosphokinase activity and myosin heavy chain staining (markers for differentiation of the myoblasts) and the cell number per capsule in the enhanced microcapsules indicated a higher degree of differentiation and proliferation when compared to the standard microcapsules, thus demonstrating an improved microenvironment for the encapsulated cells. Efficacy was tested in a melanoma cancer tumor model by treating tumor induced by B16-F0/neu tumor cells in mice with myoblasts secreting angiostatin from either the standard or enhanced APA microcapsules. Mice treated with enhanced APA-microcapsules had an 80% reduction in tumor volume at day 21 compared to a 70% reduction in those treated with standard APA

  16. A hybrid lentivirus-transposon vector for safer gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vink, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on the HIV-1 lentivirus are an attractive option for clinical applications because they enter a broad range of target cells efficiently and deliver stable gene expression through integration into host chromosomes. However, lentiviral vectors are known to integrate preferentially within actively transcribing genes. Leukaemia-like expansions observed in gene therapy trials using gammaretroviral vectors and are thought to have been caused by disruption o...

  17. Gene Therapy, Early Promises, Subsequent Problems, and Recent Breakthroughs

    OpenAIRE

    Saeideh Razi Soofiyani; Behzad Baradaran; Farzaneh Lotfipour; Tohid Kazemi; Leila Mohammadnejad

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in medicine. The concept of gene delivery to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed around half a century, but scientist’s ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology made this purpose to reality. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. While gene therapy initially conceived as a way t...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of combined gene therapy expressing constitutive human GM-CSF and hyperthermia-regulated human IL-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An adenovirus that expresses both interleukin (IL-12 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF has been proven to be very effective in treating several tumors, but causes serious normal tissue toxicities. Methods In this study, a novel adenoviral vector was constructed by placing the human GM-CSF gene under the control of the CMV-IE promoter and human IL-12 gene under the control of heat shock protein 70B gene promoter. Both hGM-CSF and hIL-12 expressions in virus-infected tumor cells were analyzed in vitro and in vivo when underlying single or multiple rounds of hyperthermia. Results We observed constitutive high expression of human GM-CSF and heat-induced expression of human IL-12 after a single round of hyperthermia post viral infection. The heat-induced hIL-12 expression exhibited a pulse-like pattern with a peak at 24 hrs followed by a decline 48 hrs post heat stress. Repeated heat treatment was more effective in inducing hIL-12 expression than a one-time heat treatment. Interestedly, we also observed that constitutive expression of hGM-CSF could be stimulated by heat stress in tested tumor cells. Conclusion Our study provided a novel strategy for combined gene therapy that allows constitutive expression of a non-toxic gene such as GM-CSF and heat-induced expression of a toxic gene such as IL-12. In addition, our study also showed that hyperthermia can be used to trigger gene expression in temporal and special manner.

  19. Gene therapy in head and neck cancer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Chisholm, E; Bapat, U.; Chisholm, C; Alusi, G.; Vassaux, G

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a rapidly evolving field with head and neck squamous cell cancer being one of the more frequently targeted cancer types. The number of clinical trials in the UK is growing and there is already a commercially available agent in China. Various gene therapy strategies along with delivery mechanisms for targeting head and neck cancer are reviewed.

  20. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  1. Generation of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toietta, Gabriele; Pastore, Lucio; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Finegold, Milton; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lee, Brendan

    2002-02-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HD-Ad) represent a potentially valuable tool for safe and prolonged gene expression in vivo. The current approach for generating these vectors is based on ligation of the expression cassette into large plasmids containing the viral inverted terminal repeats flanking "stuffer" DNA to maintain a final size above the lower limit for efficient packaging into the adenovirus capsid (approximately 28 kb). The ligation to produce the viral plasmid is generally very inefficient. Similar problems in producing first-generation adenoviral (FG-Ad) vectors were circumvented with the development of a system taking advantage of efficient homologous recombination between a shuttle plasmid containing the expression cassette and a FG-Ad vector backbone in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183. Here we describe a method for fast and efficient generation of HD-Ad vector plasmids that can accommodate expression cassettes of any size up to 35 kb. To validate the system, we generated a HD-Ad vector expressing the fusion protein between beta-galactosidase and neomycin resistance genes under the control of the SR alpha promoter, and one expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The viruses were rescued and tested in vitro and for in vivo expression in mice. The data collected indicate the possibility for achieving a high level of hepatocyte transduction using HD-Ad vectors derived from plasmids obtained by homologous recombination in E. coli, with no significant alteration of liver enzymes and a less severe, transient thrombocytopenia in comparison with previous reports with similar doses of a FG-Ad vector. PMID:11829528

  2. Progress in Chimeric Vector and Chimeric Gene Based Cardiovascular Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chun-Song; YOON Young-sup; ISNER Jeffrey M.; LOSORDO Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy for cardiovascular diseases has developed from preliminary animal experiments to clinical trials. However, vectors and target genes used currently in gene therapy are mainly focused on viral, nonviral vector and single target gene or monogene. Each vector system has a series of advantages and limitations. Chimeric vectors which combine the advantages of viral and nonviral vector,chimeric target genes which combine two or more target genes and novel gene delivery modes are being developed. In this article, we summarized the progress in chimeric vectors and chimeric genes based cardiovascular gene therapy, which including proliferative or occlusive vascular diseases such as atheroslerosis and restenosis, hypertonic vascular disease such as hypertension and cardiac diseases such as myocardium ischemia, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure, even heart transplantation. The development of chimeric vector, chimeric gene and their cardiovascular gene therapy is promising.

  3. Transfection of Primary Hepatocytes with Liver-Enriched Transcription Factors Using Adenoviral Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Marta; Jover, Ramiro; Bort, Roque

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultured hepatocytes are probably the best model to study endogenous metabolic pathways, toxicity, or drug metabolism. Many of these studies require expression of ectopic genes. It would be desirable to use a method of transfection that allows dose-response studies, high efficiency of transfection, and the possibility to express several genes at the same time. Adenoviral vectors fulfill these requirements, becoming a valuable tool for primary hepatocyte transfection. Moreover, they are easy to generate and do not require a high level of biocontainment. In the present chapter, we describe the generation, cloning, amplification, and purification of an adenoviral vector capable of infecting primary cultured hepatocytes. This recombinant adenovirus induces robust expression of the protein of interest in hepatocytes within a wide range of doses. PMID:26272145

  4. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Xue; Zhang; Ning-Li; Wang; Qing-Jun; Lu

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology.

  5. Taking stock of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alton Eric WFW

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of the cystic fibrosis (CF gene opened the way for gene therapy. In the ten years since then, proof of principle in vitro and then in animal models in vivo has been followed by numerous clinical studies using both viral and non-viral vectors to transfer normal copies of the gene to the lungs and noses of CF patients. A wealth of data have emerged from these studies, reflecting enormous progress and also helping to focus and define key difficulties that remain unresolved. Gene therapy for CF remains the most promising possibility for curative rather than symptomatic therapy.

  6. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  7. Antagonism between gene therapy and epigenetic therapy on human laryngeal carcinoma tumor-bearing mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN Meng; WANG Qi; FANG Ju-gao; WANG Hong; FAN Er-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene therapy and epigenetic therapy have gained more attention in cancer treatment.However,the effect of a combined treatment of gene therapy and epigenetic therapy on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma have not been studied yet.To study the mechanism and clinical application,human laryngeal carcinoma cell (Hep-2) tumor-bearing mice were used.Methods A xenograft tumor model was established by the subcutaneous inoculation of Hep-2 cells in the right armpit of BALB/c nu/nu mice.The mice with well-formed tumor were randomly divided into six groups.Multisite injections of rAd-p53 and/or 5-aza-dC were used to treat tumor.Tumor growth was monitored by measuring tumor volume and growth rate.p53 and E-cadherin protein levels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining.The mRNA levels were monitored with FQ-PCR.Results Gene therapy was much more effective than single epigenetic therapy and combined therapy.The gene therapy group has the lowest tumor growth rate and the highest expression levels of p53 and E-cadherin.Conclusions The combined treatment of gene and epigenetic therapy is not suggested for treating head and neck carcinoma,because gene therapy shows an antagonistic effect to epigenetic therapy.However,the mechanisms of action are still unclear.

  8. Advances in gene therapy technologies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

    OpenAIRE

    Petrs-Silva, Hilda

    2013-01-01

    Hilda Petrs-Silva, Rafael LindenInstitute of Biophysics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a class of diseases that leads to progressive degeneration of the retina. Experimental approaches to gene therapy for the treatment of inherited retinal dystrophies have advanced in recent years, inclusive of the safe delivery of genes to the human retina. This review is focused on the development of gene therapy for RP using recombinant a...

  9. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol; Amin Hajitou

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent dev...

  10. Gene Therapy for Cancer Treatment: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Deanna; Burmester, James K.

    2006-01-01

    The broad field of gene therapy promises a number of innovative treatments that are likely to become important in preventing deaths from cancer. In this review, we discuss the history, highlights and future of three different gene therapy treatment approaches: immunotherapy, oncolytic virotherapy and gene transfer. Immunotherapy uses genetically modified cells and viral particles to stimulate the immune system to destroy cancer cells. Recent clinical trials of second and third generation vacc...

  11. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  12. Translational Approaches towards Cancer Gene Therapy: Hurdles and Hopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Of the cancer gene therapy approaches, gene silencing, suicide/apoptosis inducing gene therapy, immunogene therapy and targeted gene therapy are deemed to sub­stantially control the biological consequences of genomic changes in cancerous cells. Thus, a large number of clinical trials have been conducted against various malignancies. In this review, we will discuss recent translational progresses of gene and cell therapy of cancer. Methods: Essential information on gene therapy of cancer were reviewed and discussed towards their clinical translations. Results: Gene transfer has been rigorously studied in vitro and in vivo, in which some of these gene therapy endeavours have been carried on towards translational investigations and clinical applications. About 65% of gene therapy trials are related to cancer therapy. Some of these trials have been combined with cell therapy to produce personalized medicines such as Sipuleucel-T (Provenge®, marketed by Dendreon, USA for the treatment of asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Conclusion: Translational approach links two diverse boundaries of basic and clinical researches. For successful translation of geno­medicines into clinical applications, it is essential 1 to have the guidelines and standard operating procedures for development and application of the genomedicines specific to clinically relevant biomarker(s; 2 to conduct necessary animal experimental studies to show the “proof of concept” for the proposed genomedicines; 3 to perform an initial clinical investigation; and 4 to initiate extensive clinical trials to address all necessary requirements. In short, translational researches need to be refined to accelerate the geno­medicine development and clinical applications.

  13. Targeting gene therapy vectors to CNS malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, M A; Herrlinger, U; Rainov, N; Pechan, P; Weissleder, R; Breakefield, X O

    1998-04-01

    Gene therapy offers significant advantages to the field of oncology with the addition of specifically and uniquely engineered mechanisms of halting malignant proliferation through cytotoxicity or reproductive arrest. To confer a true benefit to the therapeutic ratio (the relative toxicity to tumor compared to normal tissue) a vector or the transgene it carries must selectively affect or access tumor cells. Beyond the selective toxicities of many transgene products, which frequently parallel that of contemporary chemotherapeutic agents, lies the potential utility of targeting the vector. This review presents an overview of current and potential methods for designing vectors targeted to CNS malignancies through selective delivery, cell entry, transport or transcriptional regulation. The topic of delivery encompasses physical and pharmaceutic means of increasing the relative exposure of tumors to vector. Cell entry based methodologies are founded on increasing relative uptake of vector through the chemical or recombinant addition of ligand and antibody domains which selectively bind receptors expressed on target cells. Targeted transport involves the potential for using cells to selectively carry vectors or transgenes into tumors. Finally, promoter and enhancer systems are discussed which have potential for selectivity activating transcription to produce targeted transgene expression or vector propagation. PMID:9584951

  14. 75 FR 65640 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Tumor Vaccines and Biotechnology Branch, Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center...

  15. Myostatin: genetic variants, therapy and gene doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Katayama Yamada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, myostatin (MSTN has been at the forefront of muscle therapy research because intrinsic mutations or inhibition of this protein, by either pharmacological or genetic means, result in muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. In addition to muscle growth, MSTN inhibition potentially disturbs connective tissue, leads to strength modulation, facilitates myoblast transplantation, promotes tissue regeneration, induces adipose tissue thermogenesis and increases muscle oxidative phenotype. It is also known that current advances in gene therapy have an impact on sports because of the illicit use of such methods. However, the adverse effects of these methods, their impact on athletic performance in humans and the means of detecting gene doping are as yet unknown. The aim of the present review is to discuss biosynthesis, genetic variants, pharmacological/genetic manipulation, doping and athletic performance in relation to the MSTN pathway. As will be concluded from the manuscript, MSTN emerges as a promising molecule for combating muscle wasting diseases and for triggering wide-ranging discussion in view of its possible use in gene doping.Desde sua descoberta, a miostatina (MSTN entrou na linha de frente em pesquisas relacionadas às terapias musculares porque mutações intrínsecas ou inibição desta proteína tanto por abordagens farmacológicas como genéticas resultam em hipertrofia muscular e hiperplasia. Além do aumento da massa muscular, a inibição de MSTN potencialmente prejudica o tecido conectivo, modula a força muscular, facilita o transplante de mioblastos, promove regeneração tecidual, induz termogênese no tecido adiposo e aumenta a oxidação na musculatura esquelética. É também sabido que os atuais avanços em terapia gênica têm uma relação com o esporte devido ao uso ilícito de tal método. Os efeitos adversos de tal abordagem, seus efeitos no desempenho de atletas e métodos para detectar doping genético s

  16. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  17. Bacteria as vectors for gene therapy of cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baban, Chwanrow K

    2012-01-31

    Anti-cancer therapy faces major challenges, particularly in terms of specificity of treatment. The ideal therapy would eradicate tumor cells selectively with minimum side effects on normal tissue. Gene or cell therapies have emerged as realistic prospects for the treatment of cancer, and involve the delivery of genetic information to a tumor to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. However, there is still much to be done before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved, primarily developing the means of targeting genes to tumors safely and efficiently. An emerging family of vectors involves bacteria of various genera. It has been shown that bacteria are naturally capable of homing to tumors when systemically administered resulting in high levels of replication locally. Furthermore, invasive species can deliver heterologous genes intra-cellularly for tumor cell expression. Here, we review the use of bacteria as vehicles for gene therapy of cancer, detailing the mechanisms of action and successes at preclinical and clinical levels.

  18. Design of radiopharmaceuticals for monitoring gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of radiopharmaceuticals for monitoring gene transfer therapy with emission tomography is expected to lead to improved management of cancer by the year 2010. There are now only a few examples and approaches to the design of radiopharmaceuticals for gene transfer therapy. This paper introduces a novel concept for the monitoring of gene therapy. We present the optimisation of the labelling of recombinant human β-NGF ligands for in vitro studies prior to using 123I for SPET and 124I for PET studies. (author)

  19. Germ-line gene therapy and the medical imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Ronald; Davis, Lawrence H

    1992-06-01

    Somatic cell gene therapy has yielded promising results. If germ cell gene therapy can be developed, the promise is even greater: hundreds of genetic diseases might be virtually eliminated. But some claim the procedure is morally unacceptable. We thoroughly and sympathetically examine several possible reasons for this claim but find them inadequate. There is no moral reason, then, not to develop and employ germ-line gene therapy. Taking the offensive, we argue next that medicine has a prima facie moral obligation to do so.

  20. Immuno-isolation in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Pasquale; Potter, Murray; Hirte, Hal; Chang, Patricia

    2006-04-01

    The implantation of genetically-modified non-autologous cells in immuno-protected microcapsules is an alternative to ex vivo gene therapy. Such cells delivering a recombinant therapeutic product are isolated from the host's immune system by being encapsulated within permselective microcapsules. This approach has been successful in pre-clinical animal studies involving delivery of hormone or enzymes to treat dwarfism, lysosomal storage disease, or hemophilia B. Recently, this platform technology has shown promise in the treatment for more complex diseases such as cancer. One of the earliest strategy was to augment the chemotherapeutic effect of a prodrug by implanting encapsulated cells that can metabolise prodrugs into cytotoxic products in close proximity to the cancer cells. More recent approaches include enhancing tumor cell death through immunotherapy, or suppressing tumor cell proliferation through anti-angiogenesis. These can be achieved by delivering single molecules of cytokines or angiostatin, respectively, by implanting microencapsulated cells engineered to secrete these recombinant products. Recent refinements of these approaches include genetic fusion of cytokines or angiostatin to additional functional groups with tumor targeting or tumor cell killing properties, thus enhancing the potency of the recombinant products. Furthermore, a COMBO strategy of implanting microencapsulated cells to deliver multiple products targeted to diverse pathways in tumor suppression also showed much promise. This review will summarise the application of microencapsulation of genetically-modified cells to cancer treatment in animal models, the efficacy of such approaches, and how these studies have led to better understanding of the biology of cancer treatment. The flexibility of this modular system involving molecular engineering, cellular genetic modification, and polymer chemistry provides potentially a huge range of application modalities, and a tremendous multi

  1. Construction of a bicistronic recombinant adenoviral vector for human interleukin-10 and enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jian-qing; LIN Cai-zhu; LIN Xian-zhong; ZENG Kai; GAO You-guang

    2012-01-01

    Background Human interleukin-10 (hlL-10) is a cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor,which is involved in various immune responses.The purpose of this study was to construct an adenoviral vector carrying the hlL-10 gene for expression of biologically active hlL-10 in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs).Methods A pSNAV2.0-hlL10 plasmid was used as a template to obtain a hlL-10 cDNA fragment that was subcloned by restriction enzyme digestion and ligation into a pDC316-IRES-EGFP-lacZ alpha plasmid carrying an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) marker gene.The pDC316-hlL-10-IRES-EGFP plasmid was linearized by Pmel digestion and used to transfect HEK293 packaging cells using the adenovirus packaging system AdMax.Virus particles were amplified by repeatedly infecting HEK293 cells with the seed virus and then purified by ion exchange.After the number of virus particles and titer was determined,rMSCs were infected with the adenoviral vector.The infection rate was determined by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry,and hlL-10 protein expression in rMSCs was measured by Western blotting.Results The virus particle concentration,OD260/280 value and virus titer of the amplified and purified recombinant adenovirus were 3.2×1011 VP/ml,approximately 2.0,and 1.1×1010 TCID50/ml,respectively.Bright green fluorescence was observed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry in the recombinant adenovirus-infected rMSCs.GFP expression was considered the multiplicity of infection (MOI) and was time-dependent.The infection rate was 92.9% at 100 MOI.Conclusions A bicistrenic recombinant adenoviral vector for hlL-10 and EGFP gene expression were successfully constructed.The infection rate of rMSCs by the adenovirus was high (92.9% at 100 MOI) and the target gene hlL-10 was highly expressed in cells.The present study provides an experimental basis for further research of immunosuppressive therapy using hlL-10.The expression level of hlL-10 protein as detected by

  2. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described. PMID:26193303

  3. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Herrera-Carrillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described.

  4. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy.

  5. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Chiu Liu; Zan Shen; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Marie CM Lin

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971,scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of antiangiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has Received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy.

  6. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesenbach, Uta; Pytel, Kamila M; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesenbach, Uta; Pytel, Kamila M; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  8. Inhibition of apoptosis reduces immunogeneic potential of adenoviral-treated syngeneic liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puellmann, Kerstin; Beham, Alexander; Kienle, Klaus; Vogel, Mandy; Schlitt, Hans Juergen; Jauch, Karl Walter; Rentsch, Markus

    2006-11-27

    Effects of adenoviral therapy and reduced apoptosis on immune response were investigated in a rat liver transplantation model after prolonged ischemia-reperfusion. Liver donors were treated i.v. either with an adenoviral construct, expressing bcl-2, green-fluorescent-protein, or doxycyclin. Intrahepatic apoptosis was assessed by terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The intrahepatic presence of CD4, CD8a, CD163, immunoglobulin (Ig)beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and myeloperoxidase (MPO) was quantified by realtime polymerase chain reaction at 24 hours and seven days after transplantation. Bcl-2 expression abrogated the TNF-alpha elevation and reduced apoptosis of hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells as compared to advCMV green fluorescent protein. No effects on CD4, CD8a, CD163 and MPO expression were noticed in bcl-2 pretreated livers, whereas Igbeta was slightly enhanced compared to controls. Adenoviral infected liver grafts trigger an immune response but reduced apoptosis resulted in down-regulation of TNF-alpha. Thus, bcl-2 transfer might simultaneously reduce graft ischemia reperfusion injury and immunogenicity. PMID:17130789

  9. Effective Gene Therapy in a Mouse Model of Prion Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Karine Toupet; Valérie Compan; Carole Crozet; Chantal Mourton-Gilles; Nadine Mestre-Francés; Françoise Ibos; Pierre Corbeau; Jean-Michel Verdier; Véronique Perrier

    2008-01-01

    Classical drug therapies against prion diseases have encountered serious difficulties. It has become urgent to develop radically different therapeutic strategies. Previously, we showed that VSV-G pseudotyped FIV derived vectors carrying dominant negative mutants of the PrP gene are efficient to inhibit prion replication in chronically prion-infected cells. Besides, they can transduce neurons and cells of the lymphoreticular system, highlighting their potential use in gene therapy approaches. ...

  10. Large Animal Models of Neurological Disorders for Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gagliardi, Christine; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of therapeutic interventions for genetic disorders and diseases that affect the central nervous system (CNS) has proven challenging. There has been significant progress in the development of gene therapy strategies in murine models of human disease, but gene therapy outcomes in these models do not always translate to the human setting. Therefore, large animal models are crucial to the development of diagnostics, treatments, and eventual cures for debilitating neurological diso...

  11. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy in the Canine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same wa...

  12. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jae Heon Kim; Hong Jun Lee; Yun Seob Song

    2014-01-01

    Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new ...

  13. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeuti...

  14. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.;

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  15. Xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolution and cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田聆; 魏于全

    2001-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes for death of human beings to date, and cancer biotherapy (mainlyimmunotherapy and gene therapy) has become the most promising approach after surgical therapy, radiotherapy andchemotherapy. However, there are still many limitations on cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy; therefore great ef-fort is being made to develop new strategies. It has been known that, in the process of evolution, a number of genes, theso-called xenogeneic homologous genes, are well-conserved and show the structural and/or functional similarity betweenvarious species to some degree. The nucleotide changes between various xenogeneic homologous genes are derived frommutation, and most of them are neutral mutations. Considering that the subtle differences in xenogeneic homologousgenes can break immune tolerance, enhance the immunogenicity and induce autologous immune response so as to elimi-nate tumor cells, we expect that a strategy of inducing autoimmune response using the property of xenogeneic homologousgenes will become a new therapy for cancer. Moreover, this therapy can also be used in the treatment of other diseases,such as autoimmune diseases and AIDS. This article will discuss the xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolutionand cancer therapy.

  16. Gene therapy: Regulations, ethics and its practicalities in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Jin; Yi-Da Yang; You-Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new and promising approach which opens a new door to the treatment of human diseases.By direct transfer of genetic materials to the target cells, it could exert functions on the level of genes and molecules. It is hoped to be widely used in the treatment of liver disease, especially hepatic tumors by using different vectors encoding the aim gene for anti-tumor activity by activating primary and adaptive immunity,inhibiting oncogene and angiogenesis. Despite the huge curative potential shown in animal models and some pilot clinical trials, gene therapy has been under fierce discussion since its birth in academia and the public domain because of its unexpected side effects and ethical problems. There are other challenges arising from the technique itself like vector design, administration route test and standard protocol exploration. How well we respond will decide the fate of gene therapy clinical medical practice.

  17. Gene therapy in dentistry: tool of genetic engineering. Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Khushboo; Singh, Saurabh; Garg, Kavita Nitish

    2015-03-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The concept of transferring genes to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed nearly half a century, but the ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology has brought this goal to reality. The feasibility of gene transfer was first demonstrated using tumour viruses. This led to development of viral and nonviral methods for the genetic modification of somatic cells. Applications of gene therapy to dental and oral problems illustrate the potential impact of this technology on dentistry. Preclinical trial results regarding the same have been very promising. In this review we will discuss methods, vectors involved, clinical implication in dentistry and scientific issues associated with gene therapy.

  18. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy: Lost in translation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Duan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dongsheng DuanDepartment of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USAAbstract: A milestone of molecular medicine is the identification of dystrophin gene mutation as the cause of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Over the last 2 decades, major advances in dystrophin biology and gene delivery technology have created an opportunity to treat DMD with gene therapy. Remarkable success has been achieved in treating dystrophic mice. Several gene therapy strategies, including plasmid transfer, exon skipping, and adeno-associated virus-mediated microdystrophin therapy, have entered clinical trials. However, therapeutic benefit has not been realized in DMD patients. Bridging the gap between mice and humans is no doubt the most pressing issue facing DMD gene therapy now. In contrast to mice, dystrophin-deficient dogs are genetically and phenotypically similar to human patients. Preliminary gene therapy studies in the canine model may offer critical insights that cannot be obtained from murine studies. It is clear that the canine DMD model may represent an important link between mice and humans. Unfortunately, our current knowledge of dystrophic dogs is limited, and the full picture of disease progression remains to be clearly defined. We also lack rigorous outcome measures (such as in situ force measurement to monitor therapeutic efficacy in dystrophic dogs. Undoubtedly, maintaining a dystrophic dog colony is technically demanding, and the cost of dog studies cannot be underestimated. A carefully coordinated effort from the entire DMD community is needed to make the best use of the precious dog resource. Successful DMD gene therapy may depend on valid translational studies in dystrophin-deficient dogs.Keywords: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, gene therapy, dystrophin, adeno-associated virus, exon-skipping, canine model

  19. Short-term Correction of Arginase Deficiency in a Neonatal Murine Model With a Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Chia-Ling; Rosenblatt, Robin A; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Lay, Fides D; Dow, Adrienne C; Livesay, Justin; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Grody, Wayne W; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy has the potential to ameliorate abnormalities before disease onset. Our gene knockout of arginase I (AI) deficiency is characterized by increasing hyperammonemia, neurological deterioration, and early death. We constructed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDV) carrying AI and examined for correction of this defect. Neonates were administered 5 × 109 viral particles/g and analyzed for survival, arginase activity, and ammonia and amino acids levels. The life expectancy of arg−/− mice increased to 27 days while controls died at 14 days with hyperammonemia and in extremis. Death correlated with a decrease in viral DNA/RNA per cell as liver mass increased. Arginase assays demonstrated that vector-injected hepatocytes had ~20% activity of heterozygotes at 2 weeks of age. Hepatic arginine and ornithine in treated mice were similar to those of saline-injected heterozygotes at 2 weeks, whereas ammonia was normal. By 26 days, arginase activity in the treated arg−/− livers declined to <10%, and arginine and ornithine increased. Ammonia levels began increasing by day 25, suggesting the cause of death to be similar to that of uninjected arg−/− mice, albeit at a later time. These studies demonstrate that the AI deficient newborn mouse can be temporarily corrected and rescued using a HDV. PMID:19367256

  20. Gene therapy imaging in patients for oncological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thus far, traditional methods for evaluating gene transfer and expression have been shown to be of limited value in the clinical arena. Consequently there is a real need to develop new methods that could be repeatedly and safely performed in patients for such purposes. Molecular imaging techniques for gene expression monitoring have been developed and successfully used in animal models, but their sensitivity and reproducibility need to be tested and validated in human studies. In this review, we present the current status of gene therapy-based anticancer strategies and show how molecular imaging, and more specifically radionuclide-based approaches, can be used in gene therapy procedures for oncological applications in humans. The basis of gene expression imaging is described and specific uses of these non-invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring illustrated. Molecular imaging of transgene expression in humans and evaluation of response to gene-based therapeutic procedures are considered. The advantages of molecular imaging for whole-body monitoring of transgene expression as a way to permit measurement of important parameters in both target and non-target organs are also analyzed. The relevance of this technology for evaluation of the necessary vector dose and how it can be used to improve vector design are also examined. Finally, the advantages of designing a gene therapy-based clinical trial with imaging fully integrated from the very beginning are discussed and future perspectives for the development of these applications outlined. (orig.)

  1. Drug-Gene Interactions between Genetic Polymorphisms and Antihypertensive Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelleman, Hedi; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; De Boer, Anthonius; Kroon, Abraham A; Verschuren, Monique W M; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Psaty, Bruce M; Klungel, Olaf H

    2004-01-01

    Genetic factors may influence the response to antihypertensive medication. A number of studies have investigated genetic polymorphisms as determinants of cardiovascular response to antihypertensive drug therapy. In most candidate gene studies, no such drug-gene interactions were found. However, ther

  2. Clinical infection control in gene therapy : A multidisciplinary conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, ME; Jordan, CT; Chang, SMW; Conrad, C; Gerberding, JL; Kaufman, HL; Mayhall, CG; Nolta, JA; Pilaro, AM; Sullivan, S; Weber, DJ; Wivel, NA

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy is being studied for the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited disorders. Retroviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, adeno-associated viruses, herpesviruses, and others are being engineered to transfer genes into humans. Treatment protocols using recombinant viruses are being in

  3. Therapeutic Prospects of Gene Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farraha, Melad; Chong, James J H; Kizana, Eddy

    2016-08-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common types of cardiac arrhythmias experienced in clinical practice, increasing the risk of stroke, dementia, myocardial infarction and death. Currently available options for the treatment of AF use either pharmacological agents or catheter-based ablation therapies to restore sinus rhythm or control the ventricular response rate. These current treatment options are suboptimal at best, motivating research into discovering more effective and innovative ways to treat AF. Gene therapy is being explored for its potential to treat various human conditions including cardiac arrhythmias. Gene transfer vectors with increasing transduction efficiency and biosafety have been developed and trialled for cardiovascular disease treatment. With an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms of AF, several gene therapy targets have been identified and evaluated in an attempt to rate or rhythm control the heart during AF. This review will discuss the gene therapy vectors in use today and methods for delivery of these vectors to the atrium. Further, it will evaluate several gene therapy strategies and approaches for sinus rhythm restoration and ventricular rate control that have the potential to emerge as a therapy for AF. PMID:27262391

  4. Gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burney TJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tabinda J Burney1,2, Jane C Davies1,2,31Department of Gene therapy, Imperial College London, 2UK CF Gene Therapy Consortium London, 3Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: Gene therapy is being developed as a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF, a condition that has hitherto been widely-researched yet for which no treatment exists that halts the progression of lung disease. Gene therapy involves the transfer of correct copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR DNA to the epithelial cells in the airways. The cloning of the CFTR gene in 1989 led to proof-of-principle studies of CFTR gene transfer in vitro and in animal models. The earliest clinical trials in CF patients were conducted in 1993 and used viral and non-viral gene transfer agents in both the nasal and bronchial airway epithelium. To date, studies have focused largely on molecular or bioelectric (chloride secretion outcome measures, many demonstrating evidence of CFTR expression, but few have attempted to achieve clinical efficacy. As CF is a lifelong disease, turnover of the airway epithelium necessitates repeat administration. To date, this has been difficult to achieve with viral gene transfer agents due to host recognition leading to loss of expression. The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium (Imperial College London, University of Edinburgh and University of Oxford is currently working on a large and ambitious program to establish the clinical benefits of CF gene therapy. Wave 1, which has reached the clinic, uses a non-viral vector. A single-dose safety trial is nearing completion and a multi-dose clinical trial is shortly due to start; this will be powered for clinically-relevant changes. Wave 2, more futuristically, will look at the potential of lentiviruses, which have long-lasting expression. This review will summarize the current status of translational

  5. Gene Therapy In Squamous Cell Carcinoma – A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Susan Varghese

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer remains one of the leading causes of death world wide. Various means to destroy tumor cells preferentially have been developed; gene therapy is one among them with less treatment morbidity. Gene therapy involves the transfer of therapeutic or working copy of genes into a specific cell of an individual in order to repair a faulty copy of gene. The alteration can be accomplished by repairing or replacing the damaged DNA by various strategies and vectors. To date genetically altered viruses are commonly used as gene delivery vehicle (vector which has an advantage of evolutionary selection of host-virus relation. Non viral vectors which include the physical transfection of genes can be accomplished by electrophoration, microinjection, or use of ballistic particles and chemical transfection by forming liposomes.

  6. The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Domashenko, A; Cotsarelis, G

    2001-01-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells for continued hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be targeted by topical gene delivery to mouse skin. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrated the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts as well. We defined liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection occurred only during anagen onset. Considerations and obstacles for using gene therapy to treat alopecias and skin disease are discussed. A theoretical framework for future gene therapy treatments for cutaneous and systemic disorders is presented.

  7. Gene therapy for cancer: regulatory considerations for approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, S R; Han, J; Au, P; Shannon, K; Puri, R K

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly changing field of gene therapy promises a number of innovative treatments for cancer patients. Advances in genetic modification of cancer and immune cells and the use of oncolytic viruses and bacteria have led to numerous clinical trials for cancer therapy, with several progressing to late-stage product development. At the time of this writing, no gene therapy product has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Some of the key scientific and regulatory issues include understanding of gene transfer vector biology, safety of vectors in vitro and in animal models, optimum gene transfer, long-term persistence or integration in the host, shedding of a virus and ability to maintain transgene expression in vivo for a desired period of time. Because of the biological complexity of these products, the FDA encourages a flexible, data-driven approach for preclinical safety testing programs. The clinical trial design should be based on the unique features of gene therapy products, and should ensure the safety of enrolled subjects. This article focuses on regulatory considerations for gene therapy product development and also discusses guidance documents that have been published by the FDA.

  8. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Lessons Learned and Path Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Mendell, Jerry R.; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Kaspar, Brian K.; Walker, Christopher M.; Clark, K. Reed

    2012-01-01

    Our Translational Gene Therapy Center has used small molecules for exon skipping and mutation suppression and gene transfer to replace or provide surrogate genes as tools for molecular-based approaches for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Exon skipping is targeted at the pre-mRNA level allowing one or more exons to be omitted to restore the reading frame. In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), clinical trials have been performed with two different oligomers, a 2′O-methyl-ribo-oligonucleo...

  9. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy: Lost in translation?

    OpenAIRE

    Dongsheng Duan

    2011-01-01

    Dongsheng DuanDepartment of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USAAbstract: A milestone of molecular medicine is the identification of dystrophin gene mutation as the cause of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the last 2 decades, major advances in dystrophin biology and gene delivery technology have created an opportunity to treat DMD with gene therapy. Remarkable success has been achieved in treating dystrophic mice. Several...

  10. Development of HIV vectors for anti-HIV gene therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Poeschla, E; Corbeau, P; Wong-Staal, F

    1996-01-01

    Current gene therapy protocols for HIV infection use transfection or murine retrovirus mediated transfer of antiviral genes into CD4+ T cells or CD34+ progenitor cells ex vivo, followed by infusion of the gene altered cells into autologous or syngeneic/allogeneic recipients. While these studies are essential for safety and feasibility testing, several limitations remain: long-term reconstitution of the immune system is not effected for lack of access to the macrophage reservoir or the pluripo...

  11. Gene Therapy for the Inner Ear: Challenges and Promises

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Allen F.; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Since the recognition of genes as the discrete units of heritability, and of DNA as their molecular substrate, the utilization of genes for therapeutic purposes has been recognized as a potential means of correcting genetic disorders. The tools of molecular biology, which allow the manipulation of DNA sequence, provided the means to put this concept into practice. However, progress in the implementation of these ideas has been slow. Here we review the history of the idea of gene therapy and t...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  13. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Dominic J.; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann–Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases. PMID:26611604

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed

  15. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loskog, Angelica

    2015-11-01

    Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics. PMID:26561829

  16. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Loskog

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics.

  17. Biological activity and safety of adenoviral vector-expressed wild-type p53 after intratumoral injection in melanoma and breast cancer patients with p53-overexpressing tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dummer, R; Bergh, J; Karlsson, Y; Horovitz, JA; Mulder, NH; Huinin, DT; Burg, G; Hofbauer, G; Osanto, S

    2000-01-01

    p53 mutations are common genetic alterations in human cancer. Gene transfer of a wild-type (wt) p53 gene reverses the loss of normal p53 function in vitro and in vivo. A phase I dose escalation study of single intratumoral (i.t.) injection of a replication-defective adenoviral expression vector cont

  18. Pharmacokinetics of combined gene therapy expressing constitutive human GM-CSF and hyperthermia-regulated human IL-12

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Fang; Wang Huiping; Zhang Jufeng; Chen Xiafang; Li Chuanyuan; Huang Qian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background An adenovirus that expresses both interleukin (IL)-12 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF) has been proven to be very effective in treating several tumors, but causes serious normal tissue toxicities. Methods In this study, a novel adenoviral vector was constructed by placing the human GM-CSF gene under the control of the CMV-IE promoter and human IL-12 gene under the control of heat shock protein 70B gene promoter. Both hGM-CSF and hIL-12 expressi...

  19. Gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burney, Tabinda J; Davies, Jane C

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is being developed as a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), a condition that has hitherto been widely-researched yet for which no treatment exists that halts the progression of lung disease. Gene therapy involves the transfer of correct copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) DNA to the epithelial cells in the airways. The cloning of the CFTR gene in 1989 led to proof-of-principle studies of CFTR gene transfer in vitro and in animal models. The earliest clinical trials in CF patients were conducted in 1993 and used viral and non-viral gene transfer agents in both the nasal and bronchial airway epithelium. To date, studies have focused largely on molecular or bioelectric (chloride secretion) outcome measures, many demonstrating evidence of CFTR expression, but few have attempted to achieve clinical efficacy. As CF is a lifelong disease, turnover of the airway epithelium necessitates repeat administration. To date, this has been difficult to achieve with viral gene transfer agents due to host recognition leading to loss of expression. The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium (Imperial College London, University of Edinburgh and University of Oxford) is currently working on a large and ambitious program to establish the clinical benefits of CF gene therapy. Wave 1, which has reached the clinic, uses a non-viral vector. A single-dose safety trial is nearing completion and a multi-dose clinical trial is shortly due to start; this will be powered for clinically-relevant changes. Wave 2, more futuristically, will look at the potential of lentiviruses, which have long-lasting expression. This review will summarize the current status of translational research in CF gene therapy. PMID:23776378

  20. Sjogren Syndrome-Gene Therapy and its Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rahpeyma

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren syndrome is one of the autoimmune diseases which is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration to exocrine glands and causes keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Today, a large population, with a majority of women over 40, suffer from this disease and have several complications regarding oral health and reduced life quality such as severe dental caries, painful eyes, olfactory and gustatory deficiency, speech, mastication and swallowing discomforts. Unfortunately, these patients do not respond to the conventional therapies. Nowadays in medical world, which its target is basic therapy and not symptomatic one, several gene therapy approaches, have gained importance in treatment of this apparently incurable diseases. Due to the facts that this disease is the second prevelant autoimmune disease, after rheumatoid arthritis, and the conventional therapies of the disease are all relative and symptomatic, researchers have insisted on the basic and causative therapy through gene transfer more than before. In the Present article, through reviewing 58 references containing recent scientific and investigatory findings it has been tried, to consider the pathogenesis and conventional therapies of this syndrome. Another purpose of this study was to investigate several and potentially very effective gene transfer systems and different theraputic genes (mainly membrane water channels, ione transporter molecules, transcription factors, antifungal proteins and free radical scavengers.

  1. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  2. Gene engineering biological therapy for juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Mikhel's

    2011-01-01

    However, GEBA therapy cannot completely cure the disease as before despite the progress achieved. GEBAs have potentially a number of serious side effects, among which there are severe infections and there is a risk of developing malignancies and autoimmune processes. Their administration requires careful monitoring to reveal the early development of serious adverse reactions, thus preventing a poor outcome.

  3. Microneedles as a Delivery System for Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eChen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs, which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy.

  4. Phase I trial of recombinant adenovirus gene transfer in lung cancer. Longitudinal study of the immune responses to transgene and viral products.

    OpenAIRE

    Gahéry-Ségard, H; Molinier-Frenkel, V.; Le Boulaire, C; Saulnier, P.; Opolon, P; Lengagne, R.; Gautier, E; Le Cesne, A; Zitvogel, L; Venet, A.; Schatz, C; Courtney, M; Le Chevalier, T.; Tursz, T; Guillet, J G

    1997-01-01

    Animal studies indicate that the use of replication-deficient adenovirus for human gene therapy is limited by host antivector immune responses that result in transient recombinant protein expression and blocking of gene transfer when rechallenged. Therefore, we have examined immune responses to an adenoviral vector and to the beta-galactosidase protein in four patients with lung cancer given a single intratumor injection of 10(9) plaque-forming units of recombinant adenovirus. The beta-galact...

  5. Development of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy for Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health concern that affects millions of people. There are no adequate long-term therapies for chronic pain sufferers, leading to significant cost for both society and the individual. The most commonly used therapy for chronic pain is the application of opioid analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs can lead to addiction and may cause side effects. Further studies of the mechanisms of chronic pain have opened the way for development of new treatment strategies, one of which is gene therapy. The key to gene therapy is selecting safe and highly efficient gene delivery systems that can deliver therapeutic genes to overexpress or suppress relevant targets in specific cell types. Here we review several promising viral vectors that could be applied in gene transfer for the treatment of chronic pain and further discuss the possible mechanisms of genes of interest that could be delivered with viral vectors for the treatment of chronic pain.

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of 'biologicals', in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L. I. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-10-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  8. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Martini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR to the affected organ (lung. Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

  9. GENE THERAPY, RECENT DEVELOPMENT AND FUTURE PROSPECTS IN GASTROINTESTINAL ONCOLOGY: A REVIEW ARTICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotla Ramya Sree and Mudavath Hanumanaik

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of nucleic acids into cells has as a purpose of medical condition or disease. Currently, gene therapy studies a broad range of potential therapeutic interventions, including the body's immune reaction to tumours, new blood vessels in the heart to alleviate heart attacks and to stop HIV-replication in patients with AIDS1 .There is also renewed emphasis on the gene therapy of genetic diseases, such as haemophilia A and B, and cystic fibrosis. Human gene therapy experimentation raises many issues. In this review article, background of gene therapy, introduction, genetic diseases, gene function, germ line gene therapy, hurdles in gene therapy, methods for gene therapy, ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo-gene therapy, risks associated with gene therapy, have been given.

  10. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavroudi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The grim statistics speak for themselves with reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem guided gene therapy. Stem cells have the unique potential for self-renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for therapeutic use of stem cells is their cancerous transformation. Therefore, we

  11. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Moving the Field Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R.

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies has evolved as a promising treatment for this progressive group of disorders. While corticosteroids and/or supportive treatments remain standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), loss of ambulation, respiratory failure and compromised cardiac function is the inevitable outcome. Recent developments in genetically mediated therapies have allowed for personalized treatments that strategically target individual muscular dystrophy subtypes bas...

  12. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jing-Xue; Wang, Ning-Li; Lu, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews t...

  13. Antisense Gene Silencing: Therapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels T. Nielsen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how the technique is exploited in a pre-clinical and clinical perspective in relation to neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. A novel suicide gene therapy using iNOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of NO in tumours is extremely complex; depending on the concentration it has major effects on vascular tone, endothelial proliferation, cell viability and radiosensitivity. As such, it is not surprising that its manipulation has been identified by many investigators as an exciting target for cancer therapy. The use of a gene therapy strategy utilising the iNOS gene to produce NO offers the potential for targeting NO production specifically within the tumour volume, combined with high NO-generating capacity. We have shown that iNOS gene therapy driven by a strong constitutive promoter (CMV) results in significant growth delay of the murine RIF-1 tumour in vivo. Due to the potent nature of NO any gene therapy strategy will require at lest one level of specificity. We have used the X-ray inducible WAF1/iNOS construct to confine NO generation to within the radiation field i.e. the tumour. A single injection of the X-ray inducible WAF1/iNOS construct followed, 16 h later, by an induction dose of 4 Gy X-rays resulted in significant enhancement of the cell killing effect of subsequent therapeutic doses of X-rays in the same tumour model. The effect was equivalent to a sensitiser enhancement ratio of ∼2.0, half the radiation dose being required to produce the biological effect when iNOS gene therapy was combined with radiation. Intra-tumoural injection of the WAF1/iNOS construct followed by 4 Gy X-rays also resulted in significant radiosensitisation in the HT29 xenograft model. We have so far demonstrated the cytotoxic and radiosensitising potential of iNOS gene therapy, however there are further benefits to the use of NO as an anti-cancer agent. These include anti-angiogenic effects and inhibition of tumour metastasis. Further studies will enable the design of a clinically appropriate protocol to be established

  15. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  16. Gene therapy in disorders of lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, Stefan F C; Twisk, Jaap; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2007-01-01

    Current pharmacologic interventions in lipid metabolism are insufficient in a subset of patients at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In particular, several monogenetic disorders of lipid metabolism with diverse clinical complications are beyond treatment to date. Somatic gene transfer is a

  17. Gene and stem cell therapy in peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalka, C; Baumgartner, Iris

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis strongly associated with a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In a considerable proportion of patients with PAOD, revascularization either by endovascular means or by open surgery combined with best possible risk factor modification does not achieve limb salvage or relief of ischaemic rest pain. As a consequence, novel therapeutic strategies have been developed over the last two decades aiming to promote neovascularization and remodelling of collaterals. Gene and stem cell therapy are the main directions for clinical investigation concepts. For both, preclinical studies have shown promising results using a wide variety of genes encoding for growth factors and populations of adult stem cells, respectively. As a consequence, clinical trials have been performed applying gene and stem cell-based concepts. However, it has become apparent that a straightforward translation into humans is not possible. While several trials reported relief of symptoms and functional improvement, other trials did not confirm this early promise of efficacy. Ongoing clinical trials with an improved study design are needed to confirm the potential that gene and cell therapy may have and to prevent the gaps in our scientific knowledge that will jeopardize the establishment of angiogenic therapy as an additional medical treatment of PAOD. This review summarizes the experimental background and presents the current status of clinical applications and future perspectives of the therapeutic use of gene and cell therapy strategies for PAOD.

  18. Advances in gene therapy technologies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrs-Silva H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hilda Petrs-Silva, Rafael LindenInstitute of Biophysics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a class of diseases that leads to progressive degeneration of the retina. Experimental approaches to gene therapy for the treatment of inherited retinal dystrophies have advanced in recent years, inclusive of the safe delivery of genes to the human retina. This review is focused on the development of gene therapy for RP using recombinant adenoassociated viral vectors, which show a positive safety record and have so far been successful in several clinical trials for congenital retinal disease. Gene therapy for RP is under development in a variety of animal models, and the results raise expectations of future clinical application. Nonetheless, the translation of such strategies to the bedside requires further understanding of the mutations and mechanisms that cause visual defects, as well as thorough examination of potential adverse effects. Keywords: retinitis pigmentosa, photoreceptor, gene therapy, AAV

  19. Biosafety challenges for use of lentiviral vectors in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel

    2013-12-01

    Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for the genetic modification of cells in biomedical research and gene therapy. Their use in recent clinical trials for the treatment of adrenoleukodystrophy, β-thalassemia, Wiskott-Aldrich- Syndrome and metachromatic leukodystrophy underlined their efficacy for therapies especially in case of hereditary diseases. In comparison to gammaretroviral LTR-driven vectors, which were employed in the first clinical trials, lentiviral vectors present with some favorable features like the ability to transduce also non-dividing cells and a potentially safer insertion profile. However, genetic modification with viral vectors in general and stable integration of the therapeutic gene into the host cell genome bear concerns with respect to different levels of personal or environmental safety. Among them, insertional mutagenesis by enhancer mediated dysregulation of neighboring genes or aberrant splicing is still the biggest concern. However, also risks like immunogenicity of vector particles, the phenotoxicity of the transgene and potential vertical or horizontal transmission by replication competent retroviruses need to be taken into account. This review will give an overview on biosafety aspects that are relevant to the use of lentiviral vectors for genetic modification and gene therapy. Furthermore, assay systems aiming at evaluating biosafety in preclinical settings and recent promising clinical trials including efforts of monitoring of patients after gene therapy will be discussed.

  20. State of the art: gene therapy of haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, H T; Riley, B E; Doering, C B

    2016-07-01

    Clinical gene therapy has been practiced for more than a quarter century and the first products are finally gaining regulatory/marketing approval. As of 2016, there have been 11 haemophilia gene therapy clinical trials of which six are currently open. Each of the ongoing phase 1/2 trials is testing a variation of a liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector encoding either factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) . As summarized herein, the clinical results to date have been mixed with some perceived success and a clear recognition of the immune response to AAV as an obstacle to therapeutic success. We also attempt to highlight promising late-stage preclinical activities for AAV-FVIII where, due to inherent challenges with manufacture, delivery and transgene product biosynthesis, more technological development has been necessary to achieve results comparable to what has been observed previously for AAV-FIX. Finally, we describe the development of a stem cell-based lentiviral vector gene therapy product that has the potential to provide lifelong production of FVIII and provide a functional 'cure' for haemophilia A. Integral to this program has been the incorporation of a blood cell-specific gene expression element driving the production of a bioengineered FVIII designed for optimal efficiency. As clearly outlined herein, haemophilia remains at the forefront of the rapidly advancing clinical gene therapy field where there exists a shared expectation that transformational advances are on the horizon. PMID:27405679

  1. Gene therapy in Alzheimer's disease - potential for disease modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Tjernberg, Lars O; Winblad, Bengt; Saido, Takaomi C

    2010-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in the elderly, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline. The mechanism underlying onset of the disease has not been fully elucidated. However, characteristic pathological manifestations include extracellular accumulation and aggregation of the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) into plaques and intracellular accumulation and aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau, forming neurofibrillary tangles. Despite extensive research worldwide, no disease modifying treatment is yet available. In this review, we focus on gene therapy as a potential treatment for AD, and summarize recent work in the field, ranging from proof-of-concept studies in animal models to clinical trials. The multifactorial causes of AD offer a variety of possible targets for gene therapy, including two neurotrophic growth factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, Abeta-degrading enzymes, such as neprilysin, endothelin-converting enzyme and cathepsin B, and AD associated apolipoprotein E. This review also discusses advantages and drawbacks of various rapidly developing virus-mediated gene delivery techniques for gene therapy. Finally, approaches aiming at down-regulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 levels by means of siRNA-mediated knockdown are briefly summarized. Overall, the prospects appear hopeful that gene therapy has the potential to be a disease modifying treatment for AD.

  2. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -blind placebo-controlled trials could not confirm the initial high efficacy of either the growth factor protein or the gene therapy approaches observed in earlier small trials. The clinical studies so far have all been without any gene-related serious adverse events. Future trials will focus on whether...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...

  3. Targeting p53 and its domains for cancer gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Julia Matissek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated proteins in human cancer and has been extensively targeted for cancer therapy. This resulted in wild type p53 gene therapeutic approval for the treatment of head and neck cancer in China. p53 mainly functions as a transcription factor and stimulates a variety of genes involved in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway by binding to p53 responsive elements as a t...

  4. Optimising gene therapy of hypoparathyroidism with hematopoietic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yi; L(U) Bing-jie; XU Ping; SONG Chun-fang

    2005-01-01

    Background The treatment of hypoparathyroidism (HPT) is still a difficult clinical problem, which necessitates a new therapy. Gene therapy of HPT has been valuable, but how to improve the gene transfer efficiency and expression stability is a problem. This study was designed to optimize the gene therapy of HPT with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) recombined with the parathyroid hormone (PTH) gene. Methods The human PTH gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from pcDNA3.1-PTH vectors and inserted into murine stem cell virus (MSCV) vectors with double enzyme digestion (EcoRI and XhoI). The recombinant vectors were transfected into PA317 packaging cell lines by the lipofectin method and screened by G418 selective medium. The condensed recombinant retroviruses were extracted and used to infect HSCs, which were injected into mice suffering from HPT. The change of symptoms and serum levels of PTH and calcium in each group of mice were investigated. Results The human PTH gene was inserted into MSCV vectors successfully and the titres were up to 2×107 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml in condensed retroviral solution. The secretion of PTH reached 15 ng·10-6·cell-1 per 48 hours. The wild type viruses were not detected via PCR amplification, so they were safe for use. The mice suffering from HPT recovered quickly and the serum levels of calcium and PTH remained normal for about three months after the HSCs recombined with PTH were injected into them. The therapeutic effect of this method was better than simple recombinant retroviruses injection.Conclusions The recombinant retroviral vectors MSCV-PTH and the high-titre condensed retroviral solution recombined with the PTH gene are obtained. The recombinant retroviral solution could infect HSCs at a high rate of efficiency. The infected HSCs could cure HPT in mice. This method has provided theoretical evidence for the clinical gene therapy of HPT.

  5. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy.

  6. Gene therapy ethics and haemophilia: an inevitable therapeutic future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimichele, D; Miller, F G; Fins, J J

    2003-03-01

    Haemophilia was recognized early on as an ideal candidate for a gene transfer approach to therapy. In the past decade, gene transfer experimentation in the haemophilias has indeed played an integral role in furthering the science in the global field of gene therapy. However, these expectations have placed haemophilia gene transfer researchers under pressure to succeed in a scientific domain in which successes are infrequent and progress is necessarily slow. These same expectations have also fueled the perception of gene therapy as the inevitable therapeutic goal for the youngest children with haemophilia. In this paper, we will discuss the ethical implications of this perception in light of anticipated benefits, acceptable risk, perceived consumer need and the unknown cost of this intervention. A framework for the future study and therapeutic implementation of gene transfer technology in this specific population is proposed. Public debate on this issue that includes the voices of the intended beneficiaries, especially the parents of the youngest children with haemophilia and the children themselves, is encouraged. PMID:12614364

  7. Gene therapy for lung inflammatory diseases: not so far away?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, J M; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C

    1997-08-01

    The lung is a readily accessible target organ for gene therapy. To date, therapeutic gene delivery has largely focused on introducing functional, corrective genes in lung diseases arising from single gene defects such as cystic fibrosis. More recently interest has centred on gene therapy as a potential therapeutic tool in modulating complex pathological processes such as pulmonary inflammation. Genetic modification of critical components of the inflammatory process may be beneficial-for example, overexpressing anti-elastase genes may circumvent elastase mediated lung damage in emphysema. With the development of improved viral and liposome vectors and the evolution of effective adjuvant immunosuppression to obviate host immune responses--for example, using selective cytokines and blockers of T cell surface activation--the potential exists to target therapeutic doses of transgene to deficient or dysregulated cells. Furthermore, increased understanding of tissue-specific promoter regions and of mechanisms controlling regulation of gene expression offer the potential for close control of therapeutic gene expression within the lung. Continuing refinements in these technologies will provide new therapeutic strategies in inflammatory lung disease. PMID:9337837

  8. Potential of Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors in Modulating Airway Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahul Kushwah; Huibi Cao; Jim Hu

    2007-01-01

    Innate immune responses form the first line of defense against foreign insults and recently significant advances have been made in our understanding of the initiation of innate immune response along with its ability to modulate inflammation. In airway diseases such as asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, over reacting of the airway innate immune responses leads to cytokine imbalance and airway remodeling or damage. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors have the potential to deliver genes to modulate airway innate immune responses and have many advantages over its predecessors. However, there still are a few limitations that need to be addressed prior to their use in clinical applications.

  9. Dystrophin Gene Replacement and Gene Repair Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in 2016: An Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-01

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repairing the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy and readiness for clinical trials. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD. PMID:27003751

  10. Recent trends in the gene therapy of β-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finotti A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alessia Finotti,1–3 Laura Breda,4 Carsten W Lederer,6,7 Nicoletta Bianchi,1–3 Cristina Zuccato,1–3 Marina Kleanthous,6,7 Stefano Rivella,4,5 Roberto Gambari1–3 1Laboratory for the Development of Gene and Pharmacogenomic Therapy of Thalassaemia, Biotechnology Centre of Ferrara University, Ferrara, Italy; 2Associazione Veneta per la Lotta alla Talassemia, Rovigo, Italy; 3Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Section of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ferrara University, Ferrara, Italy; 4Department of Pediatrics, Division of Haematology/Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 5Department of Cell and Development Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 6Department of Molecular Genetics Thalassaemia, The Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Nicosia, Cyprus; 7Cyprus School of Molecular Medicine, Nicosia, Cyprus Abstract: The β-thalassemias are a group of hereditary hematological diseases caused by over 300 mutations of the adult β-globin gene. Together with sickle cell anemia, thalassemia syndromes are among the most impactful diseases in developing countries, in which the lack of genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis have contributed to the maintenance of a very high frequency of these genetic diseases in the population. Gene therapy for β-thalassemia has recently seen steadily accelerating progress and has reached a crossroads in its development. Presently, data from past and ongoing clinical trials guide the design of further clinical and preclinical studies based on gene augmentation, while fundamental insights into globin switching and new technology developments have inspired the investigation of novel gene-therapy approaches. Moreover, human erythropoietic stem cells from β-thalassemia patients have been the cellular targets of choice to date whereas future gene-therapy studies might increasingly draw on induced pluripotent stem cells. Herein, we summarize the most

  11. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P; Kashentseva, Elena A; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Curiel, David T; Leppla, Stephen; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2016-03-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. PMID:26740390

  12. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAfter more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme

  13. Modeling of gene therapy for regenerative cells using intelligent agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Aya Sedky; Aboutabl, Amal Elsayed; Ibrahim, M Shaarawy

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting field that has attracted much interest since the first submission of clinical trials. Preliminary results were very encouraging and prompted many investigators and researchers. However, the ability of stem cells to differentiate into specific cell types holds immense potential for therapeutic use in gene therapy. Realization of this potential depends on efficient and optimized protocols for genetic manipulation of stem cells. It is widely recognized that gain/loss of function approaches using gene therapy are essential for understanding specific genes functions, and such approaches would be particularly valuable in studies involving stem cells. A significant complexity is that the development stage of vectors and their variety are still not sufficient to be efficiently applied in stem cell therapy. The development of scalable computer systems constitutes one step toward understanding dynamics of its potential. Therefore, the primary goal of this work is to develop a computer model that will support investigations of virus' behavior and organization on regenerative tissues including genetically modified stem cells. Different simulation scenarios were implemented, and their results were encouraging compared to ex vivo experiments, where the error rate lies in the range of acceptable values in this domain of application.

  14. Modulation of TNFalpha, a determinant of acute toxicity associated with systemic delivery of first-generation and helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, V P; Toietta, G; McCormack, W M; Conde, I; Clarke, C; Palmer, D; Finegold, M J; Pastore, L; Ng, P; Lopez, J; Lee, B

    2006-09-01

    Understanding the determinants of the host innate immune response to systemic administration of adenoviral (Ad) vectors is critical for clinical gene therapy. Acute toxicity occurs within minutes to hours after vector administration and is characterized by activation of innate immune responses. Our data indicate that in mice, indicators of vector toxicity include elevations of cytokine levels, liver transaminase levels and thrombocytopenia. To discern potential targets for blunting this host response, we evaluated genetic factors in the host response to systemically administered first-generation Ad vectors (FGV) and helper-dependent Ad vectors (HDV) containing beta-galactosidase expression cassettes. A preliminary screen for modulation of vector-induced thrombocytopenia revealed no role for interferon-gamma, mast cells or perforin. However, vector-induced thrombocytopenia and interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression are less evident in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-deficient mice. Moreover, we also demonstrated that TNFalpha blockade via antibody or huTNFR:Fc pretreatment attenuates both thrombocytopenia (>40% increase in platelet count) and IL-6 expression (>80% reduction) without affecting interleukin 12 , liver enzymes, hematological indices or vector transduction in a murine model. Our data indicate that the use of HDV, in combination with clinically approved TNFalpha immunomodulation, may represent an approach for improving the therapeutic index of Ad gene therapy for human clinical trials. PMID:16708078

  15. What's next for gene therapy? Virginia Tech plastics researchers design polymer macromolecules as gene transfer agents

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy depends upon foreign DNA, even viruses, to deliver genes, therapeutic proteins, or medicine to cells within the body. Many scientists are looking for better chaperones across the cell membrane. Virginia Tech researchers think polymer molecules can be created to do the job.

  16. Perinatal stem-cell and gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbek, Daniel; Schoeberlein, Andreina; Wagner, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Most genetic diseases of the lymphohematopoietic system, including hemoglobinopathies, can now be diagnosed early in gestation. However, as yet, prenatal treatment is not available. Postnatal therapy by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation from bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood is possible for several of these diseases, in particular for the hemoglobinopathies, but is often limited by a lack of histocompatible donors, severe treatment-associated morbidity, and preexisting organ damage that developed before birth. In-utero transplantation of allogeneic HSC has been performed successfully in various animal models and recently in humans. However, the clinical success of this novel treatment is limited to diseases in which the fetus is affected by severe immunodeficiency. The lack of donor cell engraftment in nonimmunocompromised hosts is thought to be due to immunologic barriers, as well as to competitive fetal marrow population by host HSCs. Among the possible strategies to circumvent allogeneic HLA barriers, the use of gene therapy by genetically corrected autologous HSCs in the fetus is one of the most promising approaches. The recent development of strategies to overcome failure of efficient transduction of quiescent hematopoietic cells using new vector constructs and transduction protocols opens new perspectives for gene therapy in general, as well as for prenatal gene transfer in particular. The fetus might be especially susceptible for successful gene therapy approaches because of the developing, expanding hematopoietic system during gestation and the immunologic naiveté early in gestation, precluding immune reaction towards the transgene by inducing tolerance. Ethical issues, in particular regarding treatment safety, must be addressed more closely before clinical trials with fetal gene therapy in human pregnancies can be initiated. PMID:18420474

  17. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  18. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  19. Recent progress in gene therapy for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Ryuichi

    2002-12-01

    Gene therapy is emerging as a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as peripheral arterial disease, ischemic heart disease, restenosis after angioplasty, vascular bypass graft occlusion and transplant coronary vasculopathy, for which no known effective therapy exists. The first human trial in cardiovascular disease started in 1994 treating peripheral vascular disease with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and since then, many different potent angiogenic growth factors have been tested in clinical trials for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. In addition, therapeutic angiogenesis using the VEGF gene has been used to treat ischemic heart disease since 1997. The results from these clinical trials have exceeded expectations; improvement in the clinical symptoms of peripheral arterial disease and ischemic heart disease has been reported. Another strategy for combating the disease processes, targeting the transcriptional process, has been tested in a human trial. IN particular, transfection of cis-element double-stranded (ds) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) (= decoy) is a powerful tool in a new class of anti-gene strategies. Transfection of ds-ODN corresponding to the cis sequence will attenuate the authentic cis-trans interaction, leading to removal of trans-factors from the endogenous cis-elements and subsequent modulation of gene expression. Genetically modified vein grafts transfected with a decoy against E2F, an essential transcription factor in cell cycle progression, appear to have long-term potency in human patients. There is great potential in gene therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:12499610

  20. Current Status of Gene Therapy for Inherited Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy as a treatment modality for pulmonary disorders has attracted significant interest over the past decade. Since the initiation of the first clinical trials for cystic fibrosis lung disease using recombinant adenovirus in the early 1990s, the field has encountered numerous obstacles including vector inflammation, inefficient delivery, and vector production. Despite these obstacles, enthusiasm for lung gene therapy remains high. In part, this enthusiasm is fueled through the diligence of numerous researchers whose studies continue to reveal great potential of new gene transfer vectors that demonstrate increased tropism for airway epithelia. Several newly identified serotypes of adeno-associated virus have demonstrated substantial promise in animal models and will likely surface soon in clinical trials. Furthermore, an increased understanding of vector biology has also led to the development of new technologies to enhance the efficiency and selectivity of gene delivery to the lung. Although the promise of gene therapy to the lung has yet to be realized, the recent concentrated efforts in the field that focus on the basic virology of vector development will undoubtedly reap great rewards over the next decade in treating lung diseases. PMID:12524461

  1. Silica nanoparticle is a possible safe carrier for gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Zhigang; DAI Heping; TANG Baisha; XIA Kun; XIA Jiahui; LIANG Desheng; LI Yumei; LONG Zhigao; PAN Qian; LIU Xionghao; WU Lingqian; ZHU Shaihong; CAI Fang

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop a safe and effective gene therapy carrier, some toxicological and biodynamical experiments were carried out on silica nanoparticles (SiNPs). First we prepared SiNPs with appropriate portions of cyclohexane, deionized water and ethyl silicate, and then transfected the modified SiNPs and GFP plasmid DNA complex into the HT1080 cells to test the effectiveness of transfection for gene therapy. At the same time, we injected the SiNPs into a number of mice through tail vein. Then we made the mice crossed to evaluate the acute, long-term and reproductive toxicity. In vivo distribution analysis and pathological examination were made on both adult mice and their offspring. SiNPs were uniform and had an average diameter of 40 nm, and the modified SiNPs carried exogenous DNA molecules into target cells and the transferred GFP fusion gene was effectively expressed in the cells. The SiNPs injected via tail vein were widely distributed in almost all of tissues, and the injected mice had the ability to reproduce normally. The in vivo and in vitro results of this study clearly show that SiNPs can be used as a safe and effective carrier for gene transfection and gene therapy.

  2. Terapia gênica Gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nance Beyer Nardi; Leonardo Augusto Karam Teixeira; Eduardo Filipe Ávila da Silva

    2002-01-01

    Terapia gênica é um procedimento médico que envolve a modificação genética de células como forma de tratar doenças. Os genes influenciam praticamente todas as doenças humanas, seja pela codificação de proteínas anormais diretamente responsáveis pela doença, seja por determinar suscetibilidade a agentes ambientais que a induzem. A terapia gênica é ainda experimental, e está sendo estudada em protocolos clínicos para diferentes tipos de doenças. O desenvolvimento de métodos seguros e eficientes...

  3. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy.

  4. [The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotsarelis, G

    2002-05-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells required for continuous hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be the target of topical gene delivery in the skin of the mouse. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrate the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts. We consider liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection is possible only during the early anagen phase. Factors and obstacles for the use of gene therapy in treating alopecia and skin diseases are discussed. A theoretical framework for future treatment of cutaneous and systemic disorders using gene therapy is presented.

  5. Baculoviruses as Vectors for Gene Therapy against Human Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay J. Stanbridge

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Current curative strategies for prostate cancer are restricted to the primary tumour, and the effect of treatments to control metastatic disease is not sustained. Therefore, the application of gene therapy to prostate cancer is an attractive alternative. Baculoviruses are highly restricted insect viruses, which can enter, but not replicate in mammalian cells. Baculoviruses can incorporate large amounts of extra genetic material, and will express transgenes in mammalian cells when under the control of a mammalian or strong viral promoter. Successful gene delivery has been achieved both in vitro and in vivo and into both dividing and nondividing cells, which is important since prostate cancers divide relatively slowly. In addition, the envelope protein gp64 is sufficiently mutable to allow targeted transduction of particular cell types. In this review, the advantages of using baculoviruses for prostate cancer gene therapy are explored, and the mechanisms of viral entry and transgene expression are described.

  6. Combination recombinant simian or chimpanzee adenoviral vectors for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Colloca, Stefano; Seder, Robert A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-12-16

    Recombinant adenoviral vector (rAd)-based vaccines are currently being developed for several infectious diseases and cancer therapy, but pre-existing seroprevalence to such vectors may prevent their use in broad human populations. In this study, we investigated the potential of low seroprevalence non-human primate rAd vectors to stimulate cellular and humoral responses using HIV/SIV Env glycoprotein (gp) as the representative antigen. Mice were immunized with novel simian or chimpanzee rAd (rSAV or rChAd) vectors encoding HIV gp or SIV gp by single immunization or in heterologous prime/boost combinations (DNA/rAd; rAd/rAd; rAd/NYVAC or rAd/rLCM), and adaptive immunity was assessed. Among the rSAV and rChAd tested, rSAV16 or rChAd3 vector alone generated the most potent immune responses. The DNA/rSAV regimen also generated immune responses similar to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. rChAd63/rChAd3 and rChAd3 /NYVAC induced similar or even higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell and IgG responses as compared to rAd28/rAd5, one of the most potent combinations of human rAds. The optimized vaccine regimen stimulated improved cellular immune responses and neutralizing antibodies against HIV compared to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. Based on these results, this type of novel rAd vector and its prime/boost combination regimens represent promising candidates for vaccine development. PMID:26514419

  7. Intricacies for Posttranslational Tumor-Targeted Cytokine Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffry Cutrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The safest and most effective cytokine therapies require the favorable accumulation of the cytokine in the tumor environment. While direct treatment into the neoplasm is ideal, systemic tumor-targeted therapies will be more feasible. Electroporation-mediated transfection of cytokine plasmid DNA including a tumor-targeting peptide-encoding sequence is one method for obtaining a tumor-targeted cytokine produced by the tumor-bearing patient’s tissues. Here, the impact on efficacy of the location of targeting peptide, choice of targeting peptide, tumor histotype, and cytokine utilization are studied in multiple syngeneic murine tumor models. Within the same tumor model, the location of the targeting peptide could either improve or reduce the antitumor effect of interleukin (IL12 gene treatments, yet in other tumor models the tumor-targeted IL12 plasmid DNAs were equally effective regardless of the peptide location. Similarly, the same targeting peptide that enhances IL12 therapies in one model fails to improve the effect of either IL15 or PF4 for inhibiting tumor growth in the same model. These interesting and sometimes contrasting results highlight both the efficacy and personalization of tumor-targeted cytokine gene therapies while exposing important aspects of these same therapies which must be considered before progressing into approved treatment options.

  8. Terapia gênica para osteoporose Gene therapy for osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pacheco da Costa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A osteoporose é considerada um dos problemas de saúde mais comuns e sérios da população idosa mundial. É uma doença crônica e progressiva, caracterizada pela diminuição da massa óssea e deterioração da microarquitetura do tecido ósseo. A terapia gênica representa uma nova abordagem para o tratamento da osteoporose e tem como princípio devolver a função comprometida pelo metabolismo. Esta revisão visa focar os trabalhos relevantes desenvolvidos nos últimos anos, disponibilizados nas bases de dados médicas, e que utilizaram a terapia gênica para o tratamento da osteoporose em modelos animais, bem como, as perspectivas futuras desta terapia. A maioria dos estudos utiliza os genes BMPs, PTH e OPG na tentativa de restabelecer a massa óssea. Apesar da carência de novas moléculas, todos os genes empregados nos estudos se mostraram eficientes no tratamento da doença. Os benefícios que a terapia gênica proporcionará aos pacientes no futuro devem contribuir substancialmente para o aumento na qualidade de vida dos idosos. Em breve, protocolos clínicos envolvendo humanos irão beneficiar os indivíduos com osteoporose.Osteoporosis is considered one of the most common and serious problems affecting the elderly population worldwide. It is a chronic and progressive disease, characterized by decreased bone mass and degeneration of the microarchitecture of the bone tissue. Gene therapy represents a new approach in osteoporosis treatment, and its main function is to restore the compromised function in the metabolism. This review aims to elucidate the main studies on gene therapy in recent years, in the medical databases, that use gene therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis in animal models, as well as the future prospects of this therapy. The majority of the studies use the BMP, PTH and OPG genes, in an attempt to reestablish bone mass. Despite the lack of new molecules, all genes employed in these studies have proven to be

  9. 77 FR 73472 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  10. Gene Profiling Technique to Accelerate Stem Cell Therapies for Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to accelerate stem cell therapies for eye diseases Gene profiling technique to accelerate stem cell therapies for ... The method simultaneously measures the expression of multiple genes, allowing scientists to quickly characterize cells according to ...

  11. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  12. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology. PMID:25012686

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Maliandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  14. Progress on gene therapy, cell therapy, and pharmacological strategies toward the treatment of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Pradeep; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Bachtarzi, Houria

    2015-05-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a muscle-specific, late-onset degenerative disorder whereby muscles of the eyes (causing ptosis), throat (leading to dysphagia), and limbs (causing proximal limb weakness) are mostly affected. The disease is characterized by a mutation in the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear-1 (PABPN1) gene, resulting in a short GCG expansion in the polyalanine tract of PABPN1 protein. Accumulation of filamentous intranuclear inclusions in affected skeletal muscle cells constitutes the pathological hallmark of OPMD. This review highlights the current translational research advances in the treatment of OPMD. In vitro and in vivo disease models are described. Conventional and experimental therapeutic approaches are discussed with emphasis on novel molecular therapies including the use of intrabodies, gene therapy, and myoblast transfer therapy. PMID:25860803

  15. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy. PMID:27436147

  16. 75 FR 66381 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... Lentiviral Vector Based Gene Therapy Products. FDA intends to make background material available to...

  17. 77 FR 63840 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and..., Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, and...

  18. 78 FR 44133 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... on guidance documents issued from the Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center...

  19. 78 FR 79699 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue, and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), FDA. On February...

  20. 76 FR 81513 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends to make...

  1. 76 FR 9028 - Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated January 2011. The guidance document provides manufacturers of cellular and gene therapy (CGT) products with recommendations for developing... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products''...

  2. 76 FR 22405 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... gene therapy products for the treatment of retinal disorders. Topics to be considered include...

  3. Experimental Studies on PNP Suicide Gene Therapy of Hepatoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the killing effect of PNP/MeP-dR suicide gene system on hepatoma cells,pcDNA3. 0/PNP, an eukaryotic expression vector harboring E. coli PNP gene, was transfected into human hepatoma HepG2 cells by liposome-mediated method. A HepG2 cell line with stable PNP gene expression, HepG2/PNP, was established with presence of G418 selection. The cell growth curves were determined with trypan blue staining. The sensitivity of HepG2/PNP to MePdR and bystander effects were assayed by MTT and FCM methods. The enzymatic activity of the product of PNP gene was determined by HPLC method. The cytotoxic effects of MeP-dR on HepG2/PNP cells were obvious (IC50 =4.5μmol/L) and all HepG2/PNP cells were killed 4 days after the treatment with 100μmol/L MeP~dR. In mixed cultures containing increasing percentages of HepG2/PNP cells, total population killing was demonstrated when HepG2/PNP cells accounted for as few as 5% of all HepG2 cells 8 days after the treatment with 100μmol MeP-dR. Highpressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) demonstrated that the PNP enzyme could convert MePdR into 6-MP. PNP/MeP-dR suicide gene system had an advantage over traditional suicide gene systems for hepatoma gene therapy. Our e results suggest that high-level bystander effects of this system result in significant anti-tumor responses to hepatoma gene therapy, especially in vivo.

  4. Gene and stem cell therapy of the hair follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    The hair follicle is a highly complex appendage of the skin containing a multiplicity of cell types. The follicle undergoes constant cycling through the life of the organism including growth and resorption with growth dependent on specific stem cells. The targeting of the follicle by genes and stem cells to change its properties, in particular, the nature of the hair shaft is discussed. Hair follicle delivery systems are described such as liposomes and viral vectors for gene therapy. The nature of the hair follicle stem cells is discussed, in particular, its pluripotency.

  5. Lifelong elimination of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toietta, Gabriele; Mane, Viraj P; Norona, Wilma S; Finegold, Milton J; Ng, Philip; McDonagh, Antony F; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lee, Brendan

    2005-03-15

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. Current therapy relies on phototherapy to prevent kernicterus, but liver transplantation presently is the only permanent cure. Gene therapy is a potential alternative, and recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors, devoid of all viral coding sequences, induce prolonged transgene expression and exhibit significantly less chronic toxicity than early-generation Ad vectors. We used a HD-Ad vector to achieve liver-restricted expression of human uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 in the Gunn rat, a model of the human disorder. Total plasma bilirubin levels were reduced from >5.0 mg/dl to 2 yr after a single i.v. administration of vector expressing the therapeutic transgene at a dose of 3 x 10(12) viral particles per kg. HPLC analysis of bile from treated rats showed the presence of bilirubin glucuronides at normal WT levels >2 yr after one injection of vector, and i.v. injection of bilirubins IIIalpha and XIIIalpha in the same animals revealed excess bilirubin-conjugating capacity. There was no significant elevation of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase) and only transient, moderate thrombocytopenia after injection of the vector. A clinically significant reduction in serum bilirubin was observed with a dose as low as 6 x 10(11) viral particles per kg. We conclude that complete, long-term correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome can be achieved with one injection of HD-Ad vector and negligible chronic toxicity. PMID:15753292

  6. Prevention of peritoneal adhesions: A promising role for gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hussein M Atta

    2011-01-01

    Adhesions are the most frequent complication of abdominopelvic surgery, yet the extent of the problem, and its serious consequences, has not been adequately recognized. Adhesions evolved as a life-saving mechanism to limit the spread of intraperitoneal inflammatory conditions. Three different pathophysiological mechanisms can independently trigger adhesion formation. Mesothelial cell injury and loss during operations, tissue hypoxia and inflammation each promotes adhesion formation separately, and potentiate the effect of each other. Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that interruption of a single pathway does not completely prevent adhesion formation. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of adhesion formation and the results of single gene therapy interventions. It explores the promising role of combinatorial gene therapy and vector modifications for the prevention of adhesion formation in order to stimulate new ideas and encourage rapid advancements in this field.

  7. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jacob L.; O'Connor, Deirdre M.; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies.

  8. Optimization of PAMAM-gold nanoparticle conjugation for gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Elizabeth R.; Lin, Adam Y.; Yan, Jiaxi; Luo, Laureen; Foster, Aaron E.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of efficient and biocompatible non-viral vectors for gene therapy remains a great challenge, and exploiting the properties of both nanoparticle carriers and cationic polymers is an attractive approach. In this work, we have developed gold nanoparticle (AuNP) polyamidoamine (PAMAM) conjugates for use as non-viral transfection agents. AuPAMAM conjugates were prepared by crosslinking PAMAM dendrimers to carboxylic-terminated AuNPs via EDC and sulfo-NHS chemistry. EDC and sulfo-NH...

  9. Recent trends in the gene therapy of β-thalassemia

    OpenAIRE

    Finotti A; Breda L; Lederer CW; Bianchi N; Zuccato C; Kleanthous M.; Rivella S; Gambari R

    2015-01-01

    Alessia Finotti,1–3 Laura Breda,4 Carsten W Lederer,6,7 Nicoletta Bianchi,1–3 Cristina Zuccato,1–3 Marina Kleanthous,6,7 Stefano Rivella,4,5 Roberto Gambari1–3 1Laboratory for the Development of Gene and Pharmacogenomic Therapy of Thalassaemia, Biotechnology Centre of Ferrara University, Ferrara, Italy; 2Associazione Veneta per la Lotta alla Talassemia, Rovigo, Italy; 3Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Section of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ferrara...

  10. Recent trends in the gene therapy of β-thalassemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Alessia Finotti,1–3 Laura Breda,4 Carsten W Lederer,6,7 Nicoletta Bianchi,1–3 Cristina Zuccato,1–3 Marina Kleanthous,6,7 Stefano Rivella,4,5 Roberto Gambari1–3 1Laboratory for the Development of Gene and Pharmacogenomic Therapy of Thalassaemia, Biotechnology Centre of Ferrara University, Ferrara, Italy; 2Associazione Veneta per la Lotta alla Talassemia, Rovigo, Italy; 3Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Section of Biochemistry and Molecular ...

  11. Contemporary Animal Models For Human Gene Therapy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Chitra; Nathar, Trupti Job; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Hickstein, Dennis Durand; Remington Nelson, Everette Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, gene therapy has been making considerable progress as an alternative strategy in the treatment of many diseases. Since 2009, several studies have been reported in humans on the successful treatment of various diseases. Animal models mimicking human disease conditions are very essential at the preclinical stage before embarking on a clinical trial. In gene therapy, for instance, they are useful in the assessment of variables related to the use of viral vectors such as safety, efficacy, dosage and localization of transgene expression. However, choosing a suitable disease-specific model is of paramount importance for successful clinical translation. This review focuses on the animal models that are most commonly used in gene therapy studies, such as murine, canine, non-human primates, rabbits, porcine, and a more recently developed humanized mice. Though small and large animals both have their own pros and cons as disease-specific models, the choice is made largely based on the type and length of study performed. While small animals with a shorter life span could be well-suited for degenerative/aging studies, large animals with longer life span could suit longitudinal studies and also help with dosage adjustments to maximize therapeutic benefit. Recently, humanized mice or mouse-human chimaeras have gained interest in the study of human tissues or cells, thereby providing a more reliable understanding of therapeutic interventions. Thus, animal models are of great importance with regard to testing new vector technologies in vivo for assessing safety and efficacy prior to a gene therapy clinical trial. PMID:26415576

  12. Progress in gene therapy of dystrophic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Y.; Duan, D.

    2012-01-01

    The heart is frequently afflicted in muscular dystrophy. In severe cases, cardiac lesion may directly result in death. Over the years, pharmacological and/or surgical interventions have been the mainstay to alleviate cardiac symptoms in muscular dystrophy patients. Although these traditional modalities remain useful, the emerging field of gene therapy has now provided an unprecedented opportunity to transform our thinking/approach in the treatment of dystrophic heart disease. In fact, the pre...

  13. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ching-Chiu; Shen, Zan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie CM

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971, scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of anti-angiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized an...

  14. Baculoviruses as Vectors for Gene Therapy against Human Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stanbridge Lindsay J.; Dussupt Vincent; Maitland Norman J.

    2003-01-01

    Current curative strategies for prostate cancer are restricted to the primary tumour, and the effect of treatments to control metastatic disease is not sustained. Therefore, the application of gene therapy to prostate cancer is an attractive alternative. Baculoviruses are highly restricted insect viruses, which can enter, but not replicate in mammalian cells. Baculoviruses can incorporate large amounts of extra genetic material, and will express transgenes in mammalian cells when under the co...

  15. Gene Therapy: A Potential Approach for Cancer Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Boulis; Christina Krudy; Handy, Chalonda R.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is experienced by as many as 9 0 % of cancer patients at some point during the disease. This pain can be directly cancer related or arise from a sensory neuropathy related to chemotherapy. Major pharmacological agents used to treat cancer pain often lack anatomical specificity and can have off-target effects that create new sources of suffering. These concerns establish a need for improved cancer pain management. Gene therapy is emerging as an exciting prospect. This paper discus...

  16. Engineered bacteriophage targeting gene networks as adjuvants for antibiotic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Timothy K.; Collins, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug development is increasingly lagging behind the evolution of antibiotic resistance, and as a result, there is a pressing need for new antibacterial therapies that can be readily designed and implemented. In this work, we engineered bacteriophage to overexpress proteins and attack gene networks that are not directly targeted by antibiotics. We show that suppressing the SOS network in Escherichia coli with engineered bacteriophage enhances killing by quinolones by several orde...

  17. Novosti pri zdravljenju z gensko terapijo: New developments in gene therapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Rožman, Primož; Sedej, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy is the treatment of genetic disor - ders by introducing genetic material into cells. For this purpose, viral vectors and non-viral methods for introducing genes into cells are used, the later being in general less effective. After the enthusiastic beginings in 1990, gene ther - apy came to a standstill due to side effects of ad - enoviral vectors during gene therapy and when several patients developed leukemia. Nowadays, many studies are testing clinical efficacy of gene therapy ...

  18. Influential Factors and Synergies for Radiation-Gene Therapy on Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Lin; Junxing Huang; Yujuan Shi; Yanhong Xiao; Ting Guo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-gene therapy, a dual anticancer strategy of radiation therapy and gene therapy through connecting radiation-inducible regulatory sequence to therapeutic gene, leading to the gene being induced to express by radiation while radiotherapy is performed and finally resulting in a double synergistic antitumor effect of radiation and gene, has become one of hotspots in the field of cancer treatment in recent years. But under routine dose of radiation, especially in the hypoxia environment ...

  19. Cytokine and Immuno-Gene Therapy for Solid Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Yuan Li; Qian Huang; Hsiang-Fu Kung

    2005-01-01

    Despite recent progress in our understanding of cancer biology and in many areas of cancer treatment, the success rate for cancer therapy remains dismal. Immunotherapy for cancer has long been an exciting field for many cancer researchers due to the possibility to mobilize the body's own immune system to eradicate cancer not only locally but also systemically. Since its initial discovery, cytokine-based immunotherapy has been vigorously and extensively investigated for cancer treatment due to the perception of it as a relatively easily purifiable, injectable form of cancer treatment agent. However, so far most cytokine-based therapy trials have fallen short of expectations. One of main obstacles is the difficulty to achieve therapeutically relevant dosage in patients without generating excessive normal tissue toxicity. The emergence of novel gene therapy approach to deliver therapeutic cytokine to tumors locally generated great excitement since it has the potential of generating sustained high local concentration of immunostimulatory cytokine without raising the systemic levels of the cytokines, which is responsible for most of the observed toxicity. In this review, we will attempt to provide an overview of the field and discuss some of the problems associated with cytokine-based immuno-gene therapy and potential solutions.Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):81-91.

  20. Cytokine and Immuno-Gene Therapy for Solid Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-YuanLi; QianHuang; Hsiang-FuKung

    2005-01-01

    Despite recent progress in our understanding of cancer biology and in many areas of cancer treatment, the success rate for cancer therapy remains dismal. Immunotherapy for cancer has long been an exciting field for many cancer researchers due to the possibility to mobilize the body's own immune system to eradicate cancer not only locally but also systemically. Since its initial discovery, cytokine-based immunotherapy has been vigorously and extensively investigated for cancer treatment due to the perception of it as a relatively easily purifiable, injectable form of cancer treatment agent. However, so far most cytokine-based therapy trials have fallen short ofexpectations. One of main obstacles is the difficulty to achieve therapeutically relevant dosage in patients without generating excessive normal tissue toxicity. The emergence of novel gene therapy approach to deliver therapeutic cytokine to tumors locally generated great excitement since it has the potential of generating sustained high local concentration of immunostimulatory cytokine without raising the systemic levels of the cytokines, which is responsible for most of the observed toxicity. In this review, we will attempt to provide an overview of the field and discuss some of the problems associated with cytokine-based immuno-gene therapy and potential solutions. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):81-91.

  1. Disseminated adenoviral infection masquerading as lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction in a kidney transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboumohamed, Ahmed; Flechner, Stuart M; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres; Srinivas, Titte R; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-11-01

    Viral infections continue to cause significant morbidity in immunosuppressed kidney transplant patients. Although cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and polyoma "BK" virus are more frequently encountered, the Adenovirus can cause multi-organ system infections, and may be difficult to diagnose because it is not often considered in the initial work up in kidney transplant recipients. We present an unusual case of a kidney recipient 1 year post-transplant with disseminated adenoviral infection, who had an initial presentation of lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction with hematuria and sterile pyuria. This progressed to a severe tubulointerstitial nephritis and acute kidney injury that improved with reduction of immunosuppression. Serial blood viral loads are useful for monitoring the course of infection. Urinary adenoviral infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis whenever a kidney transplant recipient presents with unexplained lower tract voiding dysfunction, hematuria, and sterile pyuria. The allograft kidney and bladder can be targets of viral proliferation. Early diagnosis with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy is essential to clear the virus and maintain allograft function. PMID:23816478

  2. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens. PMID:25757622

  3. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being promoted through the use of

  4. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra [Max Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Center of Molecular Medicine (CMMC) and Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); MPI for Neurological Research, Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Cologne (Germany); Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro [University of California Los Angeles (United States). Department of Medicine

    2005-12-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being

  5. 胰腺癌:基因治疗的前景%Pancreatic cancer-Outlook:gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.-Matthias L(o)hr

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy offers an elegant alternative to toxic chemotherapy regimens, mostly without severe side effects.Cancer gene therapy was among the first applications. Following the enthusiasm in the early nineties, a more rationale view is the recent way to look at it. This tutorial review looks upon the tools of gene therapy and the principle elements (vector, promoter, targeting, therapeutic gene). The principles of gene therapy such as gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT)and gene directed tumor vaccination are explained. Further, published protocols and clinical studies for pancreatic carcinoma gene therapy are reviewed. Finally, an outlook is given on the latest developments, some of them beyond conventional gene therapy.

  6. Apoptosis as a target for gene therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Adrián Rabinovich

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints resulting from hyperplasia of synovial fibroblasts and infiltration of lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells, all of which manifest signs of activation. All these cells proliferate abnormally, invade bone and cartilage, produce an elevated amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines, metalloproteinases and trigger osteoclast formation and activation. Some of the pathophysiological consequences of the disease may be explained by the inadequate apoptosis, which may promote the survival of autoreactive T cells, macrophages or synovial fibroblasts. Although RA does not result from single genetic mutations, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms implicated in joint destruction has revealed novel targets for gene therapy. Gene transfer strategies include inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, blockade of cartilage-degrading metalloproteinases, inhibition of synovial cell activation and manipulation of the Th1-Th2 cytokine balance. Recent findings have iluminated the idea that induction of apoptosis in the rheumatoid joint can be also used to gain therapeutic advantage in the disease. In the present review we will discuss different strategies used for gene transfer in RA and chronic inflammation. Particularly, we will highlight the importance of programmed cell death as a novel target for gene therapy using endogenous biological mediators, such as galectin-1, a beta-galactoside-binding protein that induces apoptosis of activated T cells and immature thymocytes.

  7. Cytochrome P450-based cancer gene therapy: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, On; Kingsman, Susan; Naylor, Stuart

    2002-12-01

    Results from a number of preclinical studies have demonstrated that a P450-based gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) strategy for the treatment of cancer is both safe and efficacious. This strategy has now moved forward into the clinic. At least two different approaches using different delivery methods (retroviral vector MetXia [Oxford BioMedica] and encapsulated P450 expressing cells), different cytochrome P450 isoforms (human CYP2B6 versus rat CYP2B1) and different prodrugs (cyclophosphamide [CPA] versus ifosfamide [IFA]) have concluded Phase I/II clinical trial with encouraging results. In the future, P450-based GDEPT can potentially be further enhanced by improved vectors for P450 gene delivery and disease-targeted promoters for focused gene expression at the target site. In addition, there is scope for developing synthetic P450s and their respective prodrugs to improve both enzyme kinetics and the profile of the active moiety. PMID:12517265

  8. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in gene transfer technology have greatly expanded the opportunities for developing immunotherapy strategies for breast carcinoma. Genetic immunotherapy approaches include the transfer of genes encoding cytokines and costimulatory molecules to modulate immune function, as well as genetic immunization strategies which rely on the delivery of cloned tumor antigens. Improved gene transfer vectors, coupled with a better understanding of the processes that are necessary to elicit an immune response and an expanding number of target breast tumor antigens, have led to renewed enthusiasm that effective immunotherapy may be achieved. It is likely that immunotherapeutic interventions will find their greatest clinical application as adjuvants to traditional first-line therapies, targeting micrometastatic disease and thereby reducing the risk of cancer recurrence

  9. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  10. Adenoviral vectors stimulate glucagon transcription in human mesenchymal stem cells expressing pancreatic transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Zaldumbide

    Full Text Available Viral gene carriers are being widely used as gene transfer systems in (transdifferentiation and reprogramming strategies. Forced expression of key regulators of pancreatic differentiation in stem cells, liver cells, pancreatic duct cells, or cells from the exocrine pancreas, can lead to the initiation of endocrine pancreatic differentiation. While several viral vector systems have been employed in such studies, the results reported with adenovirus vectors have been the most promising in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined whether the viral vector system itself could impact the differentiation capacity of human bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs toward the endocrine lineage. Lentivirus-mediated expression of Pdx-1, Ngn-3, and Maf-A alone or in combination does not lead to robust expression of any of the endocrine hormones (i.e. insulin, glucagon and somatostatin in hMSCs. Remarkably, subsequent transduction of these genetically modified cells with an irrelevant early region 1 (E1-deleted adenoviral vector potentiates the differentiation stimulus and promotes glucagon gene expression in hMSCs by affecting the chromatin structure. This adenovirus stimulation was observed upon infection with an E1-deleted adenovirus vector, but not after exposure to helper-dependent adenovirus vectors, pointing at the involvement of genes retained in the E1-deleted adenovirus vector in this phenomenon. Lentivirus mediated expression of the adenovirus E4-ORF3 mimics the adenovirus effect. From these data we conclude that E1-deleted adenoviral vectors are not inert gene-transfer vectors and contribute to the modulation of the cellular differentiation pathways.

  11. An overview of the history, applications, advantages, disadvantages and prospects of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarlou, M; Baradaran, B; Saedi, T A; Jafarlou, V; Shanehbandi, D; Maralani, M; Othman, F

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has become a significant issue in science-related news. The principal concept of gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease. Although gene therapy was originally conceived as a way to treat life-threatening disorders (inborn defects, cancers) refractory to conventional treatment, it is now considered for many non–life-threatening conditions, such as those adversely impacting a patient’s quality of life. An extensive range of efficacious vectors, delivery techniques, and approaches for developing gene-based interventions for diseases have evolved in the last decade. The lack of suitable treatment has become a rational basis for extending the scope of gene therapy. The aim of this review is to investigate the general methods by which genes are transferred and to give an overview to clinical applications. Maximizing the potential benefits of gene therapy requires efficient and sustained therapeutic gene expression in target cells, low toxicity, and a high safety profile. Gene therapy has made substantial progress albeit much slower than was initially predicted. This review also describes the basic science associated with many gene therapy vectors and the present progress of gene therapy carried out for various surface disorders and diseases. The conclusion is that, with increased pathobiological understanding and biotechnological improvements, gene therapy will become a standard part of clinical practice. PMID:27358116

  12. Treating hearing disorders with cell and gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Lisa N.; Richardson, Rachael T.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Wise, Andrew K.

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is an increasing problem for a substantial number of people and, with an aging population, the incidence and severity of hearing loss will become more significant over time. There are very few therapies currently available to treat hearing loss, and so the development of new therapeutic strategies for hearing impaired individuals is of paramount importance to address this unmet clinical need. Most forms of hearing loss are progressive in nature and therefore an opportunity exists to develop novel therapeutic approaches to slow or halt hearing loss progression, or even repair or replace lost hearing function. Numerous emerging technologies have potential as therapeutic options. This paper details the potential of cell- and gene-based therapies to provide therapeutic agents to protect sensory and neural cells from various insults known to cause hearing loss; explores the potential of replacing lost sensory and nerve cells using gene and stem cell therapy; and describes the considerations for clinical translation and the challenges that need to be overcome.

  13. Undermining tumor angiogenesis by gene therapy: an emerging field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indraccolo, S

    2004-09-01

    The recent discovery of several molecules that negatively modulate the migration and growth of endothelial cells, collectively referred to as inhibitors of angiogenesis, has made it possible to test the hypothesis that control of angiogenesis might be an effective strategy in controlling tumor growth, as well as ameliorating the course of other life-threatening diseases. Angiogenesis inhibitors are heterogeneous in origin and potency, and their growing list includes products of the proteolysis of larger molecules with a different function, such as angiostatin and endostatin, natural modulators of vascular endothelial growth factor activity, such as sFLT-1, and some cytokines with a marked anti-endothelial activity, such as IL-12 and interferon-alpha. Pre-clinical studies have clearly indicated that most of these factors exert cytostatic rather than cytotoxic effects, thus implying the need for long-term administration in order to obtain a prolonged therapeutic effect. This feature of angiostatic therapy and the difficulty in synthesizing large amounts of recombinant functional proteins have prompted several studies, which have investigated their delivery by a gene therapy approach. This review addresses the several experimental approaches attempted to date, points out the constraints that have delayed clinical application, and envisions possible areas of integration between antiangiogenic gene therapy and other established therapeutic options against cancer. PMID:15384943

  14. Progress toward gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    1999-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is available. The lethal consequences of DMD are caused by absence of a structural protein, called dystrophin, from skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. The usefulness of gene replacement as therapy for this disease has been established in transgenic mouse models. Unfortunately, progress toward therapy for human patients has been limited by the characteristics of currently available viral vectors and by lack of a suitable technique for delivery of such vectors to a large mass of muscle cells. Successful gene therapy of DMD will require a vector that can carry most of the dystrophin coding sequence, that can be cheaply produce in large quantities, that can be delivered to a large mass of muscle cells, and that provides stable expression of dystrophin after delivery. We and others have worked to develop such a vector through modification of adenoviruses (Ad). Here we review the characteristics of conventional Ad vectors and new helper-dependent, or gutted, Ad vectors. Gutted Ad vectors contain cis-acting DNA sequences necessary for viral replication and packaging, but are deleted, or gutted, for all viral coding sequences. We found that gutted vectors efficiently delivered full-length dystrophin to the skeletal muscles of dystrophic (mdx) mice. Dystrophic muscles injected with these vectors expressed dystrophin for at least four months post-injection, which was the longest time point tested. These data suggest that gutted vectors will allow delivery and long-term expression of dystrophin. PMID:12194388

  15. Gene Therapy for Brain Cancer: Combination Therapies Provide Enhanced Efficacy and Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Muhammad, A K M G; Yagiz, Kader; Farrokhi, Catherine; Pechnick, Robert N; Pedro R Lowenstein; Castro, Maria G

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain cancer in adults. Despite significant advances in treatment and intensive research, the prognosis for patients with GBM remains poor. Therapeutic challenges for GBM include its invasive nature, the proximity of the tumor to vital brain structures often preventing total resection, and the resistance of recurrent GBM to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Gene therapy has been proposed as a useful adjuvant for GBM, to be use...

  16. A REVIEW OF GENE AND STEM CELL THERAPY IN CUTANEOUS WOUND HEALING

    OpenAIRE

    Branski, Ludwik K.; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2008-01-01

    Different therapies that modulate wound repair have been proposed over the last few decades. This article reviews the two emerging fields of gene and stem cell therapy in wound healing. Gene therapy, initially developed for treatment of congenital defects, is a new option for enhancing wound repair. In order to accelerate wound closure, genes encoding for growth factors or cytokines have showed the most potential. The majority of gene delivery systems are based on viral transfection, naked DN...

  17. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone...... or in combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  18. Cationic Polyene Phospholipids as DNA Carriers for Ocular Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Machado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent success in the treatment of congenital blindness demonstrates the potential of ocular gene therapy as a therapeutic approach. The eye is a good target due to its small size, minimal diffusion of therapeutic agent to the systemic circulation, and low immune and inflammatory responses. Currently, most approaches are based on viral vectors, but efforts continue towards the synthesis and evaluation of new nonviral carriers to improve nucleic acid delivery. Our objective is to evaluate the efficiency of novel cationic retinoic and carotenoic glycol phospholipids, designated C20-18, C20-20, and C30-20, to deliver DNA to human retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE cells. Liposomes were produced by solvent evaporation of ethanolic mixtures of the polyene compounds and coformulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE or cholesterol (Chol. Addition of DNA to the liposomes formed lipoplexes, which were characterized for binding, size, biocompatibility, and transgene efficiency. Lipoplex formulations of suitable size and biocompatibility were assayed for DNA delivery, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using RPE cells and a GFP-encoding plasmid. The retinoic lipoplex formulation with DOPE revealed a transfection efficiency comparable to the known lipid references 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane-carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC and GeneJuice. The results demonstrate that cationic polyene phospholipids have potential as DNA carriers for ocular gene therapy.

  19. Long-term follow-up of cancer patients treated with gene therapy medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2012-06-01

    European Union requirements are discussed for the long-term follow-up of advanced therapy medicinal products, as well as how they can be applied to cancer patients treated with gene therapy medicinal products in the context of clinical trials, as described in a specific guideline issued by Gene Therapy Working Party at the European Medicine Agency.

  20. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical trials in pediatric populations, as well as challenges and considerations in the...

  1. Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Organoids for Reversible Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman; DelTatto, Michael; Shansky, Janet; Lemaire, Julie; Chang, Albert; Payumo, Francis; Lee, Peter; Goodyear, Amy; Raven, Latasha

    1996-01-01

    Genetically modified murine skeletal myoblasts were tissue engineered in vitro into organ-like structures (organoids) containing only postmitotic myofibers secreting pharmacological levels of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Subcutaneous organoid Implantation under tension led to the rapid and stable appearance of physiological sera levels of rhGH for up to 12 weeks, whereas surgical removal led to its rapid disappearance. Reversible delivery of bioactive compounds from postimtotic cells in tissue engineered organs has several advantages over other forms of muscle gene therapy.

  2. Introduction of radiolabeled therapeutic oligonucleotides as nanonuclear explosive gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthetic oligonucleotide technology is also at early trial points in human testing against HIV, leukemia, Herpes virus, and other diseases, whose outcome will remain for the future. The current status of these varied approaches is presented in later parts in this article: What are therapeutic oligonucleotides?, Why Auger-emitters are useful in gene therapy?, What is the synergistic effect on combining Auger emitter and Triplex-forming ODN?, How have TFO researches evolved from the starting point?, In which areas of clinical research will this research illuminating?

  3. Multi-gene targeted antiangiogenic therapies for experimental corneal neovascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peng; Yin, Hongmei; Wang, Yao; Mi, Jing; He, Wenxiao; Xie, Lixin; Wang, Yiqiang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effectiveness of multigene-based anti-angiogenic gene therapies for experimental murine corneal neovascularization (corneal NV). Methods Recombinant retroviral vectors encoding murine endostatin (mEndo), murine-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (msFlk-1), or murine-soluble Tie2 (msTie2) were constructed and packaged in PT67 cells. Viral titers were determined by infection of NIH3T3 cells. Expressions of mEndo, msFlk-1, and msTie2 were confirmed by ...

  4. Research progress of gene target therapy for refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-hua TANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the strategies of gene therapy for the treatment of refractory epilepsy (RE mainly include modulating neurotransmitter systems, neuropeptide Y (NPY and neurotrophic factors. Among them, the hot target spots include γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and its receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and its receptor, galanin, NPY and neurotrophic factors. This paper reviews the chief research results, and advantages and disadvantages of studies, and provides evidence for the treatment of refractory epilepsy. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.12.004

  5. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic ablation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gene therapy strategy of mutation compensation is designed to rectify the molecular lesions that are etiologic for neoplastic transformation. For dominant oncogenes, such approaches involve the functional knockout of the dysregulated cellular control pathways provoked by the overexpressed oncoprotein. On this basis, molecular interventions may be targeted to the transcriptional level of expression, via antisense or ribozymes, or post-transcriptionally, via intracellular single chain antibodies (intrabodies). For carcinoma of the breast, these approaches have been applied in the context of the disease linked oncogenes erbB-2 and cyclin D1, as well as the estrogen receptor. Neoplastic revision accomplished in modal systems has rationalized human trials on this basis

  6. Animal models for prenatal gene therapy: rodent models for prenatal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybal, Jessica L; Endo, Masayuki; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Herbert, Bronwen R; Waddington, Simon N; Flake, Alan W

    2012-01-01

    Fetal gene transfer has been studied in various animal models, including rabbits, guinea pigs, cats, dogs, and nonhuman primate; however, the most common model is the rodent, particularly the mouse. There are numerous advantages to mouse models, including a short gestation time of around 20 days, large litter size usually of more than six pups, ease of colony maintenance due to the small physical size, and the relatively low expense of doing so. Moreover, the mouse genome is well defined, there are many transgenic models particularly of human monogenetic disorders, and mouse-specific biological reagents are readily available. One criticism has been that it is difficult to perform procedures on the fetal mouse with suitable accuracy. Over the past decade, accumulation of technical expertise and development of technology such as high-frequency ultrasound have permitted accurate vector delivery to organs and tissues. Here, we describe our experiences of gene transfer to the fetal mouse with and without ultrasound guidance from mid to late gestation. Depending upon the vector type, the route of delivery and the age of the fetus, specific or widespread gene transfer can be achieved, making fetal mice excellent models for exploratory biodistribution studies. PMID:22648774

  7. Study of thrombopoietin for gene therapy of thrombocytopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崇松; 卢大儒; 李昌本; 邱信芳; 薛京伦

    1999-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is likely to be a potent, specific and reliable medication in the treatment of thrombocytopenia. A TPO-highly-expressed plasmid pcDNA3-TPO was constructed and a primary study was made on the expression of TPO cDNA in vitro and gene transfer study for thrombocytopenia in vivo. rhTPO showed complete and stable bioactivity by a series of indicators. High expression of TPO was detected in plasma from healthy mice or thrombocytopenia mice model receiving direct intramuscular injection of pcDNA3-TPO. And the platelet level of healthy mice peaked to 1.9-fold of baseline. Mice with CTX-induced thrombocytopenia achieved profound nadirs, acceleration of recovery, even 1.8—2.0-fold supranormal levels of peripheral platelet counts. The results offered experimental support for clinical application of gene therapy for thrombocytopenia via direct intramuscular injection of TPO cDNA.

  8. Beta-Adrenergic gene therapy for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Walter J

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene therapy using in vivo recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer is an effective technique that offers great potential to improve existing drug treatments for the complex cardiovascular diseases of heart failure and vascular smooth muscle intimal hyperplasia. Cardiac-specific adenovirus-mediated transfer of the carboxyl-terminus of the β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARKct, acting as a Gβγ-β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARK1 inhibitor, improves basal and agonist-induced cardiac performance in both normal and failing rabbit hearts. In addition, βARKct adenovirus infection of vascular smooth muscle is capable of significantly diminishing neointimal proliferation after angioplasty. Therefore, further investigation is warranted to determine whether inhibition of βARK1 activity and sequestration of Gβγ via an adenovirus that encodes the βARKct transgene might be a useful clinical tool for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies.

  9. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with severe coronary artery disease can be treated satisfactorily with current recommended medications and revascularization techniques. Various vascular growth factors have the potential to induce angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. Clinical trials have only evaluated the effect...... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....

  10. Combination therapy of murine liver cancer with IL-12 gene and HSV-TK gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the synergistic anti-tumor effects of murine IL-12 gene and HSV-TK gene therapy in mice bearing liver cancer. Methods: Mouse liver cancer MM45T. Li (H-2d) cells were transfected with retroviral vector containing IL-12 gene or HSV-TK gene insert. Gene-modified liver cancer cells, MM45T. Li/IL-12 and MM45T. Li/TK, with stable expression of IL-12 and TK were obtained. Balb/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously with 2′ 105 MM45T. Li cells. When the tumor reached a size of 0.5-1.0 cm, a mixture of MM45T.Li/TK cells and 60Co-irradiated MM45T. Li/IL-12 cell were injected intratumoraly. Ganciclovir (GCV) was injected ip (40 mg.kg-1.d-1) for 10 days. Intratumoral injection of 60Co-irradiated MM45T. Li/IL-12 cells was repeated twice in one week apart. Mice with distant tumors were treated according to the same protocol. CTL activity of spleen cells was measured by 51Cr-release assay and phenotype of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes by immunohistochemical staining. Results: In mice treated with MM45T. Li/IL-12 or MM45T. Li/TK+GCV individually led to moderate reduction in tumor growth, but neither could eradicate the tumor completely, while in 60% of mice treated with a mixture of MM45T. Li/IL-12 and MM45T. Li/TK cells plus GCV, complete tumor regression was observed, with no tumor recurrence for two months. The growth of distant tumor was also inhibited significantly in mice similarly treated. Most of the mice received combined gene therapy plus GCV had abundant CD4+, CD8+T lymphocyte infiltration. Their CTL activity was significantly higher than in mice received single gene therapy. Conclusion Combination therapy with IL-12 gene and HSV-TK gene plus GCV is effective for mouse liver cancer.

  11. Optimizing autologous cell grafts to improve stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psatha, Nikoletta; Karponi, Garyfalia; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, stem cell gene therapy has achieved unprecedented curative outcomes for several genetic disorders. Despite the unequivocal success, clinical gene therapy still faces challenges. Genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells are particularly vulnerable to attenuation of their repopulating capacity once exposed to culture conditions, ultimately leading to low engraftment levels posttransplant. This becomes of particular importance when transduction rates are low or/and competitive transplant conditions are generated by reduced-intensity conditioning in the absence of a selective advantage of the transduced over the unmodified cells. These limitations could partially be overcome by introducing megadoses of genetically modified CD34(+) cells into conditioned patients or by transplanting hematopoietic stem cells hematopoietic stem cells with high engrafting and repopulating potential. On the basis of the lessons gained from cord blood transplantation, we summarize the most promising approaches to date of increasing either the numbers of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation or/and their engraftability, as a platform toward the optimization of engineered stem cell grafts. PMID:27106799

  12. Experimental gene therapy using p21Waf1 gene for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by gene gun technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuichi; Fujii, Teruhiko; Yamana, Hideaki; Kato, Seiya; Morimatsu, Minoru; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    In our previous study, the proliferation rate of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, which poorly expressed p21Waf1, was found to be regulated by p21Waf1 gene transfection using adenovirus vector. In the present study, in order to examine the effect of p21Waf1 gene therapy in esophageal cancer, we used gene gun technology, which proved to be a powerful method to introduce the p21Waf1 gene into esophageal cancer cells. p21Waf1 transfection to KE3 and YES2 cells (weakly expressed p21Waf1 protein cells) showed a high expression of p21Waf1 protein after applying this gene gun technique. In KE3 and YES2 cells, statistical significant growth inhibition was observed after p21Waf1 transfection compared with LacZ transfection (KE3, p=0.0009; YES2, pgun technique significantly inhibited the low basal p21Waf1 expressed esophageal cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, p21Waf1 transfection strongly enhanced the effect of 5Fu suggesting that p21Waf1 may prove beneficial in chemotherapy combined with gene therapy using gene gun technology in patients with esophageal cancer who have a low level of p21Waf1 expressed tumor.

  13. Clinical development of gene therapy needs a tailored approach: a regulatory perspective from the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Gopalan; Cossu, Giulio; Galli, Maria Cristina; Flory, Egbert; Ovelgonne, Hans; Salmikangas, Paula; Schneider, Christian K; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues

    2014-03-01

    Gene therapy is a rapidly evolving field that needs an integrated approach, as acknowledged in the concept article on the revision of the guideline on gene transfer medicinal products. The first gene therapy application for marketing authorization was approved in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) region in 2012, the product being Alipogene tiparvovec. The regulatory process for this product has been commented on extensively, highlighting the challenges posed by such a novel technology. Here, as current or previous members of the Committee for Advanced Therapies, we share our perspectives and views on gene therapy as a treatment modality based on current common understanding and regulatory experience of gene therapy products in the European Union to date. It is our view that a tailored approach is needed for a given gene therapy product in order to achieve successful marketing authorization. PMID:24649836

  14. Clinical development of gene therapy needs a tailored approach: a regulatory perspective from the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Gopalan; Cossu, Giulio; Galli, Maria Cristina; Flory, Egbert; Ovelgonne, Hans; Salmikangas, Paula; Schneider, Christian K; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues

    2014-03-01

    Gene therapy is a rapidly evolving field that needs an integrated approach, as acknowledged in the concept article on the revision of the guideline on gene transfer medicinal products. The first gene therapy application for marketing authorization was approved in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) region in 2012, the product being Alipogene tiparvovec. The regulatory process for this product has been commented on extensively, highlighting the challenges posed by such a novel technology. Here, as current or previous members of the Committee for Advanced Therapies, we share our perspectives and views on gene therapy as a treatment modality based on current common understanding and regulatory experience of gene therapy products in the European Union to date. It is our view that a tailored approach is needed for a given gene therapy product in order to achieve successful marketing authorization.

  15. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl K Edwards

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs or anti-TNF-α therapy. We used quantitative real-time PCR to compare peripheral blood gene expression profiles in active ("unstable" RA patients on DMARDs, stable RA patients on DMARDs, and stable RA patients treated with a combination of a DMARD and an anti-TNF-α agent (infliximab or etanercept to healthy human controls. The expression of 48 inflammatory genes were compared between healthy controls (N=122, unstable DMARD patients (N=18, stable DMARD patients (N=26, and stable patients on combination therapy (N=20. Expression of 13 genes was very low or undetectable in all study groups. Compared to healthy controls, patients with unstable RA on DMARDs exhibited increased expression of 25 genes, stable DMARD patients exhibited increased expression of 14 genes and decreased expression of five genes, and combined therapy patients exhibited increased expression of six genes and decreased expression of 10 genes. These findings demonstrate that active RA is associated with increased expression of circulating inflammatory markers whereas increases in inflammatory gene expression are diminished in patients with stable disease on either DMARD or anti-TNF-α therapy. Furthermore, combination DMARD and anti-TNF-α therapy is associated with greater reductions in circulating inflammatory gene expression compared to DMARD therapy alone. These results suggest that assessment of peripheral blood gene expression may prove useful to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  16. Effective gene therapy in a mouse model of prion diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Toupet

    Full Text Available Classical drug therapies against prion diseases have encountered serious difficulties. It has become urgent to develop radically different therapeutic strategies. Previously, we showed that VSV-G pseudotyped FIV derived vectors carrying dominant negative mutants of the PrP gene are efficient to inhibit prion replication in chronically prion-infected cells. Besides, they can transduce neurons and cells of the lymphoreticular system, highlighting their potential use in gene therapy approaches. Here, we used lentiviral gene transfer to deliver PrPQ167R virions possessing anti-prion properties to analyse their efficiency in vivo. Since treatment for prion diseases is initiated belatedly in human patients, we focused on the development of a curative therapeutic protocol targeting the late stage of the disease, either at 35 or 105 days post-infection (d.p.i. with prions. We observed a prolongation in the lifespan of the treated mice that prompted us to develop a system of cannula implantation into the brain of prion-infected mice. Chronic injections of PrPQ167R virions were done at 80 and 95 d.p.i. After only two injections, survival of the treated mice was extended by 30 days (20%, accompanied by substantial improvement in behaviour. This delay was correlated with: (i a strong reduction of spongiosis in the ipsilateral side of the brain by comparison with the contralateral side; and (ii a remarkable decrease in astrocytic gliosis in the whole brain. These results suggest that chronic injections of dominant negative lentiviral vectors into the brain, may be a promising approach for a curative treatment of prion diseases.

  17. Current status of gene therapy for breast cancer: progress and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    McCrudden CM; McCarthy HO

    2014-01-01

    Cian M McCrudden, Helen O McCarthySchool of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UKAbstract: Breast cancer is characterized by a series of genetic mutations and is therefore ideally placed for gene therapy intervention. The aim of gene therapy is to deliver a nucleic acid-based drug to either correct or destroy the cells harboring the genetic aberration. More recently, cancer gene therapy has evolved to also encompass delivery of RNA interference technologies, as well as c...

  18. IL-12 gene therapy for cancer: in synergy with other immunotherapies

    OpenAIRE

    Melero, I; Mazzolini, G; Narvaiza, I; Qian, C.; Chen, L.; Prieto, J

    2001-01-01

    In preclinical models of cancer, gene therapy with interleukin 12 (IL-12) has reached unprecedented levels of success when combined with immunotherapy approaches such as gene transfer of other cytokines and/or chemokines, costimulatory molecules or adoptive cell therapy. These combinations have been found to produce synergistic rather than additive effects. Meanwhile, IL-12 gene therapy is beginning clinical testing as a single agent, but combination strategies are at hand.

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy reduces ventricular arrhythmia in animal models of myocardial ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumoto,Akihisa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    It was recently reported that gene therapy using hepatocyte growth factor (HGF has the potential to preserve cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. We speculated that this HGF gene therapy could also prevent ventricular arrhythmia. To investigate this possibility, we examined the antiarrhythmic effect of HGF gene therapy in rat acute and old myocardial infarction models. Myocardial ischemia was induced by ligation of the left descending coronary artery. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ-coated liposome containing HGF genes were injected directly into the myocardium fourteen days before programmed pacing. Ventricular fibrillation (VFwas induced by programmed pacing. The VF duration was reduced and the VF threshold increased after HGF gene therapy ( p< 0.01. Histological analyses revealed that the number of vessels in the ischemic border zone was greatly increased after HGF gene injection. These findings revealed that HGF gene therapy has an anti-arrhythmic effect after myocardial ischemia.

  20. The latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongliang Pan; Lianchao Jin; Xianghua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The absence of ef ective therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) establishes the need to de-velop novel therapeutic modality, such as targeted gene therapy, which is ideal for the treatment of CRPC. But its application has been limited due to lack of favorable gene vector and the reduction of“bystander ef ect”. Consequently, scientists al over the world focus their main experimental research on the fol owing four aspects:targeted gene, vector, transfer means and comprehensive therapy. In this paper, we reviewed the latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer .

  1. ORMOPLEXEs for gene therapy: In vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, J C; Soares, A R; Domingues, I; Monteiro, G A; Gonçalves, M C

    2016-06-01

    Gene therapy stays on the cutting edge of biomedical research, being the design of the optimal gene delivery vector one of the key requests. Silica-based nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as promising non-viral gene delivery vector, due to their high biocompatibility, nontoxicity, non-immunogenicity, biodegradability and enormous bioconjugation versatility. In this work a sol-gel methodology for the synthesis of amino-functionalized silica NPs (NH2-ORMOSIL NPs) was optimized, and NPs were characterized by TEM and FTIR. In a first step NH2-ORMOSIL NPs were bioconjugated with a plasmid DNA, pVAX1-GFP, assembling an ORMOPLEXE, confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. In a second step, in vitro studies have been performed with cultured CHO cells, where ORMOPLEXEs transfection was proved by CLSM. In vivo transfection efficiency and bio-distribution were performed in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, assessed by FM. Finally, NPs ecotoxicity was studied in zebrafish embryos by following the mortality and developmental endpoints. PMID:27040249

  2. RETROVIRAL-MEDIATED SUICIDE GENE THERAPY OF EXPERIMENTAL GLIOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Lingfei; Ge Kai; Zheng Zhongcheng; Sun Lanying; Liu Xinyuan

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To establish a retroviral-mediated suicide gene therapy system for experimental glioma and test its efficacy. Methods: C6 rat glioma cells were infected with recombinant retrovirus containing HSV-tk gene. The C6/tk cell line which stably expressed tk was selected and cloned. The sensitivities of C6/tk cells to several nucleoside analogues, such as GCV, BVdU, ACV were compared by the growth inhibition studies. Antitumor effects were also observed after GCV treatment in nude mice bearing tumors derived from C6/tk cells. Results:The growth inhibition studies showed that GCV was the most efficient prodrug in this system. C6/tk cells were highly sensitive to GCV, with an IC50<0.2 μmol/L, being 500-fold less than that in tk-negative C6 cells. In vivo studies showed significant tumor inhibition in the treatment group. Conclusion: Glioma cells can be eradicated by using retroviral-mediated suicide gene system in vitro as well as in vivo.

  3. Large Animal Models for Foamy Virus Vector Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Horn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Foamy virus (FV vectors have shown great promise for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC gene therapy. Their ability to efficiently deliver transgenes to multi-lineage long-term repopulating cells in large animal models suggests they will be effective for several human hematopoietic diseases. Here, we review FV vector studies in large animal models, including the use of FV vectors with the mutant O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, MGMTP140K to increase the number of genetically modified cells after transplantation. In these studies, FV vectors have mediated efficient gene transfer to polyclonal repopulating cells using short ex vivo transduction protocols designed to minimize the negative effects of ex vivo culture on stem cell engraftment. In this regard, FV vectors appear superior to gammaretroviral vectors, which require longer ex vivo culture to effect efficient transduction. FV vectors have also compared favorably with lentiviral vectors when directly compared in the dog model. FV vectors have corrected leukocyte adhesion deficiency and pyruvate kinase deficiency in the dog large animal model. FV vectors also appear safer than gammaretroviral vectors based on a reduced frequency of integrants near promoters and also near proto-oncogenes in canine repopulating cells. Together, these studies suggest that FV vectors should be highly effective for several human hematopoietic diseases, including those that will require relatively high percentages of gene-modified cells to achieve clinical benefit.

  4. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Pro-apoptotic gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dysregulation of apoptosis contributes in a variety of ways to the malignant phenotype. It is increasingly recognized that the alteration of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic molecules determines not only escape from mechanisms that control cell cycle and DNA damage, but also endows the cancer cells with the capacity to survive in the presence of a metabolically adverse milieu, to resist the attack of the immune system, to locally invade and survive despite a lack of tissue anchorage, and to evade the otherwise lethal insults induced by drugs and radiotherapy. A multitude of apoptosis mediators has been identified in the past decade, and the roles of several of them in breast cancer have been delineated by studying the clinical correlates of pathologically documented abnormalities. Using this information, attempts are being made to correct the fundamental anomalies at the genetic level. Fundamental to this end are the design of more efficient and selective gene transfer systems, and the employment of complex interventions that are tailored to breast cancer and that are aimed concomitantly towards different components of the redundant regulatory pathways. The combination of such genetic modifications is most likely to be effective when combined with conventional treatments, thus robustly activating several pro-apoptotic pathways

  5. A preliminary step of a novel strategy in suicide gene therapy with lentiviral vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahan Afrooz Ghanbari

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this step of our strategy, we demonstrated that modification of orientation and location of promoter may overcome some issues in lentiviral suicide gene therapy, especially when toxin or apoptosis-inducing genes are used.

  6. Simultaneous gene silencing of KRAS and anti-apoptotic genes as a multitarget therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kristin; Lademann, Franziska; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; Jahnke, Beatrix; Aust, Daniela E.; Kahlert, Christoph; Weber, Georg; Weitz, Jürgen; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumor types worldwide and an effective therapy is still elusive. Targeted therapy focused against a specific alteration is by definition unable to attack broad pathway signaling modification. Tumor heterogeneity will render targeted therapies ineffective based on the regrowth of cancer cell sub-clones. Therefore multimodal therapy strategies, targeting signaling pathways simultaneously should improve treatment. SiRNAs against KRAS and the apoptosis associated genes BCLXL, FLIP, MCL1L, SURVIVIN and XIAP were transfected into human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines. Induction of apoptosis was measured by Caspase 3/7 activation, subG1 FACS analysis and PARP cleavage. The therapeutic approach was tested in a subcutaneous allograft model with a murine cancer cell line. By using siRNAs as a systematic approach to remodel signal transduction in pancreatic cancer the results showed increasing inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis induction in vitro and in vivo. Thus, siRNAs are suitable to model multimodal therapy against signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer. Improvements in in vivo delivery of siRNAs against a multitude of targets might therefore be a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26716649

  7. Simian virus 40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppenheim Ariella

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. One of the primary organs affected by sepsis is the lung, presenting as the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. Organ damage in sepsis involves an alteration in gene expression, making gene transfer a potential therapeutic modality. This work examines the feasibility of applying simian virus 40 (SV40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy. Methods Sepsis-induced ARDS was established by cecal ligation double puncture (2CLP. SV40 vectors carrying the luciferase reporter gene (SV/luc were administered intratracheally immediately after sepsis induction. Sham operated (SO as well as 2CLP rats given intratracheal PBS or adenovirus expressing luciferase served as controls. Luc transduction was evaluated by in vivo light detection, immunoassay and luciferase mRNA detection by RT-PCR in tissue harvested from septic rats. Vector abundance and distribution into alveolar cells was evaluated using immunostaining for the SV40 VP1 capsid protein as well as by double staining for VP1 and for the surfactant protein C (proSP-C. Immunostaining for T-lymphocytes was used to evaluate the cellular immune response induced by the vector. Results Luc expression measured by in vivo light detection correlated with immunoassay from lung tissue harvested from the same rats. Moreover, our results showed vector presence in type II alveolar cells. The vector did not induce significant cellular immune response. Conclusion In the present study we have demonstrated efficient uptake and expression of an SV40 vector in the lungs of animals with sepsis-induced ARDS. These vectors appear to be capable of in vivo transduction of alveolar type II cells and may thus become a future therapeutic tool.

  8. Improved virus purification processes for vaccines and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, Piergiuseppe; Peixoto, Cristina; Silva, Ricardo R J S; Alves, Paula M; Mota, José P B; Carrondo, Manuel J T

    2015-05-01

    The downstream processing of virus particles for vaccination or gene therapy is becoming a critical bottleneck as upstream titers keep improving. Moreover, the growing pressure to develop cost-efficient processes has brought forward new downstream trains. This review aims at analyzing the state-of-the-art in viral downstream purification processes, encompassing the classical unit operations and their recent developments. Emphasis is given to novel strategies for process intensification, such as continuous or semi-continuous systems based on multicolumn technology, opening up process efficiency. Process understanding in the light of the pharmaceutical quality by design (QbD) initiative is also discussed. Finally, an outlook of the upcoming breakthrough technologies is presented. PMID:25677990

  9. A novel strategy for cancer gene therapy: RNAi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Qiuwei; CAI Rong; LIU Xinyuan; QIAN Cheng

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) induces genesilencing at a level of posttranscription mediated bydouble stranded RNA. There are numerous methods for delivery of small double-stranded interference RNA (siRNA) to the target cells, including nonviral and viral vectors. Among these methods, viral vectors are the more efficient vehicles. The expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) by viral vectors in target cells can be cut by Dicer enzyme to become ~21 bp siRNA, which could guide degradation of cognate mRNA. RNAi technology can be directed against cancer using a variety of strategies, including the inhibition of overexpressed oncogenes, promoting apoptosis, regulating cell cycle, antiangiogenesis and enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Since RNAi technology has become an excellent strategy for cancer gene therapy, this review outlines the latest developments and applications of such a novel technology.

  10. Standard free droplet digital polymerase chain reaction as a new tool for the quality control of high-capacity adenoviral vectors in small-scale preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Philip; Stellberger, Thorsten; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Schulz, Eric; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Doerner, Johannes; Baiker, Armin E; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-02-01

    High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdVs) are promising tools for gene therapy as well as for genetic engineering. However, one limitation of the HCAdV vector system is the complex, time-consuming, and labor-intensive production process and the following quality control procedure. Since HCAdVs are deleted for all viral coding sequences, a helper virus (HV) is needed in the production process to provide the sequences for all viral proteins in trans. For the purification procedure of HCAdV, cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation is usually performed followed by buffer exchange using dialysis or comparable methods. However, performing these steps is technically difficult, potentially error-prone, and not scalable. Here, we establish a new protocol for small-scale production of HCAdV based on commercially available adenovirus purification systems and a standard method for the quality control of final HCAdV preparations. For titration of final vector preparations, we established a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) that uses a standard free-end-point PCR in small droplets of defined volume. By using different probes, this method is capable of detecting and quantifying HCAdV and HV in one reaction independent of reference material, rendering this method attractive for accurately comparing viral titers between different laboratories. In summary, we demonstrate that it is possible to produce HCAdV in a small scale of sufficient quality and quantity to perform experiments in cell culture, and we established a reliable protocol for vector titration based on ddPCR. Our method significantly reduces time and required equipment to perform HCAdV production. In the future the ddPCR technology could be advantageous for titration of other viral vectors commonly used in gene therapy.

  11. Advances in gene therapy and early imaging monitoring for avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy is a method that transfers foreign gene to target cells, so as to correct or compensate the disease which is caused by the gene defects and abnormalities. As a new technology, gene therapy has been used in many fields, such as cancer, cardiovascular and nervous system disease, and it brings some hope for patients with difficult and complicated disease. Avascular necrosis of femoral head is a refractory and common disease in clinical, but the traditional surgery therapy and conservative treatment both have many shortcomings,and the effect is unsatisfactory. As a new technology,gene therapy showed bright future in orthopedics ischemic disease, and its potential feasibility has been confirmed by many animal experiments. This article focuses on the research progress of gene therapy and early monitoring in the avascular necrosis of the femoral head. (authors)

  12. Facilitating Redundancy-Oriented Management with Gene-Therapy-Oriented Management Against Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyoo-Man

    2016-06-01

    This article tests the hypothesis that "if redundancy-oriented management has negative aspects, then it could be facilitated by gene-therapy-oriented management." Negative aspects include disadvantages, misjudgments, or miscalculations. The article provides a newly revised principle of disaster management by studying gene-therapy-oriented management. Based on qualitative analysis, redundancy-oriented and gene-therapy-oriented management are analyzed via five variables: governments, business, volunteers, households, and the international community. The article is valuable because an analytical frame on gene-therapy-oriented management is systematically reconceptualized for the field of disaster management via three elements: unhealthy proteins (problems or failed measures), a vector (new or modified solutions), and target cells (positive outcomes). In accepting the hypothesis, the key tenet is that stakeholders have to assist the progress of redundancy-oriented management with gene-therapy-oriented management by paying attention to the genes of each disaster. PMID:26720173

  13. Fabrication of resorbable microporous intravascular stents for gene therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasubramanian, G; Meidell, R S; Landau, C; Dollar, M L; Holt, D B; Willard, J E; Prager, M D; Eberhart, R C

    1994-01-01

    The authors have produced resorbable, microporous endoluminal stents from Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA)/Poly epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) blends. Both helical and tube stent designs have been obtained by solvent casting and flotation-precipitation fabrication techniques. A range of PLLA/PCL blend ratios and process variables were employed to investigate their influence on mechanical properties, porosity, and degradation rate. Polymer blends with higher PLLA proportions exhibit higher elastic moduli and ultimate tensile strength, and lower elongation, porosity, and degradation rates than do materials with higher PCL content. Stents with suitable mechanical properties for deployment and support of the vessel wall were obtained. Poly(ethylene oxide) was incorporated into these devices using an acid swelling technique, opening the pore structure and improving the hydrophilic character, thereby enabling the uptake of recombinant adenoviral vectors. The 50:50 PLLA/PCL blended stents were impregnated with recombinant adenovirus (AdCMB beta Gal, encoding a nuclear localizing variant of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase). Cultured CV-1 cells incubated with stents impregnated with the recombinant virus expressed nuclear localized beta-galactosidase activity, confirming that absorbed virus is released from the matrix in an infectious form, with kinetics suggesting that genetically enhanced endovascular devices of this design are feasible.

  14. Optimization of PAMAM-gold nanoparticle conjugation for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Elizabeth R; Lin, Adam Y; Yan, Jiaxi; Luo, Laureen; Foster, Aaron E; Drezek, Rebekah A

    2014-02-01

    The development of efficient and biocompatible non-viral vectors for gene therapy remains a great challenge, and exploiting the properties of both nanoparticle carriers and cationic polymers is an attractive approach. In this work, we have developed gold nanoparticle (AuNP) polyamidoamine (PAMAM) conjugates for use as non-viral transfection agents. AuPAMAM conjugates were prepared by crosslinking PAMAM dendrimers to carboxylic-terminated AuNPs via EDC and sulfo-NHS chemistry. EDC and sulfo-NHS have been utilized widely and in numerous applications such as amino acid coupling; however, their use in the coupling of PAMAM dendrimers to AuNPs presents new challenges to form effective and stable constructs for delivery that have not yet been examined. Enhanced colloidal stability and DNA condensation ability was established by probing two critical synthetic parameters: the reaction rate of the PAMAM crosslinking step, and the amine to carboxyl ratio. Based on this work, increasing the amine to carboxyl ratio during conjugation of PAMAM onto AuNPs yielded the optimal vector with respect to colloidal stability and transfection efficiency in vitro. AuPAMAM conjugates present attractive candidates for non-viral gene delivery due to their commercial availability, ease of fabrication and scale-up, high yield, high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. PMID:24286816

  15. Nanoexplosive gene therapy using triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Eun Jung; Min, Hye Jung; Choe, Jae Gol; Park, Gil Hong; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFO) labeled with Auger emitter could be ideal vehicles for delivering radiation energy to specific DNA sequences, and followed by double-stranded DNA breaks and subsequent inactivation of targeted genes. We designed TFOs targeting the selected DNA fragments (i.e., estrogen receptors and N-myc promoter) and labeled with {sup 125}I and {sup 111}In. Various Cancer cells, e.g., MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), MCF-10A (immortalized breast cells), Jurkat (T-cell leukemia), ARO (thyroid cancer), SNU-449 (Colon Caner), and HL-60 (polymyelocytic leukemia), were prepared and treated with radiolabeled TFO for 24 h. After the incubation, subcellular fractions (i.e., cell nucleus, cytoplasm and cultured medium) were collected and measured radioactivity by a gamma scintillation counter, respectively. The mean value of % injected dose for each fraction was ranged as follows: nucleus, 4.4-20%; cytoplasm, 8.2-29%; and medium, 64-87%. Therefore, we speculated that TFO labeled with Auger emitter could be a next-generation therapeutic tool in nanoexplosive gene therapy.

  16. Nanoexplosive gene therapy using triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFO) labeled with Auger emitter could be ideal vehicles for delivering radiation energy to specific DNA sequences, and followed by double-stranded DNA breaks and subsequent inactivation of targeted genes. We designed TFOs targeting the selected DNA fragments (i.e., estrogen receptors and N-myc promoter) and labeled with 125I and 111In. Various Cancer cells, e.g., MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), MCF-10A (immortalized breast cells), Jurkat (T-cell leukemia), ARO (thyroid cancer), SNU-449 (Colon Caner), and HL-60 (polymyelocytic leukemia), were prepared and treated with radiolabeled TFO for 24 h. After the incubation, subcellular fractions (i.e., cell nucleus, cytoplasm and cultured medium) were collected and measured radioactivity by a gamma scintillation counter, respectively. The mean value of % injected dose for each fraction was ranged as follows: nucleus, 4.4-20%; cytoplasm, 8.2-29%; and medium, 64-87%. Therefore, we speculated that TFO labeled with Auger emitter could be a next-generation therapeutic tool in nanoexplosive gene therapy

  17. 77 FR 65693 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... Therapies Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of October 17, 2012 (77 FR... Register of October 17, 2012, FDA announced that a meeting of the Cellular, Tissue and Gene...

  18. An evolutionary-game model of tumour-cell interactions: possible relevance to gene therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lars Arve; Bentzen, Søren; Alsner, Jan;

    2001-01-01

    interpretations of gene therapy. Two prototypical strategies for gene therapy are suggested, both of them leading to extinction of the malignant phenotype: one approach would be to reduce the relative proportion of the cooperating malignant cell type below a certain critical value. Another approach would...

  19. 76 FR 49774 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  20. 78 FR 15726 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  1. 76 FR 18768 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  2. 76 FR 64951 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  3. Thoracoscopic monitoring for pericardial application of local drug or gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, RA; Grandjean, JG; Suurmeijer, AJH; van Gilst, WH; van Veldhuisen, DJ; van Boven, AJ

    2002-01-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a promising new approach for a variety of diseases. As far as gene therapy aimed at the myocardium is concerned a new transcutaneous delivery method may be into the pericardial sac. Objective: To evaluate the safety and applicability of the percutaneous pericardial del

  4. Evaluation of β-globin gene therapy constructs in single-copy transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); K.C. Tan-Un; P. Pasceri; A. Harper; X. Wu; P.J. Fraser (Peter); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractEffective gene therapy constructs based on retrovirus or adeno-associated virus vectors will require regulatory elements that direct expression of genes transduced at single copy. Most beta-globin constructs designed for therapy of beta-thalassemias are regulated by the 5'HS2 component o

  5. Adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy: Development of an autologous cancer vaccination therapy (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Masami; Nasu,Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells (REIC)/Dickkopf (Dkk)-3 is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene and has been studied with respect to the application of cancer gene therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that the intratumoral injection of an adenovirus vector carrying the human REIC/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC) suppresses tumor growth in mouse models of prostate, breast and testicular cancer and malignant mesothelioma. The mechanisms underlying these antitumor therapeutic effects have ...

  6. Genetic disorders and the ethical status of germ-line gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, E M; Gert, B M

    1991-12-01

    Recombinant DNA technology will soon allow physicians an opportunity to carry out both somatic cell- and germ-line gene therapy. While somatic cell gene therapy raises no new ethical problems, gene therapy of gametes, fertilized eggs or early embryos does raise several novel concerns. The first issue discussed here relates to making a distinction between negative and positive eugenics; the second issue deals with the evolutionary consequences of lost genetic diversity. In distinguishing between positive and negative eugenics, the concept of malady is applied as a definitional criterion for identifying genetic disorders that could qualify for germ-line therapy. Because gene replacement techniques are currently unavailable for humans, and because even if they were possible the number of people involved would be quite small, the loss of diversity concern seems moot. Finally, we discuss the issue of iatrogenic disorders associated with gene therapy and discuss several 'real world considerations.' PMID:1787394

  7. Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Cancer Gene Therapy: Current Status

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Jingfeng; Luo, Yuxuan; Sun, Jihong; Zhou, Yurong; Zhang, Yajing; Yang, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the frontiers of modern medicine. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is becoming a promising approach to treat a variety of diseases and cancers. AAV-mediated cancer gene therapies have rapidly advanced due to their superiority to other gene-carrying vectors, such as the lack of pathogenicity, the ability to transfect both dividing and non-dividing cells, low host immune response, and long-term expression. This article reviews and provides up to date kno...

  8. Viral vectors for cystic fibrosis gene therapy: What does the future hold?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Griesenbach

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Uta Griesenbach1, Makoto Inoue2, Mamoru Hasegawa2, Eric WFW Alton11Department of Gene Therapy, Imperial College London, UK; The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium; 2DNAVEC Corporation, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: Gene transfer to the airway epithelium has been more difficult than originally anticipated, largely because of significant extra- and intracellular barriers in the lung. In general, viral vectors are more adapted to overcoming these barriers than nonviral gene transfer agents and are, therefore, more efficient in transferring genes into recipient cells. Viral vectors derived from adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and Sendai virus, which all have a natural tropism for the airway epithelium, have been evaluated for cystic fibrosis (CF gene therapy. Although these vectors transduce airway epithelial cells efficiently, gene expression is transient and repeated administration is inefficient. They are, therefore, unlikely to be suitable for CF gene therapy. More recently, lentiviruses (LV have been assessed for lung gene transfer. In contrast to retroviruses, they transduce nondividing cells and randomly integrate into the genome. However, LVs do not have a natural tropism for the lung, and a significant amount of effort has been put into pseudotyping these vectors with proteins suitable for airway gene transfer. Several studies have shown that LV-mediated transduction leads to persistent gene expression (for the lifetime of the animal in the airways and, importantly, repeated administration is feasible. Thus, appropriately pseudotyped LV vectors are promising candidates for CF gene therapy. Here, we will review preclinical and clinical research related to viral CF gene therapy.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene therapy, adenovirus, AAV, lentivirus, Sendai virus

  9. ET-67SUICIDE GENE THERAPY FOR GLIOMA USING MULTILINEAGE-DEFFERENTIATING STRESS ENDURING (MUSE) CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Wakao, Shohei; KAWAJI, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomo; Kamio, Yoshinobu; AMANO, SHINJI; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Sakai, Naoto; TOKUYAMA, TSUTOMU; Dezawa, Mari; NAMBA, HIROKI

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have been investigating cell-based glioma gene therapy using various kinds of stem cells transduced with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSVtk). In our previous study, we used SSEA3/CD105 double-positive multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells transduced with HSVtk (Muse-tk cells) as the vehicle for HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV) gene therapy. We demonstrated a potent in vitro tumoricidal bystander effect for various glioma cells. In the present stu...

  10. Clinical development of gene therapy needs a tailored approach: a regulatory perspective from the European Union.

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Gopalan; Cossu, Giulio; Galli, Maria Cristina; Flory, Egbert; Ovelgonne, Hans; Salmikangas, Paula; Schneider, Christian K; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy is a rapidly evolving field that needs an integrated approach, as acknowledged in the concept article on the revision of the guideline on gene transfer medicinal products. The first gene therapy application for marketing authorization was approved in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) region in 2012, the product being Alipogene tiparvovec. The regulatory process for this product has been commented on extensively, highlighting the challenges posed by such a novel ...

  11. Antiangiogenic Gene Therapy of Cancer Utilizing a Recombinant Adenovirus to Elevate Systemic Endostatin Levels in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Andrew L.; Restifo, Nicholas P; Alexander, H. Richard; Bartlett, David L.; Hwu, Patrick; Seth, Prem; Libutti, Steven K.

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a possible alternative to the chronic delivery of recombinant antiangiogenic proteins to cancer patients. Inducing normal host tissues to produce high circulating levels of these proteins may be more effective than targeting antiangiogenic genes to tumor tissue specifically. Previously reported gene therapy approaches in mice have achieved peak circulating endostatin levels of 8–33 ng/ml. Here we report plasma endostatin levels of 1770 ng/ml after administration of a r...

  12. Intrinsic Bio-Signature of Gene Delivery Nanocarriers May Impair Gene Therapy Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-viral lipid/polymeric vectors have widely been used as nanocarriers (NCs for gene delivery. They possess large surface area to volume ratio and are able to interact with biomolecules through functional moieties, resulting in inadvertent biological impacts, in particular at genomic level. Thus, their genomic bio-signature needs to be investigated prior to use in vivo. Using high-throughput microarray and qPCR gene expression profiling techniques, we have reported the genomic impacts of lipid/polymeric NCs. Given the fact that the ultimate objectives of gene therapy may inevitably be impaired by nonspecific intrinsic genomic impacts of these NCs, here, we highlight their nonspecific genomic bio-signature. We envision that better understanding on the genotoxicity of gene delivery NCs, as guiding premise, will help us to develop much safer NCs and also to accelerate their translation into clinical use and to provide pivotal information on safety liabilities early in discovery and developments process prior to its inevitable consequences in vivo.

  13. Sensitization of prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine induced by a replication incompetent adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficiency of cytosine deaminase adenoviral/5-fluorocytosine system on prostate cancer cell lines. METHODS: Cell culture, infectivity test and sensitivity test, observing the bystander effect and animal model experiment were carried out. RESULTS: All the established prostate cancer cell lines were eventually infectable, but ratio of vector/cell and time of exposed at which infection occurs was dependent on the cell lines. The expression of transfered cytosine deaminase gene peaked at different days, but persisted beyond 11 days. The prostate cell lines were sensitized to the 5-fluorocytosine by infection with the cytosine deaminase gene adenoviral vector, and only 5% of the LNCap and 10% of the RM-1 cells infected were required for 100% cell death. In the animal model, there was significant eradiation of tumor growth at the ratio of 400 vector particles/cell and with the systematic treatment of 5-fluorocytosine. CONCLUSION: The adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit can sensitize the prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine, and the system can significantly inhibit the growth of prostatic tumor in mice.

  14. ENHANCED ANTITUMOR EFFECTS OF SUICIDE GENE THERAPY BY SIMULTANEOUS TRANSFER OF GMCSF GENE IN LEUKEMIA-BEARING MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju Dianwen; Cao Xuetao; Yu Yizhi; Tao Qun; Wang Baomei; Wan Tao

    1998-01-01

    In the present report, antitumor effect of combined transfer of suicide gene and cytokine gene was studied.Adenovirus engineered to express E. Coli. Cytosine deaminase (AdCD) and/or adenovirus engineered toexpress murine granulocyte-macrophage colonystimulating factor (AdGMCSF) were used for the treatment of leukemia-bearing mice. The mice were inoculated s.c. With FBL-3 erythroleukemia cells and 3days later received intratumoral injection of AdCD in the presence or absence of AdGMCSF followed by intraperitoneal 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) treatment. The results demonstrated that mice received combined therapy of AdCD/5FC and AdGMCSF developed tumors most slowly and survived much longer when compared with mice treated with AdCD/5FC alone, AdGMCSF alone, AdlacZ/5FC or PBS. Combined transfer of CD gene and GM-CSF gene achieved higher specific CTL activity than control therapies. Pathological examination illustrated that the tumor mass showed obvious necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration in mice after combined therapy. The results demonstrated that combined transfer of suicide gene and cytokine gene could synergistically inhibit the growth of leukemia in mice and induce antitumor immunity of the host. The combination therapy might be a potential approach for cancer gene therapy.

  15. Potentiation of radiotherapy by a localized antiangiogenic gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We hypothesized that electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding an antiangiogenic factor, the recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM-15, (pRDD) could modify the tumor microenvironment and radiosensitize tumor. Materials and methods: pRDD was injected in the TLT tumor or FSaII fibrosarcomas before electroporation. pO2 in tumors and oxygen consumption in vitro were measured by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry. Tumor perfusion was assessed by laser doppler imaging and patent blue assay. Results: pRDD electrotransfer caused a significant delay in TLT growth and an anti-angiogenic effect. It significantly increased tumor pO2 in TLT and FSaII for at least 4 days. pRDD electrotransfer and radiotherapy were more effective than either treatment alone. Modifications of tumor microenvironment were evaluated: tumor perfusion and interstitial fluid pressure were not modified. Oxygen consumption by the cells was decreased resulting both from a decrease in oxygen consumption rate and from a decrease in cell viability. Conclusion: The combination of localized antiangiogenic gene therapy and radiotherapy applied in the time of maximal oxygenation could be a promising alternative for cancer treatment

  16. The intricacies of neurotrophic factor therapy for retinal ganglion cell rescue in glaucoma: a case for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldvari, Marianna; Chen, Ding Wen

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons is an important aspect of reversing vision loss in glaucoma patients. While current therapies can effectively lower intraocular pressure, they do not provide extrinsic support to RGCs to actively aid in their protection and regeneration. The unmet need could be addressed by neurotrophic factor gene therapy, where plasmid DNA, encoding neurotrophic factors, is delivered to retinal cells to maintain sufficient levels of neurotrophins in the retina. In this review, we aim to describe the intricacies in the design of the therapy including: the choice of neurotrophic factor, the site and route of administration and target cell populations for gene delivery. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges currently being faced in RGC-related therapy development with special considerations to the existence of multiple RGC subtypes and the lack of efficient and representative in vitro models for rapid and reliable screening in the drug development process.

  17. The intricacies of neurotrophic factor therapy for retinal ganglion cell rescue in glaucoma:a case for gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marianna Foldvari; Ding Wen Chen

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons is an important aspect of reversing vision loss in glaucoma patients. While current therapies can effectively lower intraocular pressure, they do not provide extrinsic support to RGCs to actively aid in their protection and regeneration. The unmet need could be addressed by neurotrophic factor gene therapy, where plasmid DNA, encoding neurotrophic factors, is delivered to retinal cells to maintain sufifcient levels of neurotrophins in the retina. In this review, we aim to describe the intricacies in the design of the therapy including: the choice of neurotrophic factor, the site and route of administration and target cell populations for gene delivery. Furthermore, we also dis-cuss the challenges currently being faced in RGC-related therapy development with special considerations to the existence of multiple RGC subtypes and the lack of efifcient and representativein vitro models for rapid and reliable screening in the drug development process.

  18. Photothermal combined gene therapy achieved by polyethyleneimine-grafted oxidized mesoporous carbon nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ying; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Yan, Xueying; Yao, Shuangchao; Peng, Xiyue; Wang, Yi; Huang, Rongqin

    2016-09-01

    Combining controllable photothermal therapy and efficacious gene therapy in a single platform holds great promise in cancer therapy due to the enhanced combined therapeutic effects. Herein, polyethyleneimine-grafted oxidized mesoporous carbon nanospheres (OP) were developed for combined photothermal combined gene therapy in vitro and in vivo. The synthesized OP was characterized to have three dimensional spherical structure with uniformed diameter, ordered mesopores with graphitic domains, high water dispersion with zeta potential of +22 mV, and good biocompatibility. Consequently, OP was exploited as the photothermal convertor with strong NIR absorption and the gene vector via electrostatic interaction, which therefore cannot only deliver the therapeutic gene (pING4) to tumors for gene therapy, but also can eliminate the tumors by photothermal ablation. Moreover, the improved gene therapy accompanied by the NIR photothermally enhanced gene release was also well achieved based on OP. The excellent combined therapeutic effects demonstrated in vitro and in vivo suggested the OP's potential for cancer therapy. PMID:27258483

  19. Potential of the FES-hERL PET reporter gene system - Basic evaluation for gene therapy monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Takako [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)]. E-mail: takakof@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Lohith, Talakad G. [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Takamatsu, Shinji [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Mori, Tetsuya [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Tanaka, Takeshi [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    Purpose: In vivo reporter genes can be powerful tools in supporting and ensuring the success of gene therapy. A careful and rational design of a reporter system is essential to realize a noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging system applicable for humans. We designed a new in vivo reporter gene imaging system that uses F-18-labeled estradiol (FES) and human estrogen receptor ligand (hERL) binding domain, taking advantage that FES is a radiopharmaceutical already being used for human studies with access to a wide range of tissues, including the brain, and that hERL lacking DNA binding domain can no longer work as a transcription factor, and carried out basic studies to evaluate its potential for gene therapy monitoring. Methods: We constructed a plasmid (pTIER) to coexpress a model therapeutic gene and the reporter gene hERL and transfected Cos7 cells and examined their uptake of [{sup 3}H]estradiol and FES in culture media. The uptake of FES by mouse calf muscle electroporated with pTIER was also tested. Results: The cells transfected with pTIER took up the radioligands efficiently and specifically in culture media. Also, the mouse calf muscle electroporated with pTIER accumulated a higher amount of FES than did the control. Conclusion: The data indicate that our new reporter gene system seems promising for in vivo imaging of gene expression and gene therapy monitoring.

  20. Progress of Gene-Modified Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy For Hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atil Bisgin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia represent the most common forms of hemoglobinopathies. Since the first successful bone marrow transplant in 1981, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only treatment option for the patients. However, the current routine therapies for these conditions are limited by the availability of suitable donors and graft-vs-host disease. On the other hand, hemoglobinopathies were long considered amenable to the genetic correction by available gene transfer technologies. Therefore, gene therapy strategies aim at the globin gene transfer resulting hemoglobin function recovery. Here we review the studies and clinical applications of gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies within the timeline of developed technologies, including the viral vectors, transposons, homolog recombination as a treatment modality together with generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and chimeraplasty. This brief review highlights the gene therapy strategies, current developments, challenges and future perspectives for hemoglobinopathies.

  1. Test of critical steps towards a combined cell and gene therapy approach for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kajhøj, Tine Qvistgaard; Duch, Mogens R.; Pedersen, Finn Skou;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Therapies for muscular dystrophies remain a major challenge in spite of advanced strategies using either cell or gene therapy. We here propose a combined approach of cell and gene therapy. As gene delivery vehicles with specific homing potential we have chosen mesoangioblasts which...

  2. Antiangiogenic Metargidin Peptide (AMEP) Gene Therapy in Disseminated Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Iben; Gehl, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery by electroporation is an efficient method for transfecting genes into various tissues including tumors. Here we present the treatment protocol used in a phase 1 study on gene electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding an antiangiogenic peptide into cutaneous melanoma.......Gene delivery by electroporation is an efficient method for transfecting genes into various tissues including tumors. Here we present the treatment protocol used in a phase 1 study on gene electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding an antiangiogenic peptide into cutaneous melanoma....

  3. 自杀基因联合细胞因子的癌症治疗%Combined therapy of suicide gene and cytokine gene for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红孝; 袁家英; 张建华; 潘伯荣

    2004-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION The transfer of suicide genes into tumor cells is currently being used in a variety of clinical gene therapy trials for the treatment of cancer, and suicide gene therapy is the transduction of a gene that transforms a non-toxic into a toxic substance[1].

  4. Ephrin A2 receptor targeting does not increase adenoviral pancreatic cancer transduction in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Conny T Bakker; Naoya Koizumi; Hiroyuki Mizuguchi; John G Wesseling; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To generate an adenoviral vector specifically targeting the EphA2 receptor (EphA2R) highly expressed on pancreatic cancer cells in vivo.METHODS:YSA,a small peptide ligand that binds the EphA2R with high affinity,was inserted into the HI loop of the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber knob.To further increase the specificity of this vector,binding sites for native adenoviral receptors,the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrin,were ablated from the viral capsid.The ablated retargeted adenoviral vector was produced on 293T cells.Specific targeting of this novel adenoviral vector to pancreatic cancer was investigated on established human pancreatic cancer cell lines.Upon demonstrating specific in vitro targeting,in vivo targeting to subcutaneous growing human pancreatic cancer was tested by intravenous and intraperitoneal administration of the ablated adenoviral vector.RESULTS:Ablation of native cellular binding sites reduced adenoviral transduction at least 100-fold.Insertion of the YSA peptide in the HI loop restored adenoviral transduction of EphA2R-expressing cells but not of cells lacking this receptor.YSA-mediated transduction was inhibited by addition of synthetic YSA peptide.The transduction specificity of the ablated retargeted vector towards human pancreatic cancer cells was enhanced almost 10-fold in vitro.In a subsequent in vivo study in a nude (nu/nu) mouse model however,no increased adenoviral targeting to subcutaneously growing human pancreas cancer nodules was seen upon injection into the tail vein,nor upon injection into the peritoneum.CONCLUSION:Targeting the EphA2 receptor increases specificity of adenoviral transduction of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro but fails to enhance pancreatic cancer transduction in vivo.

  5. Current status of gene therapy for breast cancer: progress and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrudden CM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cian M McCrudden, Helen O McCarthySchool of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UKAbstract: Breast cancer is characterized by a series of genetic mutations and is therefore ideally placed for gene therapy intervention. The aim of gene therapy is to deliver a nucleic acid-based drug to either correct or destroy the cells harboring the genetic aberration. More recently, cancer gene therapy has evolved to also encompass delivery of RNA interference technologies, as well as cancer DNA vaccines. However, the bottleneck in creating such nucleic acid pharmaceuticals lies in the delivery. Deliverability of DNA is limited as it is prone to circulating nucleases; therefore, numerous strategies have been employed to aid with biological transport. This review will discuss some of the viral and nonviral approaches to breast cancer gene therapy, and present the findings of clinical trials of these therapies in breast cancer patients. Also detailed are some of the most recent developments in nonviral approaches to targeting in breast cancer gene therapy, including transcriptional control, and the development of recombinant, multifunctional bio-inspired systems. Lastly, DNA vaccines for breast cancer are documented, with comment on requirements for successful pharmaceutical product development.Keywords: breast cancer, gene therapy, nonviral, clinical trial

  6. The Future of Hemophilia Treatment: Longer-Acting Factor Concentrates versus Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gene therapy is the only novel technology that currently offers the prospect of a lasting cure for hemophilia and freedom from the burden of repeated injections. Recent data from a handful of patients who have undergone gene therapy for hemophilia B are very encouraging with a sustained factor IX (FIX) level of 0.05 IU/mL maintained for over 4 years. While this level is above the current usual target trough levels, it falls well short of the level that patients on prophylaxis with longer-acting products can expect. Prophylaxis is also associated with high peak levels, which permits patients to maintain an active lifestyle. A major barrier to widespread adoption of gene therapy is a high seroprevalence of antibodies to adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in the general population. Young children would be the best candidates for gene therapy in view of much lower seroprevalence to AAV in infants. A stable level of FIX early in life would prevent the onset of joint bleeds and the development of arthropathy. The recent experience with apolipoprotein tiparvovec (Glybera; uniQure, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) indicates that gene therapy is unlikely to prove to be a cheap therapeutic option. It is also quite possible that other new technologies that do not require viral vectors (such as stem cell therapy) may overtake gene therapy during development and make it redundant. PMID:27148842

  7. Carbon nanotubes as vectors for gene therapy: past achievements, present challenges and future goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Katie; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Promising therapeutic and prophylactic effects have been achieved following advances in the gene therapy research arena, giving birth to the new generation of disease-modifying therapeutics. The greatest challenge that gene therapy vectors still face is the ability to deliver sufficient genetic payloads in order to enable efficient gene transfer into target cells. A wide variety of viral and non-viral gene therapy vectors have been developed and explored over the past 10years, including carbon nanotubes. In this review we will address the application of carbon nanotubes as non-viral vectors in gene therapy with the aim to give a perspective on the past achievements, present challenges and future goals. A series of important topics concerning carbon nanotubes as gene therapy vectors will be addressed, including the benefits that carbon nanotubes offer over other non-viral delivery systems. Furthermore, a perspective is given on what the ideal genetic cargo to deliver using carbon nanotubes is and finally the geno-pharmacological impact of carbon nanotube-mediated gene therapy is discussed.

  8. Refined human artificial chromosome vectors for gene therapy and animal transgenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuki, Y.; Hoshiya, H.; Takiguchi, M; Abe, S.; Iida, Y.; Osaki, M.; Katoh, M; Hiratsuka, M; Shirayoshi, Y; HIRAMATSU, K.; Ueno, E; Kajitani, N; Yoshino, T.; Kazuki, K; Ishihara, C.

    2010-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have several advantages as gene therapy vectors, including stable episomal maintenance, and the ability to carry large gene inserts. We previously developed HAC vectors from the normal human chromosomes using a chromosome engineering technique. However, endogenous genes were remained in these HACs, limiting their therapeutic applications. In this study, we refined a HAC vector without endogenous genes from human chromosome 21 in homologous recombination-pro...

  9. The Application of Nanoparticles in Gene Therapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    HERRANZ, FERNANDO; ALMARZA, ELENA; RODRÍGUEZ, IGNACIO; SALINAS, BEATRIZ; ROSELL, YAMILKA; DESCO, MANUEL; BULTE, JEFF W.; RUIZ-CABELLO, JESÚS

    2012-01-01

    The combination of nanoparticles, gene therapy, and medical imaging has given rise to a new field known as gene theranostics, in which a nanobioconjugate is used to diagnose and treat the disease. The process generally involves binding between a vector carrying the genetic information and a nanoparticle, which provides the signal for imaging. The synthesis of this probe generates a synergic effect, enhancing the efficiency of gene transduction and imaging contrast. We discuss the latest approaches in the synthesis of nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging, gene therapy strategies, and their conjugation and in vivo application. PMID:21484943

  10. EFFECTIVE NEW CANCER THERAPIES WHICH ARE INDEPENDENT OF P53 GENE STATUS

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Kondo, Natsuko; Mori, Eiichiro; Noda, Taichi; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    The gene product of the tumor suppressor gene p53 is known to play an important role in cancer therapy. The p53 molecule induces cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair after cells are subjected to cancer therapies involving ionizing radiation, hyperthermia and anti-cancer drugs. Patients with cancers bearing mutated (m) p53 or deleted p53 gene often have a poorer prognosis than those with cancers bearing wild-type (wt) p53 gene. We reported that efficient cell lethality by ionizing radia...

  11. Secretion of thymidine kinase to increase the effectivity of suicide gene therapy results in the loss of enzymatic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerens, A. M. J.; Rots, M. G.; Bermudez, B.; De Vries, E. F. J.; Haisma, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Low efficiency of gene transfer is one of the major limitations of gene therapy. A solution to this problem may be transmission; by modification of the transgene, the gene product can be secreted and internalized by the surrounding cells. Cancer gene therapy using the herpes simplex thymidine kinase

  12. Utilizing social media to study information-seeking and ethical issues in gene therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robillard, Julie M; Whiteley, Louise Emma; Johnson, Thomas Wade;

    2013-01-01

    The field of gene therapy is rapidly evolving, and while hopes of treating disorders of the central nervous system and ethical concerns have been articulated within the academic community, little is known about views and opinions of different stakeholder groups....

  13. Perspective on Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Modification for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Michael E; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a X-linked, progressive childhood myopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, one of the largest genes in the genome. It is characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration and dysfunction leading to cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a highly promising gene therapy vector. AAV gene therapy has resulted in unprecedented clinical success for treating several inherited diseases. However, AAV gene therapy for DMD remains a significant challenge. Hurdles for AAV-mediated DMD gene therapy include the difficulty to package the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in an AAV vector, the necessity for whole-body gene delivery, the immune response to dystrophin and AAV capsid, and the species-specific barriers to translate from animal models to human patients. Capsid engineering aims at improving viral vector properties by rational design and/or forced evolution. In this review, we discuss how to use the state-of-the-art AAV capsid engineering technologies to overcome hurdles in AAV-based DMD gene therapy. PMID:26414293

  14. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  15. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene controlled by Cfos promoter confers cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells%腺病毒介导的HSV-TK/GCV系统在Cfos启动子调控下对胶质瘤细胞的杀伤作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王浩; 潘建青; 胡继良; 冯诣; 宋伟健; 罗杰; 刘欣民; 魏强国; 洪全球

    2015-01-01

    transfected into U251 cells.The expression of EGFP was observed under a fluorescence microscope.Recombinant adenovirus infected U251 cells were cultured with 1,10,100 and 1000 μmol/L GCV to observe specific cytotoxic effect on glioma.Results The recombinant plasmid vectors Ad-CMV-TK-IRES-hrGFP and Ad-cfos-TK-IRES-hrGFP were verified by restriction endonuclease digestion digestion and sequencing.Ad-CMV-TK-IRES-hrGFP and Ad-Cfos-TK-IRES-hrGFP adenovirus were collected and purified,successfully.The titers of adenovirus reached 1 ×1010 IU/ml.In company with the rising of GCV concentration gradient (1,10,100 and 1000 μmol/L),the inhibition rate of U251 cells gradually increased (24.18%±6.01%,30.39%±9.67%,57.07%±9.29% and 94.50%±3.48%) at mutiplicity of infection (MOI) 100.In company with the rising of GCV concentration gradient (1,10,100 and 1000 μmol/L),the inhibition rate of U87 cells gradually increased (9.78%± 2.24%,86.33% ±5.06%,98.48% ±0.79% and 98.76% ±0.93) at MOI 100.Conclusion Adenoviral-mediated delivery of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene controlled by Cfos promoter can confer cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro.

  16. Worsening of Cardiomyopathy Using Deflazacort in an Animal Model Rescued by Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Luisa Rotundo; Stefania Faraso; Elvira De Leonibus; Gerardo Nigro; Carmen Vitiello; Alessio Lancioni; Daniele Di Napoli; Sigismondo Castaldo; Vincenzo Russo; Fabio Russo; Giulio Piluso; Alberto Auricchio; Vincenzo Nigro

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that gene therapy can rescue the phenotype and extend lifespan in the delta-sarcoglycan deficient cardiomyopathic hamster. In patients with similar genetic defects, steroids have been largely used to slow down disease progression. Aim of our study was to evaluate the combined effects of steroid treatment and gene therapy on cardiac function. We injected the human delta-sarcoglycan cDNA by adeno-associated virus (AAV) 2/8 by a single intraperitoneal injection in...

  17. Enhancement of plasmid-mediated gene therapy for muscular dystrophy by directed plasmid integration

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoni, Carmen; Jarrahian, Sohail; Wheeler, Thurman M.; LI, YINING; Olivares, Eric C.; Michele P Calos; Rando, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated gene therapy can restore dystrophin expression in skeletal muscle in the mdx mouse, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, sufficient long-term expression and distribution of dystrophin remain a hurdle for translating this technology into a viable treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To improve plasmid-mediated gene therapy for muscle diseases, we studied the effects of targeted plasmid integration using a phage integrase (φC31) that can mediate the integratio...

  18. RNAi-based Gene Therapy for Dominant Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian; Harper, Scott Q.

    2012-01-01

    Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) refers to a group of 25 genetic diseases linked by common clinical features, including wasting of muscles supporting the pelvic and shoulder girdles. Cardiac involvement may also occur. Like other muscular dystrophies, LGMDs are currently incurable, but prospective gene replacement therapies targeting recessive forms have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies. In contrast, little attention has been paid to developing gene therapy approaches f...

  19. Current Status and Prospects of Gene Therapy for the Inner Ear

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hong; Huang, Aji; Cao, Shousong

    2011-01-01

    Inner ear diseases are common and often result in hearing disability. Sensorineural hearing loss is the main cause of hearing disability. So far, no effective treatment is available although some patients may benefit from a hearing aid equipped with a hearing amplifier or from cochlear implantation. Inner ear gene therapy has become an emerging field of study for the treatment of hearing disability. Numerous new discoveries and tremendous advances have been made in inner ear gene therapy incl...

  20. Development of gene therapy: potential in severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Bobby Gaspar, H

    2009-01-01

    Claudia A Montiel-Equihua, Adrian J Thrasher, H Bobby GasparCentre for Immunodeficiency, Molecular Immunology Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UKAbstract: The history of stem cell gene therapy is strongly linked to the development of gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and especially adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID. Here we discuss the developments achieved in over two decades of clinical and laboratory research that led to the establishment of a pr...

  1. Development of gene therapy: potential in severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Thrasher, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Claudia A Montiel-Equihua, Adrian J Thrasher, H Bobby GasparCentre for Immunodeficiency, Molecular Immunology Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UKAbstract: The history of stem cell gene therapy is strongly linked to the development of gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and especially adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID. Here we discuss the developments achieved in over two decades of clinical and laboratory research that led to the establishment of a pr...

  2. Clostridial spores as live 'Trojan horse' vectors for cancer gene therapy: comparison with viral delivery systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Q. Wei; Ren, Ruimei; Good, David; Anné, Jozef

    2008-01-01

    Solid tumours account for 90% of all cancers. Gene therapy represents a potential new modality for their treatment. Up to now, several approaches have been developed, but the most efficient ones are the viral vector based gene therapy systems. However, viral vectors suffer from several deficiencies: firstly most vectors currently in use require intratumoural injection to elicit an effect. This is far from ideal as many tumours are inaccessible and many may have already spread to other parts o...

  3. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Giles

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals.

  4. Near-infrared light triggered photodynamic therapy in combination with gene therapy using upconversion nanoparticles for effective cancer cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Kai; Yang, Guangbao; Cheng, Liang; He, Lu; Liu, Yumeng; Li, Yonggang; Guo, Liang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-07-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via resonance energy transfer from UCNPs to photosensitizer Ce6, while the residual upconversion luminescence is utilized for imaging. On the other hand, the silencing of Plk1 induced by siRNA delivered with UCNPs could induce significant cancer cell apoptosis. As the result of such combined photodynamic and gene therapy, a remarkably enhanced cancer cell killing effect is realized. Our work thus highlights the promise of UCNPs for imaging guided combination therapy of cancer.Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via

  5. Effective gene-viral therapy for telomerase-positive cancers by selective replicative-competent adenovirus combining with endostatin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Q; Liu C; Jiang M; Fang G; Liu X; Wu M; Qian Q; Nie M; Sham J; Su C; Xue H; Chua D; Wang W; Cui Z; Liu Y

    2005-01-01

    Gene-viral therapy, which uses replication-selective transgene-expressing viruses to manage tumors, can exploit the virtues of gene therapy and virotherapy and overcome the limitations of conventional gene therapy. Using a human telomerase reverse transcriptase-targeted replicative adenovirus as an antiangiogenic gene transfer vector to target new angiogenesis and making use of its unrestrained proliferation are completely new concepts in tumor management. CNHK300-mE is a selective replication transgene-expressing adenovirus constructed to carry mouse endostatin gene therapeutically. Infection with CNHK300-mE was associated with selective replication of the adenovirus and production of mouse endostatin in telomerase-positive cancer cells. Endostatin secreted from a human gastric cell line, SGC-7901, infected with CNHK300-mE was significantly higher than that infected with nonreplicative adenovirus Ad-mE in vitro (800±94.7 ng/ml versus 132.9±9.9 ng/ml) and in vivo (610±42 ng/ml versus 126 +/- 13 ng/ml). Embryonic chorioallantoic membrane assay showed that the mouse endostatin secreted by CNHK300-mE inhibited angiogenesis efficiently and also induced distortion of pre-existing vasculature. CNHK300-mE exhibited a superior suppression of xenografts in nude mice compared with CNHK300 and Ad-mE. In summary, we provided a more efficient gene-viral therapy strategy by combining oncolysis with antiangiogenesis.

  6. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs.

  7. Combination effect of oncolytic adenovirus therapy and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir in hepatic carcinoma animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-qun ZHENG; Yin XU; Ren-jie YANG; Bin WU; Xiao-hua TAN; Yi-de QIN; Qun-wei ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Oncolytic adenovirus, also called conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD), can selectively propagate in tumor cells and cause cell lysis. The released viral progeny can infect neighboring cancer cells, initiating a cascade that can lead to the ultimate destruction of the tumor. Suicide gene therapy using herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) and ganciclovir (GCV) offers a potential treatment strategy for cancer and is undergoing preclinical trials for a variety of tumors.We hypothesized that HSV-TK gene therapy combined with oncolytic adenoviral therapy would have an enhanced effect compared with the individual effects of the therapies and is a potential novel therapeutic strategy to treat liver cancer. Methods: To address our hypothesis, a novel CRAD was created, which consisted of a telomerase-dependent oncolytic adenovirus engineered to express E1A and HSV-TK genes (Ad-ETK). The combined effect of Ad-ETK and GCV was assessed both in vitro and in vivo in nude mice bearing HepG2 cell-derived tumors. Expression of the therapeutic genes by the transduced tumor cells was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting.Results: We confirmed that Ad-ETK had antitumorigenic effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) both in vitro and in vivo, and the TK/GCV system enhanced oncolytic adenoviral therapy. We confirmed that both E1A and HSV-TK genes were expressed in vivo.Conclusion: The Ad-ETK construct should provide a relatively safe and selective approach to killing cancer cells and should be investigated as an adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. Gene Therapy of T Helper Cells in HIV Infection. Mathematical Model of the Criteria for Clinical Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Lund, Ole søgaard; Gram, Gregers;

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of the criteria for gene therapy of T helper cells to have a clinical effect on HIV infection. Our main results are that the therapy should be designed to give the transduced cells a significant but not necessarily total protection against HIV-induced cell...... deaths, and to avoid the production of viral mutants that are insensitive to gene therapy. The transduced cells will not survive if the gene therapy only blocks the spread of virus....

  9. Genetic treatment of a molecular disorder: gene therapy approaches to sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Megan D; Orkin, Stuart H; Bauer, Daniel E

    2016-02-18

    Effective medical management for sickle cell disease (SCD) remains elusive. As a prevalent and severe monogenic disorder, SCD has been long considered a logical candidate for gene therapy. Significant progress has been made in moving toward this goal. These efforts have provided substantial insight into the natural regulation of the globin genes and illuminated challenges for genetic manipulation of the hematopoietic system. The initial γ-retroviral vectors, next-generation lentiviral vectors, and novel genome engineering and gene regulation approaches each share the goal of preventing erythrocyte sickling. After years of preclinical studies, several clinical trials for SCD gene therapies are now open. This review focuses on progress made toward achieving gene therapy, the current state of the field, consideration of factors that may determine clinical success, and prospects for future development.

  10. Construction and characterization of gelonin and saporin plasmids for toxic gene-based cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-05-01

    Toxic gene therapy (or suicidal gene therapy) is gaining enormous interest, specifically for the treatment of cancer. The success of this therapy lies in several crucial factors, including the potency of gene products to kill the transfected tumor cells and the transfection ability of the transfection vehicles. To address the potency problem, in the present study, we engineered two separate mammalian transfection plasmids (pSAP and pGEL) containing genes encoding ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), gelonin and saporin. After the successful preparation and amplification of the plasmids, they were tested on various cancer cell lines (HeLa, U87, 9L, and MDA-MB-435) and a noncancerous cell line (293 HEK) using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as the transfection agent. Transfection studies performed under varying gene concentration, incubation time, and gene-to-PEI ratios revealed that, compared to the treatment of pGFP (GFP expression plasmid)/PEI, both pGEL/PEI and pSAP/PEI complexes could induce significantly augmented cytotoxic effects at only 2 μg/mL gene concentration. Importantly, these cytotoxic effects were observed universally in all tested cancer cell lines. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of pGEL and pSAP as effective gene candidates for the toxic gene-based cancer therapy. PMID:27008027

  11. Cytosine deaminase adenoviral vector and 5-fluorocytosine selectively reduce breast cancer cells 1 million-fold when they contaminate hematopoietic cells: a potential purging method for autologous transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sanchez, F; Pizzorno, G; Fu, S Q; Nanakorn, T; Krause, D S; Liang, J; Adams, E; Leffert, J J; Yin, L H; Cooperberg, M R; Hanania, E; Wang, W L; Won, J H; Peng, X Y; Cote, R; Brown, R; Burtness, B; Giles, R; Crystal, R; Deisseroth, A B

    1998-07-15

    Ad.CMV-CD is a replication incompetent adenoviral vector carrying a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-driven transcription unit of the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene. The CD transcription unit in this vector catalyzes the deamination of the nontoxic pro-drug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), thus converting it to the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This adenoviral vector prodrug activation system has been proposed for use in selectively sensitizing breast cancer cells, which may contaminate collections of autologous stem cells products from breast cancer patients, to the toxic effects of 5-FC, without damaging the reconstitutive capability of the normal hematopoietic cells. This system could conceivably kill even the nondividing breast cancer cells, because the levels of 5-FU generated by this system are 10 to 30 times that associated with systemic administration of 5-FU. The incorporation of 5-FU into mRNA at these high levels is sufficient to disrupt mRNA processing and protein synthesis so that even nondividing cells die of protein starvation. To test if the CD adenoviral vector sensitizes breast cancer cells to 5-FC, we exposed primary explants of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) and the established breast cancer cell (BCC) lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 to the Ad.CMV-CD for 90 minutes. This produced a 100-fold sensitization of these epithelial cells to the effects of 48 hours of exposure to 5-FC. We next tested the selectivity of this system for BCC. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), collected from cancer patients during the recovery phase from conventional dose chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, were exposed to the Ad.CMV-CD for 90 minutes in serum-free conditions, little or no detectable conversion of 5-FC into 5-FU was seen even after 48 hours of exposure to high doses of 5-FC. In contrast, 70% of 5-FC was converted into the cytotoxic agent 5-FU when MCF-7 breast cancer cells (BCCs) were exposed to the same Ad.CMV-CD vector followed by 5-FC for

  12. Nonviral Gene Therapy of the Nervous System: Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xue-Feng; Fan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation has been widely used to efficiently transfer foreign genes into the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), and thus plays an important role in gene therapeutic studies on some brain disorders. A lot of work concerning electroporation is focused on gene transfer into rodent brains. This technique involves an injection of nucleic acids into the brain ventricle or specific area and then applying appropriate electrical field to the injected area. Here, we briefly introduced the advantages and the basic procedures of gene transfer into the rodent brain using electroporation. Better understanding of electroporation in rodent brain may further facilitate gene therapeutic studies on brain disorders.

  13. Gene expression studies on human keratinocytes transduced with human growth hormone gene for a possible utilization in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking advantage of the recent progress in the DNA-recombinant techniques and of the potentiality of normal human keratinocytes primary culture to reconstitute the epidermis, it was decided to genetically transform these keratinocytes to produce human growth hormone under controllable conditions that would be used in gene therapy at this hormone deficient patients. The first step to achieve this goal was to standardize infection of keratinocytes with retrovirus producer cells containing a construct which included the gene of bacterial b-galactosidase. The best result was obtained cultivating the keratinocytes for 3 days in a 2:1 mixture of retrovirus producer cells and 3T3-J2 fibroblasts irradiated with 60 Gy, and splitting these infected keratinocytes on 3T3-J2 fibroblasts feeder layer. Another preliminary experiment was to infect normal human keratinocytes with interleukin-6 gene (hIL-6) that, in pathologic conditions, could be reproduced by keratinocytes and secreted to the blood stream. Thus, we verify that infected keratinocytes secrete an average amount of 500 ng/106 cell/day of cytokin during the in vitro life time, that certify the stable character of the injection. These keratinocytes, when grafted in mice, secrete hIL-6 to the blood stream reaching levels of 40 pg/ml of serum. After these preliminary experiments, we construct a retroviral vector with the human growth hormone gene (h GH) driven by human metallothionein promoter (h PMT), designated DChPMTGH. Normal human keratinocytes were infected with DChPMTGH producer cells, following previously standardized protocol, obtaining infected keratinocytes secreting to the culture media 340 ng h GH/106 cell/day without promoter activation. This is the highest level of h GH secreted in human keratinocytes primary culture described in literature. The h GH value increases approximately 10 times after activation with 100 μM Zn+2 for 8-12 hours. (author). 158 refs., 42 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Preclinical Efficacy and Safety Profile of Allometrically Scaled Doses of Doxycycline Used to Turn "On" Therapeutic Transgene Expression from High-Capacity Adenoviral Vectors in a Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderVeen, Nathan; Raja, Nicholas; Yi, Elizabeth; Appelman, Henry; Ng, Philip; Palmer, Donna; Zamler, Daniel; Dzaman, Marta; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most commonly occurring primary brain cancer in adults, in whom its highly infiltrative cells prevent total surgical resection, often leading to tumor recurrence and patient death. Our group has discovered a gene therapy approach for GBM that utilizes high-capacity "gutless" adenoviral vectors encoding regulatable therapeutic transgenes. The herpes simplex type 1-thymidine kinase (TK) actively kills dividing tumor cells in the brain when in the presence of the prodrug, ganciclovir (GCV), whereas the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) is an immune-stimulatory molecule under tight regulation by a tetracycline-inducible "Tet-On" activation system that induces anti-GBM immunity. As a prelude to a phase I clinical trial, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved doses of the tetracycline doxycycline (DOX) allometrically scaled for rats. DOX initiates the expression of Flt3L, which has been shown to recruit dendritic cells to the brain tumor microenvironment-an integral first step in the development of antitumor immunity. The data revealed a highly safe profile surrounding these human-equivalent doses of DOX under an identical therapeutic window as proposed in the clinical trial. This was confirmed through a neuropathological analysis, liver and kidney histopathology, detection of neutralizing antibodies, and systemic toxicities in the blood. Interestingly, we observed a significant survival advantage in rats with GBM receiving the 300 mg/day equivalent dosage of DOX versus the 200 mg/day equivalent. Additionally, rats rejected "recurrent" brain tumor threats implanted 90 days after their primary brain tumors. We also show that DOX detection within the plasma can be an indicator of optimal dosing of DOX to attain therapeutic levels. This work has significant clinical relevance for an ongoing phase I clinical trial in humans with primary GBM and for other therapeutic approaches using

  15. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease: advances in vector development, targeting, and delivery for clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Melvin Y; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of inherited and acquired cardiovascular diseases. The identification of the molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure and other associated cardiac diseases led to encouraging preclinical gene therapy studies in small and large animal models. However, the initial clinical results yielded only modest or no improvement in clinical endpoints. The presence of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses directed against the viral vector and/or the gene-modified cells, the insufficient gene expression levels, and the limited gene transduction efficiencies accounted for the overall limited clinical improvements. Nevertheless, further improvements of the gene delivery technology and a better understanding of the underlying biology fostered renewed interest in gene therapy for heart failure. In particular, improved vectors based on emerging cardiotropic serotypes of the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) are particularly well suited to coax expression of therapeutic genes in the heart. This led to new clinical trials based on the delivery of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase protein (SERCA2a). Though the first clinical results were encouraging, a recent Phase IIb trial did not confirm the beneficial clinical outcomes that were initially reported. New approaches based on S100A1 and adenylate cyclase 6 are also being considered for clinical applications. Emerging paradigms based on the use of miRNA regulation or CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering open new therapeutic perspectives for treating cardiovascular diseases by gene therapy. Nevertheless, the continuous improvement of cardiac gene delivery is needed to allow the use of safer and more effective vector doses, ultimately bringing gene therapy for heart failure one step closer to reality.

  16. [Protection of corneal endothelium from apoptosis by gene and cell therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsluger, T A

    2016-06-01

    Protection of corneal endothelium from apoptosis using gene and cell therapy is in a translational phase. This approach offers advantages for eye banking and after transplantation. Safe vehicles for gene or cell therapeutic transduction of corneal endothelium with nucleic acids are available. This strategy will be further developed in consultation with the Paul Ehrlich Institute and European regulatory authorities.

  17. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Therapeutic genetic correction strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy is a therapeutic approach that is designed to correct specific molecular defects that contribute to the cause or progression of cancer. Genes that are mutated or deleted in cancers include the cancer susceptibility genes p53 and BRCA1. Because mutational inactivation of gene function is specific to tumor cells in these settings, cancer gene correction strategies may provide an opportunity for selective targeting without significant toxicity for normal nontumor cells. Both p53 and BRCA1 appear to inhibit cancer cells that lack mutations in these genes, suggesting that the so-called gene correction strategies may have broader potential than initially believed. Increasing knowledge of cancer genetics has identified these and other genes as potential targets for gene replacement therapy. Initial patient trials of p53 and BRCA1 gene therapy have provided some indications of potential efficacy, but have also identified areas of basic and clinical research that are needed before these approaches may be widely used in patient care

  18. Gene therapy in an era of emerging treatment options for hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, P E

    2015-06-01

    Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B) is less common than factor VIII deficiency (hemophilia A), and innovations in therapy for hemophilia B have generally lagged behind those for hemophilia A. Recently, the first sustained correction of the hemophilia bleeding phenotype by clotting factor gene therapy has been described using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver factor IX. Despite this success, many individuals with hemophilia B, including children, men with active hepatitis, and individuals who have pre-existing natural immunity to AAV, are not eligible for the current iteration of hemophilia B gene therapy. In addition, recent advances in recombinant factor IX protein engineering have led some hemophilia treaters to reconsider the urgency of genetic cure. Current clinical and preclinical approaches to advancing AAV-based and alternative approaches to factor IX gene therapy are considered in the context of current demographics and treatment of the hemophilia B population. PMID:26149016

  19. Targeting a newly established spontaneous feline fibrosarcoma cell line by gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rounak Nande

    Full Text Available Fibrosarcoma is a deadly disease in cats and is significantly more often located at classical vaccine injections sites. More rare forms of spontaneous non-vaccination site (NSV fibrosarcomas have been described and have been found associated to genetic alterations. Purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of adenoviral gene transfer in NVS fibrosarcoma. We isolated and characterized a NVS fibrosarcoma cell line (Cocca-6A from a spontaneous fibrosarcoma that occurred in a domestic calico cat. The feline cells were karyotyped and their chromosome number was counted using a Giemsa staining. Adenoviral gene transfer was verified by western blot analysis. Flow cytometry assay and Annexin-V were used to study cell-cycle changes and cell death of transduced cells. Cocca-6A fibrosarcoma cells were morphologically and cytogenetically characterized. Giemsa block staining of metaphase spreads of the Cocca-6A cells showed deletion of one of the E1 chromosomes, where feline p53 maps. Semi-quantitative PCR demonstrated reduction of p53 genomic DNA in the Cocca-6A cells. Adenoviral gene transfer determined a remarkable effect on the viability and growth of the Cocca-6A cells following single transduction with adenoviruses carrying Mda-7/IL-24 or IFN-γ or various combination of RB/p105, Ras-DN, IFN-γ, and Mda-7 gene transfer. Therapy for feline fibrosarcomas is often insufficient for long lasting tumor eradication. More gene transfer studies should be conducted in order to understand if these viral vectors could be applicable regardless the origin (spontaneous vs. vaccine induced of feline fibrosarcomas.

  20. Gene targeting in melanoma therapy: exploiting of surface markers and specific promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverdlov E. D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems of gene therapy of melanoma is effective expression of therapeutic gene in tumor cells and their metastases but not in normal cells. In this review, we will consider a two-step approach to a highly specific gene therapy. At the first step, therapeutic genes are delivered specifically to tumor cells using cell surface markers of melanoma cells as targets. At the second step, a specific expression of the therapeutic genes in tumor cells is ensured. Surface markers of melanoma cells were analyzed as potential targets for therapeutic treatment. Criteria for choosing the most promising targets are proposed. The use of specific melanoma promoters allows to further increase the specificity of treatment via transcriptional control of therapeutic gene expression in melanoma cells.