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Sample records for adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

  1. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

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    Ahn, Hyung Kyu [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-11-15

    A 18-year-old man had a painless swelling in the right anterior portion of maxilla for 2 years. On radiographic examination, a radiolucent region that was not associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Small scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the cystic lumen. At second case, a 16-year-old girl had a painless swelling in the anterior portion of maxilla for 3 years. On radio graphic examination, a radiolucent region that associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Multiple scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the radiolucent cystic lumen. With the patient under local anesthesia, well encapsulated tumors were enucleated. The diagnosis made in the pathologist's report was Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor, benign lesion often having distinct clinical and radiographic features.

  2. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, an uncommon tumor

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    K Vasudevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT in the maxilla in a young girl aged 14 years and its surgical management. We also review the literature and variations in the nomenclature and classifications of this interesting tumor. The review of literature gives an interesting picture regarding terminologies in the past and dilemma in classifying this tumor. The introduction of the name adenomatoid odontogenic tumour has resulted in the simpler and fruitful surgical management like enucleation and curettage with no reports of recurrences. In the past, similar lesion with the terminology like adeno ameloblastoma has resulted in unnecessary mutilating surgery. The conflicting views whether the lesion is being neoplasm or an anomalous hamartomatous growth is also being discussed.

  3. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of the mandible

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    Kailasam Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is a benign odontogenic tumor, which presents as a noninvasive lesion of the jaws with slow but progressive growth. AOT is often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. It accounts for about 2.2 to 7.1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is predominantly seen in young females, in the anterior maxilla, associated with unerupted canines. This report describes a rare case of AOT in the mandible. This paper highlights the controversies regarding its origin and management in the light of recent findings.

  4. Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor - Report of Three Cases

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    Avinash Kshar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT is a benign epithelial tumor that accounts for 3% of all odontogenic tumors. This tumor, most commonly found in maxillary arch, mimics a follicular cyst associated with an impacted tooth. Clinically, it presents as a slowly growing, painless mass, found more frequently in female patients and has a peak incidence in the second decade of life. Ranking four among the odontogenic tumors the AOT is not a particularly rare tumor. Surgical enucleation is the treatment of choice and recurrences have not been reported. In this article three cases of AOT are presented with characteristic clinical, radiographic and histological features.

  5. A Huge Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor of Maxilla

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    Balasundari Shreedhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is a benign, nonneoplastic (hamartomatous lesion with a slow progressing growth. It occurs in both intraosseous and peripheral forms. This paper reports the case of a female aged 16 years who presented with a swelling in anterior maxilla; canine was missing, and a supernumerary tooth was present in the mid line. Radiology revealed a well-defined radiolucent area associated with impacted canine and root resorption of adjacent teeth, which was diagnosed histopathologically as AOT. The patient was treated surgically and later rehabilitated with fixed prosthesis.

  6. Follicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandible: A Rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multicystic ameloblastoma.[2]. WHO in 1971 adopted the term “adenomatoid odontogenic tumor” proposed by Philipsen and Birn[3,4] and defined the lesion as, “a tumor of odontogenic epithelium with duct-like structures and with varying degrees of inductive changes in the connective tissue. The tumor may be partly cystic, ...

  7. Follicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandible: A Rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively rare, benign, hamartomatous, and cystic odontogenic neoplasm that was first described more than a century ago. The lesion still continues to intrigue experts with its varied histomorphology and controversies regarding its development. The present article describes a ...

  8. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: correlation of MRI with histopathological findings

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    Konouchi, Hironobu; Asaumi, Jun-ichi E-mail: asaumi@md.okayama-u.ac.jp; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Hisatomi, Miki; Kishi, Kanji

    2002-10-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is a rare benign and odontogenic tumor that is frequently misdiagnosed as other odontogenic cysts and tumors on radiographic examination. To acquire additional information of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, we performed magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) at a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor. The lesion was divided between the peripheral portion with a thick circular shape and the central portion with a round shape on the basis of the signal intensity (SI) of MRI. The peripheral portion showed intermediate SI contained multifocal no SI on T1WI, high SI contained multifocal no SI on T2WI, and heterogeneous enhancement on CE-T1WI. These multifocal areas corresponded to the numerous punctate radiopaque foci shown on computed tomography. The central portion showed homogeneous low SI on T1WI, homogeneous very high SI on T2WI, and no enhancement on CE-T1WI. Macroscopic examination revealed the round shaped lesion included one large cystic space correspondent to the central portion with a clear cystic wall correspondent to the peripheral portion on MRI. The MRI features corresponded to the macroscopic findings of the histopathological examination.

  9. Study on the origin and nature of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumor by immunohistochemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcelo Macedo Crivelini; Ana Maria Pires Soubhia; Renata Callestini Felipini

    2005-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a clinically benign lesion. Discussions about the AOT hamartomatous or neoplastic nature, and the probable odontogenic epithelial cell it originates from still exist...

  10. An Unusual Site of Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor Presenting as Periapical (Radicular Cyst: A Rare Case Report

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    C Anand Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Here we are presenting a rare case report of an unusual site of extrafollicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in the mandible w.r.t 32, 33, 34 and 35 mimicking periapical disease clinical and radiographically. However, diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor should be considered when the clinician is presented with a corticated radiolucency in the anterior lower jaw, especially in teens and young adults.

  11. Comparative immunohistochemical study of Bcl-X in ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

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    Shukla, Payal; Prabhu, Sudeendra; Jose, Maji; Sripathi Rao, B H

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Since its recognition as a physiologic process associated with tumor, among molecular mechanisms involved in tumor progression, defects in regulation of apoptosis have generated an accelerating volume of research that has sought to elucidate the role of programed cell death in pathogenesis and treatment of various tumors. Therefore, this study was performed to understand better the diverse biological profile of epithelial odontogenic tumors with the help of immunohistochemical expression of Bcl-X protein. Materials and Methods: We studied Bcl-X protein expression in 45 cases of epithelial odontogenic tumors which included 15 cases each of ameloblastomas, keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) and correlated the expression with their growth pattern. Results: Cytoplasmic staining of Bcl-X revealed overexpression in ameloblastoma when compared to KCOT and AOT. Percentage of positive cells showed a statistically significant difference, P = 0.007 between ameloblastoma and KCOT, whereas P odontogenic tumors show diverse growth profiles. An increased Bcl-X expression was seen in ameloblastoma compared to KCOT and least expression in case of AOT which could be indicative of more aggressive biological behavior and increased cell survival activity of ameloblastoma than KCOT and AOT. This signifies the diagnostic relevance of this biomarker and also could be a possible regulator of the proliferative compartment by contributing in tumor progression and cytodifferentiation of epithelial odontogenic tumors. PMID:28479687

  12. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with peripheral cemento-osseous reactive proliferation: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

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    Naidu, Aparna; Slater, Lee J; Hamao-Sakamoto, Aya; Waters, Patrick; Kessler, Harvey P; Wright, John M

    2016-09-01

    Two cases of a rare variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor encompassed by a prominent reactive cemento-osseous proliferation are reported. This unique variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor has only been seen twice in the authors' collective experience. Literature documenting the histopathologic patterns of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and the occurrence of other combined lesions other is reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

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    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  14. Tumor odontógeno adenomatoide en región mandibular Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in mandibular region

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    Ernesto Sánchez Cabrales

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El tumor odontogénico adenomatoide es un tumor poco frecuente derivado del epitelio odontontogénico, que contiene estructuras canaliculares con modificaciones inductivas de intensidad variable en el tejido conjuntivo. Es una lesión de crecimiento lento y poco invasiva pero que se puede asemejar a otras lesiones odontógenas de mayor agresividad como el quiste dentígero y el ameloblastoma entre otros. Su localización clásica (área de caninos superiores nos orienta al diagnóstico y su patrón histológico ductiforme es muy propio de este tumor. Otros tumores que se encuentran dentro de este grupo son el fibroma ameloblástico, el odontoameloblastoma, el quiste odontógeno calcificante y los odontomas compuesto y complejo. Este grupo de lesiones puede o no tener formaciones de tejido duro dental dentro de ellos. Por esta razón, se presenta un paciente con este tipo de tumor, al que se le realizó estudio histopatológico, se revisó la literatura acerca de este tumor odontogénico benigno y sus características clínicas, radiográficas, tratamiento, así como los diagnósticos diferenciales que se deben tener en cuenta.The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is an uncommon neoplasm derivative of the odontogenic epithelium containing canalicular structures with inductor modifications of variable intensity in the conjunctival tissue. It is a slow growth lesion and no much invasive but that may to be similar to other odontogenic lesions more aggressive including the dentigerous cyst and the ameloblastoma among others. Its classical location (upper canine area guides us to diagnosis and its duct histological pattern is very typical of this tumor. Other tumors included in this group are the ameloblastic fibroma, the ameloblastic odontoma, the calcified odontogenic cyst and composed and complex odontomas. This group of lesions may or not to have formations of hard tissue inside. Thus, authors present the case of a patient presenting with this type of

  15. A case report of Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in the mandibular anterior region

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    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Kwon, Kyung Hwan; Paeng, Jun Young [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a tumor of odontogenic epithelium with varying degrees of inductive changes in the connective tissue. The common radiographic appearance of AOT is a unilocular radiolucency associated with an unerupted tooth. Detectable radiopacities are reported in many cases. We present a case of AOT in a 9-year old-female patient. Cystic lesion with numerous, punctuate radiopaque foci was seen on the anterior region of the mandible. These radiopacities mostly were situated on the buccal side of impacted tooth on the multiplanar images of cone beam computed tomograph. Characteristic duct like structures and amyloid like material were observed on histopathologic finding.

  16. Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor − A Report of Two Cases with Histopathology Correlation

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    Pavitra Baskaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is an uncommon, hamartomatous, benign, epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin that was first described by Driebaldt in 1907, as a pseudo-adenoameloblastoma. The current World Health Organisation (WHO classification of odontogenic tumors defines AOT as being composed of the odontogenic epithelium in a variety of histoarchitectural patterns, embedded in mature connective tissue stroma, and characterized by slow, but progressive growth. The current article reports two cases with different presentations; first in a young female patient and the second in a middle-aged male patient. The importance of biopsy, which is the gold standard for diagnosis, and its use in planning of the treatment is discussed.

  17. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia.

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    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias.

  18. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of the mandible with unusual radiographic features: A case report

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    Narayanan, Veena S. [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Coorg Institute of Dental Sciences, Virajpe (India); Naidu, Giridhar; Haldar, Maya [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Peoples' Dental Academy, Bhopal (India); Ragavendra, Raju; Mhaske-Jedhe, Shubang [Dept. of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Peoples' Dental Academy, Bhopal (India)

    2013-06-15

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) usually presents as a unilocular, pericoronal radiolucency in the maxillary anterior region in adolescent females. Very few conditions occur in such a narrow age range and at such a restrictive site. Rarely, these tumors present with varied clinical features. A case of AOT of the mandible is reported with unusual features such as large size, multilocular appearance, and aggressive behavior. The role of radiology in diagnosis of atypical AOT is extremely important. The unique radiological manifestations of the lesion helped in the diagnosis, and it was managed conservatively with no evidence of recurrence.

  19. Concomitant occurrence of cemento-ossifying fibroma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with bilateral impacted permanent canines in the mandible.

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    Prakash, A Ravi; Reddy, P Sreenivas; Bavle, Radhika M

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon, benign and slow growing odontogenic tumor, which is usually located in an anterior region of the maxilla without pain. Cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF) is a relatively rare benign tumor of the jaw. Here we present 2 lesions presenting in unusual forms, follicular variant of AOT in the mandible and COF associated with impacted canine in the mandible, occurring concomitantly in the same patient. Both lesions presented classic histopathologic features.

  20. Immunoexpression of integrins in ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, and human tooth germs.

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    de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa; de Almeida Freitas, Roseana; Pereira Pinto, Leão; Batista de Souza, Lélia

    2008-07-01

    The expression of integrins alpha2beta1, alpha3beta1, and alpha5beta1 in 30 ameloblastomas (20 solid and 10 unicystic tumors), 12 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs), and 5 human tooth germs in different stages of odontogenesis was analyzed. The distribution, location, pattern, and intensity of immunohistochemical expression were evaluated. Intensity was analyzed using scores (0 = absence, 1 = weak staining, and 2 = strong staining). No difference in the immunoexpression of the integrins was observed between solid and unicystic ameloblastomas. When these two ameloblastoma types were pooled into a single group, the following significant differences were found: immunoexpression of integrin alpha2beta1 was stronger in ameloblastomas than in AOTs and tooth germs, and the expression of integrin alpha5beta1 was stronger in ameloblastomas than in AOTs. The lack of detection of integrin alpha3beta1 in tooth germs and its detection in the odontogenic tumors studied suggest that this integrin might be used as a marker of neoplastic transformation in odontogenic tissues.

  1. Overexpression of MDM2 protein in ameloblastomas as compared to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

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    A Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies on odontogenic tumors have identified various molecular alterations responsible for their development, and determination of epithelial proliferation is a useful means of investigating the differences in biologic behavior of these tumors. One such specific marker to identify proliferative activity and tumor aggressiveness by immunohistochemistry (IHC is MDM2, 90-95kDa protein. Objective: This immunohistochemical study using MDM2 expression was undertaken to understand better the diverse biological activity of two groups of odontogenic tumors namely ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT based on their cell proliferation activity. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 cases, comprising of 36 ameloblastoma samples and 14 AOT samples, were subjected to heat-induced antigen retrieval method using citrate buffer in a pressure cooker. Consequently, the sections were stained with MDM2 monoclonal antibody and visualized using an LSAB+ kit. Results: In ameloblastomas, statistically significant association was seen between plexiform ameloblastomas, follicular ameloblastomas with granular cell changes, desmoplastic and unicystic variants. The predominant nuclear staining by MDM2 revealed overexpression in ameloblastomas as compared to AOT. Conclusion: The MDM2 overexpression noticed in plexiform ameloblastoma, follicular ameloblastoma with granular cell changes and acanthomatous ameloblastoma when compared to simple unicystic and desmoplastic ameloblastoma suggest a relatively enhanced proliferative phenotype of these solid multicystic variants of ameloblastomas. On overall comparison, higher expression was noted in ameloblastomas when compared to AOT. This indicates differences in the aggressive nature between these two groups of odontogenic tumors favoring the perception of a greater aggressive nature of ameloblastomas.

  2. Expression of CK14 and vimentin in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and dentigerous cyst

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    Sudhakara, Muniswamappa; Rudrayya, S Puranik; Vanaki, Srineevas S; Bhullar, RamanPreet Kaur; Shivakumar, MS; Hosur, Mahadevi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Origin of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) has long been a controversy, and the issue of it being a neoplasm or hamartoma was a subject of debate for a long time. Earlier it was grouped under a mixed group of odontogenic tumors considering the varying degrees of inductive changes. Recently, the WHO classification states that the presence of hard tissue within AOT was not due to induction but was rather a metaplastically produced mineralization and hence the tumor was reclassified under a group of tumors arising from odontogenic epithelium. This study is an attempt to identify if both epithelial (cytokeratin 14 [CK14]) and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers are expressed in the follicular and extrafollicular variants of AOT and to compare the expression with dentigerous cyst (DC) as this cyst is known to arise from reduced enamel epithelium which expressed CK14. This is done to possibly relate the origin of AOT with reduced enamel epithelium. Aims and Objectives: To study, analyze and correlate the expression of CK14 and vimentin in AOT and DC. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study on paraffin embedded tissues. Sixteen cases of AOT and 15 cases of DC were retrieved from the departmental archives and subjected to CK14 and vimentin immunostaining. Statistical Methods: Measures of central tendency was used to analyze the results. Results and Observations: Ninety percent of cases of follicular AOT (FAOT) and 100% cases of extra-follicular AOTs (EAOTs) showed positivity for CK14 and all cases of DC showed positivity for CK14. Vimentin was positive in 44% and negative in 56% cases of both FAOT and EAOT taken together. Conclusion: The CK14 expression profile in AOT and DC supports its odontogenic epithelial specific nature. The possible role of reduced enamel epithelium and dental lamina in histogenesis of AOT and DC is strongly evident by their CK14 expression pattern. PMID:27721599

  3. Assessment of MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the differential diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

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    Asaumi, Jun-ichi E-mail: asaumi@md.okayama-u.ac.jp; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Shigehara, Hiroshi; Kishi, Kanji

    2004-09-01

    The radiographical differentiation of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) from dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, odontogenic keratocysts and amelobastomas is sometimes difficult. We attempted to differentiate AOT from other lesions similar to AOT in radiographic findings using MRI. The MRI features of AOT in our three cases included homogeneous low SI in the cystic portion and homogeneous intermediate SI in the solid portion on T1WI, homogeneous high SI in the cystic portion and intermediate to slightly high SI in the solid portion on T2WI and enhancement of only the solid portion on CE-T1WI although none of the sequences included SI of calcifications. The contrast index curves in the three cases of AOT showed a gradual increase to 300 s, which signified a benign tumor. These MRI features were characteristic features of AOT and might be a basis for differentiating AOT from the above possible lesions in radiographic examinations.

  4. A retrospective review of 61 cases of adenomatoid odontogenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a benign lesion originating from the dental lamina or its remnants. It is a relatively uncommon neoplasm representing about 3% of all odontogenic tumors. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and radiological characteristics of AOTs in five major tertiary ...

  5. A rare case report of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma in the maxilla

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    Agnes Assao

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Therefore, it is necessary similar cases to be published to increase the knowledge about the clinical behavior and evolution of this tumor, to enable such lesions to be more clearly defined in the next classification of odontogenic tumors.

  6. Tumor odontogénico adenomatoide en la región mandibular: reporte de un caso / Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandibular Region: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ordóñez Daza, Dora Eugenia; scuela de Odontología, Universidad del Valle; Herrera Escandón, Juan José; Escuela de Odontología, Universidad del Valle.

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: El tumor odontogénico adenomatoide es una neoplasia benigna que corresponde al 2-7 % de todos los tumores odontogénicos en la cavidad oral. Más de la mitad de los casos se diagnostica en adolescentes, principalmente en mujeres. Es una lesión de crecimiento lento pero progresivo, no invasiva, y se puede confundir con un quiste odontogénico si no se usan las herramientas diagnósticas adecuadas. Reporte de caso: El reporte describe el caso de una niña de 13 años de edad con un tumo...

  7. Odontogenic Tumors

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    TAHSİNOĞLU, Melih

    2013-01-01

    DefinitionThe neoplasms that consist of the cells considered specialized for odontogenesis, and their product (dentin, enamel, cementum) are called odontogenic tumors.ClassificationTo initiate odontogenesis, epithelium is a must. Same rule holds for the odontogenic tumors: without odontogenic epithelium, odontogenic tumors cannot be, without the induction of odontogenic epithelium odontogenic mesenchyme cannot develop.

  8. A case report and short review on changing trends in the site of occurrence of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: Unravelling the past 15 years

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    Sneha Sethi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is an uncommon benign odontogenic lesion, with debatable histogenesis and variable histopathology. A systematic and diverse insight into the evolution, clinical presentation, histology, and immunohistochemical findings of this lesion is reviewed and presented. We reviewed the data published from 2000 to 2014 of approximately 255 cases that revealed a significant change in the incidence of predominant site involved, in contrast to the findings published by Reichart. We have also included the chronological order of events leading to the coining of the term AOT, which shows the curiosity that has been dedicated to understanding the lesion. Immunohistochemistry is considered to be a hallmark in pathology for learning the molecular pathogenesis and giving a correct final diagnosis. Several markers have been used to investigate and understand this lesion, and a compilation of the findings has been tabulated.

  9. A case report and short review on changing trends in the site of occurrence of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: Unravelling the past 15 years

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    Sethi, Sneha; Kumar, Manish; Aggarwal, Pratul; Indra Kumar, H. S.; Sugandhi, Chetan D.; Singh, Silvie

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon benign odontogenic lesion, with debatable histogenesis and variable histopathology. A systematic and diverse insight into the evolution, clinical presentation, histology, and immunohistochemical findings of this lesion is reviewed and presented. We reviewed the data published from 2000 to 2014 of approximately 255 cases that revealed a significant change in the incidence of predominant site involved, in contrast to the findings published by Reichart. We have also included the chronological order of events leading to the coining of the term AOT, which shows the curiosity that has been dedicated to understanding the lesion. Immunohistochemistry is considered to be a hallmark in pathology for learning the molecular pathogenesis and giving a correct final diagnosis. Several markers have been used to investigate and understand this lesion, and a compilation of the findings has been tabulated. PMID:27857774

  10. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour mimicking a periapical cyst in pregnant woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Bhandari, Neha

    2010-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (AOT) are uncommon odontogenic lesions characterized histologi-cally by duct-like structures derived from the epithelial component of the lesion and can be distinctly classified into follicular, extrafollicular and extraosseous variants (Neville BW, Damm DD, Allen ...

  11. Adenomatoid tumor i binyre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-01

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are...

  12. Odontogenic tumors.

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    Chrysomali, Evanthia; Leventis, Minas; Titsinides, Savas; Kyriakopoulos, Vasileios; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to analyze the frequency and distribution of odontogenic tumors in a Greek population and compare the findings with those reported in the recent literature. Records of the Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Dental School, University of Athens, with histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors (based on the World Health Organization 2005 classification) were reviewed retrospectively from January 1970 to December 2011. A total of 652 cases of odontogenic tumors were reported. Of these, 651 (99.8%) were benign and only 1 (0.2%) was malignant. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor was the most frequent lesion (52.7%), followed by odontoma (18.9%) and ameloblastoma (16.1%). The mean age of patients was 38.0 years with a wide range (2.5-92 years). Odontogenic tumors are rare lesions and appear to show a definite geographic variation. In Athens, Greece, they are presented mainly by the keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and ameloblastoma.

  13. Simultaneous adenomatoid odontogenic and keratocystic odontogenic tumours in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

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    Shephard, M; Shepard, M; Coleman, H

    2014-03-01

    Gorlin and Goltz described a syndrome in which multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts and bifid ribs occurred in combination. The jaw keratocysts are a consistent feature of 'Gorlin-Goltz' or naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Central nervous system and ocular involvement occurred together with the fairly typical facial features of frontal bossing and hypertelorism. This case report documents the pathology associated with an impacted maxillary canine tooth in a boy with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. The patient presented for investigation of the failure of eruption of the right permanent maxillary canine tooth. Radiographic investigation showed the presence of a well circumscribed radiolucency located around the crown of an impacted right maxillary canine tooth. The patient's medical history revealed a medulloblastoma that was treated 13 years ago. The right maxillary canine tooth and associated peri-coronal tissue were removed under general anaesthetic. A diagnosis of a keratocystic odontogenic tumour with an associated adenomatoid odontogenic tumour was made. The common differential diagnoses for a peri-coronal radiolucency in the maxilla that need to be considered by dentists include a dentigerous cyst, follicular keratocystic odontogenic tumour and adenomatoid odontogenic tumour. A rare case of both keratocystic odontogenic tumour and associated follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is described in a patient with naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Study on the origin and nature of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumor by immunohistochemistry Estudo da origem e natureza do tumor odontogênico adenomatóide pela imunoistoquímica

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    Marcelo Macedo Crivelini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is a clinically benign lesion. Discussions about the AOT hamartomatous or neoplastic nature, and the probable odontogenic epithelial cell it originates from still exist. This research aimed to study and discuss the subject by the immunohistochemical detection of cytokeratins, laminin, collagen IV, PCNA and p53 in 8 tumor samples and 8 dental follicle samples containing reduced enamel epithelium. The results have shown that CK14 labelling indicated differentiation grades for secreting ameloblasts or ameloblasts in the post-secreting stage in the adenomatoid structure of AOT. Laminin, found on the luminal surface of adenomatoid structures, was compatible with the reduced enamel epithelium during the "protective stage of amelogenesis". PCNA specifically labelled the spindled areas and peripheral cords of the AOT, indicating that these areas are responsible for tumor growth. After considerations about pathogenesis, the authors suggested that the nature of AOT is hamartomatous with histogenesis from the reduced enamel epithelium.O tumor odontogênico adenomatóide (TOA é uma lesão clinicamente benigna, cujas discussões acerca de sua natureza hamartomatosa ou neoplásica, e provável célula epitelial odontogênica de origem ainda existem. Este projeto de pesquisa teve por objetivo estudar o assunto através da detecção imuno-histoquímica das citoqueratinas, laminina, colágeno IV, PCNA e p53, utilizando-se para isso 08 amostras do tumor e 08 amostras de folículo pericoronário contendo epitélio reduzido do órgão do esmalte (EROE. Os resultados mostraram que a marcação da CK14 sinalizou graus de diferenciação para ameloblastos secretores ou pós-secretores nas estruturas adenomatóides do TOA, e a laminina presente em sua superfície luminal foi compatível com o EROE durante o "estágio protetor" da amelogênese. O PCNA marcou especificamente áreas enoveladas e cordões periféricos do TOA

  15. Análise imuno-histoquímica das citoqueratinas em ameloblastoma e tumor odontogênico adenomatóide Immunohistochemical analysis of cytokeratins in ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ferreira Lopes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O presente trabalho teve por objetivo traçar o perfil das citoqueratinas (CKs 7, 8, 10, 13, 14, 18 e 19 em ameloblastomas e tumor odontogênico adenomatóide (TOA visando contribuir para o entendimento da histogênese desses tumores e somar com os resultados já relatados na literatura. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: do arquivo do Laboratório de Anatomia Patológica do Departamento de Odontologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN foi selecionada uma amostra com dez casos de ameloblastomas e oito de TOA para o estudo imuno-histoquímico, utilizando-se anticorpos anti-CKs pelo método da estreptoavidina-biotina. RESULTADOS: Observou-se que nos ameloblastomas a CK 14 esteve presente em todos os casos, enquanto a CK 19 foi observada nas células periféricas (oito casos e nas centrais (cinco casos. Para os TOA, observou-se imunopositividade para a CK 14 em todos os casos, enquanto a CK 19 esteve marcada predominantemente nas células ductais (seis casos. CONCLUSÃO: As citoqueratinas são expressas de forma variada nos ameloblastomas e nos TOA, os quais preservam CK típicas do germe dental em estágios avançados do desenvolvimento, confirmando sua origem exclusiva a partir do epitélio odontogênico e não se evidenciando CK características do epitélio escamoso.OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to describe the immunohistochemical expression of cytokeratins (CKs 7, 8, 10,13, 14, 18 and 19 in the epithelial components of ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT. The results were compared and histogenesis discussed. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Specimens of ten ameloblastomas and eight adenomatoid odontogenic tumors were examined by immunohistochemistry using streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method and anti-CKs antibody. The sample was obtained from Department of Oral Pathology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical reactivity for CK14 was detected in all cases of

  16. Distribution of mast cells in benign odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Caldas Pereira, Francisco; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo Silva; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Jurisic, Vladimir; Sales, Caroline Brandi Schlaepfer; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of mast cells in a series of odontogenic tumors. Forty-five cases of odontogenic tumors were investigated using immunohistochemistry for mast cell triptase, and differences between groups were statistically evaluated. Mast cells were present in 96% of odontogenic tumors. Mast cells present in solid ameloblastoma were observed in the tumor stroma surrounding more solid and follicular epithelial islands, with or without squamous metaplasia. The odontogenic mixoma showed few mast cells. In odontogenic tumors with a cystic structure, the mast cells were distributed throughout all areas of the lesions, mainly in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. In addition, the total density of mast cells between all odontogenic tumors showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). A greater mast cells distribution was found in keratocystic odontogenic tumor in relation to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (p odontogenic tumor were compared to the odontogenic myxoma (p odontogenic tumor showed a higher mean of mast cells when compared with the other tumors of the sample. Mast cells values presented by syndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumor were significantly greater than those of the sporadic keratocystic odontogenic tumor that were not associated with the syndrome (p = 0.03). Mast cells are probably one of the major components of the stromal scaffold in odontogenic tumors. We found significant differences of mast cells between syndrome nonsyndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumors, although their distribution did not seem to have any influence on the biologic behavior of benign odontogenic tumors.

  17. Report of Two Cases of Combined Odontogenic Tumors: Ameloblastoma with Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastic Fibroma with Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Ashley Nicole; Montague, Lindsay; Cohen, Donald; Islam, Nadim; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2015-09-01

    Combined odontogenic neoplasms have rarely been documented. Such tumors have also been described by other researchers as "hybrid" lesions. The histologic features are often identical to other individually well-established odontogenic neoplasms such as ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Their clinical presentation is variable, ranging from cysts to neoplasms showing varying degrees of aggressive behavior. Most combined tumors contain features of one of the odontogenic tumors in combination with either a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) or a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. We present two new cases of combined odontogenic tumors: an ameloblastoma with an odontogenic keratocyst and an AF with COC. Predicting clinical outcome is challenging when a combination tumor is encountered due to the paucity of such lesions. One must understand salient features of these entities and differentiate them from the more common conventional neoplasms to expand classification and provide prognostic criteria.

  18. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Odontogenic Cysts and Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth Ann; Collins, Bobby M

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews a myriad of common and uncommon odontogenic cysts and tumors. The clinical presentation, gross and microscopic features, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and diagnostic pitfalls are addressed for inflammatory cysts (periapical cyst, mandibular infected buccal cyst/paradental cyst), developmental cysts (dentigerous, lateral periodontal, glandular odontogenic, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst), benign tumors (keratocystic odontogenic tumor, ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma and fibroodontoma, odontoma, squamous odontogenic tumor, calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, primordial odontogenic tumor, central odontogenic fibroma, and odontogenic myxomas), and malignant tumors (clear cell odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastic fibrosarcoma). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors.

  1. Frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nigel R; Gannon, Orla M; Savage, Neil W; Batstone, Martin D

    2014-02-01

    A systematic review of the literature from 1993 to 2011 was undertaken examining frequency data of the most common odontogenic cysts and tumors. Seven inclusion criteria were met for the paper to be incorporated. In the preliminary search 5231 papers were identified, of these 26 papers met the inclusion criteria. There were 18 297 odontogenic cysts reported. Of these there were 9982 (54.6%) radicular cysts, 3772 (20.6%) dentigerous cysts and 2145 (11.7%) keratocystic odontogenic tumors. With the reclassification of keratocystic odontogenic tumor in 2005 as an odontogenic tumor, there were 8129 odontogenic tumors reported with 3001 (36.9%) ameloblastomas, 1163 (14.3%) keratocystic odontogenic tumors, 533 (6.5%) odontogenic myxomas, 337 (4.1%) adenomatoid odontogenic tumors and 127 (1.6%) ameloblastic fibromas. This systematic review found that odontogenic cysts are 2.25 times more frequent than odontogenic tumors. The most frequent odontogenic cyst and tumor were the radicular cyst and ameloblastoma respectively. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Glypican-3 distinguishes aggressive from non-aggressive odontogenic tumors: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Ramon Barreto; Dias, Rosane Borges; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Santana Filho, Manoel; Melo, Leonardo Araújo; Trierveiler, Marília; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; Leonardi, Rosalia; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2017-04-01

    Glypican-3 is a cell surface proteoglycan that is found in embrionary tissues, and there are no studies investigating this protein in odontogenic tumor. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate glypican-3 in a series of aggressive and non-aggressive odontogenic tumors. Fifty-nine cases of tumors were divided into aggressive odontogenic tumors (20 solid ameloblastomas, four unicystic ameloblastoma, 28 KOTs including five associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome) and non-aggressive odontogenic tumors (five adenomatoid odontogenic tumors and two calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors) and analyzed for glypican-3 using immunohistochemistry. Glypican-3 was observed in seven solid ameloblastoma and eighteen keratocystic odontogenic tumors including three of the five syndromic cases, but there was no significant difference between syndromic and sporadic cases (P > 0.05; Fisher's exact Test). All cases of unicystic ameloblastoma (n = 4), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (n = 5), and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (n = 2) were negative. This provided insights into the presence of glypican-3 in odontogenic tumors. This protein distinguished aggressive from non-aggressive odontogenic tumors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. CD56 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Dehghani-Nazhvani, Ali; Razmjouyi, Faranak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Odontogenic cysts and tumors have a wide spectrum of clinical characteristics that lead to the different management strategies. Since definite diagnosis is difficult in some cases, it has been suggested that CD56 may be a candidate marker for definitive diagnosis of some odontogenic tumors. The present study was designed to examine CD56 expression in lesions with histopathological similarities. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, analytical study the subjects were 22 ameloblastomas, 13 dentigerous cysts, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), 4 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT), 3 orthokeratinized odonto-genic cysts, 3 calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC) and one glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC). All the samples were examined for CD56 immunoreactivity. Data were analyzed using chi-square test. Results. Twenty cases (91%) of ameloblastomas, 3 (75%) AOT, 4 (40%) KCOT and one case of GOC were positive for CD56. None of the dentigerous cysts, COC and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts was CD56-positive. There was a significant difference in the CD56 expression between ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst, as well as COC. Also, KCOT showed significantly higher expression than orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Conclusion. In this study CD56 expression was limited to the odontogenic tumors and more aggressive cystic lesions. This marker can be a useful aid for distinguishing cysts and tumors from similar lesions.

  4. CD56 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors

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    Zohreh Jaafari-Ashkavandi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Odontogenic cysts and tumors have a wide spectrum of clinical characteristics that lead to the different management strategies. Since definite diagnosis is difficult in some cases, it has been suggested that CD56 may be a candidate marker for definitive diagnosis of some odontogenic tumors. The present study was designed to examine CD56 expression in lesions with histopathological similarities. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, analytical study the subjects were 22 ameloblastomas, 13 dentigerous cysts, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT, 4 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT, 3 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts, 3 calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC and one glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC. All the samples were examined for CD56 immunoreactivity. Data were analyzed using chi-square test. Results. Twenty cases (91% of ameloblastomas, 3 (75% AOT, 4 (40% KCOT and one case of GOC were positive for CD56. None of the dentigerous cysts, COC and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts was CD56-positive. There was a significant difference in the CD56 expression between ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst, as well as COC. Also, KCOT showed significantly higher expression than orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Conclusion. In this study CD56 expression was limited to the odontogenic tumors and more aggressive cystic lesions. This marker can be a useful aid for distinguishing cysts and tumors from similar lesions.

  5. Analysis of silver stained nucleolar organizing regions in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    OpenAIRE

    M D Prasanna; Charan, C. R.; Kranti Kiran Reddy Ealla; V Surekha; Ganesh Kulkarni; Sandhya Gokavarapu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the probable differences in cell proliferation index of odontogenic cysts and tumors by means of a comparative silver stained nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) quantification. Study Design: This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on archival paraffin blocks (n = 62), consisting of 10 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, 10 radicular cysts, 10 conventional ameloblastomas, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, 10 calcifying e...

  6. An atypical adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in the mandible: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The differential diagnosis between AOT and other odontogenic tumours such as ameloblastoma should be well made to avoid extensive ablative surgery. However, AOT frequently resembles other odontogenic lesions such as dentigerous cysts or ameloblastoma. Immunohistochemically, AOT is characterized by positive ...

  7. Analysis of silver stained nucleolar organizing regions in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Md; Charan, Cr; Reddy Ealla, Kranti Kiran; Surekha, V; Kulkarni, Ganesh; Gokavarapu, Sandhya

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the probable differences in cell proliferation index of odontogenic cysts and tumors by means of a comparative silver stained nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) quantification. This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on archival paraffin blocks (n = 62), consisting of 10 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, 10 radicular cysts, 10 conventional ameloblastomas, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, 10 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors and 2 ameloblasic carcinomas. The mean AgNOR count of odontogenic cysts was 1.709 and the benign odontogenic tumors was 1.862. Highest AgNOR count was recorded in odontogenic keratocyst and lowest was seen in radicular cyst. Statistically significant difference in AgNOR counts of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, amelobalastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, benign odontogenic tumors and ameloblastic carcinoma were seen. AgNORs in ameloblastic carcinoma were more in number and more widely spread. AgNOR technique may be considered a good indicator of cell proliferation in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

  8. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P cysts (P 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  9. Odontogenic tumors: a study of 120 cases in an Indian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkhede, A; Tupkari, J-V; Sardar, M

    2011-11-01

    Studies on odontogenic tumors published from many parts of the world show a distinct geographic variation; however, there is little information available in the English-language literature on the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in India. This retrospective study was designed to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in an Indian population and compare them with various reports from other parts of the world. The histopathology records of the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology of Government Dental College and Hospital, Mumbai were retrieved retrospectively within the period of January 2001 to July 2010. A total of 120 lesions classified as odontogenic tumors were reviewed. These were analyzed for age, gender, site of tumor and histopathologic typing. Criteria used were World Health Organization (WHO) classification 2005. The mandible and maxilla were divided into 4 anatomic regions, and the distribution of each odontogenic tumor among these regions was recorded and analyzed. A total of 120 cases of odontogenic tumors were reported in this period. Odontogenic tumors in the present study constituted 5.78% of all the 2075 registered biopsies. The most frequent histological type was ameloblastoma (40.83%), followed by Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (37.5%), odontome (11.66%) and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (5.8%). In general, the odontogenic tumors showed a predilection for the mandible and the posterior regions of the jaws. Ameloblastomas occurred with a marked predilection for the mandible, while adenomatoid odontogenic tumor showed predilection for the maxilla, anterior regions of the jaws, and young females. A frequency of 5.78% of odontogenic tumors was observed in this study. Ameloblastoma comprised the single most common tumor of all odontogenic tumors. This study observed geographic variations in the frequency and distribution of odontogenic tumors.

  10. Immunohistochemical expression of WNT5A and MMPs in odontogenic epithelial tumors and cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Antunes, Daniella Moraes; Saturno, Juvani Lago; Massuda, Fabiola; Paiva, Katiúcia Batista da Silva; Nunes, Fabio Daumas

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was compare the expression of WNT5A and MMP2, 7 and 20, in frequent benign odontogenic tumors and odontogenic cysts, since these lesions have a different biological behavior. Eighty-one paraffin-embedded specimens of odontogenic tumors, including ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, and thirty-two odontogenic cysts were used for immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of WNT5A in odontogenic tumors and inflammatory cyst was higher than in developmental odontogenic cyst. There was no statistical difference (ptumors. The expression of MMP7 was lower in RC with a statistical difference when compared with all tumors and cysts. Statistical differences also occurred when comparing glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) to keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KOT) and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT). MMP20 expression was higher in ameloblastoma when compared to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), DC and GOC. The expression of MMP20 was lower in CCOT when compared to all tumors and cysts. The expression of WNT5A in a group of odontogenic lesions suggests the participation of a non-canonical WNT signaling pathway in the progression and maintenance of these lesions. These molecules are possibly involved in the biological differences between odontogenic tumors and cysts. Considering previous studies, WNT5A may help promote the calcification seen in AOT, CCOT and CEOT by activating MMP7. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Mixed odontogenic tumor: ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etit, Demet; Uyaroglu, Mehmet Ali; Erdogan, Nezahat

    2010-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors constitute a group of heterogeneous disease derived from epithelial, mesenchymal and/or ectomesenchymal elements. Ameloblastoma is the best known and the most frequent form of odontogenic tumors. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), known as Pindborg tumor, is locally invasive lesion which has a characteristic amiloid deposition. Here a case of a peripheral ameloblastoma associated with CEOT is presented with clinical and morphological features.

  12. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Olavo Hoston Gonçalves; de Carvalho, Laura Priscila Barboza; Lacerda Brasileiro Junior, Vilson; de Figueiredo, Cláudia Roberta Leite Vieira

    2013-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign epithelial odontogenic neoplasm of slow growth that is locally aggressive and tends to invade bone and adjacent soft tissue. Here is reported the case of a 21-year-old female patient with a CEOT in the left mandibular posterior region. The computerized tomography in coronal plane revealed a hypodense lesion in the posterior region of the left mandibular body with hyperdense areas inside and was associated with element 37. An incisional biopsy of the lesion was performed and the histopathological analysis revealed the presence of layers of epithelial odontogenic cells that formed prominent intercellular bridges. A large quantity of extracellular, eosinophilic, and amyloid-like material and an occasional formation of concentric calcifications (Liesegang rings) were also found. The histopathological diagnosis was a Pindborg tumor. Resection of the tumor with a safety margin was performed and after 6 months of follow-up there has been no sign of recurrence of the lesion.

  13. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olavo Hoston Gonçalves Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT is a rare benign epithelial odontogenic neoplasm of slow growth that is locally aggressive and tends to invade bone and adjacent soft tissue. Here is reported the case of a 21-year-old female patient with a CEOT in the left mandibular posterior region. The computerized tomography in coronal plane revealed a hypodense lesion in the posterior region of the left mandibular body with hyperdense areas inside and was associated with element 37. An incisional biopsy of the lesion was performed and the histopathological analysis revealed the presence of layers of epithelial odontogenic cells that formed prominent intercellular bridges. A large quantity of extracellular, eosinophilic, and amyloid-like material and an occasional formation of concentric calcifications (Liesegang rings were also found. The histopathological diagnosis was a Pindborg tumor. Resection of the tumor with a safety margin was performed and after 6 months of follow-up there has been no sign of recurrence of the lesion.

  14. Odontogenic Tumor Markers - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premalatha, B R; Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Reddy, Narendranatha P; Indu, M

    2013-01-01

    The practice of pathology is currently undergoing significant change, due to advances in the field of molecular pathology. Tumor markers are molecules that help the pathologists for confirmatory diagnosis of histopathologically confounding lesions. Odontogenic tumors are relatively rare with estimated incidence of less than 0.5 cases/ 100,000 population per year. Odontogenic tumors can pose diagnostic challenges because of overlapping histology. But, appropriate diagnosis is crucial as their treatment modality and prognosis differ; in these situations tumor markers can be helpful. But lack of comprehensive literature on specific markers for odontogenic tumors imposes pathologists to think aimlessly about various markers to arrive at an appropriate diagnosis. With this background, it is our attempt at compiling diagnostically important odontogenic tumor markers. Also, a note is added on tumor behaviour studies in common clinically important odontogenic tumors: Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic odontogenic tumor. How to cite this article: Premalatha B R, Patil S, Rao R S, Reddy N P, Indu M. Odontogenic Tumor Markers - An Overview. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):65-75. How to cite this article: Premalatha B R, Patil S, Rao R S, Reddy N P, Indu M. Odontogenic Tumor Markers - An Overview. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):65-75 PMID:24155593

  15. A positive correlation between immunohistochemical expression of CD31 and mast cell tryptase in odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Dibazar, Sana

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we compared mast cell tryptase and CD31 expression between odontogenic tumors with the aim of predicting the clinical behavior of these lesions at the time of initial biopsy. We also evaluated the correlation between mast cell tryptase and CD31 expression to clarify the role of mast cells (MCs) in the growth of odontogenic tumors. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-MC tryptase and anti-CD31 antibodies was performed on 48 cases of odontogenic tumors including solid ameloblastoma (SAM), unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), odontogenic myxoma (OM), cystic calcifying odontogenic tumor (CCOT) and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT). Ten high power fields were analyzed for each sample. Total MC count was significantly increased in SAM compared to other odontogenic tumors (podontogenic tumors (podontogenic tumors (p=0.018, r=0.34). Our findings suggest a role for MCs in aggressive clinical behavior of odontogenic tumors. The significant correlation found between MC count and microvessel density in odontogenic tumors is in agreement with the theory of participation of MCs in tumor progression. Targeting MC activity may represent an important nonsurgical therapeutic approach, especially for aggressive odontogenic tumors.

  16. Twist and Snail expression in tumor and stromal cells of epithelial odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyu-Young; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jae-Il; Ahn, Sun-Ha; Hong, Seong-Doo

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate expression of Twist and Snail in tumor and stromal cells of epithelial odontogenic tumors and to analyze relationships between Twist and Snail expression and between tumor and stromal expression. Immunohistochemistry was performed using Twist and Snail antibodies in 60 ameloblastomas (AMs; 20 solid/multicystic, 20 unicystic, and 20 recurrent), six ameloblastic carcinomas (ACs), 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs), and six calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs). A higher rate of tumor cells strongly positive for Twist was observed in AC compared to the other tumors (P = 0.019). The rate of tumor cells strongly positive for Snail tended to be higher in AC than in AM (P = 0.060). AM and AC showed a higher rate of Twist-positive stromal cells than AOT and CEOT (P Tumor cells of recurrent AM showed stronger expression of Twist (P tumor expression of Twist and Snail (r = 0.376, P = 0.001) and between tumor and stromal expression of Snail (r = 0.334, P = 0.002). Twist and Snail may affect the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in AC and be involved in recurrence of AM. Stromal Twist expression may be associated with aggressive clinical behavior of epithelial odontogenic tumors. A Twist-Snail pathway may participate in the development and progression of odontogenic tumors, and tumor-stroma interaction in odontogenic tumors may be mediated by Snail. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of Amelotin Expression in Benign Odontogenic Tumors

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    Daiana Paula Stolf

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Amelotin (AMTN is highly and selectively expressed by odontogenic epithelium-derived ameloblasts throughout the maturation stage of enamel formation. The protein is secreted and concentrated at the basal lamina interface between ameloblasts and the mineralized enamel matrix. Odontogenic tumors (OT are characterized by morphological resemblance to the developing tooth germ. OT vary from slowly expanding, encapsulated tumors to locally aggressive and destructive lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression profile of AMTN in benign odontogenic tumors and to correlate it with specific features of the lesions. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for AMTN was performed on human ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma (AF, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO, odontoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT. Results: Generally, ameloblastoma and AF did not stain for AMTN. A strong signal was detected in ameloblast-like layers of AFO and odontoma. Epithelial cells in AOT did not stain for AMTN, while calcifying areas of extracellular eosinophilic matrix were intensely stained. Interestingly, ghost cells present in odontomas and CCOT revealed variable staining, again in association with calcification foci. Conclusions: Amelotin expression was consistently detected in tumors presenting differentiated ameloblasts and obvious matrix deposition. Additionally, the presence of the protein in the eosinophilic matrix and small mineralized foci of AOT and calcification areas of ghost cells may suggest a role for AMTN in the control of mineralization events. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(5.000: 236-245

  18. [Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szporek, Bozena J; Cieślik, Tadeusz; Jedrzejewski, Piotr W; Lipiarz, Ludwik Z

    2005-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which was first described by Pindborg in 1955 representing only 1% of all odontogenic tumors. The tumor has an ectodermal odontogenic origin. This tumor are considered benign but can be locally aggressive in nature with recurrence rates of 10-15% reported. Surgical treatment varies from simply enucleation to partial resection of the affected bone. Since 1973 three cases only of the Pinborg tumor have been presented in the Polish literature. We described the case of a 44-year-old man with Pindborg tumor in the right maxilla. Standard x-ray examinations and CT scan were performed in order to obtain information about tumor's localization. Autors discuss the radiologic features of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor and treatment method and the relevant literature.

  19. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor of mandible

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    Ankita Bohra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor is considered to be a benign cystic neoplasia of jaw bone with a higher rate of recurrence. It is noted to be third most common odontogenic cyst after radicular and dentigerous cyst. Most common location is posterior mandible and ascending ramus. A case with odontogenic keratocyst of the right posterior mandible is presented with proper clinical and radiographic examinations along with histopathological investigation. Cystic lesion was surgically resected with iliac crest bone graft replacement and reconstruction plate placement. Follow-up of 1 year is completed with repeated radiographic examinations in 4 months interval with no evidence of recurrence.

  20. Expression of odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein, amelotin, ameloblastin, and amelogenin in odontogenic tumors: immunohistochemical analysis and pathogenetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelini, Marcelo Macedo; Felipini, Renata Callestini; Miyahara, Glauco Issamu; de Sousa, Suzana Cantanhede Orsini Machado

    2012-03-01

    Screening for expression of amelogenesis-related proteins represents a powerful molecular approach to characterize odontogenic tumors and investigate their pathogenesis. In this study, we have examined the presence and distribution of odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM), amelotin (AMTN), ameloblastin (AMBN), and amelogenin (AMEL) by immunohistochemistry in samples of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), developing odontoma, ameloblastoma, calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT), ameloblastic fibroma (AF), myxoma, odontogenic fibroma (OF), and reduced enamel epithelia (REE). Positive results were obtained in those tumors with epithelial component, except for AF, OF, and ameloblastoma. ODAM was found around mineralized structures (dystrophic calcifications) and CEOT's amyloid, whereas AMTN stained the eosinophilic material of AOTs. The CCOT transitory cells to ghost cells were strongly positive with all proteins except AMEL, and the REE as well as odontomas showed immunoexpression for ODAM, AMTN, AMBN, and AMEL similar to those found in normal rat tooth germs. Based on these results, some histopathogenetic theories were formulated. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor

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    BRENDA DE SOUZA MOURA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the frequency of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT in the Oral Surgery Service (OSS of the University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF / UFRJ, with respect to recurrence rate, gender, age of recurrence and location of the injury Methods: clinical records were reviewed and histopathological reports of KOT patients of the HUCFF/UFRJ between 2002 and 2012. Patients diagnosed with KOT were divided into two groups for the occurrence of relapse: positive (n=6 and negative (n=19 Results: regarding the location, there was a predilection for the mandible. In the average age of patients in the positive group was 40.5 and the negative group, 35.53. In the distribution by gender, positive group showed equal distribution, different from that observed in the negative group, which showed a predilection for males Conclusion: KOT was the second most frequent injury in our patients, recurrence was lower among males and had the jaw as most affected location

  2. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neeraj; Sahai, Sharad; Singh, Sourav; Singh, Smita

    2011-07-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare entity and represents less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. Dr. J J Pindborg (1958) first described four cases of this unusual lesion; subsequently Shafer et al coined the term Pindborg tumor. This lesion is a locally aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasm arising from epithelial tissue. It occurs most commonly in 4(th)-5(th)-6(th) decade of life and bears no gender predilection. A case of CEOT in a 50-year-old male arising in the left body region is described.

  3. Odontogenic tumors: where are we in 2017 ?

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    John M. Wright

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors are a heterogeneous group of lesions of diverse clinical behavior and histopathologic types, ranging from hamartomatous lesions to malignancy. Because odontogenic tumors arise from the tissues which make our teeth, they are unique to the jaws, and by extension almost unique to dentistry. Odontogenic tumors, as in normal odontogenesis, are capable of inductive interactions between odontogenic ectomesenchyme and epithelium, and the classification of odontogenic tumors is essentially based on this interaction. The last update of these tumors was published in early 2017. According to this classification, benign odontogenic tumors are classified as follows: Epithelial, mesenchymal (ectomesenchymal, or mixed depending on which component of the tooth germ gives rise to the neoplasm. Malignant odontogenic tumors are quite rare and named similarly according to whether the epithelial or mesenchymal or both components is malignant. The goal of this review is to discuss the updated changes to odontogenic tumors and to review the more common types with clinical and radiological illustrations.

  4. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: II. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor Versus Ghost Cell Odontogenic Tumors Derived from Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Suk Keun; Kim, Yeon Sook

    2014-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs) and ghost cell odontogenic tumors (GCOTs) are characteristic odontogenic origin epithelial tumors which produce calcifying materials from transformed epithelial tumor cells. CEOT is a benign odontogenic tumor composed of polygonal epithelial tumor cells that show retrogressive calcific changes, amyloid-like deposition, and clear cytoplasm. Differentially, GCOTs are a group of transient tumors characterized by ghost cell presence, which comprise...

  5. Metallothionein immunoexpression in selected benign epithelial odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues; Caldeira, Patrícia Carlos; Souto, Giovanna Ribeiro; de Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2014-03-01

    Odontogenic tumors exhibited variable biologica behaviors. Metallothionein (MT) is correlated with the cellular homeostasis of essential metals, cellular differentiation, and proliferation. The core goals of this study are (i) to report and to compare MT expression among benign epithelial odontogenic tumors; (ii) to correlate MT with cellular proliferation index; and (iii) to evaluate the influence of the inflammatory infiltrate on MT expression. Ten cases of solid ameloblastomas (SABs), 4 squamous odontogenic tumors (SOTs), 5 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs), and 3 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs) were subjected to immunohistochemical to anti-MT, anti-Ki-67, and anti-PCNA. Statistical analysis was performed using BioEstat(®) 4.0. Metallothionein staining was found to be the highest in the SABs (93.1%), followed by SOTs (52.9%), AOTs (38.4%), and CEOTs (0%). MT staining exhibited statistically significant differences between the SABs and the SOTs (P = 0.0047) and the AOTs (P = 0.0022). A weak-to-strong positive correlation between IMT and IK or IP was observed in SABs and SOTs, whereas a strong negative correlation was observed in AOTs. No differences in IMT, IK, and IP were observed between inflammation groups A and B. The increased MT expression observed in the SABs might be correlated with clinical behavior (local invasiveness and high rate of recurrence). In the SABs and SOTs, MT plays a role in the stimulation of cellular proliferation. In contrast, MT can inhibit cellular proliferation in the AOT. The IMT, IK, and IP are not affected by inflammation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Multifocal calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor.

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    Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Wong, Derek; Shuler, Charles F; Linz, Vincent; Kalmar, John R; Allen, Carl M

    2007-08-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), or Pindborg tumor, is a rare and benign odontogenic neoplasm that affects the jaw. The most common manifestation of CEOT is a unifocal or localized lesion of the involved jaw, which may appear clinically as a hard tissue swelling and radiographically as a mixed radiolucent-radiopaque mass. In this article, we present a unique case of CEOT affecting multiple sites in the maxilla and mandible of a 51-year-old white man. Though biopsy samples from all involved sites revealed similar histopathologic features consistent with CEOT, the fact that there was a multifocal presentation is an unusual phenomenon for CEOT and has never been reported. Multifocal odontogenic lesions are not typical but have been observed in conditions associated with known genetic mutations. For example, multiple odontogenic keratocysts are the most common feature of the inherited condition known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. This case, however, is the first one to demonstrate that there may be a multifocal variant of CEOT that has not been previously recognized.

  7. Concurrent hepatic adenomatoid tumor and hepatic hemangioma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Beom; Yu, Eunsil; Shim, Ju-Hyun; Song, Gi-Won; Kim, Gwang Un; Jin, Young-Joo; Park, Ho-Seop

    2012-06-01

    A 45-year-old male with alleged asymptomatic hepatic hemangioma of 4 years duration had right upper-quadrant pain and was referred to a tertiary hospital. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a hypervascular mass of about 7 cm containing intratumoral multilobulated cysts. A preoperative liver biopsy was performed, but this failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. The patient underwent a partial hepatectomy of segments IV and VIII. The histologic findings revealed multifocal proliferation of flattened or cuboidal epithelioid cells and a highly vascular edematous stroma. Immunohistochemistry findings demonstrated that the epithelioid tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3), vimentin, calretinin, and cytokeratin 5/6, and were focally positive for CD10, and negative for WT1 and CD34, all of which support their mesothelial origin. Immunohistochemistry for a mesothelial marker should be performed for determining the presence of an adenomatoid tumor when benign epithelioid cells are seen.

  8. Concurrent hepatic adenomatoid tumor and hepatic hemangioma: a case report

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    Ji-Beom Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old male with alleged asymptomatic hepatic hemangioma of 4 years duration had right upper-quadrant pain and was referred to a tertiary hospital. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a hypervascular mass of about 7 cm containing intratumoral multilobulated cysts. A preoperative liver biopsy was performed, but this failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. The patient underwent a partial hepatectomy of segments IV and VIII. The histologic findings revealed multifocal proliferation of flattened or cuboidal epithelioid cells and a highly vascular edematous stroma. Immunohistochemistry findings demonstrated that the epithelioid tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3, vimentin, calretinin, and cytokeratin 5/6, and were focally positive for CD10, and negative for WT1 and CD34, all of which support their mesothelial origin. Immunohistochemistry for a mesothelial marker should be performed for determining the presence of an adenomatoid tumor when benign epithelioid cells are seen.

  9. Extraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheimer, F W; Zielinski, R J; Wesley, R K

    1977-10-01

    A 20-year-old man presented with a painless enlargement of the maxillary gingiva with no bone involvement. Microscopic examination with special stains confirmed the diagnosis of a clear cell variant of a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor). This is the second reported case of such a variant in an extraosseous location.

  10. A comparative study of syndecan-1 expression in different odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan

    2017-01-01

    Expression of various cellular/molecular factors change during the course of tumor formation from odontogenic tissues of the tooth germ. Evaluation of these factors can help provide a better perception of the tumorigenesis and biologic behavior of odontogenic tumors (OTs). Syndecan-1 is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan which has not been extensively investigated in these lesions. The objective of the present study was to assess the immunohistochemical expression of CD138 in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), ameloblastic fibroma (AF) and odontogenic myxoma (OM) and to compare it with ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). A total of 58 OTs consisting of 7 AOTs, 5 OMs, 7 AFs, 29 KCOTs and 10 ameloblastomas were immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal antibody against syndecan-1 and the percentage and intensity of the immunostained cells was assessed. Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Bonferroni analysis was used for comparisons (P tumors. Syndecan-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of AOT, AF, KCOT and ameloblastoma. However, considering the different behaviors of these tumors along with their similar expression of syndecan-1, it seems that its effect on clinical aggressiveness is limited. The significance of negative immunoexpression of this protein in OM requires further investigation.

  11. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: II. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor Versus Ghost Cell Odontogenic Tumors Derived from Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Keun; Kim, Yeon Sook

    2014-06-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs) and ghost cell odontogenic tumors (GCOTs) are characteristic odontogenic origin epithelial tumors which produce calcifying materials from transformed epithelial tumor cells. CEOT is a benign odontogenic tumor composed of polygonal epithelial tumor cells that show retrogressive calcific changes, amyloid-like deposition, and clear cytoplasm. Differentially, GCOTs are a group of transient tumors characterized by ghost cell presence, which comprise calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT), dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT), and ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC), all derived from calcifying odontogenic cysts (COCs). There is considerable confusion about COCs and GCOTs terminology, but these lesions can be classified as COCs or GCOTs, based on their cystic or tumorous natures, respectively. GCOTs include ameloblastomatous tumors derived from dominant odontogenic cysts classified as CCOTs, ghost cell-rich tumors producing dentinoid materials as DGCTs, and the GCOT malignant counterpart, GCOCs. Many authors have reported CEOTs and GCOTs variably express keratins, β-catenin, BCL-2, BSP, RANKL, OPG, Notch1, Jagged1, TGF-β, SMADs, and other proteins. However, these heterogeneous lesions should be differentially diagnosed to allow for accurate tumor progression and prognosis prediction.

  12. Odontogenic tumors in Western India (Gujarat): analysis of 209 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Sharanjeet; Chawda, Jyoti; Jani, Dhaval

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Odontogenic tumors show a distinct geographic variation. In 2005 a new WHO classification was published which included odontogenic keratocyst as one of the odontogenic tumors, renaming it as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor. To our knowledge there are only few studies based on 2005 classification in Asian subcontinent. This study was done to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in Gujarat and compare it with reports from other parts of the world. St...

  13. Kallikrein 4 and matrix metalloproteinase-20 immunoexpression in malignant, benign and infiltrative odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelini, Marcelo Macedo; Oliveira, Denise Tostes; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; de Sousa, Suzana Cantanhede Orsini Machado; Loyola, Adriano Motta

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) (enamelysin) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4) are enzymes secreted by ameloblasts that play an important role in enamel matrix degradation during amelogenesis. However, studies have shown that neoplastic cells can produce such enzymes, which may affect the tumor infiltrative and metastatic behaviors. The aim of this study is to assess the biological role of MMP20 and KLK4 in odontogenic tumors. The enzymes were analyzed immunohistochemically in ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, keratocystic odontogenic tumor with or without recurrence and odontogenic carcinoma. Clinicopathological parameters were statistically correlated with protein expression using the Fisher's exact test. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon-independent methods were used to evaluate the differences in median values. Positive Immunoexpression was detected in all benign lesions, with a prevalence of 75-100% immunolabeled cells. Patients were predominantly young, Caucasian, female, with slow-growing tumors located in the mandible causing asymptomatic swelling. No KLK4 expression was seen in carcinomas, and the amount of MMP20-positive cells varied between 20% and 80%. Rapid evolution, recurrence and age >60 years characterized the malignant nature of these lesions. Data showed that KLK4 and MMP20 enzymes may not be crucial to tumoral infiltrative capacity, especially in malignant tumors, considering the diversity and peculiarity of these lesions. The significant immunoexpression in benign lesions, remarkably in AOT, is likely associated with differentiated tumor cells that can produce and degrade enamel matrix-like substances. This would be expected since the histogenesis of odontogenic tumors commonly comes from epithelium that recently performed a secretory activity in tooth formation.

  14. Large keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the mandible

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    Sri Krishna Koppula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is a rare odontogenic cyst of epithelial origin. There are many types of cysts of the jaws, but what make the odontogenic keratocyst unusual are its characteristic features including its potentially aggressive behavior, high recurrence rate, and an association with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Odontogenic keratocysts, now reclassified as keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs by the World Health Organization, are a clinical entity with a characteristic microscopic picture, kinetic growth, and biological behavior. The characteristic features are unique among all the different inflammatory and developmental cysts that occur in the jaws. In this report, we present a 35-year-old female patient with a massive KCOT with buccal cortical plate expansion and unusual anteroposterior extension extending from the premolar area up to the condyle.

  15. Synchronous occurrence of odontogenic myxoma with multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhe; Liu, Bing; Zhang, WenFeng; Chen, XinMing

    2013-01-01

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign developmental tumor with many distinguishing clinical and histologic features. Usually, multiple KCOTs occur as a component of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The odontogenic myxoma is a rare benign tumor that represents about 3% of all odontogenic tumors. This article reports the case of mandible odontogenic myxoma with synchronous occurrence of multiple KCOTs, partial expression of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. A review of the international literature is also presented.

  16. Diagnostically Challenging Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: A Selective Review of 7 Jawbone Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Considerable variation in the clinicopathologic presentation of epithelial odontogenic tumors can sometimes be confusing and increase the chance of misdiagnosis. Seven diagnostically challenging jawbone lesions are described. There were 2 cases of mistaken identity in our ameloblastoma file. One unicystic type, initially diagnosed and treated as a lateral periodontal cyst, showed destructive recurrence 6 years postoperatively. The other globulomaxillary lesion was managed under the erroneous diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and recurred 4 times over an 11-year period. This tumor was found in retrospect to be consistent with an adenoid ameloblastoma with dentinoid. The diagnosis of cystic squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT) occurring as a radicular lesion of an impacted lower third molar was one of exclusion. Of two unsuspected keratocystic odontogenic tumors, one depicted deceptive features of pericoronitis, while the other case has long been in our files with the diagnosis of globulomaxillary SOT. Two cases of primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma appeared benign clinically and exhibited unexpected findings; an impacted third molar began to erupt in association with the growth of carcinoma and another periradicular carcinoma showed dentinoid formation. Cases selectively reviewed in this article present challenging problems which require clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:20596984

  17. Comparison of immunoexpression of VEGF, TGF-β and MMP-9 in ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor = Comparação da imunoexpressão de VEGF, TGF-β e MMP-9 em ameloblastoma e tumor odontogênico adenomatóide

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    Ferreira, Stefânia Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudos sobre tumores odontogênicos têm identificado várias disfunções moleculares envolvidas no seu desenvolvimento, e alguns mecanismos como a angiogênese e modulação da matriz são objetos úteis para investigar as diferenças no comportamento biológico destes tumores. Alguns marcadores importantes para identificar a agressividade do tumor por imunoistoquímica são as proteínas VEGF, TGF-ß e MMP-9. Este estudo teve como objetivo comparar a expressão imunoistoquímica de VEGF, TGF-ß e MMP-9 entre ameloblastoma e tumor odontogênico adenomatoide (TOA. Métodos: Imunoexpressão de VEGF, TGF-ß e MMP-9 foi estudada em 15 ameloblastomas sólidos e 15 TOA. Uma análise semiquantitativa das células imunomarcadas foi realizada e a análise estatística foi feita usando o teste não paramétrico de Mann-Whitney e o teste de correlação de Spearman, com nível de significância de 0,05 (P0. 05. Conclusão: Os resultados sugerem o envolvimento da angiogênese na progressão tumoral de ameloblastomas e o efeito indutor de células estromais em TOA, portanto, justificando o seu potencial de crescimento mais baixo

  18. Odontogenic tumors in Nigerian children and adolescents- a retrospective study of 92 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oluseyi F; Ladeinde, Akinola L; Adeyemo, Wasiu L; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle O

    2004-01-01

    Background Tumours arising from odontogenic tissues are rare and constitute a heterogenous group of interesting lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OT) among Nigerian children and adolescents 19 years or younger. Patients and methods The histopathology records were retrospectively reviewed for all the tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral cavity and the jaws seen in children and adolescents ≤ 19 years seen between January 1980 and December 2003. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were re-evaluated and the diagnosis in each case was confirmed or modified according to World Health Organization (WHO) classification, 1992; and were subjected to analysis of age, sex, site of tumor and histopathologic type. Results A total of 477 tumors and tumor-like lesions were seen in patients ≤ 19 years during the period of the study. Of these, 92 (19.3%) were odontogenic tumors. Benign odontogenic tumors constituted 98.9% of the cases seen, while only 1 case (1.1%) of malignant variety was seen during the period. The mean (SD) age of patients was 14.9 (± 3.1) years (range, 4–19 years). Male-to-female ratio was 1:1; and mandible-to-maxilla ratio was 2.7:1. OT's were most frequently seen in patients aged 16–19 years (46.7%) and the least number (2.2%) were found in patients aged 0–5 years. Among nine histologic types of OT seen, ameloblastoma (48.9%), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (19.6%) and odontogenic myxoma (8.7%) were predominant. Multicystic/solid and unicystic variants of ameloblastoma were diagnosed in 40 (89%) and 5 (11%) cases respectively. Conclusions Odontogenic tumors are relatively common in children and adolescents in Nigeria. One out of every 5 children and adolescents with tumors and tumor-like lesions of oral cavity and the jaws seen in this study had a diagnosis of odontogenic tumor. PMID:15566578

  19. c-Myc oncogene expression in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosvi, Zama; Rekha, K

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of c-Myc oncogene in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors. Ten cases each of ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst were selected and primary monoclonal mouse anti-human c-Myc antibody was used in a dilution of 1: 50. Statistical Analysis was performed using Mann Whitney U test. 80% positivity was observed in ameloblastoma, AOT and OKC; 50% positivity in radicular cyst and 20% positivity in dentigerous cyst. Comparison of c-Myc expression between ameloblastoma and AOT did not reveal significant results. Similarly, no statistical significance was observed when results of OKC were compared with ameloblastoma and AOT. In contrast, significant differences were seen on comparison of dentigerous cyst with ameloblastoma and AOT and radicular cyst with AOT. From the above data we conclude that (1) Ameloblastoma and AOT have similar proliferative potential and their biologic behavior cannot possibly be attributed to it. (2) OKC has an intrinsic growth potential which is absent in other cysts and reinforces its classification as keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

  20. Different manifestations of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor

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    Estevam Rubens Utumi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor normally presents as apainless, slow-growing mass, involving both maxilla and mandible,primarily the anterior segment (incisor/canine area. It generallyaffects young adults in the third to fourth decades, with no genderpredilection. Computerized tomography images revealed importantcharacteristics that were not detected by panoramic radiography,such as fenestration, calcification and tooth-like structures. Thetypical microscopic feature of this lesion is the presence of variableamounts of aberrant epithelial cells, without nuclei, which arenamed “ghost cells”. In addition, dysplastic dentine can be foundand occasionally the cyst can be associated with an area of dentalhard tissue formation resembling an odontoma. The treatment forcalcifying cystic odontogenic tumor involves simple enucleationand curettage. The purpose of this article is to present two differentmanifestation of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in whichcomputerized tomography, associated to clinical features, servedas an important tool for diagnosis, adequate surgical planning andfollow-up of patients.

  1. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [4,5,8,12,15,16]. In 2005, calcifying odontogenic cyst was reclassified into categories: Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT), a benign cystic neoplasm characterized by an ameloblastoma‑like epithelium with ghost cells that may calcify.

  2. Posterior Mediastinal Adenomatoid Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Vishwas Parekh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid tumor is an uncommon benign neoplasm of mesothelial differentiation that distinctively arises in and around the genital organs. In rare instances, it has been described in extragenital locations. There have been only two reports documenting its occurrence in the anterior mediastinum, and no reports documenting its occurrence in the posterior mediastinum. We report the first case of posterior mediastinal adenomatoid tumor. A 37-year-old Caucasian woman presented with symptoms of bronchitis. Imaging studies identified a 2.0 cm posterior mediastinal mass abutting the T9 vertebral body, clinically and radiologically most consistent with schwannoma. Histologic sections revealed a lesion composed of epithelioid cells arranged in cords and luminal profiles embedded in a fibrotic to loose stroma and surrounded by a fibrous pseudocapsule. Lesional cells showed vacuolated eosinophilic cytoplasm and peripherally displaced nuclei with prominent nucleoli. There was focal cytologic atypia but no mitotic figures or necrosis was identified. The lesional cells expressed cytokeratin, calretinin, and nuclear WT1 but were negative for PAX8, TTF1, p53, chromogranin, CD31, and CD34, and Ki67 showed <2% proliferation rate, diagnostic of adenomatoid tumor. Three years after resection, the patient is in good health without tumor recurrence. Thus, our encounter effectively expands the differential diagnosis of posterior mediastinal neoplastic entities.

  3. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikarinen, V J; Calonius, P E; Meretoja, J

    1976-08-01

    A 36-year-old woman was examined and treated for a rare odontogenic tumor in the mandible, the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as the Pindborg tumor. The tumor extended from the left mandibular molar region to the right premolar area and had almost completely destroyed the bone in the anterior mandibular region. An orthopantomogram showed a multiloculated radiolucent lesion, with an unerupted tooth in the center surrounded by a radiopaque area. In addition, finely granular calcification was visible here and there in the tumor area. In the histologic examination the tumor tissue could be identified as calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. Under electron microscopy the fibrillar structure at the basal cell level suggested the presence of amyloid. The tumor was removed by enucleation with a collar of surrounding tissue. No signs of recurrence have been noted at follow-up examinations.

  4. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor): an unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baunsgaard, P; Løntoft, E; Sørensen, M

    1983-05-01

    A case of the rare calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is reported. The tumor was situated high in the left maxillary antrum, bulging into the nasal cavity. The presenting signs were homolateral nasal stenosis and bulging of the lateral nasal wall. The clinical appearances and histological findings are submitted and compared with those in cases described previously. Treatment and prognosis are discussed. From the present case it is apparent that despite its odontogenic nature the tumor may occur so far from the teeth that clinically it may be mistaken for a tumor of the nasal cavity.

  5. A 10-year retrospective study on odontogenic tumors in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Nasim; Rajabi, Moones; Mehrdad, Leili; Sajjadi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review cases of odontogenic tumors diagnosed in two pathology centers in Tehran, Iran, during a 10-year period. Patients' records were seen at two teaching pathology Centre's of Shahid Beheshti University between the months of March 2000 to 2010 with histologic diagnosis of any type of odontogenic tumors. The records were analyzed for frequency, age, sex, site, as well as clinical, radiographic and histopathologic findings. Of 30706 biopsies, 4767 (15.5%) cases were diagnosed as oral and maxillofacial lesions. Among these, 720 cases were tumoral with 188 (26.1%) cases of odontogenic tumors. Tumors with odontogenic epithelium origin formed 70.2% of total numbers of odontogenic tumors. Mixed odontogenic tumors and tumors of odontogenic ectomesenchyme comprised 12.2% and 17.5% of the cases respectively. Ameloblastoma, with a frequency of 62.2% was the most common tumor in this review which was followed by odontoma and odontogenic myxoma. Although there are few studies on odontogenic tumors in literature, the comparison of our results with existing data shows significant differences in the distribution of tumors and age of patients, which may be due to ethnic features and geographic distribution of patients. Future studies on other ethnic groups are essential for further clarification of the findings in this research.

  6. Prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors among UAE population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natheer Hashim Al-Rawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Odontogenic cysts and tumors are lesions that tend to arise from the tooth apparatus or its remnants. Odontogenic cysts and tumors constitute an important aspect of oral maxillofacial pathology as they can be diagnosed in general dental practice. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors diagnosed in the UAE and to compare the results with findings in the literature. Materials and Methods: Data of odontogenic cysts diagnosed between 1990 and 2010 were collected from the files of the Oral Pathology Laboratory and Oral Surgery Department of Tawam Hospital, UAE. Results: Most of the prevalent odontogenic cysts are radicular cysts (69.1% - followed by dentigerous cysts (7.9%. Among the odontogenic tumors, the most prevalent is odontoma (12.2% followed by ameloblastoma (2.9%. The middle and posterior mandible was the most common anatomic site for the formation of cysts and tumors. In fact, 93.4% of patients over 40 years presented with odontogenic cysts, whereas 6.3% presented with odontogenic tumor. Odontoma as odontogenic tumor was seen mostly in the first and second decades of life. Conclusion: The prevalence of odontogenic cysts was similar to that reported in the literature, with inflammatory cysts occurring most frequently.

  7. Tumor odontógeno adenomatoide en región mandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Sánchez Cabrales; Dadonim Vila Morales; Ángel Mario Felipe Garmendia; Alain Serra Ortega; Alma Torres Gómez de Cádiz

    2010-01-01

    El tumor odontogénico adenomatoide es un tumor poco frecuente derivado del epitelio odontontogénico, que contiene estructuras canaliculares con modificaciones inductivas de intensidad variable en el tejido conjuntivo. Es una lesión de crecimiento lento y poco invasiva pero que se puede asemejar a otras lesiones odontógenas de mayor agresividad como el quiste dentígero y el ameloblastoma entre otros. Su localización clásica (área de caninos superiores) nos orienta al diagnóstico y su patrón hi...

  8. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla (Pindborg tumor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Danko; Manojlović, Spomenka; Luksić, Ivica; Grgurević, Jaksa

    2012-11-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), or the Pindborg tumor, is very rare neoplasm, which accounts up to 1% of all odontogenic tumors. These tumors involve mandible almost twice as common as the maxillary bone, mostly in the premolar and molar region and present at first with local swelling. There is no gender predilection and the tumor usually appears between 2nd and 6th decade of life. We report the case of a 36-year-old male patient with a Pindborg tumor in the maxillary region on the right side, also involving the adjacent maxillary sinus, with destroying of the local anatomical structures. Complete surgical excision of the tumor has been performed and four years after surgical treatment, there is no sign of recurrence.

  9. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Garg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/controllers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  10. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  11. [Case study: a calcified epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withofs, D; Neyt, L; Abeloos, J; De Clercq, C; Mommaerts, M

    1992-09-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a benign but locally aggressive tumor. Occasionally the term Pindborg tumor is used after the Danish pathologist who first described this tumor as an entity. The clinical feature is most commonly a slow-growing painless swelling. The tumor may show considerable roentgenographic variation. Usually this tumor shows characteristic histological features. Some variants can mimic malignant neoplasms. The invasive nature is not so obvious as that of an ameloblastoma, nevertheless it has to be treated in the same way. A long follow-up period is indicated since recurrence can occur after many years. A patient with a characteristic Pindborg tumor is presented.

  12. Big keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the mandible: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a rare, benign, intraosseous tumor of odontogenic origin with a potential of aggressive and infiltrative behavior. It shows specific histopathological features, and has a high recurrence rate. Case Details: The presented case was of a 30 years old man from South ...

  13. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Clinicopathological aspects and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Robles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign intraosseous neoplasm derived from remnants of the dental lamina and it occurs with high frequency. Regarding histological characteristics, it has a high recurrence rate which is one of the main therapeutic problems. Also, it presents high local aggressiveness, expressed in cortical expansion, delayed eruption and displacement of teeth, blood vessels and nerves. At present, there are various treatments, being ideal the one which presents the lowest risk of recurrence with low morbidity for the patient. In this review, the main histopathological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of this oral pathology are discussed.

  14. Survival and Prognosis for Malignant Tumors of Odontogenic Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sunil; Mark, Jonathan; Xie, Changchun; Ghulam, Enas; Patil, Yash

    2016-07-01

    Determine survival and factors affecting survival for patients with malignant tumors of odontogenic origin. Retrospective analysis of the National Cancer Institute's SEER database (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results). Tertiary medical center. All cases of malignant tumors of odontogenic origin were extracted from the SEER database for the period of 1973 to 2011. Demographic, tumor-specific, and survival data were tabulated and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis conducted according to histopathologic results. Cox regression analysis stratified for histopathology was conducted to determine factors that influenced survival. A total of 308 cases of malignant tumors with odontogenic origin were analyzed. Malignant ameloblastoma accounted for 59.7% of cases, followed by malignant odontogenic tumor (35.4%; including odontogenic carcinoma, odontogenic sarcoma, primary intraosseous carcinoma, and ameloblastic carcinoma) and ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (2.9%). The overall mean and median were 229 and 227 months, respectively, while the 5-year survival rate was 81% for the entire cohort. Malignant ameloblastoma exhibited the best mean survival (237 months), whereas malignant odontogenic tumor (139 months) and ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (42 months) had lower mean survival rates. Younger age, surgery with adjuvant radiation, and smaller tumor size were found to improve survival. Significantly different survival can be expected depending on individual tumor histopathology, tumor size, age at diagnosis, and treatment modality. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  15. [Calcifying odontogenic cyst. A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, G; Lanza, A; Tartaro, G P

    1995-12-01

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) is a rare lesion that involves the jaws which, at times, may evolve into a solid, benign, tumor-like mass. There is no significant sex predilection, but it is probably more common in later life. The diagnosis is base only on histologic examination that represents, in the best of cases, the only way to differentiate the COC from other pathologies. Such lesions include: odontogenic cyst, residual cyst, globulomaxillary cyst, lateral periodontal cyst, ameloblastoma (multicystic and unicystic), odontogenic mixoma, and still with calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor (Pindborg tumor) and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor. The authors report a case of COC, starting point for a review of the clinical, radiographic and histomorphologic features of the lesion.

  16. Amelogenin in odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anigol, Praveen; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Anand, Nagaraja; Yerlagudda, Komali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amelogenins are the major enamel proteins that play a major role in the biomineralization and structural organization of enamel. Aberrations of enamel-related proteins are thought to be involved in oncogenesis of odontogenic epithelium. The expression of amelogenin is possibly an indicator of differentiation of epithelial cells in the odontogenic lesions. Aims and Objectives: The present study aimed to observe the expression of amelogenin immunohistochemically in various odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Paraffin sections of 40 odontogenic lesions were stained immunohistochemically with amelogenin antibodies. The positivity, pattern and intensity of expression of the amelogenin antibody were assessed, graded and statistically compared between groups of odontogenic cysts and tumors. Results: Almost all the odontogenic lesions expressed amelogenin in the epithelial component with the exception of an ameloblastic carcinoma. Differing grades of intensity and pattern were seen between the cysts and tumors. Intensity of expression was uniformly prominent in all odontogenic lesions with hard tissue formation. Statistical analysis however did not indicate significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: The expression of amelogenin antibody is ubiquitous in odontogenic tissues and can be used as a definitive marker for identification of odontogenic epithelium. PMID:25937729

  17. Expression of proliferative markers in ameloblastomas and malignant odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, D; Lourenço, S Q C; Ruiz-Ávila, I; Bravo, M; Sousa, T; de Faria, P A S; González-Moles, M A

    2013-05-01

    To compare the proliferative activity in ameloblastoma and malignant odontogenic tumors, as assessed by Ki-67 immunostaining and determine whether expression of substance P (SP) and NK-1 receptor (NK-1R) is related to cell proliferation in these tumors. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate protein expression in 44 benign and malignant odontogenic tumors from 39 patients. Immunohistochemistry was performed with anti-SP, anti-NK-1R, and anti-Ki-67 monoclonal antibodies, and the clinical and pathological data of the patients with odontogenic tumor were evaluated. Expression of Ki-67 in malignant odontogenic tumors was significantly higher than in ameloblastomas (P tumors, expression of SP and NK-1R was positively correlated with higher expression of Ki-67. These findings show that the expression level of Ki-67 in ameloblastomas was positively correlated with the rate of growth of odontogenic tumors. Overexpression of NK-1R complex in malignant odontogenic tumors could be part of the trigger stimulus that results in higher proliferative activity of the tumor. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Cytologic findings in calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarkhar, Mohammad Javad; Tabei, Seyed Z; Kumar, Perikala V; Hashemi, Seyed Baseer

    2005-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), or Pindborg's tumor, is a rare, benign, odontogenic neoplasm first described by Pindborg in 1955. It is most commonly seen in the fourth and fifth decades of life, usually arises in the mandibular premolar-molar areas and accounts for approximately 1% of all intraosseous odontogenic tumors. This report describes the cytologic findings in a case of CEOT. A 62-year-old woman was referred to the ear, nose and throat clinic with a right maxillary mass. The fine needle aspiration (FNA) smears showed numerous calcifications; amorphous, eosinophilic material; and clusters of round epithelial cells embedded in a bloody background. The smears were diagnosed as suspicious for malignancy. Maxillectomy was done. The histologic sections were diagnosed as CEOT. FNA findings of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor have been described rarely. The clusters of epithelial cells with prominent nucleoli are mistaken for features of a malignant tumor.

  19. Odontogenic tumors: a retrospective clinicopathological study from two Italian centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, C; Mascitti, M; Santarelli, A; Tempesta, A; Limongelli, L; Favia, G; Maiorano, E

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to perform an epidemiological analysis of all odontogenic tumors treated in the University Hospitals "Ospedali Riuniti" in Ancona and "Policlinico" in Bari, from 1990 to 2015. A retrospective survey of 277 patients treated for odontogenic tumors from 1990 to 2015 was performed. Data were retrieved from the archives of the above quoted Sections of Pathology. The lesions were classified according to 2005 WHO histological classification, and the following variables were analyzed: age, sex, histopathological diagnosis, site distribution, tumor size, and relapses. Peripheral odontogenic tumors were analyzed considering these lesions separately from their central counterparts. In a total of 344 surgical specimens, there were 277 primary tumors and 67 recurrences. As regards primary lesions, there were 185 odontogenic keratocysts (keratocystic odontogenic tumors) (66.8%), 49 ameloblastomas (17.7%), and 40 other benign odontogenic tumors (14.4%). As to malignant tumors, only 3 ameloblastic carcinomas were found (1.1%). The mean age was 46.7 years, with a M:F ratio of 1.8:1. The mandible was the most common site of localization, with 211 cases (76.2%). Also, 21 cases of peripheral odontogenic tumors were found, ameloblastomas being the most common (8 cases, 38.1%). There is a wide variety of cysts, some of which are subject to variations according to sex, localization, and age. Odontogenic tumors are rare neoplasms and appear to show variations according to sex, localization, and age, and may be useful to the clinicians who need to make clinical judgments before biopsy about the most probable diagnosis.

  20. Central granular cell odontogenic tumor: Report of an unusual case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Madan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central granular cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT is an unusual benign odontogenic neoplasm characterized by the presence of granular cells associated with apparently inactive odontogenic epithelium. These tumors tend to occur in the posterior mandible and usually present as well-defined unilocular or multilocular radiolucent lesions. So far, only <40 cases of CGCOT have been described in the literature under various terminologies. Though these tumors were not considered as distinct entity in the recent WHO classification of odontogenic tumors, long-term follow-up is recommended as malignant counterpart of CGCOT has already been reported. The main aim of this article is to report an additional case of CGCOT to the literature, occurring in a 73-year-old male.

  1. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor: Case Reports and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukta B Motwani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The lesion traditionally known as odontogenic keratocyst has been renamed by WHO in 2005, as "keratocystic" odontogenic tumor as it is more appropriate and reflects its potential for local, destructive behavior. It is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of jaw, which is unusual due to its characteristic histopathological and clinical features, including potentially aggressive behavior, high recurrence rate and association with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of proper diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumor in order to prevent the recurrence due to improper surgical excision of the lesion.

  2. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) without calcification: A rare entity

    OpenAIRE

    Seema Kaushal; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Maneesh Vijay; Ankur Rustagi

    2012-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a rare benign odontogenic tumor that was first described by Pindborg in 1955. It accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic neoplasms. The tumor is characterized histologically by the presence of polygonal epithelial cells, calcification, and eosinophilic deposits resembling amyloid. Noncalcifying Pindborg tumor is very rare and only three cases have been documented in the English language literature so far. We present an additional case of non...

  3. Tumor odontógeno adenomatoide en región mandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Sánchez Cabrales

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El tumor odontogénico adenomatoide es un tumor poco frecuente derivado del epitelio odontontogénico, que contiene estructuras canaliculares con modificaciones inductivas de intensidad variable en el tejido conjuntivo. Es una lesión de crecimiento lento y poco invasiva pero que se puede asemejar a otras lesiones odontógenas de mayor agresividad como el quiste dentígero y el ameloblastoma entre otros. Su localización clásica (área de caninos superiores nos orienta al diagnóstico y su patrón histológico ductiforme es muy propio de este tumor. Otros tumores que se encuentran dentro de este grupo son el fibroma ameloblástico, el odontoameloblastoma, el quiste odontógeno calcificante y los odontomas compuesto y complejo. Este grupo de lesiones puede o no tener formaciones de tejido duro dental dentro de ellos. Por esta razón, se presenta un paciente con este tipo de tumor, al que se le realizó estudio histopatológico, se revisó la literatura acerca de este tumor odontogénico benigno y sus características clínicas, radiográficas, tratamiento, así como los diagnósticos diferenciales que se deben tener en cuenta.

  4. Prevalence profile of odontogenic cysts and tumors on Brazilian sample after the reclassification of odontogenic keratocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Filipe; de Noronha, Mariana Saturnino; Silva, Maiza Luiza Vieira; Amaral, Márcio Bruno Figueiredo; Grossmann, Soraya de Mattos Carmago; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; de Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; de Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the reclassification of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) as a tumor on the prevalence profile of odontogenic cysts (OCs) and odontogenic tumors (OTs). Two referral Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology services in Brazil were evaluated. All cases diagnosed as OCs or OTs were selected and classified according to the 1992 WHO-classification (cases before 2005 WHO classification of tumors excluding OKC) and the 2005 WHO classification of tumors, going forward including cases of odontogenic keratocyst tumor (KCOT). The frequency and prevalence of OCs and OTs were compared before and after the reclassification. Among 27,854 oral biopsies, 4920 (17.66%) were OCs and 992 (3.56%) were OTs. The prevalence of OTs before 2005 WHO classification of tumors was 2.04%, while the prevalence after 2005 WHO classification was 11.51% (p tumor diagnosed was odontoma with 194 cases (39.67%), and after 2005 WHO classification of tumors the KCOT was the most frequent with 207 cases (41.07%). The increase in the prevalence of OTs after 2005 WHO is related to the improvement of pathology services and to the inclusion of KCOT in the OTs group. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between ezrin and podoplanin expressions in keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denise Tostes; de Santis, Laís Priscila; Assao, Agnes; Tjioe, Kellen Cristine; Nonogaki, Suely; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Soares, Fernando Augusto

    2014-12-05

    The aims of this study were to investigate the immunolocalization of ezrin and its relationship with the podoplanin expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors. The immunohistochemical expressions of ezrin and podoplanin by odontogenic epithelium were evaluated in keratocystic odontogenic tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Our results showed strong cytoplasmic ezrin and membranous podoplanin expressions in basal epithelial layer of all keratocystic odontogenic tumors. The cytoplasmic and membranous ezrin expressions were also detected in suprabasal epithelial layers of tumors. Statistically significant difference between cellular immunolocalization of ezrin and podoplanin odontogenic epithelium were found by Wilcoxon's test (p odontogenic tumors was detected by Spearman test. These results suggest that ezrin and podoplanin may contribute to the expansive growth and local invasiveness of keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Additionally, as both proteins were overexpressed by odontogenic epithelium, their possible roles need to be further explored in benign odontogenic tumors.

  6. Comparison of immunoexpression of VEGF, TGF-β and MMP-9 in ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor = Comparação da imunoexpressão de VEGF, TGF-β e MMP-9 em ameloblastoma e tumor odontogênico adenomatóide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferreira, Stefânia Jeronimo; Lima, Emeline das Neves de Araújo; Maia, Conceição Aparecida Dornelas Monteiro; Pinheiro, Fábio Henrique de Sá Leitão; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida; Galvão, Hébel Cavalcanti

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Estudos sobre tumores odontogênicos têm identificado várias disfunções moleculares envolvidas no seu desenvolvimento, e alguns mecanismos como a angiogênese e modulação da matriz são objetos...

  7. [Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla (Pindborg tumor)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Jäkel, K T; Friedrich, R E

    2004-02-01

    A male patient presented with an extraordinarily large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT or Pindborg-tumor) that affected the maxilla. The disease became evident due to alterations in the facial aspect, in particular of the perioral region, caused by the expanding tumor. CEOT is characterised by the slowly growing mass of part of the jaws. Multilocular or extraosseous manifestations are extremely rare. Malignant transformation with metastases is rare. Radiography depicts characteristic, but not obligatory, areas of calcification inside the tumor. The surgical therapy for CEOT is complete local resection with safe margins. If tooth bearing parts of the jaws are affected, these teeth almost always have to be removed. The prognosis is excellent for overall survival. Local recurrences have rarely been reported but may be found even decades after primary treatment. Three years following surgical therapy there is no evidence of local recurrence. A long-term follow-up control is recommended.

  8. Unusual presentation of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha Kesidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT is a common odontogenic cyst with aggressive behavior with a high recurrence rate. Features that predict recurrence of KOT are thin friable epithelium which is difficult to enucleate and presence of satellite cysts in the fibrous wall. Most of the lesions grow in an anteroposterior direction without causing any bony expansion. Here, we report two cases of KOT with different clinical presentation.

  9. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi K Nair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT has been identified as a "tumor" after observation of its biological behavior and genetic abnormalities consistent with neoplastic progression. In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO working group considered odontogenic keratocyst (OKC to be a tumor and recommended the term KCOT, distinguishing the lesion from the orthokeratinizing variant, which is now considered an OKC or orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Very rarely, KCOTs can transform into more aggressive lesions such as ameloblastoma and primary intraosseous carcinoma (PIOSCC. In this paper, we present a case of KCOT involving the angle and ramus of the mandible, with histopathologic evidence of ameloblastomatous changes. We also discuss about the evolution of this lesion from a cyst to a tumor along with the latest updates of the entity.

  10. CT and MR imaging appearances of an extraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, A S; Pak, M W; Kew, J; Metreweli, C

    2000-02-01

    We herein report a rare case of extraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor with local aggressive behavior. CT and MR imaging showed the distinctive appearances of this histologic entity. We briefly discuss the radiologic features of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor and the relevant literature.

  11. Deep Neck Space Infection Caused by Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji-Su; Kim, Su-Gwan; You, Jae-Seek; Min, Hong-Gi; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Eun-Sik; Kim, Cheol-Man; Lim, Kyung-Seop

    2014-03-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign cystic intraosseous tumor of odontogenic origin. An infection of a KCOT is not common because KCOT is a benign developmental neoplasm. Moreover, a severe deep neck space infection with compromised airway caused by infected KCOT is rare. This report presents a 60-year-old male patient with a severe deep neck space infection related to an infected KCOT due to cortical bone perforation and rupture of the exudate. Treatment of the deep neck space infection and KCOT are reported.

  12. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: case report with CT and ultrasonography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumer, A Pinar; Sumer, Mahmut; Celenk, Peruze; Danaci, Murat [Faculty of Dentistry, University of Ondokuz Mayis, Samsun (Turkmenistan); Gunhan, Oemer [Gulhane Military Medicine Academy, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2012-03-15

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign odontogenic tumor with a potentially aggressive and infiltrative behavior. KCOT is most commonly occurred in mandible and demonstrate a unilocular, round, oval, scalloped radiolucent area, while large lesions may appear multilocular. An important characteristic of KCOT is its propensity to grow in an antero-posterior direction within medullary cavity of bone causing minimal expansion. Definitive diagnosis relies on histological examination. In this report, a KCOT that had an expansion both buccal and lingual cortical bone is described including its features in computed tomography and ultrasonographic exams. The lesion was removed surgically via an intraoral approach under local anesthesia and histologically reported as a KCOT.

  13. Odontogenic calcificant cystic tumor: a report of two clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Daniel; Villanueva, Julio; Espinosa, Sebastián; Cornejo, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Odontogenic Calcificant Cystic Tumor (OCCT) is an infrequent injury. It arises from odontogenic epithelial rests present in the maxilla, jaw or gum. Gorlin and col. described the OCCT for first time as an own pathological entity in 1962. Clinically, the OCCT represents 1% of the odontogenic injuries. It is possible to be found from the first decade to the eighth decade. It affects in same proportion the maxilla and the jaw, being the most common in the dented zones, with greater incidence in the first molar area. Two case reports of OCCT in two different ages, both in female individuals, one at 5 years old and the other at 35 years old are presented. Enucleation of the tumor was the treatment chosen. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature related to these two cases of OCCT and its treatment, putting an emphasis on its aetiology, biological behaviour and treatment.

  14. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor. A clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicconetti, A; Tallarico, M; Bartoli, A; Ripari, A; Maggiani, F

    2004-06-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), Pindborg tumor, is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm representing about 0.4-3% of all odontogenic tumors. This tumor more frequently affects adults in an age range of 20-60 years, with a peak of incidence between 40 and 60 years. About 190 cases of CEOT have been reported in the dental literature. Fifty-two percent of cases of CEOT is associated with a tooth impacted and/or displaced by the tumor. The primary CEOT has a recurrence rate of 10-15%, after total excision, and its malignant transformation is a very rare occurrence. The authors report a case of primary intra-osseous CEOT, embedding the mandibular right second molar, in a 24 year-old male. Radiographs showed a well-defined unilocular osteolytic lesion, swelling and reabsorbing the mandible and displacing the inferior alveolar nerve. It was possible to perform conservative surgical treatment consisting of the enucleation of the tumor together with a portion of tumor-free bone cavity margin and the debridement of the inferior alveolar neuro-vascular bundle, which was surrounded by a tumor capsule-like structure. The postoperative histological examination of the tumor revealed typical benign features. The differential diagnosis and work-up of the tumor treatment are discussed in relation with its histological typing and localization in the jaws.

  15. The relationship between ezrin and podoplanin expressions in keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Denise Tostes; Santis, Priscila de; Assao, Agnes; Tjioe, Kellen C; Nonogaki, Suely; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Soares, Fernando Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aims of this study were to investigate the immunolocalization of ezrin and its relationship with the podoplanin expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Material and Methods The immunohistochemical expressions of ezrin and podoplanin by odontogenic epithelium were evaluated in keratocystic odontogenic tumors using monoclonal antibodies...

  16. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Treatment modalities: Study of 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor has been one of the most controversial entities of the maxillofacial surgery. It can become quite large because of its ability for significant expansion, extension into adjacent tissues and rapid growth and also has high reccurence rate as it shows a thin, friable wall, which is ...

  17. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Treatment modalities: Study of 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-11

    Jun 11, 2013 ... Management of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor has been one of the most controversial entities of the maxillofacial surgery. It can become quite large because of its ability for significant expansion, extension into adjacent tissues and rapid growth and also has high reccurence rate as it shows a thin, ...

  18. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a ...

  19. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor and ndash; An Interesting Case Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Peter Thermadam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the jaw lesions, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, ameloblastoma, dentigerous cyst forms the common ones. Even though there are classical clinical features for each of the odontogenic lesions, at times, it may be difficult to arrive at a clinical diagnosis for the lesion without the histopathological examination. Age, gender and demographic data can be overlapping in few lesions. We hereby present an interesting case of similar type where in clinical diagnosis was challenging and interesting. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 209-213

  20. [Pindborg tumor or odontogenic calcifying epithelial tumor. A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, G; Sotsiu, F

    1991-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) is an uncommon odontogenic neoplasm first recognized as a distinct entity by Pindborg in 1955. One of the frequent histological findings is the occurrence of amorphous deposits of so called amyloid like material within the tumour. A case of this tumour is reported in a 75 years woman.

  1. Intraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor: A rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Chandramani B; Vijayvargiya, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a locally aggressive, rare benign odontogenic neoplasm that accounts for tumors. It was first described by a Dutch pathologist Jens Jorgen Pindborg in 1955. It is most often located in the posterior mandible. The tumor usually appears between the second and sixth decade of life and has no gender predilection. It is slow-growing neoplasm with a recurrence rate of 10-15% and with rare malignant transformation. Early diagnosis is essential to avoid oro-maxillofacial deformation and destruction. CEOT is rarely reported in India. We, herewith present a rare case of CEOT with unusual features associated with an impacted right third molar in the posterior mandible of 35 years male, with an emphasis on clinical, radiographic, histopathology and immunohistochemical features.

  2. Characterization and management of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor in relation to its histopathological and biological features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral Mendes, R.A.; Carvalho, J.F.C.; van der Waal, I.

    2010-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), formerly referred to as odontogenic keratocyst, is a benign neoplasm of odontogenic origin which may present an aggressive and infiltrative behavior leading to high recurrence rates. A review of the various treatment modalities, ranging from simple enucleation

  3. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    OpenAIRE

    Saravana HL Goteti

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005) cla...

  4. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) without calcification: A rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Seema; Mathur, Sandeep R; Vijay, Maneesh; Rustagi, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a rare benign odontogenic tumor that was first described by Pindborg in 1955. It accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic neoplasms. The tumor is characterized histologically by the presence of polygonal epithelial cells, calcification, and eosinophilic deposits resembling amyloid. Noncalcifying Pindborg tumor is very rare and only three cases have been documented in the English language literature so far. We present an additional case of noncalcifying Pindborg tumor and review the previously reported cases. Because noncalcifying Pindborg tumor is believed to be an aggressive variant, a definitive resection of the tumor with tumor-free surgical margins and long-term follow-up is recommended.

  5. Giant pindborg tumor (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor): an unusual case report with radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Satya Ranjan; Lenka, Sthitaprajna; Sahoo, Sujit Ranjan; Mishra, Sobhan

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors develop in the jaws from odontogenic tissues such as enamel organ, Hertwig epithelial root sheath, dental lamina, and so on. A variety of tumors unique to the maxilla and mandible are therefore seen. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare, aggressive, benign odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin accounting for only about 1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is eponymously called "Pindborg tumor", as it was first described by Pindborg in 1955. The origin of this locally invasive tumor remains unknown. It is thought to arise from stratum intermedium. It commonly affects the posterior mandible manifesting as a slow-growing asymptomatic swelling often associated with an impacted tooth. We report a case of CEOT, for which, owing to its huge size we have proposed the term "giant" Pindborg tumor (CEOT). This is probably the largest case of this tumor reported so far in the English literature. The present case also has the classic yet rare "driven snow" appearance of the tumor on radiographs.

  6. Giant Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor: Three Cases and a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Caixeta Guimarães

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign intra-bone mass originating from dental lamina or its residue. It represents 2–11% of jaw cysts, and has a slow but aggressive growth. The evaluation of molecular characteristics, immunohistochemistry, and genetic expression currently have no established classification regarding the evolution and pathophysiologic pattern of these lesions.   Materials and Methods: This is a clinical retrospective study with a full analysis of patient history regarding physical evaluation, radiologic images, pathology results, and surgical resection. We performed a major literature review concerning current concepts relating to its biological characterization.   Results: Three cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor were identified. Two of the cases were large, with aggressive behavior and significant bone destruction and recurrence, which had been overlooked for more than a decade. The third case had an early diagnosis, and the treatment led to full recovery and complete healing. Conclusion:  The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign lesion with slow growth, which lends itself to a more conservative treatment, even in cases of large lesions. A better understanding of these tumors, both at the biological and molecular level, could lead to guidelines for treatment and prognosis of such patients.

  7. Metallothionein in the radicular, dentigerous, orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts and in keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues; Caldeira, Patrícia Carlos; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; de Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2011-03-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a protein correlated with cellular differentiation and proliferation, as well as with the inhibition of apoptosis. The aims were to report and to compare the MT expression in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT); to correlate the MT with cellular proliferation; and to evaluate the influence of the inflammation in MT. Nine cases of radicular cyst (RC), nine dentigerous cyst (DC), four orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC), and eight KOT were submitted to immunohistochemistry using anti-MT and anti-Ki-67. Indexes of MT (IMT) and Ki-67 (IK) were obtained. Lesions were grouped according to inflammation: mild-to-moderate (group A) and intense (group B). IMT proved to be highest in RC (91%), followed by DC (89%), KOT (78%), and OOC (63%). IMT was inversely correlated with IK in KOT, and OCC, but was positively correlated with RC and DC. No differences in IMT and in IK could be observed between groups A and B. The higher IMT found in RC and DC compared to OCC and KOT, as well as the differences between the last ones, is possibly correlated with their different histopathological features and clinical behavior. In RC and DC, MT may play a role in cellular proliferation. However, it seems that MT is either less or is not related to proliferation in OOC and in KOT. Moreover, inflammation does not seem to alter IMT and IK. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Odontogenic tumors: A review of 675 cases in Eastern Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana HL Goteti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005 classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2% was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2% and odontoma (19.9%. The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population.

  9. Giant Pindborg Tumor (Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor: An Unusual Case Report with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Ranjan Misra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors develop in the jaws from odontogenic tissues such as enamel organ, Hertwig epithelial root sheath, dental lamina, and so on. A variety of tumors unique to the maxilla and mandible are therefore seen. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT is a rare, aggressive, benign odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin accounting for only about 1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is eponymously called ′′Pindborg tumor′′, as it was first described by Pindborg in 1955. The origin of this locally invasive tumor remains unknown. It is thought to arise from stratum intermedium. It commonly affects the posterior mandible manifesting as a slow-growing asymptomatic swelling often associated with an impacted tooth. We report a case of CEOT, for which, owing to its huge size we have proposed the term ′′giant′′ Pindborg tumor (CEOT. This is probably the largest case of this tumor reported so far in the English literature. The present case also has the classic yet rare ′′driven snow′′ appearance of the tumor on radiographs.

  10. The expression of cytokeratin in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, dentigerous cyst, radicular cyst and dermoid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Kaname; Wato, Masahiro; Hayashi, Teruyoshi; Yasuda, Norihiro; Matsushita, Takumi; Ito, Tomohiko; Gamoh, Shoko; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Akio; Morita, Shosuke

    2014-09-01

    The epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocysts exhibits either parakeratosis or orthokeratosis. In 2005, the WHO classified odontogenic keratocysts with parakeratosis as keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT). Odontogenic keratocysts with orthokeratosis were not classified as odontogenic tumors, but instead referred to as orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). To clarify the difference between these two lesions, we investigated their biological characteristics using immunohistochemical studies for cytokeratins (CK) in KCOT and OOC as well as in dentigerous cysts (DC), radicular cysts (RC) and dermoid cysts (DMC). We examined twenty-five cases of KCOT, fifteen cases each of OOC, DC and RC, and ten cases of DMC. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of CK10, 13, 17 and 19. To evaluate the immunohistochemical staining pattern, we divided the epithelial lining of the lesions into three layers (surface layer: su, spinous layer: sp, basal layer: ba). For CK10, most OOC and DMC specimens of su and sp were positive. For CK13 and 19, most KCOT, DC and RC specimens of su and sp were positive. For CK17, most KCOT specimens of su and sp were positive. The percentages of total CK expression of su and sp, and ba of CK19 differed significantly between the lesions (P < 0.001). These results support the hypothesis that OOC originate from not the odontogenic apparatus, but the oral epithelial component.

  11. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 188 cases from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSheddi, Manal Abdulaziz; AlSenani, May Ahmad; AlDosari, Amani Wassam

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) represent an uncommon group of lesions that arise from the tooth-forming apparatus. They pose a significant diagnostic and management challenge. There is a lack of data among the Saudi population. The aim of the study was to establish the relative frequency of the various histological types of OTs. A retrospective study of 188 cases of OTs using the histopathology archives of the College of Dentistry, King Saud University. The histopathology archives of the College of Dentistry, King Saud University were reviewed from January 1984 to December 2010 for OTs. The age and gender of the patients, tumor site, and histopathologic typing were analyzed. A total of 188 (4.3%) patients met the criteria for being classified as an OT. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor (36.7%) was the most commonly diagnosed, followed by ameloblastoma (25.0%), odontoma (14.9%), and odontogenic myxoma (6.4%). Two cases of malignant OTs (1.1%) are found. The male-to-female ratio was 1.4:1. The most frequently affected area was the posterior mandible (48.9%), followed by the anterior maxilla (22.9%). This is a relatively large series of OTs revealing aspects of similarities and differences with those of previous studies of populations in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The findings of the present study may be useful as a guide for clinicians who need to make clinical judgments prior to biopsy about the most probable diagnosis.

  12. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla with ulcerative stomatitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yoshiyuki; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2009-04-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign odontogenic tumor, known as Pindborg tumor. Although ulcer formation was reported in one previously involving the peripheral maxilla, such change of the overlying mucosa has been reported in intraosseous CEOT. We report maxillary CEOT in a patient who complained of spontaneous pain due to extensive ulcer formation of the oral mucosa.

  13. Clear-cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) in the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Yi; Wu, Chung-Wei; Wang, Wen-Chen; Lin, Li-Min; Chen, Yuk-Kwan

    2013-06-01

    We present an uncommon case (female patient aged 59 years) of the clear-cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) (also known as Pindborg tumor) in the mandible. The clinical characteristics and probable origins of the clear tumor cells of previously reported cases of clear-cell variant of intraosseous CEOT are also summarized and discussed.

  14. A Clinicopathological Study of Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors in Hamadan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Fahimeh; Zargaran, Massoumeh; Najmi, Hamidreza; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Odontogenic cysts and tumors are the most frequent osseous destructive lesions of the jaws; however, there is little information regarding the relative frequency of these lesions among the Iranian population. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution of clinically and histologically- diagnosed odontogenic cysts and tumors during a period of 13 years in Hamadan, and also its correlation with age, gender, and the site of the lesion. Materials and Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 413 oral and maxillofacial specimens during 1996 to 2008.The age and the gender of patients, as well as the site of lesion were recorded. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Totally, 70 specimens were recorded as odontogenic cysts and 11 specimens were diagnosed as odontogenic tumors. The most frequent odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cysts (27.2%), followed by radicular cysts (18.6%) and odontogenic keratocysts (18.6%). In addition, cysts were more frequent in male than female individuals. Ameloblastoma was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (64%). Conclusion: Odontogenic cysts were in correlation with age, gender and location. These results showed that dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst were more frequent than other studies. More investigations should be performed to determine the frequency of odontogenic tumors in Iran. PMID:25469355

  15. Odontogenic tumors: A retrospective study of four Brazilian diagnostic pathology centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    da-Costa, Daniela O P.; Maurício, Almir S.; de-Faria, Paulo A S.; da-Silva, Licínio E.; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This article presents the results of a retrospective study of the frequency and classification of odontogenic tumors recorded at four centers of diagnostic pathology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Study Design: All medical records and microscopic slides of odontogenic tumor specimens for the years 1997 to 2007 were retrieved from the files of four services of diagnostic pathology in Rio de Janeiro City. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. Results: A total of 201 odontogenic tumors were found among 15,758 oral biopsies (1.3%). The frequencies of these tumors at the four centers ranged from 0.5% at the National Cancer Institute to 3.3% in a private laboratory. Chi-square analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) between the proportions of odontogenic tumors in the studied centers. Of these, 94.5% were benign and 5.5% were malignant. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (32.3%) was the most frequent lesion, followed by ameloblastoma (29.8%) and odontoma (18.4%). Conclusions: Odontogenic tumors are uncommon in Brazil. Different pathology laboratories reported divergent frequencies of odontogenic tumors, which may reflect institutional specializations and the patient populations served. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, WHO classification. PMID:22143740

  16. Peripheral calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor - Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Deepthi; Jayade, Bhushan V; Jayade, Gautam; Gopalkrishnan, K

    2014-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), Pindborg tumor is a benign, slow growing, but locally invasive neoplasm. It is known to have a common intraosseous variant and a very rare extraosseous variant. We report an unusual case of an extraosseous variant of CEOT of unusual large size and maxillary anterior location, the treatment was planned considering the clinical, radiological and histological features. Though peripheral types are less aggressive and had no recurrence, in our case regular follow up is required considering the aggressiveness of the lesion and its proximity to important adjacent structures.

  17. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor in the mandible - An unusual case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kurian Mathew

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Keratocysytic Odontogenic tumor is a lesion occurring in the oral cavity that has a high recurrence rate. This lesion has an ability to mimic other lesions affecting the jaw. The tumor has a varied clinical and radiographic presentation. This article presents a case report of a 45 year old male patient presenting with an asymptomatic swelling on the right lower jaw associated with an impacted tooth and depicts an unusual radiographic picture. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 45-48

  18. Are All Odontogenic Keratocysts Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors? Correlation between Imaging Features and Epithelial Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harkanwal Preet Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was to correlate and analyze the imaging features and epithelial cell proliferation pattern in different cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT and study the role of inflammation using proliferative markers and different radiographic patterns of KCOT to determine its biological behavior. One hundred and eighty-six cases of KCOT were taken together and grouped based on radiographic patterns. Forty cases were randomly selected and stained using a proliferating cellular nuclear antigen marker. The correlation between imaging and epithelial proliferation with and without inflammation was determined. Unilocular variety is the most common type of KCOT, showing least epithelial proliferation of all the patterns. More than 50% of the multilocular KCOTs were associated with inflammation, showing an enhanced rate of epithelial proliferation. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. Different rates of epithelial proliferation of the different patterns suggested that all odontogenic keratocysts do not behave like tumors and that aggressive treatment should be reserved for selective cases only depending on radiographic and other histopathological parameters such as inflammation.

  19. Kallikrein-related peptidase expression in odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Mark Roger; Woodford, Rebecca; Cuddy, Karl Kevin; Jackson-Boeters, Linda; Hayter, Alyssa; Inkaran, Jeyanth; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Khan, Zia

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to profile the expression of human kallikrein (KLK)-related peptidases (KLK) in odontogenic lesions. Paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed, non-odontogenic (control) and odontogenic lesions were stained for KLK using a standard immunohistochemical technique. The intensity and proportion of epithelial cells stained was scored. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was utilized to evaluate KLK 1-15 mRNA expression in ameloblastomas. KLK 3, 4, 9, 11, and 14 were present in all lesions. KLK 3 staining was increased in ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors. KLK 5 was present only in Keratocystic odontogenic tumor. KLK 6 was significantly higher in ameloblastomas than in other lesions. For KLK 7, keratocystic odontogenic tumors and nasopalatine duct cysts were significantly different. KLK 6, 8, 10, 11, and 13 were significantly higher in ameloblastomas than in other lesions. KLK 9 was increased in keratocystic odontogenic tumors and dentigerous cysts. The expression of KLK 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 12 mRNA was found in ameloblastomas. The results suggested that KLK 6, 8, 10, and 13 could be involved in the progression of ameloblastomas. KLK 10 could have a greater role in odontogenic lesions, rather than non-odontogenic lesions. Future studies aim to define the specific roles of KLK cascades in odontogenic lesions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Expression of p73 and TRAIL in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascitti, Marco; Santarelli, Andrea; Zizzi, Antonio; Procaccini, Maurizio; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Rubini, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors are a group of lesions arising from the odontogenic apparatus. Although the mechanism of oncogenesis and tumor progression in these lesions remains unknown, certain proteins, such as those involved in apoptosis, seem to be involved in the differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of p73 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in odontogenic tumors and cysts, and to clarify changes in the expression of these proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 21 ameloblastomas, 15 keratocystic odontogenic tumors and 15 dentigerous cysts. We carried out quantitative assessment of p73 and TRAIL expression by determining the percentages of positive cells on a continuous scale. Five cases of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst were also examined. The percentages of cells immunohistochemically positive for p73 were 52.6 ± 25.4% in ameloblastomas, 76.0 ± 13.1% in keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and 26.7 ± 30.7% in odontogenic cysts, whereas the corresponding figures for TRAIL were 57.6 ± 16.1%, 8.9 ± 10.0%, and 1.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. Imbalance of the apoptosis pathway, with dysregulation of p73 and TRAIL, seems to play a role in the oncogenesis of odontogenic tumors.(J Oral Sci 58, 459-464, 2016).

  1. Non-syndromic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Involving the Maxillary Sinus: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabelo, Gustavo Davi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The odontogenic keratocyst tumor is rarely found in maxilla. Case Report: This article describes a report of a case of a 60-year-old Caucasian female with an asymptomatic growth in the region of the posterior maxilla tumor diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst. We discuss the diagnosis and workup for this type of injury.

  2. Defects of the Carney complex gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia F C; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-06-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as to facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene displays a loss of protein expression as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included in the study: six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial components of the tumors were separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around the PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations along with two 5'-UTR and four intronic mutations in mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, which indicates that additional genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of such tumors, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice do not show abnormalities, which indicates that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Retrospective study of 289 odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpa, Marianna-Sampaio; Tenório, Jefferson-da-Rocha; do Nascimento, George-João-Ferreira; de Souza-Andrade, Emanuel-Sávio; Veras-Sobral, Ana-Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are considered important among oral lesions because of their clinicopathological heterogeneity, and variable biological behavior. This paper aims to determine the frequency and distribution of OTs, over a period of 10 years, at a public university in Northeastern Brazil and compare this data with previous reports. Material and Methods We reviewed all cases of OTs from oral pathology laboratory of University of Pernambuco (UPE), from 2004 to 2014. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors were classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. In addition, we searched in the English-language literature retrospective studies on OTs that used the same classification. Results Data was obtained allowing the analysis of the tissue hemodynamics. We were able to map the vascularization of the face and it was possible to access three arteries of small diameter (0,60mm angular artery; 0,55mm greater palatine artery; 0,45mm infraorbital artery). Conclusions OTs are uncommon neoplasms with geographic variation. Our clinicopathological features are according to literature. In the present study, KCOT was the most frequent one, showing that the new classification of OTs altered the distribution of these lesions and possibly made KCOT the most common OT observed in diagnostic services worldwide. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, oral pathology. PMID:26827068

  4. Maxillary calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor presenting with abnormal eye signs: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridle, Chris; Visram, Karima; Piper, Kim; Ali, Nayeem

    2006-10-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOT) are uncommon, accounting for less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. The CEOT, since its description by Pindborg in 1958 as a separate pathologic entity, is commonly known as the Pindborg tumor. We present an unusual case of such a tumor in the maxilla presenting with abnormal eye signs. The case demonstrates the use of a Le Fort I down-fracture osteotomy approach to maxillary tumors.

  5. Recurrent bilateral gingival peripheral calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, Aline Corrêa; Camisasca, Danielle Resende; Bonelli, Beatriz R M Venturi; Cabral, Márcia Grillo; Lourenço, Simone Q C; Torres, Sandra R; Pinto, Décio Santos

    2009-09-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is an extremely rare, benign neoplasm, accounting for approximately 1% of all odontogenic tumors. Peripheral CEOTs commonly resemble oral hyperplastic or reactive lesions and are histologically similar to their intraosseous counterparts. We report an unusual case of multifocal peripheral CEOT. A 40-year-old female presented with bilateral soft, painful, erythematous, gingival swellings localized in premolar areas of the mandibular gingiva. The presumptive diagnosis was bilateral pyogenic granuloma. The masses were surgically excised under local anesthesia without bone curettage and both recurred 12 months later. Morphologic features, and histochemical and immunohistochemical tests revealed bilateral peripheral calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor. There is no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence 3.5 years after excision. This multifocal phenomenon has been reported previously only for intraosseous CEOT. Gingival masses must be carefully evaluated for clinical and histologic evidence of neoplasia.

  6. Using Carnoy's Solution in Treatment of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Alchalabi, Najwa Jameel; Merza, Ahmed Maki; Issa, Sabah Abdulaziz

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor using enucleation and Carnoy's solution with peripheral ostectomy. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients (14 females and 15 males) with age range from 12 to 62 years were included in this study and followed up for 7 years; all the patients were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Specialized Surgeries Teaching Hospital (Al-Shaheed Ghazi Al-Hariri Hospital-Medical City,...

  7. Treatment of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor/Pindborg tumor by a conservative surgical method

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    T Vigneswaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT also known as Pindborg tumor is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far nearly 200 cases have been reported in literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. Approximately, 50% of the cases are associated with an unerupted tooth or odontome, but was not so with our case. Considering the intrabony mandibular location of the lesion and its limited size, we opted for a more conservative surgery. The clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features and the surgical treatment done are discussed with relevant references.

  8. Treatment of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor/Pindborg tumor by a conservative surgical method.

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    Vigneswaran, T; Naveena, R

    2015-04-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) also known as Pindborg tumor is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far nearly 200 cases have been reported in literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. Approximately, 50% of the cases are associated with an unerupted tooth or odontome, but was not so with our case. Considering the intrabony mandibular location of the lesion and its limited size, we opted for a more conservative surgery. The clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features and the surgical treatment done are discussed with relevant references.

  9. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: A clinico-radio-pathological dilemma

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    M S Hada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT is a rare benign neoplasm of mandible in adults. The presentation of this entity is varied and often confused with a variety of mucosal and jaw lesions and clinical, radiological, and pathological feature of CEOT often-mimic malignancy. The objective of this report is to highlight the clinical features and radiological findings which should arouse suspicion of a benign lesion and importance of providing adequate clinical information to the pathologist to attain accurate diagnosis.We discussed two cases with tumors located in the maxilla. Both presented as expansile lesions with one biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma. Both were pursued with clinico-radiological suspicion of benign lesions and confirmed with pathological correlation of histology and immunohistochemistry as CEOT. Therefore a High index of suspicion and clinico-radiological information are the key feature for diagnosis of this rare tumor.

  10. Interaction of stromal and microvascular components in keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

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    Sousa-Neto, Ernesto Santos; Cangussu, Maria Cristina Teixeira; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Guimarães, Vanessa Sousa; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; Carneiro Júnior, Braúlio; Leonardi, Rosalia; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the interaction of stromal components in odontogenic tumors. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate mast cells (MCs), myofibroblasts, macrophages, and their possible association with angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs). Thirty cases of KCOTs were included and analyzed by immunohistochemistry for mast cell tryptase, α-SMA, CD34, CD163, and D240. For comparative purpose, 15 radicular cysts (CRs) and 7 pericoronal follicles (PFs) were included. There was an increase in MCs for RCs and this difference was significant when they were compared to KCOTS and PFs. A significant increase in the density of MFs was observed for KCOTs when compared to RCs and PFs (P = 0.00). No significant difference in CD163-positive macrophages (P = 0.084) and CD34-positive vessels (P = 0.244) densities was observed between KCOTs, RCs, and PFs, although KCOTs showed a higher density of all proteins. Significant difference in lymphatic vessel density was observed for KCOTs when compared to RCs and PFs (P = 0.00). Positive correlation was observed between mast cell tryptase and CD34 in KCOTs (P = 0.025). A significant interaction between the MC population and CD34-positive vessels in KCOTs supported the hypothesis that MCs and blood vessels contribute to the stromal scaffold of KCOT. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Defects of the Carney complex's gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors

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    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia FC; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in their pathogenesis may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene shows loss of protein expression, as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, LOH analysis and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included, being six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial component of the tumors was separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a+/− mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations, besides two 5’-UTR and four intronic mutations in the mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a+/− mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, suggesting that additional genes may be involved in their pathogenesis, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A's expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a+/− mice do not show abnormalities, suggesting that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  12. Morphometric evaluation of keratocystic odontogenic tumor before and after marsupialization

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    Deborah Campos Telles

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the morphometric evaluation of the epithelial lining and fibrous capsule in histological specimens of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs before and after marsupialization. Histological sections from six KOTs that had undergone marsupialization followed by enucleation were photographed. The thickness and features of the capsule and of the epithelial lining of the tumor were evaluated upon marsupialization and upon subsequent enucleation using Axion Vision software. The histological specimens taken upon marsupialization presented an epithelial lining that is typical of KOTs. After marsupialization, the enucleated specimens had a modified epithelial lining and a fibrous capsule that both presented a greater median thickness (p = 0.0277 and p = 0.0212, respectively, morphological changes, and significant enlargement. These modifications can facilitate full surgical treatment and may well be related to a low KOT recurrence rate.

  13. Clonal nature of odontogenic tumours.

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    Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Oliveira, Carla da Silveira; Castro, Wagner Henriques; de Lacerda, Júlio César Tanos; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2009-04-01

    Although clonal origin is an essential step in the comprehension of neoplasias, there have been no studies to examine whether odontogenic tumours are derived from a single somatic progenitor cell. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clonal origin of odontogenic tumours. Fresh samples of seven ameloblastomas, two odontogenic mixomas, two adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, one calcifying odontogenic cyst, one calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) and six odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) of female patients were included in this study. After DNA extraction, the HUMARA gene polymorphism assay was performed. Most of the informative odontogenic lesions studied (12 out of 16) showed a monoclonal pattern. Among the polyclonal cases, two were OKC, one CEOT and one odontogenic mixoma. Our results suggest that most odontogenic tumours are monoclonal.

  14. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: report of a recurrent destructive case with review of literature.

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    Ramin Foroughi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT is an uncommon odontogenic tumor with well-known histopathological features and a challenging treatment plan. Although some investigators advocate conservative approach as the treatment of choice, others believe in radical surgical excision to avoid recurrence or malignant transformation. The main objective of this case report is presenting an unusual destructive recurrence of CEOT after 8 years in a 34-year-old woman, and discussing an effective treatment plan for this tumor.

  15. Stromal characterization and comparison of odontogenic cysts and odontogenic tumors using picrosirius red stain and polarizing microscopy: A retrospective and histochemical study.

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    Jahagirdar, P B; Kale, A D; Hallikerimath, S

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic lesions represent a range of conditions, the features of which probably depend on the stage of induction towards tooth formation reached prior to neoplastic or hamartomatous proliferation. It has been also suggested that inductive changes may allow progression from one type of odontogenic tumor to another. The epithelium also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of these lesions; even stroma is likely to play an equally important role in the pathogenesis and biological behavior. So, this study was performed to investigate, compare, and correlate different types of collagen fibers in odontogenic cysts and odontogenic tumors. Thirty each pre-diagnosed odontogenic cysts and tumors were histochemically analyzed using a special stain (Picrosirius red stain) and polarizing microscopy. Seven cases (99%) of inflammatory cysts exhibited predominantly greenish-yellow birefringence indicating procollagen, intermediate, or pathologic collagen fibers suggestive of loosely packed collagen fibers. Predominant yellowish-orange birefringence exhibited by 21 cases (99%) of developmental cysts was comparable to the yellowish-orange and orangish-red to red birefringence exhibited by odontogenic tumors suggesting tightly packed fibers. The Picrosirius red stain in conjunction with polarizing microscopy serves as a specific and sensitive tool in characterizing collagen fibers in odontogenic cysts and odontogenic tumor.

  16. Immunohistochemical expression of protein 53, murine double minute 2, B-cell lymphoma 2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor

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    Hébel Cavalcanti Galvão

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Even though odontogenic cysts share a similar histogenesis, they show different growth and differentiation profile due to differences in the proliferative cellular activity. Aims: We perform an immunohistochemical assessment of protein 53 (p53, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2, and murine double minute 2 (MDM2 expression in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor analyzing their correlation with the biological behavior of these lesions. Materials and Methods: By the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method with antibodies against p53, PCNA, bcl-2, and MDM2 proteins, 11 radicular cysts, 11 dentigerous cysts, and 11 keratocystic odontogenic tumor were analyzed. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskall-Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05 were used to analyze the data. Results: Immunopositivity for PCNA was observed in all cases appraised, predominantly in the suprabasal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor epithelial lining (SD ± 19.44, but no significant differences were found among the groups of lesions. Bcl-2 immunoexpression was observed especially in the basal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PCNA LI was significantly higher than bcl-2 LI in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. MDM2 and p53 immunoexpression were not detected in the lesions studied. Among the evaluated lesions, the keratocystic odontogenic tumor showed different immunoexpression of the proliferation and apoptosis markers. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that the keratocystic odontogenic tumor presents distinct biological behavior of the odontogenic cysts, as for the processes of proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, reinforcing the information in favor of the neoplastic nature of this lesion.

  17. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor with ossification and calcification: A case report with unusual histological findings

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    Swati Shrikant Gotmare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, formerly known as odontogenic keratocyst, is a benign developmental odontogenic tumor with many distinguishing clinical and histologic features. Hard tissue deposits, which usually take the form of dystrophic calcifications, cartilaginous tissue, or dentinoid, are uncommon findings in the connective tissue capsule of the KCOT. We report a case of a 33-year-old female with KCOT showing osseous tissue and calcified deposits close to its epithelial lining, which is an extremely rare occurrence. A brief review on the reported prevalence of hard tissue deposits in KCOTs and possible mechanisms that has been implicated in mineralization and bone formation has been discussed.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors and primary cells.

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    Amm, Hope M; Casimir, Monee D; Clark, Dakota B; Sohn, Phillip; MacDougall, Mary

    2014-08-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are locally invasive, rapidly proliferating cystic lesions of the jaw. The bone-invasive nature of these tumors has been previously associated with the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which degrade the extracellular matrix. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression and activity of MMPs in primary KCOT cells and tumor tissue. Four independently established KCOT primary cell populations were grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium supplemented with 10% FBS and antibiotics. Primary cells were analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC), and for secretion of active MMPs. Primary tumor sections were analyzed by IHC. Of the 18 human MMPs examined, 9 were consistently expressed in primary KCOT cells. MMP-2 and MMP-14 were highly expressed in all KCOT populations, while MMP-1, 3, 11, 12, 16, 17, and 19 were moderately expressed. MMP-3, 11, 12, 16, 17 and 19 were shown to be expressed in KCOTs for the first time. No significant differences in MMPS profiles were found between syndromic (KCOT-3) and non-syndromic cell populations (KCOT-1/2/4). Protein expression of MMP-1, 11, 12, 14 and 16 was confirmed in each KCOT cell populations by IHC. KCOT-3 cells secreted active MMP-2 as determined by a gel zymography assay. Expression of MMP-1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 14, and 16 was confirmed in matching primary KCOT tumor sections representing syndromic and non-syndromic KCOTs. KCOT primary cell populations and tumors express a wide range of MMPs, which likely play a role in the bone-invasive nature of these tumors.

  19. Midkine expression correlating with growth activity and tooth morphogenesis in odontogenic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Shuichi; Seki, Sachiko; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Ikeda, Tohru

    2008-01-01

    Midkine (MK; a low molecular weight heparin-binding growth factor) is a multifunctional cytokine. MK plays a role in morphogenesis of many organs including teeth through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. We immunohistochemically examined MK expression in various human odontogenic tumors. There was no difference in positive rate and intensity of MK between benign odontogenic tumors and their malignant counterparts. Ameloblastoma showed MK localization in the peripheral columnar cells in bud...

  20. Expressão de MMPs, marcadores angiogênicos e proliferação celular em tumores odontogênicos Expression of MMPs, angiogenic and proliferation cell markers in odontogenic tumors

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    Felipe Rodrigues de Matos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO E OBJETIVO: O conhecimento do comportamento biológico de lesões de natureza odontogênica é essencial para tornar a abordagem terapêutica adequada e estabelecer um prognóstico. A produção de metaloproteinases da matriz extracelular (MMPs, a angiogênese e a proliferação celular fornecem subsídios para o crescimento tumoral. O presente artigo tem como objetivo fazer uma revisão de literatura de pesquisas em tumores odontogênicos (TOs selecionados a partir da nova classificação da Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS de 2005 sobre a expressão de MMPs, marcadores angiogênicos e proliferação celular e verificar, nestes estudos, a relação desses marcadores quanto ao comportamento biológico dessas lesões. RESULTADOS: Nota-se que as MMPs -1, -2, -7, -9 e -26 encontram-se mais expressas no componente epitelial e estroma e, particularmente, a -13 em estroma. Uma maior angiogênese é observada em TOs mais agressivos. CD 105 foi mais expresso no TO ceratocístico (TOC e CD34 em ameloblastomas sólidos (ASs. Relata-se elevada expressão do Ki-67 e p53 no TOC e no AS e baixo índice de proliferação celular no TO adenomatoide (TOA. CONCLUSÃO: Esses resultados mostram que as MMPs participam no processo de invasão e recorrência de algumas lesões odontogênicas, estando associadas ao comportamento biológico desses tumores. A angiogênese é fundamental para fornecer suporte à proliferação celular e esses dois eventos em conjunto estão correlacionados com diferentes níveis de comportamento biológico nos TOs, quando comparados com cistos de natureza odontogênica, o que pode sugerir o uso de inibidores angiogênicos como provável abordagem terapêutica nessas lesões.INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: The study of biological behavior of odontogenic lesions is essential to the establishment of appropriate therapeutic approach and prognosis. The production of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, angiogenesis and

  1. Role of HIF-1α and CASPASE-3 in cystogenesis of odontogenic cysts and tumors.

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    da Costa, Natacha M M; de Siqueira, Adriane S; Ribeiro, André L R; da Silva Kataoka, Maria S; Jaeger, Ruy G; de Alves-Júnior, Sérgio M; Smith, Andrew M; de Jesus Viana Pinheiro, João

    2017-02-25

    Odontogenic cysts and tumors are the most relevant lesions that affect the gnathic bones. These lesions have in common the formation of cystic areas and this common feature may suggest involvement of similar mechanisms. The hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), a responsive protein to hypoxia and caspase-3, an irreversible apoptosis marker, may contribute to cyst formation. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the immunoexpression of these proteins in odontogenic cysts and tumors. Twenty cases of ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) (n = 20), radicular cyst (RC) (n = 18), dentigerous cyst (DC) (n = 11), calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (n = 8), and dental follicle (DF) (n = 10) were used to investigate HIF-1α and caspase-3 expression in sequential serial cuts by immunohistochemistry. HIF-1α was overexpressed in RC, DC, and ameloblastoma when compared with DF. The basal and sometimes the lower suprabasal layer showed no or very low expression in DC, KOT, and ameloblastoma, the last also showing strong expression in solid epithelial areas and initial cystic formation regions. Caspase-3 was found to be overexpressed in all lesions, with the highest expression in odontogenic cysts compared to tumors. HIF-1α and caspase-3 were localized in similar areas of the same lesions, especially in the epithelium surrounding cystic formations. This study showed distinct immunoexpression of HIF-1α and caspase-3 in odontogenic cyst and tumors, with higher expression observed in odontogenic cysts. These findings suggest a possible correlation between hypoxia, apoptosis, and cystogenesis, leading to understand the mechanisms responsible to cystic formation in odontogenic lesions.

  2. Expressions of bax, bcl-2 and Ki-67 in odontogenic keratocysts (Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor) in comparison with ameloblastomas and radicular cysts.

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    Soluk Tekkeşın, Merva; Mutlu, Sevcihan; Olgaç, Vakur

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the apoptotic features and proliferation potential of odontogenic keratocysts compared with ameloblastomas and radicular cysts by analysing the role of bax, bcl-2, and Ki-67. The study material consisted of 20 odontogenic keratocysts, 20 radicular cysts, and 20 ameloblastomas. Immunohistochemically, bax, bcl-2 and Ki-67 were applied. The positive cells were evaluated in both neoplastic/nonneoplastic odontogenic epithelium and connective tissue cells. Ameloblastoma showed stronger bcl-2 expression than odontogenic keratocysts and radicular cysts. Bcl-2 expression in the whole thickness of epithelium and connective tissue of odontogenic keratocyst was significantly higher than radicular cyst. The expression of bax in the epithelium of radicular cyst was significantly higher than odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma. The lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst showed stronger Ki-67 expression than ameloblastoma and radicular cyst. The proliferation potential of the epithelium and the overexpression of various anti-apoptotic proteins in odontogenic epithelial tumors are quite significant for their clinical behaviour. High expressions of bcl-2 and Ki-67 in odontogenic keratocysts accord with their aggressive clinical behaviour and a high recurrence rate.

  3. Application of endoscopy to treat mandibular keratocystic odontogenic tumors

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    Z. Gao

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopy to remove keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs with virtual 3D mandibular images. Fifteen patients (mean age, 40.27±14.58 years who underwent endoscopic mandibular KCOT enucleation between May 2009 and October 2009 were included. Virtual 3D mandibular reconstructions derived from computed tomography (CT imaging were generated for all patients. Recurrence and pathological fracture were evaluated as the primary outcome variables at 1 and 12 months after operation. Secondary infection and inferior alveolar nerve injury were evaluated as the secondary outcome variables at 1 and 6 months after operation. None of the 15 patients exhibited signs of recurrence or pathological fracture after operation. During long-term follow-up, no symptoms of inferior alveolar nerve injury or secondary infection were observed and no signs of recurrence were found in any of the patients. Endoscopy helps surgeons to remove mandibular KCOTs with small incisions. Moreover, endoscopy can provide clear and magnified views and help to avoid damage to the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. Therefore, under the support of preoperative virtual 3D mandibular images, the application of endoscopy to remove the tumors should be considered to be a treatment option for KCOTs.

  4. Application of endoscopy to treat mandibular keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z; Ni, Q W; Gao, W; Liu, Y P; Zhang, Q

    2017-07-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopy to remove keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) with virtual 3D mandibular images. Fifteen patients (mean age, 40.27±14.58 years) who underwent endoscopic mandibular KCOT enucleation between May 2009 and October 2009 were included. Virtual 3D mandibular reconstructions derived from computed tomography (CT) imaging were generated for all patients. Recurrence and pathological fracture were evaluated as the primary outcome variables at 1 and 12 months after operation. Secondary infection and inferior alveolar nerve injury were evaluated as the secondary outcome variables at 1 and 6 months after operation. None of the 15 patients exhibited signs of recurrence or pathological fracture after operation. During long-term follow-up, no symptoms of inferior alveolar nerve injury or secondary infection were observed and no signs of recurrence were found in any of the patients. Endoscopy helps surgeons to remove mandibular KCOTs with small incisions. Moreover, endoscopy can provide clear and magnified views and help to avoid damage to the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. Therefore, under the support of preoperative virtual 3D mandibular images, the application of endoscopy to remove the tumors should be considered to be a treatment option for KCOTs.

  5. Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in a non-syndromic minor patient: Report of an unusual case

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    Shalu Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is developmental odontogenic cysts of epithelial origin known for their potentially aggressive behavior and significant rate of recurrences. Single odontogenic cysts are very well documented in the literature. Multiple (KCOT are principle features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. We report an intriguing case of multiple KCOT in a non-syndromic patient simultaneously occurring in maxilla as well as in mandible with brief highlight on molecular data and the treatment modality.

  6. The relative frequency of odontogenic tumors: A study of 376 cases in a Brazilian population.

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    Lima-Verde-Osterne, R; Turatti, E; Cordeiro-Teixeira, R; Barroso-Cavalcante, R

    2017-03-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are rare lesions, exclusive of the jaws, that are derived from epithelial and/or ectomesenchymal elements of the tooth-forming apparatus. Their biological behavior is heterogeneous, including hamartomatous tissue proliferation, benign nonaggressive and aggressive neoplasms, and malignant tumors with metastatic capacity. The aim of this study was to describe the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population. In addition, a review of the literature identified studies on odontogenic tumors that follow the 2005 World Health Organization. A total of 376 cases of odontogenic tumors from an oral pathology service were reviewed about age, gender, anatomic site and histologic diagnosis. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (31.6%) were the most common, followed by ameloblastoma (28.5%), and odontoma (22.6%). The mean age was 32.2 years, and more than half the patients (52.1%) were in the second and third decades of life. The male to female ratio was 1:1.37, with a maxilla to mandible ratio of 1:2.08. The variation in relative frequency of tumors observed among the several series, including the present study, is probably due in part to cultural differences between geographic areas but also to the study design.

  7. Massive keratocystic odontogenic tumor of mandible: A case report and review of literature

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    G C Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, also known as odontogenic keratocysts, as defined by World Health Organization (WHO, are known for their peculiar behavior, varied origin, debated development, unique tendency to recur, and disputed treatment modalities. We present a case of KCOT involving symphysis menti, right and left halves of the body of mandible in an 11-year-old girl treated with enucleation and open dressing (bismuth, iodoform, paraffin paste with long-term follow-up.

  8. Odontogenic tumors: a 14-year retrospective study in Santa Catarina, Brazil.

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    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Porto, Juliana Cristina; Vieira, Daniella Serafim Couto; Siqueira, Filipe Modolo; Rivero, Elena Riet Correa

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are lesions that develop exclusively on maxillary bones, and form a heterogeneous group. They vary from hamartomatous lesions to benign and malign tumors. Although they are rarely observed in dentistry clinics, it is extremely important for the dentist to be aware of them. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of odontogenic tumors diagnosed in the population of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Cases of odontogenic tumors were selected from the anatomopathological diagnostic services at Federal University of Santa Catarina from 1998 to 2011. Clinical data on these cases were collected from biopsy reports and patient files. Seventy-eight cases of odontogenic tumors were surveyed. Of these diagnoses, 51% were keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs); the remaining cases were mainly ameloblastomas and odontomas. The most frequently observed lesion in this retrospective study was KCOT (more than half of cases). Thus, this study shows that modifying the classification of the OTs altered the frequency of the lesions, possibly making KCOT the most common lesion observed in diagnostic services worldwide.

  9. EVALUATION OF KERATOCYSTIC ODONTOGENIC TUMORS USING CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

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    Mustafa Gümüşok

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this retrospective study is to determine the radiological features of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT.Materials and Methods: CBCT images of 28 patients who had histopathologically-confirmed KCOT were retrospectively reviewed from the archives of the Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Gazi University Faculty of Dentistry. The location and size of KCOT, cortical expansion, cortical perforation, relation with the impacted teeth, and the impact on the mandibular canal were evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients at initial diagnosis was 34.5 years. Patients with an impacted tooth were significantly younger than those without an impacted tooth (p<0.05. Among KCOTs, 21% were localized in the maxilla whereas 79% were found in the mandible. The lesions localized in the mandible were mostly found in the retromolar-ramus region. Of these patients, 93% had cortical expansion and 75% had bone perforation. Of the 22 mandibular lesions, 20 were in close proximity of the mandibular canal and 18 (90% of these lesions had caused destruction in the mandibular canal. Conclusion: KCOTs exhibit their aggressive nature in the jaw bone. CBCT is a useful radiological imaging method to examine the radiologic characteristics of KCOTs such as bone destruction and their spatial relations with the neighboring anatomic structures.

  10. Using Carnoy's Solution in Treatment of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alchalabi, Najwa Jameel; Merza, Ahmed Maki; Issa, Sabah Abdulaziz

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor using enucleation and Carnoy's solution with peripheral ostectomy. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients (14 females and 15 males) with age range from 12 to 62 years were included in this study and followed up for 7 years; all the patients were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Specialized Surgeries Teaching Hospital (Al-Shaheed Ghazi Al-Hariri Hospital-Medical City, Baghdad, Iraq). Enucleation followed by peripheral ostectomy and the application of Carnoy's solution is the standardized method of treatment. Results: This study showed (32.7%) unilocular radiolucency for the lesions (19.9%) as multilocular radiolucency. Furthermore, it showed that the recurrence rate by this method was 0% with a minimum neurosensory disturbance. Conclusion: The complications and morbidity originating from the application of Carnoy's solution occurred less frequently and were less serious than those associated with resection while the recurrence rate is 0% which is equal to the recurrence rate of resection. PMID:28713736

  11. Biological pathways involved in the aggressive behavior of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor and possible implications for molecular oriented treatment - An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.A.; Carvalho, J.F.C.; van der Waal, I.

    2010-01-01

    In the classification of Head and Neck Tumors, published in 2005 by the World Health Organization Classification, the odontogenic keratocyst has been reclassified as a benign intraosseous neoplasm, calling it "keratocystic odontogenic tumor" (KCOT). Significant differences on the molecular level

  12. Transnasal Marsupialization Using Endoscopic Sinus Surgery for Treatment of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor in Maxillary Sinus

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    Masafumi Ohki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We report the first utilisation of transnasal marsupialization to treat a keratocystic odontogenic tumor in the maxillary sinus of a 37-year-old man. Case Report. A 37-year-old man presented with a nasal discharge and right odontalgia. Computed tomography revealed an expanding cystic lesion with a calcificated wall containing an impacted tooth in the right maxillary sinus. The diagnosis was keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Transnasal marsupialization was performed using endoscopic sinus surgery to enlarge the maxillary ostium and remove a portion of the cystic wall. Pathological findings included lining squamous epithelium and inflammation. The remaining tumor shrank, becoming free of infection after surgery, without proliferation. Conclusion. Transnasal marsupialization using endoscopic sinus surgery is effective in treating keratocystic odontogenic tumors. It offers minimal surgical invasion and reductive change, making it advantageous for complete removal with fewer complications in the bones and surrounding tissue in the case of secondary surgery.

  13. Odontogenic tumors and giant cell lesions of jaws - a nine year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Objectives A definite geographic variation has been observed in the frequency of odontogenic tumors and giant cell lesions of the jaws reported from different parts of the world. However, there are a few studies on these lesions, especially giant cell lesions, reported from India. Hence, this study was designed to provide a demographic data on the odontogenic tumors and giant cell lesions reported from our institute located in the city of Hyderabad. Hyderabad is the capital city of the southern state of Andhra Pradesh in India. A retrospective analysis of odontogenic tumors and giant cell lesions of jaws reported in our institute between the years 2000 and 2009 was done and this data was compared with previous reports from different parts of the world and India. Methods Biopsies of the lesions received between the years 2000 and 2009 were reviewed and patient's history, clinical, radiological and histopathological characteristics were analyzed. Results A total of 77 biopsies were received during the nine year study period. These lesions were more frequently seen in the males, in a younger age group and showed a predilection for the mandible. Most of them presented as radiolucent, slow growing and painless lesions. Ameloblastomas (71.4%) constituted the majority of odontogenic tumors while central giant cell granulomas (7.8%) constituted the majority of giant cell lesions. Conclusion These lesions showed a definite geographic variation with ameloblastomas being the most common odontogenic tumors and odontomas being relatively rarer lesions in our region. PMID:21729276

  14. Intraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor in a case with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuga, Priya S; Ravikumar, A; Krishnarathnam, K; Rajendiran, S

    2009-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare benign odontogenic tumor of locally aggressive behavior. It is more common in the posterior part of the mandible of adults, typically in the fourth to fifth decades. Its origin as well as its true malignant potential is not clearly known. It usually starts as a painless swelling and is often concurrent with an impacted tooth. A case of CEOT in a 55-year-old man with multiple myeloma is presented. Clinical, radiological, and pathologic findings are discussed.

  15. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor with malignant transformation and metastatic spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veness, M J; Morgan, G; Collins, A P; Walker, D M

    2001-08-01

    Pindborg tumors (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors) are uncommon neoplasms of odontogenic origin most often located in the posterior mandible. First described in detail in 1955 by Pindborg, these tumors are considered benign but can be locally aggressive in nature, with recurrence rates of 10% to 15% reported. The malignant form of this tumor is exceedingly rare. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman initially treated for a painful infected left mandibular third molar. The patient underwent extraction of the tooth and excision of an associated soft tissue component. Subsequent histologic review identified a Pindborg tumor of the left posterior mandible. After initial excision, this tumor recurred twice, with the recurrences exhibiting a progression to a malignant Pindborg tumor (odontogenic carcinoma) with vascular invasion and spread to a cervical lymph node. Further treatment involved radical surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. At last review 12 months after treatment, the patient was disease free. This article describes only the second case of odontogenic carcinoma. The transformation from benign to malignant histologic findings has not previously been documented in this tumor. The salient clinical features of this case are presented along with supportive pathologic and radiologic evidence.

  16. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the right mandibular condyle: A rare case

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    Kamala Rawson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC was first described by Hans Philipsen in 1956. The World Health Organization (WHO has designated OKC as a Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT. KCOT is defined as ′a benign uni- or multicystic, intraosseous tumor of odontogenic origin, with a characteristic lining of parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium, with a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior′. Radiographically, most OKCs are unilocular, presenting a well-defined peripheral rim and a central cavity having satellite cysts. It is characterized by a thin fibrous capsule and a lining of keratinized stratified squamous epithelium, which is typically corrugated, usually about 6 to 10 cells in thickness, and generally without rete pegs. The present case report describes an unusual case of KCOT with minimal clinical presentation indicative of a tumor highlighting the potential difficulties in determining the diagnosis.

  17. Clinicopathologic analysis and syndecan-1 and Ki-67 expression in calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors, dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes da Silva, Wagner; Ribeiro Bartholomeu Dos Santos, Teresa Cristina; Cabral, Márcia Grillo; Azevedo, Rebeca Souza; Pires, Fábio Ramôa

    2014-05-01

    Benign and malignant tumor cells can express altered adhesion properties, and these features can be associated with their proliferative and invasive characteristics. This study aimed to evaluate syndecan-1 and Ki-67 expression in ghost cell-containing odontogenic tumors. Clinical data were retrieved from laboratory records, and hematoxylin-eosin-stained slides and sections, labeled with monoclonal antibodies anti-syndecan-1 and anti-Ki-67 using the immunoperoxidase technique, were evaluated. Included were 21 central calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOTs) (4 associated with odontoma), 2 peripheral CCOTs, 1 dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and 1 ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC). Syndecan-1 was mainly expressed in cells resembling stellate reticulum and in stromal cells from the fibrous capsule. The mean Ki-67 labeling index was 4.1% (49.3% for GCOC), but it was not associated with syndecan-1 expression. Syndecan-1 is variably expressed in cells resembling the stellate reticulum, stromal cells, and basal cells and might be associated with the biology of these tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Conservative Management of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors of Jaws

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    Nurhan Güler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate different surgical treatment methods for keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs and the outcome of those treatments over a 9-year period. Patients and Methods. A retrospective review was performed on 43 KCOTs in 39 patients. In radiographic evaluations for diagnosis, follow ups and before and after treatment, panoramic, 3D CT and MR images were used. The three groups of different surgical treatment were (1 enucleation for small unilocular lesions without certainty of histology; (2 enucleation with Carnoy's solution, for small unilocular lesions after previous histological confirmation of KOCT; (3 marsupialization followed by enucleation with Carnoy's solution implemented for large often multilocular KCOTs with intact or destruction of cortical bone without infiltration of neighbouring tissue. Results. 43 KCOT cases were mostly localized in mandible (76.7%, radiologically unilocular (72%, and parakeratocysts (88.4%. Inflammation and satellite cysts (daughter cysts were detected histopathologically in 14 (32.5% and 7 (16.3%, respectively. Among the 43 cysts, 20 (46.5% were associated with the impacted third molar and of 21 (48.8% was in tooth bearing area, and 5 (11, 6% located on edentulous areas. It was located mostly in the anterior region of maxilla (90% and in mandibular molar and ramus (62.8%. The treatments of KCOTs were 18 (41.9% for group 1, and 10 (23.3% group 2, and 15 (34.8% group 3. A statistically significant relationship was found between the radiographic appearance and treatment methods (=0.00. No recurrence was found on 40.54±23.02 months follow up. Conclusion. We concluded that successful treatment methods were enucleation and Carnoy's solution in small lesions and marsupialization in lesions that have reached a very large size, but because KCOT was observed in second decade mostly, long-term follows up are suggested.

  19. Malignant odontogenic tumors: a multicentric Latin American study of 25 cases.

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    Martínez Martínez, M; Mosqueda-Taylor, A; Carlos, R; Delgado-Azañero, W; de Almeida, O P

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to show the epidemiological features of 25 malignant odontogenic tumors (MOT) in Latin America. We retrieved 25 cases of MOT out of 2142 odontogenic tumors, from four oral diagnostic centers in Latin America, and described the main clinical and pathological characteristics. A total of 19 cases were carcinomas, including eight ameloblastic carcinomas, five primary intra-osseous squamous cell carcinomas, three clear cell odontogenic carcinomas and three ghost cell odontogenic carcinomas. All six sarcomas corresponded to ameloblastic fibrosarcoma. Thirteen cases occurred in men and 12 in women, age ranged from 7 to 77 years old, with a mean of 41.4 years. The average age of patients with carcinomas and sarcomas were 48.53 and 19 years old, respectively. As malignant odontogenic tumors are very rare, this series helps to better clarify their relative frequency, predominant subtypes, and clinical characteristics in Latin America. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The amyloid deposit in calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is immunoreactive for cytokeratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviel-Ronen, S; Liokumovich, P; Rahima, D; Polak-Charcon, S; Goldberg, I; Horowitz, A

    2000-06-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare benign tumor with locally aggressive behavior. It is characterized by squamous epithelial cells, calcifications, and eosinophilic deposits that have been identified as amyloid. We report a case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor and investigate the nature of the amyloid, using histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural studies. The amyloid was immunohistochemically negative for basement membrane components and positive for all cytokeratin stains performed (cocktail of cytokeratins 1, 5, 6, 8, 13, and 16, and cytokeratins AE1 and AE3). The amyloid stained focally in a glandular-like pattern, reminiscent of the epithelial glandlike structures of the tumor. We conclude that the amyloid is derived from filamentous degeneration of keratin filaments that originate from the tumor squamous epithelium. The keratin degeneration is part of a developmental or aging process that the tumor undergoes.

  1. Epidemiological and Clinicopathological Analysis of 92 Odontogenic Tumors: A 5-year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ipsita; Venkatesh, Deepa; Bawa, Geetanjali; Vaseemuddin, Syed; Joseph, Amit; Sangtani, Jimmy K

    2017-11-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are a heterogeneous group of lesions that are derived from odontogenic apparatus comprised of odontogenic epithelium, ectomesenchyme, and/ or mesenchymal elements. The OTs show marked geographical variation. This study was conducted to analyze the epidemiology and clinicopathological presentation of OTs based on age, sex, and site. This study was conducted in Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology. Records were reviewed retrospectively for all the lesions of oral cavity from January 2010 to December 2015. A total of 92 lesions were found to be OTs and were classified into benign and malignant tumors. They were further subdivided into three subtypes based on the types of odontogenic tissues involved. These were epithelial OTs (EOTs), mixed OTs (MIXOTs), and mesenchymal OTs (MOTs). Of 92 OTs, 84 were benign (males 48, females 36) and 8 were malignant (male 2, females 6). The most common benign tumor was ameloblastoma (AME) (20), followed by keratocystic OT (KCOT) (17), calcifying EOT (CEOT) (14), compound odontome (OD-Cd) (12), complex odontome (OD-Cx) (10), odontogenic fibroma (OF) (5), odontogenic myxoma (OM) (4), and cementoblastoma (CB) (2). The most common malignant tumor was primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) (3) followed by fibrosarcoma (FS) (3) and ameloblastic carcinoma (AC). Author concluded that there was geographic and demographic variation in distribution of OTs, which may be attributed to socioeconomic and genetic factors. Literature showing prevalence of OTs in India is negligible. By this article, we have analyzed the frequency of various OTs according to sex, age, and site. A comprehensive record of OTs should be started so that pathologists and surgeons would be able to acquire the information about the tumor for reference in the future.

  2. E-cadherin regulators are differentially expressed in the epithelium and stroma of keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Carneiro Júnior, Bráulio; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Paiva, Katiúcia Batista Silva; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is the process where cells lose their epithelial features and acquire properties of typical mesenchymal cells. The dissociation of tumor cells due to changes in cell-cell adhesion is one of the key principles of tumor invasion and EMT. Thus, the knowledge of the molecular features of EMT in keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KOT) can provide useful markers to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis and perhaps contribute to an alternative therapeutic approach as it shows an aggressive clinical behavior and high recurrence rates. This study aimed to evaluate the EMT in KOT by the immunoexpression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Snail, and Slug and comparing to radicular cysts and dental follicles. Thirty-two KOTs, 15 radicular cysts, and 08 dental follicles were used for immunohistochemistry, evaluating the extent, intensity, labeling pattern, cellular compartment in the epithelium and stroma, and the presence of inflammation. E-cadherin was preserved in most cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. N-cadherin was increased in the tumor epithelium, a result that was positively correlated with the heterogeneous and nuclear immunoexpression of Slug in the epithelium; Slug also correlated with high Snail immunoexpression. N-cadherin was positively correlated with Slug in the stroma of keratocystic odontogenic tumors. The high immunoexpression of Snail and nuclear Slug in keratocystic odontogenic tumors suggests these proteins as transcription factors without necessarily participating in 'cadherin switching'. However, the knowledge of their induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in odontogenic tumors is still limited. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Radiologic manifestation of odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origins

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    Park, Tae Won [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-11-15

    The author observed radiographs which were diagnosed as odontogenic fibroma, odontogenic myxoma, central cementifying fibroma in the department of Oral Radiology and Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, from 1975 to 1985. The following conclusions were made. 1. Odontogenic fibroma The age ranged from 32 to 72 years, and two were females and one was male. all the three cases occurred in the posterior region of the maxilla. Two cases were unilocular pattern, and one was multilocular pattern. 2. Odontogenic myxoma The age ranged from 40 to 55 years, and four were females and two were males. Of cases occurred in the mandible, both cases occurred in the molar area involving the mandibular body and angle. Of 4 maxillary lesions, one occurred in the anterior area, two occurred in the premolar area, and one occurred in the molar area. All the cases showed multilocular radiolucencies, and most of them (5 cases) had ill-defined border. 3. Cementifying fibroma occurred more common in young and middle aged adults with greatest incidence in 5th decade. It is more common in females with the ratio of about 2 : 1. Of 19 cases, 15 cases occurred in the mandible, and 4 cases occurred in the maxilla. Of the mandibular lesions , 14 cases involved premolars and/or molars, and all the 4 cases of maxillary lesions occurred in the premolars and/ or molar area. Radiographically, two were radiolucent type of early stage, twelve were mixed type of intermediate stage, and five were radiopaque type of mature stage.

  4. Clear cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of maxilla: Report of a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrashetty, Dinesh; Rangaswamy, Shruthi; Belgode, Niranjan

    2013-09-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign tumor of the jaws. Pindborg's tumor having clear cells is extremely rare. Twelve central lesions have been reported of which only three cases have occurred in maxilla. Clear cell variant is a distinct entity, has more aggressive biological behavior and higher chances of recurrence. Hence it is important that presence of clear cells be included in histopathological diagnosis. Here we present a rare case of clear cell CEOT having aggressive behavior.

  5. Comparison of immunohistochemical expression of CD10 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma

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    Elham Hormozi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study propose that high expression rate of CD10 might be one of the reasons for the aggressive behavior of AB and high recurrence rate of OKC and reinforce the classification of OKC as an odontogenic tumor.

  6. Odontogenic tumors: A review of 675 cases in Eastern Libya | Goteti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a ...

  7. Central Granular Cell Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case with CBCT Features.

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    Najmeh Anbiaee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central granular cell odontogenic tumor CGCOT of the jaw is an exceedingly rare benign odontogenic neoplasm with 35 reported cases in the literature. Among these, very few studies have focused on the cone-beam CT features of CGCOT. Here, we report a case of an asymptomatic CGCOT in a 16-year-old girl and focus on the cone-beam CT features. Only 36 cases of this lesion, including this one, have been reported so far. The case presented is of special importance due to the young age of the patient, the posterior location of the lesion and the multilocular pattern in the cone beam CT images.

  8. A comparative analysis of LEF-1 in odontogenic and salivary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth A; Acquafondata, Marie; Barnes, E Leon; Seethala, Raja R

    2015-02-01

    LEF-1 is a nuclear transcription factor of the Wnt pathway that regulates multipotent skin stem cell differentiation. β-Catenin is considered a transcriptional coactivator that interacts with LEF-1.This study evaluates LEF-1 in a variety of odontogenic and salivary tumors and determines the prevalence of β-catenin coexpression. Ninety-eight salivary gland tumors and 51 odontogenic tumors were evaluated for LEF-1 and β-catenin immunohistochemical staining. Positivity was defined as at least 2+ intensity in more than 50% of tumor cells, which required a composite score of 6 or more. LEF-1 was positive in 64% (7/11) of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOT). Nuclear β-catenin was present in 82% (9/11) of CCOT. Coexpression of LEF-1 and nuclear β-catenin was noted in all LEF-1-positive CCOT. Strong and diffuse LEF-1 expression was seen in 69% (11/16) of basal cell adenocarcinomas (BCAC) and 63% (5/8) of basal cell adenomas (BA). Nuclear β-catenin was present in 50% (4/8) of BA and 43% (6/14) of BCAC. For BA, 4 of 5 LEF-1-positive tumors showed coexpression of β-catenin, and for BCAC, 5 of 9 LEF-1-positive tumors showed coexpression. In conclusion, this study documents for the first time the presence of LEF-1 expression and nuclear β-catenin coexpression in select basaloid salivary gland tumors and various odontogenic tumors. We demonstrate LEF-1 expression in both BA and BCAC preferentially over other salivary gland tumors suggesting some utility as a diagnostic marker. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adenomatoid hyperplasia of lower lip

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    Gaganjot Kaur Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid hyperplasia (AH is an uncommon, non-neoplastic swelling on the palate caused due to hyperplasia of the mucinous acini. The lesion clinically presents as a sessile tumor-like nodule resembling pleomorphic adenoma. Histopathologic findings include lobules of enlarged mucinous acini which are filled with secretory granules. The nuclei are squeezed to the basal portions, associated with focal inflammation and ductal dilatation, and a history of trauma is often elicited. Here, we report a rare case of AH of the lower lip in a 20-year-old male patient, which mimics a mucous retention cyst or mucocele.

  10. The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. A review of recent literature and report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindborg, J J; Vedtofte, P; Reibel, J; Praetorius, F

    1991-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) was described as an entity by Pindborg in 1955. In 1976 a review of the world literature comprising 113 cases was published. Since then, several studies concerned with pathological aspects of this tumor have appeared. Many of these studies have focused on the nature of the amyloid-like material present in CEOT. In this paper a new case is presented and the literature after 1976 is reviewed with respect to histopathological aspects of CEOT.

  11. Squamous Odontogenic Tumor with Unusual Localization and Appearance: A Rare Case Report

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    Sucheta Bansal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous odontogenic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and may affect multiple sites in the mouth. SOT was first described by Pullon et al. (1975. Since then, there have been less than 50 reported cases. The tumor is often asymptomatic, although it can present with symptoms of pain and tooth mobility. We report a case of SOT occurring in a 26-year-old female in the anterior mandible with unusual localization and appearance.

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of laminin-1 and Ki-67 in radicular cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors

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    El-Kholy Moataz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Odontogenic cysts are those which arise from the epithelium associated with the development of teeth. Some odontogenic cysts were found to have special biological features that make them distinct from other lesions. This study was conducted to detect the immunoepxression of laminin-1 and Ki-67 in both radicular cysts (RCs and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs and to examine the possible predictive value of these markers. Methods Thirteen cases of RCs and twelve cases of KCOTs were included in this study. Antibodies against laminin-1 and Ki-67 were used as primary antibodies. Results ten cases out of thirteen cases of RCs were immunopositive to laminin-1. The immunonegative cases of RCs showed high degree of inflammation inside the connective tissue wall. One case out of twelve cases of KCOTs was immunopositive to laminin-1 and the rest were immunonegative. Seven cases out of thirteen cases of RCs showed immunopositivity for Ki-67 with increased numbers of immunopositive cells when the inflammation was severe in the connective tissue wall. All KCOTS were immunopositive to Ki-67. Conclusions The benign nature of radicular cysts and the aggressive behavior of keratocystic odontogenic tumors could be explained by the expression of laminin and Ki-67. Laminin-1 and Ki-67 could be valuable markers for the prediction of the biologic behavior of cystic lesions.

  13. Clinicopathologic and Molecular Characteristics of Familial Cherubism with Associated Odontogenic Tumorous Proliferations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyris, Prokopios P; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Hu, Ying; Reichenberger, Ernst J; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2017-07-18

    Cherubism is a rare autosomal dominant condition affecting the jaws and caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the adapter protein SH3BP2 that maps to chromosome 4p16.3. Cherubism is characterized by symmetrically developing bone lesions in the maxilla and mandible. The lesions have been radiographically and histopathologically well-described. Here, we present a family with cherubism with two of its members featuring odontogenic tumorous proliferations in association with persistent central giant cell lesions (CGCL). Specifically, the proband, a 25-year-old male, developed a radiolucent lesion characterized histologically by central odontogenic fibroma-like proliferation in association with a CGCL component, while his mother, at age 57, was diagnosed with primary intraosseous odontogenic carcinoma with areas of benign fibro-osseous lesions. In both patients the lesions occurred in the anterior mandible and presented with clinical enlargement. The son underwent incisional biopsy and did not have additional treatment. His mother underwent extensive mandibulectomy due to widespread tumor. The son has two affected children with classic cherubism while a third child at age 5, had not shown any features of the disease. Mutation analysis of three affected members resulted in the identification of a heterozygous mutation in SH3BP2 (c.1244G>C; p.Arg415Pro). To the best of our knowledge, association of cherubism with odontogenic neoplastic lesions has hitherto not been reported in the literature, thus suggesting a relationship between cherubism with disturbed odontogenesis.

  14. Recurrence rate of keratocystic odontogenic tumor after conservative surgical treatment without adjunctive therapies: a 35-year single institution experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Amaral Mendes, R.A.; Lindeboom, V.B.; van der Waal, I.

    2010-01-01

    The recurrence rate in conservative surgical treatment, without adjunctive treatment, of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) has been studied. A total number of 68 patients, previously untreated and fulfilling the histopathological criteria provided by the 2005 WHO classification, has been

  15. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF TUMOR-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS IN AMELOBLASTOMA AND ODONTOGENIC CYSTS

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    B.K.H. Moghadam

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor atpha (TGF-a, parathyroid hormone-tike proteins (PTHLP and oncogene p53 proteins have all been demonstrated in a variety of human tumors anil have been implicated as causes of tumor cell aggressiveness. The present study determined the existence of these peptides and their immunohistochemicat profiles in ameloblastomas. Odontogenic keratocysts and dentigerous cysts were included for comparison. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections of 22 amelohlastom as, 18 odontogenic keratocysts and 17 dentigerous cysts were examined immunohistochemicalfy. Results showed that 14/22 ameloblastomas demonstrated a very strong positive staining for TGF-a in approximately 95% of the amelohlasts. Staining intensity in the remainder of the ameloblastomas was moderate in 2/22, weak in 1/22 samples and was focal in distribution in 5/22 sections. Immunoreacttvity for PTHLP was demonstrated in 20/22 ameloblastomas with variable levels of staining intensity ranging from very strong in 9/22, to moderate in 5/22 and weak in 3/22 specimens. The most intense staining for both antigens was demonstrated at the peripheral margins of invading tumor cells. The staining intensity in the majority of odontogenic cysts was weak or absent. Occasional focal staining with approximately 5% cell positivity and variable staining intensity was found in some specimens. Positive immunoreactivity for p53 oncogene was not demonstrated in any odontogenic lesion types examined in this study. In conclusion, the apparent in situ immunolocalization of TGF-a and PTHLP in ameloblast tumor cells indicates that these peptides were produced locally in ameloblastomas. Secondly, their expression were independent of ameloblastoma sub-types and were not altered by fixation methods used to process the formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections. Finally, the original assumptions tluit ameloblastomas are benign but locally aggressive tumors was supported in this study by showing

  16. The relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in the Black Sea region of Turkey: an analysis of 86 cases

    OpenAIRE

    ŞENEL, Figen ÇİZMECİ; DAYISOYLU, Ezher Hamza; Ersöz, Şafak; ALTINTAŞ, Nuray YILMAZ; TOSUN, Emre; Üngör, Cem; Taşkesen, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    To determine the relative frequency and distribution of different types of odontogenic tumors in southeastern Europe, focusing on the Black Sea region of Turkey. Materials and methods: In total 1165 oromaxillofacial biopsy records were evaluated for histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors over a 7-year period from patients referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Department of Pathology, Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry and Medicine, Trabzon, T...

  17. Odontogenic tumors: a collaborative study of 218 cases diagnosed over 12 years and comprehensive review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerci, Ahmet-Ercan; Nazlim, Sinan; Etoz, Meryem; Deniz, Kemal; Yasa, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the frequency and distribution of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in the Cappadocia region of Turkey, and to compare the findings with those reported in the literature. The records of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology Departments at Erciyes University, with histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors (based on the World Health Organization classification, 2005), over a 12-year period, were analyzed. The relative frequency of different types of tumors was also analyzed and compared with the literature. OTs in the present study constituted 2.74% of all the 7,942 registered biopsies. A total of 218 cases of OTs were collected and reviewed. Of these, (94.04%) were benign and (5.96%) were malignant. The mandible was the most commonly affected anatomic location, with 170 cases (77.9%). Ameloblastoma with a predilection for the posterior mandible was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (30.28%), followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (19.5%), odontoma (13.4%), and odontogenic myxoma (8.5%). OTs are rare neoplasms and appear to show geographic variations in the world. In Cappadocia, Turkey, they are more common in the mandible, with ameloblastoma followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumors with the incidences observed in the present study being similar to those of previous studies from Asia and Africa, and in contrast to those reported from American countries.

  18. Surgical management of dentigerous cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor in children: a conservative approach and 7-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Zindel Deboni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dentigerous cyst (DC is one of the most common odontogenic cysts of the jaws and rarely recurs. On the other hand, keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, formerly known as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, is considered a benign unicystic or multicystic intraosseous neoplasm and one of the most aggressive odontogenic lesions presenting relatively high recurrence rate and a tendency to invade adjacent tissue. Two cases of these odontogenic lesions occurring in children are presented. They were very similar in clinical and radiographic characteristics, and both were treated by marsupialization. The treatment was chosen in order to preserve the associated permanent teeth with complementary orthodontic treatment to direct eruption of the associated permanent teeth. At 7-years of follow-up, none of the cases showed recurrence.

  19. Cytogical features of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) with abundant cementum-like material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorano, Eugenio; Renne, Giuseppe; Tradati, Nicoletta; Viale, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare tumor, most frequently occurring in the mandible and composed of large sheets of epithelial cells, sometimes showing nuclear pleomorphism. This paper was aimed at reporting of the cytological features of an unusual case of CEOT, affecting a 14-year-old female, with abundant deposition of intercellular calcified material. The cytological preparations were characterized by large clusters of scarcely cohesive, large polyhedral cells and abundant calcified material. The latter consisted of intensely basophilic substance either in large clusters or discrete concretions and, at high-power view, occasional tumor cells also contained calcified material. Histologically, the uncalcified stroma displayed focal Congo Red positivity with the typical birefringence under polarized light. The neoplastic cells were consistently immunoreactive for epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin and, to a lesser extent, for wide spectrum cytokeratins (AE1 AE3) and cytokeratins 8-18 and 19. The cytological features of CEOT are rather characteristic, and the detection of intra- and extracellular calcifications may help to differentiate this neoplasm from others that most commonly arise in this area.

  20. Tumor de Pindborg (tumor odontogénico epitelial calcificante Pindborg tumor (Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rubio Palau

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente artículo es realizar una revisión de la literatura del tumor de Pindborg a propósito de un caso. El interés radica en su baja frecuencia y a la importancia de la anatomía patológica para su diagnóstico y correcto tratamiento ya que puede confundirse en algunos casos con otras tumoraciones benignas, a diferencia de las cuales, en este tumor debe realizarse una resección con márgenes de seguridad para disminuir la probabilidad de recidiva.The aim of this article is to review the literature on Pindborg tumor based on a case. In view of its low frequency and the importance of histology for its correct diagnosis and treatment as it can be confused with other benign tumors, appropriate resection is necessary with tumor-free margins in order to reduce the probability of local recurrence.

  1. Amyloid-Producing Odontogenic Tumors of the Facial Skin in Three Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, K; Endoh, C; Kagawa, Y; Ohmachi, T; Yamagami, T; Nomura, K; Matsuda, K; Okamoto, M; Taniyama, H

    2017-03-01

    Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (APOTs) of the facial skin were diagnosed in 3 domestic cats. The neoplasms had the histopathological characteristics of the odontogenic tumor. The neoplastic cells were present in irregular islands, strands, and sheets. The peripheral neoplastic cells of the islands and strands were arranged in a palisading fashion, while the central cells were polyhedral to stellate and randomly arranged. Multiple spherules of homogeneous eosinophilic material were closely apposed to the neoplastic epithelial cells. The spherules stained with Congo red and produced an apple green birefringence under polarization microscopy, indicative of amyloid. Immunohistochemically, amyloid materials of the neoplasms reacted with polyclonal antibodies for ameloblastin, amelogenin, and sheathlin antibodies. Neoplastic epithelial cells also reacted with antiameloblastin, amelogenin, and sheathlin antibodies, with varied intensity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of dermal neoplasms of the 3 cats were analogous to those of APOTs reported in the dog and the cat.

  2. [A rare odontogenic calcifying epithelial tumor, or Pindborg tumor. Report of a clinical case nd review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, P; Riccioni, S; Lomurno, G

    1999-01-01

    Clinical, histological and embryogenetic features of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor or Pindborg's tumor are described. A case of Pindborg's tumor in the molar region of the right mandible in a 66 year old male patient is presented. Standard X-ray examinations and CT scan were performed in order to obtain information about tumor's size. The histologic features revealed the presence of a homogeneous substance resembling amyloid and many cells filled by calcified material in the form of concentric Liesegang's rings. Treatment methods are also discussed.

  3. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in the Pathogenesis of Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eliane Macedo Sobrinho; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; dos Santos Dias, Ivoneth; Santos, Sérgio Henrique; Batista de Paula, Alfredo Maurício; Feltenberger, John David; Sena Guimarães, André Luiz; Farias, Lucyana Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors is not well known. It is important to identify genetic deregulations and molecular alterations. This study aimed to investigate, through bioinformatic analysis, the possible genes involved in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Genes involved in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT were identified in GeneCards. Gene list was expanded, and the gene interactions network was mapped using the STRING software. “Weighted number of links” (WNL) was calculated to identify “leader genes” (highest WNL). Genes were ranked by K-means method and Kruskal-Wallis test was used (Ptumors exhibit a power law behavior. Our topological analysis suggested leader genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT, by clustering coefficient calculated for both odontogenic tumors (0.028 for AM, zero for KCOT). The results obtained in the scatter diagram suggest an important relationship of these genes with the molecular processes involved in AM and KCOT. Ontological analysis for both AM and KCOT demonstrated different mechanisms. Bioinformatics analyzes were confirmed through literature review. These results may suggest the involvement of promising genes for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT. PMID:28357197

  4. Effectiveness of surgical decompression in the treatment of a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Slusarenko da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cystic tumor (CCOT is a benign lesion of odontogenic origin characterized by an ameloblastoma-like epithelium with ghost cells that may calcify. Despite broadly considered as a cyst, some investigators prefer to classify it as a neoplasm. Clinically, it occurs predominantly during the third decade of life. No difference in gender prevalence has been observed nor predilection of the lesion between maxilla and mandible. The most affected region extends from the incisor tooth to bicuspids. The classic treatment of the lesion is full excision, although a different approach may be determined by the possible association with another odontogenic tumor. Depending on the tumor size and the vicinity with important structures, decompression may be undertaken before its complete removal. The present report describes a case of CCOT with large proportions, located at the right maxilla and extending to the maxillary sinus, nasal cavity, and orbital floor. The treatment option was surgical decompression as the initial procedure, with satisfactory outcome. After partial remission, the lesion was fully removed, and the post-operative follow-up was uneventful.

  5. Odontogenic tumors and tumor —like lesions in Tanzania | Simon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ameloblastoma was the most commonly seen odontogenic tumour (73.7%), followed by odontogenic myxoma (10.3%). The site, sex, and histologic distribution of ameloblastoma did not differ from other African studies. Over 50% of patients with ameloblastoma presented to hospital late (after three or more years).

  6. Non-syndromic multiple keratocyst odontogenic tumor: A rare case report

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    Abhijeet Alok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs are one of the most frequent features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS. The condition is linked with mutation in the PTCH gene. Partial expression of the gene may result in occurrence of multiple recurring odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs. Although KCOTs are common in clinical practice, simultaneous occurrence of multiple cysts in both the maxilla and mandible of a patient is rare. These patients have early propensity to develop multiple neoplasms like basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma. Hence, early diagnosis and treatment is of utmost importance in reducing the severity of the long-term sequelae of NBCCS. We report a rare case of multiple KCOTs in a non-syndromic male patient, with emphasis on its diagnosis, radiographic features, and treatment.

  7. Clear cell calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor involving the maxillary sinus: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Priya; Nayak, Meghanand T; Singhvi, Abhishek; Sharma, Jayanti

    2012-09-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm of the jaws, accounting for less than 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It rarely extends into the maxillary sinus. Till date, six cases involving maxillary sinus have been reported. In this paper, we report the seventh case of a 52-year-old male with CEOT in maxilla extending from distal surface of the right maxillary canine to retromolar area and involving maxillary sinus with no association with impacted teeth. The diagnosis was confirmed by aspiration cytology and histologically, the tumor was composed of sheets of epithelial cells, with areas of clear cell changes. The presence of clear cells in the histological sections, accounts for the aggressive nature of the tumor simulating the clinical appearance. Prevention of recurrence can be achieved by radical resection.

  8. Survivin, cyclin D1, and p21hras in keratocystic odontogenic tumors before and after decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajić, I; Škodrić, S; Milenković, S; Tepavčević, Z; Soldatović, I; Čolić, S; Milašin, J; Andrić, M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate survivin, cyclin D1, and p21hras expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors before and after decompression, as well as in pericoronal follicles. A potential correlation between the expression levels of these proteins was also investigated. We analyzed eighteen keratocystic tumors treated by decompression and subsequent enucleation along with seven pericoronal follicles using immunohistochemistry. Keratocystic tumor samples, both before and after decompression, were positive for each of the investigated proteins. In pericoronal follicles, survivin exhibited cytoplasmic staining in contrast to nuclear staining in keratocystic tumors. Cyclin D1 expression was negative in pericoronal follicles, and p21hras expression was similar in both groups. Survivin showed significantly higher expression after decompression, while cyclin D1 and p21hras remained unchanged (P = 0.039, P = 0.255, P = 0.913, respectively). There was no correlation between these proteins neither before nor after decompression. Within the limits of the study, we can conclude that following decompression, keratocystic odontogenic tumors preserve distinct immunohistochemical profiles of cyclin D1 and p21hras expression, despite substantial reduction in size of the lesions. Significant increase of survivin expression after decompression might be attributed to higher level of epithelial proliferation caused by this procedure. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Odontogenic tumors: clinical and pathology study of 238 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Linard Avelar; Antonio Azoubel Antunes; Thiago de Santana Santos; Emanuel Sávio de Souza Andrade; Edwaldo Dourado

    2008-01-01

    Os tumores odontogênicos são neoplasias que se desenvolvem exclusivamente nos ossos gnáticos, originando-se dos tecidos odontogênicos por proliferação de tecido epitelial, mesenquimal ou ambos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência de tumores odontogênicos em determinada instituição e comparar com outros estudos da literatura mundial. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo de coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: O material do estudo foi levantado a partir dos registros de pacientes com tumores odontogênicos, no ...

  10. Marsupialization and enucleation of keratocystic odontogenic tumor with the use of Carnoy's solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Goran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT or odontogenic keratocysts are aggressive and expansive odontogenic neoplasms with high recurrence rate (25%- 60%. There are a small number of publications about the combination of marsupialization and enucleation with the use of Carnoy's solution for the treatment of KCOT. Case report. In a female patient, aged 24, marsupialization KCOT was done in the first stage, and enucleation with the use of Carnoy's solution in the second stage, six months later. Lost sensibility of the lower lip was reestablished after three months. A postoperation defect was completely filled in seven months. One year later orthopantomographic x-ray showed the presence of a newly formed bone tissue, whereas in 7 years a completely preserved new mandibular bone and recanalisation of mandibular canal were observed. Conclusion. We consider that our method was successful in the treatment of KCOT, with no occurrence of recidives seven years later. However, it is necessary to follow the patient periodically because of a possible late recidive.

  11. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 127 cases Tumores odontogênicos: análise de 127 casos

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    Jean Nunes SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty-seven cases of histologically confirmed odontogenic tumors were retrieved from a total of 5,289 oral and maxillary lesions diagnosed at the Division of Oral Pathology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, during a period of 30 years (l970-l999. The most common histological diagnosis was odontoma (50.40%, followed by ameloblastoma (30.70%. The prevalence of odontogenic tumors was greater in females and the peak incidence occurred in the second and third decades of life. The main anatomical location was the mandible, and no malignant tumors were found.De uma série de 5.289 casos de lesões orais e dos maxilares diagnosticadas no Laboratório de Patologia Oral da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte no período de 30 anos (1970-1999, foram analisados 127 casos de tumores odontogênicos confirmados histologicamente. A lesão mais freqüente foi o odontoma (50,40% seguida pelo ameloblastoma (30,70%. A prevalência de tumores odontogênicos foi maior nas mulheres e o pico de incidência ocorreu na segunda e terceira décadas de vida. A localização anatômica mais comum foi a mandíbula e não foram encontrados casos de tumores malignos.

  12. Correlation between ploidy status using flow cytometry and nucleolar organizer regions in benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Mahmoud, Sarah Ahmed; El-Rouby, Dalia Hussein; El-Ghani, Safa Fathy Abd; Badawy, Omnia Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Differentiation between the aggressive benign odontogenic tumors and their malignant counterparts is controversial and difficult. While flow cytometry (FCM) allowed DNA analysis in neoplasia, argyrophilic organizer regions (AgNORs) number and/or size in a nucleus are correlated with the ribosomal gene activity and therefore with cellular proliferation. The aim of this research was to study the diagnostic accuracy of FCM and AgNORs staining in differentiating between benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors and to correlate between these two interventions. Sixteen benign cases [8 cases of ameloblastoma (AB) and 8 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT)] and 13 malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors [8 cases of ameloblastic carcinoma (ABC) and 5 cases of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma(CCOC)] were included in the current study. For FCM analysis, a single cell suspension from Formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors was prepared according to a modified method described by Hedley (1989) and AgNORs staining were performed in accordance to the Ploton protocol (1986). Analysis of AgNORs was performed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The work revealed that all the examined tumors were diploid, except for 40% of CCOC cases. The S-phase fraction (SPF) value, AgNORs count and AgNORs area/cell showed statistically significant difference on comparing benign and malignant groups. A weak positive correlation was observed between SPF and AgNORs count. The SPF value was considered to be more sensitive and specific in differentiation between aggressive benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors in comparison to AgNORs counting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel PTCH1 mutations in patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumors screened for nevoid basal cell carcinoma (NBCC syndrome.

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    Lorenza Pastorino

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs are cystic tumors that arise sporadically or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease mainly characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, KCOTs of the jaws and a variety of other tumors. PTCH1 mutation can be found both in sporadic or NBCCS associated KCOTs. The aim of the current study was to assess whether a combined clinical and bio-molecular approach could be suitable for the detection of NBCCS among patients with a diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs. The authors collected keratocystic odontogenic tumors recorded in the database of the Pathology Department of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia during the period 1991-2011. Through interviews and examinations, family pedigrees were drawn for all patients affected by these odontogenic lesions. We found out that 18 of the 70 patients with KCOTs and/or multiple basal cell carcinomas actually met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of NBCCS. A wide inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability was evident in the families. Ameloblastomas (AMLs were reported in two probands that are also carriers of the PCTH1 germline mutations. Nine germline mutations in the PTCH1 gene, 5 of them novel, were evident in 14 tested probands. The clinical evaluation of the keratocystic odontogenic tumors can be used as screening for the detection of families at risk of NBCCS. Keratocystic odontogenic lesions are uncommon, and their discovery deserves the search for associated cutaneous basal cell carcinomas and other benign and malignant tumors related to NBCCS.

  14. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor with impacted maxillary third molar involving the right maxillary antrum:An unusual case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, first described by Phillipsen in 1956, has metamorphosized as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT as reported in WHO classification of head and neck tumors in 2005. KCOT is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaw and its occurrence in maxilla is unusual and its appearance in maxillary antrum along with maxillary impacted third molar is very uncommon. This article reports a case of KCOT associated with impacted maxillary third molar in right maxillary antrum and describes its rare site of occurrence.

  15. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor with impacted maxillary third molar involving the right maxillary antrum: an unusual case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhishek; Rai, Bhagavandas; Nair, Manju A; Bhut, Mitul K

    2011-01-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), first described by Phillipsen in 1956, has metamorphosized as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) as reported in WHO classification of head and neck tumors in 2005. KCOT is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaw and its occurrence in maxilla is unusual and its appearance in maxillary antrum along with maxillary impacted third molar is very uncommon. This article reports a case of KCOT associated with impacted maxillary third molar in right maxillary antrum and describes its rare site of occurrence.

  16. Clinicopathological and cell proliferation evaluation of ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors: a 10 year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Leorik Pereira; Serpa, Marianna Sampaio; Santana, Thalita; do Nascimento, George João Ferreira; de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; Sobral, Ana Paula Veras

    2017-02-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are important lesions of the gnathic bones due to their clinicopathological heterogeneity and variable biological behavior; therefore, epidemiological studies are needed to outline the incidence and behavior of these tumors. To evaluate the incidence and epidemiological profile of ameloblastoma (AMB) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) from an oral pathology service, and correlate morphological findings of these tumors with the immunoexpression of a cellular proliferation marker (Ki-67), a retrospective study (2002-2012) was conducted to characterize demographic, clinical, radiological, and morphological data of AMBs and KCOTs. Then, a representative sample composed of 49 cases of each tumor was selected to perform immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of Ki-67 through the streptavidin biotin peroxidase technique. For statistical analysis, we used Fisher's exact test (p tumors corroborates with data reported in the literature, and the levels of cellular proliferation were similar in both tumors, although the inflammation seems to induce a differential proliferative behavior in KCOT.

  17. Prevalence and clinicopathological comparison of kerotocystic odontogenic tumor and orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst in South Indian sample population: A retrospective study over 13 years

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    Manickam Selvamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Methodology: The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT and orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC, to identify their clinicopathological features among the patients by studying the biopsy specimens obtained from the archives of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, Karnataka, India during the period of 2001-2013. Data for this study is retrieved from the case records of the patients fitting the histological classification of the World Health Organization (2005. The following clinical variables, namely age, gender, anatomical location, and histological features are analyzed. Results: Of the 3026 biopsy reports (100% present in the archives, we had 31 cases (1.02% of KCOT, 11 cases (0.36% of OOC and a combination of para and orthokeratinized lining epithelium made 1 case (0.033%. The most frequent clinical manifestation was asymptomatic followed by the combination of pain and swelling. The male: female ratio was 1.4:1 with a mean age of 30 years in KCOT, while 2.7:1 with a mean age of 29.1 years in OOC. Posterior molar-ramus region was most commonly involved in both KCOT and OOC. Conclusion: Due to aggressiveness and high recurrence rate of KCOT, differentiation between KCOT and OOC is important, with respect to their treatment modalities. Such epidemiological pools are also essential for the analysis of geographical distribution of odontogenic tumours

  18. A comparative immunohistochemical analysis of COX-2, p53, and Ki-67 expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.A.; Carvalho, J.F.C.; van der Waal, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) and more commonly used markers, such as p53 and Ki-67. Study design. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in 20 biopsy specimens

  19. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in proliferation of odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

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    Bhavana Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: VEGF expression by the epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors may play a role in epithelial proliferation via autocrine mechanism as reflected by increased AgNOR counts. The angiogenic activity via paracrine pathway may be responsible for the difference in growth rate and neoplastic behavior of the lesions.

  20. [Dissertation 25 years later, part 2. Development of teeth and odontogenic tumors, now and then

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Processes playing a role in normal odontogenesis may also occur in development of odontogenic tumours. Studying odontogenesis may shed new light on the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumours and studying odontogenic tumours may do the same for understanding normal odontogenesis. An overview is given on

  1. Cone-beam computed tomographic illustration of an unusual position of keratocystic odontogenic tumor mimicking a dentigerous cyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepankar Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is an advanced imaging modality, with its application in all branches of dentistry. Of all the imaging modalities available, CBCT, with minimum required exposure, provides the best image quality and helps in arriving at a correct diagnosis and in treatment planning. An odontogenic keratocyst, reclassified as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, has an aggressive behavior, is prone to recur, and thus, has been classified as a tumor. Here, we discuss a rare case of a keratocystic odontogenic tumor occurring in the maxilla, with an ectopic tooth position mimicking a dentigerous cyst.

  2. Peripheral odontogenic myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanober Tasnime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic myxomas are a rare benign odontogenic mesenchymal tumor found exclusively in the tooth-bearing area of the jaw and are usually located centrally in the mandible. Soft tissue localization is rarely seen and is classified as peripheral odontogenic myxoma (POM. POM is slow growing and less aggressive as compared to central myxoma. It has a low recurrence rate, comprises 3-6% of all odontogenic tumors. Only a few cases of POM on maxillary gingiva are reported in the literature. Here, we present an unusual case of primary POM occurring in the gingiva of anterior maxilla in a 14-year-old female patient.

  3. Peripheral odontogenic myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnime, Sanober; Saxena, Chitrapriya; Bansal, Vishal; Wadhwan, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxomas are a rare benign odontogenic mesenchymal tumor found exclusively in the tooth-bearing area of the jaw and are usually located centrally in the mandible. Soft tissue localization is rarely seen and is classified as peripheral odontogenic myxoma (POM). POM is slow growing and less aggressive as compared to central myxoma. It has a low recurrence rate, comprises 3-6% of all odontogenic tumors. Only a few cases of POM on maxillary gingiva are reported in the literature. Here, we present an unusual case of primary POM occurring in the gingiva of anterior maxilla in a 14-year-old female patient.

  4. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour. PMID:24455099

  5. Clinical and Radiographic Study of Benign Odontogenic Tumors in the Jaws

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    Kim, Gyung Yae; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-11-15

    The author observed and analyzed the age, sex, chief complaint and radiographic finding of sixty-one cases of benign odontogenic tumors seen in Yonsei Medical Center, for the period of Jan. 1979 to Aug. 1989. The results were as follows: 1. Benign odontogenic tumors of 61 cases included 52 cases (85.3%) of ameloblastoma and odontoma, and 9 cases of other lesions. Radiographically, the border of the lesions were well-defined. 2. Ameloblastoma constituting twenty-seven cases (44.3%) occurred the average age of 31.1 years and had a 3:1 male predominance. The most common complaint was swelling (20 cases, 74.0%) and followed by pain (13 cases, 48.2%). Radiographically, the most common site was mandibular body area (74.0%) and the lesions were mainly multiocular radiolucency; in 17 cases (63.0%) and unilocular radiolucent lesion were seen in 10 cases (37.0%). 16 cases (59.3%) showed the resorption of roots of adjacent teeth. 3. Odontoma constituting twenty-five cases (41.0%) discovered at the average age of 16.9 years and had a 3:2 male predominance. The most common complaint was delayed eruption of tooth (8 cases, 31.0%) and 7 cases (27.0%) detected on a routine radiograph of the area. Radiographically, 17 cases (68.0%) were of compound type and 8 were of complex variety and compound odontomas were common in the anterior maxilla, whereas complex odontomas occurred more frequently in the posterior mandible. 19 cases (76.0%) showed the impaction of adjacent teeth.

  6. Non-odontogenic tumors of the facial bones in children and adolescents: role of multiparametric imaging

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    Becker, Minerva; Stefanelli, Salvatore; Poletti, Pierre Alexandre; Merlini, Laura [University of Geneva, Division of Radiology, Department of Imaging and Medical Informatics, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Rougemont, Anne-Laure [University of Geneva, Division of Clinical Pathology, Department of Genetic and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors of the pediatric facial skeleton represent a major challenge in clinical practice because they can lead to functional impairment, facial deformation, and long-term disfigurement. Their treatment often requires a multidisciplinary approach, and radiologists play a pivotal role in the diagnosis and management of these lesions. Although rare, pediatric tumors arising in the facial bones comprise a wide spectrum of benign and malignant lesions of osteogenic, fibrogenic, hematopoietic, neurogenic, or epithelial origin. The more common lesions include Langerhans cell histiocytosis and osteoma, while rare lesions include inflammatory myofibroblastic and desmoid tumors; juvenile ossifying fibroma; primary intraosseous lymphoma; Ewing sarcoma; and metastases to the facial bones from neuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma, or retinoblastoma. This article provides a comprehensive approach for the evaluation of children with non-odontogenic tumors of the facial skeleton. Typical findings are discussed with emphasis on the added value of multimodality multiparametric imaging with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), positron emission tomography CT (PET CT), and PET MRI. Key imaging findings and characteristic histologic features of benign and malignant lesions are reviewed and the respective role of each modality for pretherapeutic assessment and post-treatment follow-up. Pitfalls of image interpretation are addressed and how to avoid them. (orig.)

  7. CD1a-positive Langerhans cells and their relationship with E-cadherin in ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

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    Mello, Leonardo Araújo; Figueiredo, Andréia Leal; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo Silva; Martins, Manoela Domingues; de Figueiredo, Claúdia Roberta Leite Vieira; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; de Albuquerque Júnior, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Santos, Jean Nunes Dos

    2013-07-01

    Ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs) are lesions that are characterized by locally invasive growth and cause extensive bone destruction. In addition, it is known that E-cadherin influences the adhesion of Langerhans cells (LCs) to keratinocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate, using immunohistochemistry, the distribution of CD1a-positive cells in ameloblastomas and KOTs and their relationship with E-cadherin, in comparison to calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT). The CD1a-positive LCs were observed in 11 ameloblastomas and KOTs. All of the cases of CCOT showed CD1a-positive LCs and a significant difference was found when this tumor was compared with ameloblastomas (P odontogenic tumors that were studied (P > 0.05, Spearman test). A quantitative difference of CD1a-positive cells between AMs and KOTs in comparison to CCOTs was observed. This permits to speculate that a depletion of CD1a-positive LCs might influence the local invasiveness of ameloblastomas and KOTs. Furthermore, it is suggested that E-cadherin mediates cell adhesion in these tumors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor-associated amyloid consists of a novel human protein.

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    Solomon, Alan; Murphy, Charles L; Weaver, Kristal; Weiss, Deborah T; Hrncic, Rudi; Eulitz, Manfred; Donnell, Robert L; Sletten, Knut; Westermark, Gunilla; Westermark, Per

    2003-11-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs), also known as Pindborg tumors, are characterized by the presence of squamous-cell proliferation, calcification, and, notably, amyloid deposits. On the basis of immunohistochemical analyses, the amyloidogenic component had heretofore been deemed to consist of cytokeratin-related or other molecules; however, its chemical composition had never been elucidated. We have used our microanalytic techniques to characterize the protein nature of CEOT-associated amyloid isolated from specimens obtained from 3 patients. As evidenced by the results of amino-acid sequencing and mass spectrometry, the fibrils were found to be composed of a polypeptide of approximately 46 mer. This component was identical in sequence to the N-terminal portion of a hypothetical 153-residue protein encoded by the FLJ20513 gene cloned from the human KATO III cell line. That the amyloid protein was derived from this larger molecule was demonstrated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification of tumor-cell RNA where a full-length FLJ20513 transcript was found. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the amyloid within the CEOTs immunostained with antibodies prepared against a synthetic FLJ20513-related dodecapeptide. Our studies provide unequivocal evidence that CEOT-associated amyloid consists of a unique and previously undescribed protein that we provisionally designate APin.

  9. Massive keratocystic odontogenic tumor of mandible crossing the midline in 11-year child: An unusual case report and its management

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    A N Sulabha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is now designated by World Health Organization (WHO as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT. The OKC involves approximately 11% of all the cysts in jaws. OKC possesses tumor-like characteristics because of its clinical behavior. Incidence of occurrence of this lesion in nonnevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome patients before ten is low. Case Report: We report a massive OKC in the anterior region of mandible in a child. Combination of age, sex, size of the lesion, its location, and rapid growth in the present case makes it different from other KCOTs. Our management plan aimed to preserve the natural dentition, shape, function, and continuity of mandible. Discussion: An aggressive treatment modality like enucleation in combination with Carnoy′s solution application, as done in the present case might be considered as a viable treatment modality for massive KCOT. The present paper also highlights brief discussion concerning the management of OKC.

  10. Non-calcifying and Langerhans cell-rich variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor

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    Hung-Pin Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reported the clinicopathological features, treatment and prognosis of nine cases of noncalcifying and Langerhans cell (LC-rich calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT collected from the English literature. Of the nine cases, seven were intraosseous and two were extraosseous. All nine tumors were found in Asian patients. The age of the nine patients ranged from 20 years to 58 years with a mean age of 41 years. There were five female and four male patients. The seven intraosseous cases included six in the anterior and premolar region of the maxilla and one in the posterior region and ascending ramus of the mandible. The two extraosseous cases were located at the upper lateral incisor and premolar gingivae, respectively. Of the seven intraosseous cases, five showed unilocular and two multilocular radiolucency without foci of calcification. Six of the seven intraosseous cases showed resorption of the tooth roots in the tumor-involved region. Histologically, noncalcifying and LC-rich CEOTs were composed of small nests and thin strands of tumor epithelial cells with a relatively high number of LCs among them. This was the reason why we classed these nine cases as noncalcifying and LC-rich CEOTs. Two extraosseous cases received total excision of the gingival mass. For the seven intraosseous cases, four accepted partial maxillectomy or mandibulectomy, two received total excision or enucleation, and one underwent curettage. The six cases with the follow-up information available showed no tumor recurrence after a follow-up period of 6 months to 10 years.

  11. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor involving the maxillary antrum with displacement of the third molar: A rare case report

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    Ashwini Kumar Mengji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaw with a high rate of recurrence. The lesion commonly occurs in the mandibular molar-ramus area and is rarely seen in the maxilla. Its occurrence in the maxillary sinus along with a displaced third molar is very rare. This article reports a case of KCOT in a 15-year-old boy with a displaced third molar involving the right maxillary antrum.

  12. Disruption of Smad4 in odontoblasts causes multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors and tooth malformation in mice.

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    Gao, Yuanrong; Yang, Guan; Weng, Tujun; Du, Juan; Wang, Xuejiu; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Songlin; Yang, Xiao

    2009-11-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic epithelial neoplasias with a high recurrence rate. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of KCOTs are still largely unknown. Here, we show that specific ablation of Smad4 in odontoblasts unexpectedly resulted in spontaneous KCOTs in mice. The mutant mice exhibited malformed teeth characterized by fractured incisors and truncated molar roots. These abnormalities were mainly caused by disrupted odontoblast differentiation that led to irregular dentin formation. The cystic tumors arising from the reactivation of epithelial rests of Malassez (ERM), in which Smad4 remained intact, proliferated and formed stratified and differentiated squamous epithelia that exhibited a dramatic upregulation of Hedgehog signaling. Odontoblasts, which are responsive to transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signals, may produce signal molecules to inhibit the activation of ERM. Indeed, we observed a downregulation of BMP signals from Smad4 mutant odontoblasts to the adjacent Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). Intriguingly, KCOTs frequently emerged from Smad4-deficient ERM in keratinocyte-specific Smad4 knockout mice, suggesting a novel mechanism in which reciprocal TGF-beta/BMP signaling between odontoblasts and HERS was required for tooth root development and suppression of KCOT formation. These findings provide insight into the genetic basis underlying KCOTs and have important implications for new directions in KCOT treatment.

  13. Disruption of Smad4 in Odontoblasts Causes Multiple Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors and Tooth Malformation in Mice▿

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    Gao, Yuanrong; Yang, Guan; Weng, Tujun; Du, Juan; Wang, Xuejiu; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Songlin; Yang, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic epithelial neoplasias with a high recurrence rate. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of KCOTs are still largely unknown. Here, we show that specific ablation of Smad4 in odontoblasts unexpectedly resulted in spontaneous KCOTs in mice. The mutant mice exhibited malformed teeth characterized by fractured incisors and truncated molar roots. These abnormalities were mainly caused by disrupted odontoblast differentiation that led to irregular dentin formation. The cystic tumors arising from the reactivation of epithelial rests of Malassez (ERM), in which Smad4 remained intact, proliferated and formed stratified and differentiated squamous epithelia that exhibited a dramatic upregulation of Hedgehog signaling. Odontoblasts, which are responsive to transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signals, may produce signal molecules to inhibit the activation of ERM. Indeed, we observed a downregulation of BMP signals from Smad4 mutant odontoblasts to the adjacent Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). Intriguingly, KCOTs frequently emerged from Smad4-deficient ERM in keratinocyte-specific Smad4 knockout mice, suggesting a novel mechanism in which reciprocal TGF-β/BMP signaling between odontoblasts and HERS was required for tooth root development and suppression of KCOT formation. These findings provide insight into the genetic basis underlying KCOTs and have important implications for new directions in KCOT treatment. PMID:19703995

  14. The Possible Role of Mast Cells in the Odontogenic Cyst’s Pathogenesis: A Comparative Study between Dentigerous Cyst and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

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    Sareh Farhadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, mast cells were recognized in the pathogenesis of more aggressive pathologic lesions. This study was aimed to evaluate and compare the density of mast cells in Dentigerous cyst (DC and Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT regarding their different clinical behavior. Method. This study was conducted on 23 and 26 cases of DC and KCOT, respectively. Four-micron sections were prepared for Toluidine blue staining and mast cell densities in two desired cysts were studied. Final data was analyzed via t-test and Mann-Whitney U test method regarding the significant level lower than 0.05. Results. Mast cell densities were significantly higher in KCOTs for deep and superficial layers and both layers (P0.05. Conclusion. It seems that mast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of KCOT, but, regarding wide range of mast cell’s biologic activities, further investigations are recommended to confirm the issue and prepare the details.

  15. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferations in radicular cysts: a clinicopathologic study of forty-two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Rinku M; Brannon, Robert B; Fowler, Craig B

    2011-05-01

    Squamous odontogenic tumor-like epithelial islands occurring in the walls of odontogenic cysts are histologically identical to the squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT). Microscopically, the squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferations (SOTLPs) share certain histologic features with SOT, acanthomatous and desmoplastic ameloblastoma, and well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the rarely reported SOTLPs occurring in radicular cysts. The purpose of this study was to define the clinical and histopathologic spectrum of SOTLP in radicular cysts and to investigate its histogenesis, prevalence, and biologic behavior. A retrospective clinicopathologic study was conducted at the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry, and a total of 42 radicular cysts with SOTLPs were accepted. Clinical findings and detailed histopathologic features were documented, and follow-up information was solicited for the 42 cases. Forty-two cases of radicular cysts with SOTLPs were found among 1241 radicular cysts. Two thirds of the cases revealed the SOTLPs were arising from budlike extensions of the epithelial lining of the cyst. The SOT-like epithelial islands were in areas free of inflammatory cells in 73.8% of the cases. No evidence of recurrence or unexpected clinical behavior was reported in 11 cases with adequate follow-up. The prevalence of SOTLPs in radicular cysts at Louisiana State University School of Dentistry is 3.4%. The SOTLPs appear to originate from the epithelial lining of the cyst and do not appear to be directly associated with inflammation. The biologic behavior of the radicular cyst with SOTLP is innocuous, with no apparent potential for neoplastic transformation or recurrence. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) in a patient with Gorlin syndrome: a case report with late presentation and absence of skin manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Atif Ali; Edhi, Muhammad Muzzammil; Faridi, Naveen; Hosein, Mervyn; Khan, Mehmood

    2016-07-22

    Gorlin syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOT) and falx cerebral calcifications, which occur due to mutation in PTCH gene. A 36 year old Asian patient presented with jaw swelling and pain. Radiographic examination revealed six cysts in maxilla and mandible which were excised and histologically were compatable with keratocystic odontogenic tumors. CT scan also revealed falx cerebral calcification which led to the diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome confirmed on genetic testing. There was no evidence of basal cell carcinoma and other manifestations of Gorlin syndrome were absent. Multiple KCOT are hallmark of Gorlin syndrome and should always leads to its suspicion even in the absence of other manifestations and late presentation. Moreover, keratocystic odontogenic tumors have a particularly higher risk of recurrence and patients with Gorlin syndrome are prone to develop additional keratocystic odontogenic tumors from basal cells of oral epithelium. Therefore we suggest a stepwise approach to manage such patients which include a preoperative biopsy to establish a definitive diagnosis and complete removal of all keratocystic odontogenic tumors to prevent recurrence followed by close clinical follow up and early removal of any newly developed or recurrent cyst. Additionally thorough clinical examination is necessary to rule out the possibility of Gorlin syndrome in any patient with keratocystic odontogenic tumors as there are only subtle differences in histology of those cysts with a syndromic association and clinical features of Gorlin syndrome are markedly variable. Hence late occurrence of keratocystic odontogenic tumors and absence of skin manifestations like basal cell carcinoma should not preclude a diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome.

  17. The relationship between radiological features and clinical manifestation and dental expenses of keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Hyun; Huh, Kyung Heo; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Bae, Kwang Hak [Dept. of School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to identify correlations between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) data from CT sections, and data on the KCOT clinical manifestation and resulting dental expenses. Following local Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a seven-years of retrospective study was performed regarding patients with KCOTs treated at the Seoul National University Dental Hospital. A total of 180 KCOT were included in this study. The following information was collected: age, gender, location and size of the lesion, radiological features, surgical treatment provided and dental expenses. There was no significant association between the size of the KCOT and age, gender, and presenting preoperative symptoms. In both jaws, it was unusual to find KCOTs under 10 mm. The correlation between the number of teeth removed and the size of the KCOT in the tooth bearing area was statistically significant in the mandible, whereas in the maxilla, no significant relationship was found. Dental expenses compared with the size of the KCOT were found to be significant in both jaws. The size of KCOT was associated with a significant increase in dental expenses for both jaws and the number of teeth removed from the mandible. These findings emphasize the importance of routine examinations and early detection of lesions, which in turn helps preserving anatomical structures and reducing dental expenses.

  18. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor: Possible Role in Locally Aggressive Behavior

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    Wen-Qun Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to clarify whether epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is involved in the pathogenesis and development of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT. The expression levels of EMT-related proteins and genes in normal oral mucosa (OM, radicular cyst (RC, and KCOT were determined and compared by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our data showed that the expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin and Pan-cytokeratin was significantly downregulated in KCOT with upregulation of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin compared to OM and RC. Importantly, TGF-β, a potent EMT inducer, and Slug, a master transcription factor, were also found highly expressed in KCOT. In addition, the results from Spearman rank correlation test and clustering analysis revealed the close relationship between Slug and MMP-9, which was further evidenced by double-labeling immunofluorescence that revealed a synchronous distribution for Slug with MMP-9 in KCOT samples. All the data suggested EMT might be involved in the locally aggressive behavior of KCOT.

  19. Expression of YAP/TAZ in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors and Its Possible Association with Proliferative Behavior

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    Qi-Wen Man

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to clarify whether YAP/TAZ is involved in the pathogenesis and proliferative growth of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT. The expression levels of YAP/TAZ and downstream proteins and genes in normal oral mucosa (OM and KCOT were determined and compared by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that the expression of YAP/TAZ and downstream proteins (Cyr61, CTGF was significantly upregulated in KCOT with upregulation of Ki-67 compared to OM. Importantly, the mRNA levels of transcription factors (TEAD1, TEAD4, and RUNX2 and cell cycle related genes (CDK2, PCNA, which interact with the transcriptional coactivators YAP/TAZ, are also upregulated in the KCOT. In addition, the results from Spearman rank correlation test revealed the close relationship between YAP/TAZ and Ki-67, which was further evidenced by double-labelling immunofluorescence that revealed a synchronous distribution for YAP/TAZ with Ki-67 in KCOT samples. All the data suggested YAP/TAZ might be involved in the proliferative behavior of KCOT.

  20. OCT4 and SOX2 are reliable markers in detecting stem cells in odontogenic lesions

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    Abhishek Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context (Background: Stem cells are a unique subpopulation of cells in the human body with a capacity to initiate differentiation into various cell lines. Tumor stem cells (TSCs are a unique subpopulation of cells that possess the ability to initiate a neoplasm and sustain self-renewal. Epithelial stem cell (ESC markers such as octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4 and sex-determining region Y (SRY-box 2 (SOX2 are capable of identifying these stem cells expressed during the early stages of tooth development. Aims: To detect the expression of the stem cell markers OCT4 and SOX2 in the normal odontogenic tissues and the odontogenic cysts and tumors. Materials and Methods: Paraffin sections of follicular tissue, radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, and ameloblastic carcinoma were obtained from the archives. The sections were subjected to immunohistochemical assay by the use of mouse monoclonal antibodies to OCT4 and SOX2. Statistical Analysis: The results were evaluated by descriptive analysis. Results: The results show the presence of stem cells in the normal and lesional tissues with these stem cell identifying markers. SOX2 was found to be more consistent and reliable in the detection of stem cells. Conclusion: The stem cell expressions are maintained in the tumor transformation of tissue and probably suggest that there is no phenotypic change of stem cells in progression from normal embryonic state to its tumor component. The quantification and localization reveals interesting trends that indicate the probable role of the cells in the pathogenesis of the lesions.

  1. Tumores odontogênicos: estudo clínico-patológico de 238 casos Odontogenic tumors: clinical and pathology study of 238 cases

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    Rafael Linard Avelar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Os tumores odontogênicos são neoplasias que se desenvolvem exclusivamente nos ossos gnáticos, originando-se dos tecidos odontogênicos por proliferação de tecido epitelial, mesenquimal ou ambos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência de tumores odontogênicos em determinada instituição e comparar com outros estudos da literatura mundial. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo de coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: O material do estudo foi levantado a partir dos registros de pacientes com tumores odontogênicos, no período de janeiro de 1992 a março de 2007 (15 anos. Foram incluídos os casos de pacientes que se enquadravam na Classificação Histológica da Organização Mundial de Saúde (OMS de 2005. Foram analisados os indicadores gênero, faixa etária, localização anatômica, tipo histológico e presença de sintomatologia. RESULTADOS: Os tumores odontogênicos constituíram 4,76% dentre todas as lesões biopsiadas dentro do período estudado. A idade média dos pacientes foi de 30,7 anos, 57% dos pacientes eram do gênero masculino. O tumor odontogênico ceratocístico foi o tipo histológico mais prevalente (30%, seguido do ameloblastoma (23,7%. Quanto à presença de sintomatologia, 75,7% dos casos apresentaram-se assintomáticos. CONCLUSÃO: Os tumores odontogênicos parecem ter discreta predileção pelo gênero feminino, segunda e terceira décadas de vida, sendo mais freqüentes na mandíbula e, na maioria dos casos apresentam-se assintomáticos.Odontogenic tumors are neoplasms that develops exclusively in the gnathic bones; they originate from odontogenic tissues, by epithelial or mesenchymal proliferation, or both. AIM: To evaluate the incidence of odontogenic tumors in a specific institution, and to compare these findings with other studies in the literature. STUDY FORMAT: A cross-sectional cohort retrospective study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The sample was obtained from the files of patients with odontogenic tumors diagnosed between January

  2. Analysis of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and angiogenic index in syndromic and non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors

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    Rafaella Bastos LEITE

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT-1 and 3 (GLUT-3 in keratocystic odontogenic tumors associated with Gorlin syndrome (SKOTs and non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (NSKOTs, and to establish correlations with the angiogenic index. Seventeen primary NSKOTs, seven recurrent NSKOTs, and 17 SKOTs were selected for the study. The percentage of immunopositive cells for GLUT-1 and GLUT-3 in the epithelial component of the tumors was assessed. The angiogenic index was determined by microvessel count. The results were analyzed statistically using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman’s correlation test. High epithelial immunoexpression of GLUT-1 was observed in most tumors (p = 0.360. There was a higher frequency of negative cases for GLUT-3 in all groups. The few GLUT-3-positive tumors exhibited low expression of this protein in epithelial cells. No significant difference in the angiogenic index was observed between groups (p = 0.778. GLUT-1 expression did not correlate significantly with the angiogenic index (p > 0.05. The results suggest that the more aggressive biological behavior of SKOTs when compared to NSKOTs may not be related to GLUT-1 or GLUT-3 expression. GLUT-1 may play an important role in glucose uptake by epithelial cells of KOTs and this process is unlikely related to the angiogenic index. GLUT-1 could be a potential target for future development of therapeutic strategies for KOTs.

  3. Analysis of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and angiogenic index in syndromic and non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Rafaella Bastos; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; Nogueira, Renato Luiz Maia; Souza, Lélia Batista de; Pereira Pinto, Leão; Nonaka, Cassiano Francisco Weege

    2017-04-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT-1) and 3 (GLUT-3) in keratocystic odontogenic tumors associated with Gorlin syndrome (SKOTs) and non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (NSKOTs), and to establish correlations with the angiogenic index. Seventeen primary NSKOTs, seven recurrent NSKOTs, and 17 SKOTs were selected for the study. The percentage of immunopositive cells for GLUT-1 and GLUT-3 in the epithelial component of the tumors was assessed. The angiogenic index was determined by microvessel count. The results were analyzed statistically using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman's correlation test. High epithelial immunoexpression of GLUT-1 was observed in most tumors (p = 0.360). There was a higher frequency of negative cases for GLUT-3 in all groups. The few GLUT-3-positive tumors exhibited low expression of this protein in epithelial cells. No significant difference in the angiogenic index was observed between groups (p = 0.778). GLUT-1 expression did not correlate significantly with the angiogenic index (p > 0.05). The results suggest that the more aggressive biological behavior of SKOTs when compared to NSKOTs may not be related to GLUT-1 or GLUT-3 expression. GLUT-1 may play an important role in glucose uptake by epithelial cells of KOTs and this process is unlikely related to the angiogenic index. GLUT-1 could be a potential target for future development of therapeutic strategies for KOTs.

  4. The evaluation of Ki67, p53, MCM3 and PCNA immunoexpressions at the level of the dental follicle of impacted teeth, dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

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    Coşarcă, Adina Simona; Mocan, Simona Liliana; Păcurar, Mariana; Fülöp, Emőke; Ormenişan, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the immunoexpression of Ki67, p53, MCM3 and PCNA markers in epithelial remnants of dental follicles of impacted teeth and to identify a possible correlation between the immunoexpression of these markers in dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors in order to evaluate their evolutionary behavior. A total of 102 cases were included in the study and divided into three subgroups: the first subgroup consisted of 62 cases with dental follicles of impacted teeth, the second included 20 cases of dentigerous cysts and the third subgroup comprised a number of 20 cases with keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Immunomarking with the four antibodies was performed. A positive marking was obtained in over 60% of the dental follicles for all markers. Statistically significant differences were also obtained in dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors for Ki67, p53 and MCM3. Assessment of the four antibodies in the two layers of keratocystic odontogenic tumors shows a positive correlation between Ki67 and MCM3 both for the basal and parabasal layer, with slightly increased values in the latter. In order to determine the proliferative capacity of epithelial remnants in the dental follicles, Ki67 and PCNA, Ki67 and MCM3 are the most useful markers in practice; they have similar behavior and are more likely to help in distinguishing between dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

  5. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: An updated analysis of 339 cases reported in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to integrate the available data published on calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOT) into a comprehensive analysis of its clinical and radiologic features. An electronic search was undertaken in May 2016. Eligibility criteria were publications having enough clinical, radiological and/or histological information to confirm definite diagnosis. A total of 362 lesions were found, 339 with enough information were analyzed. Variants clear cells (n = 33) and Langerhans cells (n = 10) were rarely described in the literature, as well as lesions with malignant transformation (n = 8). Central lesions (n = 264) were more prevalent than their peripheral counterparts (n = 24). A higher prevalence characterized the mandible, posterior region, and third and fourth decades. About 40% of the peripheral lesions showed signs of underlying bone erosion, and about half of the central ones showed signs of cortical bone perforation. Recurrence was found in all lesions (12.6%), peripheral lesions (18.8%), central lesions (11.6%), clear cell (10.7%), Langerhans cell (0%), and those with malignant transformation (42.9%). Excision or curettage was associated with the highest recurrence rate. None of the variables showed a statistically significant influence on the recurrence rate. The possible locally aggressive behavior of the lesions recommends a less conservative management than simple curettage. The clear cell variant shows similar demographic data and biological behavior compared to the non-variant lesions, suggesting that the presence of clear cells does not have an important clinical significance. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Metgud, Rashmi; Naik, Smitha; Lerra, Sahul; Tiwari, Priya; Mamta; Katakwar, Payal; Tak, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Cyst and tumors arise from tissue remains of odontogenesis, these interactions have been considered to play an important role in the tumorigenesis of odontogenic lesions. The connective tissue stroma has an essential role in the preservation of epithelial tissues and minor alterations in the epithelium are followed by corresponding changes in the stroma, such as angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the first factor which maintains its position as the most critical driver of vascular formation and is required to initiate the formation of immature vessels, with this aim, present study was executed to evaluate VEGF expression in kertocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst (RC). A retrospective study was carried out comprising a total of 31 cases; 13 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), nine cases of dentigerous cyst (DC) and nine cases of RC. The sections were stained immunohistochemically with VEGF antibody and were evaluated for the presence and intensity of the immuno reactive cells. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test to inter-compare the VEGF expression between KCOT, DC, and RC. VEGF expression in the epithelium and connective tissue was significantly higher in KCOT compared to dentigerous and RC. One case of KCOT with carcinomatous change also revealed positive results for the VEGF expression in the dysplastic epithelium, tumor islands, and connective tissue. The significant difference was observed on inter-comparison of the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC, whereas no significant difference was observed in the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC. The present study data supports the literature finding that angiogenesis can be important in the progression and enlargement of odontogenic cysts similarly to what occurs in neoplastic conditions and further it can be concluded that the higher positivity for VEGF of KCOT could help to

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis of periapical cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, E; Kayikcioglu, T; Kayipmaz, S

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we propose a decision support system for effective classification of dental periapical cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) lesions obtained via cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT has been effectively used in recent years for diagnosing dental pathologies and determining their boundaries and content. Unlike other imaging techniques, CBCT provides detailed and distinctive information about the pathologies by enabling a three-dimensional (3D) image of the region to be displayed. We employed 50 CBCT 3D image dataset files as the full dataset of our study. These datasets were identified by experts as periapical cyst and KCOT lesions according to the clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features. Segmentation operations were performed on the CBCT images using viewer software that we developed. Using the tools of this software, we marked the lesional volume of interest and calculated and applied the order statistics and 3D gray-level co-occurrence matrix for each CBCT dataset. A feature vector of the lesional region, including 636 different feature items, was created from those statistics. Six classifiers were used for the classification experiments. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier achieved the best classification performance with 100% accuracy, and 100% F-score (F1) scores as a result of the experiments in which a ten-fold cross validation method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. SVM achieved the best classification performance with 96.00% accuracy, and 96.00% F1 scores in the experiments in which a split sample validation method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. SVM additionally achieved the best performance of 94.00% accuracy, and 93.88% F1 in which a leave-one-out (LOOCV) method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. Based on the results, we determined that periapical cyst and KCOT lesions can be classified with a high accuracy with the models that we built using

  8. Hybrid clear cell odontogenic carcinoma and ameloblastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) which was previously designated clear cell odontogenic tumor also exhibits an aggressive biologic behavior and a tendency to metastasize to distant locations. Both lesions are rare. We report an odontogenic carcinoma with a dual histomorphologic feature of CCOC and AC ...

  9. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: Odontogenic and Maxillofacial Bone Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John M; Vered, Marilena

    2017-03-01

    The 4th edition of the World Health Organization's Classification of Head and Neck Tumours was published in January of 2017. This article provides a summary of the changes to Chapter 4 Tumours of the oral cavity and mobile tongue and Chapter 8 Odontogenic and maxillofacial bone tumours. Odontogenic cysts which were eliminated from the 3rd 2005 edition were included in the 4th edition as well as other unique allied conditons of the jaws. Many new tumors published since 2005 have been included in the 2017 classification.

  10. Benign odontogenic tumors versus histochemically related tissues: preliminary results from mid-infrared and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmas, Joanna; Prządka, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    Three types of human odontogenic tumors histologically classified as compound composite odontoma, ossifying fibroma, and Pindborg tumor were characterized using mid-infrared spectroscopy (mid-IR) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR). For comparison, human jawbone and dental mineralized tissues such as dentin, enamel, and dental cement were also characterized. The studies focused on the structural properties and chemical composition of pathological tissues versus histochemically related tissues. All analyzed tumors were composed of organic and mineral parts and water. Apatite was found to be the main constituent of the mineral part. Various components (water, structural hydroxyl groups, carbonate ions (CO(3)(2-)), and hydrogen phosphate ions (HPO(4)(2-))) and physicochemical parameters (index of apatite maturity and crystallinity) were examined. The highest organic/mineral ratio was observed in fibrocementoma, a finding that can be explained by the fibrous character of the tumor. The lowest relative HPO(4)(2-) content was found in odontoma. This tumor is characterized by the highest mineral crystallinity index and content of structural hydroxyl groups. The Pindborg tumor mineral portion was found to be poorly crystalline and rich in HPO(4)(2-). The relative CO(3)(2-) content was similar in all samples studied. The results of spectroscopic studies of odontogenic tumors were consistent with the standard histochemical analysis. It was shown that the various techniques of ssNMR and elaborate analysis of the mid-IR spectra, applied together, provide valuable information about calcified benign odontogenic tumors.

  11. Odontogenic myxoma: report of 2 cases

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    Kim, Joo Yeon; Park, Geum Mee; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The odontogenic myxoma is an infiltrative benign tumor of bone that occurs almost exclusively in the jaw bones and comprises 3% to 6% of odontogenic tumors. This neoplasm is thought to arise from the primitive mesenchymal structures of a developing tooth, including the dental follicle, dental papilla, or periodontal ligament. Radiographically the odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns: unicystic, multilocular, pericoronal, and radiolucent-radiopaque, making the differential diagnosis difficult. In this report, two cases of the odontogenic myxoma in the jaw bones are presented. The first case involved only the mandible, while the second case involved the maxilla. Both cases presented extensive multilocular radiolucencies characteristic of odontogenic myxoma.

  12. Adenomatoid hyperplasia of the minor salivary glands on the buccal mucosa: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereci, Omür; Cimen, Emre

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid hyperplasia of the minor salivary glands is a hyperplastic oral lesion which may be seen on minor salivary gland bearing areas on all oral mucosa, especially on soft and hard palate. This study reports a rare case of buccal adenomatoid hyperplasia of the minor salivary glands and discusses the clinical significance. 48 year old male patient presented with a complaint of a swelling on his left cheek. Clinical examination revealed a bluish mass on the buccal mucosa. A provisional diagnosis of salivary gland neoplasm was made and the lesion was excised under local anesthesia. The histological diagnosis was adenomatoid hyperplasia of the minor salivary glands. Buccal localization of the adenomatoid hyperplasia of the minor salivary glands is quite uncommon in the literature. There are two cases in the English literature for our knowledge. In the clinical examination, the nodular and protuberated appearance of the lesion resembles buccal minor salivary gland tumors and vascular lesions. Histological analysis is fundamental to achieve correct diagnosis. The differential diagnosis of buccal nodular, exophytic and colored mucosal lesions should include adenomatoid hyperplasia of the minor salivary glands. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. An atypical adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in the mandible: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, M.M. College of Dental Sciences and Research, Ambala, India. Correspondence to ... radiographic examination for dental treatments. We have presented a case of a unique ... There was thinning and erosion of the buccal and lingual cortices with full thickness defect in the ...

  14. Disruption of Smad4 in odontoblasts and dental epithelial cells influences the phenotype of multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weipeng; Yang, Guan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiao; Li, Tiejun

    2015-07-31

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic epithelial neoplasms with a high recurrence rate. The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of KCOTs are still largely unknown. Previous research showed that specific ablation of Smad4 in odontoblasts and dental epithelia resulted in spontaneous KCOTs in mice, and that constitutively activated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling was detected in the cyst epithelia of both Smad4(Co/Co) OC-Cre and Smad4(Co/Co) K5-Cre mice. Here, we ablated Smad4 in mouse odontoblasts and dental epithelia and compared the sizes and numbers of KCOTs. Both the number and size of KCOTs in Smad4(Co/Co) OC-Cre mice were larger than those in Smad4(Co/Co) K5-Cre mice, suggesting that paracrine signals from root odontoblasts play a more important role than those from Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the maxilla-a serious entity often misdiagnosed: A report of two cases resembling dentigerous cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T K Rama Murthy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common maxillary location for a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is the canine region where they commonly are mistaken for an inflammatory radicular cyst or dentigerous cyst or a lateral periodontal cyst or even a nasopalatine cyst. This misdiagnosis occurs mainly because of the appearance of KCOT as a unilocular radiolucency in the maxilla, particularly if the KCOT is found coincidentally with a nonvital tooth. Additionally, the cyst is frequently infected producing pus that obscures the typical white cheesy material. A misdiagnosis based solely on clinical information can lead to the possibility of the patient being treated with a conservative endodontic therapy or even conservative surgical techniques thereby greatly increasing the chances of progression or recurrence of this aggressive lesion. Here, we report two such cases diagnosed and treated aggressively.

  16. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible: A case report with diagnostic considerations

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    Angela Santoro

    2016-02-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Benign odontogenic tumors may be distinguished from other odontogenic/non-odontogenic neoplasias and from malignant tumours through a cytologic differential diagnosis as treatment differs accordingly.

  17. Early reconstruction of bone defect created after initial surgery of a large keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report

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    Matijević Stevo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is defined as a benign cystic neoplasm of the jaws of odontogenic origin with a high rate of recurrence. The most lesions occur in the posterior part of the mandible. Treatment of KCOT remains controversial, but the goals of treatment should involve eliminating the potential for recurrence while minimizing surgical morbidity. However, another significant therapeutic problem related to the management of KCOT is an adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect, as well as appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a patient, especially in cases of a very large destruction of the jaws bone. Case report. We presented a 65-year-old female patient with very large KCOT of the mandible. Orthopantomographic radiography showed a very large elliptical multilocular radiolucency, located on the right side of the mandible body and the ascending ramus of the mandible, with radiographic evidence of cortical perforation at the anterior border of the mandibular ramus and the superior border of the alveolar part of the mandible. The surgical treatment included two phases. In the first phase, the tumor was removed by enucleation and additional use of Carnoy solution, performing peripheral ostectomy and excision of the affected overlying mucosa, while in the second phase, restorative surgery of the existing mandibular defect was performed 6 months later. Postoperatively, we did not register any of postoperative complications, nor recurrence within 2 years of the follow-up. Conclusion. Adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect and appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of the patient should be the primary goal in the treatment of KCOT, having in mind the need for a long-term post-surgical follow-up.

  18. The effect of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on the displacement pattern of inferior alveolar canal in CBCT examinations

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    Isa Abdi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The inferior alveolar canal should be examined as a significant anatomical landmark, particularly in the posterior body and ramus of the mandible, for dental and surgical procedures. In the present study, the effects of two pathological lesions, ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, on canal displacement were investigated. Methods. This study had a single-blinded design. Twenty-six patients with lesions in the mandible referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, were studied in two equal groups (13 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of ameloblastoma and 13 with a histopathological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst. After confirming the initial incisional biopsy and pathological report, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT of lesions larger than 3 cm mesiodistaly and those involving the mandibular posterior body and ramus were included in the study. Two maxillofacial surgeons in association with an oral and maxillofacial radiologist examined three points on CBCT images to determine the mandibular canal position relative to the lesions from the lingual and buccal aspects. Results. The results of statistical analyses showed that in ameloblastoma, the inferior alveolar canal had been displaced more buccally in the ramus area (point A (84.6% but in the distal region (point C, the displacement was less buccal (41.6%. The canal was displaced buccally in 53.8% of cases at point A and in 46.2% of cases at point C in KOT lesions. Finally chi-squared test did not show any statistically significant differences between these two lesions. Conclusion. The results of this study showed no relationship between these lesions and the displacement of the mandibular canal.

  19. Molecular Signaling in Benign Odontogenic Neoplasia Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amm, Hope M.; MacDougall, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Several molecular pathways have been shown to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors. These neoplasms arise from the epithelial or mesenchymal cells of the dental apparatus in the jaw or oral mucosa. Next generation genomic sequencing has identified gene mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with many of these tumors. In this review, we focus on two of the most common odontogenic tumor subtypes: ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumors. We highlight gene expression and protein immunohistological findings and known genetic alterations in the hedgehog, BRAF/Ras/MAPK, epidermal growth factor receptor, Wnt and Akt signaling pathways relevant to these tumors. These various pathways are explored to potentially target odontogenic tumors cells and prevent growth and recurrence of disease. Through an understanding of these signaling pathways and their crosstalk, molecular diagnostics may emerge as well as the ability to exploit identified molecular differences to develop novel molecular therapeutics for the treatment of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27547697

  20. Conservative Treatment of Multiple Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors in a Young Patient with Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome by Decompression: A 7-year Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Oh, Min-Seok; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Jin-Young; Nam, Soon-Hyeun; Lim, Su-Min

    Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) occurred in a young child is challenging problem in the field of pediatric dentistry, and might have been related to nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). Because of high recurrence rate of KCOTs, complete surgical resection is generally accepted as definitive treatment. However, complete surgical resection could induce negative effect on the development of permanent teeth and growth of jaw. Herein, we reported successful treatment case of young KCOT patient with NBCCS. Although multiple KCOTs occurred continually, the majority of the lesions healed well by decompression and important anatomical structures and permanent teeth were successfully preserved. The purpose of this paper is to report more conservative treatment of multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) by repeated decompressions with later peripheral ostectomy during a 7-year follow-up.

  1. Central Odontogenic Fibroma of Simple Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth Thankappan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Central odontogenic fibroma (COF is an extremely rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted tooth resembling dentigerous cyst. In this report, a 10-year-old male patient is presented, who was diagnosed with central odontogenic fibroma of simple type from clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings.

  2. Assessing alpha-tocopherol levels in patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargavi Krishna Ayinampudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: A keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT is a benign uni- or multicystic, intraosseous tumour of odontogenic origin, with a characteristic lining of parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and potential for aggressive, infiltrative behaviour. Various studies in hamsters showed that, alpha-Tocopherol, which is an active biological form of Vitamin E, is a potent antioxidant known to inhibit tumour formation and also regression of established tumours. So, the aim of the present pilot study was to assess the levels of Alpha-Tocopherol(Vitamin E in Patients with KCOT and compare them with Vitamin E levels in normal healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: A sample of 20 individuals were taken and Alpha Tocopherol levels in serum were assessed. Independent sample t test was used to analyse the data. Serum Vitamin-E levels were found to be decreased in KCOT cases. Results: Mean Vitamin-E level was found to be decreased (mean + S.D. = 10,549.34 +/- 2494.21 ng/mL as compared to healthy controls (mean + S.D. = 13,982.42 +/- 2178.02 ng/mL. The reduction in serum vitamin E level was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The reduction in Vitamin E levels in KCOT patients might be suggestive of the possible interrelation between Vitamin E and KCOT invivo. Also, increase in intake of Vitamin E might help in reducing the risk of recurrence in KCOT by reducing the dysregulation of Cyclin D1 and Down-Regulation of mutant p53.

  3. Immunohistochemical expression of p63, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and notch-1 in radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Cláudia Kallás; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Leon, Jorge Esquiche; SILVA-SOUSA, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the immunohistochemical expression of p63 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Notch-1 in the epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RC), dentigerous cysts (DC) and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOT). For this study, 35 RC, 22 DC and 17 KOT were used. The clinical and epidemiological data were collected from the patient charts filed in the Oral Pathology Laboratory, University of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Immunohistochemical reactions agains...

  4. Outcome after 8 years of a modified conservative treatment experience in keratocystic odontogenic tumor in 5 patients

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    Alberto Peraza, DDS, Ms

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT according to WHO classification comprises approximately 12% of all tumors of the jaw. The pathognomonic microscopic findings are the parakeratin at the superficial layer. Their clinical and radiographic presentation is variable, showing different degrees of aggressive behavior and recurrences. We present a retrospective study with a modified conservative approach for the treatment of the KCOT. Five patients between 16 and 23 years old were treated in 2009. These presented radiologic features suggestive of KCOT such as unilocular lesions in the mandible. The diagnosis was confirmed by incisional biopsy and histopathological study of every lesion. The treatment performed was: Carnoy's solution by 5 minutes without chloroform and decompression with plastic stents from 7 to 11 months, switching the position of the stents once bone formation was evident, Carnoy's again for 3 minutes, enucleation, peripheral ostectomy, and concomitant xenograft. All the patients underwent simultaneous xenograft reconstruction after enucleation. Recurrence was negative after 8 years of follow up. No patient showed infection or fracture, only 1 reported discomfort with the stent. The modified treatment in our study suggests that this protocol so far has a low recurrence rate. The commitment of the patient is important for the long-term follow up and treatment.

  5. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst: A rare presentation

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    Neha Bhasin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst (OOC is a developmental cyst of odontogenic origin and was initially defined as the uncommon orthokeratinized variant of the Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC, until the World Health Organization′s (WHO′s classification in 2005, where it was separated from the Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT. It is a relatively uncommon developmental cyst comprising of only 0.4% of all odontogenic cysts. It is rather mystifying that its radiographic features are similar to the dentigerous cyst and histological characteristics are similar to the odontogenic keratocyst; and it has inconsistent cytokeratin expression profiles overlapping with both the dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst as well as with the epidermis. It has a predilection for the posterior mandibular region. This is a report of a rare case of OOC in an unusual maxillary anterior region, with emphasis on its biological characteristics.

  6. PTCH1 gene mutations in Keratocystic odontogenic tumors: a study of 43 Chinese patients and a systematic review.

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    Yan-Yan Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is a locally aggressive cystic jaw lesion that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS. PTCH1, the gene responsible for NBCCS, may play an important role in sporadic KCOTs. In this study, we analyzed and compared the distribution pattern of PTCH1 mutations in patients with sporadic and NBCCS-associated KCOTs. METHODS: We detected PTCH1 mutations in 14 patients with NBCCS-associated KCOTs and 29 patients with sporadic KCOTs by direct sequencing. In addition, five electronic databases were searched for studies detecting PTCH1 mutations in individuals with NBCCS-associated or sporadic KCOTs, published between January 1996 and June 2013 in English language. RESULTS: We identified 15 mutations in 11 cases with NBCCS-associated KCOTs and 19 mutations in 13 cases with sporadic KCOTs. In addition, a total of 204 PTCH1 mutations (187 mutations from 210 cases with NBCCS-associated and 17 mutations from 57 cases with sporadic KCOTs were compiled from 78 published papers. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that mutations in transmembrane 2 (TM2 are closely related to the development of sporadic KCOTs. Moreover, for the early diagnosis of NBCCS, a genetic analysis of the PTCH1 gene should be included in the new diagnostic criteria.

  7. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of AgNORs in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, unicystic ameloblastoma and multicystic ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Udayashankar, Urmila; Guduru, Vijay Srinivasvas; Ramprasad, V V S; Ramisetty, Sabitha Devi; Namala, Srilekha; Badavath, Kiran Kumar Naik

    2014-09-01

    A comparative evaluation of proliferation activity in unicystic ameloblastoma (UA), multicystic ameloblastoma (MA) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) using silver staining technique. In the present study 21 histopathologically confirmed paraffin blocks,7 each of UA, MA and KCOT were selected and stained with silver nitrate. For quantitative analysis, 100 cells were counted at 1000x magnification for AgNORs and the mean value was calculated. Qualitative analysis of AgNORs included normal (oval shaped) and abnormal groups (bean shaped) in the lesion. The statistical analysis of data was done by a specialist statistician using two way ANOVA and multiple comparisons with Tukey's test in advanced excel. The AgNOR count was more in KCOT when compared to MA and UA with the pattern of distribution of AgNORs more in basal than in the parabasal layer in KCOT. The qualitative analysis showed small to large oval AgNOR's in KCOT and few clusters in MA whereas in UA irregular clusters were seen. This concludes the expediency of AgNOR staining in reflecting the high proliferation rate and a more aggressive behavior of KCOT in comparison to MA and UA which signifies requirement of a more hostile surgical approach in KCOT to avoid recurrences following different treatment modalities.

  8. Integrated genotypic analysis of hedgehog-related genes identifies subgroups of keratocystic odontogenic tumor with distinct clinicopathological features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Shimada

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT arises as part of Gorlin syndrome (GS or as a sporadic lesion. Gene mutations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH of the hedgehog receptor PTCH1 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of KCOT. However, some KCOT cases lack evidence for gene alteration of PTCH1, suggesting that other genes in the hedgehog pathway may be affected. PTCH2 and SUFU participate in the occurrence of GS-associated tumors, but their roles in KCOT development are unknown. To elucidate the roles of these genes, we enrolled 36 KCOT patients in a study to sequence their entire coding regions of PTCH1, PTCH2 and SUFU. LOH and immunohistochemical expression of these genes, as well as the downstream targets of hedgehog signaling, were examined using surgically-excised KCOT tissues. PTCH1 mutations, including four novel ones, were found in 9 hereditary KCOT patients, but not in sporadic KCOT patients. A pathogenic mutation of PTCH2 or SUFU was not found in any patients. LOH at PTCH1 and SUFU loci correlated with the presence of epithelial budding. KCOT harboring a germline mutation (Type 1 showed nuclear localization of GLI2 and frequent histological findings such as budding and epithelial islands, as well as the highest recurrence rate. KCOT with LOH but without a germline mutation (Type 2 less frequently showed these histological features, and the recurrence rate was lower. KCOT with neither germline mutation nor LOH (Type 3 consisted of two subgroups, Type 3A and 3B, which were characterized by nuclear and cytoplasmic GLI2 localization, respectively. Type 3B rarely exhibited budding and recurrence, behaving as the most amicable entity. The expression patterns of CCND1 and BCL2 tended to correlate with these subgroups. Our data indicates a significant role of PTCH1 and SUFU in the pathogenesis of KCOT, and the genotype-oriented subgroups constitute entities with different potential aggressiveness.

  9. MR imaging features of peritoneal adenomatoid mesothelioma: a case report

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    Lins, Cynthia Maria Coelho; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Monteiro, Carlos Ribeiro [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Internal Medicine], e-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br; Cunha, Adilson Ferreira [School of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics; Valeri, Fabio V. [Victorio Valeri Institute of Medical Diagnosis, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Feres, Omar [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Surgery and Anatomy

    2009-07-01

    Adenomatoid mesothelioma of the peritoneum (AMP) is a rare benign tumor originating from mesothelial cells.1 Most frequently, AMP occurs between 26 and 55 years of age, at a mean age of 41 years. In contrast to diffuse malignant mesothelioma, which has been linked to asbestos exposure, the etiology of AMP has not been established. Only a minority of patients have symptoms related to the tumor. AMP may present local recurrence, but it has no potential for malignant transformation. Although there are many case reports of abdominal mesotheliomas, to date, there have been no reports of MR imaging features of AMP. In this article, we present the MR imaging features of a case of AMP with histopathological correlation. (author)

  10. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation: case report | Wafula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung is a rare lesion that typically manifests as severe progressive respiratory distress in the neonate secondary to expansion of the affected lung. We present a neonate in whom this condition was diagnosed and managed at the Aga Khan University Hospital. In presenting ...

  11. Hybrid clear cell odontogenic carcinoma and ameloblastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ameloblastic carcinoma (AC) produces extensive local destruction, perforation of the cortical plate, extension into surrounding soft tissues, numerous recurrent lesions, and metastasis, usually to cervical lymph nodes. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) which was previously designated clear cell odontogenic tumor ...

  12. Peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour of the maxillary gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Ana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Odontogenic tumors are lesions that are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor or calcifying odontogenic cyst is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by an ameloblastoma-like epithelium and ghost cells. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor may be centrally or peripherally located, and its ghost cells may exhibit calcification, as first described by Gorlin in 1962. Most peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. Case presentation Authors report a rare case of a peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor of the maxillary gingiva. A 39-year-old male patient presented with a fibrous mass on the attached buccal gingiva of the upper left cuspid teeth. It was 0.7-cm-diameter, painless and it was clinically diagnosed as a peripheral ossifying fibroma. After an excisional biopsy, the diagnosis was peripheric calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. The patient was monitored for five years following the excision, and no recurrence was detected. Conclusions All biopsy material must be sent for histological examination. If the histological examination of gingival lesions with innocuous appearance is not performed, the frequency of peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and other peripheral odontogenic tumors may be underestimated.

  13. Non Calcifying Type of Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor: An Unusual Case Report with Special Emphasis on Histogenesis of Calcifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneeru, Sravya; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Korlepara, Rajani; Gaddipati, Rajasekhar; Kundoor, Vinay Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour also known as Pindborg tumour, is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm of locally aggressive behavior. It is thought to arise from the epithelial element of the enamel origin which are reminiscent of the cells in the stratum intermedium layer of enamel organ in tooth development. The tumour is characterized histologically by the presence of polygonal epithelial cells, calcifications and eosinophilic deposits resembling amyloid. Non-calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumours are very rare and unusual. Only five cases have been reported in the English literature till date. Here, we present an additional case of non calcifying type along with a review of previously reported cases. It has a much lower recurrence and malignant transformation rate.

  14. Clinical observation: congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation

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    Chernenkov Yu.V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to describe the case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation. The definition of this pathology, its morphology, classification, frequency and clinical forms are considered in the work. The data of the observation of a newborn with a complicated form of the defect have been determined: the peculiarities of the neonatal adaptation, the results of examination and treatment.

  15. Five years follow-up of a keratocyst odontogenic tumor treated by marsupialization and enucleation: A case report and literature review

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    Rafael Scaf de Molon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic cysts are considered as nonneoplasic benign lesions. Among the cysts, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT is an intra-osseous tumor characterized by parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior, and for the possibility to develop carcinomas in the lesion wall. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of KCOT in a young patient and discuss the treatment alternatives to solve this case. A 15-year-old male was referred for treatment of a giant lesion in his left side of the mandible. After the biopsy, a diagnostic of KCOT was made, and the following procedures were planned for KCOT treatment. Marsupialization was performed for lesion decompression and consequent lesion size reduction. Afterward, enucleation for complete KCOT removal was performed followed by third mandibular molar extraction. After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed. The treatment proposed was efficient in removing the KCOT with minimal surgical morbidity and optimal healing process, and the first and second mandibular molars were preserved with pulp vitality. In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function. No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed.

  16. A study of the distribution of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 in odontogenic cyst and tumors: Histochemical study

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    Khushboo Phull

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: High expression of bcl-2 in KCOT supports the general agreement that some features of KCOT are those of a neoplasia. The bcl-2 expression in connective tissue cells suggests that these cells may also be important as epithelial cells in the biological behavior odontogenic keratocyst.

  17. Marsupialization of unicystic ameloblastoma: A conservative approach for aggressive odontogenic tumors

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    Dogan Dolanmaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA is known as a distinct entity which has a less aggressive behavior when compared with conventional ameloblastoma. In this report, we have presented two cases of UAs, (of which one case showed a more aggressive behavior with mural invasion into the adjacent tissues and granular cell differentiation, both of which were successfully managed with enucleation following marsupialization. We aim to highlight how this method can be used for the successful management of such cases, rather than following more aggressive approaches. In both the cases, marsupialization was done for the UA lesions initially and follow-ups were maintained. When the tumor size had regressed on radiographic follow up, an enucleation procedure with ostectomy of the margins was carried out. Special importance was also given to the endodontic treatment of the teeth involved in the area of the lesion. The patients were free of the condition and did not show any signs of recurrence on radiographic follow-ups even after 30 months of the final procedure. Granular variant of UA is quite rare and had been considered to be more aggressive. Marsupialization of UA is an alternative treatment option of resection even for more aggressive variants, as long as the histological behavior of the lesion was carefully evaluated and strict radiographic follow-up is maintained.

  18. Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Komal; Deshmukh, Siddharth B; Alex, Sheeba

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cysts. Both these factors seem to be interrelated to each other. The importance of the MMPs in the induction of the angiogenic process has recently been described. MMPs, which are produced by microvascular endothelial cells, break down the extracellular matrix. This is one of the earliest and sustained events in the process of new capillary formation. Thus, we studied the expression of VEGF and MMP-9 in Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and radicular cysts (RCs). Ten cases each of KCOTs, DCs and RCs and were included in the study and immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-VEGF and anti-MMP-9 antibody using standard protocol. When the data of positive cells in the epithelium of KCOTs was compared with DCs and RCs, it showed highly significant results (Pcyst that is currently considered a cystic tumor rather than a developmental cyst.

  19. Density of Langerhans cells in the keratocystic odontogenic tumor Densidade das células de Langerhans no tumor odontogênico queratocístico

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    Thiago Martins Meira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs are distinct odontogenic lesions commonly affecting the mandible bones. Langerhans cells (LCs are specialized dendritic cells responsible for the presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes in mucosal and cutaneous surfaces. OBJECTIVE: This study analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of LCs in KOTs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifteen cases of KOTs were studied using the anti-CD1a marker. Results: LCs were observed in all 15 cases analyzed. They were found to be concentrated in areas of cystic epithelial hyperplasia, mainly in those areas presenting higher concentration of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, a significant association between the number of LCs and areas of cystic epithelium presenting hyperplasia (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.0223 was observed. The shape and location of these cells in KOTs epithelium were variable. CONCLUSION: The lower number of LCs observed on atrophic cystic epithelium of KOTs may be due to decreased epithelial immunosurveillance and this may result in locally aggressive invasiveness.INTRODUÇÃO: Tumor odontogênico queratocístico (TOQ é uma lesão odontogênica de caráter distinto que afeta frequentemente ossos maxilares. Células de Langerhans (CLs são células dendríticas especializadas, responsáveis pela apresentação de antígenos aos linfócitos T nas superfícies cutânea e mucosa. OBJETIVO: Este estudo analisou a expressão imuno-histoquímica das CLs em lesões de TOQ. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Quinze casos de TOQ foram estudados utilizando o marcador anti-CD1a. RESULTADOS: As CLs foram observadas em todos os 15 casos analisados. Essas células estavam concentradas em áreas de hiperplasia do epitélio cístico, especialmente naquelas que apresentavam alta concentração de células inflamatórias. Em adição, foi encontrada associação significativa entre número de CLs e áreas do epitélio cístico que apresentavam hiperplasia (Mann-Whitney test, p

  20. Immunohistochemical expression of p63, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and notch-1 in radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cláudia Kallás; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Leon, Jorge Esquiche; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the immunohistochemical expression of p63 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Notch-1 in the epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RC), dentigerous cysts (DC) and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOT). For this study, 35 RC, 22 DC and 17 KOT were used. The clinical and epidemiological data were collected from the patient charts filed in the Oral Pathology Laboratory, University of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Immunohistochemical reactions against the p63, EGFR and Notch-1 were performed in 3-µm-thick histological sections. The slides were evaluated according to the following criteria: negative: 50% of positive cells. Moreover, the intensity of EGFR and Notch-1 expressions was also evaluated. Fisher's exact test and Spearman's correlation coefficients were used for statistical analysis, considering a significance level of 5%. Almost all cases demonstrated p63, EGFR and Notch-1 expressions. The p63 expression was significantly higher in KOT (p<0.001). Positive correlation between these immunomarkers was observed. These findings suggest the participation of p63, EGFR and Notch-1 in the development, maintenance and integrity of cystic odontogenic epithelial lining, favoring lesion persistence. The high expression of p63 in KOT suggests that it may be related to their more aggressive biological behavior and marked tendency to recurrence.

  1. Odontoblasts in odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Nadine C; Peters, Edmund; Daley, Tom

    2013-09-01

    Odontoblasts are secretory cells displaying epithelial and mesenchymal features, which exist in a monolayer at the interface between the dentin and pulp of a tooth. During embryogenesis, these cells form a dentin shell and throughout life continue to produce dentin while, also acting as sensor cells helping to mediate tooth sensitivity. In this process, odontoblasts are forced to migrate inwards, resulting in an ongoing loss of pulp volume. Correspondingly, there is also a decrease in the surface area of the dentin which supports the odontoblast cell layer. As these events transpire, odontoblasts maintain a tightly controlled monolayer relationship to each other as well as to their dentin substrate. Stability is maintained laterally by epithelial attachment structures and transversely by complex cytoplasmic extensions into the supporting dentin. As a result, it is not possible for the layer to buckle to relieve the mechanical stresses, which develop during the inward migration. A theoretical consequence of this distinctive self-generated niche is the development of long term compressive stresses within the odontoblast population. We present a mechanobiology model, which causally relates the increase in cellular compressive stresses to contact inhibition of proliferation. We link this hypothesis to the observation that there are no reports of pulpal odontoblasts showing neoplasia or acquisition of changes suggestive of a pre-neoplastic phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor (Pındborg Tümörü); Bir Vak'a Bildirisi

    OpenAIRE

    ILICALI, Aygen

    2013-01-01

    ÖZETHistolojik özellikleri yönünden ilginç olan ve üst çenede çok nadir görülen Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic tümör vak'ası bildirildi. Vak'anın diğer ilginç yönü de Türkiye'de rastlanan ikinci Pindborg tümörü vak'ası olmasıdır.

  3. Controversies in Odontogenic Tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwach, Pooja; Joy, Tabita; Tupkari, Jagdish; Thakur, Arush

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic tumours are lesions that occur solely within the oral cavity and are so named because of their origin from the odontogenic (i.e. tooth-forming) apparatus. Odontogenic tumours comprise a variety of lesions ranging from non-neoplastic tissue proliferations to benign or malignant neoplasms. However, controversies exist regarding the pathogenesis, categorisation and clinical and histological variations of these tumours. The recent 2017 World Health Organization classification of odontogenic tumours included new entities such as primordial odontogenic tumours, sclerosing odontogenic carcinomas and odontogenic carcinosarcomas, while eliminating several previously included entities like keratocystic odontogenic tumours and calcifying cystic odonogenic tumours. The aim of the present review article was to discuss controversies and recent concepts regarding odontogenic tumours so as to increase understanding of these lesions. PMID:29062548

  4. Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komal Khot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cysts. Both these factors seem to be interrelated to each other. The importance of the MMPs in the induction of the angiogenic process has recently been described. MMPs, which are produced by microvascular endothelial cells, break down the extracellular matrix. This is one of the earliest and sustained events in the process of new capillary formation. Thus, we studied the expression of VEGF and MMP-9 in Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs, dentigerous cysts (DCs and radicular cysts (RCs. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of KCOTs, DCs and RCs and were included in the study and immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-VEGF and anti-MMP-9 antibody using standard protocol. Result: When the data of positive cells in the epithelium of KCOTs was compared with DCs and RCs, it showed highly significant results (P < 0.05. Furthermore, the expression of VEGF and MMP-9 in the stroma of KCOTs showed a significant result when compared to DCs and RCs. The expression of VEGF in inflammatory cells was more in RCs when compared to DCs. Also, the expression of MMP-9 was more in RCs and DCs as compared to KCOTs. Conclusion: Higher expression of VEGF and MMP-9 in KCOTs could be responsible for the aggressive behavior of this cyst that is currently considered a cystic tumor rather than a developmental cyst.

  5. Kerathocyst odontogenic tumor: Importance of selection the best treatment modality and a periodical follow-up to prevent from recurrence: A case report and literature review

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    Nasim Jafaripozve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is a relatively common oral and maxillofacial lesion with specific characteristics such us rapid growth, extension into the surrounding tissues and high rates of recurrence. Various treatment modalities have been reported. Due to the very thin and friable lining characteristic of the tumor, enucleation can be difficult undertaken and for this reason it is associated with the highest recurrence rates. A 22-year-old male referred to our clinic due to a slight expansion in the right mandible from 2 years ago. He has a history of occurrence of KCOT in this region that was treated surgically by enucleation and curettage 5 years ago. Cone beam computed tomography showed a multilocular radiolucent lesion that extended from the angle of the mandible to the symphysis. Incisional biopsy showed a KCOT recurrence that surgically treated with resection of the right mandible by continuity preservation. Selection of the best treatment modality and also a periodical lifelong follow-up is very important to reduce the rate of recurrence and morbidity of the patient.

  6. A Case of Odontogenic Myxoma with Unusual Histological Features Mimicking a Fibro-Osseous Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma is a rare benign but locally aggressive odontogenic tumor. This report describes a case of odontogenic myxoma producing diffusely dispersed calcified products in a pattern reminiscent of a fibro-osseous lesion of the jaw. Differential diagnoses for myxoid lesions of the jaws also are discussed. This paper highlights how an odontogenic myxoma can produce a large amount of calcified products to mimic a fibro-osseous process. PMID:20607463

  7. Ameloblastomatous calcifying odontogenic cyst: A rare histologic variant

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    Basavaraj N Kallalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a well-known odontogenic tumor that can be associated with calcifying odontogenic cysts (COCs, but only a few reports give its clinical and radiographic features. Calcifying odontogenic cyst was first categorized as a distinct entity by Gorlin et al., and has been named after him since then. Calcifying odontogenic cyst is an uncommon developmental odontogenic lesion that demonstrates histopathologic diversity. It is well known that this lesion can occur in association with odontogenic tumors such as complex odontoma and ameloblastoma. The term COC was not included by the World Health Organization (WHO in its report of 2005 and is called calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT. Histopathologic examination of ameloblastomatous CCOT reveals ameloblastic islands containing ghost cells. Although association of ameloblastoma with this lesion is important, only a few cases have been reported in literature. The present case report is of ameloblastomatous calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, a rare histologic variant, in a 20-year-old male patient in the left mandibular posterior region.

  8. Claudin expression and tight junction protein localization in the lining epithelium of the keratocystic odontogenic tumors, dentigerous cysts, and radicular cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siar, Chong Huat; Abbas, Syed Amjad

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression and localization of tight junction proteins (TJPs) or claudins in the keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and to correlate with its biological behavior. Five claudins (-1, -3, -4, -5, and 7) were examined immunohistochemically in 25 KCOTs and compared with 10 dentigerous cysts (DCs) and 10 radicular cysts (RCs). Marked claudin-3 loss of expression in KCOT basal layer (n=24/25; 96%) compared with DCs (n=1/10; 10%) and RCs (n=5/10; 50%) (P<.05) suggests that claudin-3 downregulation may indicate altered or loss of basal cell polarity and impaired barrier function of KCOT lining epithelium and this might contribute indirectly to its biological behavior. In contrast, claudins-1, -4, -5, and -7 distribution patterns were less distinctive in all three entities, suggesting that these TJP molecules probably play limited roles in influencing their different growth potentials. Present findings suggest that differential claudin expressions in the lining epithelium of KCOTs, DCs, and RCs probably reflect their neoplastic or nonneoplastic nature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pindborg tumor in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Kafil; Khan, Nazoora; Zaheer, Sufian; Sherwani, Rana; Hasan, Abrar

    2010-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor), is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm representing about 0.4-3% of all odontogenic tumors. This tumor more frequently affects adults in the age range of 20-60 years, with a peak incidence in the 5th decade of life. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour has a much lower recurrence rate than ameloblastoma and malignant transformation, and metastasis is rare.

  10. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible

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    V Chhabra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central odontogenic fibroma (COF is an extremely rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. It appears as an asymptomatic expansion of the cortical plate of the mandible or maxilla. Radiologically it presents as a unilocular or multilocular radiolucency. It responds well to surgical enucleation with no tendency for recurrence. We describe a case of COF in mandibular right posterior region in a 16-year-old female. The lesion was surgically removed and analyzed histopathologically.

  11. A study of 1177 odontogenic lesions in a South Kerala population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepthi, PV; Beena, VT; Padmakumar, SK; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: A study on odontogenic cysts and tumors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors and their distribution according to age, gender, site and histopathologic types of those reported over a period of 1998–2012 in a Tertiary Health Care Center at South Kerala. Settings and Design: The archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Archival records were reviewed and all the cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors were retrieved from 1998 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using the computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) IBM SPSS Software version 16. Results: Of 7117 oral biopsies, 4.29% were odontogenic tumors. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor comprising 50.2% of cases, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (24.3%). These tumors showed a male predilection (1.19: 1). Odontogenic tumors occurred in a mean age of 33.7 ± 16.8 years. Mandible was the most common jaw affected (76.07%). Odontogenic cysts constituted 12.25% of all oral biopsies. Radicular cyst comprised 75.11% of odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous cyst (17.2%). Conclusions: This study showed similar as well as contradictory results compared to other studies, probably due to geographical and ethnic variations which is yet to be corroborated. PMID:27601809

  12. Odontogenic Mixoma in a Ten-Year-Old Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Ennya Lieseth Leonel; Melo-Uribe, Mario; Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2016-10-01

    Odontogenic myxomas are benign, rarely seen intraosseous tumors arising from the embryonic connective tissue associated to tooth formation. The authors present the case of a 10-year-old patient affected by this entity.

  13. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst with Complex Odontoma: Histological and Immunohistochemical Features

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    Mohsen Merati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a rare odontogenic cyst. Only 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors are COC. COC associated with odontoma (COCaO reported in 24% of COCs. COCaO presents a greater incidence in female, with a ratio of 2 to 1. The highest incidence of COCaO occurs during the second decade with a mean age of 16 years, most frequently occurring in the maxilla (61.5%. Here, we describe a classic case of COCaO of the maxillary incisor-canine region in 17-year-old girl, and discuss the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical finding of this tumor.

  14. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst with Complex Odontoma: Histological and Immunohistochemical Features

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    Nooshin Mohtasham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a rare odontogenic cyst. Only 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors are COC. COC associated with odontoma (COCaO reported in 24% of COCs. COCaO presents a greater incidence in female, with a ratio of 2 to 1. The highest incidence of COCaO occurs during the second decade with a mean age of 16 years, most frequently occurring in the maxilla (61.5%. Here, we describe a classic case of COCaO of the maxillary incisor-canine region in 17-year-old girl, and discuss the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical finding of this tumor.

  15. Pindborg tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Santhosh Kumar Caliaperoumal; Gowri, S.; J.Dinakar

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references.

  16. Pindborg tumor

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    Santhosh Kumar Caliaperoumal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references.

  17. Pindborg tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S; Dinakar, J

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references.

  18. Prevalence of odontogenic lesions among the Kanpur population: an institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Amrita; Ramesh, Gayathri; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Pandey, Amit; Raj, Ankita

    2017-05-01

    The frequency and incidence of odontogenic cysts and tumors are controversial and depends in the geographic location. These lesions have great clinical and histopathological diversity, and reflect a need for epidemiological profile to be considered when these lesions are studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors over a period of 10 years and to compare with other data reported around the world. Data for the study were obtained from the archives of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, diagnosed as the cases of Odontogenic cysts and tumors histopathologically, reported from January 2007 to March 2016. Case records of the patients that fit the histological classification of the World Health Organization (2005) were included in the study and the variables analyzed were: Age, sex, anatomical location, and histological type. In a total of 1319 biopsies reported, 112 were odontogenic in nature. Of these 112 odontogenic lesions reported, Odontogenic Cysts accounted for 54.4% and odontogenic tumors of 45.53%. Of them 61.60% of the patients were males. Common age of occurrence was 21-50 years and mandibular posterior was the most common site of occurrence. Most common odontogenic cyst and tumor reported was dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma respectively. This study provides epidemiological information on odontogenic cyst and tumors at an institutional level. The relative frequency of these cysts and tumors can be analyzed at a global level to understand their prevalence, incidence, biological behaviour, and distribution.

  19. Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation of Lung-Rare Case Report

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    N. S. Kamakeri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of lung associated with Cystic dysplasia of kidney, cystic disease of liver with mixed gonadal dysgenesis is rare and is not reported in literature so far. Hence an attempt is made to present this rarest entity.

  20. Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation of the Lung: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) of the lung an entity which results from a harmatomatous proliferation of the bronchioles constitutes 25% of the all congenital lung anomalies. Majority of cases of CCAM usually present with respiratory distress from birth, while others may present with recurrent chest ...

  1. Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: A diagnostic dilemma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) of the lung is an uncommon anomaly that arises from excessive disorganised proliferation of tubular bronchial structures excluding the alveoli. These are believed to represent focal pulmonary dysplasia because skeletal muscle may be identified from within the cyst wall.

  2. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible: A case report with diagnostic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Angela; Pannone, Giuseppe; Ramaglia, Luca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Saviano, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic fibroma (OF), a rare odontogenic tumor of mesodermal origin, has been thought to originate from either dental follicle, periodontal ligament, or dental papilla [1]. Different studies reported high variability in the incidence rate as being between 3 and 23% of all odontogenic tumors [2,3]. OF manifests a dual character at the histopathological examination showing odontogenic epithelial structures mimicking those observed in biopsy of ameloblastoma and, in addition, peculiar fragments of cellular stroma. The clinical and radiological features of OF are similar to other odontogenic and/or non-odontogenic tumours and the differential diagnosis may first occur at fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Presentation of case In the case reported, a young patient showed a localized gingival enlargement involving radiologically the superior margin of the right angle of the mandible and associated with an un-erupted tooth. The morphological characteristics together with clinical and radiologic findings confirmed the tumor to be a central odontogenic fibroma (COF) with secondary gingival involvement. Discussion and conclusion Benign odontogenic tumors may be distinguished from other odontogenic/non-odontogenic neoplasias and from malignant tumours through a cytologic differential diagnosis as treatment differs accordingly. PMID:26793312

  3. Immunohistochemical Analysis of P63 Expression in Odontogenic Lesions

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    Saede Atarbashi Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available P63 may have a role in tumorigenesis and cytodifferentiation of odontogenic lesions. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of P63 in a total of 30 cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors. The percentage of positive cells was calculated in the lining of odontogenic cysts and islands of ameloblastoma. P63 expression was evident in all types of odontogenic lesions. P63 was expressed throughout the lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst except surface parakeratinized layer. In addition, calcifying odontogenic cyst showed P63 expression in all layers. In almost all radicular and dentigerous cysts, the basal and parabasal layers were immunoreactive. Peripheral cells of ameloblastoma expressed P63; however, stellate reticulum had weaker immunostaining. No significant difference in P63 expression was observed between studied lesions (. Expression of P63 in odontogenic lesions suggests that this protein is important in differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. However, it seems that it could not be a useful marker to differentiate between aggressive and nonaggressive lesions. P63 also represents a progenitor or basal cell marker, and it is not expressed in mature differentiated cells.

  4. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambawaia, Shahnaz S.; Karjodkar, Freny R.; Yadav, Archana; Sansare, Kaustubh; Sontakke, Subodh [Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai (India)

    2014-03-15

    Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are rare intrabony solitary or multiloculated cysts of odontogenic origin. The importance of GOCs lies in the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence similar to keratocystic odontogenic tumors and that they may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Thus, the oral and maxillofacial radiologists play an important role in definitive diagnosis of GOC based on distinctive cases; though they are rare. In large part, this is due to the GOC's complex and frequently non-specific histopathology. This report describes a case of GOC occurrence in the posterior mandibular ramus region in a 17-year-old female, which is a rare combination of site, age, and gender for occurrence.

  5. [Cystic adenomatoid malformation pulmonary: are we able to foresee its evolution?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Vicente, B; Bardají, C; Obiols, P; Abad, P; Rigol, S

    2009-04-01

    The congenital pulmonary malformation are a rare entity in pediatric age. Between of them, the cystic adenomatoid malformation (MAQ) is the most ferquent entity, followed by pulmonary sequestration (SP) and the most rare broncogenic cyst. As a consequence of ultrasound and fetal magnetic resonance we are abble to diagnose earlier this patology. To know the clinical findings, the diagnosis, and the evolution, we have done a retrospective study of underwented MAQ at our hospital during the last 17 years, including such with late diagnosis as with prenatal diagnosis, and describing those presenting impredictable evolution or a different difficul diagnosis. We report four MAQ's cases. Three of them, about late diagnose: the first one evolutioned till malignant tumor, the second one with a supplementary lobe and third one with a wrong MAQ diagnose. The fourth one associated MAQ with a SP.

  6. Controversies in Odontogenic Tumours: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwach, Pooja; Joy, Tabita; Tupkari, Jagdish; Thakur, Arush

    2017-08-01

    Odontogenic tumours are lesions that occur solely within the oral cavity and are so named because of their origin from the odontogenic (i.e. tooth-forming) apparatus. Odontogenic tumours comprise a variety of lesions ranging from non-neoplastic tissue proliferations to benign or malignant neoplasms. However, controversies exist regarding the pathogenesis, categorisation and clinical and histological variations of these tumours. The recent 2017 World Health Organization classification of odontogenic tumours included new entities such as primordial odontogenic tumours, sclerosing odontogenic carcinomas and odontogenic carcinosarcomas, while eliminating several previously included entities like keratocystic odontogenic tumours and calcifying cystic odonogenic tumours. The aim of the present review article was to discuss controversies and recent concepts regarding odontogenic tumours so as to increase understanding of these lesions.

  7. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma: a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakheja Dinesh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare odontogenic tumor occurring in the anterior region of the mandible in 5th–7th decades and shows a female preponderance. It is potentially aggressive, capable of frequent recurrences and loco-regional and distant metastases. Case presentation A 45- year- old woman presented with a radiolucent left mandibular swelling associated with loss of teeth. Left cervical lymph nodes were enlarged on palpation. The patient underwent resection of the tumor but consequent to resected margins being positive for tumor cells underwent left hemimandibulectomy with ipsilateral functional neck dissection and was free of recurrence at 8 months follow-up. Conclusion Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of jaw tumors with conspicuous clear cell component. Curettage or conservative resection inevitably results in recurrences and/or metastasis and more radical resection is warranted in these tumors, especially when they are large and show soft tissue invasion.

  8. Tumor odontogênico cístico calcificante com proliferação ameloblastomosa em seio maxilar Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor with ameloblastoma proliferation in the maxillary sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Gonçalves Carnasciali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O tumor odontogênico cístico calcificante (TOCC com proliferação ameloblastomosa é uma variante rara entre os cistos maxilares. Este trabalho objetiva apresentar o relato clínico de um paciente do sexo masculino, 18 anos de idade, que apresentava aumento de volume extra e intraoral do lado esquerdo da maxila, firme à palpação, de característica normocrômica e indolor. A conduta consistiu em realização de tomografia Cone Beam, biópsia incisional, remoção completa da lesão, curetagem e fixação maxilar. O paciente encontra-se em acompanhamento clínico e radiográfico sem recidiva após doze meses. Dessa forma, ressalta-se a importância do diagnóstico precoce, a conduta clínica empregada e o acompanhamento periódico.Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOT with proliferative ameloblastoma are a rare variant among maxillary cysts. This study aims to present a clinical report of an 18-year-old male patient with extra and intra oral swelling of the left maxilla, firm to touch, with normochromic characteristics and painless. The clinical approach comprised cone-beam tomography, incisional biopsy, complete removal of the lesion, curettage and maxilla fixation. His clinical and radiographic follow-up has revealed no relapse after 12 months. Hence, this study corroborates the importance of early diagnosis, clinical approach and periodical follow-ups.

  9. Odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents: a review of forty-eight cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, A O; Adisa, A O; Popoola, B O

    2013-06-01

    Odontogenic tumours comprise a large heterogeneous group of lesions originating from odontogenic epithelium and/or ectomesenchyme and its vestiges. The aim of this study was to analyze odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents seen at a tertiary institution in South Western Nigeria and compare with results from previous studies. Archival records of the Department of Oral Pathology, University College Hospital Ibadan were reviewed. All histologically diagnosed odontogenic tumours in patients 19 years and below spanning a period of 21 years (1990-2011) were retrieved. Data regarding age, gender, and tumor topography were analyzed using SPSS for Window (version 18.0; SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL). One hundred and forty seven jaw swellings were seen in children and adolescents aged 19 or less during the study period, out of which 48 (32.7%) were odontogenic tumours. More cases were seen in males than females with a male: female ratio of 7:5. The mandible was the commonest site of occurrence with mandible: maxilla ratio of 11:4. Ameloblastoma was the commonest odontogenic tumours with 14 (29.1%) solid ameloblastoma and 9 (18.8%) cystic ameloblastoma cases followed by fibromyxoma with 8 (16.7%) cases. calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour , calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour and odontogenic fibroma were occasionally seen. This study showed that ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumour in children and no case of odontoma was seen. Odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents may not be as rare as previously reported by some authors and inclusion of keratocystic odontogenic tumour in this study slightly affected the relative incidence of odontogenic tumors in children and adolescents.

  10. Orbital Cellulitis of Odontogenic Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, William; Chakrabarti, Rahul; Choong, Jessica; Hardy, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic orbital cellulitis, although uncommon, has the potential to cause severe vision loss if unsuspected and untreated. Compared to non-odontogenic bacteriology, odontogenic orbital abscesses typically feature a heavy mixed growth with anaerobic organisms. We review the literature and discuss the case of a 26-year-old male who presented with anaerobic orbital cellulitis for treatment.

  11. Peripheral odontogenic myxoma in a 12-year-old girl: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitkar, Sampada; Kamat, Mamata; Tamagond, Sridevi; Varekar, Aniruddha; Datar, Uma

    2017-06-01

    Peripheral odontogenic myxoma is a rare odontogenic tumor representing an extra osseous counterpart of central odontogenic myxoma. It is commonly seen in gingiva between the 3rd and 4th decades of life and appears predominantly in females. Compared to central odontogenic myxoma, it is a less aggressive, slow-growing lesion with a low recurrence rate. However, close postoperative follow-up is required because of the unlimited growth potential of incompletely removed lesions. It shares many features with other soft tissue myxoid proliferations occurring in the oral cavity and hence needs to be differentiated from them. Very few cases of peripheral odontogenic myxomas have been reported and, to the best of our knowledge, no case has been reported in a pediatric patient. We present an unusual case of peripheral odontogenic myxoma occurring in a 12-year-old girl located in the anterior mandibular gingiva, with an emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  12. Metastatic ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: description of a case and search for actionable targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilien J. Rappaport

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC is an exceedingly rare malignant tumor on the spectrum of already uncommon odontogenic or dentinogenic tumors. We describe here the case of metastatic GCOC in a patient with a history of recurrent dentinogenic ghost cell tumor of the mandible, now presenting with bilateral pleural effusions. We will discuss typical histopathologic and histochemical features of GCOC, along with results of genomic testing and their role in directing therapy.

  13. Calcifying Ghost Cell Odontogenic Cyst: Report of a Case and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Sonone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying ghost cell odontogenic cyst (CGCOC was first described by Gorlin et al. in 1962. Calcifying ghost cell odontogenic cyst is comparatively rare in occurrence, constituting about 0.37% to 2.1% of all odontogenic tumors. The most notable features of this pathologic entity are histopathological features which include a cystic lining demonstrating characteristic “Ghost” epithelial cells with a propensity to calcify. In addition, the CGCOC may be associated with other recognized odontogenic tumors, most commonly odontomas. There are variants of CGCOC according to clinical, histopathological, and radiological characteristics. Therefore a proper categorization of the cases is needed for better understanding of the pathogenesis of each variant. Here, we report a classical case of calcifying odontogenic cyst along with a brief review of literature.

  14. Calcifying ghost cell odontogenic cyst: report of a case and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonone, Archana; Sabane, V S; Desai, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    The calcifying ghost cell odontogenic cyst (CGCOC) was first described by Gorlin et al. in 1962. Calcifying ghost cell odontogenic cyst is comparatively rare in occurrence, constituting about 0.37% to 2.1% of all odontogenic tumors. The most notable features of this pathologic entity are histopathological features which include a cystic lining demonstrating characteristic "Ghost" epithelial cells with a propensity to calcify. In addition, the CGCOC may be associated with other recognized odontogenic tumors, most commonly odontomas. There are variants of CGCOC according to clinical, histopathological, and radiological characteristics. Therefore a proper categorization of the cases is needed for better understanding of the pathogenesis of each variant. Here, we report a classical case of calcifying odontogenic cyst along with a brief review of literature.

  15. Surgical management of odontogenic myxoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase-Koga, Yoko; Saijo, Hideto; Hoshi, Kazuhito; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yoshiyuki

    2014-04-05

    Odontogenic myxoma is a benign odontogenic tumor with locally aggressive behavior, and is relatively rare in the oral cavity. There are currently no clear surgical management guidelines for odontogenic myxoma, and a variety of approaches may be used. This study evaluated the literature concerning the surgical management of odontogenic myxoma, and reports the long-term outcome of a case managed by using a more conservative surgical approach. We managed a 40-year-old Japanese man with odontogenic myxoma in the right mandible by enucleation and curettage, a relatively conservative approach that has proved to have been justified by a lack of recurrence over 10 years. Our strategy was compared with others reported in the literature, which was identified by a PubMed search using the term "odontogenic myxoma". Articles without full text or with missing data were excluded. The age and sex of patients, the tumor location (maxilla/mandible), treatment (conservative/radical), recurrence, and follow-up period were compared in the reported cases that we evaluated. From the initial 211 studies identified, 20 studies qualified as mandibular cases of odontogenic myxoma. Recurrence was reported in three cases that had been treated with a more conservative surgical approach. Enucleation and curettage has proved an effective approach in several cases in ours there has been no recurrence more than 10 years after surgery but the risk of recurrence appears to be higher. We discuss the important factors that must be considered when determining the correct management approach to odontogenic myxoma.

  16. Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic myxoma (OM is a rare and locally invasive benign neoplasm found exclusively in the jaws. OM commonly occurs in the second and third decade, and the mandible is involved more commonly than the maxilla. The lesion often grows without symptoms and presents as a painless swelling. The radiographic features are variable, and the diagnosis is therefore not easy. A case of OM of the maxilla with unusual radiographic and histologic features is described in a 30-year-old male. A panoramic radiograph revealed a well-demarcated, multilocular radiolucent lesion with ′tennis racket′ appearance involving maxillary antrum. The histopathology showed loosely arranged spindle-shaped stellate cells and few areas of inactive odontogenic epithelium in a mucoid intercellular substance.

  17. Case Report: Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma: A Rarity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clear odontogenic carcinoma is an unusual tumor in the buccal cavity, mandible or maxilla. There is slight female preponderance and the peak age of occurance is in the 6th and 7th decades of life. It shows loco-regional and distant metastasis thereby resulting to great challenges in diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Computed tomographic characteristics of odontogenic neoplasms in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, Joseph T; Reetz, Jennifer A; Sánchez, Melissa D; Bradley, Charles W; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Mai, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic neoplasms are locally invasive oral tumors in dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe CT characteristics for varying histopathologic types of canine odontogenic neoplasms. A board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of histologic findings reviewed and scored imaging studies. A total of 29 dogs were included in the study. Twenty-three of these dogs had concurrent dental radiographs. The most common CT characteristics for all tumor types were a direct association with or in the region of multiple teeth in 96.4% (27/28), contrast enhancement in 96.3% (26/27), alveolar bone lysis in 93.1% (27/29), and mass-associated tooth displacement in 85.2% (23/27). Mass-associated cyst-like structures were identified in 53.6% (15/28) and were only present in tumors containing odontogenic epithelium. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas (n = 15) appeared as extra-osseous (10/15) or intra-osseous (5/15) masses. Intra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas were more likely to have mass-associated cyst-like structures and were subjectively more aggressive when compared with extra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (n = 3) had subjectively uniform CT imaging characteristics and consisted of round soft tissue and mineral attenuating masses with multiple associated cyst-like structures. Fibromatous epulides of periodontal ligament origin (n = 4) were contrast enhancing extra-osseous masses that were rarely referred for CT examinations and 25% (1/4) were not visible with CT. Other odontogenic tumors were less represented or had more variable CT imaging characteristics. Mass-associated tooth destruction was appreciated more often with dental radiographs and extra-oral tumor extension was identified more often with CT. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. Odontogenic Myxoma of the Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Manne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic myxomas are benign but locally aggressive neoplasms found almost exclusively in the jaws and arise only occasionally in other bones. We present a rare case of odontogenic myxoma occurring in the mandible of a 19-year-old male patient with a brief review of clinical and radiological features, and diagnostic and operative dilemmas in managing the same.

  20. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case report with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Uma Vasant; Kamat, Mamata Sharad; Kanitkar, Sampada Shriram; Byakodi, Sanjay Satappa

    2017-01-01

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) is a rare odontogenic malignancy with a female predilection, typically presenting as swelling in anterior region of mandible. CCOC was classified as a malignant neoplasm of odontogenic origin by the WHO in 2005 as it exhibits an aggressive growth pattern, local recurrence, and tendency of distant metastasis. Histologically, CCOC is characterized by sheets and islands of vacuolated/clear cells. Since clear cells are present in few odontogenic tumors, salivary gland neoplasms, and metastatic tumors to the jaws; presence of clear cells in a lesion of head and neck area poses a diagnostic challenge. Knowledge about the clinical course, histopathologic pattern, and immunoprofile of CCOC aids in differentiating it from other clear cell tumors. Herein, we present a case of CCOC in anterior mandibular region of 60-year-old female patient with an emphasis on its differential diagnosis from other clear cell lesions of the jaws.

  1. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case report with emphasis on differential diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Vasant Datar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC is a rare odontogenic malignancy with a female predilection, typically presenting as swelling in anterior region of mandible. CCOC was classified as a malignant neoplasm of odontogenic origin by the WHO in 2005 as it exhibits an aggressive growth pattern, local recurrence, and tendency of distant metastasis. Histologically, CCOC is characterized by sheets and islands of vacuolated/clear cells. Since clear cells are present in few odontogenic tumors, salivary gland neoplasms, and metastatic tumors to the jaws; presence of clear cells in a lesion of head and neck area poses a diagnostic challenge. Knowledge about the clinical course, histopathologic pattern, and immunoprofile of CCOC aids in differentiating it from other clear cell tumors. Herein, we present a case of CCOC in anterior mandibular region of 60-year-old female patient with an emphasis on its differential diagnosis from other clear cell lesions of the jaws.

  2. Cutaneous odontogenic sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M J; Scott, M J

    1980-06-01

    A case report and discussion of cutaneous odontogenic sinus tracts, frequently encountered but often misdiagnosed and mistreated, are presented. Awareness that periapical dental abscesses are the most common etiologic factor of cutaneous sinus tracts involving the face and neck will facilitate their early diagnosis and prevent needless treatment or anxiety for the patient. These lesions are often misinterpreted as chronic, resistant to therapy, pyogenic nodules, or granulomas. A high degree of suspicion is required for making the correct diagnosis, and dental roentgenographic studies should routinely be obtained in all such lesions. Permanent healing cannot be achieved unless the original site of infection is located and eradicated.

  3. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Fernández, Míriam; Alberola-Ferranti, Margarita; Hueto-Madrid, Juan Antonio; Bescós-Atín, Coro

    2014-12-01

    Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare condition characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinitation in the form of Ghost cell with varying amounts of dysplastic dentina. We report a case of a 70 year-old woman with a rapid onset of painful swelling right maxillary tumor. Magnetic resonance showed a huge tumor dependent on the right half of the right hard palate with invasion of the pterygoid process and focally to the second branch of the trigeminal. Radiological stage was T4N0. The patient underwent a right subtotal maxillectomy with clear margins. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given. The patient was free of residual or recurrent disease 12 months after surgery. The tumor was 3,9cm in diameter. It was spongy and whitish gray. Microscopically the tumor was arranged in nets and trabeculae, occasionally forming palisade. Tumoral cells had clear cytoplasm with vesicular nuclei. There was atipia and mitosi with vascular and perineural invasion. The excised tumor was diagnosed as a GCOC. Ghost cell carcinoma is a rare odontogenic carcinoma. Its course is unpredictable, ranging from locally invasive tumors of slow growth to highly aggressive and infiltrative ones. Wide surgical excision with clean margins is the treatment of choice although its combination with postoperative radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy, remains controversial. Key words:Ameloblastic carcinoma, calcifying odontogenic cyst, Ghost cell carcinoma, keratinizing epithelial odontogenic cyst, maxillary tumor, odontogenic carcinoma.

  4. Odontogenic cysts. A clinicopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sheddi, Manal A

    2012-03-01

    To determine the relative frequency of OC, and compare it with previous studies. A retrospective review of histopathology archives in the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia of the period 1984-2010 was carried out from September 2010 to February 2011. Diagnosis was confirmed according to the World Health Organization histological classification for odontogenic tumors published in 2005. The relevant clinicopathological data were analyzed. A total of 470 cases satisfied the diagnostic criteria as OC. They represented approximately 11% of all pathologic specimens accessioned. Apical radicular cyst (64.3%) was the most frequent OC, followed by dentigerous cyst (25.1%). The overall male to female ratio was 1.40:1. The mean age of patients at diagnosis was 30 years. It peaked at the second to third decade. The mandible was involved in 48.5%, and the maxilla in 43.6% of the cases. The prevalence of OC is similar to those reported in other studies, in which most OC were inflammatory in origin. They peaked at the second to third decade with the posterior mandible and anterior maxilla being the most frequent sites affected. Studies from different regions of KSA are needed to further understand these lesions.

  5. Video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy for congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimović, Amina; Hasanbegović, Edo; Mujičić, Ermina; Milišić, Selma; Haxhija, Emir; Karavdić, Kenan; Pilav, Alen

    2017-02-01

    Aim The aim was to show rare cases of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and the manner of its surgical treatment with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Methods Two male and one female child, 7, 4 and 3 years of age were treated for symptoms of cough and high temperature in district hospitals. In all three children laboratory blood tests and chest radiography were done. Auscultatory findings showed the presence of pneumonia. Children were treated with appropriate doses of antibiotics. After the rehabilitation of inflammation, they were sent to the University Clinical Center Sarajevo, where video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (VATS) was indicated after computerized tomography (CT). Results Chest CT scan pointed to the CCAM and pulmonary sequestration (PS) changes to the lungs. This has required surgery lobectomy of an affected part of the lungs. In two children with PS, the aberrant systemic artery came from the most proximal part of aorta abdominals, the third patient did not have an anomalous artery. Conclusion VATS lobectomy is an alternative to the traditional thoracotomy for the treatment of CCAM and PS, however, it should be investigated in the future for its safety and effectiveness. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  6. Immunohistochemical evaluation of podoplanin in odontogenic tumours & cysts using anti-human podoplanin antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Namrata; Khanduri, Nitin; Kurup, Deepak; Gupta, Brijesh; Mitra, Pranjan; Chawla, Roshani

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic Cysts & tumors originate through some aberration from the normal pattern of odontogenesis. Ameloblastoma is one of the most frequent intraosseous odontogenic tumors. However it is no longer appropriate to use the diagnosis of ameloblastoma without specifying the type. Varied-clinical entities of ameloblastoma differ in their biologic behaviour. Odontogenic cysts like dentigerous and radicular cysts are less aggressive in nature than odontogenic tumors. Recently, podoplanin commonly used as a lymphatic endothelial marker in cancers has recently been found to play a possible role in odontogenic tumorigenesis also. Therefore the purpose of this study was to immunohistochemically analyse the expression of podoplanin in ameloblastomas, KCOTs, dentigerous cysts, radicular cysts & dental follicles. Paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of 15 Ameloblastomas (7 follicular, 6 unicystic, 2 desmoplastic),10KCOTs, 5 dentigerous cysts, 5 radicular cysts & 5 dental follicles were immunohistochemically examined using antibody against podoplanin. All ameloblastomas displayed podoplanin expression in ameloblast-like cells of the epithelial islands while the stellate-reticulum like cells exhibited no or weak immunostaining. Expression of podoplanin in KCOTs was strongly positive in the cells of the basal and suprabasal layers & odontogenic epithelial nests. Positive immunoreaction for podoplanin was observed in the inflammatory radicular cysts and inflamed dentigerous cyst only and negative or weak expression in the lining epithelium of uninflamed dentigerous cysts and dental follicles. Our results suggest that podoplanin can be used as a potential proliferative marker to observe the aggressive behaviour of ameloblastomas and KCOTs.

  7. Cytokeratins in epithelia of odontogenic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivelini, MM; de Araujo, VC; de Sousa, SOM; de Araujo, NS

    Neoplasms and tumours related to the odontogenic apparatus may be composed only of epithelial tissue or epithelial tissue associated with odontogenic ectomesenchyme. The immunohistochemical detection of different cytokeratins (CKs) polypeptides and vimentin has made it easier to explain the

  8. Demographic presentation of odontogenic myxoma among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They accounted for 10.6% of all odontogenic tumours, thus ranked the 2nd most attended odontogenic tumour in twelve year period. the 1st one being Ameloblastoma (72.2%). In this study odontogenic myxoma was found to occur in children below ten years old. There was female preponderance, but a lack of mandible ...

  9. The Calcifying Epithelial Odonogenic Tumor : Report of a Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hosaka Mitsuo [Dental Research Institute, School of Dentisty, Nippon Dental university, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-15

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which was first described by Pindborg in 1955 and accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. The tumor occurs primarily in the molar-premolar region of the mandible, and 52% of cases are associated with an unerupted tooth. The clinical feature is most commonly a slow-growing painless swelling. The tumor may show considerable radiographic variation and usually characteristic histopathologic features. In this study, we report a case of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor on the left mandibular body and ramus area in a 28-year-old male with a brief review of the concerned literatures.

  10. Odontogenic myxoma: a case report with recent image modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Kwang Won; Lim, Sung Hoon [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    The odontogenic myxoma is an benign, slow growing neoplasm which is of ectomesenchymal origin. This neoplasm occurs almost exclusively in the jaw bones and comprises 0.2% to 17.7% of odontogenic tumors. The odontogenic myxoma may show a wide spectrum of radiographic appearances, unilocular, multilocular radiolucency and a distinct or diffuse border, making the differential diagnosis difficult. We present a case of the odontogenic myxoma in the maxilla with conventional and recent image modalities. Occlusal film revealed a medially extended multilocular lesion with intralesional fine and straight trabeculations from the scalloped margin and buccal expansion and thinning of cortical bone. Computed tomogram revealed lesion showed equivalent density to the muscles in the left maxillary sinus with partial cortical discontinuity of medical wall and the tennis-racket pattern with internal straight trabeculations. MRI revealed intermediate signal intensity on T1 weighted image and high signal intensity on T2 weighted image. In Gd enhanced MR image, the peripheral portions of the lesion were enhanced.

  11. Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation: Is There a Need for Pregnancy Termination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Iavazzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Congenital cystic adenomatoid lung malformation is a rare unilateral dysplasia of the lung. Three pathologic types are described in the literature: type I with cysts >2 cm, type II with cysts <1 cm, and type III with microcysts. The aim of this paper is to present a case of a fetus with congenital cystic adenomatoid lung malformation and discuss the necessity for pregnancy termination according to its prognosis and future mortality. Case. A 36-year-old pregnant woman (para: 1, gravida: 1 presented in our department for anatomy ultrasound screening at 20+1 weeks of gestation. The ultrasound detected a cystic adenomatoid right lung malformation measuring 1.45×1.67 cm which caused mediastinal shift of the heart and the lung to the left side. Other findings were cysts of the choroid plexus and echogenic intracardiac foci. The parents after genetic counseling decided pregnancy termination. The pregnant received cabergoline for ablactation. Conclusion. Congenital cystic adenomatoid lung malformation has different prognosis according to the type (69% in type I, 0% in types II and III. Fetal hydrops, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, Potter's syndrome, and gastrointestinal atresia are common cofindings. Genetic counseling is necessary, and pregnancy termination is proposed to the cases with poor prognosis.

  12. Immunohistochemical Assessment of HER3 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand, Marieh; Saravani, Shirin; Kamyab, Nazanin; Jahantigh, Mehdi; Torabi Parizi, Molouk

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been demonstrated that HER3 plays an important role in some human cancers and the HER3 expression is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare HER3 expression in epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study, which assessed all 57 paraffin blocks of RCs, DCs and OKCs (21 RCs, 16 DCs, 20 OKC) from pathological archive of Dentistry College of Zahedan, Iran. The HER3 expression in cytoplasm and membrane was examined by immunohistochemical method. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS16 by ANOVA and Chi-square. P cysts was higher than that in inflammatory odontogenic cysts. The higher rate of HER3 expression in OKC may justify inherent growth potential, stimulation-independent proliferation capability, invasive growth and high recurrence rate of the cyst accepted today as a tumor. PMID:26734469

  13. Central odontogenic fibroma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [School of Dentistry, Busan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Central odontogenic fibroma is a rare odontogenic neoplasm that originates from odontogenic ectomesenchyme. Here, a case of central odontogenic fibroma in a 17-year-old male is reported. Since the present case showed a multilocular radiolucency with partially ill-defined border between the right mandibular condyle and the distal root of the right mandibular third molar, differential diagnosis involved a wide range of pathosis from benign lesions like ameoloblastic fibroma and odontogenic myxoma to more aggressive lesions such as desmoplastic fibroma, juvenile aggressive fibromatosis, or fibrosarcoma.

  14. [Pindborg's tumor: a propos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Jalal; Choumi, Faiçal; Abir, Badr; Elkhatib, Karim; Abouchadi, Abdeljalil; Nassih, Mohammed; Rzin, Abdelkader

    2010-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor was first described as an entity by Danish pathologist Jens Pindborg in 1955. It is an uncommon and locally invasive benign odontogenic tumor. The most characteristic findings are the presence of amyloid-like substance and calcified concentric liesegang rings.

  15. Carnoy's solution in the mangement of odontogenic keratocyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanmalai, Sivaraj; Kandhasamy, Kohila; Prabu, Neetika; Prince, Christo Naveen; Prabu, Chandrakala Shekarappa Annapurna Pannaikadu Somasundaram

    2012-01-01

    Carnoy's solution is a substance used as a complementary treatment after the conservative excision of odontogenic keratocyst. The application of Carnoy's solution promotes a superficial chemical necrosis and is intended to reduce recurrence rates. However, the inferior alveolar vascular–nervous plexus can occasionally be exposed after the removal of a lesion. The safety of the application of Carnoy's solution over this plexus has been reported, but to date, no clinical report has been made. The authors present a case that was given Carnoy's solution over the inferior alveolar vascular–nervous plexus as a complementary treatment for the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Effective control of recurrence with low and transient neural morbidity was suggested with this technique. PMID:23066248

  16. Carnoy′s solution in the mangement of odontogenic keratocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraj Sivanmalai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnoy′s solution is a substance used as a complementary treatment after the conservative excision of odontogenic keratocyst. The application of Carnoy′s solution promotes a superficial chemical necrosis and is intended to reduce recurrence rates. However, the inferior alveolar vascular-nervous plexus can occasionally be exposed after the removal of a lesion. The safety of the application of Carnoy′s solution over this plexus has been reported, but to date, no clinical report has been made. The authors present a case that was given Carnoy′s solution over the inferior alveolar vascular-nervous plexus as a complementary treatment for the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Effective control of recurrence with low and transient neural morbidity was suggested with this technique.

  17. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Condyloma acuminatum associated with odontogenic myxoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, G; Mushtaq, Mohammed; Vura, Nanda Gopal; Shekar, Ravi; Kumar, Sravan

    2009-12-01

    Condylomata acuminatum is a sexually transmitted infectious disease caused by human papiloma virus on the skin. The transmission is mainly by close contact with infected person and autoinoculation. In oral cavity the condition manifests as soft pink nodules which proliferate and coalesce rapidly to form diffuse papillomatous clusters of varying size. Odontogenic myxoma is a rare tumor of jaws which occurs in the tooth-bearing areas of the mandible and maxilla. It is an uncommon, benign, but locally aggressive neoplasm. This case report highlights a 17-year-old girl with two lesions in oral cavity with soft tissue growth on the palate which has been diagnosed as Condyloma Acuminatum, treated by surgical excision and a large swelling on the right side of the mandible in the same patient diagnosed as odontogenic myxoma where marginal resection was performed.

  19. Demographic Profile of Non-Odontogenic Jaw Lesions in an Iranian Population: A 30-Year Archive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Baghai Naini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The frequency of non-odontogenic lesions of the jawbones is lower than that of odontogenic lesions; however, study of the epidemiologic data of these lesions is required for health care programs. This study aimed to assess the relative frequency and demographic profile of non-odontogenic jaw lesions in an Iranian population over a 30-year period.Materials and Methods: This archive review was performed using demographic and biopsy information of all patients with non-odontogenic lesions of the jawbones submitted to the Oral Pathology Department of Dental School of Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 1984 to 2014. Demographic data included in the study were: age at diagnosis, gender and location of lesion. The lesions were divided into three groups of group 1: cystic lesions, group 2: tumors and tumor-like lesions, and group 3: infectious/ inflammatory/reactive lesions. Frequency and clinical data were analyzed using SPSS 22.Results: Of 972 non-odontogenic jaw lesions, the ratio of mandibular to maxillary lesions was 1.63:1. Female to male ratio was 1.33:1 and the mean age of patients was 29.09±16.90 years. The most common non-odontogenic jaw lesion was central giant cell granuloma (CGCG. In groups 1, 2 and 3, nasopalatine duct cyst, CGCG, and osteomyelitis were the most frequent lesions, respectively.Conclusions: Non-odontogenic lesions of the jawbones are a diverse group of lesions with different frequency and behavior. This study demonstrated that tumors and tumor-like lesions of the jaws were more common than cystic and infectious/ inflammatory/reactive lesions. Overall, the most common non-odontogenic jaw lesion was CGCG.

  20. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: hazards of delayed diagnosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Anne M

    2012-02-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is a rare pulmonary developmental anomaly, which typically manifests in neonates and infants. Presentation in adulthood is uncommon, with <60 cases reported in the literature. The majority of cases involve one lobe only. We report a case of type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in an adult presenting with a respiratory tract infection and haemoptysis. At thoracotomy, complex cystic masses were noted in the right upper and lower lobes. Lung-sparing surgery, in the form of two segmentectomies and a non-anatomical resection, was performed in order to avoid pneumonectomy. Such presentations may be problematic as potentially incomplete resections may increase the risk of complications and malignant transformation. This suggests the importance of appropriate clinical and radiological follow up.

  1. Radiological and histopathological study of benign tumors of the mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seon Young; Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeung Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-06-15

    Benign tumors of the mandible are uncommon lesions. That were classified into odontogenic tumors and nonodontogenic tumors. Author reviewed the radiological evaluation and pathological microscopic finding from 33 benign tumors of the mandible that were confirmed by the biopsy during last 10 years in Dental Clinics, Ewha Womans University Hospital and Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Following results were obtained; 1. Benign tumors of the mandible were classified into odontogenic (66.7%) and non-odontogenic tumors (33.3%). 2. The range of the age distribution was between 6 years and 67 years old. The commonest age group was the second decade (39.4%). 3. There was no difference to sex distribution. 4. The most frequent location was the body of the mandible (42.4%). 5. Radiographic findings were relatively characteristic in odontogenic tumors rather than non-odontogenic tumors. 1) Radiolucent cystic lesions-ameloblastoma, odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibtoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and neurofibroma. 2) Radiopaque mass lesions-odontoma, cementoma and osteoma. 3) Mixed patterns-ossifying fibroma, cementifying fibroma, calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor and hemangioma. It was concluded that the radiographic examination was of value to diagnose the benign tumors of the mandible in symptomless patients.

  2. Calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with complex odontoma: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallana-Alvarez, Silvia; Mayorga-Jimenez, Francisco; Torres-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Avellá-Vecino, Francisco Javier; Salazar-Fernandez, Clara

    2005-01-01

    We report a calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with odontoma (COCaO) and an included permanent canine in the superior maxilla, in a 19 year-old-man. The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first described as a distinct entity by Gorlin et al in 1962. The lesion is a mixed odontogenic benign tumor, and although most of the cases present cystic characteristics, a few are of the solid type (15%), and its rare malignant transformation is well documented. The COC may occur in association with other odontogenic tumors, the most common is the odontoma, occurring in about 24% of the cases. For this association the term Odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst has been suggested. Radiographically is a well defined mixed lesion and histologically consists of a large cyst. In the central area of the cyst enamel and dentin deposits can be found, irregularly distributed in areas and in other parts it takes on a well defined organoid aspect. A thorough review of literature takes place and the pathogenesis is discussed.

  3. Case Report: Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomy Journal of Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Brain abscess of odontogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Antonio Azoubel; de Santana Santos, Thiago; de Carvalho, Ricardo Wathson Feitosa; Avelar, Rafael Linard; Pereira, Carlos Umberto; Pereira, José Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Brain abscess is a rare and threatening infection, which is in a suppuration area, caused either by trauma, neurosurgical complication, or by a secondary infection of dental origin complication. The infectious process spread from the start focus can occur in 2 ways: hematogenous or by contiguity. The treatment should ideally be based on the etiological factor excision, combined with drainage and antibiotics as adjuvant; this philosophy is not observed in the reports described in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This study's goal was to report a case of brain abscess consequent of an odontogenic outbreak, where an adequate treatment was set up, but it was already in advanced stages and had as a result the lethal outcome. Complications from the odontogenic infections have a low incidence, but should never be disregarded, because they can lead to death, as described in this manuscript.

  5. Odontogenic tumours in Children and Adilescents: A Review od ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ameloblastoma was the commonest odontogenic tumours with 14 (29.1%) solid ameloblastoma and 9 (18.8%) cystic ameloblastoma cases followed by fibromyxoma with 8 (16.7%) cases. calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour , calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour and odontogenic fibroma were occasionally seen.

  6. Molecular analysis to demonstrate that odontogenic keratocysts are neoplastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaram, Narasimhan P; Collins, Bobby M; Barnes, Leon; Lomago, Deren; Aldeeb, Dalal; Swalsky, Patricia; Finkelstein, Sydney; Hunt, Jennifer L

    2004-03-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are unique odontogenic lesions that have the potential to behave aggressively, that can recur, and that can be associated with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Whether they are developmental or neoplastic continues to be debated. To identify loss of heterozygosity of tumor suppressor genes in OKCs and to suggest a pathogenetic origin for these lesions. We examined 10 OKCs for loss of heterozygosity of tumor suppressor genes, using a microdissection and semiquantitative genotyping analysis. The genes analyzed included 10 common tumor suppressor genes, as well as the PTCH gene, which is mutated in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Loss of heterozygosity was seen in 7 of 10 cases, with a frequency between 11% and 80% of the genes studied. The genes that exhibited the most frequent allelic losses were p16, p53, PTCH, and MCC (75%, 66%, 60%, and 60%, respectively). Daughter cysts were associated with a higher frequency of allelic loss (P =.02), but epithelial budding was not. Our study indicates that a significant number of OKCs show clonal loss of heterozygosity of common tumor suppressor genes. The finding of clonal deletion mutations of genomic DNA in these cysts supports the hypothesis that they are neoplastic rather than developmental in origin.

  7. Clinicopathological Characteristics of Odontogenic Myxoma in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Odontogenic epithelium was rare and observed in 5 (9.5%) cases while calcific material was present in sixteen (25.4%) cases. Late presentation was a common feature and surgical excision was the treatment of choice. Conclusion: Odontogenic myxoma is un-common among Nigerians when compared with ameloblastoma ...

  8. Radiology in diagnostics of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekhonatskaya М.L

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose: to prove diagnostic capabilities of modern radiation techniques in odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Material and methods: The study involved 546 patients with sinusitis. The following methods have been used: X-ray of the paranasal sinuses, contrast maxillary sinus radiography, contact intraoral radiographs, orthopantomography, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Results. In 7,9% of cases the presence of odontogenic sinusitis has been established, in 92,1 % rhinogenous sinusitis has been revealed. The work provides information about the effectiveness of various radiation techniques in the diagnosis of odontogenic sinusitis. Conclusion. For suspected odontogenic sinusitis, treatment of choice includes the combined use of X-ray of the paranasal sinuses in the mentoanterior projection and contact intraoral radiographs of «causal teeth». Computer tomography is the most informative additional method to clarify the diagnosis of odontogenic sinusitis.

  9. Neoplasms associated with dentigerous cyst: An insight into pathogenesis and clinicopathologic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra V Kalburge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic cysts may occur in association with odontogenic tumors. Because neoplastic and hamartomatous aberrations can occur at any stage of odontogenesis, combined features of odontogenic tumors with epithelial and mesenchymal components may arise within odontogenic cysts. One of the most common of these is dentigerous cyst (DC which has neoplastic potential and shows associated pathologies such as ameloblastoma, squamous cell carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT, and odontoma. The authors report four cases of DC and associated lesions exhibiting AOT in two cases while one case each of complex odontome and MEC. Emphasis is placed on pathogenesis and clinicopathologic features of these lesions.

  10. Ameloglastic fibro-odontoma with a change of calcifying odontogenic cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyuk Rok; Han, Jin Woo; Lee, Jin Ho; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, In Woo; Lee, Suk Keun [Kangnung National Univ., Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-15

    Thirteen-year-old girl complaining of the swelling and pain on the left midface visited our dental hospital. On the radiographic examination, well-defined radiolucent lesion with hyperostotic border was found in the left maxilla accompanying with the external root resorption of the involved teeth and the displaced second molar. CT showed calcified bodies, thinning of hard palate, inferior orbital wall and lateral wall of nasal fossa, and thinning and perforation of the buccal plate of the maxilla. Enucleation and curettage of the lesion and nasoantrostomy was carried out and histopathologic examination mainly showed a solid tumor tissue composed of odontogenic epithelium and pulp tissues admixed with dentin and enamel formation. And some part of reduced follicular epithelium of tooth germ showed a change mimicking calcifying odontogenic cyst. Taken together, we concluded the lesion is an ameloblastic fibro-odontoma with as change of calcifying odontogenic cyst.

  11. Odontogenic myxoma of the face: mimicry of cherubism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, Grant M; Skapek, Stephen X; Lingen, Mark; Reid, Russell R

    2014-11-01

    The present study is a case report of a 3-year-old girl who was referred to our clinic with the clinical features of cherubism. A locally aggressive tumor was diffusely infiltrating the maxilla and mandible. At 4 years after resection, our patient has not demonstrated any signs of recurrence, which might point to a role for adjunctive chemotherapy, in this case imatinib (Gleevec), for odontogenic myxoma. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Rare case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation associated with polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłoński, Janusz; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Andrzejewska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare pulmonary abnormality that results from aberrant fetal lung development. It about 4-26% of cases it can be associated with other congenital abnormalities. We describe a case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation 2 associated with polycystic kidney disease. The association of these two congenital malformations is exceptional. Only four similar cases have been reported in the literature. A 2-year-old girl was referred to the Department of Paediatric Surgery and Oncology Medical University of Lodz with pneumonia and left pneumothorax. For three weeks prior to referral the patient was treated with antibiotics. Chest x-ray revealed hyperinflation of left upper lobe with mediastinal shift to right. Computer tomographic scan of the lung revealed multiple cyst in the left upper lobe, left-site pneumothorax and mediastinal shift to the right. The patient underwent thoracotomy. Intraoperatively, multiple cysts in the left upper lobe were found and left upper lobectomy was performed. Histologic study was compatible with type 2 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation. Ultrasound examination showed multilocular cysts in both kidneys. The dimensions of the cysts were: MWR4. 54x45x45 mm and 25x21x24 mm on the left and right sides, respectively. Significant increase in cyst size on the left side was observed. Ten months after first hospitalization resection of the cystic lower pole of the left kidney was performed. The presence of even a single renal cyst in a child with CCAM is an indication for further follow up examinations.

  13. Cyclin d1 expression in odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Nasim; Modabbernia, Shirin; Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Sajjadi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    In the present study expression of cyclin D1 in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocyst, radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and glandular odontogenic cyst was investigated to compare proliferative activity in these lesions. Immunohistochemical staining of cyclin D1 on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of odontogenic keratocysts (n=23), dentigerous cysts (n=20), radicular cysts (n=20) and glandular odontogenic cysts (n=5) was performed by standard EnVision method. Then, slides were studied to evaluate the following parameters in epithelial lining of cysts: expression, expression pattern, staining intensity and localization of expression. The data analysis showed statistically significant difference in cyclin D1 expression in studied groups (p cysts were frequently confined in parabasal layer, different from radicular cysts and glandular odontogenic cysts. The difference was statistically significant (p cysts comparing to dentigerous cysts and radicular cysts, implying the possible role of G1-S cell cycle phase disturbances in the aggressiveness of odontogenic keratocyst and glandular odontogenic cyst.

  14. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  15. Cerebral Abscess Potentially of Odontogenic Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marouene Ben Hadj Hassine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic origins are rarely implicated in the formation of brain abscesses. The relative paucity of this kind of infection and the difficulty in matching the causative microorganisms of a brain abscess to an odontogenic source can explain the late management of patients. We herein describe a case of a 46-year-old man with a cerebellar abscess that was probably due to an odontogenic infection. The diagnosis supported by imaging and microscopic identification, mini craniectomy for abscess drainage followed by eradication of all potential dental infectious foci, and an antibiotic regimen based on cephalosporins, metronidazole, and vancomycine contributed to a successful outcome.

  16. Odontogenic infections: Microbiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashi Bahl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the involvement of fascial spaces, their bacteriology, sensitivity to antibiotics and management of odontogenic infection in 100 patients of age less than 60 years. Results: The mandibular 3 rd molar was found to be the most commonly offending tooth, followed by the mandibular 2 nd molar. The submandibular space was the most frequently involved fascial space both in single fascial space infections and multiple fascial space infections. Mixed growth (aerobic and anaerobic was seen in culture smears of 60 patients, only aerobic bacterial growth was seen in 25 patients and anaerobic bacterial growth was seen in culture smears of 15 patients. Streptococcus viridans was the most frequently isolated bacteria among the aerobes, whereas Bacteroides and Prevotella were the most common bacterial species among anaerobes. Empirical antibiotic therapy in the form of Co amoxiclav and Metronidazole was given. Incision and drainage followed by extraction of the offending tooth/teeth was carried out. Conclusion: It was concluded that odontogenic infections were mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were necessary to isolate all pathogens. Successful management of these infections depends on changing the environment through decompression, removal of the etiologic factor and by choosing the proper antibiotic.

  17. Simultaneous occurrence of an Odontogenic Myxoma and a Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Su; Lee, Sang Rae; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Byung Do [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of oral cancer and odontogenic myxoma is relatively uncommon benign tumor of mesenchymal origin. There are, to our knowledge, no prior reports of simultaneously occurring squamous cell carcinoma and odontogenic myxoma of the jaw bones. In this case, at first, the plain films and computed tomograms revealed a large expansible multilocular radiolucent lesion on left mandible and marked expansion of cortical plate. In addition this radiograms revealed also infiltrative bony destruction of anterior and medial border of ascending ramus of left mandible and alveolar bone of left maxilla, floating teeth on left lower molar area and metastatic enlargement of left submandibular, jugular digastric and spinal accessory lymph nodes. Magnetic resonance imaging of this patient revealed infiltrative growth of tumor on alveolar bone of left maxilla, left retromolar fat pad, left masseter and left medial pterygoid muscle. Intraoral presurgical biopsy presented typical features of squamous cell carcinoma. After chemotherapy with radiation therapy during 6 months, this central lesion was diagnosed as odontogenic myxoma by the postsurgical biopsy. After 3 months, this patient presented multiple metastatic signs at lumbar spines, rib and liver. Consequently, our case is simultaneous occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma and odontogenic myxoma.

  18. Clinical Features and Treatments of Odontogenic Sinusitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Kyung Chul; Lee, Sung Jin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how clinical features such as sex, age, etiologic factors, and presenting symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis are differentiated from other types of sinusitis...

  19. An atypical presentation of Pindborg tumor in anterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujib, Bangalore Rahim Ahmed; Kulkarni, Pavan Gurunathrao; Lingappa, Ashok; Jahagirdar, Abhishek; Soman, Cristalle

    2012-07-01

    Pindborg tumor, the eponymous counterpart of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm that was first described by a Dutch pathologist Jens Jorgen Pindborg in 1955 and accounts for approximately 1% of all odontogenic tumors. Its origin as well as its malignant potential is controversial. This neoplasm is possibly of stratum intermedium origin and occurring predominantly in the mandible of adults. We hereby report a case of Pindborg tumor arising in the premaxilla which is seldom (9 out of 200 cases) documented in the scientific literature.

  20. An atypical presentation of Pindborg tumor in anterior maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangalore Rahim Ahmed Mujib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pindborg tumor, the eponymous counterpart of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm that was first described by a Dutch pathologist Jens Jorgen Pindborg in 1955 and accounts for approximately 1% of all odontogenic tumors. Its origin as well as its malignant potential is controversial. This neoplasm is possibly of stratum intermedium origin and occurring predominantly in the mandible of adults. We hereby report a case of Pindborg tumor arising in the premaxilla which is seldom (9 out of 200 cases documented in the scientific literature.

  1. Management of odontogenic orbital cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCroos, F C; Liao, J C; Ramey, N A; Li, I

    2011-08-15

    This work describes a series of patients with odontogenic orbital cellulitis (OOC), focusing on rate of abscess formation, need for surgical intervention, and imaging findings helpful for rapid diagnosis. Review of a current case and 22 patients with OOC from the scientific literature demonstrated periapical lucency as the most commonly (36.4%) reported finding on facial and orbital computerized tomography (CT) scan. Orbital abscess occurred in 72.7% of cases, and tooth extraction and/or abscess drainage was required in 95.5% of cases reviewed for control of infection. The current case presented with periapical lucency on CT scan, developed orbital abscess despite broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, and required multiple surgical interventions for disease resolution. Though our patient regained excellent vision, OOC often can result in severe vision loss. Periapical lucency on CT can help identify this atypical origin of cellulitis that is strongly associated with abscess formation and need for surgical intervention.

  2. Mixoma odontogénico Odontogenic myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Valcárcel Llerandi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El mixoma odontogénico se considera una neoplasia benigna, poco frecuente, de consistencia firme y gelatinosa, de crecimiento lento con potencial infiltrativo que produce expansión de la cortical con extensa destrucción ósea y alto índice de recidiva. De origen ectomesenquimático, probablemente derivado del órgano dentario. No existe una predilección particular por sexo, y si una ligera preferencia por presentarse en mandíbula, generalmente asintomático. Se presenta una paciente femenina de dieciséis años de edad, color de la piel blanca, con antecedentes de salud, que acude a consulta de cirugía máxilo facial por aumento de volumen de hemicara derecha, sin otra sintomatología acompañante. Al examen físico se observa aumento de volumen en región maxilar derecha. Al realizar tomografía axial computarizada se observó lesión hiperdensa que ocupaba todo el seno maxilar derecho, con áreas de mayor densidad, que respetaba el hueso que conforma el piso de la órbita. Bajo anestesia general naso traqueal se le realizó hemimaxilectomia, retirada de tumor y colocación de prótesis inmediata obturadora. Después de un año de evolución clínica y radiográfica se colocó la prótesis definitiva, sin presencia de recidiva tumoral.An odontogenic myxoma is a uncommon benign neoplasm of a gelatinous and solid consistency, of lengthy growing with a infiltration potential producing an cortex expansion of with and extend bone destruction and a high rate of relapse. Its origin is ectomesenchymal, probably derived from dental organ. There is not a particular sexual preference, but a slight one by be present in mandible and generally asymptomatic. This is the case of a female white patient aged 16, with health backgrounds referred to Maxillofacial consultation due to an of right hemifacial increase without another accompanying symptomatology. At physical examination there is an increase in volume of right maxillary region. In computerized

  3. Clinical Features and Treatments of Odontogenic Sinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Jin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate how clinical features such as sex, age, etiologic factors, and presenting symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis are differentiated from other types of sinusitis. Also, this study was designed to find methods for reducing the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis. Materials and Methods A retrospective chart analysis was completed on twenty-seven patients with odontogenic sinusitis. They were all treated at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital between February 2006 and August 2008. The study protocol and informed consent forms were approved by the institutional review boards for human beings at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Results Ten patients (37.0%) had dental implant related complications and 8 (29.6%) had dental extraction related complications. Unilateral purulent nasal discharge was the most common symptom (66.7%). The therapeutic modality included transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery in 19 (70.4%) patients, and a Caldwell-Luc operation in two (7.4%) patients. Conclusion In our study, there was no significant difference in the incidence between genders. The average age of the patients was 42.9 years. The incidence was highest in the fourth decade. There were no significant differences between the symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis and that of other types of sinusitis. However, almost all of the patients with odontogenic sinusitis had unilateral symptoms. Iatrogenic causes, which include dental implants and dental extractions, were the most common etiologic factors related to the development of odontogenic sinusitis. Therefore, a preoperative consultation between a rhinologist and a dentist prior to the dental procedure should be able to reduce the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis. PMID:20879062

  4. Odontogenic Infections: A 1-year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Benjamin; Weusmann, Jens; Azaripour, Adriano; Braun, Benedikt; Walter, Christian; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence, demographic patterns and management of odontogenic infections in patients undergoing treatment in an outpatient dental emergency service of a university hospital. In a retrospective study of the year 2012, all patients suffering from odontogenic infections were included. Demographic data, diagnosis and the conducted treatment were analyzed. Odontogenic infections were defined as pulpitis, apical and marginal periodontitis, abscesses and pericoronitis. A total of 2,058 out of 4,209 emergency patients suffered from odontogenic infections. The majority (45.0%) had an apical periodontitis, 20.8% abscesses, 17.3% a marginal periodontitis, 16.3% a pulpitis and 5.8% a pericoronitis. Mean age was 37.5 ± 17.0 years standard deviation (SD) (1.2-96.4). Most patients were 20 to 29 years (24.6%), followed by the age group of 30 to 39 year old patients (21.0%). Males were affected more frequently (55.5%) than females (45.5%). Most of the patients (64.5%) of the patients received a dental or surgical treatment. Antibiotics were prescribed in 31.7% of cases. Amoxicillin was the most common prescribed antibiotic (54.5%). Odontogenic infections represent one of the main reasons for consulting the emergency service. Due to the high number of cases and the severe complications, dentists have to be familiar with the surgical management of odontogenic infections as well as the appropriate use of antibiotics. Nearly half of all patients who sought, treatment in the emergency service had an odontogenic infectious disease. This should be considered for the organization and planning of the service.

  5. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour-case series from five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) also known as Pindborg's tumour is a relatively rare odontogenic neoplasm of epithelial derivation that constitutes about 0.4-3% of all intraosseous odontogenic tumours. Objectives: To document all cases of CEOT encountered in five tertiary centres in Nigeria ...

  6. Retrospective study of spontaneous bone regeneration after decompression of large odontogenic cystic lesions in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović Marko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Surgical treatment of odontogenic cysts in childhood could be accompanied by injury of important anatomical structures. Even though enucleation is considered to be preferable treatment of odontogenic cysts, the specificities of pediatric age favor more conservative surgical approach. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of decompression as the uttermost treatment of odontogenic cysts in the pediatric age. Methods. This retrospective study included 22 patients, 7−16 years old, with a single jaw cystic lesion. The majority of these lesions were dentigerous cyst (14, and the rest belonged to keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT (8. All lesions were primarily treated with decompression; it was a final treatment (one-stage procedure in 13 dentigerous cysts, and it was followed by enucleation (twostage procedure in one dentigerous cyst and all the KCOT. Results. A total of 13 (59.1% dentigerous cysts were treated successfully only with decompression as one stage procedure, while the other 9 (40.9% cysts required enucleation (1 dentigerous and 8 KCOT, after decompression (p ≤ 0.001. Conclusion. Related to non-aggressive lesions, more conservative treatment approach, such as decompression as one-stage procedure, should be considered. On the other hand, KCOTs in children require a two-stage procedure for a successful treatment outcome. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175021

  7. Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla: A review discussion with two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Limdiwala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic myxoma (OM is a rare entity of slowly growing benign neoplasm of ectomesenchymal origin, comprising of 3-6% of all odontogenic tumors that histologically presenting spindle-shaped, stellate and round cells within loosely arranged myxomatous tissue stroma. OM originates from the dental papilla, follicle or periodontal ligament with an exclusive location in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws, association with missing or unerupted teeth. Clinically and radiographically the reported incidence and demographic information of this tumor has wide variability. Most common clinical variant is associated with the impacted tooth and shows local invasion with destruction of adjacent structures and displacement of teeth. Radiographically, common manifestations are multilocular radiolucent areas with well-defined borders and typical soap bubble or tennis racket appearances. This paper presents two rare case reports of OM of maxilla along with review discussion.

  8. Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla: A review discussion with two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limdiwala, Piyush; Shah, Jigna

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare entity of slowly growing benign neoplasm of ectomesenchymal origin, comprising of 3-6% of all odontogenic tumors that histologically presenting spindle-shaped, stellate and round cells within loosely arranged myxomatous tissue stroma. OM originates from the dental papilla, follicle or periodontal ligament with an exclusive location in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws, association with missing or unerupted teeth. Clinically and radiographically the reported incidence and demographic information of this tumor has wide variability. Most common clinical variant is associated with the impacted tooth and shows local invasion with destruction of adjacent structures and displacement of teeth. Radiographically, common manifestations are multilocular radiolucent areas with well-defined borders and typical soap bubble or tennis racket appearances. This paper presents two rare case reports of OM of maxilla along with review discussion.

  9. A study on the mixed jaw lesions associated with teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    1. Retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of tentative diagnosis or impression from the clinico-radiographic materials of jaw lesions which showed mixed lesions associated with teeth. 2. To observe the diagnostic importance of the calcified part of the lesions which appear as radiopaque areas. 14 cases of jaw lesions which showed mixed lesions associated with teeth were reviewed. These lesions were mostly diagnosed as adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (6 cases) or calcifying odontogenic cysts with (4 cases) or without odontomas (4 cases). The calcified elements of the lesions which demonstrated various sizes and patterns of radiopaque shadows resembled odontoid tissues in some cases but could not be defined in some other cases radiographically. The final histopathologic diagnosis confirmed adenomatoid odontogenic tumors in 4 of the 6 cases. The remaining 2 cases turned out to be odontoma and ameloblastic fibroodontoma. The 4 cases of calcifying odontogenic cysts with odontomas were correct in 3 cases but remaining 1 case was just odontoma. The 4 cases of calcifying odontogenic cysts were proved to be odontogenic keratocyst, calcified peripheral fibroma, unicystic ameloblastoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The diagnostic accuracy of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumors and calcifying odontogenic cysts were high when the lesions show typical appearance. The calcifications which show radiopaque areas could be odontomas or dystrophic calficifations or remnants of bone fragments from resorption.

  10. An ectopic tooth concealing an odontogenic myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parmjit; Davies, Huw Teifion

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents a 13-year-old girl who attended an orthodontic clinic for an ectopic UR5. After investigation, a diagnosis of an odontogenic myxoma was made and the tumour was excised. A panoramic radiograph taken almost two years earlier for another dental problem was found to show an ectopic UR5 associated with a subtle radiolucency. Odontogenic myxomas may be of higher frequency than once thought in the paediatric population and therefore should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of any intraosseous radiolucency. Any radiolucent area associated with an unerupted tooth should be investigated further or closely followed up. The odontogenic myxoma is a rare but potentially serious benign tumour of the jaws.

  11. Computed tomography of odontogenic myxoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D.S. E-mail: d.macdon@interchange.ubc.ca; Yeung, R.W.K.; Li, T.; Lee, K.M

    2004-03-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the computed tomography (CT) presentation of odontogenic myxoma (OM) in a Chinese population and to compare them with those observed on the accompanying conventional radiographs (CR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The files of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University of Hong Kong between 1989 and 2000 were reviewed for myxoma cases. RESULTS: Ten cases of OM were found of which eight had been investigated by CT. The formatted hard copy was found in seven cases, four in the maxilla and three in the mandible. Most of the OMs had a round shape but one was fusiform. CT was more likely to display a cortex and its perforation. All OMs had perforated cortices on CT with soft tissue appearing outside the bony contour in two cases. Contrast enhancement was apparent in six cases. Both CR and CT displayed septae, but the latter method revealed that most septae were situated at the periphery, presenting as 'sunray' type spicules in one case. Tooth displacement and root resorption were more reliably observed on CR. CONCLUSION: The likelihood of perforation and pattern of septa of OM is better displayed by CT. CR should also allow a better assessment of the degree of definition of the lesion's margins with adjacent normal bone. Therefore, both CT and CR should be used in an investigation of an OM.

  12. Odontogenic sinusitis: developments in diagnosis, microbiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Alan D; Granquist, Eric J; Adappa, Nithin D

    2017-10-27

    Odontogenic causes of sinusitis are frequently missed; clinicians often overlook odontogenic disease whenever examining individuals with symptomatic rhinosinusitis. Conventional treatments for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) will often fail in odontogenic sinusitis. There have been several recent developments in the understanding of mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of odontogenic sinusitis, and clinicians should be aware of these advances to best treat this patient population. The majority of odontogenic disease is caused by periodontitis and iatrogenesis. Notably, dental pain or dental hypersensitivity is very commonly absent in odontogenic sinusitis, and symptoms are very similar to those seen in CRS overall. Unilaterality of nasal obstruction and foul nasal drainage are most suggestive of odontogenic sinusitis, but computed tomography is the gold standard for diagnosis. Conventional panoramic radiographs are very poorly suited to rule out odontogenic sinusitis, and cannot be relied on to identify disease. There does not appear to be an optimal sequence of treatment for odontogenic sinusitis; the dental source should be addressed and ESS is frequently also necessary to alleviate symptoms. Odontogenic sinusitis has distinct pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, microbiology, and treatment strategies whenever compared with chronic rhinosinusitis. Clinicians who can accurately identify odontogenic sources can increase efficacy of medical and surgical treatments and improve patient outcomes.

  13. Study of polarization colors in the connective tissue wall of odontogenic cysts using picrosirius red stain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lesions of odontogenic origin comprise the heterogeneous group ranging from hamartomatous proliferations, cysts to benign and malignant tumors. Interplay between the epithelium and connective tissue can be assumed to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of odontogenic cysts. Aims and Objectives: A study was taken up to show the role of picrosirius red (PSR stain to demonstrate the fibers and also to assess the difference in the nature of the fibers (different color patterns and to find out the role of it, if any in the pathogenesis and biological behavior of the commonly occurring odontogenic cysts. Materials and Methods: Collagen fibers of 30 cases of odontogenic cysts (10 radicular cysts, 10 odontogenic keratocysts (OKC′s, and 10 dentigerous cysts were studied by staining the sections with PSR stain and examining them under bright field and polarizing microscope. Results: Sixty-seven percentage of the thin collagen fibers and 55% of the thick fibers in radicular cyst showed green-yellow birefringence. Fifty-seven percentage of the thin collagen fibers and 15% of the thick fibers in OKC showed green-yellow birefringence. Eighty-two percentage of the thin collagen fibers and 66% of the thick fibers in dentigerous cysts showed green-yellow birefringence. Rest of the fibers showed orange-red birefringence. Statistical analysis with one-way ANOVA was significant with a P < 0.01 only for thick fibers. Moreover, comparison of polarization colors of thick fibers of odontogenic cysts with duration of the lesion gave statistically significant results. Conclusion: The observations in the present study with respect to color profiles of the collagen fibers in the three commonly occurring odontogenic cysts possibly explain the biological behavior of the lesions. The predominant orange-red birefringence in OKC′s in comparison to radicular and dentigerous cysts suggests that OKC′s exhibit well organized and tightly packed fibers. This

  14. Management of Odontogenic Fibromyxoma in Pediatric Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These may include dental papilla, dental follicle or periodontal. Management of Odontogenic Fibromyxoma in. Pediatric Nigerian Patients: A Review of 8 Cases. Omeje KU, Amole IO, Osunde OD1, Efunkoya AA. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Bayero University, Aminu Kano Teaching ...

  15. Radiographic study of the odontogenic keratocyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Sang Deuk; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Karp Shik [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    To acquire the useful diagnostic information through the analysis of the clinical and radiological characteristics of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst. The researchers compared and analysed the clinical and radiological features of 112 cases of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst confirmed by histopathologic examination. Mandibular odontogenic keratocysts occurred more frequently in males than in females and the incidence is the highest in the 2nd and 3rd decades. These cysts occurred in the mandibular posterior area, angle-ramus area and anterior area 51.8%, 31.2% and 17.0% respectively. These cysts had undulating border (69.6%) rather than smooth border (30.4%). Most of these cysts had well-defined hyperostotic border (94.6%). These cysts caused cortical thinning or expansion (78.6%) rather than no cortical reaction (21.4%). Loss of lamina dura was observed in 72.3%, displacement of tooth appeared in 35.7% and root resorption appeared in 12.5% of cases. In 71% of cases, displacement of mandibular canal was observed. Internal patterns of lesional radiolucency were even (61.6%) or uneven (38.4%). These results would be helpful in diagnosing of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst.

  16. The Prevalence of Inflammatory and Developmental Odontogenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic jaw cysts in a Libyan population and to compare the data with previously published reports from other countries. Materials and methods- We retrieved and analyzed 2190 case notes and biopsy records of the Department of Oral and ...

  17. Pindborg tumor arising in association with an impacted supernumerary tooth in the anterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waingade, Manjushri; Gawande, Pushkar; Aditya, Amita; Medikeri, Raghavendra S

    2014-06-01

    Pindborg tumor/Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor (CEOT) is a benign epithelial odontogenic tumor which shows locally aggressive behavior and accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. The most frequent location is the mandibular premolar and molar area; less frequently the lesion is found in the maxilla. Since histopathology remains the main method for definitive diagnosis, this lesion presents an enigma to a clinician when lesions occur in atypical locations. The authors report a case of CEOT in the maxillary anterior region associated with an impacted supernumerary tooth (mesiodens).

  18. Odontogenic myxoma in an 8-year-old Labrador Retriever dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barigye, Robert; Schultz, Jessie; Newell, Teresa K; Dyer, Neil W

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) was diagnosed in an 8-year-old Labrador Retriever dog with an ulcerohemorrhagic mass located on the caudal area of the right maxillary gingiva. The neoplasm was characterized by a low mitotic index and moderate numbers of spindle, stellate, and round cells that were sparsely distributed in an alcian blue reactive myxomatous matrix. Individual neoplastic cells were characterized by small amounts of faintly eosinophilic staining cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, and stippled amphophilic staining chromatin that was immunoreactive for vimentin but negative for cytokeratin and actin. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of canine OM from North America, and it shares histomorphologic and histochemical features with 3 other cases reported in dogs elsewhere. Whereas, a literature review suggests untreated canine OM is insidious and locally aggressive, the prognosis in the present dog remains unknown. These findings support previous recommendations for inclusion of canine OM on the World Health Organization list of odontogenic tumors.

  19. Pindborg Tumor Presenting as a Nasal Polyp: Immunohistology and Ultrastructural Features of a Rare Case, With Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Kaur, Gurwinder; Nada, Ritambhra; Mohindra, Satyawati

    2016-09-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare benign odontogenic tumor. This tumor predominantly involves the mandible, though the maxilla can also be involved in some cases. The involvement of maxillary sinuses, however, has been previously reported in only 8 case reports English literature. These patients chiefly presented with nasal obstruction along with epistaxis or proptosis in rare cases. However, a primary presentation as nasal polyp is unheard of. We present a rare case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor presenting as a nasal polyp, posing a diagnostic difficulty. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Odontogenic infection causing orbital cellulitis in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis-Costa, Marcelo Dias Moreira; Santos, George Soares; Maciel, Jucileia; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; de Melo, Willian Morais

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic abscess can become an orbital cellulitis, causing potentially serious intracranial and orbital complications. The full clinical complications from odontogenic orbital cellulitis in a pediatric patient are rarely seen daily in hospital emergency departments. Thus, odontogenic orbital cellulitis still remains a rarity, resulting in a medical challenge. With this in mind, this study aimed to describe a case of periorbital and orbital cellulitis resulting from odontogenic origin in a 6-year-old patient who was successfully treated by performing intravenous antibiotic administration combined with surgical drainage.

  1. Severe odontogenic infection: An emergency. Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisosto-Jara, Claudia; Diaz-Ricouz, Camilo; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic infections (OI) are a major reason for consultation in dental practice. They affect people of all ages, and most of them respond well to current medical and surgical treatments. However, some OI can spread to vital and deep structures, overcome the host immune system - especially in diabetic, immunocompromised or weakened patients - and even prove fatal. Ludwig’s angina is a severe form of diffuse cellulitis that can have an acute onset and spread very rapidly, bilaterally affecting areas of the head and neck, and may prove life threatening. A case of severe dental infection is presented in which emphasis is placed on the importance of airway maintenance, followed by surgical decompression under adequate antibiotic coverage. Key words:Ludwig’s angina, severe odontogenic infection, surgical decompression, dental infection. PMID:28210456

  2. Microbiology of odontogenic bacteremia: beyond endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parahitiyawa, N B; Jin, L J; Leung, W K; Yam, W C; Samaranayake, L P

    2009-01-01

    The human gingival niche is a unique microbial habitat. In this habitat, biofilm organisms exist in harmony, attached to either enamel or cemental surfaces of the tooth as well as to the crevicular epithelium, subjacent to a rich vascular plexus underneath. Due to this extraordinary anatomical juxtaposition, plaque biofilm bacteria have a ready portal of ingress into the systemic circulation in both health and disease. Yet the frequency, magnitude, and etiology of bacteremias due to oral origin and the consequent end organ infections are not clear and have not recently been evaluated. In this comprehensive review, we address the available literature on triggering events, incidence, and diversity of odontogenic bacteremias. The nature of the infective agents and end organ infections (other than endocarditis) is also described, with an emphasis on the challenge of establishing the link between odontogenic infections and related systemic, focal infections.

  3. [Pindborg tumor: a poorly differentiated form without calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafian, H; Mauprivez, C; Furon, V; Pluot, M; Lefevre, B

    2004-09-01

    Pindborg tumor is a rare benign epithelial calcified odontogenic tumor. Radiological diagnosis is generally suspected because of the presence of calcifications. A 61-year-old man presented a polymorphous Pindborg tumor of the anterior maxillary. The diagnosis was hindered due to the nonspecific radiographic image and the lack of calcification. Pathology provided the positive diagnosis of poorly-differentiated young odontogenic epithelial tumor. Pindborg tumor is a rare lesions usually found in the posterior mandibular bone. Calcification is a characteristic feature. There are two historical forms, a squamous form with very favorable outcome and a clear-cell form with less favorable prognosis.

  4. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malik, NA. Vol 5, No 6 (2015) - Articles Follicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandible: A Rare Case Report Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2141-9248. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use ...

  5. Ki-67 and MCM-2 in Dental Follicle and Odontogenic Cysts: The Effects of Inflammation on Proliferative Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Nurhan; Çomunoğlu, Nil; Cabbar, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is any association between inflammation and the expression of markers of cell cycle entry (Ki-67 and MCM-2) in dental follicle (DF) of asymptomatic impacted teeth and odontogenic cysts. The study consisted of 70 DFs and 20 odontogenic cysts (radicular cyst (RC), dentigerous cyst (DC) and keratocytic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) located at posterior mandibular region. Histological findings of inflammation for all specimen and mucous cell prosoplasia, squamous metaplasia, glandular epithelium for all DFs were stained with hematoxyline and eosin, periodic acid schiff, alcian blue, and mucin. Epithelial cell proliferation was determined by using immunohistochemical labeling for Ki-67 and MCM-2. The histologic examinations showed 16% mucous cell prosoplasia, 54% squamous metaplasia, 20% glandular epithelium, 37% inflammation. Inflammation was detected in all RCs and %62 in DF, %43 in DC and KCOT. Positive correlation was found between the inflammation of DF and odontogenic cysts (P cysts, respectively. While the mean Ki-67 expressions were statistically significant in DF and KCOT (P < 0.01), MCM-2 were significant in RC and KCOT (P < 0.01). MCM-2 expresion in RCs were statistically significant than KCOT (P < 0.01). The results of this study indicated that the higher MCM-2 expressions in RC than the KCOT might be related to the inflammation and this protein might be more sensitive to inflammation. PMID:22778705

  6. Odontogenic myxoma: a clinicopathological study of 33 cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, E.N.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Vuhahula, E.; Ngassapa, D.; Stoelinga, P.J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma, a rare tumour that occurs in the jaws, has been reported to be the second commonest odontogenic tumour in many countries. Few studies, however, provide detailed clinicopathological findings of a large series of cases and no study so far has attempted to calculate the incidence of

  7. Recognition of Odontogenic Cyst-Fluid Cholesterol Concentration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypercholesterolaemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Serum cholesterol is usually determined to know if a subject is at a risk of heart diseases. This lipid is found in most fluids in the body including the odontogenic cyst-fluid. We investigated the concentration of cholesterol in the odontogenic ...

  8. Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peanut plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some ...

  9. To shunt or not to shunt a pulmonary adenomatoid cystic malformation after 33 weeks of gestation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ruano

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Macrocystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung can cause severe mediastinal shift, hydrops and polyhydramnios, thereby increasing the risk of perinatal deaths. After 33 weeks of gestation, repeated puncturing of the cyst is recommended. We present a case in which a cyst-amniotic shunt was placed instead of performing this procedure. CASE REPORT: A cyst-amniotic shunt was placed at 33 weeks of gestation because of a large macrocystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung associated with severe mediastinal shift and polyhydramnios. Although it was confirmed that the catheter was in the correct place, the cyst increased in size again two weeks later, associated with repetition of polyhydramnios. It was postulated that the catheter was blocked, and we chose to place another catheter instead of performing repeated punctures. The cystic volume, polyhydramnios and mediastinal shift regressed progressively. At 38.5 weeks, a 3,310/g male infant was delivered without presenting any respiratory distress. The infant underwent thoracotomy on the 15th day of life. Thus, in the present study, we discuss the possibility of placing a cyst-amniotic shunt instead of performing repeated cystic punctures, even at a gestational age close to full term.

  10. P53 Protein Expression in Dental Follicle, Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Inflammatory Subtypes of Cysts: An Immunohistochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashhadiabbas Fatemeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is a developmental odontogenic cyst with aggressive clinical behavior. This cyst shows a different growth mechanism from the more common dentigerous cyst and now has been renamed as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT. Inflammation can assist tumor growth via different mechanisms including dysregulation of the p53 gene. This study aims to assess and compare the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 in inflamed and non-inflamed types of OKC and dentigerous cyst. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of p53 was assessed in 14 cases of dental follicle, 34 cases of OKC (including 18 inflamed OKCs, and 31 cases of dentigerous cyst (including 16 inflamed cysts. Results: The mean percentage of p53 positive cells was 0.7% in dental follicles, 5.4% in non-inflamed OKCs, 17.3% in inflamed OKCs, 1.2% in non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and 2.2% in inflamed dentigerous cysts. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.050 except for the difference between inflamed and non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and between dental follicle and non-inflamed dentigerous cyst. Conclusions: The difference in p53 expression in OKC and dentigerous cyst can explain their different growth mechanism and clinical behavior. Inflammation is responsible for the change in behavior of neoplastic epithelium of OKC via p53 overexpression.

  11. Ameloblastoma ex calcifying odontogenic cyst in the mandible: report of a rare case

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadzadeh Rezaei, Maryam; Bagherpour, Ali; Mahmoudi, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) or Gorline cyst is now classified by the World Health Organization as a tumor. Ameloblastoma is the most common pathology that could be associated with COC. This association might be in two forms; Ameloblastomatous variant of COC and “ameloblstoma ex COC”. Ameloblastoma ex COC is very rare. In this report, we present an 11-year-old girl of ameloblastoma ex COC presenting as a well-defined unilocular radiolucent lesion with remarkable bucco-lingual expansion i...

  12. Treatment of Odontogenic Myxoma: A Multidisciplinary Approach—6-Year Follow-Up Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gustavo Oliveira de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most aggressive diseases that affect the oral environment are considered tumors of the jaw. The surgical treatment is preferably done by surgical resection of the lesion, resulting in a great loss of tissue and esthetics. Multidisciplinary planning is required for the rehabilitation of these cases. Autogenous grafting techniques or vascularized flaps allow ridge reconstruction for implant placement, restoring function, and esthetics. This paper reports a 6-year follow-up case of an odontogenic myxoma treated with wide resection and mandibular bone reconstruction for posterior rehabilitation with dental implants.

  13. Peripheral and central aggressive form of Pindborg tumor of mandible - A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayakrishna, K; Soumithran, C S; Sobhana, C R; Biradar, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), or Pindborg tumor, is a rare and benign odontogenic neoplasm that affects the jaw. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor can be divided into 2 clinico-topographic variants: Intraosseous (central) or Extraosseous (peripheral), with an incidence of 94% and 6%, respectively. The intraosseous tumors have a predilection for the mandible, and most tumors arise in the molar and premolar region of the mandible. When present, extraosseous tumors are often located in the anterior jaw and involve the gingiva. In this article we present a unique rare variety of Pindborg tumor of mandible with both intraosseous & extraosseous presentation and also locally aggressive behavior. A 35 year old man presented with Pindborg tumor (CEOT) of mandible with both intraosseous and extraosseous variant in a single lesion, extending from right premolar region to the left molar region. CEOT is an uncommon neoplasm accounting for less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. Although CEOT is considered less aggressive clinically than typical infiltrating ameloblastoma, but our case is a rarity which was aggressive and also rapidly progressive in short duration, with intra and extraosseous presentation. Hence it was managed surgically similar to a malignant lesion. Presentation of two different variants of an odontogenic tumor in a single lesion and aggressive behavior of rather slow growing tumor, mimicking malignant lesion definitely shows possibility of rare variations in different magnitude. Hence proper diagnosis for management with better prognosis of these kinds of tumors is very much essential.

  14. Peripheral and central aggressive form of Pindborg tumor of mandible – A rare case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayakrishna, K.; Soumithran, C.S.; Sobhana, C.R.; Biradar, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Inroduction The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), or Pindborg tumor, is a rare and benign odontogenic neoplasm that affects the jaw. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor can be divided into 2 clinico-topographic variants: Intraosseous (central) or Extraosseous (peripheral), with an incidence of 94% and 6%, respectively. The intraosseous tumors have a predilection for the mandible, and most tumors arise in the molar and premolar region of the mandible. When present, extraosseous tumors are often located in the anterior jaw and involve the gingiva. Purpose In this article we present a unique rare variety of Pindborg tumor of mandible with both intraosseous & extraosseous presentation and also locally aggressive behavior. Case report A 35 year old man presented with Pindborg tumor (CEOT) of mandible with both intraosseous and extraosseous variant in a single lesion, extending from right premolar region to the left molar region. Discussion CEOT is an uncommon neoplasm accounting for less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. Although CEOT is considered less aggressive clinically than typical infiltrating ameloblastoma, but our case is a rarity which was aggressive and also rapidly progressive in short duration, with intra and extraosseous presentation. Hence it was managed surgically similar to a malignant lesion. Conclusion Presentation of two different variants of an odontogenic tumor in a single lesion and aggressive behavior of rather slow growing tumor, mimicking malignant lesion definitely shows possibility of rare variations in different magnitude. Hence proper diagnosis for management with better prognosis of these kinds of tumors is very much essential. PMID:25737906

  15. Odontogenic Fibromyxoma of Maxilla: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Umashankar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic fibromyxoma (OM is a rare locally invasive, non metastasizing benign neoplasm found exclusively in the jaws. It commonly occurs in the second and third decade,and the mandible is involved more commonly than the maxilla. The lesion often grows without symptoms and presents as a painless swelling. The radiographic features are variable so the diagnosis is not easy in many cases. It posesa diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to its morphology and biological behaviour. A caseo f OM of the maxilla with unusual radiographic and histological features is described in a 27 year old female.

  16. CT-MPR invaluable in diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Hideaki; Shimazu, Kaoru; Kamada, Morito; Shiroyama, Akihiro; Mouri, Daisuke; Yamashita, Masashi; Kawasaki, Yasunori; Koseki, Takakazu; Mouri, Manabu [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    In everyday examination, it is usual to encounter odontogenic maxillary sinusitis patients. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis is generally best diagnosed by dental X-ray imaging. Many medical facilities not having a dental X-ray unit use coronal computed tomography (CT) images to diagnose odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Coronal CT imaging causes artifacts, however due to dental prosthesises. Computed tomography-Multiplanar reformation (CT-MPR) imaging has proved useful in evaluating the paranasal sinus because it is not influenced by dental prosthesises. We evaluated the usefulness of CT-MPR for diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis by retrospectively analyzing 16 patients, with the following results. We couldn't diagnose all cases of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in posteroanterior and Waters projection images. Panoramic radiography is needed to diagnose odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Dental X-ray imaging missed some cases, but all cases were diagnosed by CT-MPR imaging, giving a 100% diagnosestic rate. CT-MPR imaging is thus at least as valuable or better than dental X-ray imaging in diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. (author)

  17. Differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawazu, Toshiyuki; Yoshiura, Kazunori; Yuasa, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu; Ohzeki, Satoru; Shinohara, Masanori [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry; Araki, Kazuyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    1997-09-01

    Radiographic features of ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst are similar although their biological behaviors are different. Therefore, it is very important to differentiate these lesions before treatment. The aim of this study was to differentiate between the two lesions based on characteristic CT findings. Fifty-three patients diagnosed histopathologically as having ameloblastoma (29 cases) or odontogenic keratocyst (24 cases) and who underwent CT were evaluated radiologically, and some characteristic radiological features to differentiate both lesions were assessed. Ameloblastomas tended to be more than 40 mm in long diameter and 0.5 short/long diameter ratio, whereas odontogenic keratocysts were less than 40 mm and 0.5, respectively (P<0.05: Chi-square test). Buccal expansion of the cortex was seen more often in ameloblastomas than in odontogenic keratocysts (P<0.05: Chi-square test). Together with these features and internal high density structure, which was only seen in odontogenic keratocysts, differential diagnostic criteria between ameloblastomas and odontogenic keratocysts were proposed. Diagnostic accuracy based on these criteria was 84.9%. These results that our criteria to differentiate ameloblastomas from odontogenic keratocysts using CT are clinically useful prior to treatment. (author)

  18. Pigmented Pindborg tumor of the maxilla: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Subashchandrabose; Madanagopaal, Lakshmikanth Ramiah; Sarada, Venkaterwaran

    2016-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as the Pindborg tumor, is a benign locally invasive neoplasm. Common variants of CEOT include noncalcifying, Langerhans cell, bone and cementum forming and clear cell, which have a prognostic significance. Pigmented variants are known to occur in other odontogenic tumors. However, a definitive pigmented variant of CEOT has not been reported in literature so far. Here, we report the first case of pigmented Pindborg tumor arising from the maxilla in a young female. The pigment was demonstrated as melanin by staining and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The pigmented variant of CEOT did not recur within 18 months postsurgery. Our report indicates that it is essential to recognize the pigmented variant. We discuss the common variants of CEOT and potential histogenesis of the pigmented variant. Further studies are required to reveal the histogenesis of melanocytes and their pathological significance in the odontogenic tumors.

  19. A case of cutaneous odontogenic sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Michiya; Ichimiya, Makoto; Yoshikawa, Yoshiaki; Hamamoto, Yoshiaki; Muto, Masahiko

    2005-10-01

    Despite the fact that cutaneous sinus tracts of odontogenic origin are well documented, the condition is still commonly misdiagnosed, because chronic periapical periodontitis may be asymptomatic and is rarely open to the skin. A 75-year-old Japanese woman presented to our clinic with the chief complaint of a left cheek skin lesion with mild pain. Physical examination revealed a subcutaneous nodule covered with erythematous skin on her left buccal region. Cultures from the subcutaneous nodule grew Bacteroides species and Peptostreptococcus micros but did not yield acid-fast bacilli, fungi, or Actinomyces. Stains of smeared pus showed a considerable number of Gram-negative rods. The histopathological examination revealed a focal abscess formation in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Dental evaluation, including an orthopantogram, showed a radiolucent alveolar area at the left lower first molar apex, suggesting a periapical abscess. Antibiotic therapy for three weeks associated with surgical root canal therapy eliminated the subcutaneous nodule. A high degree of suspicion is required to correctly diagnose a lower facial lesion as being of odontogenic origin, and prompt dental evaluation should be considered.

  20. Non-syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocysts associated with dental anomalies: A report of unusual case and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulabha A Narsapur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, now known as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, is the most common cystic lesion occurring in the maxillofacial region. Multiple occurrence of these cysts is less frequent and is usually associated with syndromes, the most common being the Gorlin Goltz syndrome or the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS. We hereby report an unusual case of multiple OKCs in a healthy adult, associated with other dental anomalies. Management approach consisted of enucleation with curettage of the smaller lesions and decortication of buccal cortex in the large lesion. The condition in the present case may be because of the multifocal nature of OKC rather than its association with any syndrome. Concomitant occurrence of multiple OKCs with other dental anomalies may be coincidental. Impacted teeth or missing teeth must be radiographed to rule out the lesions associated with them.

  1. A silent transformation of keratocystic odontogenic tumour to squamous cell carcinoma: A case report and review of literature

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    Upendra Gurugubelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Till date cases reported elsewhere in the world regarding keratocystic odontogenic tumor transformation to squamous cell carcinoma are very sparse. It has been usually noticed in adult males, with the predominant location being posterior mandibular area. We hereby report a case of squamous cell carcinoma involving anterior mandibular area to posterior mandibular region in a 65-year-old female patient with no evidence of any ulceration and growth intraorally, suggesting that the tumor had a bony origin. Therefore, thorough monitoring of such tumours is necessary to arrive at a proper diagnosis, followed by providing treatment at the earliest.

  2. Clinicoradiologic Differential Diagnosis of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    To clarify the clinical and radiologic parameters that can be used to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma. The records of 46 patients of ameloblstoma and 48 patients of odontogenic keratocyst at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital during the period of 1979 to 1995 were retrospectively reviewed. As a possible means for differentiating between the odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, the clinical parameters and the radiologic parameters were evaluated. In the clinical parameters, there was no significant deference in age, sex, and sign and symptoms (p>0.05).In the radiologic parameters, there was significant difference in site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth (p<0.05). The site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth can be the parameters to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, but a definite differentiation of these two lesions needs a more specialized imaging modality.

  3. Oncologic profile of maxillary odontogenic myxoma: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Radhikaprasad Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic myxoma (OM is an ectomesenchyme derived neoplasm, almost exclusively found in jaws. This article presents a maxillary OM with a brief review of the molecular and proteomic antecedents of OMs, capturing its histopathogenesis.

  4. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy for odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tsugihama; Otori, Nobuyoshi; Asaka, Daiya; Okushi, Tetsushi; Haruna, Shin-ichi

    2014-12-01

    Odontogenic maxillary cysts and tumours originate from the tooth root and have traditionally been treated through an intraoral approach. Here, we report the efficacy and utility of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for the treatment of odontogenic maxillary cysts and a tumour. We undertook EMMM under general anaesthesia in six patients: four had radicular cysts, one had a dentigerous cyst, and one had a keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The cysts and tumours were completely excised and the inferior turbinate and nasolacrimal duct were preserved in all patients. There were no peri- or postoperative complications, and no incidences of recurrence. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy appears to be an effective and safe technique for treating odontogenic cysts and tumours.

  5. Keratin metaplasia in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts

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    Thangadurai Maheswaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find the prevalence of keratin metaplasia and its relation with clinico-pathological profile of the odontogenic cyst. Materials and Methods: Odontogenic cysts were studied histologically with special stains to identify the presence of keratin and compared with various parameters such as underlying connective tissue inflammation, average epithelial thickness, and site of the cyst, type of the cyst, age and the sex of the patient. Results: Of 71 cases of various odontogenic cysts, 26 (36.6% cases exhibited keratinization in the epithelial lining. In cysts with severe inflammation there is absence of keratinization. Conclusions: This study reveals higher prevalence of keratin metaplasia in the odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, inflammation is found to be one of factor influencing keratin metaplasia.

  6. Cytokeratin Expression in Evaluation of Odontogenic Cysts | Iyogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background & Objectives: Odontogenic cysts differ significantly in biologic behaviour (particularly neoplastic potential), thereby making confirmatory histological diagnosis imperative for proper clinical management. This study therefore explores the use of cytokeratin (CK) immunophenotyping in the histological distinction ...

  7. Occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Young Jo; Kim, Young Du; Moon, Seok-Whan; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Ki, Chang Seok

    2013-12-01

    An 8-year-old male presented with a cystic lung lesion in the left lower lobe, which was initially detected during surgery for a spontaneous rupture of the sigmoid colon at the age of 6 years. Tissue fragility and a tendency to bleed easily were noted during the surgery, which strongly suggested vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Although there was no abnormality in the hemostasis screening test, or any suspicious hereditary problem in his pedigree, genetic gene testing for vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was recommended, and showed a de novo mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This report presents the case of patient with occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of lung, in addition to a duplicated infrarenal vena cava.

  8. Central odontogenic fibroma (simple type) in a four year old boy: Atypical cone-beam computed tomographic appearance with periosteal reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbiaee, Najme; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed; Sanaei, Alireza [Dept. of , Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. A case of COF (simple type) of the mandible in a four-year-old boy is described in this report. The patient showed asymptomatic swelling in the right inferior border of the lower jaw for one week. A panoramic radiograph showed a poorly-defined destructive unilocular radiolucent area. Cone-beam computed tomography showed expansion and perforation of the adjacent cortical bone plates. A periosteal reaction with the Codman triangle pattern was clearly visible in the buccal cortex. Since the tumor had destroyed a considerable amount of bone, surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted.

  9. Detection of maternal transmission of a splicing mutation in the TSC2 gene following prenatal diagnosis of fetal cardiac rhabdomyomas mimicking congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung and cerebral tubers and awareness of a family history of maternal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chang, Tung-Yao; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Su, Yi-Ning; Chen, Yi-Yung; Chern, Schu-Rern; Su, Jun-Wei; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-09-01

    To present a prenatal diagnosis of familial tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). A 29-year-old woman was referred to our institution for amniocentesis at 24 weeks of gestation because of congenital anomaly. The fetus had been found to have an intrathoracic echogenic mass, suspicious of type III congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung (CCAML). The woman presented with a medical history of epilepsy and had received anticonvulsants but did not disclose the disease entity associated with the epilepsy. Amniocentesis revealed a karyotype of 46,XX. A fetal ultrasound examination at 26 weeks of gestation reported the diagnosis of type III CCAML. At 30 weeks of gestation, magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple cortical tubers in the brain along with an intracardiac mass suspicious of cardiac rhabdomyoma, and a diagnosis of fetal TSC was made. A prenatal ultrasound examination at 30 weeks of gestation revealed multiple cardiac tumors and multiple cortical tubers in the brain. The mother admitted that she had been diagnosed to have TSC. Molecular analysis of the cultured amniocytes and the parental blood showed a splicing mutation of c.2639+1G>C in the splice donor site of intron 22 of TSC2 gene in the mother and the fetus. Prenatal diagnosis of an intrathoracic lesion with a family history of parental epilepsy should raise a suspicion of fetal cardiac rhabdomyoma and TSC, and prompt magnetic resonance imaging investigation and molecular genetic analysis if necessary. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Big Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor of the Mandible: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    transformation into a squamous cell carcinoma. (3). CASE PRESENTATION. A 30 years old male patient came from the southern part of Ethiopia with referral .... mitotic activity in basal cell layer, friable capsule and inaccessible sites preventing complete removal, presence of daughter or satellite cysts. (4,5,6). KCOT tends to ...

  11. Surgical treatment of odontogenic keratocyst by enucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs are benign, they are often locally destructive and tend to recur after conservative surgical treatment. They must therefore be distinguished from other cysts of the jaw. Keratocysts possess outpouchings and microscopic daughter cysts from which recurrences may arise. Histologic examination is essential for diagnosis since the appearances on roentgenograms and at operation usually do not reveal the true nature of the lesion. Since many non-dental surgeons and pathologists are unaware of OKCs, a case is presented in which surgical treatment was by original conservative method. Decompression causes a reduction in the cyst volume with new bone formation so that the structures impinged upon (e.g., teeth, nerves are completely free.

  12. Two cases report of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Paeng, Jun Young; Lee, Jun; Choi, Moon Ki [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Wonkwang Dental Research Institute, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Eulji University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) is a rare disorder of the jaws and shows various radiographic features. The purpose of this study is to describe the different radiographic appearances of 2 cases of COC. Case 1 was located in the posterior maxilla extending into maxillary sinus, showing unilocular radiolucency with a well-defined margin. Cortical bone expansion and thinning were prominent. Root resorption of adjacent teeth was apparent. Case 2 showed unilocular radiolucency with a calcified material. Calcification was supposed to be dystrophic dental hard structures, detected at the periphery of the lesion. Ghost cell and proliferation of ameloblastoma-like tissues were common features for these two lesions on histopathological findings. This reports presented common and atypical radiographic features of the COC.

  13. Odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells on tricalcium phosphate scaffolds

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    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: The 3D culture system improves odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. The differentiation level of the cells in 3D culture is significantly lower than that of odontoblasts present in pulp tissue. TCP biomaterial possesses an odontogenic-inducing property.

  14. Differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Sang A; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    The objective of this study is to find the differentiating characteristics of ameloblastomas and odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw by analyzing computed tomography (CT) images of the lesions, clarify radiological characteristics associated with jaw lesions, and to make a diagnosis based on these findings. Test subjects were chosen among the patients who were diagnosed as having an odontogenic keratocyst or ameloblastoma at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital from January 1996 to December 2000 and had CT scans taken preoperatively. The subject pool was comprised of 51 cases of odontogenic keratocyst and 37 cases of ameloblastoma. The following measures were used for image analysis of the lesion : the anatomic location, CT pattern, mesiodistal width, buccolingual width, the ratios between mesiodistal width and buccolingual width, height, CT number, homogeneity of radiodensity, the appearance of a sclerotic rim, continuity of adjacent cortical bone, and displacement and resorption of adjacent teeth. Comparing the CT patten, mesiodistal width, buccolingual width, height, CT number, homogeneity, appearance of sclerotic rim, continuity of adjacent cortical bone, there were statistically significant differences between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst test subjects (p<0.05). Comparing the ratios between mesiodistal width and buccolingual width, displacement and resorption of adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05). We compared odontogenic keratocysts and ameloblastomas in CT scans. They occurred most frequently in the posterior to the ramus of the mandible. The findings of patterns of the CT images showed that size and border of lesions were more aggressive in ameloblastomas than in odontogenic keratocysts. The internal contents represented an increased attenuation area (IAA) in odontopenic keratocyst. Odontogenic keratocysts were shown to have higher CT numbers than ameloblastomas.

  15. Pattern of odontogenic tumours in Nigeria: a review of the literature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result: Ameloblastoma was found to be the most reported odontogenic tumour, and has been described as the most frequently occurring odontogenic tumour in Nigeria. Although malignant variants of odontogenic tumours were well recognized, they were less reported in Nigeria than in the rest of the world. Peak age of ...

  16. [Oropharyngeal tumors of dogs--a clinical study of 79 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörsting, N; von Reiswitz, A; Wohlsein, P; Bullerdiek, J; Reimann, N; Nolte, I

    1998-01-01

    This study presents the data on incidence, TNM-classification and therapy outcome of 79 dogs with oropharyngeal tumors, which were admitted to the Clinic of Small Animals, Hannover School of Veterinary Medicine. 52 neoplasms were examined histologically. The most common tumors were malignant melanoma (n = 17), fibrosarcoma (n = 5), squamous cell carcinoma and peripheral odontogenic fibroma (n = 4). It could be determined that dogs treated by surgery, regardless of tumor type and type of surgery, had longer survival times than untreated dogs. With regard to survival time and the rate of local tumor recurrence, radical surgery (partial mandibulectomy/maxillectomy) led to good results in squamous cell carcinomas and invasive odontogenic tumors, but, keeping in mind the small number of cases, showed no advantage over conservative surgery in malignant melanomas, fibrosarcomas, neurofibrosarcomas and non invasive odontogenic tumors. It could be shown that the clinical staging of the patients was of prognostic relevance.

  17. Central Odontogenic Fibroma of Mandible: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Bayat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Central odontogenic fibroma is a rare odontogenic neoplasm that originates from odontogenic ectomesenchyme. Most cases occur in the mandible and between the ages of 11 and 39 years. The neoplasm shows a definite female preponderance, with a ratio of 2.2:1 and has a very low recurrence rate. The aim of this article was to report a case of this rare lesion which was accidental found. Case Report: A 11-year-old female, during her orthodontic treatment and without any complain and any sign or symptoms, performed a panoramic image for assessing the permanent teeth buds. In the panoramic view a unilocular radiolucent lesion with well-defined and corticated borders in the right mandibular body region was evident. The lesion was treated with simple excision. Simple type of central odontogenic fibroma histopathologic features was observed in the microscopic view. Conclusion: Although the central odontogenic fibroma is a rare benign neoplasm, however, a careful evaluation of radiographic images is important for early detection of lesions because the patient may have no clinical symptoms such as swelling, pain and paresthesia.

  18. Epidermoid/Dermoid cysts mimicking odontogenic infections: review of literature

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    Amin Rahpeyma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermoid/Epidermoid cysts are rare pathologic lesions that may involve the floor of the mouth. Infection and inflammation of the cyst can produce a clinical picture very similar to the submandibular and submental abscesses with odontogenic origin. Dermoid/epidermoid cysts are on the floor of the mouth with submental or submandibular component can be mistaken for odontogenic infections. Methods: Four biopsy proven dermoid/epidermoid cysts operated in the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Ghaem hospital (2012-2013, were reviewed. Results: Four patients, including two classic cases and two infected dermoid/epidermoid cysts, were erroneously diagnosed as odontogenic infection. Discussion: The lesions located solely below mylohyoid muscle need to be removed through anextraoral approach but the lesions above the mylohyoid muscle or those that have both supra- and infra-mylohyoid components can be removed through an intraoral incision.Conclusion: Dermoid/epidermoid cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of submental/submandibular swellings. In the absence of an odontogenic cause of infection, fine-needle aspiration biopsy and appropriate imaging evaluation techniques with sonography, CT or MRI are mandatory for correct diagnosis and surgical treatment planning. The clinicians should be very cautious to differentiate odontogenic infections from infected dermoid/epidermoid cysts.

  19. Queratoquiste odontogénico Odontogenic keratocyst

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    Juan Carlos Quintana Díaz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El queratoquiste odontogénico constituye un tipo histológico de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo cuya mayor incidencia ocurre entre la segunda y tercera décadas de la vida, y puede tener un segundo momento de frecuente aparición hacia la quinta década. Las zonas del tercer molar inferior y el ángulo mandibular son las mayormente afectadas, desde donde la lesión progresa hacia la rama y el cuerpo. Entre los otros quistes odontogénicos este presenta gran importancia debido a la alta tasa de recurrencia ubicada entre el 25 y 60 % además de presentar características histopatológicas que lo diferencian de otras lesiones quísticas. Se reporta un caso en un paciente de sexo femenino, de 33 años de edad, que al examen clínico y radiográfico, presentó una lesión circunscrita al cuerpo de la mandíbula del lado izquierdo, en el área de brote del segundo premolar, radiolucida unilocular. Después de los exámenes clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológico se diagnosticó: queratoquiste odontogénico. Se realizó tratamiento quirúrgico con resultados satisfactorios y sin señales clínicas ni radiográficas de recidiva hasta el momento, el defecto óseo fue reconstruido con Hidroxiapatita HAP-200 sin reacción adversa al implante.Odontogenesis keratocyst is a histological type of developmental odontogenic cysts whose incidence occurring between the second and the third decades of life with a potential second appearance in fifth decade. The lower third molars and the mandibular angle areas are the more involved and from there the lesion progresses to branch and body. Among the other types of cysts this is very important due to the high rate of relapse located between the 25 and the 60 % and by its histopathologic features differentiating it from other cystic lesions. The case of a female aged 33 is presented, which in clinical and radiographic examination had a lesion circumscribed to radiolucent unilocular left mandibular area

  20. Etiologies and Treatments of Odontogenic Maxillary Sinusitis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Fahimeh; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Safai, Pooria

    2015-01-01

    Context: Maxillary sinusitis is an important issue in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. This study aims to present a systematic review of etiologies and treatments of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic database search was performed based on related MeSH keywords. Articles published between January 2001 and December 2014 was selected according to the inclusion criteria. The information extracted from various studies was categorized in various tables. Results: The study selected 19 studies. In most studies, oroantral fistula (OAF) was the most common etiology of odontogenic sinusitis. Alpha-hemolytic streptococcus was the most common flora in sinusitis with dental origin. The literature shows that the Caldwell-Luc approach may be the best method for treating sinusitis in cases of displaced teeth. Conclusions: OAF is a common cause of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and may easily be treated by endoscopy and fistula closure. Maxillofacial surgeons and dentists should consider this problem to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent complications. PMID:26756016

  1. [Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin: surgical treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemli, H; Mnejja, M; Dhouib, M; Karray, F; Ghorbel, A; Abdelmoula, M

    2012-04-01

    The frequency of maxillary sinusitis of dental origin (MSDO) is under estimated. The medical and surgical treatment has improved thanks to endoscopic guidance. We report our experience and strategy in the treatment of MSDO. Twenty-two patients presenting with MSDO were treated between 1998 and 2008. The results were evaluated on clinical, functional, sinusal, and odontologic signs. MSDO accounted for 16% of surgically managed sinusitis. CT was performed in 95% of cases. The etiologies were apical leakage in seven patients, migration of a tooth or root during extraction, or presence of ectopic tooth in the sinus in nine patients, a cyst in three patients, and oroantral communication in three patients. Surgery was performed after antibiotic and NSAID treatment. The first surgical step was the treatment of the odontogenic source. The second step was sinus drainage by endoscopic treatment in 64%, Caldwell-Luc in 23%, and drainage by oroantral communication enlarged then closed in the same operative time in 13%. The follow up ranged from 3 months to 10 years. Early postoperative superinfection was observed in two patients. Two patients presented with recurrent sinusitis. The postoperative sequels were hyposmia in three patients, dental pulpotomy, and trigeminal neuralgia in five patients treated by Caldwell-Luc surgery. Nasal endoscopy has improved the surgical management of MSDO. It makes curettage and exclusion of sinus cavities obsolete. It is reliable and has a low rate of complications. The best treatment remains prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Odontogenic foci--possible etiology of urticaria?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchter, A; Kruse-Lösler, B; Joos, U; Kleinheinz, J

    2003-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that chronic odontogenic infections could pose a risk for myocardial infarction, cerebral ischemia, and arteriosclerosis. However, the correlation between urticaria and dental infections has rarely been examined so far. Therefore, we performed a case-control study using a standardized questionnaire and examination. We investigated 66 patients suffering from an acute or chronic urticaria and 65 age- and sex-matched healthy patients as a control group. Dental status was determined by a so-called total dental index (TDI) which primarily reflects caries, periodontitis, periapical lesions, and nonvital and missing teeth. All 66 patients were referred from the department of dermatology. After their treatment in hospital, all patients received a questionnaire with questions on intensity and localization of the urticaria. The TDI of the urticaria patients was slightly better ( n=66; 2.6+/-1.98) than that of the control group ( n=65, TDI=3.3+/-1.86). Subsequently, it was determined if the urticaria had receded after dental treatment. In conclusion, chronic dental infections do not seem to correlate with an increased risk for urticaria.

  3. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral cavity and jaws: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The purpose was to examine the prevalence, gender, age and site(s) of odontogenic and nonodontogenic benign tumors, and tumor‑like lesions occurring in the oral cavity and jaws in a Turkish population, particularly, in the Eastern Turkey, and to compare findings of this study with other reports. Materials and ...

  4. A case report of odontogenic myxoma with characteristic multilocular lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Paeng, Jun Young [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Although odontogenic myxoma (OM) has various radiographic appearances, the characteristic features of OM are the multilocular radiolucent lesion, straight bony septa along the margin forming either square or triangular spaces. We present a case of OM in a 25-year old-male patient. Multilocular radiolucent lesion on the left mandible body showed tennis racket appearance. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) showed straight bony septa along the margin and cortical perforation. This CBCT features would have significantly contributed to allowing a diagnosis of OM. We think that this case shows characteristic radiographic features of odontogenic myxoma.

  5. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhyarani, B.; Noorani, Hina; Shivaprakash, P. K.; Dayanand, A. Huddar

    2016-01-01

    Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise. PMID:27307677

  6. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sandhyarani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise.

  7. A three-year-old boy with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and congenital pulmonary adenomatoid malformation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cakan Nedim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy leads to demyelination of the nervous system, adrenal insufficiency, and accumulation of long-chain fatty acids. Most young patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy develop seizures and progressive neurologic deficits, and die within the first two decades of life. Congenital or acquired disorders of the respiratory system have not been previously described in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Case presentation A 3-year-old Arabic boy from Yemen presented with discoloration of the mucous membranes and nail beds, which were considered cyanoses due to methemoglobinemia. He also had shortness of breath, fatigue, emesis and dehydration episodes for which he was admitted to our hospital. Chest radiograph and chest computed tomography scans showed congenital pulmonary adenomatoid malformation. A few weeks before the removal of the malformation, he had a significant episode of hypotension and hypoglycemia. This development required further in-hospital evaluation that led to the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency and the initiation of treatment with corticosteroids. One year later, he developed seizures and loss of consciousness. Magnetic resonance imaging of his head showed diffuse demyelination secondary to X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. He was treated with anti-seizure and anti-oxidants, and was referred for bone marrow transplant evaluation. Conclusion The presence of adrenal insufficiency, neurologic deficits and seizures are common manifestations of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. The association of congenital lung disease with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy or Addison's disease has not been described previously.

  8. A retrospective study of cysts and tumors of the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aroquiadasse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orofacial cysts and tumors are known to exhibit geographic variations in prevalence and pattern. The knowledge of the epidemiology of odontogenic cysts and tumors is limited in a developing nation like India, which may be attributed to inadequate documentation in our hospitals and health care centres. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of different types of odontogenic cysts and tumors diagnosed at a tertiary care dental college hospital in Puducherry and compare the findings with the information reported in other parts of the world. Material and Methods: A record-based study was conducted using data from the clinical and histopathological records of the last ten years (2006–2015 from the departments of oral medicine and radiology and oral pathology in a dental college and hospital, Puducherry. Results: Of the total 974 patients, 510 were males and the age ranged from 1 to 95 years. The analysis showed that malignant lesions were the most common lesion (55.8%, distributed almost equally between males (53.6% and females (46.3%. Malignant lesions more often occurred during the 6th and 7th decade of life. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor was the most common benign odontogenic tumor (33.3%, occurring most commonly in males involving the mandible. Among odontogenic cysts, dentigerous cyst was the most common developmental odontogenic cyst. Radicular cyst was the most common inflammatory cyst and was more prevalent among males. Conclusion: Our study is the first of its kind to assess the prevalence of any cyst and tumor that occurs in the oral cavity (both odontogenic and nonodontogenic in an Indian population. To determine the global epidemiological burden of these lesions we urge further prevalence studies to be performed in the Indian subcontinent as well as the world.

  9. Odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts: An analysis of 526 cases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the age, gender, and sites of different types of odontogenic cysts (OCs) and non‑OCs (nOCs) (seen in eastern Anatolian population in Turkey. Materials and Methods: The following data were collected from the clinical records and histopathology reports of the Department of ...

  10. Odontogenic and Nonodontogenic Cysts: An Analysis of 526 Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... in terms of incidence, age, sex, cyst type, and site. Results: A ... and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations ..... Clinico-pathologic study of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican.

  11. Antimicrobial Therapy in Management of Odontogenic Infections in General Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Curtis J; Pellecchia, Robert

    2016-04-01

    This article focuses on the diagnosis and management of odontogenic infections. Current antibiotic regimens are reviewed and discussed including use of alternative antibiotics with patients known to have a penicillin allergy. Emphasis is made on proper examination of the patient with use of diagnostic aids to provide the correct treatment of choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blindness secondary to odontogenic orbital cellulitis is a rarity. We report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with facial swelling and orbital pain. Examination revealed right orbital purulent discharge, nil light perception in the right eye and the presence of a grossly carious ipsilateral maxillary molar. Investigations ...

  13. Odontogenic myxoma: a clinicopathological study in a South African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titinchi, Fadi; Hassan, Bassam A; Morkel, Jean A; Nortje, Christoffel

    2016-09-01

    Odontogenic myxoma is a benign, locally aggressive neoplasm of the jaws. Prevalence rates range between 0.5% and 17.7% of odontogenic tumours. There are few reports in the literature on this lesion in African populations, and therefore, this study aimed to report on odontogenic myxoma in a South African population over a 40-year period. The clinical records and orthopantomograms of 29 histopathologically diagnosed odontogenic myxoma were retrospectively analysed. Details of age, gender, ethnic origin and clinical, histological as well as radiological features were recorded. The ages of patients ranged from 7 to 44 years with a mean of 21.3 years. The male-to-female ratio was 1:2.6 with the majority of patients being of mixed race and Africans. Clinically, 31% complained of pain while 58.6% had a history of swelling. The majority of odongenic myxomas (62.1%) were located in the mandible with the posterior region being most commonly affected. Multilocular lesions (69.2%) were more common and were significantly larger than unilocular lesions (P myxomas have variable clinical, radiological and histological features. Most of these features in this population were similar to other populations. It is mandatory to use conventional radiographs along with histopathological examination to aid in arriving at an accurate diagnosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Epidemiology of odontogenic infections in a secondary healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients aged 20-29 years were more predisposed to odontogenic infections, predominantly peridontitis (51.5%) followed by caries (18.6%) and irreversible pulpitis (9.3%). Teeth in the right lower quadrant of the mouth were most frequently excised in both sexes. Predominant isolates were: β-haemolytic Streptococci (34%), ...

  15. Odontogenic Orbital Cellulitis Causing Blindness: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blindness secondary to odontogenic orbital cellulitis is a rarity. We report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with facial swelling and orbital pain. Examination revealed right orbital purulent discharge, nil light perception in the right eye and the presence of a grossly carious ipsilateral maxillary molar. Investigations ...

  16. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst: A Report of Three Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen González Galván

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT until Wright (1981 defined it as a different entity. Surgery is the usual treatment, and recurrence or association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been described. In this report, we presented three cases of this pathology, and we review the principal clinical, histological, radiological, and therapeutic aspects. Case 1. A 73-year-old female presents with a slight swelling on the right mandible, associated with an unilocular well-defined radiolucent lesion. Case 2. A 27-year-old female presents with a painful mandibular swelling associated with an unilocular radiolucent lesion posterior to the 4.8. Case 3. A 61-year-old male was casually detected presents with an unilocular radiolucent lesion distal to the 4.8. Conclusion. The OOC is a specific odontogenic clinicopathological entity that should be differentiated from the KCOT as it presents a completely different biological behaviour.

  17. Clinical efficacy of ampicillin in treatment of acute odontogenic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević Stevo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antibiotics choice and the duration of their application in the therapy of acute odontogenic abscess is considered to be controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of ampicillin in treatment of acute odontogenic abscess and to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolated bacteria in early phase of abscess development. Methods. This study included 60 patients with acute odontogenic abscess who were surgically treated (extraction of teeth and/or abscess incision divided into two groups, ampicillin group and surgical group (without antibiotic treatment. Results. In the ampicillin group of patients treatment lasted on the average 4.67 days, while in the surgical group 6.17 days. A total of 78 bacterial strains were isolated from 60 patients. The most often bacteria were found to be Gram-positive facultative anaerobs (68/78. The most common bacteria isolated were Viridans streptococci (43/78. Susceptibility of isolated bacteria to ampicillin were 70.5%. Conclusion. Peroral use of ampicillin, after surgical treatment in an early phase of dentoalveolar abscess development, statistically significantly reduced the time of clinical symptoms of acute odontogenic abscess in comparison to surgical treatment only. The isolated bacterial strains in an early phase of dentoalveolar abscess development showed a high sensitivity to ampicillin.

  18. Factors associated with hospitalization of children with acute odontogenic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klačar Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the sociodemographic and clinical features of odontogenic infections between hospitalized and nonhospitalized children and to show what were the risk factors in children that could predict the course of odontogenic infection and indicate the need for hospital treatment. The design of our study was of the case-control type. The two study groups consisted of 70 inpatients and 35 outpatients with odontogenic infections who were treated at Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Clinical Center in Kragujevac, Serbia. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected retrospectively from patients' hospital records. The following characteristics were significantly associated with hospital treatment of children with acute odontogenic infection: living in a village (OR =7.26,[1.43-36.96], multi-spatial infection (OR =0.04, [0.00-0.91], and affection of upper face (OR = 0.01, [0.00-0.86]. Tooth extraction was important intervention in the treatment regimen and reduced frequency of hospitalization (OR=0.07, [0.01-0.70]. The differences between hospitalized and non-hospitalized children were not significant in regard to: ethnicity, employment of parents, anatomical region of infection, side of the facial infection, source of infection (posterior or anterior deciduous or permanent teeth, and treatment (drainage and incision, oral or parenteral antibiotics. In children with acute odontogenic infection it is necessary to do tooth extraction in timely manner, especially if the source of infection is tooth from upper jaw and if it is multi-spatial infection.

  19. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Renshyan [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chu Leeshing [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yen Sanhui [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang Chenpei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chou Kuoliang [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wu Liangchi [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chang Chiwei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lui Muntain [Dept. of Dentistry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen Kuangy [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh Shinhwa [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-10-01

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. {sup 18}F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that {sup 18}F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  20. Extension of Pindborg tumor to the maxillary sinus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtasham, Nooshin; Habibi, Ataollah; Jafarzadeh, Hamid; Amirchaghmaghi, Maryam

    2008-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a benign epithelial odontogenic lesion that accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is most frequently seen in the posterior areas of the mandible. Extension of this lesion to the maxillary sinus is extremely rare. In this paper, we report the fourth of such cases which has been reported, up to now. This tumor was encased between the right maxillary lateral and canine roots with extension to the maxillary sinus. Histologically, the tumor is composed of sheets of epithelial cells with eosinophilic or clear cytoplasm, intercellular bridges, nuclear pleomorphism, but no mitotic figures, amorphous eosinophilic and calcified materials were seen within the sheets of epithelial cells.

  1. A radiologic study of differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chei Karp Shik [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to obtain some information for the radiographic differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma in the mandible. The author compared and analysed the clinico-radiographic features of 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst and 32 cases of unicystic ameloblastoma. The following results obtained; 1. Odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma occurred the most frequently in the 2nd and 3rd decades, and both lesions occurred with slight predilection in males. The most frequent lesional site was molar area in odontogenic keratocyst (50.0%) and mandibular angle and ramus area in unicystic ameloblastoma (71.9%). 2. Cortical thinning and expansion were observed with similar occurrences in odontogenic keratocyst (77.1%) and in unicystic ameloblastoma (72.9%). 3. Typical undulating lesional border was observed more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (79.2%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (46.9%). 4. Well-defined lesional outline occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (97.9%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (53.1%). 5. Root resorption of adjacent teeth occurred more frequently in unicystic ameloblastoma (65.2%) than in odontogenic keratocyst (18.8%) respectively, but loss of lamina dura was frequently observed in odontogenic keratocyst (79.2%). And tooth displacement occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (50.0%) than in umicystic ameloblastoma (17.4%). 6. Displacement of mandibular canal occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (75.0%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (61.5%). 7. Inhomogeneous lesional radiolucency occurred more frequently in unicystic ameloblastoma (53.1%) than in odontogenic keratocyst (39.6%).

  2. Immunohistochemical Expression of PCNA in Epithelial Linings of Selected Odontogenic Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahela, Tanveer; Aesha, Syeda; Ranganathan, Kannan; T, Rooban; Roa K, Uma Devi; Joshua, Elizabeth; Ahmed, Afroz Syed; Chittamsetty, Harika

    2013-11-01

    Though odontogenic lesions have in common origin from the primitive odontogenic epithelium , there is a diversity in their initiation behavior and growth. The aggressive nature of odontogenic keratocyst similar to ameloblastoma in comparision with the other common odontogenic (dentigerous and radicular) cyst could be due to possible differences in their epithelial linings. PCNA (Proliferating cell nuclear antigen) is a cell cycle related antigen, used in the study of cell kinetics of these epithelial linings, to corelate the biological behaviour among these common odontogenic lesions. This paper has intended to study the cell kinetics of 4 selected odontogenic lesions (dentigerous cyst, radicular cyst,odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma) to demonstrate differences in their epithelial linings. Sixty samples of paraffin embedded tissue specimens (archival tissues) were included (15 radicularcysts, 15 odontogenic keratocysts; 15 dentigerous cysts and15 Ameloblastoma. Among cyst OKC had higher values than DC and RC. When staining results of all the cyst were compared individually with ameloblastoma ,the staining results of OKC was similar to ameloblastoma ,and ameloblastoma presented higher values than OKC (p=0.000). The results of this study show 1) Though OKC and DC are developmental in origin and radicular cyst is inflammatory, OKC has intrinsic growth potential among these cyst 2). Ameloblastoma has similar proliferative potential as OKC and hence it has been reinforced as KCOT(Keratocystic odontogenic tumour) in the recent classification.

  3. Bone and cementum as stromal features in Pindborg tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, P J

    1991-02-01

    A case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) occurring in the left mandible of a 50-yr-old man was characterized by the presence of large masses of calcified collagen. Calcified amyloid acted as the nucleus for the deposition of this material. Because of the close association between both types of calcified material, it is presumed that the calcified amyloid is an inductive stimulus for the stromal cells to differentiate towards production of a collagenous matrix destined to calcify and resembling cementum. The stromal component of CEOT thus seems to be just as odontogenic as the epithelium is.

  4. A huge glandular odontogenic cyst occurring at posterior mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    The glandular odontogenic cyst is a rare lesion described in 1987. It generally occurs at anterior region of mandible in adults over the age of 40 and has a slight tendency to recur. Histopathologically, a cystic cavity lined by a nonkeratinized, stratified squamous, or cuboidal epithelium varying in thickness is found including a superficial layer with glandular or pseudoglandular structures. A 21-year-old male visited Dankook University Dental Hospital with a chief complaint of swelling of the left posterior mandible. Radiographically, a huge multilocular radiolucent lesion involving impacted 3rd molar at the posterior mandible was observed. Buccolingual cortical expansion with partial perforation of buccal cortical bone was also shown. Histopathologically, this lesion was lined by stratified squamous epithelium with glandular structures in areas of plaque-like thickening. The final diagnosis was made as a glandular odontogenic cyst.

  5. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst: The Value of Intraepithelial Hemosiderin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdullGaffar, Badr; Koilelat, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a relatively rare but well-described clinicopathologic entity. Its rarity and unpredictable clinical behavior are challenging to managing clinicians. Its variable and overlapping histomorphologic features are also diagnostically challenging for pathologists. Other odontogenic cysts and oral cystic neoplasms can simulate GOC. There are specific histologic criteria that help distinguish GOC from other mimickers. To our knowledge, the phenomenon of hemosiderin pigments deposition within the lining glandular epithelium of GOC has not been covered in detail or specifically reported so far in the literature. We report a case of nontraumatized anterior mandibular GOC in a middle-aged male, which histologically showed hemosiderin pigments within the lining epithelium without stromal siderophages. This finding might reflect a nonspecific spontaneous intraluminal hemorrhage. However, intraepithelial hemosiderin in GOC may be an additional helpful diagnostic clue of GOC in challenging cases since this phenomenon has not been reported in other mimicker cystic lesions.

  6. Recurrent Pindborg tumor of the maxilla: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somayaji, Gangadhara; Rajeshwary, Aroor; Ramesh, Sullia; Dinesh, Sullia

    2013-02-01

    We report a case of recurrent Pindborg tumor (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor) of the maxilla. The patient was a 34-year-old woman who had been previously diagnosed with Pindborg tumor and treated with curettage. She was subsequently referred to us for evaluation of nasal obstruction. Examination revealed the presence of a mass lesion in the right nasal cavity and right maxilla, which was identified as a recurrence of her earlier Pindborg tumor. The patient was treated with maxillectomy with orbital preservation. Pindborg tumor is a rare odontogenic tumor; when it does occur, it is more often seen in the mandible than in the maxilla. While this tumor is often treated with curettage alone, the aggressive nature of the recurrence in our patient necessitated radical surgery. We report this case to highlight the need to be suitably aggressive in treating these types of tumors in order to avoid recurrence.

  7. Frequency of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid sinus and response to surgical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Crovetto Martínez, Rafael; Martin Arregui, Francisco Javier; Zabala López de Maturana, Aitor; Tudela Cabello, Kiara; Crovetto de la Torre, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Odontogenic sinusitis usually affects the maxillary sinus but may extend to the anterior ethmoid sinuses. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid sinuses and determine also the surgical resolution differences between odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and odontogenic maxillary associated to anterior ethmoidal sinusitis. Study Design: This is a retrospective cohort study performed on 55 patients diagn...

  8. Odontogenic keratocyst with dystrophic calcifications in the maxilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Young; Huh, Kyung Hoe [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) with secondary inflammation involving the maxillary sinus was presented. Radiological diagnosis of this case was made based on the various findings from the cone-beam computed tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. There were calcified materials and impacted tooth within the lumen of the lesion, which is not uncommon in OKC. Histopathologic findings confirmed this lesion as OKC with secondary inflammation.

  9. Odontogenic sinusitis: an ancient but under-appreciated cause of maxillary sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nimish A; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2012-02-01

    For well over 100 years, it has been appreciated that maxillary dental infections can cause sinusitis. This insight has been largely overlooked with the advent of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) and its emphasis on the osteomeatal complex. We review several recent case series and reviews of odontogenic sinusitis that characterize and discuss emerging diagnostic modalities in odontogenic sinusitis. In recent publications on odontogenic sinusitis, up to 40% of chronic bacterial maxillary sinus infections are attributed to a dental source, which is far higher than the previously reported incidence of 10%. Plain dental films and dental evaluations frequently fail to detect maxillary dental infection that can be causing odontogenic sinusitis. However, sinus computed tomography (CT) or Cone Beam Volumetric CT (CBVCT) are far more successful in identifying dental disease causing sinusitis. The microbial pathogens of odontogenic sinusitis remain unchanged from earlier reviews; however, the clinical findings in odontogenic sinusitis are better described in recent reviews. Successful treatment of odontogenic sinusitis requires management of the odontogenic source and may require concomitant or subsequent sinus surgery. Odontogenic sinusitis is frequently recalcitrant to medical therapy and usually requires treatment of the dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent ESS is required. Evaluation of all patients with persistent chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) should include inspection of the maxillary teeth on CT scan for evidence of periapical lucencies. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is especially characteristic of odontogenic sinusitis. High-resolution CT scans and CBVCT can assist in identifying dental disease.

  10. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour) in the mandible of a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M-S; Park, M-S; Kwon, S-W; Ma, S-A; Cho, D-Y; Kim, D-Y; Kim, Y

    2006-01-01

    A 13-year-old male tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) had a marked mandibular swelling noticed 12 months earlier and associated with progressive anorexia and weight loss. Radiological and post-mortem examination revealed a mass (13x15 cm) which was firm and poorly defined, with destruction of the adjacent bone tissue. Histologically, the mass was poorly demarcated, with infiltrative growth, and composed of nests, cords and islands of epithelial cells with characteristic basal cell features. Also observed were extensive squamous metaplasia, ghost cells, stellate reticulum, and fibroblastic connective tissue stroma containing inflammatory cells. A prominent feature of this tumour consisted of abundant nodular deposits of congophilic amyloid-like material with partial mineralization (Liesegang rings). Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells and the amyloid-like material were positive for pancytokeratin and negative for vimentin. The findings supported the diagnosis of an amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (APOT), also known as calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour in man and animals.

  11. Microbial flora of odontogenic abscesses in pet guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minarikova, A; Hauptman, K; Knotek, Z; Jekl, V

    2016-10-01

    Abscesses of odontogenic origin in guinea pigs pose a serious health problem and need to be treated with a combination of surgical and medical therapy. The aim of this prospective study was to describe the microbial flora of odontogenic abscesses associated with osteomyelitis in 24 pet guinea pigs, to perform antibiotic sensitivity testing, and to make recommendations for practitioners on the antibiotics of first choice. Inclusion criteria for the study included the animal being diagnosed with an odontogenic abscess which underwent surgery and was not pre-treated with an antibiotic. Inclusion criteria matched for 24 guinea pigs. Samples (pus, capsule and affected tooth/bone) for bacteriological examination were collected under sterile conditions during the surgical procedure. The most commonly isolated bacteria from abscesses of odontogenic origin were Bacteroides fragilis in 12.8 per cent (6/47) of cases, Pasteurella multocida in 10.6 per cent (5/47) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius in 8.5 per cent (4/47). Aerobic bacterial species only were isolated in 29.2 per cent (7/24) of cases, anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 33.3 per cent (8/24), and mixed infection with anaerobic and aerobic bacterial species was seen in 37.5 per cent (9/24). Aerobes (n=20) were sensitive to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in 100 per cent of samples, benzylpenicillin potassium (penicillin G, PNCG) in 90 per cent, cephalotin in 85 per cent, amoxicillin-clavulanate in 75 per cent, doxycycline in 70 per cent, gentamicin in 65 per cent and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 55 per cent. Anaerobes (n=27) were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate in 100 per cent of cases, clindamycin in 96.3 per cent, metronidazole in 92.6 per cent, PNCG in 92.6 per cent and cephalotin in 74.1 per cent. As guinea pigs are strictly herbivorous animals, based on the results of this study the recommended antibiotic treatment for odontogenic abscesses is a combination of fluoroquinolones and metronidazole

  12. Report of a Rare Case of an Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Report of a Rare Case of an Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla and Review of Literature. SM Manjunath, AA Gupta, P Swetha, NJ Moon, S Singh, A Singh. Abstract. Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a mesenchymal tissue benign neoplasia, being relatively rare which is almost exclusively seen in tooth‑bearing areas.

  13. Implant-based rehabilitation of a large mandibular odontogenic keratocyst with 7-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janardan B Garde

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst is a unique cyst because of its locally aggressive behavior, high recurrence rate, and characteristic histological appearance. In this case report we present a 25-year-old male patient with a large odontogenic keratocyst and treatment with enucleation and chemical cauterization followed by dental implants with a 7-year follow-up.

  14. CALCIFYING ODONTOGENIC CYST:AN ANALYSIS OF THIRTY-SIX CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eshghyar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The term calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC was first introduced by Gorlin in 1962. COC occurs mainly as an intra-osseous lesion in mandible or maxilla but the peripheral variation of COC has also been reported. The confusion about COC nature as cyst or tumor has not been resolved and a vast diversity has been shown in clinicopathologic aspects of COC. The purpose of this study was the review and analysis of COC variables such as age, gender and location and reclassification of histopathologic features of cases. The study was a retrospective review, cross sectional and case series one. The records of 36 patients were obtained and the clinical characteristics such as age, gender and location of COC were registered. The histopathologic features of cases were reviewed and reclassified. The data showed that 38.3% of cases occurred in the fifth decade and beyond; 67.6% were in males and 32.4% in females. Considering location, 51.5% of COCs were found in mandible and 48.5% in maxilla; 65.6% were located in posterior part of jaws. Of the 36 cases diagnosed as COC, 32 (88.8% had cystic features and 4 (11.11% were tumoral. For better determination of histopathologic and biologic features of COC, more investigations are needed.

  15. Peripheral Odontogenic Fibroma in a Taiwan Chinese Population: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Tzu Lin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective analysis of 25 cases of peripheral odontogenic fibroma (World Health Organization-type (PODF [WHO-type] in a Taiwan Chinese population was performed at a single institution. The clinical findings, which included a wide age distribution, a female preponderance and no racial predilection, were consistent with those of previous case series reports; however, a slight preference for location in the maxilla was found in the current case series. It is noteworthy that one particularly sizable lesion was identified in a 30-year-old Chinese female who presented with a swollen mass in the right mandible that had been present for about 2 years. Intraoral examination revealed an exophytic firm mass that measured 4.5 × 4 cm, located over the right mandibular edentulous ridge from the second premolar to the second molar area. Both panoramic radiography and computerized tomography revealed multiple radiopacities within the tumor. In conclusion, the analysis of clinical data in the current case series of PODFs (WHO-type occurring in Taiwan Chinese mostly corroborates other reports; however, an unusually large mandible lesion was noted, indicative of the apparent size that such tumors can reach unless they are surgically removed at an early stage.

  16. Guided bone regeneration following surgical treatment of a rare variant of Pindborg tumor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Ronaldo C; Oliveira, Marina R; Silva, Amanda C; Ferreira, Delano H; Almeida, Oslei P

    2014-03-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a benign neoplasm, but its local destructive potential may lead to the formation of major bone defects. Microscopically, there are some histological variants. Among them, we highlight the clear cell variant due to its more aggressive behavior and a higher incidence of relapse. In this context, it is pertinent to describe the clear cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. Despite the large bone defect formed in the posterior region of the mandible, conservative treatment associated with guided bone regeneration assured complete bone formation and the absence of recurrence in an 8-year follow-up period.

  17. Er:YAG Laser Assisted Treatment of Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Silva Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central odontogenic fibroma is a very rare benign odontogenic tumour characterized by a fibrous mature stroma with variable strands or islands of inactive-looking odontogenic epithelium. Our aim is to report a case of a central odontogenic fibroma and describe the clinical usefulness of Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of this tumour. A 74-year-old woman presented with an expansive lesion located in a mandible with multilocular and mixed radiographic appearance. A conservative excision using Er:YAG laser was performed. Complete removal was obtained. There were no postoperative complications. The histopatologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of central odontogenic fibroma of rich-epithelium type. No recurrence was observed during follow-up.

  18. Oral non-squamous malignant tumors; diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Rutger; van der Waal, Isaäc

    2007-11-01

    Some 90% of oral cancers consist of squamous cell carcinomas that arise from the oral mucosa. The remaining 10% of malignancies consist of malignant melanomas, carcinomas of the intraoral salivary glands, sarcomas of the soft tissues and the bones, malignant odontogenic tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and metastases from primary tumors located elsewhere in the body. These malignancies will be briefly reviewed and discussed. The emphasis is on diagnosis and management.

  19. Incidental ameloblastoma diagnosed after treatment for childhood tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Indini, MD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic neoplasm accounting for 1% of all tumors of the jaws. It is rarely diagnosed in pediatric and adolescent age. Cancer treatment is a well-known risk factor for the onset of secondary malignancies among childhood cancer survivors, but any link between ameloblastoma and prior cancer treatments has yet to be explored. Here we report on two cases of ameloblastoma diagnosed in patients previously treated for tumors in pediatric age.

  20. Resultado postnatal de fetos con malformación adenomatoide quística pulmonar en la unidad maternofetal Clínica Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Chaparro Camacho, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    Introducción La Malformación Adenomatoide Quística Pulmonar es una patología que se desarrolla durante estadíos tempranos de desarrollo embriológico y su pronóstico depende del tamaño de la lesión pulmonar. Existen muy pocos estudios que caractericen esta patología, ninguno en nuestro país. Metodología Se realizó una serie de casos para describir el resultado postnatal de los casos registrados en la Clínica Colombia entre 2005 hasta 2013. Resultados: Se incluyeron un total de 20 casos. La ...

  1. Frequency of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid sinus and response to surgical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovetto-Martínez, Rafael; Martin-Arregui, Francisco J.; Zabala-López-de-Maturana, Aitor; Tudela-Cabello, Kiara

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Odontogenic sinusitis usually affects the maxillary sinus but may extend to the anterior ethmoid sinuses. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid sinuses and determine also the surgical resolution differences between odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and odontogenic maxillary associated to anterior ethmoidal sinusitis. Study Design: This is a retrospective cohort study performed on 55 patients diagnosed of odontogenic sinusitis and treated surgically by functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Results: This study showed that 52.7% of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis spreads to anterior ethmoid, causing added anterior ethmoid sinusitis. We found that 92.3% of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis (who underwent middle meatal antrostomy) and 96.5% of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid (treated with middle meatal antrostomy and anterior ethmoidectomy) were cured. Conclusions: Ethmoid involvement is frequent in maxillary odontogenic sinusitis. The ethmoid involvement does not worsen the results of “functional endoscopic sinus surgery” applied to the odontogenic sinusitis. Key words:Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, ethmoiditis, functional endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:24608208

  2. Management of odontogenic infection of pulpal and periodontal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Píriz, Roberto; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Giménez, Maria José

    2007-03-01

    The dental biofilm is a complex bacterial ecosystem that undergoes evolution, maturing and development, and thus leads to odontogenic infection. The infection is normally located in the tissues of the dental organ itself, and follows a chronic course of evolution. However, bacterial pathogens express virulence factors in the biofilm, and this together with changes in host immunity, may cause clinical exacerbations and spread of infection to other areas of the body. Odontogenic infection management should take into consideration the fact that therapeutic success lies in the control of the infectious aetiologic agent, using mechanical-surgical debridement and/or antimicrobial therapy. Debridement techniques have a fundamentally quantitative effect (by reducing the size of the inoculum) and therefore if these techniques are used alone to control infection, despite an initial clinical improvement that is sometimes prematurely considered as therapeutic success, odontopathogens may persist and the process may recur or become chronic. Microbiological examination may be helpful in defining therapeutic success in a more reliable way, it could define the prognosis of recurrence more precisely, and could enable the most appropriate antibiotic to be selected, thus increasing therapeutic efficacy. Antimicrobial therapy brings about a quantitative and qualitative change in the bacterial composition of the biofilm, in addition to being able to act on sites that are inaccessible through mechanical debridement. However, incorrect antimicrobial use can lead to a selection of resistant bacterial species in the biofilm, in addition to side effects and ecological alterations in the host. In order to minimise this risk, and obtain maximum antimicrobial effect, we need to know in which clinical situations their use is indicated, and the efficacy of different antibiotics with regard to bacteria isolated in odontogenic infection.

  3. Chronic cheek ulcer caused by odontogenic cutaneous sinus tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Sato

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts are often misdiagnosed, and they lead to facial wounds and scarring. Therefore, we must be aware of the possibility of this condition. A dental origin must be considered for chronic ulcers involving the cheek, chin and submental areas. The clinical course of this patient suggests two important clinical issues for prompt diagnosis. First, physical examination, including palpation and probing, are helpful for exploration of sinus tracts. Second, computed tomography is useful to detect the sinus tract and affected teeth. Computed tomography provides radiographic evidence of the relationship between the tooth and cutaneous region, and it may be superior to radiography.

  4. [Lymphotropic therapy for acute purulent odontogenic jaw periostitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭborodin, I V; Lĭubarskiĭ, M S; Loĭko, E R; Sheplev, B V

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the gingival mucosa was studied by optic microscopy in patients with acute purulent odontogenic maxillary periostitis treated traditionally and receiving lymphotropic therapy. Lymphotropic administration of the antibiotic during 2 days resulted in less pronounced dilatation of the interstitial spaces and lymph vessels adjacent to the molars and higher counts of lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages. This indicated high efficiency of lymphotropic therapy of acute purulent maxillary periostitis for molars. Microcirculation parameters and tissue leukocyte cytogram in gingival mucosal tissue adjacent to the canines and premolars differed negligibly in patients treated by different methods.

  5. Bivalent Histone Codes on WNT5A during Odontogenic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Zheng, L; Li, F; Wan, M; Fan, Y; Zhou, X; Du, W; Pi, C; Cui, D; Zhang, B; Sun, J; Zhou, X

    2018-01-01

    Lineage-committed differentiation is an essential biological program during odontogenesis, which is tightly regulated by lineage-specific genes. Some of these genes are modified by colocalization of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 marks at promoter regions in progenitors. These modifications, named "bivalent domains," maintain genes in a poised state and then resolve for later activation or repression during differentiation. Wnt5a has been reported to promote odontogenic differentiation in dental mesenchyme. However, relatively little is known about the epigenetic modulations on Wnt5a activation during tooth development. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal patterns of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 marks in developing mouse molars. Associated H3K4me3 methylases (mixed-lineage leukemia [MLL] complex) and H3K27me3 demethylases (JMJD3 and UTX) were dynamically expressed between early and late bell stage of human tooth germs and in cultured human dental papilla cells (hDPCs) during odontogenic induction. Poised WNT5A gene was marked by bivalent domains containing repressive marks (H3K27me3) and active marks (H3K4me3) on promoters. The bivalent domains tended to resolve during inducted differentiation, with removal of the H3K27me3 mark in a JMJD3-dependent manner. When JMJD3 was knocked down in cultured hDPCs, odontogenic differentiation was suppressed. The depletion of JMJD3 epigenetically repressed WNT5A activation by increased H3K27me3 marks. In addition, JMJD3 could physically interact with ASH2L, a component of the MLL complex, to form a coactivator complex, cooperatively modulating H3K4me3 marks on WNT5A promoters. Overall, our study reveals that transcription activities of WNT5A were epigenetically regulated by the negotiated balance between H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 marks and tightly mediated by JMJD3 and MLL coactivator complex, ultimately modulating odontogenic commitment during dental mesenchymal cell differentiation.

  6. Mixoma odontogénico, un reto para el diagnóstico Odontogenic myxoma, a challenge to diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Dolores Miranda Tarragó

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un paciente masculino, de 41 años de edad, piel blanca, con hábitos de fumar e ingerir bebidas alcohólicas que al examen físico manifiesta lesión tumoral de 3,3 cm. de diámetro, con aspecto de roseta, ocupando el área desdentada de reborde alveolar inferior derecho correspondiente a primer y segundo molares. En la radiografía panorámica se observó área radiolúcida multilocular que respeta el borde de la mandíbula, con una cortical irregular en algunas áreas. El diagnóstico histopatológico utilizando la coloración de hematoxilina y eosina fue de mixoma odontogénico. El paciente fue tratado quirúrgicamente y se confirmó el diagnóstico utilizando la coloración de azul alciano, que fue positiva. El mixoma odontogénico por ser un tumor que no tiene características clínicas ni radiográficas patognomónicas, síntomas imprecisos, comportamiento agresivo local y recidivas frecuentes debe ser siempre tenido en cuenta en los diagnósticos diferenciales de los tumores del maxilar y la mandíbula.The case of a 41-year-old male white patient who smokes and drinks alcoholic beverages and that on the physical examination manifests a rosette-like tumoral lesion of 3.3 cm of diameter that ocuppies the edentulous area of the inferior right alveolar crest of the mandible corresponding to the first and second molars is presented. In the panoramic radiography, it was observed a radiolucid multiocular area that respects the border of the mandible with an irregular cortical in some areas. An odontogenic myxoma was histopathologically diagnosed by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. The patient was surgically treated and the diagnosis was confirmed by alcian blue staining, which yielded positive. As the odontogenic myxoma is a tumor with neither clinical nor pathognomic radiographic characteristics, inaccurate symptoms, local aggresive behavior and frequent relapses, it should always be taken into account in the differential

  7. Atypical odontalgia misdiagnosed as odontogenic pain: a case report and discussion of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, J P; Law, A S

    1997-05-01

    Atypical odontalgia is characterized by prolonged periods of throbbing or burning pain in the teeth or alveolar process, which occurs in the absence of any identifiable odontogenic etiology. The pain may be bilateral and change in location. This article presents two cases of atypical odontalgia that were misdiagnosed and initially treated as pain of odontogenic origin. A therapeutic regimen of tricyclic antidepressants alleviated the pain in one patient and was unsuccessful in the second. These two cases demonstrate the importance of having a thorough knowledge of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic causes of orofacial pain as well as the need for careful diagnosis before undertaking any treatment.

  8. Conservation of early odontogenic signaling pathways in Aves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YiPing; Zhang, Yanding; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Barlow, Amanda J.; St. Amand, Tara R.; Hu, Yueping; Heaney, Shaun; Francis-West, Philippa; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Maas, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Teeth have been missing from birds (Aves) for at least 60 million years. However, in the chick oral cavity a rudiment forms that resembles the lamina stage of the mammalian molar tooth germ. We have addressed the molecular basis for this secondary loss of tooth formation in Aves by analyzing in chick embryos the status of molecular pathways known to regulate mouse tooth development. Similar to the mouse dental lamina, expression of Fgf8, Pitx2, Barx1, and Pax9 defines a potential chick odontogenic region. However, the expression of three molecules involved in tooth initiation, Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2, are absent from the presumptive chick dental lamina. In chick mandibles, exogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) induces Msx expression and together with fibroblast growth factor promotes the development of Sonic hedgehog expressing epithelial structures. Distinct epithelial appendages also were induced when chick mandibular epithelium was recombined with a tissue source of BMPs and fibroblast growth factors, chick skin mesenchyme. These results show that, although latent, the early signaling pathways involved in odontogenesis remain inducible in Aves and suggest that loss of odontogenic Bmp4 expression may be responsible for the early arrest of tooth development in living birds. PMID:10954731

  9. [Management of odontogenic infections in Primary Care: Antibiotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles Raya, Purificación; Javierre Miranda, Ana Pilar; Moreno Millán, Nemesio; Mas Casals, Ariadna; de Frutos Echániz, Elena; Morató Agustí, M Luisa

    2017-12-01

    Our aim is to contribute to the rational use of antibiotics prescribed by family doctors when a patient consults for a dental problem. Nowadays we should not ask which antibiotic to give. The question has to be if we need to prescribe antibiotics in front of the most common odontogenic infections seen in our practice. We review the main dental infections, which should be their appropriate management and the role of prevention. We need to know the complexity of the oral microbiome because it?ll depend on the appropriateness of the antibiotherapy, the evolution towards cure or progression of some odontogenic infections. The bacterial plaque, formed by the biofilm, behaves as a barrier to the action of antimicrobials. It?s in the prevention of its development as well as in it mechanical elimination once shaped, in what the family doctor should insist. We must transmit antibiotics don?t heal dental pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Odontogenic myxoma with diffuse calcifications: a case report and review of a rare histologic feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Huda M; Hasen, Yousef M; Odat, Abd-Albaset M; Mikdadi, Abeer M; Safadi, Rima A

    2016-10-01

    Calcifications have been rarely reported in odontogenic myxoma. We describe here an additional case and review all reported cases. A 45-year-old female patient presented with a gingival swelling around a mobile mandibular left second molar. Radiographic investigation revealed a large multilocular radiolucent lesion of the posterior mandible. Microscopic examination revealed an odontogenic myxoma with numerous newly formed trabeculae of bone or cementum-like material present throughout the specimen, reminiscent of those seen in fibro-osseous lesions of the jaws. After total excision, regular follow-up of the patient showed gradual healing of the surgical defect. To our knowledge, only a few documented cases of odontogenic myxoma with calcifications have been reported in the literature. This histopathologic finding is rare but should not lead to the misdiagnosis of a central odontogenic fibroma, cemento-ossifying fibroma, fibro-osseous lesion, or low-grade osteosarcoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differences in in vitro growth of epithelium from inflammatory and developmental odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, W J; Moore, J K; Main, D M

    1990-04-01

    Ninety-three odontogenic cysts, 42 of inflammatory and 51 of developmental origin, were grown in vitro from explants and/or cell suspensions. There was little difference in the success rate of culturing epithelium from explants of dentigerous cysts (N = 28) or odontogenic keratocysts (N = 23) (approximately 75% and 87%, respectively) and the dentigerous cyst grew particularly well from suspensions (N = 11) (91%) compared with the keratocyst (N = 19) (58%). Epithelium from developmental odontogenic cysts grew much better in vitro than did cysts of inflammatory origin (56 to 58% from explants and 19 to 25% from suspension). From this work there is little evidence to support previous statements that the dentigerous cyst cannot be grown from explants, or that the odontogenic keratocyst has 'aggressive' growth characteristics.

  12. Expression of odontogenic genes in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mashhadi Abbas, Fatemeh; Sichani Fallahi, Hamed; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Mahdavi, Nazanin; Bagheri, Seyedeh Sara

    2013-01-01

    .... A challenging problem in tooth regeneration is to find a proper clinically feasible cell to seed.This study was designed to investigate the odontogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs...

  13. Odontogenic cysts: A 40- year retrospective clinicopathological study in an Iranian population

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazi, Narges; Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Zare-Mahmoodabadi, Reza; Hosseinpour, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    We present a 40-year retrospective study of 1189 patients with odontogenic cysts (OCs) that were diagnosed from 1971 to 2011 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mashhad, Iran. In contrast to most of previous studies that have been reported inflammatory OCs as the most common type, in the current study, among cystic lesions of the jaws most were developmental in origin (62.30%). The most commonly diagnosed inflammatory and developmental odontogenic cyst...

  14. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico Temporomandibular joint replacement because of odontogenic keratocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice que tienen dos picos de incidencia entre la segunda y tercera década de vida y entre los 50 y 60 años de edad, con una ligera predilección por el sexo masculino. Aparece más frecuentemente en la región del tercer molar de la mandíbula con extensión a la rama ascendente El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo mostrar el caso de un paciente masculino de 57 años de edad en el que fue necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a un queratoquiste odontogénico que involucraba la totalidad de la rama mandibular derecha, incluyendo el proceso condíleo y coronoideo, así como el ángulo hasta el tercio posterior del cuerpo mandibular. Tras un año de realizada la intervención quirúrgica la evolución del paciente fue satisfactoria.Temporomandibular joint replacement is required in a variety of conditions. Among the most frequent are ankylosis, osteoarthrosis, advanced stages of the temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome, post-traumatic joint damage, and neoplastic or tumoral processes. Odontogenic keratocysts, which are classified as developmental odontogenic cysts for study purposes, constitute 7-10 per cent of all maxillomandibular cysts. Two peaks have been identified in their incidence: between the second and third decades of life, and between 50 and 60 years of age, with a slight predominance of the male sex. They are most common in the third molar area of the mandibule, with expansion to the ascending branch. A case is

  15. Criteria for admission of odontogenic infections at high risk of deep neck space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, N; Cloutier, L; Khaldoun, E; Bois, E; Chirat, M; Salvan, D

    2015-11-01

    Many patients with odontogenic infections are hospitalised because of the risk of deep neck space infection. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors allowing more reliable selection of patients requiring hospitalisation for both specialists and emergency physicians. This retrospective study was based on a cohort of 97 patients hospitalised for odontogenic infection in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery of Centre hospitalier Sud Francilien, Île-de-France, from January 2008 to June 2012. The majority of patients presented with dental abscess (66 patients; 68%). Nineteen patients (20%) presented with deep neck space infection. The frequency of deep neck space infection was significantly higher in patients with mandibular odontogenic infection (16/55 patients (29%) than in those with maxillary odontogenic infection (3/42 (7%); P ≤ 0.009). The incidence of deep neck space infection was significantly higher in patients with dental abscess (17/66, (26%) than in those without dental abscess (2/31 (6%); P ≤ 0.03). In addition to the well-known classical criteria (fever, neck swelling, dyspnoea, dysphagia, trismus, leukocytosis, elevated C reactive protein (CRP)), the criteria for admission for odontogenic infection should include mandibular odontogenic infection and/or the presence of dental abscess. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açikgöz, Aydan; Uzun-Bulut, Emel; Özden, Bora; Gündüz, Kaan

    2012-01-01

    To determine the relative frequency and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a large Turkish population. A retrospective survey of jaw cysts was undertaken at the Oral Diagnosis and Radiology and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Ondokuz Mayis University Dental School, Samsun, Turkey. Data were retrieved from clinical files, imaging, and histopathology reports from 2000 to 2008; a total of 12,350 patients were included. In each case, we analyzed age, gender, type and number of cysts, and cyst location. Imaging patterns and pathologies associated with cystic lesions were also determined. The prevalence of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts was 3.51%; males were affected more frequently than females. There were 452 odontogenic cysts (98.5%) and seven nonodontogenic cysts (1.5%). The most frequent odontogenic cyst was radicular (54.7%), followed by dentigerous (26.6%), residual (13.7%), odontogenic keratocyst (3.3%), and lateral periodontal cyst (0.2%). Nasopalatine duct cyst (1.5%) was the only nonodontogenic cyst. By age, cysts peaked in the third decade (24.2%). Concerning location, no statistically significant difference was found between the maxilla and mandible (p>0.05). The most frequent radiological feature of these lesions was unilocular cyst (93.7%). Pathologies associated with cystic lesions occurred in 14.7%. The prevalence of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts were lower than that reported in many other studies. In our study population, cysts were mainly inflammatory in origin.

  17. Odontogenic Keratocyst Looks Can Be Deceptive, Causing Endodontic Misdiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Veena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is the cyst arising from the cell rests of dental lamina. It can occur anywhere in the jaw, but commonly seen in the posterior part of the mandible. Radiographically, most OKCs are unilocular when presented at the periapex and can be mistaken for radicular or lateral periodontal cyst. When the cyst is multilocular and located at the molar ramus area, it may be confused to ameloblastoma. Lots of cases have been reported in the literature where OKC is associated with the nonvital tooth. So trauma could be one of the reasons in inducing this cyst. In our case, it was in the anterior region at the periapex of nonvital tooth having traumatic occlusion. Hence, the diagnosis of radicular cyst was made and endodontic treatment was done.

  18. Clinicopathological evaluation of 164 dental follicles and dentigerous cysts with emphasis on the presence of odontogenic epithelium in the connective tissue. The hypothesis of "focal ameloblastoma"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meleti, M.; van der Waal, I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Some ameloblastomas presumably originate from odontogenic epithelium within the connective tissue of dental follicles and dentigerous cysts. Therefore, it would seem reasonable to discuss as whether odontogenic epithelium proliferations, frankly displaying ameloblastomatous features

  19. Cases report of ossifying fibroma showing various radiographic appearances in posterior mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Do; Oh, Seung Hwan [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Eulji University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Common radiographic appearances of ossifying fibroma (OF) are well demarcated margin, radiolucent or mixed lesion. Lesions for the radiographic differential diagnosis with OF include fibrous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. Other confusing lesions might be the mixed lesions such as calcifying odontogenic cyst, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, and benign cementoblastoma. We reported three cases of OF in posterior mandible. These cases showed a little distinguished radiographic features of OF and diagnosed from a combination of clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic information. We need to further refine radiographic and histopathological features of OF and other confusing lesions with literatures review because some cases of these lesions are not easily differentiated radiographically and histopathologically.

  20. Demographic distribution of odontogenic cysts in Isfahan (Iran) over a 23-year period (1988-2010)

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    Khosravi, Negin; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Kowkabi, Mahsa; Navabi, Amir Arsalan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic cysts are relatively common lesions which can cause different complications. As demographic information is lacking in Iran and specially in Isfahan, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts according to age, gender and affected area among patients referring to the Oral Pathology Department of the Dental School of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran) over a 23-year period. Materials and Methods: A total of 7412 diagnosed lesions recorded in the Oral Pathology Department archives of Isfahan Dental School between 1988 and 2010 were reevaluated, then odontogenic cysts were separated through reviewing microscopic slides according to the 2005 World Health Organization classification and variables such as age, gender, the infected jaw, and its specific region were obtained by SPSS Version 16.0 from the recorded database. Results: 21.62% of the lesions were odontogenic cysts, of which 48.72% were inflammatory and 51.28% were developmental cysts. These cysts were more common in the mandible. The mean age of patients was 29.53 ± 16.1. Male to female ratio was 1.31:1. The four most frequent odontogenic cysts were radicular cysts (35.12%), dentigerous cysts (25.77%), odontogenic keratocysts (22.58%) and residual cysts (12.98%). Conclusion: Odontogenic cysts are fairly frequent jaw lesions (21.62%), of which radicular cyst was the most common cyst. The four most common lesions constituted a sum of 96.45% of the total. In general, the prevalence rates in our study are similar to the studies from other geographic parts of the world but with a lower incidence of inflammatory cysts, higher prevalence of dentigerous cysts and residual cysts and also mandibular predominance for residual cysts. PMID:23946730

  1. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a Turkish Population

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    Uzun-Bulut, Emel; Özden, Bora; Gündüz, Kaan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative frequency and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a large Turkish population. Study Design A retrospective survey of jaw cysts was undertaken at the Oral Diagnosis and Radiology and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Ondokuz Mayıs University Dental School, Samsun, Turkey. Data were retrieved from clinical files, imaging, and histopathology reports from 2000 to 2008; a total of 12,350 patients were included. In each case, we analyzed age, gender, type and number of cysts, and cyst location. Imaging patterns and pathologies associated with cystic lesions were also determined. Results: The prevalence of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts was 3.51%; males were affected more frequently than females. There were 452 odontogenic cysts (98.5%) and seven nonodontogenic cysts (1.5%). The most frequent odontogenic cyst was radicular (54.7%), followed by dentigerous (26.6%), residual (13.7%), odontogenic keratocyst (3.3%), and lateral periodontal cyst (0.2%). Nasopalatine duct cyst (1.5%) was the only nonodontogenic cyst. By age, cysts peaked in the third decade (24.2%). Concerning location, no statistically significant difference was found between the maxilla and mandible (p>0.05). The most frequent radiological feature of these lesions was unilocular cyst (93.7%). Pathologies associated with cystic lesions occurred in 14.7%. Conclusion: The prevalence of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts were lower than that reported in many other studies. In our study population, cysts were mainly inflammatory in origin. Key words: Prevalence, odontogenic, nonodontogenic, cysts. PMID:21743428

  2. Pindborg tumor in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungari, Claudio; Poladas, Giulio; Giovannetti, Filippo; Carnevale, Cristina; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2006-03-01

    Pindborg tumor or calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm. The average age at diagnosis is 40 years without a significant prevalence for one sex. The most frequent localization is the mandibular premolar and molar area; less frequently the lesion is found in the maxilla, while other localizations like the maxillary sinus are extremely rare. Ethiology of this lesion is not clear. The complete surgical removal of the lesion is usually considered the most common type of treatment. The authors report a peculiar case of Pindborg tumor characterized by a rare localization of the lesion (maxillary incisal area) and by the young age of the patient (nine years old). The correct treatment in the case of a small mass is the surgical enucleation of the lesion. The purpose of the surgical treatment is the radical resection of the neoplasm with clean margins in order to reduce the risk of recurrence of disease. Recurrence of disease many years after surgical therapy has been reported that is why a clinical and instrumental long-term follow-up of the patient are suggested.

  3. Mixoma odontogênico maxilar: relato de caso clínico comprometendo seio maxilar Maxillary odontogenic myxoma involving the maxillary sinus: case report

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    Allan Ulisses Carvalho de Melo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é relatar um caso de mixoma odontogênico no lado direito da maxila com envolvimento do seio maxilar e fazer uma revisão de literatura envolvendo aspectos clínicos, radiográficos, histológicos e de tratamento desta patologia. O mixoma odontogênico dos maxilares é uma lesão benigna, sem preferência por sexo, raça ou localização, com características clínicas e radiográficas extremamente variadas, o que amplia demasiadamente o número de patologias tumorais do sistema estomatognático com as quais pode ser feito o diagnóstico diferencial.The aim of this paper is to report a case of odontogenic myxoma that affected the right maxilla and maxillary sinus. We have also reviewed the literature in regards of the clinical, radiographic, histological and treatment aspects of this pathology. Odontogenic myxomas of the maxillofacial region are benign lesions, without preference for gender, race or location, with extremely varied clinical and radiographic characteristics, thus increasing the number oral and maxillofacial region tumors with which we can make the differential diagnosis.

  4. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst - a clinicopathologic analysis of 116 reported cases

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    Bodner, L.; Manor, E.; Shear, M.; van der Waal, I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review the literature on primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) associated with odontogenic cyst. Methods: All well-documented cases of PIOSCC published between 1938 and 2010 were collected. Only cases of PIOSCC arising from the lining of an odontogenic cyst, including the

  5. Novel Association of Odontogenic Myxoma with Constitutional Chromosomal 1q21 Microduplication: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best-Rocha, Alejandro; Patel, Kalyani; Hicks, John; Edmonds, Joseph L; Paldino, Michael J; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare, benign, and locally aggressive tumor. It tends to occur in the posterior maxilla and mandible and is often associated with root resorption and perforation of cortex. Histopathologically, there is a proliferation of spindle, bipolar, and stellate cells, with bland nuclei within a myxoid to infrequently fibromyxoid extracellular matrix. Long, thin residual bony trabeculae are often seen floating within the spindle cell proliferation because of the infiltrating nature of this tumor, and these trabeculae impart a "soap bubble" or "tennis-racket" radiologic appearance. No syndromic association of OM has been reported. Although similar histopathologic features are shared with cardiac myxoma and soft tissue myxoma, mutations in the GNAS gene have not been identified in OM to date, and only 2 of 17 OMs showed mutations in the PRKAR1A gene. In this report, we describe a case of OM in a patient with constitutional 1q21 microduplication, a locus that harbors genes encoding certain proteins in the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway, including G-protein-coupled receptors and 1 phosphodiesterase interacting protein. Review of the literature describes the key clinical features and molecular pathogenesis of 1q21 microduplication, as well as highlighting the role of PKA signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of myxomas in general.

  6. The prevalence of inflammatory and developmental odontogenic cysts in a Jordanian population: a clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataineh, Anwar B; Rawashdeh, Ma'amon A; Al Qudah, Mansour A

    2004-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of odontogenic jaw cysts in a Jordanian population and to compare these data with previously published reports from other geographic areas. The files on odontogenic jaw cysts treated between 1989 and 2001 in the Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Diagnosis Service at the Department of Oral Medicine and Oral Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Jordan University of Science and Technology, were reviewed. Clinical and radiographic data were recorded and microscopic slides evaluated according to the most recent World Health Organization classification. Cases were analyzed with regard to age, sex, and anatomic site. A diagnosis of odontogenic jaw cyst was established in 654 patients, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.7:1. Radicular cyst was the most common type of odontogenic cyst found (41.7%), followed by dentigerous cysts (24.8%). The peak age affected was between the third and fifth decades. Both jaws were almost equally affected. The most common anatomic site of incidence was the maxillary incisor/canine region, followed by the mandibular molar region. This study indicates that there are some geographic differences with regard to the relative frequency, sex, and anatomic distributions of odontogenic cysts.

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within a maxillary odontogenic keratocyst: A rare occurrence

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    Jalali, Elnaz [Eliray Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Consulting Services, Miami (United States); Tadinada, Aditya; Rengasamy, Kandasamy; Ferneini, Elie M. [University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising within the lining of an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a rare occurrence. Although potentially locally destructive, OKC is a benign odontogenic process that typically presents with clinical and radiographic features characteristic of a benign intraosseous neoplasm. We present the clinical and radiographic features of a maxillary mass that demonstrated SCC arising from the lining of an OKC. Although the initial clinical and radiographic presentation suggested an infection or malignant neoplasm, biopsies revealed an infiltrative well-differentiated SCC contiguous with and arising from the focus of a pre-existing OKC. The patient subsequently underwent a type II hemi-maxillectomy with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This report discusses the clinical and radiographic features associated with intraosseous malignancies, especially those arising from an otherwise benign odontogenic lesion. While the majority of OKCs are benign, the current report illustrates the potential for carcinomatous transformation within the lining of an OKC.

  8. A case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Hyun; Jee, Dong Hyun; La, Tae Yoon

    2013-02-01

    We report a very rare case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit. A 41-yr old male patient had visited the hospital due to severe periorbital swelling and nasal stuffiness while he was treated for a periodontal abscess. He was diagnosed with odontogenic sinusitis and orbital cellulitis, and treated with antibiotics. The symptoms were aggravated and emergency sinus drainage was performed. On the next day, a sudden decrease in vision occurred with findings of ischemic optic neuropathy and central retinal artery occlusion. Deformation of the eyeball posterior pole into a cone shape was found from the orbital CT. A high-dose steroid was administered immediately resulting in improvements of periorbital swelling, but the patient's vision had not recovered. Odontogenic orbital cellulitis is relatively rare, but can cause blindness via rapidly progressing tension orbit. Therefore even the simplest of dental problems requires careful attention.

  9. Odontogenic and rhinogenic chronic sinusitis: a modern microbiological comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibene, Alberto Maria; Vassena, Christian; Pipolo, Carlotta; Trimboli, Mariele; De Vecchi, Elena; Felisati, Giovanni; Drago, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic sinusitis and sinonasal complications of dental disease or treatment (SCDDT) play a relevant, often underappreciated role in paranasal sinus infections. Treating SCDDT patients requires tailored medical and surgical approaches in order to achieve acceptable success rates. These approaches differ from common rhinogenic sinusitis treatment protocols mostly because of the different etiopathogenesis. Our study comprehensively evaluated microbiology and antibiotic resistance in SCDDT patients and compared findings with a control group of patients affected by rhinogenic sinusitis. We performed microbiological sampling during surgery on 28 patients with SCDDT and 16 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Colonies were isolated, Gram-stained, and the species identified using classic biochemical methods. These results were confirmed by DNA pyrosequencing, and then the resistance profile of each SCDDT isolate to various antibiotics was tested. Microbial growth was observed in all SCDDT patients, whereas samples from 60% of patients in the control group failed to yield any bacterial growth (p sinus of SCDDT patients, these infections should be regarded as a different class of conditions from rhinogenic sinusitis. Our findings support the need for different approaches in the treatment of SCDDT patients. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  10. Nasoethmoidal meningocele in a child presenting bilateral congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation: Evidence for a new entity or consequence of gestational exposures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa, Ernani B; Silveira, Daniélle B; Tsugami, Laís G; Bellé, Nathan L; Matos, Izabelle O; Targa, Luciano V; Betat, Rosilene da S; da Cunha, André C; Villacis, Rolando A R; Rogatto, Sílvia R; Dorfman, Luiza E; Rosa, Rafael F M; Zen, Paulo R G

    2016-04-01

    Nasoethmoidal meningocele is considered an uncommon type of cephalocele, and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare lung disorder characterized by overgrowth of the terminal bronchioles. We report the unusual association between a nasoethmoidal meningocele and CCAM type II in a fetus exposed to valproic acid and misoprostol. The mother was an 18-year-old woman on her first pregnancy. She had a history of absence seizures since she was 5 years old. She took valproic acid from the beginning of the gestation until the end of the third month. At the end of the third month, she attempted interruption of her pregnancy using misoprostol. The fetal nasoethmoidal meningocele and CCAM type II were identified through morphological ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging. A genome-wide study detected one copy number variation classified as rare, entirely contained into the SPATA5 gene. However, it does not seem to be associated to the clinical findings of the patient. To our knowledge, there is only one case reported in the literature showing the same association between a nasoethmoidal meningocele and CCAM. Thus, the malformations observed in our patient may be related to the gestational exposures. Also, we cannot rule out that the patient may present the same condition characterized by a cephalocele and CCAM described by some authors, or even an undescribed entity, because some hallmark features, such as laryngeal atresia and limb defects, were not observed in our case. Further reports will be very important to better understand the associations described in our study. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. An unusual case presentation of follicular odontogenic keratocyst with an impacted mesiodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunil; Verma, Ajay; Sheorain, Anil; Sharma, Arun

    2013-05-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is one of the most aggressive odontogenic cysts known for its high recurrence rate and its tendency to invade adjacent tissues. Radiographically, OKCs can be of different varieties-follicular, envelopmental, replacemental, extraneous, and collateral. Its characteristic clinical and biological behavior, therapeutic approaches, prognosis, and recurrence vary in different studies. Generally, OKCs are found to be associated with impacted lower third molar. Here we present an unusual case of follicular OKC associated with an impacted mesiodens (supernumerary tooth) in a 21-year-old male patient.

  12. Botryoid odontogenic cyst developing from lateral periodontal cyst: A rare case and review on pathogenesis

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    Piyush Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Botryoid odontogenic cyst (BOC is considered to be a polycystic variant of the lateral periodontal cyst (LPC as the specimen resembled a cluster of grapes. It is a non-inflammatory odontogenic cyst. The BOCs can be unicystic or multicystic. These cysts have potential to extend in the bone and become multilocular and they have a high recurrence rate. Till now, only 73 cases of BOC have been reported. The pathogenesis of BOC is still debatable. We review different pathogenesis proposed for BOC and discuss a rare case of BOC developing from lining of an abnormally large LPC which showed aggressive behaviour in terms of growth and size.

  13. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Tumors Astrocytoma Atypical Teratoid Rhaboid Tumor (ATRT) Chondrosarcoma Choroid Plexus Craniopharyngioma Cysts Ependymoma Germ Cell Tumor ... of Tumors Astrocytoma Atypical Teratoid Rhaboid Tumor (ATRT) Chondrosarcoma Choroid Plexus Craniopharyngioma Cysts Ependymoma Germ Cell Tumor ...

  14. Co-occurrence of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst, Aggressive Central Giant Cell Granuloma and Central Odontogenic Fibroma: Report of a Very Rare Entity and Its Surgical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touraj Vaezi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC, Central odontogenic fibroma (COF and aggressive central giant cell granuloma (CGCG are rare pathologic diseases affecting the jaws. While the Co-existence of two of them is reported in the literature, existence of all three conditions in one patient is an extremely rare entity. In the present report, initial biopsy revealed fibrosarcoma, therefore mandibular resection was performed for the subject. Sectional Histopathologic evaluation revealed the co-existence of three conditions through histopathologic evaluation. This report emphasizes the importance of precise microscopical evaluation of jaw lesions and thorough sectional examination of the lesions to reach the precise diagnosis. Treatment modalities and follow-up radiographs are also provided to help clinicians manage these entities.

  15. Peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant S Kamat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumors (DGCT are uncommon lesions mainly with rare peripheral types. This report presents a case of peripheral DGCT on the left side of the mandibular alveolar ridge of a heavy smoker, a 68-year-old man, with main presenting feature as a mild pain. Submandibular lymphadenopathy and radiological "saucerization" were evident. Differential diagnosis included fibroma, neurofibroma, peripheral ameloblastoma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, and peripheral giant cell granuloma. Histologically, ameloblastoma-like epithelial elements were seen in association with grouped ghost cells. Proliferating polyhedral cells and stellate reticulum-like cells with various densities were spread over a wide range of the field. The lesion was curetted and after 2 years of follow up, it did not recur.

  16. Accuracy and interobserver-intraobserver agreement in the radiologic diagnosis of ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst

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    Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Jean; Park, In Woo; Lee, Young Ho [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-15

    Six observers with different amount of experience in the field of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology interpreted the radiographs of 13 cases of ameloblastoma and 8 cases of odontogenic keratocyst which were confirmed histopathologically and showed pseudo-multilocular appearanced and scalloped border radiographically. The authors examined the accuracy of radiologic diagnoses, interobserver agreement and intraobserver agreement. The obtained results were as follows : 1. The accuracy of radiologic diagnosis ranged from 0.48 to 0.81. The average value was 0.61 2. The accuracy of radiologic diagnosis for ameloblastoma (0.55) was lower than that for odontogenic keratocyst (0.70) (P <0.05). 3. The overall agreement among the 6 observers was 14.3% at the first interpretation and 19.0% at the second interpretation. 4. The intraobserver agreement of each observer expressed in kappa index ranged from -0.14 to 0.64. The overall intraobserver agreement was 0.29. 5. The intraobserver agreement of each observer for ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst ranged from -0.07 to 0.65 and from -0.25 to 1.00, respectively. The overall intraobserver agreement for ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst were 0.27 and 0.26, respectively. 6. The diagnostic accuracy highly correlated to the intraobserver agreement (r=0.6370).

  17. Long noncoding RNAs related to the odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yunfei; Jia, Lingfei

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the lncRNAs that are associated with the odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells. The odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells was found to be lost in the course of in vitro culture, so the lncRNA profiles were subsequently compared between freshly-isolated and cultured dental mesenchymal cells using RNA-sequencing. A co-expression analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs and coding RNAs was performed to understand their potential functions. The expression of several selected lncRNAs was also examined in developing tooth germs. Compared with cultured dental mesenchymal cells, 108 lncRNAs were upregulated and 36 lncRNAs were downregulated in freshly-isolated dental mesenchymal cells. Coding genes correlated with the lncRNAs were mainly associated with DNA and protein metabolic processes and cytoskeletal anchorage. Meg3, Malat1, Xist, and Dlx1as were significantly downregulated in cultured dental mesenchymal cells but were upregulated in odontogenic dental mesenchymal tissues. Moreover, the levels of Dlx1as were negatively correlated with that of Dlx1 in dental mesenchymal cells and dental mesenchymal tissues. The lncRNA profiles of dental mesenchymal cells are significantly changed during culturing, and the dysregulation of lncRNAs is associated with the loss of odontogenic potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. [The improvement of complex treatment of odontogenous periostitis in elderly patients].

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    Okovityĭ, S V; Muzykin, M I; Iordanishvili, A K

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of clinical examination of 114 patients aged 60-88 years with acute odontogenous periostitis receiving treatment in in-patient maxillofacial surgery unit. The dynamic of clinical symptoms is used to carry out the comparative effectiveness study of several peroral antibiotics in elderly patients.

  19. Odontogenic deep neck space infection as life-threatening condition in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Torre, D; Burtscher, D; Höfer, D; Kloss, F R

    2014-09-01

    Odontogenic deep neck space infections represent a severe disease with possible life-threatening complications. Despite knowledge of these infectious diseases, treatment remains a challenge for every maxillofacial surgeon. Therapy of severe neck infections is even more crucial during pregnancy because of the possible life-threatening situation for both the mother and the foetus. The possible compromise of oral health during pregnancy is well known, however severe odontogenic infections are rarely considered in the literature. The following case report describes the dramatic course of a deep neck space infection in a pregnant patient, commencing with typical symptoms of localized odontogenic infection and ending in a critical, life-threatening condition for the patient and a lethal condition for the foetus. The case represents the first description of intrauterine, foetal death caused by a deep neck space infection. Implications for dental and medical treatment during pregnancy, especially regarding odontogenic infections, are presented and discussed with findings in the international literature. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Intraosseous carcinoma of the jaws: A clinicopathologic review. part II: Odontogenic carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woolgar, J.A.; Triantafyllou, A.; Ferlito, A.; Devaney, K.O.; Lewis Jr., J.S.; Rinaldo, A.; Slootweg, P.J.; Barnes, L.

    2013-01-01

    This is the second of a 3-part review of the clinicopathologic features of intraosseous carcinoma of the jaws (IOCJ). This part deals with odontogenic carcinomas, rare entities that are difficult to evaluate because of changes in classification/nomenclature, lack of standardized diagnostic criteria,