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Sample records for adenine-modified functionalized dna

  1. Cleavage of adenine-modified functionalized DNA by type II restriction endonucleases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Hocek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 22 (2009), s. 7612-7622 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0317; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : functionalized DNA * restriction endonucleases * DNA polymerase * modified adenosines Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 7.479, year: 2009

  2. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...... for a long period of time before its information is accessed by the cell. Although DNA plays a critical role as an informational storage molecule, it is by no means as unexciting as a computer tape or disk drive. The structure of the DNA described by Watson and Crick in 1953 is a right handed helix of two...

  3. Functional footprinting of regulatory DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierstra, Jeff; Reik, Andreas; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Zhou, Yuanyue; Hinkley, Sarah J; Paschon, David E; Zhang, Lei; Psatha, Nikoletta; Bendana, Yuri R; O'Neil, Colleen M; Song, Alexander H; Mich, Andrea K; Liu, Pei-Qi; Lee, Gary; Bauer, Daniel E; Holmes, Michael C; Orkin, Stuart H; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory regions harbor multiple transcription factor (TF) recognition sites; however, the contribution of individual sites to regulatory function remains challenging to define. We describe an approach that exploits the error-prone nature of genome editing-induced double-strand break repair to map functional elements within regulatory DNA at nucleotide resolution. We demonstrate the approach on a human erythroid enhancer, revealing single TF recognition sites that gate the majority of downstream regulatory function.

  4. Purification of functionalized DNA origami nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alan; Benson, Erik; Högberg, Björn

    2015-05-26

    The high programmability of DNA origami has provided tools for precise manipulation of matter at the nanoscale. This manipulation of matter opens up the possibility to arrange functional elements for a diverse range of applications that utilize the nanometer precision provided by these structures. However, the realization of functionalized DNA origami still suffers from imperfect production methods, in particular in the purification step, where excess material is separated from the desired functionalized DNA origami. In this article we demonstrate and optimize two purification methods that have not previously been applied to DNA origami. In addition, we provide a systematic study comparing the purification efficacy of these and five other commonly used purification methods. Three types of functionalized DNA origami were used as model systems in this study. DNA origami was patterned with either small molecules, antibodies, or larger proteins. With the results of our work we aim to provide a guideline in quality fabrication of various types of functionalized DNA origami and to provide a route for scalable production of these promising tools.

  5. Structure and function of DNA polymerase μ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Maezawa, So

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerases are enzymes playing the central role in DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, DNA repair and recombination. DNA polymerase μ (pol μ DNA polymerase λ (pol λ) and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) in X family DNA polymerases function in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the predonmiant repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEJ involves enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA strand, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and repair the DSB. Pol μ and pol λ fill in the gaps at the junction to maintain the genomic integrity. TdT synthesizes N region at the junction during V(D)J recombination and promotes diversity of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor gene. Among these three polymerases, the regulatory mechanisms of pol μ remain rather unclear. We have approached the mechanism of pol μ from both sides of structure and cellular dynamics. Here, we propose some new insights into pol μ and the probable NHEJ model including our findings. (author)

  6. Beyond DNA repair: DNA-PK function in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a pivotal component of the DNA repair machinery that governs the response to DNA damage, serving to maintain genome integrity. However, the DNA-PK kinase component was initially isolated with transcriptional complexes, and recent findings have illuminated the impact of DNA-PK-mediated transcriptional regulation on tumor progression and therapeutic response. DNA-PK expression has also been correlated with poor outcome in selected tumor types, furthe...

  7. Functional transferred DNA within extracellular vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jin [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Department of Neurology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Jiangsu Province (China); Wu, Gengze [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Jose, Pedro A. [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine and Physiology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zeng, Chunyu, E-mail: Chunyuzeng01@163.com [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane vesicles including exosomes and shedding vesicles that mediated a cell-to-cell communication. EVs are released from almost all cell types under both physiological and pathological conditions and incorporate nuclear and cytoplasmic molecules for intercellular delivery. Besides protein, mRNA, and microRNA of these molecules, as recent studies show, specific DNA are prominently packaged into EVs. It appears likely that some of exosomes or shedding vesicles, bearing nuclear molecules are released upon bubble-like blebs. Specific interaction of EVs with susceptible recipients performs the uptake of EVs into the target cells, discharging their cargo including nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules into the cytosol. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of EVs to include increased levels of specific DNA. Thus, EVs contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer and atherosclerosis. In this review, the focus is on the characteristics, biological functions, and roles in diseases of DNA within EVs. - Highlights: • This review is focused on the DNA within EVs including its characteristics, biological functions, and roles in diseases. • It is clear that DNA within EVs might have important physiological and pathological roles in various diseases. • Knowledge in this area may provides us alternative methods for disease diagnosis or therapy in the future.

  8. Functional transferred DNA within extracellular vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jin; Wu, Gengze; Jose, Pedro A.; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane vesicles including exosomes and shedding vesicles that mediated a cell-to-cell communication. EVs are released from almost all cell types under both physiological and pathological conditions and incorporate nuclear and cytoplasmic molecules for intercellular delivery. Besides protein, mRNA, and microRNA of these molecules, as recent studies show, specific DNA are prominently packaged into EVs. It appears likely that some of exosomes or shedding vesicles, bearing nuclear molecules are released upon bubble-like blebs. Specific interaction of EVs with susceptible recipients performs the uptake of EVs into the target cells, discharging their cargo including nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules into the cytosol. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of EVs to include increased levels of specific DNA. Thus, EVs contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer and atherosclerosis. In this review, the focus is on the characteristics, biological functions, and roles in diseases of DNA within EVs. - Highlights: • This review is focused on the DNA within EVs including its characteristics, biological functions, and roles in diseases. • It is clear that DNA within EVs might have important physiological and pathological roles in various diseases. • Knowledge in this area may provides us alternative methods for disease diagnosis or therapy in the future.

  9. Function of BRCA1 at a DNA Replication Origin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieberman, Paul

    2004-01-01

    ... and allow efficient repair of damaged DNA. In this proposal, we present preliminary data that BRCA1 functions in a DNA checkpoint response for the origin of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA replication (Ori P...

  10. Adsorption of DNA binding proteins to functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces with and without DNA wrapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    We examined the adsorption of DNA binding proteins on functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When SWNTs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), moderate adsorption of protein molecules was observed. In contrast, nanotubes functionalized with CONH 2 groups (CONH 2 -SWNT) exhibited very strong interactions between the CONH 2 -SWNT and DNA binding proteins. Instead, when these SWNT surfaces were wrapped with DNA molecules (thymine 30-mers), protein binding was a little decreased. Our results revealed that DNA wrapped PEG-SWNT was one of the most promising candidates to realize DNA nanodevices involving protein reactions on DNA-SWNT surfaces. In addition, the DNA binding protein RecA was more adhesive than single-stranded DNA binding proteins to the functionalized SWNT surfaces.

  11. DNA stretching on functionalized gold surfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, R M; Cox, E C

    1994-01-01

    We describe a method for anchoring bacteriophage lambda DNA by one end to gold by Au-biotin-streptavidin-biotin-DNA bonds. DNA anchored to a microfabricated Au line could be aligned and stretched in flow and electric fields. The anchor was shown to resist a force of at least 11 pN, a linkage strong enough to allow DNA molecules of chromosome size to be stretched and aligned.

  12. Regulation and function of DNA methylation in plants and animals

    KAUST Repository

    He, Xinjian

    2011-02-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, DNA methylation can be established through the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, an RNA interference pathway for transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), which requires 24-nt small interfering RNAs. In mammals, de novo DNA methylation occurs primarily at two developmental stages: during early embryogenesis and during gametogenesis. While it is not clear whether establishment of DNA methylation patterns in mammals involves RNA interference in general, de novo DNA methylation and suppression of transposons in germ cells require 24-32-nt piwi-interacting small RNAs. DNA methylation status is dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation reactions. In plants, active DNA demethylation relies on the repressor of silencing 1 family of bifunctional DNA glycosylases, which remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, initiating a base excision repair (BER) pathway. In animals, multiple mechanisms of active DNA demethylation have been proposed, including a deaminase- and DNA glycosylase-initiated BER pathway. New information concerning the effects of various histone modifications on the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation has broadened our understanding of the regulation of DNA methylation. The function of DNA methylation in plants and animals is also discussed in this review. © 2011 IBCB, SIBS, CAS All rights reserved.

  13. Controlling Function and Structure with DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, the research on three different topics will be described. The overall area of the research is DNA nanotechnology, and the first chapter is therefore an introduction to DNA, and its advantages as a building material. The first research topic is the development of a new method...... for constructing DNA-protein hybrids. The project is still ongoing, but our initial results and thoughts on the design are reported. The design was based on the concept of DNA directed chemistry, where stable covalent bonds are directed by weaker non-covalent bonds. Applying this concept, an aptamer for the human...

  14. Function of Junk: Pericentromeric Satellite DNA in Chromosome Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Madhav; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2018-04-02

    Satellite DNAs are simple tandem repeats that exist at centromeric and pericentromeric regions on eukaryotic chromosomes. Unlike the centromeric satellite DNA that comprises the vast majority of natural centromeres, function(s) for the much more abundant pericentromeric satellite repeats are poorly understood. In fact, the lack of coding potential allied with rapid divergence of repeat sequences across eukaryotes has led to their dismissal as "junk DNA" or "selfish parasites." Although implicated in various biological processes, a conserved function for pericentromeric satellite DNA remains unidentified. We have addressed the role of satellite DNA through studying chromocenters, a cytological aggregation of pericentromeric satellite DNA from multiple chromosomes into DNA-dense nuclear foci. We have shown that multivalent satellite DNA-binding proteins cross-link pericentromeric satellite DNA on chromosomes into chromocenters. Disruption of chromocenters results in the formation of micronuclei, which arise by budding off the nucleus during interphase. We propose a model that satellite DNAs are critical chromosome elements that are recognized by satellite DNA-binding proteins and incorporated into chromocenters. We suggest that chromocenters function to preserve the entire chromosomal complement in a single nucleus, a fundamental and unquestioned feature of eukaryotic genomes. We speculate that the rapid divergence of satellite DNA sequences between closely related species results in discordant chromocenter function and may underlie speciation and hybrid incompatibility. © 2017 Jagannathan and Yamashita; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, Patrick M.; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription

  16. A novel role of the Dna2 translocase function in DNA break resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam S; Daley, James M; Pham, Nhung Tuyet; Niu, Hengyao; Xue, Xiaoyu; Ira, Grzegorz; Sung, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination entails nucleolytic resection of the 5' strand at break ends. Dna2, a flap endonuclease with 5'-3' helicase activity, is involved in the resection process. The Dna2 helicase activity has been implicated in Okazaki fragment processing during DNA replication but is thought to be dispensable for DNA end resection. Unexpectedly, we found a requirement for the helicase function of Dna2 in end resection in budding yeast cells lacking exonuclease 1. Biochemical analysis reveals that ATP hydrolysis-fueled translocation of Dna2 on ssDNA facilitates 5' flap cleavage near a single-strand-double strand junction while attenuating 3' flap incision. Accordingly, the ATP hydrolysis-defective dna2-K1080E mutant is less able to generate long products in a reconstituted resection system. Our study thus reveals a previously unrecognized role of the Dna2 translocase activity in DNA break end resection and in the imposition of the 5' strand specificity of end resection. © 2017 Miller et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. DNA complexes with Ni nanoparticles: structural and functional properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarinova, Olga N.; Smirnov, Igor P.; Safenkova, Irina V.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E.

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular complexes of biopolymers based on magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in creation of biosensors, implementation of theragnostic and gene therapeutic methods and biosafety evaluation. We investigated the impact of DNA interactions with nanoparticles of nickel (nNi) on the integrity and functionality of DNA. Data obtained by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis, TEM and AFM microscopy techniques, bacterial transformation, and real-time PCR provide evidence that ssDNA and plasmid DNA (pDNA) efficiently form complexes with nNi. AFM data suggest that the complexes are necklace-type structures, in which nanoparticles are randomly distributed along the DNA chains, rather than highly entangled clot-type structures. After desorption, observed DNA characteristics in bioanalytical and biological systems remain unchanged. Only supercoiled pDNA was nicked, but remained, as well as a plasmid–nNi complex, active in expression vector assays. These results are very important for creation of new methods of DNA immobilization and controlled manipulation.

  18. Resurrection of DNA function in vivo from an extinct genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Pask

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a burgeoning repository of information available from ancient DNA that can be used to understand how genomes have evolved and to determine the genetic features that defined a particular species. To assess the functional consequences of changes to a genome, a variety of methods are needed to examine extinct DNA function. We isolated a transcriptional enhancer element from the genome of an extinct marsupial, the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus or thylacine, obtained from 100 year-old ethanol-fixed tissues from museum collections. We then examined the function of the enhancer in vivo. Using a transgenic approach, it was possible to resurrect DNA function in transgenic mice. The results demonstrate that the thylacine Col2A1 enhancer directed chondrocyte-specific expression in this extinct mammalian species in the same way as its orthologue does in mice. While other studies have examined extinct coding DNA function in vitro, this is the first example of the restoration of extinct non-coding DNA and examination of its function in vivo. Our method using transgenesis can be used to explore the function of regulatory and protein-coding sequences obtained from any extinct species in an in vivo model system, providing important insights into gene evolution and diversity.

  19. SAXS Study of Sterically Stabilized Lipid Nanocarriers Functionalized by DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, Borislav; Angelova, Angelina; Filippov, Sergey; Karlsson, Göran; Terrill, Nick; Lesieur, Sylviane; Štěpánek, Petr

    2012-03-01

    The structure of novel spontaneously self-assembled plasmid DNA/lipid complexes is investigated by means of synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Cryo-TEM imaging. Liquid crystalline (LC) hydrated lipid systems are prepared using the non-ionic lipids monoolein and DOPE-PEG2000 and the cationic amphiphile CTAB. The employed plasmid DNA (pDNA) is encoding for the human protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A coexistence of nanoparticulate objects with different LC inner organizations is established. A transition from bicontinuous membrane sponges, cubosome intermediates and unilamelar liposomes to multilamellar vesicles, functionalized by pDNA, is favoured upon binding and compaction of pBDNF onto the cationic PEGylated lipid nanocarriers. The obtained sterically stabilized multicompartment nanoobjects, with confined supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBDNF), are important in the context of multicompartment lipid nanocarriers of interest for gene therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. SAXS Study of Sterically Stabilized Lipid Nanocarriers Functionalized by DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, Borislav; Filippov, Sergey; Štepánek, Petr; Angelova, Angelina; Lesieur, Sylviane; Karlsson, Göran; Terrill, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The structure of novel spontaneously self-assembled plasmid DNA/lipid complexes is investigated by means of synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Cryo-TEM imaging. Liquid crystalline (LC) hydrated lipid systems are prepared using the non-ionic lipids monoolein and DOPE-PEG 2000 and the cationic amphiphile CTAB. The employed plasmid DNA (pDNA) is encoding for the human protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A coexistence of nanoparticulate objects with different LC inner organizations is established. A transition from bicontinuous membrane sponges, cubosome intermediates and unilamelar liposomes to multilamellar vesicles, functionalized by pDNA, is favoured upon binding and compaction of pBDNF onto the cationic PEGylated lipid nanocarriers. The obtained sterically stabilized multicompartment nanoobjects, with confined supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBDNF), are important in the context of multicompartment lipid nanocarriers of interest for gene therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Structure and Function Study of Phi29 DNA packaging motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huaming

    molecules were required to bind to one short dsDNA molecule. The inhibitive curve of Walker B mutant gp16 analyzed by binomial distribution model showed that one inactive mutant gp16 in the gp16 ring could block the function of the motor and the stoichiometry of gp16 was six. These findings facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanism of viral DNA packaging: a novel viral DNA packaging model "push through a one-way valve" was proposed. In this model, the connector functioned as a valve to allow DNA to enter but prevented it from sliding out during DNA packaging; the six subunits in the gp16 ring acted sequentially to push DNA into the connector channel. ATP binding of gp16 induced a conformation change with a high affinity for dsDNA. Then, the ATP was hydrolyzed which resulted in the movement of subdomains in this individual gp16 subunit and DNA was pushed forward, followed by the double helix of dsDNA being brought forward to the adjacent subunit in the gp16 ring. The elucidation of the viral DNA packaging mechanism holds great potential for developing artificial motors for delivering drugs and other molecular cargos.

  2. Functionalization of DNA Nanostructures for Cell Signaling Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ronnie O.

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is an important cytokine responsible for a wide range of different cellular functions including extracellular matrix formation, angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We have sought to use self-assembling DNA nanostructures to influence TGF-beta signaling. The predictable Watson Crick base pairing allows for designing self-assembling nanoscale structures using oligonucleotides. We have used the method of DNA origami to assemble structures functionalized with multiple peptides that bind TGF-beta receptors outside the ligand binding domain. This allows the nanostructures to cluster TGF-beta receptors and lower the energy barrier of ligand binding thus sensitizing the cells to TGF-beta stimulation. To prove efficacy of our nanostructures we have utilized immunofluorescent staining of Smad2/4 in order to monitor TGF-beta mediated translocation of Smad2/4 to the cell nucleus. We have also utilized Smad2/4 responsive luminescence constructs that allows us to quantify TGF-beta stimulation with and without nanostructures. To functionalize our nanostructures we relied on biotin-streptavidin linkages. This introduces a multivalency that is not necessarily desirable in all designs. Therefore we have investigated alternative means of functionalization. The first approach is based on targeting DNA nanostructure by using zinc finger binding proteins. Efficacy of zinc finger binding proteins was assayed by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM). While ELISA indicated a relative specificity of zinc finger proteins for target DNA sequences AFM showed a high degree of non-specific binding and insufficient affinity. The second approach is based on using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) incorporated in the nanostructure through base pairing. PNA is a synthetic DNA analog consisting of a backbone of repeating N-(2-aminoethyl)-glycine units to which purine and pyrimidine bases are linked by

  3. Functional DNA: Teaching Infinite Series through Genetic Analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, R. Travis

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an extended analogy that connects infinite sequences and series to the science of genetics, by identifying power series as "DNA for a function." This analogy allows standard topics such as convergence tests or Taylor approximations to be recast in a "forensic" light as mathematical analogs of genetic concepts such as DNA…

  4. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  5. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  6. Sequential self-assembly of DNA functionalized droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; McMullen, Angus; Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; He, Xiaojin; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C; Brujic, Jasna; Chaikin, Paul M

    2017-06-16

    Complex structures and devices, both natural and manmade, are often constructed sequentially. From crystallization to embryogenesis, a nucleus or seed is formed and built upon. Sequential assembly allows for initiation, signaling, and logical programming, which are necessary for making enclosed, hierarchical structures. Although biology relies on such schemes, they have not been available in materials science. Here, we demonstrate programmed sequential self-assembly of DNA functionalized emulsions. The droplets are initially inert because the grafted DNA strands are pre-hybridized in pairs. Active strands on initiator droplets then displace one of the paired strands and thus release its complement, which in turn activates the next droplet in the sequence, akin to living polymerization. Our strategy provides time and logic control during the self-assembly process, and offers a new perspective on the synthesis of materials.Natural complex systems are often constructed by sequential assembly but this is not readily available for synthetic systems. Here, the authors program the sequential self-assembly of DNA functionalized emulsions by altering the DNA grafted strands.

  7. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K.; Ward, Lucas D.; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E.; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L.; Farnham, Peggy J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C.; Gilbert, David M.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Green, Eric D.; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D.; Myers, Richard M.; Pazin, Michael J.; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease. PMID:24753594

  8. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  9. Functional demonstration of adaptive immunity in zebrafish using DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    studies have documented existence of a classical innate immune response, there is mainly indirect evidence of functional adaptive immunity. To address this aspect, groups of zebrafish were vaccinated with DNA-vaccines against the rhabdoviruses VHSV, IHNV and SVCV. Seven weeks later, the fish were...... challenged with SVCV by immersion. Despite some variability between replicate aquaria, there was a protective effect of the homologous vaccine and no effect of the heterologous vaccines. The results therefore confirm the existence of not only a well developed but also a fully functional adaptive immune...

  10. Functional characterization of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Furtado

    Full Text Available The oxidative lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG is removed during base excision repair by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1. This lesion can erroneously pair with adenine, and the excision of this damaged base by Ogg1 enables the insertion of a guanine and prevents DNA mutation. In this report, we identified and characterized Ogg1 from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOgg1, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Like most living organisms, T. cruzi is susceptible to oxidative stress, hence DNA repair is essential for its survival and improvement of infection. We verified that the TcOGG1 gene encodes an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase by complementing an Ogg1-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Heterologous expression of TcOGG1 reestablished the mutation frequency of the yeast mutant ogg1(-/- (CD138 to wild type levels. We also demonstrate that the overexpression of TcOGG1 increases T. cruzi sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. Analysis of DNA lesions using quantitative PCR suggests that the increased susceptibility to H(2O(2 of TcOGG1-overexpressor could be a consequence of uncoupled BER in abasic sites and/or strand breaks generated after TcOgg1 removes 8-oxoG, which are not rapidly repaired by the subsequent BER enzymes. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TcOGG1-overexpressors have reduced levels of 8-oxoG both in the nucleus and in the parasite mitochondrion. The localization of TcOgg1 was examined in parasite transfected with a TcOgg1-GFP fusion, which confirmed that this enzyme is in both organelles. Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi has a functional Ogg1 ortholog that participates in nuclear and mitochondrial BER.

  11. Two novel temperate bacteriophages co-existing in Aeromonas sp. ARM81 - characterization of their genomes, proteomes and DNA methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Radlinska, Monika

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas species are causative agents of a wide spectrum of diseases in animals and humans. Although these bacteria are commonly found in various environments, little is known about their phages. Thus far, only one temperate Aeromonas phage has been characterized. Whole-genome sequencing of an Aeromonas sp. strain ARM81 revealed the presence of two prophage clusters. One of them is integrated into the chromosome and the other was maintained as an extrachromosomal, linear plasmid-like prophage encoding a protelomerase. Both prophages were artificially and spontaneously inducible. We separately isolated both phages and compared their genomes with other known viruses. The novel phages show no similarity to the previously characterized Aeromonas phages and might represent new evolutionary lineages of viruses infecting Aeromonadaceae. Apart from the comparative genomic analyses of these phages, complemented with their structural and molecular characterization, a functional analysis of four DNA methyltransferases encoded by these viruses was conducted. One of the investigated N6-adenine-modifying enzymes shares sequence specificity with a Dam-like methyltransferase of its bacterial host, while another one is non-specific, as it catalyzes adenine methylation in various sequence contexts. The presented results shed new light on the diversity of Aeromonas temperate phages.

  12. Specificity and Function of Archaeal DNA Replication Initiator Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Y. Samson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7 via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins in the single chromosome of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus are specified by distinct initiation factors. While two origins are dependent on archaeal homologs of eukaryal Orc1 and Cdc6, the third origin is instead reliant on an archaeal Cdt1 homolog. We exploit the nonessential nature of the orc1-1 gene to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels the protein’s structure rather than that of the DNA template.

  13. Specificity and function of Archaeal DNA replication initiator proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Xu, Yanqun; Gadelha, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC) that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7) via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins in the si......Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC) that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7) via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins...... in the single chromosome of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus are specified by distinct initiation factors. While two origins are dependent on archaeal homologs of eukaryal Orc1 and Cdc6, the third origin is instead reliant on an archaeal Cdt1 homolog. We exploit the nonessential nature of the orc1-1 gene...... to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels...

  14. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Akari, E-mail: akari_yo@stu.musashino-u.ac.jp [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yume [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Tada, Shusuke [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi-shi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Seki, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 981-8558 (Japan); Enomoto, Takemi [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan)

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  15. Aptamer based voltammetric determination of ampicillin using a single-stranded DNA binding protein and DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Kui; Yin, Huanshun; Zhou, Yunlei; Ai, Shiyun

    2017-12-20

    An aptamer based method is described for the electrochemical determination of ampicillin. It is based on the use of DNA aptamer, DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuNPs), and single-stranded DNA binding protein (ssDNA-BP). When the aptamer hybridizes with the target DNA on the AuNPs, the ssDNA-BP is captured on the electrode surface via its specific interaction with ss-DNA. This results in a decreased electrochemical signal of the redox probe Fe(CN) 6 3- which is measured best at a voltage of 0.188 mV (vs. reference electrode). In the presence of ampicillin, the formation of aptamer-ampicillin conjugate blocks the further immobilization of DNA-AuNPs and ssDNA-BP, and this leads to an increased response. The method has a linear reposne that convers the 1 pM to 5 nM ampicillin concentration range, with a 0.38 pM detection limit (at an S/N ratio of 3). The assay is selective, stable and reproducible. It was applied to the determination of ampicillin in spiked milk samples where it gave recoveries ranging from 95.5 to 105.5%. Graphical abstract Schematic of a simple and sensitive electrochemical apta-biosensor for ampicillin detection. It is based on the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), DNA aptamer, DNA functionalized AuNPs (DNA-AuNPs), and single-strand DNA binding protein (SSBP).

  16. New Insights into DNA Polymerase Function Revealed by Phosphonoacetic Acid-Sensitive T4 DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likui

    2017-11-20

    The bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase (pol) and the closely related RB69 DNA pol have been developed into model enzymes to study family B DNA pols. While all family B DNA pols have similar structures and share conserved protein motifs, the molecular mechanism underlying natural drug resistance of nonherpes family B DNA pols and drug sensitivity of herpes DNA pols remains unknown. In the present study, we constructed T4 phages containing G466S, Y460F, G466S/Y460F, P469S, and V475W mutations in DNA pol. These amino acid substitutions replace the residues in drug-resistant T4 DNA pol with residues found in drug-sensitive herpes family DNA pols. We investigated whether the T4 phages expressing the engineered mutant DNA pols were sensitive to the antiviral drug phosphonoacetic acid (PAA) and characterized the in vivo replication fidelity of the phage DNA pols. We found that G466S substitution marginally increased PAA sensitivity, whereas Y460F substitution conferred resistance. The phage expressing a double mutant G466S/Y460F DNA pol was more PAA-sensitive. V475W T4 DNA pol was highly sensitive to PAA, as was the case with V478W RB69 DNA pol. However, DNA replication was severely compromised, which resulted in the selection of phages expressing more robust DNA pols that have strong ability to replicate DNA and contain additional amino acid substitutions that suppress PAA sensitivity. Reduced replication fidelity was observed in all mutant phages expressing PAA-sensitive DNA pols. These observations indicate that PAA sensitivity and fidelity are balanced in DNA pols that can replicate DNA in different environments.

  17. Functions of Human Rad51 and Other Recombination Factors in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sigurdsson, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    ... of. DNA double strand breaks. Genetic and biochemical studies have suggested that the function of genes of the RAD52 group is highly conserved from yeast to humans and interestingly the efficiency of DNA double strand break...

  18. Deploying RNA and DNA with Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Asqiriba, Karim; Londero, Pablo; Bergkvist, Magnus; Leona, Marco; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes internalize into cells and are potential molecular platforms for siRNA and DNA delivery. A comprehensive understanding of the identity and stability of ammoniumfunctionalized carbon nanotube (f-CNT)-based nucleic acid constructs is critical to deploying them in vivo as gene delivery vehicles. This work explored the capability of f-CNT to bind single- and double-strand oligonucleotides by determining the thermodynamics and kinetics of assembly and the stoichiometric composition in aqueous solution. Surprisingly, the binding affinity of f-CNT and short oligonucleotide sequences was in the nanomolar range, kinetics of complexation were extremely rapid, and from one to five sequences were loaded per nanotube platform. Mechanistic evidence for an assembly process that involved electrostatic, hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking bonding interactions was obtained by varying nanotube functionalities, oligonucleotides, and reaction conditions. 31P-NMR and spectrophotometric fluorescence emission data described the conditions required to assemble and stably bind a DNA or RNA cargo for delivery in vivo and the amount of oligonucleotide that could be transported. The soluble oligonucleic acid-f-CNT supramolecular assemblies were suitable for use in vivo. Importantly, key evidence in support of an elegant mechanism by which the bound nucleic acid material can be ‘off-loaded’ from the f-CNT was discovered. PMID:23626864

  19. Functional analysis of transcribed spacers of yeast ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musters, W; Boon, K; van der Sande, C A; van Heerikhuizen, H; Planta, R J

    1990-12-01

    Making use of an rDNA unit, containing oligonucleotide tags in both the 17S and 26S rRNA gene, we have analyzed the effect of various deletions in the External Transcribed Spacer (ETS) and in one of the Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 (ITS1) on the process of ribosome formation in yeast. By following the fate of the tagged transcripts of this rDNA unit in vivo by Northern hybridization we found that deleting various parts of the ETS prevents the accumulation of tagged 17S rRNA and its assembly into 40S subunits, but not the formation of 60S subunits. Deleting the central region of ITS1, including a processing site that is used in an early stage of the maturation process, was also found to prevent the accumulation of functional 49 S subunits, whereas no effect on the formation of 60S subunits was detected. The implications of these findings for yeast pre-rRNA processing are discussed.

  20. A DNA 3′-phosphatase functions in active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Qian, Weiqiang; Miki, Daisuke; Pontes, Olga; Liu, Yunhua; Tang, Kai; Liu, Renyi; Morales-Ruiz, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R.; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark established by the combined actions of methylation and demethylation reactions. Plants use a base excision repair pathway for active DNA demethylation. After 5-methylcytosine removal, the Arabidopsis DNA glycosylase/lyase ROS1 incises the DNA backbone and part of the product has a single-nucleotide gap flanked by 3′- and 5′-phosphate termini. Here we show that the DNA phosphatase ZDP removes the blocking 3′-phosphate, allowing subsequent DNA pol...

  1. Implementation of digital image encryption algorithm using logistic function and DNA encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadi, MT; Satria, Yudi; Fauzi, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    Cryptography is a method to secure information that might be in form of digital image. Based on past research, in order to increase security level of chaos based encryption algorithm and DNA based encryption algorithm, encryption algorithm using logistic function and DNA encoding was proposed. Digital image encryption algorithm using logistic function and DNA encoding use DNA encoding to scramble the pixel values into DNA base and scramble it in DNA addition, DNA complement, and XOR operation. The logistic function in this algorithm used as random number generator needed in DNA complement and XOR operation. The result of the test show that the PSNR values of cipher images are 7.98-7.99 bits, the entropy values are close to 8, the histogram of cipher images are uniformly distributed and the correlation coefficient of cipher images are near 0. Thus, the cipher image can be decrypted perfectly and the encryption algorithm has good resistance to entropy attack and statistical attack.

  2. Molecular architecture and function of adenovirus DNA polymerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenkman, A.B. (Arjan Bernard)

    2002-01-01

    Central to this thesis is the role of adenovirus DNA polymerase (Ad pol) in adenovirus DNA replication. Ad pol is a member of the family B DNA polymerases but belongs to a distinct subclass of polymerases that use a protein as primer. As Ad pol catalyses both the initiation and elongation phases and

  3. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  4. Impact of Individual Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen-DNA Contacts on Clamp Loading and Function on DNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M.

    2012-01-01

    Ring-shaped clamp proteins encircle DNA and affect the work of many proteins, notably processive replication by DNA polymerases. Crystal structures of clamps show several cationic residues inside the ring, and in a co-crystal of Escherichia coli β clamp-DNA, they directly contact the tilted duplex passing through (Georgescu, R. E., Kim, S. S., Yurieva, O., Kuriyan, J., Kong, X. P., and O'Donnell, M. (2008) Structure of a sliding clamp on DNA. Cell 132, 43–54). To investigate the role of these contacts in reactions involving circular clamps, we examined single arginine/lysine mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in replication factor C (RFC)-catalyzed loading of the clamp onto primer template DNA (ptDNA). Previous kinetic analysis has shown that ptDNA entry inside an ATP-activated RFC-PCNA complex accelerates clamp opening and ATP hydrolysis, which is followed by slow PCNA closure around DNA and product dissociation. Here we directly measured multiple steps in the reaction (PCNA opening, ptDNA binding, PCNA closure, phosphate release, and complex dissociation) to determine whether mutation of PCNA residues Arg-14, Lys-20, Arg-80, Lys-146, Arg-149, or Lys-217 to alanine affects the reaction mechanism. Contrary to earlier steady state analysis of these mutants (McNally, R., Bowman, G. D., Goedken, E. R., O'Donnell, M., and Kuriyan, J. (2010) Analysis of the role of PCNA-DNA contacts during clamp loading. BMC Struct. Biol. 10, 3), our pre-steady state data show that loss of single cationic residues can alter the rates of all DNA-linked steps in the reaction, as well as movement of PCNA on DNA. These results explain an earlier finding that individual arginines and lysines inside human PCNA are essential for polymerase δ processivity (Fukuda, K., Morioka, H., Imajou, S., Ikeda, S., Ohtsuka, E., and Tsurimoto, T. (1995) Structure-function relationship of the eukaryotic DNA replication factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen

  5. Electrostatics of DNA-DNA juxtapositions: consequences for type II topoisomerase function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, Graham L; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Buck, Gregory R; Zechiedrich, E Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases resolve problematic DNA topologies such as knots, catenanes, and supercoils that arise as a consequence of DNA replication and recombination. Failure to remove problematic DNA topologies prohibits cell division and can result in cell death or genetic mutation. Such catastrophic consequences make topoisomerases an effective target for antibiotics and anticancer agents. Despite their biological and clinical importance, little is understood about how a topoisomerase differentiates DNA topologies in a molecule that is significantly larger than the topoisomerase itself. It has been proposed that type II topoisomerases recognize angle and curvature between two DNA helices characteristic of knotted and catenated DNA to account for the enzyme's preference to unlink instead of link DNA. Here we consider the electrostatic potential of DNA juxtapositions to determine the possibility of juxtapositions occurring through Brownian diffusion. We found that despite the large negative electrostatic potential formed between two juxtaposed DNA helices, a bulk counterion concentration as small as 50 mM provides sufficient electrostatic screening to prohibit significant interaction beyond an interhelical separation of 3 nm in both hooked and free juxtapositions. This suggests that instead of electrostatics, mechanical forces such as those occurring in anaphase, knots, catenanes, or the writhe of supercoiled DNA may be responsible for the formation of DNA juxtapositions

  6. [The kinetic and functional characteristics of DNA-dependent DNA-polymerases in Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuglyĭ, S V; Skripal', I G; Babichev, V V

    1993-01-01

    The kinetic and functional characteristics of I and II forms of DNA-dependent DNA-polymerases of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8 have been studied. It is stated that I form of DNA polymerase possesses 5'-3'-exonuclease activity and is a typical replicase; II form of DNA-polymerase possesses both 5'-3'-polymerase and 3'-5'-exonuclease activity and is, evidently, a reparase. Both forms of enzyme give preference to poly(U)- and poly(A)-matrices having extremely high activity on these polymers. The enzymatic reactions realized by both forms of DNA-polymerases are described by the first-order equation. The calculated Michaelis-Menten constants equaled 180 and 250 microM for I and II forms of polymerases, respectively. It indicates that affinity to substrate in II form of polymerase is one-third higher than in I form of enzyme.

  7. Controlling Self-Assembly Kinetics of DNA-Functionalized Liposomes Using Toehold Exchange Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Lucia; Kotar, Jurij; Di Michele, Lorenzo; Mognetti, Bortolo M

    2016-02-23

    The selectivity of Watson-Crick base pairing has allowed the design of DNA-based functional materials bearing an unprecedented level of accuracy. Examples include DNA origami, made of tiles assembling into arbitrarily complex shapes, and DNA coated particles featuring rich phase behaviors. Frequently, the realization of conceptual DNA-nanotechnology designs has been hampered by the lack of strategies for effectively controlling relaxations. In this article, we address the problem of kinetic control on DNA-mediated interactions between Brownian objects. We design a kinetic pathway based on toehold-exchange mechanisms that enables rearrangement of DNA bonds without the need for thermal denaturation, and test it on suspensions of DNA-functionalized liposomes, demonstrating tunability of aggregation rates over more than 1 order of magnitude. While the possibility to design complex phase behaviors using DNA as a glue is already well recognized, our results demonstrate control also over the kinetics of such systems.

  8. A Microneedle Functionalized with Polyethyleneimine and Nanotubes for Highly Sensitive, Label-Free Quantification of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Saadat-Moghaddam, Darius; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The accurate measure of DNA concentration is necessary for many DNA-based biological applications. However, the current methods are limited in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility, human error, and contamination. Here, we present a microneedle functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for the highly sensitive quantification of DNA. The microneedle was fabricated using ultraviolet (UV) lithography and anisotropic etching, and then functionalized w...

  9. Injection molded nanofluidic chips: Fabrication method and functional tests using single-molecule DNA experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, Pawel; Persson, Karl Fredrik; Kristensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that fabrication of nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of polymers. We functionally test our devices by single-molecule DNA experiments in nanochannels.......We demonstrate that fabrication of nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of polymers. We functionally test our devices by single-molecule DNA experiments in nanochannels....

  10. Functions and Dynamics of DNA Repair Proteins in Mitosis and Meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uringa

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMy PhD project encompassed studies on the functions of several different proteins, all involved in DNA repair, in somatic and germ-line cells. Hr6b and Rad18Sc are involved in a DNA repair mechanism called ‘Replicative Damage Bypass’ (RDB), and function as ubiquitin conjugating

  11. Optical tweezers studies of viral DNA packaging: Motor function and DNA confinement in Bacteriophages phi29, lambda, and T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas

    2007-03-01

    In the assembly of many viruses a powerful molecular motor translocates the genome into a pre-assembled capsid. We use optical tweezers to directly measure translocation of a single DNA molecule into the viral capsid. Improved techniques allow us to measure initiation and early stages of packaging. With phi29 the DNA terminal protein was found to cause large variations in the starting point of packaging. Removal of this protein results in terminal initiation, permitting more accurate assessment of motor function and DNA confinement forces. We investigated the role of electrostatic repulsion by varying ionic screening of the DNA. The observed trends are in accord with those theoretically expected considering counter-ion competition; however the forces are larger than expected in comparison with recent theories and DNA ejection measurements. We have recently succeeded in extending our methods to study two other phages: lambda and T4. These systems have unique structural and functional features, presenting an opportunity for comparative studies in this family of molecular motors. Initial measurements show that lambda and T4 translocate DNA several times faster than the phi29 motor, but are more sensitive to applied load.

  12. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in rat epidermis as a function of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, E.V.; Burns, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in proliferating rat epidermal cells diminished progressively with increasing age of the animal. The dorsal skin was irradiated with 1200 rad of 0.8 MeV electrons at various ages, and the amount of DNA damage was determined as a function of time after irradiation by the method of alkaline unwinding followed by S 1 nuclease digestion. The amount of DNA damage immediately after irradiation was not age dependent, while the rate of damage removal from the DNA decreased with increasing age. By fitting an exponential function to the relative amount of undamaged DNA as a function of time after irradiation, DNA repair halftimes of 20, 27, 69, and 107 min were obtained for 28, 100-, 200-, and 400-day-old animals, respectively

  13. Left-handed Z-DNA: structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, A.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Z-DNA is a high energy conformer of B-DNA that forms in vivo during transcription as a result of torsional strain generated by a moving polymerase. An understanding of the biological role of Z-DNA has advanced with the discovery that the RNA editing enzyme double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase type I (ADAR1) has motifs specific for the Z-DNA conformation. Editing by ADAR1 requires a double-stranded RNA substrate. In the cases known, the substrate is formed by folding an intron back onto the exon that is targeted for modification. The use of introns to direct processing of exons requires that editing occurs before splicing. Recognition of Z-DNA by ADAR1 may allow editing of nascent transcripts to be initiated immediately after transcription, ensuring that editing and splicing are performed in the correct sequence. Structural characterization of the Z-DNA binding domain indicates that it belongs to the winged helix-turn-helix class of proteins and is similar to the globular domain of histone-H5.

  14. Evaluation of Fluorescent Analogs of Deoxycytidine for Monitoring DNA Transitions from Duplex to Functional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogini P. Bhavsar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Topological variants of single-strand DNA (ssDNA structures, referred to as “functional DNA,” have been detected in regulatory regions of many genes and are thought to affect gene expression. Two fluorescent analogs of deoxycytidine, Pyrrolo-dC (PdC and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tC∘, can be incorporated into DNA. Here, we describe spectroscopic studies of both analogs to determine fluorescent properties that report on structural transitions from double-strand DNA (dsDNA to ssDNA, a common pathway in the transition to functional DNA structures. We obtained fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD spectra, steady-state fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes of the fluorophores in DNA. Our results show that PdC is advantageous in fluorescence lifetime studies because of a distinct ~2 ns change between paired and unpaired bases. However, tC∘ is a better probe for FDCD experiments that report on the helical structure of DNA surrounding the fluorophore. Both fluorophores provide complementary data to measure DNA structural transitions.

  15. DNA breathing dynamics: analytic results for distribution functions of relevant Brownian functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Malay; Gupta, Shamik; Segal, Dvira

    2011-03-01

    We investigate DNA breathing dynamics by suggesting and examining several Brownian functionals associated with bubble lifetime and reactivity. Bubble dynamics is described as an overdamped random walk in the number of broken base pairs. The walk takes place on the Poland-Scheraga free-energy landscape. We suggest several probability distribution functions that characterize the breathing process, and adopt the recently studied backward Fokker-Planck method and the path decomposition method as elegant and flexible tools for deriving these distributions. In particular, for a bubble of an initial size x₀, we derive analytical expressions for (i) the distribution P(t{f}|x₀) of the first-passage time t{f}, characterizing the bubble lifetime, (ii) the distribution P(A|x₀) of the area A until the first-passage time, providing information about the effective reactivity of the bubble to processes within the DNA, (iii) the distribution P(M) of the maximum bubble size M attained before the first-passage time, and (iv) the joint probability distribution P(M,t{m}) of the maximum bubble size M and the time t{m} of its occurrence before the first-passage time. These distributions are analyzed in the limit of small and large bubble sizes. We supplement our analytical predictions with direct numericalsimulations of the related Langevin equation, and obtain a very good agreement in the appropriate limits. The nontrivial scaling behavior of the various quantities analyzed here can, in principle, be explored experimentally.

  16. Functional analysis of multiple single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Methanosarcina acetivorans and their effects on DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase BI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Justin B; Murphy, Mary C; White, Bryan A; Mackie, Roderick I; Ha, Taekjip; Cann, Isaac K O

    2004-02-20

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and their functional homologs, replication protein A, are essential components of cellular DNA replication, repair and recombination. We describe here the isolation and characterization of multiple replication protein A homologs, RPA1, RPA2, and RPA3, from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans. RPA1 comprises four single-stranded DNA-binding domains, while RPA2 and RPA3 are each composed of two such domains and a zinc finger domain. Gel filtration analysis suggested that RPA1 exists as homotetramers and homodimers in solution, while RPA2 and RPA3 form only homodimers. Unlike the multiple RPA proteins found in other Archaea and eukaryotes, each of the M. acetivorans RPAs can act as a distinct single-stranded DNA-binding protein. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence polarization anisotropy studies revealed that the M. acetivorans RPAs bind to as few as 10 single-stranded DNA bases. However, more stable binding is achieved with single-stranded DNA of 18-23 bases, and for such substrates the estimated Kd was 3.82 +/- 0.28 nM, 173.6 +/- 105.17 nM, and 5.92 +/- 0.23 nM, for RPA1, RPA2, and RPA3, respectively. The architectures of the M. acetivorans RPAs are different from those of hitherto reported homologs. Thus, these proteins may represent novel forms of replication protein A. Most importantly, our results show that the three RPAs and their combinations highly stimulate the primer extension capacity of M. acetivorans DNA polymerase BI. Although bacterial SSB and eukaryotic RPA have been shown to stimulate DNA synthesis by their cognate DNA polymerases, our findings provide the first in vitro biochemical evidence for the conservation of this property in an archaeon.

  17. RNA-directed DNA methylation: Mechanisms and functions

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2010-07-01

    Epigenetic RNA based gene silencing mechanisms play a major role in genome stability and control of gene expression. Transcriptional gene silencing via RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) guides the epigenetic regulation of the genome in response to disease states, growth, developmental and stress signals. RdDM machinery is composed of proteins that produce and modify 24-nt- long siRNAs, recruit the RdDM complex to genomic targets, methylate DNA and remodel chromatin. The final DNA methylation pattern is determined by either DNA methyltransferase alone or by the combined action of DNA methyltransferases and demethylases. The dynamic interaction between RdDM and demethylases may render the plant epigenome plastic to growth, developmental, and environmental cues. The epigenome plasticity may allow the plant genome to assume many epigenomes and to have the right epigenome at the right time in response to intracellular or extracellular stimuli. This review discusses recent advances in RdDM research and considers future perspectives.

  18. Reverse gyrase functions in genome integrity maintenance by protecting DNA breaks in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Wenyuan; Feng, Xu; She, Qunxin

    2017-01-01

    Reverse gyrase introduces positive supercoils to circular DNA and is implicated in genome stability maintenance in thermophiles. The extremely thermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus encodes two reverse gyrase proteins, TopR1 (topoisomerase reverse gyrase 1) and TopR2, whose functions in thermophili...... genomic DNA degradation during MMS treatment, accompanied by a higher rate of cell death. Taken together, these results indicate that TopR1 probably facilitates genome integrity maintenance by protecting DNA breaks from thermo-degradation in vivo....

  19. DNA binding and unwinding by Hel308 helicase requires dual functions of a winged helix domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northall, Sarah J; Buckley, Ryan; Jones, Nathan; Penedo, J Carlos; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L

    2017-09-01

    Hel308 helicases promote genome stability linked to DNA replication in archaea, and have homologues in metazoans. In the crystal structure of archaeal Hel308 bound to a tailed DNA duplex, core helicase domains encircle single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in a "ratchet" for directional translocation. A winged helix domain (WHD) is also present, but its function is mysterious. We investigated the WHD in full-length Hel308, identifying that mutations in a solvent exposed α-helix resulted in reduced DNA binding and unwinding activities. When isolated from the rest of Hel308, the WHD protein alone bound to duplex DNA but not ssDNA, and DNA binding by WHD protein was abolished by the same mutations as were analyzed in full-length Hel308. Isolated WHD from a human Hel308 homologue (HelQ) also bound to duplex DNA. By disrupting the interface between the Hel308 WHD and a RecA-like domain, a topology typical of Ski2 helicases, we show that this is crucial for ATPase and helicase activities. The data suggest a model in which the WHD promotes activity of Hel308 directly, through binding to duplex DNA that is distinct from ssDNA binding by core helicase, and indirectly through interaction with the RecA-like domain. We propose how the WHD may contribute to ssDNA translocation, resulting in DNA helicase activity or in removal of other DNA bound proteins by "reeling" ssDNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PIG3 Functions in DNA Damage Response through Regulating DNA-PKcs Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Yin, Jiao-Jiao; Xu, Qin-Zhi; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Shi-Meng; Guan, Hua; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2013-01-01

    The p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) recently has been reported to be a new player in DNA damage signaling and response, but the crucial mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, the potential mechanism of PIG3 participation in the DNA damage response induced by ionizing radiation (IR) was investigated in multiple cell lines with depleted expression of PIG3 transiently or stably by the small interference RNA and lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression strategies. PIG3 knockdown led to an abnor...

  1. Amsacta moorei entomopoxvirus encodes a functional DNA photolyase (AMV025)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalcacioglu, R.; Dizman, Y.A.; Vlak, J.M.; Demirbag, Z.; Oers, van M.M.

    2010-01-01

    The major damage induced in DNA by ultraviolet light is the induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Amsacta moorei entomopoxvirus (AMEV) encodes a CPD photolyase (AMV025) with a putative role in converting these dimers back into monomers. In infected Lymantria dispar cells transcription

  2. Establishment and functions of DNA methylation in the germline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart-Morgan, Kathleen; Veselovska, Lenka; Kelsey, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications established during gametogenesis regulate transcription and other nuclear processes in gametes, but also have influences in the zygote, embryo and postnatal life. This is best understood for DNA methylation which, established at discrete regions of the oocyte and sperm...

  3. Functional DNA-containing nanomaterials: cellular applications in biosensing, imaging, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Lv, Yifan; Gong, Liang; Wang, Ruowen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA performs a vital function as a carrier of genetic code, but in the field of nanotechnology, DNA molecules can catalyze chemical reactions in the cell, that is, DNAzymes, or bind with target-specific ligands, that is, aptamers. These functional DNAs with different modifications have been developed for sensing, imaging, and therapeutic systems. Thus, functional DNAs hold great promise for future applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. However, these functional DNAs face challenges, especially in the field of biomedicine. For example, functional DNAs typically require the use of cationic transfection reagents to realize cellular uptake. Such reagents enter the cells, increasing the difficulty of performing bioassays in vivo and potentially damaging the cell's nucleus. To address this obstacle, nanomaterials, such as metallic, carbon, silica, or magnetic materials, have been utilized as DNA carriers or assistants. In this Account, we describe selected examples of functional DNA-containing nanomaterials and their applications from our recent research and those of others. As models, we have chosen to highlight DNA/nanomaterial complexes consisting of gold nanoparticles, graphene oxides, and aptamer-micelles, and we illustrate the potential of such complexes in biosensing, imaging, and medical diagnostics. Under proper conditions, multiple ligand-receptor interactions, decreased steric hindrance, and increased surface roughness can be achieved from a high density of DNA that is bound to the surface of nanomaterials, resulting in a higher affinity for complementary DNA and other targets. In addition, this high density of DNA causes a high local salt concentration and negative charge density, which can prevent DNA degradation. For example, DNAzymes assembled on gold nanoparticles can effectively catalyze chemical reactions even in living cells. And it has been confirmed that DNA-nanomaterial complexes can enter cells more easily than free single

  4. DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor based on gold nanoparticle amplification for Bacillus anthracis detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rong-Zhang; Song, Hong-Bin; Zuo, Guo-Min; Yang, Rui-Fu; Wei, Hong-Ping; Wang, Dian-Bing; Cui, Zong-Qiang; Zhang, ZhiPing; Cheng, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Xian-En

    2011-04-15

    The rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, has gained much attention since the anthrax spore bioterrorism attacks in the United States in 2001. In this work, a DNA probe functionalized quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor was developed to detect B. anthracis based on the recognition of its specific DNA sequences, i.e., the 168 bp fragment of the Ba813 gene in chromosomes and the 340 bp fragment of the pag gene in plasmid pXO1. A thiol DNA probe was immobilized onto the QCM gold surface through self-assembly via Au-S bond formation to hybridize with the target ss-DNA sequence obtained by asymmetric PCR. Hybridization between the target DNA and the DNA probe resulted in an increase in mass and a decrease in the resonance frequency of the QCM biosensor. Moreover, to amplify the signal, a thiol-DNA fragment complementary to the other end of the target DNA was functionalized with gold nanoparticles. The results indicate that the DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor could specifically recognize the target DNA fragment of B. anthracis from that of its closest species, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, and that the limit of detection (LOD) reached 3.5 × 10(2)CFU/ml of B. anthracis vegetative cells just after asymmetric PCR amplification, but without culture enrichment. The DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor demonstrated stable, pollution-free, real-time sensing, and could find application in the rapid detection of B. anthracis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional cloning using pFB retroviral cDNA expression libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, Katherine A; Chen, Keith; Zaharee, Kim; Sundar, Latha; Limjoco, Jamie; Miller, Anna; Vaillancourt, Peter

    2002-09-01

    Retroviral cDNA expression libraries allow the efficient introduction of complex cDNA libraries into virtually any mitotic cell type for screening based on gene function. The cDNA copy number per cell can be easily controlled by adjusting the multiplicity of infection, thus cell populations may be generated in which >90% of infected cells contain one to three cDNAs. We describe the isolation of two known oncogenes and one cell-surface receptor from a human Burkitt's lymphoma (Daudi) cDNA library inserted into the high-titer retroviral vector pFB.

  6. An AP endonuclease functions in active DNA demethylation and gene imprinting in Arabidopsis [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair, beginning with removal of methylated cytosine by the ROS1/DME subfamily of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases. Active DNA demethylation in animals requires the DNA glycosylase TDG or MBD4, which functions after oxidation or deamination of 5-methylcytosine, respectively. However, little is known about the steps following DNA glycosylase action in the active DNA demethylation pathways in plants and animals. We show here that the Arabidopsis APE1L protein has apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities and functions downstream of ROS1 and DME. APE1L and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of ape1l mutant plants revealed widespread alterations in DNA methylation. We show that the ape1l/zdp double mutant displays embryonic lethality. Notably, the ape1l+/-zdp-/- mutant shows a maternal-effect lethality phenotype. APE1L and the DNA phosphatase ZDP are required for FWA and MEA gene imprinting in the endosperm and are important for seed development. Thus, APE1L is a new component of the active DNA demethylation pathway and, together with ZDP, regulates gene imprinting in Arabidopsis.

  7. DNA-Damage-Induced Type I Interferon Promotes Senescence and Inhibits Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiujing Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Expression of type I interferons (IFNs can be induced by DNA-damaging agents, but the mechanisms and significance of this regulation are not completely understood. We found that the transcription factor IRF3, activated in an ATM-IKKα/β-dependent manner, stimulates cell-autonomous IFN-β expression in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. Cells and tissues with accumulating DNA damage produce endogenous IFN-β and stimulate IFN signaling in vitro and in vivo. In turn, IFN acts to amplify DNA-damage responses, activate the p53 pathway, promote senescence, and inhibit stem cell function in response to telomere shortening. Inactivation of the IFN pathway abrogates the development of diverse progeric phenotypes and extends the lifespan of Terc knockout mice. These data identify DNA-damage-response-induced IFN signaling as a critical mechanism that links accumulating DNA damage with senescence and premature aging.

  8. Structure/Function Studies of the Androgen Receptor DNA-Binding Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2004-01-01

    .... The research goals associated with this study are to characterize the structural and functional aspects of the AR in order to uncover the potential of its domains, and in particular the DNA-binding...

  9. Structure/Function Studies of the Androgen Receptor DNA-Binding Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2003-01-01

    .... The research goals associated with this study are to characterize the structural and functional aspects of the AR in order to uncover the potential of its domains, and in particular the DNA-binding...

  10. Determining the RAD51-DNA Nucleoprotein Filament Structure and Function by Cryo-Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingyun; Xu, Jingfei; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal tool for DNA double-strand break and replication fork repair, and it is catalyzed by a highly conserved family of recombinases. In eukaryotes, Rad51 is the recombinase that catalyzes the pairing of homologous DNA molecules and the exchange of strands between the paired molecules. Rad51 assembles on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) stemming from lesion processing to form a right-handed helical polymer that engages then samples double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) for homology. Upon matching with a homologous sequence, the Rad51-bound ssDNA invades the dsDNA, leading to the formation of a DNA joint with concomitant displacement of the strand of like polarity. The Rad51-DNA filaments are amenable to structural studies using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). In particular, recent technical breakthroughs in cryo-EM have made it possible to define the structure and function of human RAD51 at near-atomic resolution. In this chapter, we describe our cryo-EM approach to capture the human RAD51 filament structures in various stages of catalysis. The approach may also be useful for related recombinases and other helical assemblies. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of DNA repair polymorphisms with DNA repair functional outcomes in healthy human subjects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, Pavel; Štětina, R.; Poláková, Veronika; Tulupová, Elena; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Kumar, R.; Hánová, Monika; Pardini, Barbara; Slyšková, Jana; Musak, L.; De Palma, G.; Souček, P.; Hemminki, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2007), s. 657-664 ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563; GA ČR GA310/05/2626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Base excision DNA * Single-strand breaks * Peripheral blood lymphocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.406, year: 2007

  12. Imparting the unique properties of DNA into complex material architectures and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Phyllis F.; Noh, Hyunwoo; Lee, Ju Hun; Domaille, Dylan W.; Nakatsuka, Matthew A.; Goodwin, Andrew P.; Cha, Jennifer N.

    2014-01-01

    While the remarkable chemical and biological properties of DNA have been known for decades, these properties have only been imparted into materials with unprecedented function much more recently. The inimitable ability of DNA to form programmable, complex assemblies through stable, specific, and reversible molecular recognition has allowed the creation of new materials through DNA’s ability to control a material’s architecture and properties. In this review we discuss recent progress in how DNA has brought unmatched function to materials, focusing specifically on new advances in delivery agents, devices, and sensors. PMID:25525408

  13. Analysis of DNA polymerase ν function in meiotic recombination, immunoglobulin class-switching, and DNA damage tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei-Ichi Takata

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerase ν (pol ν, encoded by the POLN gene, is an A-family DNA polymerase in vertebrates and some other animal lineages. Here we report an in-depth analysis of pol ν-defective mice and human cells. POLN is very weakly expressed in most tissues, with the highest relative expression in testis. We constructed multiple mouse models for Poln disruption and detected no anatomic abnormalities, alterations in lifespan, or changed causes of mortality. Mice with inactive Poln are fertile and have normal testis morphology. However, pol ν-disrupted mice have a modestly reduced crossover frequency at a meiotic recombination hot spot harboring insertion/deletion polymorphisms. These polymorphisms are suggested to generate a looped-out primer and a hairpin structure during recombination, substrates on which pol ν can operate. Pol ν-defective mice had no alteration in DNA end-joining during immunoglobulin class-switching, in contrast to animals defective in the related DNA polymerase θ (pol θ. We examined the response to DNA crosslinking agents, as purified pol ν has some ability to bypass major groove peptide adducts and residues of DNA crosslink repair. Inactivation of Poln in mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not alter cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C, cisplatin, or aldehydes. Depletion of POLN from human cells with shRNA or siRNA did not change cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C or alter the frequency of mitomycin C-induced radial chromosomes. Our results suggest a function of pol ν in meiotic homologous recombination in processing specific substrates. The restricted and more recent evolutionary appearance of pol ν (in comparison to pol θ supports such a specialized role.

  14. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eRiviere

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster’s developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5’-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment.

  15. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5′-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  16. Co-transcriptional production of RNA–DNA hybrids for simultaneous release of multiple split functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonin, Kirill A.; Desai, Ravi; Viard, Mathias; Kireeva, Maria L.; Bindewald, Eckart; Case, Christopher L.; Maciag, Anna E.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Kim, Taejin; Sappe, Alison; Stepler, Marissa; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Kashlev, Mikhail; Blumenthal, Robert; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Control over the simultaneous delivery of different functionalities and their synchronized intracellular activation can greatly benefit the fields of RNA and DNA biomedical nanotechnologies and allow for the production of nanoparticles and various switching devices with controllable functions. We present a system of multiple split functionalities embedded in the cognate pairs of RNA–DNA hybrids which are programmed to recognize each other, re-associate and form a DNA duplex while also releasing the split RNA fragments which upon association regain their original functions. Simultaneous activation of three different functionalities (RNAi, Förster resonance energy transfer and RNA aptamer) confirmed by multiple in vitro and cell culture experiments prove the concept. To automate the design process, a novel computational tool that differentiates between the thermodynamic stabilities of RNA–RNA, RNA–DNA and DNA–DNA duplexes was developed. Moreover, here we demonstrate that besides being easily produced by annealing synthetic RNAs and DNAs, the individual hybrids carrying longer RNAs can be produced by RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of single-stranded DNA templates. PMID:24194608

  17. A Green's Function Approach to Simulate DNA Damage by the Indirect Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cicinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage is of fundamental importance in the understanding of the effects of ionizing radiation. DNA is damaged by the direct effect of radiation (e.g. direct ionization) and by indirect effect (e.g. damage by.OH radicals created by the radiolysis of water). Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains. In the recent years, the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE) have been used extensively in biochemistry [1], notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space [2]. In our future work on DNA damage, we wish to use an approach based on the GFDE to refine existing models on the indirect effect of ionizing radiation on DNA. To do so, we will use the code RITRACKS [3] developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center to simulate the radiation track structure and calculate the position of radiolytic species after irradiation. We have also recently developed an efficient Monte-Carlo sampling algorithm for the GFDE of reversible reactions with an intermediate state [4], which can be modified and adapted to simulate DNA damage by free radicals. To do so, we will use the known reaction rate constants between radicals (OH, eaq, H,...) and the DNA bases, sugars and phosphates and use the sampling algorithms to simulate the diffusion of free radicals and chemical reactions with DNA. These techniques should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the formation of DNA damage and double-strand breaks.

  18. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Leigh, Mary Beth; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based molecular techniques permit the comprehensive determination of microbial diversity but generally do not reveal the relationship between the identity and the function of microorganisms. The first direct molecular technique to enable the linkage of phylogeny with function is DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP). Applying this method first helped describe the utilization of simple compounds, such as methane, methanol or glucose and has since been used to detect microbial communities active in the utilization of a wide variety of compounds, including various xenobiotics. The principle of the method lies in providing 13C-labeled substrate to a microbial community and subsequent analyses of the 13C-DNA isolated from the community. Isopycnic centrifugation permits separating 13C-labeled DNA of organisms that utilized the substrate from 12C-DNA of the inactive majority. As the whole metagenome of active populations is isolated, its follow-up analysis provides successful taxonomic identification as well as the potential for functional gene analyses. Because of its power, DNA-SIP has become one of the leading techniques of microbial ecology research. But from other point of view, it is a labor-intensive method that requires careful attention to detail during each experimental step in order to avoid misinterpretation of results.

  19. Differential roles for Fos and Jun in DNA-binding: redox-dependent and independent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, L; Forrest, D; Curran, T

    1993-01-01

    The Fos and Jun family of transcription factors contain an invariant sequence motif lysine-cysteine-arginine (KCR) in the highly conserved DNA-binding region. Reduction of the cysteine residue is necessary to facilitate DNA-binding. Here, we examined the potential dual roles of the flanking lysine and arginine residues in influencing the redox reactivity of the cysteine and the DNA-binding activity of Fos and Jun. Two sets of Fos and Jun mutants were generated: the KCR and KSR series representing proteins capable of redox-dependent and redox-independent DNA-binding activity, respectively. Mutation of the lysine in Fos-Jun heterodimers had no obvious effect on the redox reactivity of the cysteine, suggesting that lysine is not essential in this respect. However, mutation of the arginine but not lysine, in both the KCR and the KSR series abolished DNA-binding activity. Thus, the arginine but not the lysine residue in the KCR motif is critical for both redox-dependent and redox-independent functions in DNA-binding. Surprisingly, the triple substitution, ISI, exhibited high levels of DNA-binding activity. This demonstrates that the effects of amino acid substitutions can be highly dependent on context and that non-basic amino acids can function efficiently in DNA-binding. Analysis of combinations of wild-type and mutant Fos and Jun proteins indicated that Fos was dominant in dictating the DNA-binding ability of Fos-Jun heterodimers. This suggests that the lysine and arginine residues in the KCR region of Fos are not equivalent to those in Jun and that they interact with DNA differently. Images PMID:8290340

  20. Computational and experimental studies of reassociating RNA/DNA hybrids containing split functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonin, Kirill A; Bindewald, Eckart; Kireeva, Maria; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel technique based on RNA/DNA hybrid reassociation that allows conditional activation of different split functionalities inside diseased cells and in vivo. We further expanded this idea to permit simultaneous activation of multiple different functions in a fully controllable fashion. In this chapter, we discuss some novel computational approaches and experimental techniques aimed at the characterization, design, and production of reassociating RNA/DNA hybrids containing split functionalities. We also briefly describe several experimental techniques that can be used to test these hybrids in vitro and in vivo. 2015 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. DNA biosensors implemented on PNA-functionalized microstructured optical fibers Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candiani, A.; Giannetti, S.; Cucinotta, A.; Bertucci, A.; Manicardi, A.; Konstantaki, M.; Margulis, W.; Pissadakis, S.; Corradini, R.; Selleri, S.

    2013-05-01

    A novel DNA sensing platform based on a Peptide Nucleic Acid - functionalized Microstructured Optical Fibers gratings has been demonstrated. The inner surface of different MOFs has been functionalized using PNA probes, OligoNucleotides mimic that are well suited for specific DNA target sequences detection. The hybrid sensing systems were tested for optical DNA detection of targets of relevance in biomedical application, using the cystic fibrosis gene mutation, and food-analysis, using the genomic DNA from genetic modified organism soy flour. After the solutions of DNA molecules has been infiltrated inside the fibers capillaries and hybridization has occurred, oligonucleotidefunctionalized gold nanoparticles were infiltrated and used to form a sandwich-like system to achieve signal amplification. Spectral measurements of the reflected signal reveal a clear wavelength shift of the reflected modes when the infiltrated complementary DNA matches with the PNA probes placed on the inner fiber surface. Measurements have also been made using the mismatched DNA solution for the c, containing a single nucleotide polymorphism, showing no significant changes in the reflected spectrum. Several experiments have been carried out demonstrating the reproducibility of the results and the high selectivity of the sensors, showing the simplicity and the potential of this approach.

  2. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasugi Masaki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA, and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the DNA methylation status of 899 nuclear mt genes in the liver, brain, and heart tissues of mouse, and identified 636 nuclear mt genes carrying tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs. These nuclar mt genes are involved in various mitochondrial functions and they also include genes related to human diseases. T-DMRs regulate the expression of nuclear mt genes. Nuclear mt genes with tissue-specific hypomethylated T-DMRs were characterized by enrichment of the target genes of specific transcription factors such as FOXA2 in the liver, and CEBPA and STAT1 in the brain. Conclusions A substantial proportion of nuclear mt genes contained T-DMRs, and the DNA methylation status of numerous T-DMRs should underlie tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions.

  3. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Kato

    Full Text Available The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING, resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  4. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K m , low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

  6. Complex ABCC8 DNA variations in congenital hyperinsulinism: lessons from functional studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzyamba, Morris; Farzaneh, Tabasum; Behe, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    singly or in combination led to intracellular retention of the channel complex and loss of function. By contrast, V1572I is trafficked appropriately and is functional, consistent with a mechanism of reduction to hemizygosity of paternal ABCC8 in focal disease. V1572I is likely to be a benign DNA variant...

  7. Tcf4 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity, DNA Methylation, and Memory Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Kennedy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Tcf4 leads to a rare autism spectrum disorder called Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS, which is associated with severe language impairment and development delay. Here, we demonstrate that Tcf4 haploinsufficient mice have deficits in social interaction, ultrasonic vocalization, prepulse inhibition, and spatial and associative learning and memory. Despite learning deficits, Tcf4(+/− mice have enhanced long-term potentiation in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In translationally oriented studies, we found that small-molecule HDAC inhibitors normalized hippocampal LTP and memory recall. A comprehensive set of next-generation sequencing experiments of hippocampal mRNA and methylated DNA isolated from Tcf4-deficient and WT mice before or shortly after experiential learning, with or without administration of vorinostat, identified “memory-associated” genes modulated by HDAC inhibition and dysregulated by Tcf4 haploinsufficiency. Finally, we observed that Hdac2 isoform-selective knockdown was sufficient to rescue memory deficits in Tcf4(+/− mice.

  8. Tcf4 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity, DNA Methylation, and Memory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Andrew J; Rahn, Elizabeth J; Paulukaitis, Brynna S; Savell, Katherine E; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Wang, Jing; Lewis, John W; Posey, Jessica; Strange, Sarah K; Guzman-Karlsson, Mikael C; Phillips, Scott E; Decker, Kyle; Motley, S Timothy; Swayze, Eric E; Ecker, David J; Michael, Todd P; Day, Jeremy J; Sweatt, J David

    2016-09-06

    Human haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Tcf4 leads to a rare autism spectrum disorder called Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), which is associated with severe language impairment and development delay. Here, we demonstrate that Tcf4 haploinsufficient mice have deficits in social interaction, ultrasonic vocalization, prepulse inhibition, and spatial and associative learning and memory. Despite learning deficits, Tcf4(+/-) mice have enhanced long-term potentiation in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In translationally oriented studies, we found that small-molecule HDAC inhibitors normalized hippocampal LTP and memory recall. A comprehensive set of next-generation sequencing experiments of hippocampal mRNA and methylated DNA isolated from Tcf4-deficient and WT mice before or shortly after experiential learning, with or without administration of vorinostat, identified "memory-associated" genes modulated by HDAC inhibition and dysregulated by Tcf4 haploinsufficiency. Finally, we observed that Hdac2 isoform-selective knockdown was sufficient to rescue memory deficits in Tcf4(+/-) mice. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA methylation and cognitive functioning in healthy older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiepers, O.J.G.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; de Groot, R.H.M.; Jolles, J.; Kok, F.J.; Verhoef, P.; Durga, J.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term supplementation with folic acid may improve cognitive performance in older individuals. The relationship between folate status and cognitive performance might be mediated by changes in methylation capacity, as methylation reactions are important for normal functioning of the brain.

  10. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; White, Malcolm F.

    2015-01-01

    encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U......-shaped binding path for ssDNA. The recombinant gp18 showed an ssDNA annealing activity often associated with helicases and recombinases. To gain insight into the biological role of the entire operon, we characterized SIRV2 gp19 and showed it to possess a 5'→3' ssDNA exonuclease activity, in addition...... for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair....

  11. Mitochondrial DNA damage and vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Holbrook, Monica; Westbrook, David G; Brown, Jamelle A; Feeley, Kyle P; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A; Berk, Brittany D; Weisbrod, Robert M; Widlansky, Michael E; Gokce, Noyan; Ballinger, Scott W; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2016-03-31

    Prior studies demonstrate mitochondrial dysfunction with increased reactive oxygen species generation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA promotes atherosclerosis in animal models. Thus, we evaluated the relation of mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells s with vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We assessed non-invasive vascular function and mitochondrial DNA damage in 275 patients (age 57 ± 9 years, 60 % women) with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease alone (N = 55), diabetes mellitus alone (N = 74), combined atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus (N = 48), and controls age >45 without diabetes mellitus or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (N = 98). Mitochondrial DNA damage measured by quantitative PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher with clinical atherosclerosis alone (0.55 ± 0.65), diabetes mellitus alone (0.65 ± 1.0), and combined clinical atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus (0.89 ± 1.32) as compared to control subjects (0.23 ± 0.64, P mitochondrial DNA damage levels (β = 0.14 ± 0.13, P = 0.04 and β = 0.21 ± 0.13, P = 0.002, respectively). Higher mitochondrial DNA damage was associated with higher baseline pulse amplitude, a measure of arterial pulsatility, but not with flow-mediated dilation or hyperemic response, measures of vasodilator function. We found greater mitochondrial DNA damage in patients with diabetes mellitus and clinical atherosclerosis. The association of mitochondrial DNA damage and baseline pulse amplitude may suggest a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive small artery pulsatility with potentially adverse microvascular impact.

  12. Function of ZFAND3 in the DNA Damage Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    for its annealing, branch migration, and fork regression functions. While vertebrate SMARCAL1 proteins contain two HARP domains, invertebrate SMARCAL1...aeration and respiratory distress. Many of the Hat12/2 neonates also display significant craniofacial defects with abnormalities in the bones of the skull ...diacetylation occurs specifically on lysine residues 5 and 12 and this precise pattern is widely conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution . The acetylation

  13. [Inhibitors of nucleic acid synthesis as a means of identifying the forms of DNA-dependent DNA polymerases in Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8 and of determining their functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripal', I G; Bezuglyĭ, S V; Babichev, V V

    1993-01-01

    Antibiotics, inhibitors of nucleic acids' synthesis from the group of chromomycins (olivomycin of sodium salt), anthracyclines (carminomycin and doxorubicin) and streptonigrin (bruneomycin) have been studied for their effect on DNA synthesis in vitro performed by DNA polymerases (1st and 2nd forms) of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8. It has been stated that olivomycin inhibits the function of both the first and second forms of DNA polymerases in proportion to an increase of the antibiotic concentration in the medium. Carminomycin in the concentration of about 1 microgram/ml almost completely inhibited the activity of both DNA polymerases. However, doxorubicin also belonging to the group of anthracyclins completely inhibited the activity of the first form of DNA polymerase in the concentration of 1 microgram/ml and practically has no effect in the concentration up to 100 micrograms/ml on the activity of the second form possessing 3'-->5'-function. Streptonigrin also proved to be suitable for differentiate the forms of DNA polymerases and to determine their functions. The first form of DNA polymerase with 5'-->3'-polymerase and exonuclease functions was not sensitive by this antibiotic in the concentration of 1000 micrograms/ml, while the activity of the second form of DNA polymerase with 3'-->5'-exonuclease functions was fully inhibited by this concentration of the antibiotic in the medium. The combination of doxorhubicin and streptonigrin in the medium can be used to determine the form of DNA polymerases and to identify their 5'-->3'- or 3'-->5'-exonuclease function and for selectivity inhibition of the function of one or another DNA polymerase in the medium.

  14. Functional evaluation of malaria Pfs25 DNA vaccine by in vivo electroporation in olive baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nyakundi, Ruth; Kariuki, Thomas; Ozwara, Hastings; Nyamongo, Onkoba; Mlambo, Godfree; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2013-06-28

    Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 antigen, expressed on the surface of zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the leading targets for the development of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). Our laboratory has been evaluating DNA plasmid based Pfs25 vaccine in mice and non-human primates. Previously, we established that in vivo electroporation (EP) delivery is an effective method to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Pfs25 in mice. In order to optimize the in vivo EP procedure and test for its efficacy in more clinically relevant larger animal models, we employed in vivo EP to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of Pfs25 encoding DNA vaccine in nonhuman primates (olive baboons, Papio anubis). The results showed that at a dose of 2.5mg DNA vaccine, antibody responses were significantly enhanced with EP as compared to without EP resulting in effective transmission blocking efficiency. Similar immunogenicity enhancing effect of EP was also observed with lower doses (0.5mg and 1mg) of DNA plasmids. Further, final boosting with a single dose of recombinant Pfs25 protein resulted in dramatically enhanced antibody titers and significantly increased functional transmission blocking efficiency. Our study suggests priming with DNA vaccine via EP along with protein boost regimen as an effective method to elicit potent immunogenicity of malaria DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates and provides the basis for further evaluation in human volunteers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure, function and evolution of the animal mitochondrial replicative DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaguni, Laurie S; Oliveira, Marcos T

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial replicative DNA helicase is essential for animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Deleterious mutations in the gene that encodes it cause mitochondrial dysfunction manifested in developmental delays, defects and arrest, limited life span, and a number of human pathogenic phenotypes that are recapitulated in animals across taxa. In fact, the replicative mtDNA helicase was discovered with the identification of human disease mutations in its nuclear gene, and based upon its deduced amino acid sequence homology with bacteriophage T7 gene 4 protein (T7 gp4), a bi-functional primase-helicase. Since that time, numerous investigations of its structure, mechanism, and physiological relevance have been reported, and human disease alleles have been modeled in the human, mouse, and Drosophila systems. Here, we review this literature and draw evolutionary comparisons that serve to shed light on its divergent features.

  16. DNA damage response and spindle assembly checkpoint function throughout the cell cycle to ensure genomic integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Errors in replication or segregation lead to DNA damage, mutations, and aneuploidies. Consequently, cells monitor these events and delay progression through the cell cycle so repair precedes division. The DNA damage response (DDR, which monitors DNA integrity, and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, which responds to defects in spindle attachment/tension during metaphase of mitosis and meiosis, are critical for preventing genome instability. Here we show that the DDR and SAC function together throughout the cell cycle to ensure genome integrity in C. elegans germ cells. Metaphase defects result in enrichment of SAC and DDR components to chromatin, and both SAC and DDR are required for metaphase delays. During persistent metaphase arrest following establishment of bi-oriented chromosomes, stability of the metaphase plate is compromised in the absence of DDR kinases ATR or CHK1 or SAC components, MAD1/MAD2, suggesting SAC functions in metaphase beyond its interactions with APC activator CDC20. In response to DNA damage, MAD2 and the histone variant CENPA become enriched at the nuclear periphery in a DDR-dependent manner. Further, depletion of either MAD1 or CENPA results in loss of peripherally associated damaged DNA. In contrast to a SAC-insensitive CDC20 mutant, germ cells deficient for SAC or CENPA cannot efficiently repair DNA damage, suggesting that SAC mediates DNA repair through CENPA interactions with the nuclear periphery. We also show that replication perturbations result in relocalization of MAD1/MAD2 in human cells, suggesting that the role of SAC in DNA repair is conserved.

  17. Uncoupling of satellite DNA and centromeric function in the genus Equus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Francesca M; Nergadze, Solomon G; Magnani, Elisa; Bertoni, Livia; Attolini, Carmen; Khoriauli, Lela; Raimondi, Elena; Giulotto, Elena

    2010-02-12

    In a previous study, we showed that centromere repositioning, that is the shift along the chromosome of the centromeric function without DNA sequence rearrangement, has occurred frequently during the evolution of the genus Equus. In this work, the analysis of the chromosomal distribution of satellite tandem repeats in Equus caballus, E. asinus, E. grevyi, and E. burchelli highlighted two atypical features: 1) several centromeres, including the previously described evolutionary new centromeres (ENCs), seem to be devoid of satellite DNA, and 2) satellite repeats are often present at non-centromeric termini, probably corresponding to relics of ancestral now inactive centromeres. Immuno-FISH experiments using satellite DNA and antibodies against the kinetochore protein CENP-A demonstrated that satellite-less primary constrictions are actually endowed with centromeric function. The phylogenetic reconstruction of centromere repositioning events demonstrates that the acquisition of satellite DNA occurs after the formation of the centromere during evolution and that centromeres can function over millions of years and many generations without detectable satellite DNA. The rapidly evolving Equus species gave us the opportunity to identify different intermediate steps along the full maturation of ENCs.

  18. Uncoupling of satellite DNA and centromeric function in the genus Equus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca M Piras

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that centromere repositioning, that is the shift along the chromosome of the centromeric function without DNA sequence rearrangement, has occurred frequently during the evolution of the genus Equus. In this work, the analysis of the chromosomal distribution of satellite tandem repeats in Equus caballus, E. asinus, E. grevyi, and E. burchelli highlighted two atypical features: 1 several centromeres, including the previously described evolutionary new centromeres (ENCs, seem to be devoid of satellite DNA, and 2 satellite repeats are often present at non-centromeric termini, probably corresponding to relics of ancestral now inactive centromeres. Immuno-FISH experiments using satellite DNA and antibodies against the kinetochore protein CENP-A demonstrated that satellite-less primary constrictions are actually endowed with centromeric function. The phylogenetic reconstruction of centromere repositioning events demonstrates that the acquisition of satellite DNA occurs after the formation of the centromere during evolution and that centromeres can function over millions of years and many generations without detectable satellite DNA. The rapidly evolving Equus species gave us the opportunity to identify different intermediate steps along the full maturation of ENCs.

  19. A partial structural and functional rescue of a retinitis pigmentosa model with compacted DNA nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Cai

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that compacted DNA nanoparticles can drive high levels of transgene expression after subretinal injection in the mouse eye. Here we delivered compacted DNA nanoparticles containing a therapeutic gene to the retinas of a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Nanoparticles containing the wild-type retinal degeneration slow (Rds gene were injected into the subretinal space of rds(+/- mice on postnatal day 5. Gene expression was sustained for up to four months at levels up to four times higher than in controls injected with saline or naked DNA. The nanoparticles were taken up into virtually all photoreceptors and mediated significant structural and biochemical rescue of the disease without histological or functional evidence of toxicity. Electroretinogram recordings showed that nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer restored cone function to a near-normal level in contrast to transfer of naked plasmid DNA. Rod function was also improved. These findings demonstrate that compacted DNA nanoparticles represent a viable option for development of gene-based interventions for ocular diseases and obviate major barriers commonly encountered with non-viral based therapies.

  20. Uncoupling of Satellite DNA and Centromeric Function in the Genus Equus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Elisa; Bertoni, Livia; Attolini, Carmen; Khoriauli, Lela; Raimondi, Elena; Giulotto, Elena

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that centromere repositioning, that is the shift along the chromosome of the centromeric function without DNA sequence rearrangement, has occurred frequently during the evolution of the genus Equus. In this work, the analysis of the chromosomal distribution of satellite tandem repeats in Equus caballus, E. asinus, E. grevyi, and E. burchelli highlighted two atypical features: 1) several centromeres, including the previously described evolutionary new centromeres (ENCs), seem to be devoid of satellite DNA, and 2) satellite repeats are often present at non-centromeric termini, probably corresponding to relics of ancestral now inactive centromeres. Immuno-FISH experiments using satellite DNA and antibodies against the kinetochore protein CENP-A demonstrated that satellite-less primary constrictions are actually endowed with centromeric function. The phylogenetic reconstruction of centromere repositioning events demonstrates that the acquisition of satellite DNA occurs after the formation of the centromere during evolution and that centromeres can function over millions of years and many generations without detectable satellite DNA. The rapidly evolving Equus species gave us the opportunity to identify different intermediate steps along the full maturation of ENCs. PMID:20169180

  1. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, Alain, E-mail: alain.arneodo@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Vaillant, Cedric, E-mail: cedric.vaillant@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Audit, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.audit@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Argoul, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.argoul@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); D' Aubenton-Carafa, Yves, E-mail: daubenton@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thermes, Claude, E-mail: claude.thermes@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  2. Tuning the geometry of shape-restricted DNA molecules on the functionalized Si(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaochun; Antonopoulos, Ioanna H.; Kumar, Sandip; Chen Junghuei; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2009-01-01

    Designing a well-defined and stable interface between biomolecules and semiconductor surfaces is of great importance for current and future biosensing and bioelectronic applications. The well-characterized chemistry, stability, and easily tunable electronic properties of silicon substrate make it a practical platform for this type of interface. It has been established in our previous work that a robust, covalent attachment between thiol-DNA molecules of a pre-designed geometrical shape and a modified silicon surface can be achieved. This work focuses on using this binding model and altering the distance between the DNA molecules and silicon surface by strategically placing thiol linkers within the pre-determined geometric design of the rectangularly shaped DNA. The statistical analysis of the height profiles of DNA molecules attached to the surface, as determined by AFM, provides specific insight into how the construction of the DNA molecules affects the binding distance. A comparison between two thiol-DNA molecules with different numbers of thiol groups placed either within the rectangular shape or anchored to the free loop of the same geometric design suggest that the average distance of these molecules to the functionalized silicon surface can be changed by approximately 0.5 nm.

  3. Functionalization of Poly- (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a substrate for DNA microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fixe, A.F.; Dufva, Hans Martin; Telleman, Pieter

    2004-01-01

    A chemical procedure was developed to functionalize poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates. PMMA is reacted with hexamethylene diamine to yield an aminated surface for immobilizing DNA in microarrays. The density of primary NH2 groups was 0.29 nmol/cm(2). The availability of these primary...

  4. Towards understanding the evolution and functional diversification of DNA-containing plant organelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leister, Dario Michael

    2016-01-01

    of plant nuclear genomes that have emerged since 2000. Here I review the results of these attempts to reconstruct the evolution and functions of plant DNA-containing organelles, focusing in particular on data from nuclear genomes. In addition, I discuss proteomic approaches to the direct identification...

  5. Functions of FUS/TLS From DNA Repair to Stress Response: Implications for ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Ranjith Kumar Sama

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS or FUS is a multifunctional DNA-/RNA-binding protein that is involved in a variety of cellular functions including transcription, protein translation, RNA splicing, and transport. FUS was initially identified as a fusion oncoprotein, and thus, the early literature focused on the role of FUS in cancer. With the recent discoveries revealing the role of FUS in neurodegenerative diseases, namely amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration, there has been a renewed interest in elucidating the normal functions of FUS. It is not clear which, if any, endogenous functions of FUS are involved in disease pathogenesis. Here, we review what is currently known regarding the normal functions of FUS with an emphasis on DNA damage repair, RNA processing, and cellular stress response. Further, we discuss how ALS-causing mutations can potentially alter the role of FUS in these pathways, thereby contributing to disease pathogenesis.

  6. Colloidal Dancers: Designing networks of DNA-functionalized colloids for non-random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Emily W.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Zeravcic, Zorana; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental developments of a system of DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with the goal of creating directed motion (`dancing') along patterned substrates in response to temperature cycling. We take advantage of toehold exchange in the design of the DNA sequences that mediate the colloidal interactions to produce broadened, flat, or even re-entrant binding and unbinding transitions between the particles and substrate. Using this new freedom of design, we devise systems where, by thermal ratcheting, we can externally control the direction of motion and sequence of steps of the colloidal dancer. In comparison to DNA-based walkers, which move autonomously and whose motion is controlled by the substrate, our colloidal dancers respond to external driving, and their motion can be controlled in situ. Our use of DNA-functionalized colloidal particles instead of pure DNA systems also enables walking on the mesoscale in contrast to the molecular length scales previously demonstrated, allowing for the future prospect of directed transport over larger distances.

  7. Functionalization of Fatty Acid Vesicles through Newly Synthesized Bolaamphiphile-DNA Conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wamberg, M. C.; Wieczorek, R.; Brier, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    ), and consists of a single hydrocarbon chain of 20 carbons having on one end a triazole group linked to the S'-phosphate of the nucleic acid and on the other side a hydroxyl-group. Its insertion was so effective that a fluorescent label on the DNA complementary to the conjugate could be used to visualize fatty......The surface functionalization of fatty acid vesicles will allow their use as nanoreactors for complex chemistry. In this report, the tethering of several DNA conjugates to decanoic acid vesicles for molecular recognition and synthetic purposes was explored. Due to the highly dynamic nature...

  8. The impact of arginine-modified chitosan-DNA nanoparticles on the function of macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lanxia; Bai Yuanyuan; Song Chunni; Zhu Dunwan; Song Liping; Zhang Hailing; Dong Xia; Leng Xigang, E-mail: lengxg@bme.org.c [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Laboratory of Bioengineering (China)

    2010-06-15

    It has been demonstrated that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan significantly elevates the transgenic efficacy of the chitosan. However, little is known about the impact of arginine-modified chitosan on the function of macrophages, which play a vitally important role in the inflammatory response of the body to foreign substances, especially particulate substances. This study was designed to investigate the impact of arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the function of the murine macrophage through observation of phagocytic activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-{alpha}). Results showed that both chitosan/DNA nanoparticles and arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles, containing 20 {mu}g/mL DNA, were internalized by almost all the macrophages in contact. This led to no significant changes, compared to the non-exposure group, in production of cytokines and phagocytic activity of the macrophages 24 h post co-incubation, whereas exposure to LPS induced obviously elevated cytokine production and phagocytic activity, suggesting that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan does not have a negative impact on the function of the macrophages.

  9. Potential roles for DNA replication and repair functions in cell killing by streptomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, M Zafri; Ayyappan, Vasudevan

    2013-09-01

    The aminoglycoside streptomycin binds to ribosomes to promote mistranslation and eventual inhibition of translation. Streptomycin kills bacteria, whereas many other non-aminoglycoside inhibitors of translation do not. Because mistranslation is now known to affect DNA replication, we asked if hydroxyurea, a specific inhibitor of DNA synthesis, affects killing, and find that hydroxyurea significantly attenuates killing by streptomycin. We find that the hydroxyl radical scavengers d-mannitol and thiourea have either no effect or only a modest protective effect. The iron chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl eliminated killing by streptomycin, but further investigation revealed that it blocks streptomycin uptake. Prior treatment of cells with low-levels of methyl methanesulfonate to induce the adaptive response to alkylation leads to a significant attenuation of killing, which, together with the hydroxyurea effect, suggests roles for DNA replication and repair functions in cell killing by streptomycin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number and stallion sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, Christa R; Moraes, Luis E; Connon, Richard E; Love, Charles C; Teague, Sheila; Varner, Dickson D; Meyers, Stuart A

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number has been utilized as a measure of sperm quality in several species including mice, dogs, and humans, and has been suggested as a potential biomarker of fertility in stallion sperm. The results of the present study extend this recent discovery using sperm samples from American Quarter Horse stallions of varying age. By determining copy number of three mitochondrial genes, cytochrome b (CYTB), NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) and NADH dehydrogenase 4 (ND4), instead of a single gene, we demonstrate an improved understanding of mtDNA fate in stallion sperm mitochondria following spermatogenesis. Sperm samples from 37 stallions ranging from 3 to 24 years old were collected at four breeding ranches in north and central Texas during the 2015 breeding season. Samples were analyzed for sperm motion characteristics, nuclear DNA denaturability and mtDNA copy number. Mitochondrial DNA content in individual sperm was determined by real-time qPCR and normalized with a single copy nuclear gene, Beta actin. Exploratory correlation analysis revealed that total motility was negatively correlated with CYTB copy number and sperm chromatin structure. Stallion age did not have a significant effect on copy number for any of the genes. Copy number differences existed between the three genes with CYTB having the greatest number of copies (20.6 ± 1.2 copies, range: 6.0 to 41.1) followed by ND4 (15.5 ± 0.8 copies, range: 6.7 to 27.8) and finally ND1 (12.0 ± 1.0 copies, range: 0.4 to 26.6) (P sperm mtDNA occurs during spermatogenesis and may be important for normal sperm function. Beta regression analysis suggested that for every unit increase in mtDNA copy number of CYTB, there was a 4% decrease in the odds of sperm movement (P = 0.001). Influential analysis suggested that results are robust and not highly influenced by data from individual stallions despite the low number of stallions sampled with low sperm motility. Further genome sequencing is

  11. DNA Damage, Copper and Lead Associates with Cognitive Function among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meramat, A; Rajab, N F; Shahar, S; Sharif, R A

    2017-01-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted in a group of 317 subjects older than 60 in Malaysia, aimed to determine risk factors associated with cognitive impairment in older adults, focusing on trace elements and DNA damage. Cognitive decline was determined by Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde-MDA and superoxide dismutase-SOD) were determined and DNA damage was assayed using Alkaline Comet Assay. Toenail samples were taken and analyzed using ICP-MS to determine trace element levels. A total of 62.1 % of subjects had cognitive impairment. Subjects with cognitive impairment had significantly higher levels of MDA and DNA damage as compared to the group with normal cognitive function; MDA (2.07 ± 0.05 nmol/L vs 1.85 ± 0.06 nmol/L) (p<0.05) and DNA damage (% Tail Density, 14.52 ± 0.32 vs 10.31 ± 0.42; Tail Moment, 1.79 ± 0.06 vs 1.28 ± 0.06) (p<0.05 for all parameters). However, the level of SOD among subjects with cognitive impairment (6.67 ± 0.33 u.e/min/mg protein) was lower than the level among those with normal cognitive functions (11.36 ± 0.65 u.e/min/mg protein) (p<0.05). Multiple logistic regression revealed the predictors for cognitive impairment among the subjects were DNA damage (Adjusted odd ratio [OR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-1.59), level of trace elements in toenails namely, lead (OR, 2.471; CI, 1.535-3.980) and copper (OR, 1.275; CI, 1.047-1.552) (p<0.05). High levels of lead and copper can lead to increase in oxidative stress levels and are associated with DNA damage that eventually could be associated with cognitive decline.

  12. B-chromosome ribosomal DNA is functional in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; López-León, Ma Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2012-01-01

    B-chromosomes are frequently argued to be genetically inert elements, but activity for some particular genes has been reported, especially for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes whose expression can easily be detected at the cytological level by the visualization of their phenotypic expression, i.e., the nucleolus. The B(24) chromosome in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans frequently shows a nucleolus attached to it during meiotic prophase I. Here we show the presence of rRNA transcripts that unequivocally came from the B(24) chromosome. To detect these transcripts, we designed primers specifically anchoring at the ITS-2 region, so that the reverse primer was complementary to the B chromosome DNA sequence including a differential adenine insertion being absent in the ITS2 of A chromosomes. PCR analysis carried out on genomic DNA showed amplification in B-carrying males but not in B-lacking ones. PCR analyses performed on complementary DNA showed amplification in about half of B-carrying males. Joint cytological and molecular analysis performed on 34 B-carrying males showed a close correspondence between the presence of B-specific transcripts and of nucleoli attached to the B chromosome. In addition, the molecular analysis revealed activity of the B chromosome rDNA in 10 out of the 13 B-carrying females analysed. Our results suggest that the nucleoli attached to B chromosomes are actively formed by expression of the rDNA carried by them, and not by recruitment of nucleolar materials formed in A chromosome nucleolar organizing regions. Therefore, B-chromosome rDNA in E. plorans is functional since it is actively transcribed to form the nucleolus attached to the B chromosome. This demonstrates that some heterochromatic B chromosomes can harbour functional genes.

  13. B-chromosome ribosomal DNA is functional in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Ruiz-Estévez

    Full Text Available B-chromosomes are frequently argued to be genetically inert elements, but activity for some particular genes has been reported, especially for ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes whose expression can easily be detected at the cytological level by the visualization of their phenotypic expression, i.e., the nucleolus. The B(24 chromosome in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans frequently shows a nucleolus attached to it during meiotic prophase I. Here we show the presence of rRNA transcripts that unequivocally came from the B(24 chromosome. To detect these transcripts, we designed primers specifically anchoring at the ITS-2 region, so that the reverse primer was complementary to the B chromosome DNA sequence including a differential adenine insertion being absent in the ITS2 of A chromosomes. PCR analysis carried out on genomic DNA showed amplification in B-carrying males but not in B-lacking ones. PCR analyses performed on complementary DNA showed amplification in about half of B-carrying males. Joint cytological and molecular analysis performed on 34 B-carrying males showed a close correspondence between the presence of B-specific transcripts and of nucleoli attached to the B chromosome. In addition, the molecular analysis revealed activity of the B chromosome rDNA in 10 out of the 13 B-carrying females analysed. Our results suggest that the nucleoli attached to B chromosomes are actively formed by expression of the rDNA carried by them, and not by recruitment of nucleolar materials formed in A chromosome nucleolar organizing regions. Therefore, B-chromosome rDNA in E. plorans is functional since it is actively transcribed to form the nucleolus attached to the B chromosome. This demonstrates that some heterochromatic B chromosomes can harbour functional genes.

  14. Functions of replication factor C and proliferating-cell nuclear antigen: Functional similarity of DNA polymerase accessory proteins from human cells and bacteriophage T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Stillman, B.

    1990-01-01

    The proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the replication factors A and C (RF-A and RF-C) are cellular proteins essential for complete elongation of DNA during synthesis from the simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication in vitro. All three cooperate to stimulate processive DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase δ on a primed single-stranded M13 template DNA and as such can be categorized as DNA polymerase accessory proteins. Biochemical analyses with highly purified RF-C and PCNA have demonstrated functions that are completely analogous to the functions of bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase accessory proteins. A primer-template-specific DNA binding activity and a DNA-dependent ATPase activity copurified with the multisubunit protein RF-C and are similar to the functions of the phage T4 gene 44/62 protein complex. Furthermore, PCNA stimulated the RF-C ATPase activity and is, therefore, analogous to the phage T4 gene 45 protein, which stimulates the ATPase function of the gene 44/62 protein complex. Indeed, some primary sequence similarities between human PCNA and the phage T4 gene 45 protein could be detected. These results demonstrate a striking conservation of the DNA replication apparatus in human cells and bacteriophage T4

  15. Non-transcriptional Function of FOXO1/DAF-16 Contributes to Translesion DNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daitoku, Hiroaki; Kaneko, Yuta; Yoshimochi, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kaori; Araoi, Sho; Sakamaki, Jun-Ichi; Takahashi, Yuta; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2016-08-22

    Forkhead box O (FOXO; DAF-16 in nematode) transcription factors activate a program of genes that control stress resistance, metabolism, and lifespan. Given the adverse impact of the stochastic DNA damage on organismal development and ageing, we examined the role of FOXO/DAF-16 in UV-induced DNA-damage response. Knockdown of FOXO1, but not FOXO3a, increases sensitivity to UV irradiation when exposed during S phase, suggesting a contribution of FOXO1 to translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), a replicative bypass of UV-induced DNA lesions. Actually, FOXO1 depletion results in a sustained activation of the ATR-Chk1 signaling and a reduction of PCNA monoubiquitination following UV irradiation. FOXO1 does not alter the expression of TLS-related genes but binds to the protein replication protein A (RPA1) that coats single-stranded DNA and acts as a scaffold for TLS. In Caenorhabditis elegans, daf-16 null mutants show UV-induced retardation in larval development and are rescued by overexpressing DAF-16 mutant lacking transactivation domain, but not substitution mutant unable to interact with RPA-1. Thus, our findings demonstrate that FOXO1/DAF-16 is a functional component in TLS independently of its transactivation activity. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Histone-DNA contacts in structure/function relationships of nucleosomes as revealed by crosslinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usachenko, S.I. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Bradbury, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Life Science Div.]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The magnitude of the problem of understanding the structure/function relationships of eukaryotic chromosomes can be appreciated from the fact that the human diploid genome contains more than 2 meters of DNA packaged into 46 chromosomes, each at metaphase being several microns in length. Each chromatid of a chromosome contains a single DNA molecule several centimeters in length. In addition to the DNA, chromosomes contain an equal weight of histones and an equal weight of non-histone chromosomal proteins. These histones are the major chromosomal structural proteins. The non-histone chromosomal proteins are involved in the DNA processes of transcription and replication, in chromosome organization and in nuclear architecture. Polytene chromosomes with their bands and interbands and puffs of active genetic loci provide visual evidence for long range order as do the bands and interbands of mammalian metaphase chromosomes. The gentle removal of histones and all but the most tightly bound 2--3% of non-histone proteins from metaphase chromosomes revealed by electron microscopy a residual protein scaffold constraining a halo of DNA loops extending out from the scaffold.

  17. A DNA aptamer recognising a malaria protein biomarker can function as part of a DNA origami assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godonoga, Maia; Lin, Ting-Yu; Oshima, Azusa; Sumitomo, Koji; Tang, Marco S. L.; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kinghorn, Andrew B.; Dirkzwager, Roderick M.; Zhou, Cunshan; Kuzuya, Akinori; Tanner, Julian A.; Heddle, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA aptamers have potential for disease diagnosis and as therapeutics, particularly when interfaced with programmable molecular technology. Here we have combined DNA aptamers specific for the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) with a DNA origami scaffold. Twelve aptamers that recognise PfLDH were integrated into a rectangular DNA origami and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the incorporated aptamers preserve their ability to specifically bind target protein. Captured PfLDH retained enzymatic activity and protein-aptamer binding was observed dynamically using high-speed AFM. This work demonstrates the ability of DNA aptamers to recognise a malaria biomarker whilst being integrated within a supramolecular DNA scaffold, opening new possibilities for malaria diagnostic approaches based on DNA nanotechnology. PMID:26891622

  18. Identification of two functional PCNA-binding domains in human DNA polymerase κ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Acharya, Narottam; Park, Jeseong; Basu, Debashree; Prakash, Satya; Prakash, Louise

    2014-07-01

    Previously, we have shown that human DNA polymerase (Pol) η has two functional PCNA-binding motifs, PIP1 and PIP2, and that a C-terminal deletion of Polη that lacks the ubiquitin-binding UBZ domain and the PIP2 domain but retains the PIP1 domain promotes normal levels of translesion synthesis (TLS) opposite a cis-syn TT dimer in human cells. Here, we identify two PIP domains in Polκ and show that TLS occurs normally in human fibroblast cells in which the pip1 or pip2 mutant Polκ is expressed, but mutational inactivation of both PIP domains renders Polκ nonfunctional in TLS opposite the thymine glycol lesion. Thus, the two PIP domains of Polκ function redundantly in TLS opposite this DNA lesion in human cells. However, and surprisingly, whereas mutational inactivation of the PIP1 domain completely inhibits the stimulation of DNA synthesis by Polκ in the presence of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), replication factor C, and replication protein A, mutations in PIP2 have no adverse effect on PCNA-dependent DNA synthesis. This raises the possibility that activation of Polκ PIP2 as a PCNA-binding domain occurs during TLS in human cells and that protein-protein interactions and post-transcriptional modifications are involved in such activation. © 2014 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2014 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. A Microneedle Functionalized with Polyethyleneimine and Nanotubes for Highly Sensitive, Label-Free Quantification of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat-Moghaddam, Darius; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2017-08-16

    The accurate measure of DNA concentration is necessary for many DNA-based biological applications. However, the current methods are limited in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility, human error, and contamination. Here, we present a microneedle functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for the highly sensitive quantification of DNA. The microneedle was fabricated using ultraviolet (UV) lithography and anisotropic etching, and then functionalized with PEI and SWCNTs through a dip coating process. The electrical characteristics of the microneedle change with the accumulation of DNA on the surface. Current-voltage measurements in deionized water were conducted to study these changes in the electrical properties of the sensor. The sensitivity test found the signal to be discernable from the noise level down to 100 attomolar (aM), demonstrating higher sensitivity than currently available UV fluorescence and UV absorbance based methods. A microneedle without any surface modification only had a 100 femtomolar (fM) sensitivity. All measurement results were consistent with fluorescence microscopy.

  20. Optimal functional levels of activation-induced deaminase specifically require the Hsp40 DnaJa1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Zahn, Astrid; Methot, Stephen P; Godin, David; Conticello, Silvestro G; Terada, Kazutoyo; Di Noia, Javier M

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID) deaminates deoxycytidine at the immunoglobulin genes, thereby initiating antibody affinity maturation and isotype class switching during immune responses. In contrast, off-target DNA damage caused by AID is oncogenic. Central to balancing immunity and cancer is AID regulation, including the mechanisms determining AID protein levels. We describe a specific functional interaction between AID and the Hsp40 DnaJa1, which provides insight into the function of both proteins. Although both major cytoplasmic type I Hsp40s, DnaJa1 and DnaJa2, are induced upon B-cell activation and interact with AID in vitro, only DnaJa1 overexpression increases AID levels and biological activity in cell lines. Conversely, DnaJa1, but not DnaJa2, depletion reduces AID levels, stability and isotype switching. In vivo, DnaJa1-deficient mice display compromised response to immunization, AID protein and isotype switching levels being reduced by half. Moreover, DnaJa1 farnesylation is required to maintain, and farnesyltransferase inhibition reduces, AID protein levels in B cells. Thus, DnaJa1 is a limiting factor that plays a non-redundant role in the functional stabilization of AID. PMID:22085931

  1. Formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of γ-irradiated bacteria depending on the function of fast repair processes of DNA single-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, S.I.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of γ-irradiated ( 60 Co)Ex coli bacteria depending on the function of fast repair processes of DNA single-strand breaks, is investigated. The profiles of sedimentation of DNA Ex coli cells, irradiated at 0-2 deg C in the salt medium and in EDTA-borate buffer, are presented. It is shown that when irradiating cells in EDTA-borate buffer, the output of single- and double strand breaks in DNA is much higher than in the case of their irradiation in the minimum salt medium. The dependence of output of single-strand and double-strand breaks depending on the radiatier doze of E coli cells in the salt medium and EDTA-borate buffer, is studied. The supposition is made on the presence of a regulative interaction between the accumulation of DNA single-breaks and their repair with the formation of double-strand breaks. The functionating of fast and superfast repair processes considerably affects the formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of a bacterium cell. A considerable amount of double-breaks registered immediately after irradiation forms due to a close position of single-strand breaks on the opposite DNA strands

  2. Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome with worsening cardiac function caused by pleiotropic rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauch, Gabriele; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Schmidt, Klaus G; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2002-06-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a usually fatal disorder that involves the hematopoietic system, exocrine pancreas, liver, kidneys, and often presents clinically with failure to thrive. We report a 5-year-old patient who developed, in addition to the typical features of Pearson syndrome, worsening cardiac function, mainly affecting the left ventricle. The latter finding is particularly interesting because cardiac involvement has not yet been regarded as a major feature of Pearson syndrome. The diagnosis was proved by the finding of so far undescribed pleioplasmatic rearrangement of mitochondrial (mt)DNA (loss of 5,630 bp, 70% deleted and duplicated mtDNA) in blood cells. Our report demonstrates that patients with Pearson syndrome may also have impaired cardiac function. Thus, Pearson syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with left ventricular dysfunction of unknown origin and other clinical findings suggestive of a mitochondrial disease. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Diversity of structure and function of DNA polymerase (gp43) of T4-related bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, V M; Karam, J D

    2004-11-01

    The replication DNA polymerase (gp43) of the bacteriophage T4 is a member of the pol B family of DNA polymerases, which are found in all divisions of life in the biosphere. The enzyme is a modularly organized protein that has several activities in one polypeptide chain (approximately 900 amino acid residues). These include two catalytic functions, POL (polymerase) and EXO (3 -exonuclease), and specific binding activities to DNA, the mRNA for gp43, deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs), and other T4 replication proteins. The gene for this multifunctional enzyme (gene 43) has been preserved in evolution of the diverse group of T4-like phages in nature, but has diverged in sequence, organization, and specificity of the binding functions of the gene product. We describe here examples of T4-like phages where DNA rearrangements have created split forms of gene 43 consisting of two cistrons instead of one. These gene 43 variants specify separate gp43A (N-terminal) and gp43B (C-terminal) subunits of a split form of gp43. Compared to the monocistronic form, the interruption in contiguity of the gene 43 reading frame maps in a highly diverged sequence separating the code for essential components of two major modules of this pol B enzyme, the FINGERS and PALM domains, which contain the dNTP binding pocket and POL catalytic residues of the enzyme. We discuss the biological implications of these gp43 splits and compare them to other types of pol B splits in nature. Our studies suggest that DNA mobile elements may allow genetic information for pol B modules to be exchanged between organisms.

  4. DNA strand break induction and rejoining in Chinese hamster cells as a function of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    Chinese Hamster cells (V79-S171) were irradiated with 300 kVp x-rays and low-energy charged particles, covering an LET range of about 1 to 2900 keV/μm. The LET dependence of DNA strand-break induction and the rejoining kinetics of these breaks during post-irradiation incubation were investigated using alkaline sucrose gradients. The break-induction studies indicated that strand-break efficiency generally decreases with increasing LET, that low-energy, heavy ions induce DNA breaks non-randomly, and that anoxia protects less against high-LET induction than against low-LET induction of DNA breaks. Strand-break rejoining studies indicate the presence of three classes of breaks: a fast-rejoining class (T 1 / 2 = 8 min), whose induction efficiency decreases rapidly with LET increase; a slow-rejoining class (T 1 / 2 appoximately equal to 90 min), whose induction efficiency decreased gradually with LET increase; and a non-rejoining class (remained open during post-irradiation incubation), whose induction efficiency demonstrated a peaked response as a function of LET. The RBE for induction of non-rejoining DNA breaks rose to a maximum of 4.9 at an LET of 150 keV/μm and then decreased with further LET increase. This peaked response agrees closely with RBE's from the literature that are based upon initial slopes of mammalian cell survival curves as a function of LET. The agreement implies that non-rejoining DNA breaks are causally related to the lethal, irreversible component of cell inactivation by radiation

  5. The PTEN phosphatase functions cooperatively with the Fanconi anemia proteins in DNA crosslink repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuono, Elizabeth A.; Mukherjee, Ananda; Vierra, David A.; Adroved, Morganne M.; Hodson, Charlotte; Deans, Andrew J.; Howlett, Niall G.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure and increased cancer risk. The FA proteins function primarily in DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair. Here, we have examined the role of the PTEN phosphatase in this process. We have established that PTEN-deficient cells, like FA cells, exhibit increased cytotoxicity, chromosome structural aberrations, and error-prone mutagenic DNA repair following exposure to ICL-inducing agents. The increased ICL sensitivity of PTEN-deficient cells is caused, in part, by elevated PLK1 kinase-mediated phosphorylation of FANCM, constitutive FANCM polyubiquitination and degradation, and the consequent inefficient assembly of the FA core complex, FANCD2, and FANCI into DNA repair foci. We also establish that PTEN function in ICL repair is dependent on its protein phosphatase activity and ability to be SUMOylated, yet is independent of its lipid phosphatase activity. Finally, via epistasis analysis, we demonstrate that PTEN and FANCD2 function cooperatively in ICL repair. PMID:27819275

  6. A dual function of the CRISPR-Cas system in bacterial antivirus immunity and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Mohan; Beloglazova, Natalia; Flick, Robert; Graham, Chris; Skarina, Tatiana; Nocek, Boguslaw; Gagarinova, Alla; Pogoutse, Oxana; Brown, Greg; Binkowski, Andrew; Phanse, Sadhna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Koonin, Eugene V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack; Edwards, Aled M.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) and the associated proteins (Cas) comprise a system of adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids in prokaryotes. Cas1 is a CRISPR-associated protein that is common to all CRISPR-containing prokaryotes but its function remains obscure. Here we show that the purified Cas1 protein of Escherichia coli (YgbT) exhibits nuclease activity against single-stranded and branched DNAs including Holliday junctions, replication forks, and 5′-flaps. The crystal structure of YgbT and site-directed mutagenesis have revealed the potential active site. Genome-wide screens show that YgbT physically and genetically interacts with key components of DNA repair systems, including recB, recC and ruvB. Consistent with these findings, the ygbT deletion strain showed increased sensitivity to DNA damage and impaired chromosomal segregation. Similar phenotypes were observed in strains with deletion of CRISPR clusters, suggesting that the function of YgbT in repair involves interaction with the CRISPRs. These results show that YgbT belongs to a novel, structurally distinct family of nucleases acting on branched DNAs and suggest that, in addition to antiviral immunity, at least some components of the CRISPR-Cas system have a function in DNA repair. PMID:21219465

  7. Structure and function of DnaA N-terminal domains: specific sites and mechanisms in inter-DnaA interaction and in DnaB helicase loading on oriC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yoshito; Jo, Takaaki; Matsuda, Yusaku; Matsunaga, Chika; Katayama, Tsutomu; Ueda, Tadashi

    2007-06-15

    DnaA forms a homomultimeric complex with the origin of chromosomal replication (oriC) to unwind duplex DNA. The interaction of the DnaA N terminus with the DnaB helicase is crucial for the loading of DnaB onto the unwound region. Here, we determined the DnaA N terminus structure using NMR. This region (residues 1-108) consists of a rigid region (domain I) and a flexible region (domain II). Domain I has an alpha-alpha-beta-beta-alpha-beta motif, similar to that of the K homology (KH) domain, and has weak affinity for oriC single-stranded DNA, consistent with KH domain function. A hydrophobic surface carrying Trp-6 most likely forms the interface for domain I dimerization. Glu-21 is located on the opposite surface of domain I from the Trp-6 site and is crucial for DnaB helicase loading. These findings suggest a model for DnaA homomultimer formation and DnaB helicase loading on oriC.

  8. Essential Function of Dicer in Resolving DNA Damage in the Rapidly Dividing Cells of the Developing and Malignant Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Swahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of genomic integrity is critical during neurodevelopment, particularly in rapidly dividing cerebellar granule neuronal precursors that experience constitutive replication-associated DNA damage. As Dicer was recently recognized to have an unexpected function in the DNA damage response, we examined whether Dicer was important for preserving genomic integrity in the developing brain. We report that deletion of Dicer in the developing mouse cerebellum resulted in the accumulation of DNA damage leading to cerebellar progenitor degeneration, which was rescued with p53 deficiency; deletion of DGCR8 also resulted in similar DNA damage and cerebellar degeneration. Dicer deficiency also resulted in DNA damage and death in other rapidly dividing cells including embryonic stem cells and the malignant cerebellar progenitors in a mouse model of medulloblastoma. Together, these results identify an essential function of Dicer in resolving the spontaneous DNA damage that occurs during the rapid proliferation of developmental progenitors and malignant cells.

  9. Structure of a Novel DNA-binding Domain of Helicase-like Transcription Factor (HLTF) and Its Functional Implication in DNA Damage Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishiki, Asami; Hara, Kodai; Ikegaya, Yuzu; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Sato, Mamoru; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-05-22

    HLTF (helicase-like transcription factor) is a yeast RAD5 homolog found in mammals. HLTF has E3 ubiquitin ligase and DNA helicase activities, and plays a pivotal role in the template-switching pathway of DNA damage tolerance. HLTF has an N-terminal domain that has been designated the HIRAN (HIP116 and RAD5 N-terminal) domain. The HIRAN domain has been hypothesized to play a role in DNA binding; however, the structural basis of, and functional evidence for, the HIRAN domain in DNA binding has remained unclear. Here we show for the first time the crystal structure of the HIRAN domain of human HLTF in complex with DNA. The HIRAN domain is composed of six β-strands and two α-helices, forming an OB-fold structure frequently found in ssDNA-binding proteins, including in replication factor A (RPA). Interestingly, this study reveals that the HIRAN domain interacts with not only with a single-stranded DNA but also with a duplex DNA. Furthermore, the structure unexpectedly clarifies that the HIRAN domain specifically recognizes the 3'-end of DNA. These results suggest that the HIRAN domain functions as a sensor to the 3'-end of the primer strand at the stalled replication fork and that the domain facilitates fork regression. HLTF is recruited to a damaged site through the HIRAN domain at the stalled replication fork. Furthermore, our results have implications for the mechanism of template switching. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. A novel function of CRL4(Cdt2): regulation of the subunit structure of DNA polymerase δ in response to DNA damage and during the S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sufang; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbiegniew; Zhou, Pengbo; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Ernest Y C; Lee, Marietta Y W T

    2013-10-11

    DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ4) is a heterotetrameric enzyme, whose p12 subunit is degraded in response to DNA damage, leaving behind a trimer (Pol δ3) with altered enzymatic characteristics that participate in gap filling during DNA repair. We demonstrate that CRL4(Cdt2), a key regulator of cell cycle progression that targets replication licensing factors, also targets the p12 subunit of Pol δ4 in response to DNA damage and on entry into S phase. Evidence for the involvement of CRL4(Cdt2) included demonstration that p12 possesses a proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting protein-degron (PIP-degron) and that knockdown of the components of the CRL4(Cdt2) complex inhibited the degradation of p12 in response to DNA damage. Analysis of p12 levels in synchronized cell populations showed that p12 is partially degraded in S phase and that this is affected by knockdowns of CUL4A or CUL4B. Laser scanning cytometry of overexpressed wild type p12 and a mutant resistant to degradation showed that the reduction in p12 levels during S phase was prevented by mutation of p12. Thus, CRL4(Cdt2) also regulates the subunit composition of Pol δ during the cell cycle. These studies reveal a novel function of CRL4(Cdt2), i.e. the direct regulation of DNA polymerase δ, adding to its known functions in the regulation of the licensing of replication origins and expanding the scope of its overall control of DNA replication. The formation of Pol δ3 in S phase as a normal aspect of cell cycle progression leads to the novel implications that it is involved in DNA replication as well as DNA repair.

  11. Density functional MO calculation for stacked DNA base-pairs with backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, N; Kobayashi, K

    2000-05-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of the sugar and phosphate backbones on the stable structure and electronic properties of stacked DNA base-pairs, we performed ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculations based on the density functional theory and Slater-type basis set. As a model cluster for stacked base-pairs, we employed three isomers for the dimer unit of stacked guanine-cytosine pairs composed with backbones as well as base-pairs. These structures were fully optimized and their electronic properties were self-consistently investigated. By including the backbones, the difference in total energy among the isomers was largely enhanced, while the trend in relative stability was not changed. The effect of backbones on the electronic properties is remarkable: the MOs with the character of the PO4 parts of backbones appear just below the highest-occupied MO. This result indicates that the PO4 parts might play a rule as a reaction site in chemical processes concerning DNA. Therefore, we conclude that the DNA backbones are indispensable for investigating the stability and electronic properties of the stacked DNA base-pairs.

  12. DNA Origami Scaffolds as Templates for Functional Tetrameric Kir3 K+ Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Nakata, Eiji; Endo, Masayuki; Koyama, Shohei; Mori, Emiko; Tran, Nam Ha; Dinh, Huyen; Suzuki, Yuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Kawata, Masaaki; Sato, Chikara; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Morii, Takashi; Mori, Yasuo

    2018-03-01

    In native systems, scaffolding proteins play important roles in assembling proteins into complexes to transduce signals. This concept is yet to be applied to the assembly of functional transmembrane protein complexes in artificial systems. To address this issue, DNA origami has the potential to serve as scaffolds that arrange proteins at specific positions in complexes. Herein, we report that Kir3 K + channel proteins are assembled through zinc-finger protein (ZFP)-adaptors at specific locations on DNA origami scaffolds. Specific binding of the ZFP-fused Kir3 channels and ZFP-based adaptors on DNA origami were confirmed by atomic force microscopy and gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, the DNA origami with ZFP binding sites nearly tripled the K + channel current activity elicited by heterotetrameric Kir3 channels in HEK293T cells. Thus, our method provides a useful template to control the oligomerization states of membrane protein complexes in vitro and in living cells. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The effects of proliferation and DNA damage on hematopoietic stem cell function determine aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Satish

    2016-07-01

    In most of the mammalian tissues, homeostasis as well as injury repair depend upon a small number of resident adult stem cells. The decline in tissue/organ function in aged organisms has been directly linked with poorly functioning stem cells. Altered function of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is at the center of an aging hematopoietic system, a tissue with high cellular turnover. Poorly engrafting, myeloid-biased HSCs with higher levels of DNA damage accumulation are the hallmark features of an aged hematopoietic system. These cells show a higher proliferation rate than their younger counterparts. It was proposed that quiescence of these cells over long period of time leads to accumulation of DNA damage, eventually resulting in poor function/pathological conditions in hematopoietic system. However, various mouse models with premature aging phenotype also show highly proliferative HSCs. This review examines the evidence that links proliferation of HSCs with aging, which leads to functional changes in the hematopoietic system. Developmental Dynamics 245:739-750, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Homeotic proteins participate in the function of human-DNA replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Laura; Comelli, Laura; D'Innocenzo, Barbara; Puzzi, Luca; Luin, Stefano; Arosio, Daniele; Calvello, Mariantonietta; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Peverali, Fiorenzo; Trovato, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Beltram, Fabio; Falaschi, Arturo

    2010-12-01

    Recent evidence points to homeotic proteins as actors in the crosstalk between development and DNA replication. The present work demonstrates that HOXC13, previously identified as a new member of human DNA replicative complexes, is a stable component of early replicating chromatin in living cells: it displays a slow nuclear dynamics due to its anchoring to the DNA minor groove via the arginine-5 residue of the homeodomain. HOXC13 binds in vivo to the lamin B2 origin in a cell-cycle-dependent manner consistent with origin function; the interaction maps with nucleotide precision within the replicative complex. HOXC13 displays in vitro affinity for other replicative complex proteins; it interacts also in vivo with the same proteins in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Chromatin-structure modifying treatments, disturbing origin function, reduce also HOXC13-origin interaction. The described interactions are not restricted to a single origin nor to a single homeotic protein (also HOXC10 binds the lamin B2 origin in vivo). Thus, HOX complexes probably contribute in a general, structure-dependent manner, to origin identification and assembly of replicative complexes thereon, in presence of specific chromatin configurations.

  15. RAD50, an SMC family member with multiple roles in DNA break repair: How does ATP affect function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kinoshita (Eri); E. van der Linden (Eddy); H. Sanchez (Humberto); C. Wyman (Claire)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe protein complex including Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1 (MRN) functions in DNA double-strand break repair to recognize and process DNA ends as well as signal for cell cycle arrest. Amino acid sequence similarity and overall architecture make Rad50 a member of the structural maintenance of

  16. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  17. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. In vitro transcription and translation inhibition via DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, J; Baptista, P V [Centro de Investigacao em Genetica Molecular Humana (CIGMH), Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); De la Fuente, J M, E-mail: pmvb@fct.unl.pt [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-12-17

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum as vectors for gene silencing strategies, combining the AuNPs' ease of functionalization with DNA and/or siRNA, high loading capacity and fast uptake by target cells. Here, we used AuNP functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides to specifically inhibit transcription in vitro, demonstrating the synergetic effect between AuNPs and a specific antisense sequence that blocks the T7 promoter region. Also, AuNPs efficiently protect the antisense oligonucleotide against nuclease degradation, which can thus retain its inhibitory potential. In addition, we demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with a thiolated oligonucleotide complementary to the ribosome binding site and the start codon, effectively shut down in vitro translation. Together, these two approaches can provide for a simple yet robust experimental set up to test for efficient gene silencing of AuNP-DNA conjugates. What is more, these results show that appropriate functionalization of AuNPs can be used as a dual targeting approach to an enhanced control of gene expression-inhibition of both transcription and translation.

  19. Insights into structural and functional diversity of Dof (DNA binding with one finger) transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Malviya, N; Kushwaha, H; Nasim, J; Bisht, N C; Singh, V K; Yadav, D

    2015-03-01

    The structural, functional and in-silico studies of Dof transcription factor attempted so far reveals immense opportunity to analyze the plant genomes in terms of number of Dof genes and discuss in light of the evolution. The multiple functions of Dof genes needs to explored for crop improvement. Transcription factors play a very vital role in gene regulation at transcriptional level and are being extensively studied across phylas. In recent years, sequencing of plant genomes has led to genome-wide identification and characterizations of diverse types of plant-specific transcription factor gene family providing key insights into their structural and functional diversity. The DNA binding with one finger (Dof), a class belonging to C2H2-type zinc finger family proteins, is a plant-specific transcription factor having multiple roles such as seed maturation and germination, phytohormone and light-mediated regulation and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Dof proteins are present across plant lineage, from green algae to higher angiosperm, and represent a unique class of transcription factor having bifunctional binding activities, with both DNA and proteins, to regulate the complex transcriptional machinery in plant cells. The structural and functional diversity of the Dof transcription factor family along with the bioinformatics analysis highlighting the phylogeny of Dof families is reviewed in light of its importance in plant biotechnology for crop improvement.

  20. Outer membrane protein functions as integrator of protein import and DNA inheritance in mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Sandro; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Týč, Jiří; Vaughan, Sue; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are one of the earliest diverging eukaryotes that have fully functional mitochondria. pATOM36 is a trypanosomatid-specific essential mitochondrial outer membrane protein that has been implicated in protein import. Changes in the mitochondrial proteome induced by ablation of pATOM36 and in vitro assays show that pATOM36 is required for the assembly of the archaic translocase of the outer membrane (ATOM), the functional analog of the TOM complex in other organisms. Reciprocal pull-down experiments and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that a fraction of pATOM36 interacts and colocalizes with TAC65, a previously uncharacterized essential component of the tripartite attachment complex (TAC). The TAC links the single-unit mitochondrial genome to the basal body of the flagellum and mediates the segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. RNAi experiments show that pATOM36, in line with its dual localization, is not only essential for ATOM complex assembly but also for segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. However, the two functions are distinct, as a truncated version of pATOM36 lacking the 75 C-terminal amino acids can rescue kinetoplast DNA missegregation but not the lack of ATOM complex assembly. Thus, pATOM36 has a dual function and integrates mitochondrial protein import with mitochondrial DNA inheritance. PMID:27436903

  1. A chemiluminescence biosensor based on the adsorption recognition function between Fe3O4@SiO2@GO polymers and DNA for ultrasensitive detection of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanling; Li, Jianbo; Wang, Yanhui; Ding, Chaofan; Lin, Yanna; Sun, Weiyan; Luo, Chuannan

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a chemiluminescence (CL) biosensor was prepared for ultrasensitive determination of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) based on the adsorption recognition function between core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 - graphene oxide (Fe3O4@SiO2@GO) polymers and DNA. The Fe3O4@SiO2@GO polymers were composed by GO and magnetite nanoparticles. And the core-shell polymers were confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Then Fe3O4@SiO2@GO was modified by DNA. Based on the principle of complementary base, Fe3O4@SiO2@GO-DNA was introduced to the CL system and the selectivity, sensitivity of DNA detection was significantly improved. The adsorption properties of Fe3O4@SiO2@GO to DNA were researched through the adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetic and thermodynamics. Under optimized CL conditions, DNA could be assayed with the linear concentration range of 5.0 × 10- 12-2.5 × 10- 11 mol/L. The detection limit was 1.7 × 10- 12 mol/L (3δ) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.1%. The biosensor was finally used for the determination of DNA in laboratory samples and recoveries ranged from 99% to 103%. The satisfactory results revealed the potential application of Fe3O4@SiO2@GO-DNA-CL biosensor in the diagnosis and the treatment of human genetic diseases.

  2. The preliminary study on the inductory signal triggering the error-prone DNA repair function in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Zaozhong; Luo Zuyu

    1989-01-01

    The nature of the signal triggering error-prone DNA repair function in mammalian cells was studied from two notions: (1) Does the inducing signal result from the direct hitting the cellular targets by DNA-damaging agents? (2) Is inhibition of DNA replication a prerequisite condition for the triggering effect? Thus, the ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated exogenous DNAs were introduced into human and rat cells by transfection. The results showed that this transfection was able to induce the error-prone repair as efficient as direct UV-irradiation to cells. Moreover, the two inductory treaetments expressed similar kinetics and dose-responses. No matter whether the introduced DNAs initiated replication, they exhibited the incuctory activity. Therefore, it can be considered that DNA lesions itself, not the direct interaction of DNA-damaging agents with specific cellular targets, serve as a triggering signal for the inductory process. Inhibition of DNA replication is not a prerequisite for the inductory signal

  3. Doping Level of Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes Controls the Grafting Density of Functional Groups for DNA Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švorc, Ĺubomír; Jambrec, Daliborka; Vojs, Marian; Barwe, Stefan; Clausmeyer, Jan; Michniak, Pavol; Marton, Marián; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-09-02

    The impact of different doping levels of boron-doped diamond on the surface functionalization was investigated by means of electrochemical reduction of aryldiazonium salts. The grafting efficiency of 4-nitrophenyl groups increased with the boron levels (B/C ratio from 0 to 20,000 ppm). Controlled grafting of nitrophenyldiazonium was used to adjust the amount of immobilized single-stranded DNA strands at the surface and further on the hybridization yield in dependence on the boron doping level. The grafted nitro functions were electrochemically reduced to the amine moieties. Subsequent functionalization with a succinic acid introduced carboxyl groups for subsequent binding of an amino-terminated DNA probe. DNA hybridization significantly depends on the probe density which is in turn dependent on the boron doping level. The proposed approach opens new insights for the design and control of doped diamond surface functionalization for the construction of DNA hybridization assays.

  4. The BRCA1 Ubiquitin ligase function sets a new trend for remodelling in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densham, Ruth M; Morris, Joanna R

    2017-03-04

    The protein product of the breast and ovarian cancer gene, BRCA1, is part of an obligate heterodimer with BARD1. Together these RING bearing proteins act as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Several functions have been attributed to BRCA1 that contribute to genome integrity but which of these, if any, require this enzymatic function was unclear. Here we review recent studies clarifying the role of BRCA1 E3 ubiquitin ligase in DNA repair. Perhaps the most surprising finding is the narrow range of BRCA1 functions this activity relates to. Remarkably ligase activity promotes chromatin remodelling and 53BP1 positioning through the remodeller SMARCAD1, but the activity is dispensable for the cellular survival in response to cisplatin or replication stressing agents. Implications for therapy response and tumor susceptibility are discussed.

  5. Structure and function of the small terminase component of the DNA packaging machine in T4-like bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Siyang; Gao, Song; Kondabagil, Kiran; Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-17

    Tailed DNA bacteriophages assemble empty procapsids that are subsequently filled with the viral genome by means of a DNA packaging machine situated at a special fivefold vertex. The packaging machine consists of a "small terminase" and a "large terminase" component. One of the functions of the small terminase is to initiate packaging of the viral genome, whereas the large terminase is responsible for the ATP-powered translocation of DNA. The small terminase subunit has three domains, an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a central oligomerization domain, and a C-terminal domain for interacting with the large terminase. Here we report structures of the central domain in two different oligomerization states for a small terminase from the T4 family of phages. In addition, we report biochemical studies that establish the function for each of the small terminase domains. On the basis of the structural and biochemical information, we propose a model for DNA packaging initiation.

  6. Structure and Function of p53-DNA Complexes with Inactivation and Rescue Mutations: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balu Kamaraj

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor protein p53 can lose its function upon DNA-contact mutations (R273C and R273H in the core DNA-binding domain. The activity can be restored by second-site suppressor or rescue mutations (R273C_T284R, R273H_T284R, and R273H_S240R. In this paper, we elucidate the structural and functional consequence of p53 proteins upon DNA-contact mutations and rescue mutations and the underlying mechanisms at the atomic level by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we also apply the docking approach to investigate the binding phenomena between the p53 protein and DNA upon DNA-contact mutations and rescue mutations. This study clearly illustrates that, due to DNA-contact mutants, the p53 structure loses its stability and becomes more rigid than the native protein. This structural loss might affect the p53-DNA interaction and leads to inhibition of the cancer suppression. Rescue mutants (R273C_T284R, R273H_T284R and R273H_S240R can restore the functional activity of the p53 protein upon DNA-contact mutations and show a good interaction between the p53 protein and a DNA molecule, which may lead to reactivate the cancer suppression function. Understanding the effects of p53 cancer and rescue mutations at the molecular level will be helpful for designing drugs for p53 associated cancer diseases. These drugs should be designed so that they can help to inhibit the abnormal function of the p53 protein and to reactivate the p53 function (cell apoptosis to treat human cancer.

  7. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA Repair Protein Mre11 with an Evolutionarily Conserved Nuclease Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugith Babu Badugu

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic Meiotic Recombination protein 11 (Mre11 plays pivotal roles in the DNA damage response (DDR. Specifically, Mre11 senses and signals DNA double strand breaks (DSB and facilitates their repair through effector proteins belonging to either homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair mechanisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, HR and alternative-NHEJ have been identified; however, little is known about the upstream factors involved in the DDR of this organism. In this report, we identify a putative ortholog of Mre11 in P. falciparum (PfalMre11 that shares 22% sequence similarity to human Mre11. Homology modeling reveals striking structural resemblance of the predicted PfalMre11 nuclease domain to the nuclease domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 (ScMre11. Complementation analyses reveal functional conservation of PfalMre11 nuclease activity as demonstrated by the ability of the PfalMre11 nuclease domain, in conjunction with the C-terminal domain of ScMre11, to functionally complement an mre11 deficient yeast strain. Functional complementation was virtually abrogated by an amino acid substitution in the PfalMre11 nuclease domain (D398N. PfalMre11 is abundant in the mitotically active trophozoite and schizont stages of P. falciparum and is up-regulated in response to DNA damage, suggesting a role in the DDR. PfalMre11 exhibits physical interaction with PfalRad50. In addition, yeast 2-hybrid studies show that PfalMre11 interacts with ScRad50 and ScXrs2, two important components of the well characterized Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex which is involved in DDR signaling and repair in S. cerevisiae, further supporting a role for PfalMre11 in the DDR. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that PfalMre11 is an evolutionarily conserved component of the DDR in Plasmodium.

  8. Genetic and functional diversity of ubiquitous DNA viruses in selected Chinese agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li-Li; Yu, Dan-Ting; Zhang, Li-Mei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2017-03-01

    Viral community structures in complex agricultural soils are largely unknown. Electron microscopy and viromic analyses were conducted on six typical Chinese agricultural soil samples. Tailed bacteriophages, spherical and filamentous viral particles were identified by the morphological analysis. Based on the metagenomic analysis, single-stranded DNA viruses represented the largest viral component in most of the soil habitats, while the double-stranded DNA viruses belonging to the Caudovirales order were predominanted in Jiangxi-maize soils. The majority of functional genes belonged to the subsystem “phages, prophages, transposable elements, and plasmids”. Non-metric multidimensional analysis of viral community showed that the environment medium type was the most important driving factor for the viral community structure. For the major viral groups detected in all samples (Microviridae and Caudovirales), the two groups gathered viruses from different sites and similar genetic composition, indicating that viral diversity was high on a local point but relatively limited on a global scale. This is a novel report of viral diversity in Chinese agricultural soils, and the abundance, taxonomic, and functional diversity of viruses that were observed in different types of soils will aid future soil virome studies and enhance our understanding of the ecological functions of soil viruses.

  9. A Novel Aspect of Tumorigenesis-BMI1 Functions in Regulating DNA Damage Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Ojo, Diane; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; Gu, Yan; Tang, Damu

    2015-12-01

    BMI1 plays critical roles in maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic, neural, intestinal stem cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) for a variety of cancer types. BMI1 promotes cell proliferative life span and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Upregulation of BMI1 occurs in multiple cancer types and is associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistically, BMI1 is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), and binds the catalytic RING2/RING1b subunit to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Through mono-ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119 (H2A-K119Ub), BMI1 represses multiple gene loci; among these, the INK4A/ARF locus has been most thoroughly investigated. The locus encodes the p16INK4A and p14/p19ARF tumor suppressors that function in the pRb and p53 pathways, respectively. Its repression contributes to BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. BMI1 also possesses other oncogenic functions, specifically its regulative role in DNA damage response (DDR). In this process, BMI1 ubiquitinates histone H2A and γH2AX, thereby facilitating the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) through stimulating homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Additionally, BMI1 compromises DSB-induced checkpoint activation independent of its-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We review the emerging role of BMI1 in DDR regulation and discuss its impact on BMI1-derived tumorigenesis.

  10. Functional importance of the DNA binding activity of Candida albicans Czf1p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Petrovska

    Full Text Available The human opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans undergoes a reversible morphological transition between the yeast and hyphal states in response to a variety of signals. One such environmental trigger is growth within a semisolid matrix such as agar medium. This growth condition is of interest because it may mimic the growth of C. albicans in contact with host tissue during infection. During growth within a semisolid matrix, hyphal growth is positively regulated by the transcriptional regulator Czf1p and negatively by a second key transcriptional regulator, Efg1p. Genetic studies indicate that Czf1p, a member of the zinc-cluster family of transcriptional regulators, exerts its function by opposing the inhibitory influence of Efg1p on matrix-induced filamentous growth. We examined the importance of the two known activities of Czf1p, DNA-binding and interaction with Efg1p. We found that the two activities were separable by mutation allowing us to demonstrate that the DNA-binding activity of Czf1p was essential for its role as a positive regulator of morphogenesis. Surprisingly, however, interactions with Efg1p appeared to be largely dispensable. Our studies provide the first evidence of a key role for the DNA-binding activity of Czf1p in the morphological yeast-to-hyphal transition triggered by matrix-embedded growth.

  11. Bidirectional gene sequences with similar homology to functional proteins of alkane degrading bacterium pseudomonas fredriksbergensis DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megeed, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for two overlapping fragments of DNA from a clone of newly isolated alkanes degrading bacterium Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis encoding sequences with similar homology to two parts of functional proteins is described. One strand contains a sequence with high homology to alkanes monooxygenase (alkB), a member of the alkanes hydroxylase family, and the other strand contains a sequence with some homology to alcohol dehydrogenase gene (alkJ). Overlapping of the genes on opposite strands has been reported in eukaryotic species, and is now reported in a bacterial species. The sequence comparisons and ORFS results revealed that the regulation and the genes organization involved in alkane oxidation represented in Pseudomonas frederiksberghensis varies among the different known alkane degrading bacteria. The alk gene cluster containing homologues to the known alkane monooxygenase (alkB), and rubredoxin (alkG) are oriented in the same direction, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (alkJ) is oriented in the opposite direction. Such genomes encode messages on both strands of the DNA, or in an overlapping but different reading frames, of the same strand of DNA. The possibility of creating novel genes from pre-existing sequences, known as overprinting, which is a widespread phenomenon in small viruses. Here, the origin and evolution of the gene overlap to bacteriophages belonging to the family Microviridae have been investigated. Such a phenomenon is most widely described in extremely small genomes such as those of viruses or small plasmids, yet here is a unique phenomenon. (author)

  12. Ionization and fragmentation of DNA-RNA bases: a density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadr-Arani, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) cross human tissue, deposit energy and dissipate fragmenting molecules. The resulting fragments may be highlighted by mass spectrometry. Despite the amount of information obtained experimentally by the interpretation of the mass spectrum, experience alone cannot answer all the questions of the mechanism of fragmentation of DNA/RNA bases and a theoretical study is a complement to this information. A theoretical study allows us to know the weakest bonds in the molecule during ionization and thus may help to provide mechanisms of dissociation and produced fragments. The purpose of this work, using the DFT with the PBE functional, is to study the ionization and fragmentation mechanisms of DNA/RNA bases (Uracil, Cytosine, Adenine and Guanine) and to identify the cations corresponding to each peak in mass spectra. For all RNA bases, the retro Diels-Alder reaction (elimination of HNCO or NCO*) is a major route for dissociating, with the exception of adenine for which there is no atom oxygen in its structure. Loss of NH 3 (NH 2 *) molecule is another common way to all bases that contain amine group. The possibility of the loss of hydrogen from the cations is also investigated, as well as the dissociation of dehydrogenated cations and protonated uracil. This work shows the interest of providing DFT calculation in the interpretation of mass spectra of DNA bases. (author)

  13. Linear closed mini DNA generated by the prokaryotic cleaving-joining enzyme TelN is functional in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Jochen; Schultz, Jan; Bosse, Magnus; Ziegelin, Günter; Lanka, Erich; Moelling, Karin

    2002-10-01

    For application of DNA in gene medicine plasmid or viral DNA is usually used as a vector for the gene of interest. To generate DNA with a minimum of foreign DNA sequences, we used the prokaryotic telomerase, protelomerase TelN, of bacteriophage N15. This is a novel enzyme with cleaving-joining activity, which is required for the formation of linear prophage DNA with closed ends in lysogenic bacteria. Acting on a telomere resolution site telRL, the protelomerase converts circular plasmid DNA into linear covalently closed dumbbell-shaped molecules ("doggybones") in a single-step enzyme reaction. Two such sites were inserted into an expression plasmid flanking a gene of interest. This is cleaved and joined by means of the protelomerase, yielding linear closed mini DNA coding for green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or interleukin-12 (IL-12). Upon transient transfection of human embryonal kidney cells, EGFP was expressed at higher levels from linear closed molecules than from linear open molecules generated by restriction endonucleases for comparison. The level of transcription was comparable to that observed for the parental plasmid DNA. To test whether the linear closed mini DNA molecules are functional in vivo the B16F10/C57BL/6 melanoma metastasis model was applied, where injection of IL-12-expressing DNA inhibits metastasis formation in the lung. The anti-metastatic effect of the IL-12-expressing linear closed DNA was equal or higher than that of the parental plasmid DNA. Therefore, the TelN/ telRL system is well suited to generate linear closed mini DNA with high stability and a minimum of foreign nucleotide sequences.

  14. Efficient self-assembly of DNA-functionalized fluorophores and gold nanoparticles with DNA functionalized silicon surfaces: the effect of oligomer spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, James A.; Patole, Samson; Yin, Huabing; Xiao, Qiang; Brown, Tom; Melvin, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Although strategies for the immobilization of DNA oligonucleotides onto surfaces for bioanalytical and top-down bio-inspired nanobiofabrication approaches are well developed, the effect of introducing spacer molecules between the surface and the DNA oligonucleotide for the hybridization of nanoparticle–DNA conjugates has not been previously assessed in a quantitative manner. The hybridization efficiency of DNA oligonucleotides end-labelled with gold nanoparticles (1.4 or 10 nm diameter) with DNA sequences conjugated to silicon surfaces via hexaethylene glycol phosphate diester oligomer spacers (0, 1, 2, 6 oligomers) was found to be independent of spacer length. To quantify both the density of DNA strands attached to the surfaces and hybridization with the surface-attached DNA, new methodologies have been developed. Firstly, a simple approach based on fluorescence has been developed for determination of the immobilization density of DNA oligonucleotides. Secondly, an approach using mass spectrometry has been created to establish (i) the mean number of DNA oligonucleotides attached to the gold nanoparticles and (ii) the hybridization density of nanoparticle–oligonucleotide conjugates with the silicon surface–attached complementary sequence. These methods and results will be useful for application with nanosensors, the self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices and the attachment of nanoparticles to biomolecules for single-molecule biophysical studies. PMID:23361467

  15. Functional interfaces for biomimetic energy harvesting: CNTs-DNA matrix for enzyme assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Rachel M E; Garcia, Kristen E; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Matanovic, Ivana; Banta, Scott; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-05-01

    The development of 3D structures exploring the properties of nano-materials and biological molecules has been shown through the years as an effective path forward for the design of advanced bio-nano architectures for enzymatic fuel cells, photo-bio energy harvesting devices, nano-biosensors and bio-actuators and other bio-nano-interfacial architectures. In this study we demonstrate a scaffold design utilizing carbon nanotubes, deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and a specific DNA binding transcription factor that allows for directed immobilization of a single enzyme. Functionalized carbon nanotubes were covalently bonded to a diazonium salt modified gold surface through carbodiimide chemistry creating a brush-type nanotube alignment. The aligned nanotubes created a highly ordered structure with high surface area that allowed for the attachment of a protein assembly through a designed DNA scaffold. The enzyme immobilization was controlled by a zinc finger (ZNF) protein domain that binds to a specific dsDNA sequence. ZNF 268 was genetically fused to the small laccase (SLAC) from Streptomyces coelicolor, an enzyme belonging to the family of multi-copper oxidases, and used to demonstrate the applicability of the developed approach. Analytical techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and enzymatic activity analysis, allowed characterization at each stage of development of the bio-nano architecture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The structure and function of replication protein A in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2012-01-01

    In all organisms from bacteria and archaea to eukarya, single-stranded DNA binding proteins play an essential role in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein, has two important roles in DNA metabolism: (1) in binding ssDNA to protect it and to keep it unfolded, and (2) in coordinating the assembly and disassembly of numerous proteins and protein complexes during processes such as DNA replication. Since its discovery as a vital player in the process of replication, RPAs roles in recombination and DNA repair quickly became evident. This chapter summarizes the current understanding of RPA's roles in replication by reviewing the available structural data, DNA-binding properties, interactions with various replication proteins, and interactions with DNA repair proteins when DNA replication is stalled.

  17. Methamidophos alters sperm function and DNA at different stages of spermatogenesis in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urióstegui-Acosta, Mayrut; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico); Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Hidalgo (Mexico); Piña-Guzmán, Belem [Instituto Politécnico Nacional-UPIBI, D.F. (Mexico); Rafael-Vázquez, Leticia; Solís-Heredia, M.J.; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico); Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet, E-mail: mquintan@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    Methamidophos (MET) is a highly toxic organophosphate (OP) pesticide that is widely used in developing countries. MET has male reproductive effects, including decreased fertility. We evaluated MET effects on sperm quality, fertilization and DNA integrity, exploring the sensitivity of different stages of spermatogenesis. Adult male mice received MET (3.75 or 5 mg/kg-bw/ip/day/4 days) and were euthanized 1, 28 or 45 days post-treatment (dpt) to evaluate MET's effects on epididymal maturation, meiosis or mitosis, respectively. Spermatozoa were obtained from the cauda epididymis–vas deferens and were evaluated for sperm quality, acrosome reaction (AR; Coomassie staining), mitochondrial membrane potential (by JC-1), DNA damage (comet assay), oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA) production), in vitro fertilization and protein phosphorylation (immunodetection), and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. At 1-dpt, MET inhibited AChE (43–57%) and increased abnormal cells (6%). While at 28- and 45-dpt, sperm motility and viability were significantly reduced with an increasing MET dose, and abnormal morphology increased at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days. MDA and mitochondrial activity were not affected at any dose or time. DNA damage (OTM and %DNA) was observed at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days in a time-dependent manner, whereas both parameters were altered in cells from mice exposed to 3.75 mg/kg/day/4 days only at 28-dpt. Depending on the time of collection, initial-, spontaneous- and induced-AR were altered at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days, and the fertilization capacity also decreased. Sperm phosphorylation (at serine and tyrosine residues) was observed at all time points. Data suggest that meiosis and mitosis are the more sensitive stages of spermatogenesis for MET reproductive toxicity compared to epididymal maturation. - Highlights: • Methamidophos alters sperm cell function at different stages of spermatogenesis. • Testicular stages of spermatogenesis are more sensitive to

  18. Double-check probing of DNA bending and unwinding by XPA-RPA: an architectural function in DNA repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Missura, M.; Buterin, T.; Hindges, R.; Hübscher, U.; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Naegeli, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 13 (2001), s. 3554-3564 ISSN 0261-4189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : damage recognition * DNA repair * xeroderma pigmentosum Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 12.450, year: 2001

  19. DNA Recognition by the DNA Primase of Bacteriophage T7: A Structure Function Study of the Zinc-Binding Domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabayov, B.; Lee, S.; Akabayov, S.; Rekhi, S.; Zhu, B.; Richardson, C.

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of oligoribonucleotide primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis in the DNA replication system of bacteriophage T7 is catalyzed by the primase domain of the gene 4 helicase-primase. The primase consists of a zinc-binding domain (ZBD) and an RNA polymerase (RPD) domain. The ZBD is responsible for recognition of a specific sequence in the ssDNA template whereas catalytic activity resides in the RPD. The ZBD contains a zinc ion coordinated with four cysteine residues. We have examined the ligation state of the zinc ion by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and biochemical analysis of genetically altered primases. The ZBD of primase engaged in catalysis exhibits considerable asymmetry in coordination to zinc, as evidenced by a gradual increase in electron density of the zinc together with elongation of the zinc-sulfur bonds. Both wild-type primase and primase reconstituted from purified ZBD and RPD have a similar electronic change in the level of the zinc ion as well as the configuration of the ZBD. Single amino acid replacements in the ZBD (H33A and C36S) result in the loss of both zinc binding and its structural integrity. Thus the zinc in the ZBD may act as a charge modulation indicator for the surrounding sulfur atoms necessary for recognition of specific DNA sequences.

  20. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  1. Global DNA hypomethylation has no impact on lung function or serum inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines in asbestos-exposed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Lou, Jianlin; Xia, Hailing; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Yixiao; Chen, Junqiang; Zhang, Xing; Ying, Shibo; Zhu, Lijin; Liu, Lihong; Jia, Guang

    2017-04-01

    To examine the effect of asbestos exposure on global DNA methylation and determine whether lung function and inflammatory and fibrosis biomarkers are correlated with the methylation state. A total of 26 healthy subjects without asbestos exposure (Group 1), 47 healthy subjects with exposure (Group 2), and 52 subjects with benign asbestos-related disorders (ARDs) (Group 3) participated in this cross-sectional study. Blood global 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and serum TNF-α, collagen IV, CCL5 and CC16 concentrations were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-like assays. Spirometric maneuvers were performed to assess lung function. Decreased 5mC levels were observed in Groups 2 and 3 compared to Group 1, irrespective of lung function (p asbestos exposure. Asbestos exposure causes global DNA hypomethylation. DNA hypomethylation has no influence on serum biomarkers and lung function in asbestos-exposed population with or without pleural and pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities.

  2. A Novel Aspect of Tumorigenesis—BMI1 Functions in Regulating DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozeng Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BMI1 plays critical roles in maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic, neural, intestinal stem cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs for a variety of cancer types. BMI1 promotes cell proliferative life span and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Upregulation of BMI1 occurs in multiple cancer types and is associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistically, BMI1 is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and binds the catalytic RING2/RING1b subunit to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Through mono-ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119 (H2A-K119Ub, BMI1 represses multiple gene loci; among these, the INK4A/ARF locus has been most thoroughly investigated. The locus encodes the p16INK4A and p14/p19ARF tumor suppressors that function in the pRb and p53 pathways, respectively. Its repression contributes to BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. BMI1 also possesses other oncogenic functions, specifically its regulative role in DNA damage response (DDR. In this process, BMI1 ubiquitinates histone H2A and γH2AX, thereby facilitating the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs through stimulating homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Additionally, BMI1 compromises DSB-induced checkpoint activation independent of its-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We review the emerging role of BMI1 in DDR regulation and discuss its impact on BMI1-derived tumorigenesis.

  3. A Novel Aspect of Tumorigenesis—BMI1 Functions in Regulating DNA Damage Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Ojo, Diane; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; Gu, Yan; Tang, Damu

    2015-01-01

    BMI1 plays critical roles in maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic, neural, intestinal stem cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) for a variety of cancer types. BMI1 promotes cell proliferative life span and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Upregulation of BMI1 occurs in multiple cancer types and is associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistically, BMI1 is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), and binds the catalytic RING2/RING1b subunit to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Through mono-ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119 (H2A-K119Ub), BMI1 represses multiple gene loci; among these, the INK4A/ARF locus has been most thoroughly investigated. The locus encodes the p16INK4A and p14/p19ARF tumor suppressors that function in the pRb and p53 pathways, respectively. Its repression contributes to BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. BMI1 also possesses other oncogenic functions, specifically its regulative role in DNA damage response (DDR). In this process, BMI1 ubiquitinates histone H2A and γH2AX, thereby facilitating the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) through stimulating homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Additionally, BMI1 compromises DSB-induced checkpoint activation independent of its-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We review the emerging role of BMI1 in DDR regulation and discuss its impact on BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. PMID:26633535

  4. A Dominant Mutation in Human RAD51 Reveals Its Function in DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair Independent of Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anderson T; Kim, Taeho; Wagner, John E; Conti, Brooke A; Lach, Francis P; Huang, Athena L; Molina, Henrik; Sanborn, Erica M; Zierhut, Heather; Cornes, Belinda K; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B; Auerbach, Arleen D; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-08-06

    Repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks requires action of multiple DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination. Here, we report a de novo heterozygous T131P mutation in RAD51/FANCR, the key recombinase essential for homologous recombination, in a patient with Fanconi anemia-like phenotype. In vitro, RAD51-T131P displays DNA-independent ATPase activity, no DNA pairing capacity, and a co-dominant-negative effect on RAD51 recombinase function. However, the patient cells are homologous recombination proficient due to the low ratio of mutant to wild-type RAD51 in cells. Instead, patient cells are sensitive to crosslinking agents and display hyperphosphorylation of Replication Protein A due to increased activity of DNA2 and WRN at the DNA interstrand crosslinks. Thus, proper RAD51 function is important during DNA interstrand crosslink repair outside of homologous recombination. Our study provides a molecular basis for how RAD51 and its associated factors may operate in a homologous recombination-independent manner to maintain genomic integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure-Function Analysis of the DNA Translocating Portal of the Bacteriophage T4 Packaging Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Gao, Song; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kihara, Daisuke; Sun, Lei; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2013-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special five-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages φ29, SPP1 and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the E. coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and fit the dodecamer into the cryoEM density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone-shaped with the wider end containing the “wing” and “crown” domains inside the phage head. A long “stem” encloses a central channel, and a narrow “stalk” protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and portal. The “tunnel” loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging. PMID:24126213

  6. DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence polarization for the sensitive detection of silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongke; Wang, Shuangli; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Liu, Yufang

    2018-04-05

    Despite their practical applications, Ag + ions are environmental pollutants and affect human health. So the effective detection methods of Ag + ions are imperative. Herein, we developed a simple, sensitive, selective, and cost-effective fluorescence polarization sensor for Ag + detection in aqueous solution using thiol-DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this sensing strategy, Ag + ions can specifically interact with a cytosine-cytosine (CC) mismatch in DNA duplexes and form stable metal-mediated cytosine-Ag + -cytosine (C-Ag + -C) base pairs. The formation of the C-Ag + -C complex results in evident changes in the molecular volume and fluorescence polarization signal. To achieve our aims, we prepared two complementary DNA strands containing C-base mismatches (probe A: 5'-SH-A 10 -TACCACTCCTCAC-3' and probe B: 5'-TCCTCACCAGTCCTA-FAM-3'). The stable hybridization between probe A and probe B occurs with the formation of the C-Ag + -C complex in the presence of Ag + ions, leading to obvious fluorescence quenching in comparison to the system without AuNP enhancement. The assay can be used to identify nanomolar levels of Ag + within 6 min at room temperature, and has extremely high specificity for Ag + , even in the presence of higher concentrations of interfering metal ions. Furthermore, the sensor was successfully applied to the detection of Ag + ions in environmental water samples and showed excellent selectivity and high sensitivity, implying its promising application in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure-function analysis of the DNA translocating portal of the bacteriophage T4 packaging machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Gao, Song; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kihara, Daisuke; Sun, Lei; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2014-03-06

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special 5-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages φ29, SPP1, and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the Escherichia coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and we fit the dodecamer into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone shaped with the wider end containing the "wing" and "crown" domains inside the phage head. A long "stem" encloses a central channel, and a narrow "stalk" protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and the portal. The "tunnel" loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging. © 2013.

  8. Structure and Function of the PriC DNA Replication Restart Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Sarah R; Cornilescu, Claudia C; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Metz, Alice; Leroux, Maxime; Hu, Kaifeng; Sandler, Steven J; Markley, John L; Keck, James L

    2016-08-26

    Collisions between DNA replication complexes (replisomes) and barriers such as damaged DNA or tightly bound protein complexes can dissociate replisomes from chromosomes prematurely. Replisomes must be reloaded under these circumstances to avoid incomplete replication and cell death. Bacteria have evolved multiple pathways that initiate DNA replication restart by recognizing and remodeling abandoned replication forks and reloading the replicative helicase. In vitro, the simplest of these pathways is mediated by the single-domain PriC protein, which, along with the DnaC helicase loader, can load the DnaB replicative helicase onto DNA bound by the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB). Previous biochemical studies have identified PriC residues that mediate interactions with ssDNA and SSB. However, the mechanisms by which PriC drives DNA replication restart have remained poorly defined due to the limited structural information available for PriC. Here, we report the NMR structure of full-length PriC from Cronobacter sakazakii PriC forms a compact bundle of α-helices that brings together residues involved in ssDNA and SSB binding at adjacent sites on the protein surface. Disruption of these interaction sites and of other conserved residues leads to decreased DnaB helicase loading onto SSB-bound DNA. We also demonstrate that PriC can directly interact with DnaB and the DnaB·DnaC complex. These data lead to a model in which PriC acts as a scaffold for recruiting DnaB·DnaC to SSB/ssDNA sites present at stalled replication forks. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Integral parametrization of the Kinetics of Crosslink production in plasmid DNA as a function of 8-methoxypsoralen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidania, R. de; Paramio, J. M.; Bauluz, C.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper we present results of crosslink production in pBR322 DNA along a wide range of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) concentration. Experimental data were obtained as DNA renaturation percentages, from the shift in hyperchromicity after a temperature-dependent denaturation-renaturation process. the experimental results showed a three-stage profile when represented as a function of the natural logarithms of 8-MOP concentration. an integral parametrization which allows a simultaneous fit of the three observed stages is presented here. the theoretical values of crosslink production determined from the fit are useful to asses the genotoxicity of psoralen-induced crosslinks in plasmid DNA. (Author) 24 refs.

  10. Integral parametrization of the Kinetics of Crosslink production in plasmid DNA as a function of 8-methoxypsoralen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidania, R. de; Paramio, J. M.; Bauluz, C.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we present results of crosslink production in pBR322 DNA along a wide range of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) concentration. Experimental data were obtained as DNA renaturation percentages, from the shift in hyperchromicity after a temperature-dependent denaturation-renaturation process. the experimental results showed a three-stage profile when represented as a function of the natural logarithms of 8-MOP concentration. an integral parametrization which allows a simultaneous fit of the three observed stages is presented here. the theoretical values of crosslink production determined from the fit are useful to asses the genotoxicity of psoralen-induced crosslinks in plasmid DNA. (Author) 24 refs

  11. Impedance characterization of DNA-functionalization layers on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, N.; Schwarz, S.U.; Cimalla, V.; Podolska, A.; Ambacher, O.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization and optimization for biosensor implementation with open gate AlGaN/GaN transistors is described. Probe-DNA was immobilized on the gate. As target, complementary DNA at 10-12-10-7mol/L was added. To investigate the impedimetric properties of the sensing area, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used. For very low frequencies, the bio-functionalization layer was modeled as a membrane with a charge transfer resistor in series with a Warburg element. This component present...

  12. Ancestral sequence reconstruction in primate mitochondrial DNA: compositional bias and effect on functional inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Neeraja M; Seligmann, Hervé; Stewart, Caro-Beth; De Koning, A P Jason; Pollock, David D

    2004-10-01

    Reconstruction of ancestral DNA and amino acid sequences is an important means of inferring information about past evolutionary events. Such reconstructions suggest changes in molecular function and evolutionary processes over the course of evolution and are used to infer adaptation and convergence. Maximum likelihood (ML) is generally thought to provide relatively accurate reconstructed sequences compared to parsimony, but both methods lead to the inference of multiple directional changes in nucleotide frequencies in primate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). To better understand this surprising result, as well as to better understand how parsimony and ML differ, we constructed a series of computationally simple "conditional pathway" methods that differed in the number of substitutions allowed per site along each branch, and we also evaluated the entire Bayesian posterior frequency distribution of reconstructed ancestral states. We analyzed primate mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cyt-b) and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes and found that ML reconstructs ancestral frequencies that are often more different from tip sequences than are parsimony reconstructions. In contrast, frequency reconstructions based on the posterior ensemble more closely resemble extant nucleotide frequencies. Simulations indicate that these differences in ancestral sequence inference are probably due to deterministic bias caused by high uncertainty in the optimization-based ancestral reconstruction methods (parsimony, ML, Bayesian maximum a posteriori). In contrast, ancestral nucleotide frequencies based on an average of the Bayesian set of credible ancestral sequences are much less biased. The methods involving simpler conditional pathway calculations have slightly reduced likelihood values compared to full likelihood calculations, but they can provide fairly unbiased nucleotide reconstructions and may be useful in more complex phylogenetic analyses than considered here due to their speed and

  13. Development of DNA affinity techniques for the functional characterization of purified RNA polymerase II transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.; Cohen, R.B.; Brendler, T.; Safer, B.

    1987-01-01

    Affinity adsorption, precipitation, and partitioning techniques have been developed to purify and characterize RNA Pol II transcription components from whole cell extracts (WCE) (HeLa) and nuclear extracts (K562). The titration of these extracts with multicopy constructs of the Ad2 MLP but not pUC8, inhibits transcriptional activity. DNA-binding factors precipitated by this technique are greatly enriched by centrifugation. Using this approach, factors binding to the upstream promoter sequence (UPS) of the Ad2 MLP have been rapidly isolated by Mono Q, Mono S, and DNA affinity chromatography. By U.V. crosslinking to nucleotides containing specific 32 P-phosphodiester bonds within the recognition sequence, this factor is identified as a M/sub r/ = 45,000 polypeptide. To generate an assay system for the functional evaluation of single transcription components, a similar approach using synthetic oligonucleotide sequences spanning single promoter binding sites has been developed. The addition of a synthetic 63-mer containing the UPS element of the Ad2 MLP to HeLa WCE inhibited transcription by 60%. The addition of partially purified UPS binding protein, but not RNA Pol II, restored transcriptional activity. The addition of synthetic oligonucleotides containing other regulatory sequences not present in the Ad2 MLP was without effect

  14. Polyglycerol-functionalized nanodiamond as a platform for gene delivery: Derivatization, characterization, and hybridization with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A gene vector consisting of nanodiamond, polyglycerol, and basic polypeptide (ND-PG-BPP has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The ND-PG-BPP was synthesized by PG functionalization of ND through ring-opening polymerization of glycidol on the ND surface, multistep organic transformations (–OH → –OTs (tosylate → –N3 in the PG layer, and click conjugation of the basic polypeptides (Arg8, Lys8 or His8 terminated with propargyl glycine. The ND-PG-BPP exhibited good dispersibility in water (>1.0 mg/mL and positive zeta potential ranging from +14.2 mV to +44.1 mV at neutral pH in Milli-Q water. It was confirmed by gel retardation assay that ND-PG-Arg8 and ND-PG-Lys8 with higher zeta potential hybridized with plasmid DNA (pDNA through electrostatic attraction, making them promising as nonviral vectors for gene delivery.

  15. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Fernandez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA. We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  16. Molecular basis for the functions of a bacterial MutS2 in DNA repair and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial MutS2 proteins, consisting of functional domains for ATPase, DNA-binding, and nuclease activities, play roles in DNA recombination and repair. Here we observe a mechanism for generating MutS2 expression diversity in the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori, and identify a unique MutS2 domain responsible for specific DNA-binding. H. pylori strains differ in mutS2 expression due to variations in the DNA upstream sequence containing short sequence repeats. Based on Western blots, mutS2 in some strains appears to be co-translated with the upstream gene, but in other strains (e.g. UA948) such translational coupling does not occur. Accordingly, strain UA948 had phenotypes similar to its ΔmutS2 derivative, whereas expression of MutS2 at a separate locus in UA948 (the genetically complemented strain) displayed a lower mutation rate and lower transformation frequency than did ΔmutS2. A series of truncated HpMutS2 proteins were purified and tested for their specific abilities to bind 8-oxoG-containing DNA (GO:C) and Holiday Junction structures (HJ). The specific DNA binding domain was localized to an area adjacent to the Smr nuclease domain, and it encompasses 30-amino-acid-residues containing a "KPPKNKFKPPK" motif. Gel shift assays and competition assays supported that a truncated version of HpMutS2-C12 (∼12kDa protein containing the specific DNA-binding domain) has much greater capacity to bind to HJ or GO:C DNA than to normal double stranded DNA. By studying the in vivo roles of the separate domains of HpMutS2, we observed that the truncated versions were unable to complement the ΔmutS2 strain, suggesting the requirement for coordinated function of all the domains in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. C-terminal fluorescent labeling impairs functionality of DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brieger

    Full Text Available The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2. Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency.

  18. Global functional analysis of nucleophosmin in Taxol response, cancer, chromatin regulation, and ribosomal DNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstralh, Daniel T.; Conti, Brian J.; Moore, Chris B.; Brickey, W. June; Taxman, Debra J.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of lung cancer response to chemotherapeutic agents showed the accumulation of a Taxol-induced protein that reacted with an anti-phospho-MEK1/2 antibody. Mass spectroscopy identified the protein as nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM), a multifunctional protein with diverse roles: ribosome biosynthesis, p53 regulation, nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, and centrosome duplication. Our work demonstrates that following cellular exposure to mitosis-arresting agents, NPM is phosphorylated and its chromatographic property is altered, suggesting changes in function during mitosis. To determine the functional relevance of NPM, its expression in tumor cells was reduced by siRNA. Cells with reduced NPM were treated with Taxol followed by microarray profiling accompanied by gene/protein pathway analyses. These studies demonstrate several expected and unexpected consequences of NPM depletion. The predominant downstream effectors of NPM are genes involved in cell proliferation, cancer, and the cell cycle. In congruence with its role in cancer, NPM is over-expressed in primary malignant lung cancer tissues. We also demonstrate a role for NPM in the expression of genes encoding SET (TAF1β) and the histone methylase SET8. Additionally, we show that NPM is required for a previously unobserved G2/M upregulation of TAF1A, which encodes the rDNA transcription factor TAF I 48. These results demonstrate multi-faceted functions of NPM that can affect cancer cells

  19. Self-Assembled Functional Nanostructure of Plasmid DNA with Ionic Liquid [Bmim][PF₆]: Enhanced Efficiency in Bacterial Gene Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sarvesh K; Sarkar, Sampa; Mirzadeh, Nedaossadat; Selvakannan, P R; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-04-28

    The electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged phosphate groups of plasmid DNA and the cationic part of hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Bmim][PF6]), initiates spontaneous self-assembly to form the functional nanostructures made up of DNA and ionic liquid (IL). These functional nanostructures were demonstrated as promising synthetic nonviral vectors for the efficient bacterial pGFP gene transformation in cells. In particular, the functional nanostructures that were made up of 1 μL of IL ([Bmim][PF6]) and 1 μg of plasmid DNA can increase the transformation efficiency by 300-400% in microbial systems, without showing any toxicity for E. coli DH5α cells. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopic analysis revealed that the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged phosphate oxygen and cationic Bmim(+) tends to initiate the self-assembly process. Thermogravimetric analysis of the DNA-IL functional nanostructures showed that these nanostructures consist of ∼16 wt % ionic liquid, which is considered to provide the stability to the plasmid DNA that eventually enhanced the transformation efficiency.

  20. A DNA nanocapsule with aptamer-controlled open-closure function for targeted delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A DNA capsule fitted with aptamer controlled target sensing has been "woven" using a 7308-base single-stranded DNA "thread" and 196 staple oligonucleotides. The capsule enables logic-gated molecular cargo delivery to targeted cell surfaces.......A DNA capsule fitted with aptamer controlled target sensing has been "woven" using a 7308-base single-stranded DNA "thread" and 196 staple oligonucleotides. The capsule enables logic-gated molecular cargo delivery to targeted cell surfaces....

  1. Dual functions of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase E2 in the Krebs cycle and mitochondrial DNA inheritance in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Steven E; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    The dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2) of the multisubunit α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (α-KD) is an essential Krebs cycle enzyme commonly found in the matrices of mitochondria. African trypanosomes developmentally regulate mitochondrial carbohydrate metabolism and lack a functional Krebs cycle in the bloodstream of mammals. We found that despite the absence of a functional α-KD, bloodstream form (BF) trypanosomes express α-KDE2, which localized to the mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane. Furthermore, α-KDE2 fractionated with the mitochondrial genome, the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), in a complex with the flagellum. A role for α-KDE2 in kDNA maintenance was revealed in α-KDE2 RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns. Following RNAi induction, bloodstream trypanosomes showed pronounced growth reduction and often failed to equally distribute kDNA to daughter cells, resulting in accumulation of cells devoid of kDNA (dyskinetoplastic) or containing two kinetoplasts. Dyskinetoplastic trypanosomes lacked mitochondrial membrane potential and contained mitochondria of substantially reduced volume. These results indicate that α-KDE2 is bifunctional, both as a metabolic enzyme and as a mitochondrial inheritance factor necessary for the distribution of kDNA networks to daughter cells at cytokinesis.

  2. Repair of endogenous and ionizing radiation-induced DNA damages: mechanisms and biological functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular DNA is continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous stress. Oxidative stress due to cellular metabolism is the major cause of endogenous DNA damage. On the other hand, ionizing radiation (IR) is an important exogenous stress. Both induce similar DNA damages: damaged bases, abasic sites and strand breakage. Most of these lesions are lethal and/or mutagenic. The survival of the cell is managed by efficient and accurate DNA repair mechanisms that remove lesions before their replication or transcription. DNA repair pathways involved in the removal of IR-induced lesions are briefly described. Base excision repair (BER) is mostly involved in the removal of base damage, abasic sites and single strand breaks. In contrast, DNA double strand breaks are mostly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). How DNA repair pathways prevent cancer process is also discussed. (author)

  3. Functional role of DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K.; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Lau, Yun-Fai C.; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintains genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. MMR has also been shown to influence cell signaling and the regulation of tumor development. MMR consists of various genes and includes post-meiotic segregation (PMS) 2 which is a vital component of mutL-alpha. In prostate, the functional role of this gene has never been reported and in this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of PMS2 on growth properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Previous studies have shown PMS2 to be deficient in DU145 cells and this lack of expression was confirmed by Western blotting whereas normal prostatic PWR-1E and RWPE-1 cells expressed this gene. PMS2 effects on various growth properties of DU145 were then determined by creating stable gene transfectants. Interestingly, PMS2 caused decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo growth; and increased apoptosis as compared to vector control. We further analyzed genes affected by PMS2 expression and observe the apoptosis-related TMS1 gene to be significantly upregulated whereas anti-apoptotic BCL2A1 was downregulated. These results demonstrate a functional role for PMS2 to protect against PCa progression by enhancing apoptosis of PCa cells. PMID:26036629

  4. Assaying multiple restriction endonucleases functionalities and inhibitions on DNA microarray with multifunctional gold nanoparticle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lan; Zhu, Zhijun; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2014-02-15

    Herein, a double-stranded (ds) DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with multifunctional gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes has been developed for studying restriction endonuclease functionality and inhibition. Because of decreasing significantly melting temperature, the enzyme-cleaved dsDNAs easily unwind to form single-stranded (ss) DNAs. The ssDNAs are hybridized with multiplex complementary ssDNAs functionalized GNP probes followed by silver enhancement and RLS detection. Three restriction endonucleases (EcoRI, BamHI and EcoRV) and three potential inhibitors (doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), ethidium bromide (EB) and an EcoRI-derived helical peptide (α4)) were selected to demonstrate capability of the assay. Enzyme activities of restriction endonucleases are detected simultaneously with high specificity down to the limits of 2.0 × 10(-2)U/mL for EcoRI, 1.1 × 10(-2)U/mL for BamHI and 1.6 × 10(-2)U/mL for EcoRV, respectively. More importantly, the inhibitory potencies of three inhibitors are showed quantitatively, indicating that our approach has great promise for high-throughput screening of restriction endonuclease inhibitors. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of functional DNA variants in the constitutive promoter region of MDM2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalonde Marie-Eve

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although mutations in the oncoprotein murine double minute 2 (MDM2 are rare, MDM2 gene overexpression has been observed in several human tumors. Given that even modest changes in MDM2 levels might influence the p53 tumor suppressor signaling pathway, we postulated that sequence variation in the promoter region of MDM2 could lead to disregulated expression and variation in gene dosage. Two promoters have been reported for MDM2; an internal promoter (P2, which is located near the end of intron 1 and is p53-responsive, and an upstream constitutive promoter (P1, which is p53-independent. Both promoter regions contain DNA variants that could influence the expression levels of MDM2, including the well-studied single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP SNP309, which is located in the promoter P2; i.e., upstream of exon 2. In this report, we screened the promoter P1 for DNA variants and assessed the functional impact of the corresponding SNPs. Using the dbSNP database and genotyping validation in individuals of European descent, we identified three common SNPs (−1494 G > A; indel 40 bp; and −182 C > G. Three major promoter haplotypes were inferred by using these three promoter SNPs together with rs2279744 (SNP309. Following subcloning into a gene reporter system, we found that two of the haplotypes significantly influenced MDM2 promoter activity in a haplotype-specific manner. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that the 40 bp insertion/deletion variation is causing the observed allelic promoter activity. This study suggests that part of the variability in the MDM2 expression levels could be explained by allelic p53-independent P1 promoter activity.

  6. Functional intersection of ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit in coding end joining during V(D)J recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baeck-Seung; Gapud, Eric J; Zhang, Shichuan

    2013-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is initiated by the RAG endonuclease, which introduces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the border between two recombining gene segments, generating two hairpin-sealed coding ends and two blunt signal ends. ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA......-PKcs. Mutation of these threonine residues to alanine (DNA-PKcs(3A)) renders DNA-PKcs dependent on its intrinsic kinase activity during coding end joining, at a step downstream of opening hairpin-sealed coding ends. Thus, DNA-PKcs has critical functions in coding end joining beyond promoting Artemis endonuclease...

  7. Scientific publications about DNA structure-function and PCR technique in Costa Rica: a historic view (1953-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertazzi, Federico J

    2004-09-01

    The spreading of knowledge depends on the access to the information and its immediate use. Models are useful to explain specific phenomena. The scientific community accepts some models in Biology after a period of time, once it has evidence to support it. The model of the structure and function of the DNA proposed by Watson & Crick (1953) was not the exception, since a few years later the DNA model was finally accepted. In Costa Rica, DNA function was first mentioned in 1970, in the magazine Biologia Tropical (Tropical Biology Magazine), more than 15 years after its first publication in a scientific journal. An opposite situation occurs with technical innovations. If the efficiency of a new scientific technique is proved in a compelling way, then the acceptance by the community comes swiftly. This was the case of the polymerase chain reaction, or PCR. The first PCR machine in Costa Rica arrived in 1991, only three years after its publication.

  8. SETD2 loss-of-function promotes renal cancer branched evolution through replication stress and impaired DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanu, N.; Grönroos, E.; Martinez, P.

    2015-01-01

    -of-function through an integrated bioinformatics and functional genomics approach. We find that bi-allelic SETD2 aberrations are not associated with microsatellite instability in ccRCC. SETD2 depletion in ccRCC cells revealed aberrant and reduced nucleosome compaction and chromatin association of the key replication...... proteins minichromosome maintenance complex component (MCM7) and DNA polymerase δ hindering replication fork progression, and failure to load lens epithelium-derived growth factor and the Rad51 homologous recombination repair factor at DNA breaks. Consistent with these data, we observe chromosomal...... breakpoint locations are biased away from H3K36me3 sites in SETD2 wild-type ccRCCs relative to tumours with bi-allelic SETD2 aberrations and that H3K36me3-negative ccRCCs display elevated DNA damage in vivo. These data suggest a role for SETD2 in maintaining genome integrity through nucleosome stabilization...

  9. Correspondence between radioactive and functional methods in the quality control of DNA restriction and modifying enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, L E; Pupo, E; Miranda, F

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the use of two radiolabeled lambda DNA/Hpa II substrates to detect 5'-->3', 3'-->5' single and double stranded DNA dependent exonuclease and phosphatase activities found as contaminants in restriction and modifying enzyme preparations. Looking for the meaning of the radioactive assays...... results in a real cloning experience, we performed a cloning simulation assay using the same conditions established for the radioactive assay (enzyme units and pmols of DNA ends). As a result, we found that for degradation percentages of the radioactive DNA substrate per enzyme unit below 0.5, the false...... positives in the cloning stimulation assay were less than 5%. This conditions could ensure a good performance of the enzyme preparations for cloning experiments. Finally, we described the use of the radiolabeled [gamma 33P] ATP lambda Hpa II DNA substrate to detect 5'-->3' single stranded DNA dependent...

  10. Comparative analysis of different methods of Hedera helix DNA extraction and molecular evidence of the functionality in PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danka Bošeľová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The most suitable method of total DNA extraction still remains the crucial step for many plant species, although there are many different protocols and commercial kits for DNA isolation. In this study, five different extraction protocols were analysed to find out the most appropriate method for DNA extraction from Hedera helix L. This species has numerous medical and pharmaceutical uses and is also characterized by antioxidant effects on human body. In spite of its wide medical utilization, it belongs to those plant species, where the genomic information is very limited. Comparing of different protocols resulted in the yield of extracted DNA that has ranged from 6.3 to 487 ng μl-1. The purity of extracted DNA has ranged from 1.4 up to 2.0 A260/A280. All the extraction methods used in this study were evaluated not only in term of quantity and purity of DNA but also its functionality in the restriction endonuclease digestion and polymerase chain reaction based downstream analysis was performed.

  11. Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site-Specific Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    concentration of Mg 2. Interestingly, mammalian cell extracts deficient in Fanconi anemia proteins had a 3–9-fold reduction in DNA end-joining...Mavinakere, M., and Campbell, C. Deficient DNA end joining activity in extracts from fanconi anemia fibroblasts. J. Biol. Chem., 276: 9543–9549...suppressive properties of BRCA1 de - rive, at least in part, from its response to tissue-specific DNA damage. In this regard, certain oxidative

  12. The application of psoralens to the study of DNA structure, function and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, Peter Hans [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1991-04-01

    A series of six nitroxide spin-labeled psoralens were designed, synthesized and tested as probes for DNA dynamics. The synthesis of these spin-labeled psoralen derivatives and their photoreactivity with double-stranded DNA fragments is described. The spin labels (nitroxides) were demonstrated to survive the uv irradiation required to bind the probe to the target DNA. EPR spectra of the photobound spin-labels indicate that they do not wobble with respect to the DNA on the time-scales investigated. The author has used psoralen modified DNA as a model for the study of DNA repair enzyme systems in human cell free extracts. He has shown that damage-induced DNA synthesis is associated with removal of psoralen adducts and therefore is "repair synthesis" and not an aberrant DNA synthesis reaction potentiated by deformation of the DNA by adducts. He has found that all DNA synthesis induced by psoralen monoadducts is the consequence of removal of these adducts. By the same approach he has obtained evidence that this in vitro system is capable of removing psoralen cross-links as well. Reported here are synthetic methods that make use of high intensity lasers coupled with HPLC purification to make homogeneous and very pure micromole quantities of furan-side monoadducted, cross-linked, and pyrone-side monoadducted DNA oligonucleotide. These molecules are currently being studied by NMR and X-ray crystallography. The application of the site-specifically psoralen modified oligonucleotide synthesized by these methods to the construction of substrates for the investigation of DNA repair is also discussed.

  13. Cleavage of Functionalized DNA Containing 5-Modified Pyrimidines by Type II Restriction Endonucleases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2011), s. 431-438 ISSN 1439-4227 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/09/0317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : base-modified DNA * DNA cleavage * DNA polymerases * nucleosides * restriction endonucleases Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.944, year: 2011

  14. Origins of biological function in DNA and RNA hairpin loop motifs from replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Jacob B; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei; Kitao, Akio

    2018-01-31

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) have remarkably similar chemical structures, but despite this, they play significantly different roles in modern biology. In this article, we explore the possible conformations of DNA and RNA hairpins to better understand the fundamental differences in structure formation and stability. We use large parallel temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics ensembles to sample the full conformational landscape of these hairpin molecules so that we can identify the stable structures formed by the hairpin sequence. Our simulations show RNA adopts a narrower distribution of folded structures compared to DNA at room temperature, which forms both hairpins and many unfolded conformations. RNA is capable of forming twice as many hydrogen bonds than DNA which results in a higher melting temperature. We see that local chemical differences lead to emergent molecular properties such as increased persistence length in RNA that is weakly temperature dependant. These discoveries provide fundamental insight into how RNA forms complex folded tertiary structures which confer enzymatic-like function in ribozymes, whereas DNA retains structural motifs in order to facilitate function such as translation of sequence.

  15. Structure and function of the small terminase component of the DNA packaging machine in T4-like bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Siyang; Gao, Song; Kondabagil, Kiran; Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B. (CUA); (Purdue)

    2012-04-04

    Tailed DNA bacteriophages assemble empty procapsids that are subsequently filled with the viral genome by means of a DNA packaging machine situated at a special fivefold vertex. The packaging machine consists of a 'small terminase' and a 'large terminase' component. One of the functions of the small terminase is to initiate packaging of the viral genome, whereas the large terminase is responsible for the ATP-powered translocation of DNA. The small terminase subunit has three domains, an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a central oligomerization domain, and a C-terminal domain for interacting with the large terminase. Here we report structures of the central domain in two different oligomerization states for a small terminase from the T4 family of phages. In addition, we report biochemical studies that establish the function for each of the small terminase domains. On the basis of the structural and biochemical information, we propose a model for DNA packaging initiation.

  16. Selective propagation of functional mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis restricts the transmission of a deleterious mitochondrial variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jahda H; Chen, Zhe; Xu, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is prone to mutation and few mtDNA repair mechanisms exist, crippling mitochondrial mutations are exceedingly rare. Recent studies have demonstrated strong purifying selection in the mouse female germline. However, the mechanisms underlying positive selection of healthy mitochondria remain to be elucidated. We visualized mtDNA replication during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis, finding that mtDNA replication commenced before oocyte determination during the late germarium stage and was dependent on mitochondrial fitness. We isolated a temperature-sensitive lethal mtDNA allele, mt:CoI(T300I), which resulted in reduced mtDNA replication in the germarium at the restrictive temperature. Additionally, the frequency of the mt:CoI(T300I) allele in heteroplasmic flies was decreased, both during oogenesis and over multiple generations, at the restrictive temperature. Furthermore, we determined that selection against mt:CoI(T300I) overlaps with the timing of selective replication of mtDNA in the germarium. These findings establish a previously uncharacterized developmental mechanism for the selective amplification of wild-type mtDNA, which may be evolutionarily conserved to limit the transmission of deleterious mutations.

  17. An ultra-sensitive Au nanoparticles functionalized DNA biosensor for electrochemical sensing of mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Cong; Ma, Rui; Du, Xin; Dong, Wenhao; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Qiang

    2017-06-01

    The present work describes an effective strategy to fabricate a highly sensitive and selective DNA-biosensor for the determination of mercury ions (Hg 2+ ). The DNA 1 was modified onto the surface of Au electrode by the interaction between sulfydryl group and Au electrode. DNA probe is complementary with DNA 1. In the presence of Hg 2+ , the electrochemical signal increases owing to that Hg 2+ -mediated thymine bases induce the conformation of DNA probe to change from line to hairpin and less DNA probes adsorb into DNA 1. Taking advantage of its reduction property, methylene blue is considered as the signal indicating molecule. For improving the sensitivity of the biosensor, Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) modified reporter DNA 3 is used to adsorb DNA 1. Electrochemical behaviors of the biosensor were evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Several important parameters which could affect the property of the biosensor were studied and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the biosensor exhibits wide linear range, high sensitivity and low detection limit. Besides, it displays superior selectivity and excellent stability. The biosensor was also applied for water sample detection with satisfactory result. The novel strategy of fabricating biosensor provides a potential platform for fabricating a variety of metal ions biosensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Feng

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy.

  19. HIV-1 Entry Cofactor: Functional cDNA Cloning of a Seven-Transmembrane, G Protein–Coupled Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yu; Broder, Christopher C.; Kennedy, Paul E.; Berger, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    A cofactor for HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus-type 1) fusion and entry was identified with the use of a novel functional complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning strategy. This protein, designated “fusin,” is a putative G protein–coupled receptor with seven transmembrane segments. Recombinant fusin enabled CD4-expressing nonhuman cell types to support HIV-1 Env-mediated cell fusion and HIV-1 infection. Antibodies to fusin blocked cell fusion and infection with normal CD4-positive human target ce...

  20. Preparation of DNA biosensor application from fuel oil waste by functionalization and characterization of MWCNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mishaal Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT synthesized from a fuel oil waste of power plants has discovered for the first time for DNA biosensors application. The MWCNT surface morphologies were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The thickness of the MWCNT was found 203nm and confirmed by FESEM. The electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully developed using a MWCNT modified on SiO2 thin films. The capacitance measurements were performed to detect the sensitivity of DNA detection. The change in capacitance before and after immobilization of the DNA was measured in the frequency range of 1Hz to 1MHz. The results indicate that bare device exhibited the lowest capacitance value, which was 32.7μF. The capacitance value of the DNA immobilization increase to 52μF. The permittivity and conductivity also were examined to study the effect of the DNA immobilization toward the MWCNT modified surface. This present demonstrated that the MWCNT modified SiO2 a thin film was successfully fabricated for DNA biosensor detection. Keywords: Carbon nanotubes, Sensors, Thin films, Electrochemical DNA

  1. Increasing the specificity and function of DNA microarrays by processing arrays at different stringencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufva, Martin; Petersen, Jesper; Poulsen, Lena

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarrays have for a decade been the only platform for genome-wide analysis and have provided a wealth of information about living organisms. DNA microarrays are processed today under one condition only, which puts large demands on assay development because all probes on the array need to f...

  2. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I–V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed. PMID:29342091

  3. Probing the functional impact of sequence variation on p53-DNA interactions using a novel microsphere assay for protein-DNA binding with human cell extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A Noureddine

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor regulates its target genes through sequence-specific binding to DNA response elements (REs. Although numerous p53 REs are established, the thousands more identified by bioinformatics are not easily subjected to comparative functional evaluation. To examine the relationship between RE sequence variation -- including polymorphisms -- and p53 binding, we have developed a multiplex format microsphere assay of protein-DNA binding (MAPD for p53 in nuclear extracts. Using MAPD we measured sequence-specific p53 binding of doxorubicin-activated or transiently expressed p53 to REs from established p53 target genes and p53 consensus REs. To assess the sensitivity and scalability of the assay, we tested 16 variants of the p21 target sequence and a 62-multiplex set of single nucleotide (nt variants of the p53 consensus sequence and found many changes in p53 binding that are not captured by current computational binding models. A group of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was examined and binding profiles closely matched transactivation capability tested in luciferase constructs. The in vitro binding characteristics of p53 in nuclear extracts recapitulated the cellular in vivo transactivation capabilities for eight well-established human REs measured by luciferase assay. Using a set of 26 bona fide REs, we observed distinct binding patterns characteristic of transiently expressed wild type and mutant p53s. This microsphere assay system utilizes biologically meaningful cell extracts in a multiplexed, quantitative, in vitro format that provides a powerful experimental tool for elucidating the functional impact of sequence polymorphism and protein variation on protein/DNA binding in transcriptional networks.

  4. Gamma-ray induced inhibition of DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts is a function of excision repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.J.; Paterson, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The extent of the deficiency in γ-ray induced DNA repair synthesis in an ataxia telangiectasia (AT) human fibroblast strain was found to show no oxygen enhancement, consistent with a defect in the repair of base damage. Repair deficiency, but not repair proficiency, in AT cells was accompanied by a lack of inhibition of DNA synthesis by either γ-rays or the radiomimetic drug bleomycin. Experiments with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide indicated that lack of inhibition was specific for radiogenic-type damage. Thus excision repair, perhaps by DNA strand incision or chromatin modification, appears to halt replicon initiation in irradiated repair proficient cells whereas in repair defective AT strains this putatively important biological function is inoperative

  5. Functional characterization of a rice de novo DNA methyltransferase, OsDRM2, expressed in Escherichia coli and yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Jinsong, E-mail: pangjs542@nenu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics of the Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin 130024 (China); Dong, Mingyue; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yanli [Key Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics of the Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin 130024 (China); Liu, Bao, E-mail: baoliu@nenu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics of the Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin 130024 (China)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► A rice de novo DNA methyltransferase OsDRM2 was cloned. ► In vitro methylation activity of OsDRM2 was characterized with Escherichia coli. ► Assays of OsDRM2 in vivo methylation were done with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ► OsDRM2 methylation activity is not preferential to any type of cytosine context. ► The activity of OsDRM2 is independent of RdDM pathway. - Abstract: DNA methylation of cytosine nucleotides is an important epigenetic modification that occurs in most eukaryotic organisms and is established and maintained by various DNA methyltransferases together with their co-factors. There are two major categories of DNA methyltransferases: de novo and maintenance. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a de novo methyltransferase, named OsDRM2, from rice (Oryza sativa L.). The full-length coding region of OsDRM2 was cloned and transformed into Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both of these organisms expressed the OsDRM2 protein, which exhibited stochastic de novo methylation activity in vitro at CG, CHG, and CHH di- and tri-nucleotide patterns. Two lines of evidence demonstrated the de novo activity of OsDRM2: (1) a 5′-CCGG-3′ containing DNA fragment that had been pre-treated with OsDRM2 protein expressed in E. coli was protected from digestion by the CG-methylation-sensitive isoschizomer HpaII; (2) methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis of S. cerevisiae genomic DNA from transformants that had been introduced with OsDRM2 revealed CG and CHG methylation levels of 3.92–9.12%, and 2.88–6.93%, respectively, whereas the mock control S. cerevisiae DNA did not exhibit cytosine methylation. These results were further supported by bisulfite sequencing of the 18S rRNA and EAF5 genes of the transformed S. cerevisiae, which exhibited different DNA methylation patterns, which were observed in the genomic DNA. Our findings establish that OsDRM2 is an active de novo DNA

  6. Lower sperm DNA fragmentation after r-FSH administration in functional hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvolo, Giovanni; Roccheri, Maria Carmela; Brucculeri, Anna Maria; Longobardi, Salvatore; Cittadini, Ettore; Bosco, Liana

    2013-04-01

    An observational clinical and molecular study was designed to evaluate the effects of the administration of recombinant human FSH on sperm DNA fragmentation in men with a non-classical form of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia. In the study were included 53 men with a non-classical form of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia. In all patients, sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI), assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) in situ DNA nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay, was evaluated before starting the treatment with 150 IU of recombinant human FSH, given three times a week for at least 3 months. Patients' semen analysis and DNA fragmentation index were re-evaluated after the 3-month treatment period. After recombinant human FSH therapy, we did not find any differences in terms of sperm count, motility and morphology. The average DNA fragmentation index was significantly reduced (21.15 vs 15.2, p15 %), while no significant variation occurred in the patients with DFI values ≤ 15 %. Recombinant human FSH administration improves sperm DNA integrity in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia men with DNA fragmentation index value >15 % .

  7. Functional Interplay of the Mre11 Nuclease and Ku in the Response to Replication-Associated DNA Damage ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Steven S.; Balestrini, Alessia; Petrini, John H. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Mre11 complex is a central component of the DNA damage response, with roles in damage sensing, molecular bridging, and end resection. We have previously shown that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ku70 (yKu70) deficiency reduces the ionizing radiation sensitivity of mre11Δ mutants. In this study, we show that yKu70 deficiency suppressed the camptothecin (CPT) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) sensitivity of nuclease-deficient mre11-3 and sae2Δ mutants in an Exo1-dependent manner. CPT-induced G2/M arrest, γ-H2AX persistence, and chromosome breaks were elevated in mre11-3 mutants. These outcomes were reduced by yKu70 deficiency. Given that the genotoxic effects of CPT are manifest during DNA replication, these data suggest that Ku limits Exo1-dependent double-strand break (DSB) resection during DNA replication, inhibiting the initial processing steps required for homology-directed repair. We propose that Mre11 nuclease- and Sae2-dependent DNA end processing, which initiates DSB resection prevents Ku from engaging DSBs, thus promoting Exo1-dependent resection. In agreement with this idea, we show that Ku affinity for binding to short single-stranded overhangs is much lower than for blunt DNA ends. Collectively, the data define a nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-independent, S-phase-specific function of the Ku heterodimer. PMID:21876003

  8. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress toward understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation.

  9. Two potential Petunia hybrida mitochondrial DNA replication origins show structural and in vitro functional homology with the animal mitochondrial DNA heavy and light strand replication origins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Jan M. de; Hille, Jacques; Kors, Frank; Meer, Bert van der; Kool, Ad J.; Folkerts, Otto; Nijkamp, H. John J.

    1991-01-01

    Four Petunia hybrida mitochondrial (mt) DNA fragments have been isolated, sequenced, localized on the physical map and analyzed for their ability to initiate specific DNA synthesis. When all four mtDNA fragments were tested as templates in an in vitro DNA synthesizing lysate system, developed from

  10. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela L Buscariollo

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg or vehicle (0.09% NaCl i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  11. Embryonic Caffeine Exposure Acts via A1 Adenosine Receptors to Alter Adult Cardiac Function and DNA Methylation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Victoria; Xue, Huiling; Rivkees, Scott A.; Wendler, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.09% NaCl) i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2–4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8–10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation. PMID:24475304

  12. Atomic Structure and Nonhomologous End-Joining Function of the Polymerase Component of Bacterial DNA Ligase D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,H.; Nandakumar, J.; Aniukwu, J.; Wang, L.; Glickman, M.; Lima, C.; Shuman, S.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligase D (LigD) is a large polyfunctional protein that participates in a recently discovered pathway of nonhomologous end-joining in bacteria. LigD consists of an ATP-dependent ligase domain fused to a polymerase domain (Pol) and a phosphoesterase module. The Pol activity is remarkable for its dependence on manganese, its ability to perform templated and nontemplated primer extension reactions, and its preference for adding ribonucleotides to blunt DNA ends. Here we report the 1.5- Angstroms crystal structure of the Pol domain of Pseudomonas LigD and its complexes with manganese and ATP-dATP substrates, which reveal a minimized polymerase with a two-metal mechanism and a fold similar to that of archaeal DNA primase. Mutational analysis highlights the functionally relevant atomic contacts in the active site. Although distinct nucleoside conformations and contacts for ATP versus dATP are observed in the cocrystals, the functional analysis suggests that the ATP-binding mode is the productive conformation for dNMP and rNMP incorporation. We find that a mutation of Mycobacterium LigD that uniquely ablates the polymerase activity results in increased fidelity of blunt-end double-strand break repair in vivo by virtue of eliminating nucleotide insertions at the recombination junctions. Thus, LigD Pol is a direct catalyst of mutagenic nonhomologous end-joining in vivo. Our studies underscore a previously uncharacterized role for the primase-like polymerase family in DNA repair.

  13. cDNA cloning and transcriptional controlling of a novel low dose radiation-induced gene and its function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Pingkun; Sui Jianli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To clone a novel low dose radiation-induced gene (LRIGx) and study its function as well as its transcriptional changes after irradiation. Methods: Its cDNA was obtained by DDRT-PCR and RACE techniques. Northern blot hybridization was used to investigate the gene transcription. Bioinformatics was employed to analysis structure and function of this gene. Results: LRIGx cDNA was cloned. The sequence of LRIGx was identical to a DNA clone located in human chromosome 20 q 11.2-12 Bioinformatics analysis predicted an encoded protein with a conserved helicase domain. Northern analysis revealed a ∼8.5 kb transcript which was induced after 0.2 Gy as well as 0.02 Gy irradiation, and the transcript level was increased 5 times at 4 h after 0.2 Gy irradiation. The induced level of LRIGx transcript by 2.0 Gy high dose was lower than by 0.2 Gy. Conclusion: A novel low dose radiation-induced gene has been cloned. It encodes a protein with a conserved helicase domain that could involve in DNA metabolism in the cellular process of radiation response

  14. DanQ: a hybrid convolutional and recurrent deep neural network for quantifying the function of DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Daniel; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-06-20

    Modeling the properties and functions of DNA sequences is an important, but challenging task in the broad field of genomics. This task is particularly difficult for non-coding DNA, the vast majority of which is still poorly understood in terms of function. A powerful predictive model for the function of non-coding DNA can have enormous benefit for both basic science and translational research because over 98% of the human genome is non-coding and 93% of disease-associated variants lie in these regions. To address this need, we propose DanQ, a novel hybrid convolutional and bi-directional long short-term memory recurrent neural network framework for predicting non-coding function de novo from sequence. In the DanQ model, the convolution layer captures regulatory motifs, while the recurrent layer captures long-term dependencies between the motifs in order to learn a regulatory 'grammar' to improve predictions. DanQ improves considerably upon other models across several metrics. For some regulatory markers, DanQ can achieve over a 50% relative improvement in the area under the precision-recall curve metric compared to related models. We have made the source code available at the github repository http://github.com/uci-cbcl/DanQ. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, which if left unrepaired can lead to mutations or gross chromosomal aberrations, and promote the onset of diseases associated with genomic instability such as cancer. One of the most discernible hallmarks...... of the cellular response to DSBs is the accumulation and local concentration of a plethora of DNA damage signaling and repair proteins in the vicinity of the lesion, initiated by ATM-mediated phosphorylation of H2AX (¿-H2AX) and culminating in the generation of distinct nuclear compartments, so-called Ionizing...... of such DNA repair foci still remains limited. In this review, we focus on recent discoveries on the mechanisms that govern the formation of IRIF, and discuss the implications of such findings in light of our understanding of the physiological importance of these structures....

  16. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2005-01-01

    . The ability of NAC proteins to dimerize and to bind DNAwas analysed by structure-based mutagenesis. This identified two salt bridge-forming residues essential for NAC protein dimerization. Alteration of basic residues in a loop region containing several highly conserved residues abolished DNA binding. Thus....... Furthermore, NAC protein binding to the CaMV 35S promoter was shown to depend on sequences similar to the consensus of the selected oligonucleotides. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that NAC proteins bind DNA as homo- or heterodimers and that dimerization is necessary for stable DNA binding......The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites...

  17. Correspondence between radioactive and functional methods in the quality control of DNA restriction and modifying enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, L E; Pupo, E; Miranda, F

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the use of two radiolabeled lambda DNA/Hpa II substrates to detect 5'-->3', 3'-->5' single and double stranded DNA dependent exonuclease and phosphatase activities found as contaminants in restriction and modifying enzyme preparations. Looking for the meaning of the radioactive assays...... exonuclease and phosphatase contaminating activities in some critical steps of the purification process of the restriction enzyme Kpn I....... results in a real cloning experience, we performed a cloning simulation assay using the same conditions established for the radioactive assay (enzyme units and pmols of DNA ends). As a result, we found that for degradation percentages of the radioactive DNA substrate per enzyme unit below 0.5, the false...

  18. Potential roles for DNA replication and repair functions in cell killing by streptomycin

    OpenAIRE

    Humayun, M. Zafri; Ayyappan, Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    The aminoglycoside streptomycin binds to ribosomes to promote mistranslation and eventual inhibition of translation. Streptomycin kills bacteria, whereas many other non-aminoglycoside inhibitors of translation do not. Because mistranslation is now known to affect DNA replication, we asked if hydroxyurea, a specific inhibitor of DNA synthesis, affects killing, and find that hydroxyurea significantly attenuates killing by streptomycin. We find that the hydroxyl radical scavengers D-mannitol and...

  19. Preparation of DNA biosensor application from fuel oil waste by functionalization and characterization of MWCNT

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Mishaal Mohammed; Ismail K. Al-Khateeb; Adawiya J. Haider; Ruslinda A. Rahim; U. Hashim

    2017-01-01

    The potential of using a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) synthesized from a fuel oil waste of power plants has discovered for the first time for DNA biosensors application. The MWCNT surface morphologies were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thickness of the MWCNT was found 203nm and confirmed by FESEM. The electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully developed using a MWCNT modified on SiO2 thin films. The capacitanc...

  20. DNA Recombinase Proteins, their Function and Structure in the Active Form, a Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Claudio; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a crucial sequence of reactions in all cells for the repair of double strand DNA (dsDNA) breaks. While it was traditionally considered as a means for generating genetic diversity, it is now known to be essential for restart of collapsed replication forks that have met a lesion on the DNA template (Cox et al., 2000). The central stage of this process requires the presence of the DNA recombinase protein, RecA in bacteria, RadA in archaea, or Rad51 in eukaryotes, which leads to an ATP-mediated DNA strand-exchange process. Despite many years of intense study, some aspects of the biochemical mechanism, and structure of the active form of recombinase proteins are not well understood. Our theoretical study is an attempt to shed light on the main structural and mechanistic issues encountered on the RecA of the e-coli, the RecA of the extremely radio resistant Deinococcus Radiodurans (promoting an inverse DNA strand-exchange repair), and the homolog human Rad51. The conformational changes are analyzed for the naked enzymes, and when they are linked to ATP and ADP. The average structures are determined over 2ns time scale of Langevian dynamics using a collision frequency of 1.0 ps(sup -1). The systems are inserted in an octahedron periodic box with a 10 Angstrom buffer of water molecules explicitly described by the TIP3P model. The corresponding binding free energies are calculated in an implicit solvent using the Poisson-Boltzmann solvent accessible surface area, MM-PBSA model. The role of the ATP is not only in stabilizing the interaction RecA-DNA, but its hydrolysis is required to allow the DNA strand-exchange to proceed. Furthermore, we extended our study, using the hybrid QM/MM method, on the mechanism of this chemical process. All the calculations were performed using the commercial code Amber 9.

  1. Novel Fusion Protein Targeting Mitochondrial DNA Improves Pancreatic Islet Functional Potency and Islet Transplantation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danobeitia, Juan S; Chlebeck, Peter J; Shokolenko, Inna; Ma, Xiaobo; Wilson, Glenn; Fernandez, Luis A

    2017-11-01

    Long-term graft survival is an ongoing challenge in the field of islet transplantation. With the growing demand for transplantable organs, therapies to improve organ quality and reduce the incidence of graft dysfunction are of paramount importance. We evaluated the protective role of a recombinant DNA repair protein targeted to mitochondria (Exscien I-III), as a therapeutic agent using a rodent model of pancreatic islet transplantation. We first investigated the effect of therapy on isolated rat islets cultured with pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 β, interferon γ, and tumor necrosis factor α) for 48 h and documented a significant reduction in apoptosis by flow cytometry, improved viability by immunofluorescence, and conserved functional potency in vitro and in vivo in Exscien I-III-treated islets. We then tested the effect of therapy in systemic inflammation using a rat model of donor brain death (BD) sustained for a 6-h period. Donor rats were allocated to 4 groups: (non-BD + vehicle, non-BD + Exscien I-III, BD + vehicle, and BD + Exscien I-III) and treated with Exscien I-III (4 mg/kg) or vehicle 30 min after BD induction. Sham (non-BD)-operated animals receiving either Exscien I-III or vehicle served as controls. Islets purified from BD + Exscien I-III-treated donors showed a significant increase in glucose-stimulated insulin release in vitro when compared to islets from vehicle-treated counterparts. In addition, donor treatment with Exscien I-III attenuated the effects of BD and significantly improved the functional potency of transplanted islets in vivo. Our data indicate that mitochondrially targeted antioxidant therapy is a novel strategy to protect pancreas and islet quality from the deleterious effects of cytokines in culture and during the inflammatory response associated with donation after BD. The potential for rapid translation into clinical practice makes Exscien I-III an attractive therapeutic option for the management of brain

  2. Better estimation of protein-DNA interaction parameters improve prediction of functional sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Flanagan Ruadhan A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Characterizing transcription factor binding motifs is a common bioinformatics task. For transcription factors with variable binding sites, we need to get many suboptimal binding sites in our training dataset to get accurate estimates of free energy penalties for deviating from the consensus DNA sequence. One procedure to do that involves a modified SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment method designed to produce many such sequences. Results We analyzed low stringency SELEX data for E. coli Catabolic Activator Protein (CAP, and we show here that appropriate quantitative analysis improves our ability to predict in vitro affinity. To obtain large number of sequences required for this analysis we used a SELEX SAGE protocol developed by Roulet et al. The sequences obtained from here were subjected to bioinformatic analysis. The resulting bioinformatic model characterizes the sequence specificity of the protein more accurately than those sequence specificities predicted from previous analysis just by using a few known binding sites available in the literature. The consequences of this increase in accuracy for prediction of in vivo binding sites (and especially functional ones in the E. coli genome are also discussed. We measured the dissociation constants of several putative CAP binding sites by EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay and compared the affinities to the bioinformatics scores provided by methods like the weight matrix method and QPMEME (Quadratic Programming Method of Energy Matrix Estimation trained on known binding sites as well as on the new sites from SELEX SAGE data. We also checked predicted genome sites for conservation in the related species S. typhimurium. We found that bioinformatics scores based on SELEX SAGE data does better in terms of prediction of physical binding energies as well as in detecting functional sites. Conclusion We think that training binding site detection

  3. Genotoxic stress and DNA repair in plants: emerging functions and tools for improving crop productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrazzi, Alma; Confalonieri, Massimo; Macovei, Anca; Donà, Mattia; Carbonera, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    Crop productivity is strictly related to genome stability, an essential requisite for optimal plant growth/development. Genotoxic agents (e.g., chemical agents, radiations) can cause both chemical and structural damage to DNA. In some cases, they severely affect the integrity of plant genome by inducing base oxidation, which interferes with the basal processes of replication and transcription, eventually leading to cell death. The cell response to oxidative stress includes several DNA repair pathways, which are activated to remove the damaged bases and other lesions. Information concerning DNA repair in plants is still limited, although results from gene profiling and mutant analysis suggest possible differences in repair mechanisms between plants and other eukaryotes. The present review focuses on the base- and nucleotide excision repair (BER, NER) pathways, which operate according to the most common DNA repair rule (excision of damaged bases and replacement by the correct nucleotide), highlighting the most recent findings in plants. An update on DNA repair in organelles, chloroplasts and mitochondria is also provided. Finally, it is generally acknowledged that DNA repair plays a critical role during seed imbibition, preserving seed vigor. Despite this, only a limited number of studies, described here, dedicated to seeds are currently available.

  4. Age-related formaldehyde interferes with DNA methyltransferase function, causing memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhiqian; Han, Chanshuai; Qiang, Min; Wang, Weishan; Lv, Jihui; Zhang, Shouzi; Luo, Wenhong; Li, Hui; Luo, Hongjun; Zhou, Jiangning; Wu, Beibei; Su, Tao; Yang, Xu; Wang, Xiaomin; Liu, Ying; He, Rongqiao

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampus-related topographic amnesia is the most common symptom of memory disorders in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Recent studies have revealed that experience-mediated DNA methylation, which is regulated by enzymes with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity, is required for the formation of recent memory as well as the maintenance of remote memory. Notably, overexpression of DNMT3a in the hippocampus can reverse spatial memory deficits in aged mice. However, a decline in global DNA methylation was found in the autopsied hippocampi of patients with AD. Exactly, what endogenous factors that affect DNA methylation still remain to be elucidated. Here, we report a marked increase in endogenous formaldehyde levels is associated with a decline in global DNA methylation in the autopsied hippocampus from AD patients. In vitro and in vivo results show that formaldehyde in excess of normal physiological levels reduced global DNA methylation by interfering DNMTs. Interestingly, intrahippocampal injection of excess formaldehyde before spatial learning in healthy adult rats can mimic the learning difficulty of early stage of AD. Moreover, injection of excess formaldehyde after spatial learning can mimic the loss of remote spatial memory observed in late stage of AD. These findings suggest that aging-associated formaldehyde contributes to topographic amnesia in AD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Label-free electrochemical DNA sensor using "click"-functionalized PEDOT electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Teresa; Prieto-Simón, Beatriz; Alvira, Margarita; Eritja, Ramón; Götz, Günther; Bäuerle, Peter; Samitier, Josep

    2015-12-15

    Here we describe a label-free electrochemical DNA sensor based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-modified (PEDOT-modified) electrodes. An acetylene-terminated DNA probe, complementary to a specific "Hepatitis C" virus sequence, was immobilized onto azido-derivatized conducting PEDOT electrodes using "click" chemistry. DNA hybridization was then detected by differential pulse voltammetry, evaluating the changes in the electrochemical properties of the polymer produced by the recognition event. A limit of detection of 0.13 nM was achieved using this highly selective PEDOT-based genosensor, without the need for labeling techniques or microelectrode fabrication processes. These results are promising for the development of label-free and reagentless DNA hybridization sensors based on conducting polymeric substrates. Biosensors can be easily prepared using any DNA sequence containing an alkyne moiety. The data presented here reveal the potential of this DNA sensor for diagnostic applications in the screening of diseases, such as "Hepatitis C", and genetic mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxidative DNA damage caused by pulsed discharge with cavitation on the bactericidal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Ken-ichi; Ito, Hironori; Ihara, Satoshi; Terato, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-based techniques are expected to have practical use for wastewater purification with a potential for killing contaminated microorganisms and degrading recalcitrant materials. In the present study, we analysed oxidative DNA damage in bacterial cells treated by the plasma to unveil its mechanisms in the bactericidal process. Escherichia coli cell suspension was exposed to the plasma induced by applying an alternating-current voltage of about 1 kV with bubbling formed by water-cavitation, termed pulsed discharge with cavitation. Chromosomal DNA damage, such as double strand break (DSB) and oxidative base lesions, increased proportionally with the applied energy, as determined by electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses. Among the base lesions identified, the yields of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-G) and 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OH-C) in chromosomal DNA increased by up to 4- and 15-fold, respectively, compared to untreated samples. The progeny DNA sequences, derived from plasmid DNA exposed to the plasma, indicated that the production rate of 5-OH-C exceeded that of 8-OH-G, as G:C to A:T transitions accounted for 65% of all base changes, but only a few G:C to T:A transversions were observed. The cell viabilities of E. coli cells decreased in direct proportion to increases in the applied energy. Therefore, the plasma-induced bactericidal mechanism appears to relate to oxidative damage caused to bacterial DNA. These results were confirmed by observing the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide molecules following the plasma exposure. We also compared our results with the plasma to those obtained with 137Cs γ-rays, as a well-known ROS generator to confirm the DNA-damaging mechanism involved.

  7. Quantum dot-functionalized porous ZnO nanosheets as a visible light induced photoelectrochemical platform for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Hao, Qing; Wang, Wei; Bao, Lei; Lei, Jianping; Wang, Quanbo; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    This work reports the synthesis of novel CdTe quantum dot (QD)-functionalized porous ZnO nanosheets via a covalent binding method with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane as a linker. The functional nanosheets showed an excellent visible-light absorbency and much higher photoelectrochemical activity than both CdTe QDs and ZnO nanosheets due to the porous structure and appropriate band alignment between the CdTe QDs and ZnO nanosheets. Using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor the nanosheet-modified electrode showed a sensitive photocurrent response. This speciality led to a novel methodology for the design of hydrogen peroxide-related biosensors by the formation or consumption of hydrogen peroxide. Using biotin-labeled DNA as capture probe, a model biosensor was proposed by immobilizing the probe on a nanosheet-modified electrode to recognize target DNA in the presence of an assistant DNA, which produced a ``Y'' junction structure to trigger a restriction endonuclease-aided target recycling. The target recycling resulted in the release of biotin labeled to the immobilized DNA from the nanosheet-modified electrode, thus decreased the consumption of hydrogen peroxide by horseradish peroxidase-mediated electrochemical reduction after binding the left biotin with horseradish peroxidase-labeled streptavidin, which produced an increasing photoelectrochemical response. The `signal on' strategy for photoelectrochemical detection of DNA showed a low detection limit down to the subfemtomole level and good specificity to single-base mismatched oligonucleotides. The sensitized porous ZnO nanosheets are promising for applications in both photovoltaic devices and photoelectrochemical biosensing.

  8. Ball with hair: modular functionalization of highly stable G-quadruplex DNA nano-scaffolds through N2-guanine modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2017-06-20

    Functionalized nanoparticles have seen valuable applications, particularly in the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents in biological systems. However, the manufacturing of such nano-scale systems with the consistency required for biological application can be challenging, as variation in size and shape have large influences in nanoparticle behavior in vivo. We report on the development of a versatile nano-scaffold based on the modular functionalization of a DNA G-quadruplex. DNA sequences are functionalized in a modular fashion using well-established phosphoramidite chemical synthesis with nucleotides containing modification of the amino (N2) position of the guanine base. In physiological conditions, these sequences fold into well-defined G-quadruplex structures. The resulting DNA nano-scaffolds are thermally stable, consistent in size, and functionalized in a manner that allows for control over the density and relative orientation of functional chemistries on the nano-scaffold surface. Various chemistries including small modifications (N2-methyl-guanine), bulky aromatic modifications (N2-benzyl-guanine), and long chain-like modifications (N2-6-amino-hexyl-guanine) are tested and are found to be generally compatible with G-quadruplex formation. Furthermore, these modifications stabilize the G-quadruplex scaffold by 2.0-13.3 °C per modification in the melting temperature, with concurrent modifications producing extremely stable nano-scaffolds. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by functionalizing nano-scaffolds for use within the biotin-avidin conjugation approach. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Functional roles of the N- and C-terminal regions of the human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos T Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replisome demonstrate that the mtDNA polymerase and the mtDNA helicase are stimulated by the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB. Unlike Escherichia coli SSB, bacteriophage T7 gp2.5 and bacteriophage T4 gp32, mtSSBs lack a long, negatively charged C-terminal tail. Furthermore, additional residues at the N-terminus (notwithstanding the mitochondrial presequence are present in the sequence of species across the animal kingdom. We sought to analyze the functional importance of the N- and C-terminal regions of the human mtSSB in the context of mtDNA replication. We produced the mature wild-type human mtSSB and three terminal deletion variants, and examined their physical and biochemical properties. We demonstrate that the recombinant proteins adopt a tetrameric form, and bind single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. They also stimulate similarly the DNA unwinding activity of the human mtDNA helicase (up to 8-fold. Notably, we find that unlike the high level of stimulation that we observed previously in the Drosophila system, stimulation of DNA synthesis catalyzed by human mtDNA polymerase is only moderate, and occurs over a narrow range of salt concentrations. Interestingly, each of the deletion variants of human mtSSB stimulates DNA synthesis at a higher level than the wild-type protein, indicating that the termini modulate negatively functional interactions with the mitochondrial replicase. We discuss our findings in the context of species-specific components of the mtDNA replisome, and in comparison with various prokaryotic DNA replication machineries.

  10. Molecular and Functional Characterization of ssDNA Aptamers that Specifically Bind Leishmania infantum PABP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Guerra-Pérez

    Full Text Available A poly (A-binding protein from Leishmania infantum (LiPABP has been recently cloned and characterized in our laboratory. Although this protein shows a very high homology with PABPs from other eukaryotic organisms including mammals and other parasites, exist divergences along the sequence that convert them in potential diagnostic markers and/or therapeutics targets. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands that are selected in vitro by their affinity and specificity for the target as a consequence of the particular tertiary structure that they are able to acquire depending on their sequence. Development of high-affinity molecules with the ability to recognize specifically Leishmania proteins is essential for the progress of this kind of study.We have selected a ssDNA aptamer population against a recombinant 6xHIS-LiPABP protein (rLiPABP that is able to recognize the target with a low Kd. Cloning, sequencing and in silico analysis of the aptamers obtained from the population yielded three aptamers (ApPABP#3, ApPABP#7 and ApPABP#11 that significantly bound to PABP with higher affinity than the naïve population. These aptamers were analyzed by ELONA and slot blot to establish affinity and specificity for rLiPABP. Results demonstrated that the three aptamers have high affinity and specificity for the target and that they are able to detect an endogenous LiPABP (eLiPABP protein amount corresponding to 2500 L. infantum promastigotes in a significant manner. The functional analysis of the aptamers also revealed that ApPABP#11 disrupts the binding of both Myc-LiPABP and eLiPABP to poly (A in vitro. On the other hand, these aptamers are able to bind and purify LiPABP from complex mixes.Results presented here demonstrate that aptamers represent new reagents for characterization of LiPABP and that they can affect LiPABP activity. At this respect, the use of these aptamers as therapeutic tool affecting the physiological role of PABP has to be analyzed.

  11. Improved DNA condensation, stability, and transfection with alkyl sulfonyl-functionalized PAMAM G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rata-Aguilar, Azahara, E-mail: azahara@ugr.es; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Jódar-Reyes, Ana Belén; Ortega-Vinuesa, Juan Luis [University of Granada, Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Department of Applied Physics (Spain); Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco [University of Granada, Organic Chemistry Department, Institute of Biotechnology (Spain); Martín-Rodríguez, Antonio [University of Granada, Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Department of Applied Physics (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we have used a second-generation PAMAM grafted with octadecyl sulfonyl chains to condense plasmid DNA. The influence of this modification at different levels was investigated by comparison with original PAMAM G2. The condensation process and temporal stability of the complexes was studied with DLS, finding that the aliphatic chains influence DNA compaction via hydrophobic forces and markedly improve the formation and temporal stability of a single populated system with a hydrodynamic diameter below 100 nm. Interaction with a cell membrane model was also evaluated with a pendant drop tensiometer, resulting in further incorporation of the C18-PAMAM dendriplexes onto the interface. The improvement observed in transfection with our C18 grafted PAMAM is ascribed to the size, stability, and interfacial behavior of the complexes, which in turn are consequence of the DNA condensation process and the interactions involved.

  12. Biosensor for label-free DNA quantification based on functionalized LPGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Helena M R; Moreira, Luis; Pereira, Leonor; Jorge, Pedro; Gouveia, Carlos; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Fernandes, José R A

    2016-10-15

    A label-free fiber optic biosensor based on a long period grating (LPG) and a basic optical interrogation scheme using off the shelf components is used for the detection of in-situ DNA hybridization. A new methodology is proposed for the determination of the spectral position of the LPG mode resonance. The experimental limit of detection obtained for the DNA was 62±2nM and the limit of quantification was 209±7nM. The sample specificity was experimentally demonstrated using DNA targets with different base mismatches relatively to the probe and was found that the system has a single base mismatch selectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Human MLH1 protein participates in genomic damage checkpoint signaling in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks, while MSH2 functions in DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs are among the most toxic types of damage to a cell. For this reason, many ICL-inducing agents are effective therapeutic agents. For example, cisplatin and nitrogen mustards are used for treating cancer and psoralen plus UVA (PUVA is useful for treating psoriasis. However, repair mechanisms for ICLs in the human genome are not clearly defined. Previously, we have shown that MSH2, the common subunit of the human MutSalpha and MutSbeta mismatch recognition complexes, plays a role in the error-free repair of psoralen ICLs. We hypothesized that MLH1, the common subunit of human MutL complexes, is also involved in the cellular response to psoralen ICLs. Surprisingly, we instead found that MLH1-deficient human cells are more resistant to psoralen ICLs, in contrast to the sensitivity to these lesions displayed by MSH2-deficient cells. Apoptosis was not as efficiently induced by psoralen ICLs in MLH1-deficient cells as in MLH1-proficient cells as determined by caspase-3/7 activity and binding of annexin V. Strikingly, CHK2 phosphorylation was undetectable in MLH1-deficient cells, and phosphorylation of CHK1 was reduced after PUVA treatment, indicating that MLH1 is involved in signaling psoralen ICL-induced checkpoint activation. Psoralen ICLs can result in mutations near the crosslinked sites; however, MLH1 function was not required for the mutagenic repair of these lesions, and so its signaling function appears to have a role in maintaining genomic stability following exposure to ICL-induced DNA damage. Distinguishing the genetic status of MMR-deficient tumors as MSH2-deficient or MLH1-deficient is thus potentially important in predicting the efficacy of treatment with psoralen and perhaps with other ICL-inducing agents.

  14. Antibacterial and DNA cleavage activity of carbonyl functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene-silver(I) and selenium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Rosenani A.; Iqbal, Muhammad Adnan; Mohamad, Faisal; Razali, Mohd R.

    2018-03-01

    The article describes syntheses and characterizations of carbonyl functionalized benzimidazolium salts, I-IV. While salts I-III are unstable at room temperature, salt IV remained stable and was further utilised to form N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) compounds of silver(I), V and VI, and selenium compound, VII respectively. Compounds IV-VII were tested for their antibacterial potential against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Salt IV shows a very low inhibition potential (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC 500 μg/mL) compared to the respective silver(I)-NHC, V and VI (MIC 31.25 μg/mL against both, E. coli and S. aureus) and selenium compound, VII (MIC 125 μg/mL against E. coli and 62.50 μg/mL against S. aureus). In DNA cleavage abilities, all the test compounds cleave DNA in which the VII cleaves the DNA at the faster rate. Meanwhile, the silver(I)-NHC complexes V and VI act at the same mode and pattern of DNA cleavage while VII is similar to IV.

  15. JMY functions as actin nucleation-promoting factor and mediator for p53-mediated DNA damage in porcine oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zili Lin

    Full Text Available Junction-mediating and regulatory protein(JMY is a multifunctional protein with roles in the transcriptional co-activation of p53 and the regulation of actin nucleation promoting factors and, hence, cell migration; however, its role in the maturation of porcine oocytes is unclear. In the current study, we investigated functional roles of JMY in porcine oocytes. Porcine oocytes expressed JMY mRNA and protein, and the mRNA expression level decreased during oocyte maturation. Knockdown of JMY by RNA interference decreased the rate of polar body extrusion, validating its role in the asymmetric division of porcine oocytes. JMY knockdown also down-regulated the mRNA and protein levels of actin and Arp2/3. Furthermore, JMY accumulated in the nucleus in response to DNA damage, and JMY knockdown suppressed DNA damage-mediated p53 activation. In conclusion, our results show that JMY has important roles in oocyte maturation as a regulator of actin nucleation-promoting factors and an activator of p53 during DNA damage during DNA damages in porcine oocytes.

  16. Tight regulation of ubiquitin-mediated DNA damage response by USP3 preserves the functional integrity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancini, Cesare; van den Berk, Paul C M; Vissers, Joseph H A; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Song, Ji-Ying; Hulsman, Danielle; Serresi, Michela; Tanger, Ellen; Blom, Marleen; Vens, Conchita; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Jacobs, Heinz; Citterio, Elisabetta

    2014-08-25

    Histone ubiquitination at DNA breaks is required for activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. How the dynamic removal of this modification by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) impacts genome maintenance in vivo is largely unknown. To address this question, we generated mice deficient for Ub-specific protease 3 (USP3; Usp3Δ/Δ), a histone H2A DUB which negatively regulates ubiquitin-dependent DDR signaling. Notably, USP3 deletion increased the levels of histone ubiquitination in adult tissues, reduced the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) reserves over time, and shortened animal life span. Mechanistically, our data show that USP3 is important in HSC homeostasis, preserving HSC self-renewal, and repopulation potential in vivo and proliferation in vitro. A defective DDR and unresolved spontaneous DNA damage contribute to cell cycle restriction of Usp3Δ/Δ HSCs. Beyond the hematopoietic system, Usp3Δ/Δ animals spontaneously developed tumors, and primary Usp3Δ/Δ cells failed to preserve chromosomal integrity. These findings broadly support the regulation of chromatin ubiquitination as a key pathway in preserving tissue function through modulation of the response to genotoxic stress. © 2014 Lancini et al.

  17. Functional Analysis of Cancer-Associated DNA Polymerase ε Variants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R. Barbari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication fidelity relies on base selectivity of the replicative DNA polymerases, exonucleolytic proofreading, and postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR. Ultramutated human cancers without MMR defects carry alterations in the exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase ε (Polε. They have been hypothesized to result from defective proofreading. However, modeling of the most common variant, Polε-P286R, in yeast produced an unexpectedly strong mutator effect that exceeded the effect of proofreading deficiency by two orders of magnitude and indicated the involvement of other infidelity factors. The in vivo consequences of many additional Polε mutations reported in cancers remain poorly understood. Here, we genetically characterized 13 cancer-associated Polε variants in the yeast system. Only variants directly altering the DNA binding cleft in the exonuclease domain elevated the mutation rate. Among these, frequently recurring variants were stronger mutators than rare variants, in agreement with the idea that mutator phenotype has a causative role in tumorigenesis. In nearly all cases, the mutator effects exceeded those of an exonuclease-null allele, suggesting that mechanisms distinct from loss of proofreading may drive the genome instability in most ultramutated tumors. All mutator alleles were semidominant, supporting the view that heterozygosity for the polymerase mutations is sufficient for tumor development. In contrast to the DNA binding cleft alterations, peripherally located variants, including a highly recurrent V411L, did not significantly elevate mutagenesis. Finally, the analysis of Polε variants found in MMR-deficient tumors suggested that the majority cause no mutator phenotype alone but some can synergize with MMR deficiency to increase the mutation rate.

  18. Functional analysis of an acid adaptive DNA adenine methyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori 26695.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Banerjee

    Full Text Available HP0593 DNA-(N(6-adenine-methyltransferase (HP0593 MTase is a member of a Type III restriction-modification system in Helicobacter pylori strain 26695. HP0593 MTase has been cloned, overexpressed and purified heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recognition sequence of the purified MTase was determined as 5'-GCAG-3'and the site of methylation was found to be adenine. The activity of HP0593 MTase was found to be optimal at pH 5.5. This is a unique property in context of natural adaptation of H. pylori in its acidic niche. Dot-blot assay using antibodies that react specifically with DNA containing m6A modification confirmed that HP0593 MTase is an adenine-specific MTase. HP0593 MTase occurred as both monomer and dimer in solution as determined by gel-filtration chromatography and chemical-crosslinking studies. The nonlinear dependence of methylation activity on enzyme concentration indicated that more than one molecule of enzyme was required for its activity. Analysis of initial velocity with AdoMet as a substrate showed that two molecules of AdoMet bind to HP0593 MTase, which is the first example in case of Type III MTases. Interestingly, metal ion cofactors such as Co(2+, Mn(2+, and also Mg(2+ stimulated the HP0593 MTase activity. Preincubation and isotope partitioning analyses clearly indicated that HP0593 MTase-DNA complex is catalytically competent, and suggested that DNA binds to the MTase first followed by AdoMet. HP0593 MTase shows a distributive mechanism of methylation on DNA having more than one recognition site. Considering the occurrence of GCAG sequence in the potential promoter regions of physiologically important genes in H. pylori, our results provide impetus for exploring the role of this DNA MTase in the cellular processes of H. pylori.

  19. Functional intron+ and intron- rDNA in the same macronucleus of the ciliate Tetrahymena pigmentosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1985-01-01

    alleles was followed in the total culture and in single cells during their vegetative segregation and it was observed that replication was non-preferential with respect to the two alleles. The diallelic clones were also used to demonstrate that intron-containing rDNA was transcribed and the transcript......Diallelic clones of Tetrahymena pigmentosa containing equal amounts of intron+ and intron- rDNA in the macronucleus were constructed. The macronucleus of the resulting strains divides amitotically during vegetative growth and the diallelic genotype is therefore unstable. The coexistence of the two...

  20. Creation of Functional Viruses from Non-Functional cDNA Clones Obtained from an RNA Virus Population by the Use of Ancestral Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Dräger, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    necessarily be the descendant of a functional ancestor, we hypothesized that it should be possible to produce functional clones by reconstructing ancestral sequences. To test this we used phylogenetic methods to infer two ancestral sequences, which were then reconstructed as cDNA clones. Viruses rescued from...... the reconstructed cDNAs were tested in cell culture and pigs. Both reconstructed ancestral genomes proved functional, and displayed distinct phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. We suggest that reconstruction of ancestral viruses is a useful tool for experimental and computational investigations of virulence and viral...... evolution. Importantly, ancestral reconstruction can be done even on the basis of a set of sequences that all correspond to non-functional variants....

  1. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of the bacteriophage P1 single-stranded DNA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nilsson, A.S.; Lehnherr, H.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriophage P1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB-P1), which shows 66% amino acid sequence identity to the SSB protein of the host bacterium Escherichia coli. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the P1 ssb gene coexists with its E. coli counterpart as an independent unit...

  2. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, Ondřej; Ječná, K.; Leigh, M. B.; Macková, Martina; Macek, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 407, č. 12 (2009), s. 3611-3619 ISSN 0048-9697 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2B08031 Program:2B Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA-based stable isotope probing * microbial diversity * bioremediation Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.905, year: 2009

  3. Carboxyl-functionalized magnetic microparticle carrier for isolation and identification of DNA in dairy products

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Daniel; Rittich, B.; Španová, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 311, č. 1 (2007), s. 249-254 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/05/0311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : magnetic particles * DNA * magnetite Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 1.704, year: 2007

  4. Arabidopsis RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED directly regulates DNA damage responses through functions beyond cell cycle control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horvath, B.M.; Kourová, Hana; Nagy, S.; Nemeth, E.; Magyar, Z.; Papdi, C.; Ahmad, Z.; Sanchez-Perez, G.F.; Perilli, S.; Blilou, I.; Pettko-Szandtner, A.; Darula, Z.; Meszaros, T.; Binarová, Pavla; Bogre, L.; Scheres, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 9 (2017), s. 1261-1278 ISSN 0261-4189 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11657S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arabidopsis * BRCA1 * DNA damage response Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 9.792, year: 2016

  5. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    RNA or knockout of the gene by CRISPR/Cas9 compromised restart of collapsed forks and led to DNA damage in cells experiencing DRS. Furthermore, in cancer-prone, heterozygous APC mutant mice, homozygous deletion of the Rad52 gene suppressed tumor growth and prolonged lifespan. We therefore propose that mammalian...

  6. Reproductive aging is associated with changes in oocyte mitochondrial dynamics, function, and mtDNA quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayev, Elnur; Wang, Tianren; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Lowther, Katie; Taylor, Hugh S; Horvath, Tamas; Seli, Emre

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria affect numerous aspects of mammalian reproduction. We investigated whether the decrease in oocyte quality associated with aging is related to altered mitochondria. Oocytes from old (12 months) and young (9 weeks) C57BL/6J mice were compared in relation to: mitochondria morphology and dynamics (mitochondria density, coverage, size and shape) throughout folliculogenesis; levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); mitochondrial stress reflected in the expression of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mt-UPR) genes; and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under baseline conditions and following H 2 O 2 treatment. In old mice, mitochondria of primary follicle-enclosed oocytes were smaller, with lower mitochondria coverage (total mitochondria μm 2 /μm 2 cytosol area) (pchanges were not significant. Mature oocytes (Metaphase II-MII) from old mice had significantly less mtDNA (paged MII oocytes were also higher following pretreatment with H 2 O 2 (pAging is associated with altered mitochondrial morphological parameters and decreased mtDNA levels in oocytes, as well as an increase in ROS under stressful conditions and elevated expression of mitochondrial stress response gene Hspd1. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial changes associated with ageing may help in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools in reproductive medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A functional polymorphism in the reduced folate carrier gene and DNA hypomethylation in mothers of children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S Jill; Melnyk, Stepan; Jernigan, Stefanie; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Trusty, Timothy; Lehman, Sara; Seidel, Lisa; Gaylor, David W; Cleves, Mario A

    2010-09-01

    The biologic basis of autism is complex and is thought to involve multiple and variable gene-environment interactions. While the logical focus has been on the affected child, the impact of maternal genetics on intrauterine microenvironment during pivotal developmental windows could be substantial. Folate-dependent one carbon metabolism is a highly polymorphic pathway that regulates the distribution of one-carbon derivatives between DNA synthesis (proliferation) and DNA methylation (cell-specific gene expression and differentiation). These pathways are essential to support the programmed shifts between proliferation and differentiation during embryogenesis and organogenesis. Maternal genetic variants that compromise intrauterine availability of folate derivatives could alter fetal cell trajectories and disrupt normal neurodevelopment. In this investigation, the frequency of common functional polymorphisms in the folate pathway was investigated in a large population-based sample of autism case-parent triads. In case-control analysis, a significant increase in the reduced folate carrier (RFC1) G allele frequency was found among case mothers, but not among fathers or affected children. Subsequent log linear analysis of the RFC1 A80G genotype within family trios revealed that the maternal G allele was associated with a significant increase in risk of autism whereas the inherited genotype of the child was not. Further, maternal DNA from the autism mothers was found to be significantly hypomethylated relative to reference control DNA. Metabolic profiling indicated that plasma homocysteine, adenosine, and S-adenosylhomocyteine were significantly elevated among autism mothers consistent with reduced methylation capacity and DNA hypomethylation. Together, these results suggest that the maternal genetics/epigenetics may influence fetal predisposition to autism. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Improved method for Mica functionalization used in single molecule imaging of DNA with atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Zapletalová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The modified procedure of 1-(3-aminopropylsilatrane (APS compound synthesis based on a new derivative (3‑aminopropyltrimethoxysilane for the purpose of DNA immobilization for AFM single imaging is described. New reaction pathway based on kinetically driven reaction approach is described. Necessity of two‑step purification process is proved; ability of purified APS to provide four times smoother surfaces in comparison with a crude product is demonstrated. Various analytical methods such mass spectroscopy and 1H NMR were used to show structure and enhanced purity of the APS product. APS mediates fixation of DNA molecules to mica substrates to be used for DNA imaging under Atomic Force Microscope. The use of an APS compound for simple and rapid silanization of mica surface is demonstrated. The advantages of APS‑based method are based mainly on low roughness of modified mica and homogeneous surface coverage by short sequence dsDNA (246 bp. The product obtained by the condensation reaction was purified in a two step process whose effectiveness was demonstrated not only by reduction of the silanized surface roughness, but also by mass spectroscopy (MS‑ESi, MALDI‑TOF method and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Experiments demonstrate that 1‑(3‑aminopropylsilatrane can be used to fix dsDNA molecules to a mica surface to be visualized by either the tapping mode or the force‑volume mode of AFM microscopy, as demonstrated by experiments. Moreover, necessity of advanced purification protocol is demonstrated by AFM based roughness measurements – pure vs crude APS product. The kinetics of APS‑layer aging, caused by silicon oxide growth on silanized layers, was studied by water contact angle measurements and is discussed.

  9. Plasticity of the gene functions for DNA replication in the T4-like phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Vasiliy M; Nolan, James M; Bertrand, Claire; Levy, Dawn; Desplats, Carine; Krisch, H M; Karam, Jim D

    2006-08-04

    We have completely sequenced and annotated the genomes of several relatives of the bacteriophage T4, including three coliphages (RB43, RB49 and RB69), three Aeromonas salmonicida phages (44RR2.8t, 25 and 31) and one Aeromonas hydrophila phage (Aeh1). In addition, we have partially sequenced and annotated the T4-like genomes of coliphage RB16 (a close relative of RB43), A. salmonicida phage 65, Acinetobacter johnsonii phage 133 and Vibrio natriegens phage nt-1. Each of these phage genomes exhibited a unique sequence that distinguished it from its relatives, although there were examples of genomes that are very similar to each other. As a group the phages compared here diverge from one another by several criteria, including (a) host range, (b) genome size in the range between approximately 160 kb and approximately 250 kb, (c) content and genetic organization of their T4-like genes for DNA metabolism, (d) mutational drift of the predicted T4-like gene products and their regulatory sites and (e) content of open-reading frames that have no counterparts in T4 or other known organisms (novel ORFs). We have observed a number of DNA rearrangements of the T4 genome type, some exhibiting proximity to putative homing endonuclease genes. Also, we cite and discuss examples of sequence divergence in the predicted sites for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions of homologues of the T4 DNA replication proteins, with emphasis on the diversity in sequence, molecular form and regulation of the phage-encoded DNA polymerase, gp43. Five of the sequenced phage genomes are predicted to encode split forms of this polymerase. Our studies suggest that the modular construction and plasticity of the T4 genome type and several of its replication proteins may offer resilience to mutation, including DNA rearrangements, and facilitate the adaptation of T4-like phages to different bacterial hosts in nature.

  10. (+)-(10R)-Germacrene A synthase from goldenrod, Solidago canadensis; cDNA isolation, bacterial expression and functional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Ian; Phillips, Andy L; Gittings, Simon; Lewis, Mervyn J; Hooper, Antony M; Pickett, John A; Beale, Michael H

    2002-08-01

    Profiling of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in extracts of goldenrod, Solidago canadensis, by GC-MS revealed the presence of both enantiomers of germacrene D and lesser amounts of germacrene A, alpha-humulene, and beta-caryophyllene. A similarity-based cloning strategy using degenerate oligonucleotide primers, based on conserved amino acid sequences in known plant sesquiterpene synthases and RT-PCR, resulted in the isolation of a full length sesquiterpene synthase cDNA. Functional expression of the cDNA in E. coli, as an N-terminal thioredoxin fusion protein using the pET32b vector yielded an enzyme that was readily purified by nickel-chelate affinity chromatography. Chiral GC-MS analysis of products from of (3)H- and (2)H-labelled farnesyl diphosphate identified the enzyme as (+)-(10R)-germacrene A synthase. Sequence analysis and molecular modelling was used to compare this enzyme with the mechanistically related epi-aristolochene synthase from tobacco.

  11. TGFBR2-dependent alterations of exosomal cargo and functions in DNA mismatch repair-deficient HCT116 colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Fabia; Lee, Jennifer; Michalak, Malwina; Warnken, Uwe; Hausser, Ingrid; Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Halama, Niels; Schnölzer, Martina; Kopitz, Jürgen; Gebert, Johannes

    2017-04-04

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) that lack DNA mismatch repair function exhibit the microsatellite unstable (MSI) phenotype and are characterized by the accumulation of frameshift mutations at short repetitive DNA sequences (microsatellites). These tumors recurrently show inactivating frameshift mutations in the tumor suppressor Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor Type 2 (TGFBR2) thereby abrogating downstream signaling. How altered TGFBR2 signaling affects exosome-mediated communication between MSI tumor cells and their environment has not been resolved. Here, we report on molecular alterations of exosomes shed by MSI cells and the biological response evoked in recipient cells. Exosomes were isolated and characterized by electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking, and western blot analysis. TGFBR2-dependent effects on the cargo and functions of exosomes were studied in a MSI CRC model cell line enabling reconstituted and inducible TGFBR2 expression and signaling. Microsatellite frameshift mutations in exosomal and cellular DNA were examined by PCR-based DNA fragment analysis and exosomal protein profiles were identified by mass spectrometry. Uptake of fluorescent-labeled exosomes by hepatoma recipient cells was monitored by confocal microscopy. TGFBR2-dependent exosomal effects on secreted cytokine levels of recipient cells were analyzed by Luminex technology and ELISA. Frameshift mutation patterns in microsatellite stretches of TGFBR2 and other MSI target genes were found to be reflected in the cargo of MSI CRC-derived exosomes. At the proteome level, reconstituted TGFBR2 expression and signaling uncovered two protein subsets exclusively occurring in exosomes derived from TGFBR2-deficient (14 proteins) or TGFBR2-proficient (five proteins) MSI donor cells. Uptake of these exosomes by recipient cells caused increased secretion (2-6 fold) of specific cytokines (Interleukin-4, Stem Cell Factor, Platelet-derived Growth Factor-B), depending on the TGFBR2 expression status

  12. Systematic biochemical analysis of somatic missense mutations in DNA polymerase β found in prostate cancer reveal alteration of enzymatic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chang Long; Chen, Desheng; Makridakis, Nick M

    2011-04-01

    DNA polymerase β is essential for short-patch base excision repair. We have previously identified 20 somatic pol β mutations in prostate tumors, many of them missense. In the current article we describe the effect of all of these somatic missense pol β mutations (p.K27N, p.E123K, p.E232K, p.P242R, p.E216K, p.M236L, and the triple mutant p.P261L/T292A/I298T) on the biochemical properties of the polymerase in vitro, following bacterial expression and purification of the respective enzymatic variants. We report that all missense somatic pol β mutations significantly affect enzyme function. Two of the pol β variants reduce catalytic efficiency, while the remaining five missense mutations alter the fidelity of DNA synthesis. Thus, we conclude that a significant proportion (9 out of 26; 35%) of prostate cancer patients have functionally important somatic mutations of pol β. Many of these missense mutations are clonal in the tumors, and/or are associated with loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability. These results suggest that interfering with normal polymerase β function may be a frequent mechanism of prostate tumor progression. Furthermore, the availability of detailed structural information for pol β allows understanding of the potential mechanistic effects of these mutants on polymerase function. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. DNA sequence functionalized with heterogeneous core-satellite nanoassembly for novel energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-05-15

    This work reports the use of compositionally heterogeneous asymmetric Ag@Au core-satellite nanoassembly functionalized with DNA sequence as unique signaling nanoprobes for the realization of new energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay of prostate- specific antigen (PSA). Specifically, the Ag@Au asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies (Ag@Au ACS) were fabricated on a two-dimensional glass substrate by a modified controlled assembly technique, and then functionalized with DNA sequences containing PSA aptamers as signaling nanoprobes. Then, the sandwich complexing between the PSA, its antibodies, and the signaling nanoprobes was performed on a CdS QDs modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The single stranded DNA can server as a facile mediator that place the Ag@Au ACS in proximity of CdS QDs, stimulating the interparticle exciton-plasmon interactions between Ag@Au ACS and CdS QDs and thus quenching the excitonic states in the latter. Since the damping effect is closely related to the target concentration, a novel energy-transfer-based PEC bioanalysis could be achieved for the sensitive and specific PSA assay. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0×10 -11 gmL -1 to 1.0×10 -7 gmL -1 and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3×10 -13 gmL -1 . This strategy used the Ag@Au ACS-DNA signaling nanoprobes and overcame the deficiency of short operating distance of the energy transfer process for feasible PEC immunoassay. More significantly, it provided a way to couple the plasmonic properties of the Ag NPs and Au NPs in a single PEC bioanalytical system. We expected this work could inspire more interests and further investigations on the advanced engineering of the core-satellite or other judiciously designed nanostructures for new PEC bioanalytical uses with novel properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An all-atom knowledge-based energy function for protein-DNA threading, docking decoy discrimination, and prediction of transcription-factor binding profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Beisi; Yang, Yuedong; Liang, Haojun; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2009-01-01

    How to make an accurate representation of protein-DNA interactions by an energy function is a long-standing unsolved problem in structural biology. Here, we modified a statistical potential based on the distance-scaled, finite ideal-gas reference state (DFIRE) so that it is optimized for protein-DNA interactions. The changes include a volume-fraction correction to account for unmixable atom types in proteins and DNA in addition to the usage of a low-count correction, residue/base-specific atom types, and a shorter cutoff distance for protein-DNA interactions. The new statistical energy functions are tested in threading and docking decoy discriminations and prediction of protein-DNA binding affinities and transcription-factor binding profiles. Results indicate that new proposed energy functions are among the best in existing energy functions for protein-DNA interactions. The new energy functions are available as a web-server called DDNA 2.0 at http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu. The server version was trained by the entire 212 protein-DNA complexes. PMID:19274740

  15. The PD-(D/EXK superfamily revisited: identification of new members among proteins involved in DNA metabolism and functional predictions for domains of (hitherto unknown function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujnicki Janusz M

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PD-(D/EXK nuclease superfamily, initially identified in type II restriction endonucleases and later in many enzymes involved in DNA recombination and repair, is one of the most challenging targets for protein sequence analysis and structure prediction. Typically, the sequence similarity between these proteins is so low, that most of the relationships between known members of the PD-(D/EXK superfamily were identified only after the corresponding structures were determined experimentally. Thus, it is tempting to speculate that among the uncharacterized protein families, there are potential nucleases that remain to be discovered, but their identification requires more sensitive tools than traditional PSI-BLAST searches. Results The low degree of amino acid conservation hampers the possibility of identification of new members of the PD-(D/EXK superfamily based solely on sequence comparisons to known members. Therefore, we used a recently developed method HHsearch for sensitive detection of remote similarities between protein families represented as profile Hidden Markov Models enhanced by secondary structure. We carried out a comparison of known families of PD-(D/EXK nucleases to the database comprising the COG and PFAM profiles corresponding to both functionally characterized as well as uncharacterized protein families to detect significant similarities. The initial candidates for new nucleases were subsequently verified by sequence-structure threading, comparative modeling, and identification of potential active site residues. Conclusion In this article, we report identification of the PD-(D/EXK nuclease domain in numerous proteins implicated in interactions with DNA but with unknown structure and mechanism of action (such as putative recombinase RmuC, DNA competence factor CoiA, a DNA-binding protein SfsA, a large human protein predicted to be a DNA repair enzyme, predicted archaeal transcription regulators, and the head

  16. Carboxyl-functionalized magnetic microparticle carrier for isolation and identification of DNA in dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, Daniel [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovskeho Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: horak@imc.cas.cz; Rittich, Bohuslav [Masaryk University Brno, Tvrdeho 14, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: rittich@sci.muni.cz; Spanova, Alena [Masaryk University Brno, Tvrdeho 14, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: spanova@sci.muni.cz

    2007-04-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles about 14nm in diameter were obtained by chemical coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with aqueous ammonia in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) microspheres about 1{mu}m in diameter were prepared by dispersion polymerization of GMA in aqueous ethanol in the presence of PEG-coated magnetite nanoparticles. The microspheres were hydrolyzed and carboxyl groups introduced by oxidation with KMnO{sub 4}. The particles reversibly bound bacterial DNA of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genera in the presence of high concentrations of PEG 6000 and sodium chloride from crude cell lysates of various dairy products (butter milk, cheese, yoghurt, probiotic tablets) or from cell lyophilisates. The presence of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus DNA in samples was confirmed by PCR amplification.

  17. The Functional Role of TopBP1 in DNA Maintenance at Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    that are devoid of histones and do not stain with DAPI. Some of these UFBs are induced by replication stress and interlink CFSs on segregating sister chromatids in anaphase. Another major advance was the discovery of active processing of underreplicated loci by structure-selective endonucleases MUS81 and GEN1......When cells traverse mitosis, genome integrity of the emerging daughter cells is dependent on replication of the entire genome during the preceding S-phase and accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Replication stress may cause cells to enter mitosis with underreplicated loci, consisting....... This active processing was found to be an underlying mechanism of CFS expression. A final advance was the description of how DNA damage, arising as a consequence of replication stress in S-phase, was shielded in 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs), preventing untimely DNA repair during the subsequent G1-phase. We...

  18. Carboxyl-functionalized magnetic microparticle carrier for isolation and identification of DNA in dairy products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horák, Daniel; Rittich, Bohuslav; Španová, Alena

    2007-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles about 14 nm in diameter were obtained by chemical coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with aqueous ammonia in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) microspheres about 1 μm in diameter were prepared by dispersion polymerization of GMA in aqueous ethanol in the presence of PEG-coated magnetite nanoparticles. The microspheres were hydrolyzed and carboxyl groups introduced by oxidation with KMnO4. The particles reversibly bound bacterial DNA of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genera in the presence of high concentrations of PEG 6000 and sodium chloride from crude cell lysates of various dairy products (butter milk, cheese, yoghurt, probiotic tablets) or from cell lyophilisates. The presence of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus DNA in samples was confirmed by PCR amplification.

  19. Lung function discordance in monozygotic twins and associated differences in blood DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolund, Anneli C S; Starnawska, Anna; Miller, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    anatomical structure and combination of various environmental factors; however, the exact molecular mechanisms contributing to this decline are not fully understood. DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that changes across individual's lifetime, as well as allows for interplay between environmental...... and tumour-suppressor/pro-oncogenic mechanisms. Change in FEV1 during the 11-year follow-up period was associated with blood DNA methylation level in TRIM27 gene (p value = 1.55 × 10-6), a negative regulator of CD4 T cells, and also involved in cancer development. Several enriched pathways were identified......, especially for FEV1, with one being "TGFBR" (Benjamini-Hochbergadj p value = 0.045), the receptor for TGFβ, a growth factor involved in normal lung tissue repair through pro-fibrotic effects. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that epigenetic regulation of immunological- and cancer-related genes, as well...

  20. Carboxyl-functionalized magnetic microparticle carrier for isolation and identification of DNA in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, Daniel; Rittich, Bohuslav; Spanova, Alena

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles about 14nm in diameter were obtained by chemical coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with aqueous ammonia in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) microspheres about 1μm in diameter were prepared by dispersion polymerization of GMA in aqueous ethanol in the presence of PEG-coated magnetite nanoparticles. The microspheres were hydrolyzed and carboxyl groups introduced by oxidation with KMnO 4 . The particles reversibly bound bacterial DNA of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genera in the presence of high concentrations of PEG 6000 and sodium chloride from crude cell lysates of various dairy products (butter milk, cheese, yoghurt, probiotic tablets) or from cell lyophilisates. The presence of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus DNA in samples was confirmed by PCR amplification

  1. Distinct functions of human RecQ helicases during DNA replication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Václav; Dobrovolná, Jana; Janščák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 225, červen (2017), s. 20-26 ISSN 0301-4622 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05743S; GA MŠk LH14037 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA replication * Replication stress * RecQ helicases * Genomic instability * Cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.402, year: 2016

  2. Human DNA-Damage-Inducible 2 Protein Is Structurally and Functionally Distinct from Its Yeast Ortholog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sivá, Monika; Svoboda, Michal; Veverka, Václav; Trempe, J. F.; Hofmann, K.; Kožíšek, Milan; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Sedlák, František; Belza, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Šácha, Pavel; Hubálek, Martin; Starková, Jana; Flaisigová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Grantz Šašková, Klára

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Jul 27 (2016), č. článku 30443. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : human DNA-damage-inducible 2 protein * proteasome * ubiquitin * retroviral protease-like domain Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016 http://www.nature.com/articles/srep30443

  3. Highly functionalized piperidines: Free radical scavenging, anticancer activity, DNA interaction and correlation with biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Suvankar Das; Cristiane J. da Silva; Marina de M. Silva; Maria Dayanne de A. Dantas; Ângelo de Fátima; Ana Lúcia T. Góis Ruiz; Cleiton M. da Silva; João Ernesto de Carvalho; Josué C.C. Santos; Isis M. Figueiredo; Edeildo F. da Silva-Júnior; Thiago M. de Aquino; João X. de Araújo-Júnior; Goutam Brahmachari; Luzia Valentina Modolo

    2018-01-01

    Twenty-five piperidines were studied as potential radical scavengers and antitumor agents. Quantitative interaction of compounds with ctDNA using spectroscopic techniques was also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the evaluated piperidines possesses different abilities to scavenge the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the anion radical superoxide (·O2−). The piperidine 19 was the most potent radical DPPH scavenger, while the most effective to ·O2− scavenger was piperidine...

  4. One-step synthesis of DNA functionalized cadmium-free quantum dots and its application in FRET-based protein sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Cuiling, E-mail: clzhang@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Ding, Caiping [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Zhou, Guohua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lingnan Normal University, Zhanjiang, 524048 (China); Xue, Qin [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Xian, Yuezhong, E-mail: yzxian@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2017-03-08

    DNA functionalized quantum dots (QDs) are promising nanoprobes for the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensing. Herein, cadmium-free DNA functionalized Mn-doped ZnS (DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+}) QDs were successfully synthesized by one-step route. As-synthesized QDs show excellent photo-stability with the help of PAA and DNA. Then, we constructed a novel FRET model based on the QDs and WS{sub 2} nanosheets as the energy donor-acceptor pairs, which was successfully applied for the protein detection through the terminal protection of small molecule-linked DNA assay. This work not only explores the potential bioapplication of the DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs, but also provides a platform for the investigation of small molecule-protein interaction. - Highlights: • The stable and cadmium-free DNA functionalized ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs were successfully synthesized through a facile one-step route. • We constructed a novel FRET system based on one-step synthesized DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs (donor) and WS{sub 2} nanosheets (acceptor). • The FRET-based strategy was applied for the detection of streptavidin and folate receptor by combining TPSMLD and Exo III.

  5. Structural plasticity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis uracil-DNA glycosylase (MtUng) and its functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, S M; Geethanandan, K; Mishra, P; Surolia, A; Varshney, U; Vijayan, M

    2015-07-01

    17 independent crystal structures of family I uracil-DNA glycosylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUng) and its complexes with uracil and its derivatives, distributed among five distinct crystal forms, have been determined. Thermodynamic parameters of binding in the complexes have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The two-domain protein exhibits open and closed conformations, suggesting that the closure of the domain on DNA binding involves conformational selection. Segmental mobility in the enzyme molecule is confined to a 32-residue stretch which plays a major role in DNA binding. Uracil and its derivatives can bind to the protein in two possible orientations. Only one of them is possible when there is a bulky substituent at the 5' position. The crystal structures of the complexes provide a reasonable rationale for the observed thermodynamic parameters. In addition to providing fresh insights into the structure, plasticity and interactions of the protein molecule, the results of the present investigation provide a platform for structure-based inhibitor design.

  6. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  7. Transient oxidative stress and inflammation after intraperitoneal administration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with single strand DNA in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clichici, Simona, E-mail: simonaclichici@yahoo.com [Department of Physiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Biris, Alexandru Radu [National R and D Institute of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tabaran, Flaviu [University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Filip, Adriana [Department of Physiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2012-03-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are widely used for nanotechnology. Their impact on living organisms is, however, not entirely clarified. Oxidative stress and inflammation seem to be the key mechanisms involved in MWCNTs' cytotoxicity. Until present, pulmonary and skin models were the main tested experimental designs to assess carbon nanotubes' toxicity. The systemic administration of MWCNTs is essential, with respect for future medical applications. Our research is performed on Wistar rats and is focused on the dynamics of oxidative stress parameters in blood and liver and pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver, after single dose (270 mg l{sup −1}) ip administration of MWCNTs (exterior diameter 15–25 nm, interior diameter 10–15 nm, surface 88 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) functionalized with single strand DNA (ss-DNA). The presence of MWCNTs in blood was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, while in liver histological examination and confocal microscopy were used. It was found that ss-DNA-MWCNTs induce oxidative stress in plasma and liver, with the return of the tested parameters to normal values, 6 h after ip injection of nanotubes, with the exception of reduced glutathione in plasma. The inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) had a similar pattern of evolution. We also assessed the level of ERK1/2 and the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-kB in liver that had a transient increase and returned to normal at the end of the tested period. Our results demonstrate that ss-DNA-MWCNTs produce oxidative stress and inflammation, but with a transient pattern. Given the fact that antioxidants modify the profile not only for oxidative stress, but also of inflammation, the dynamics of these alterations may be of practical importance for future protective strategies. -- Highlights: ► ss-DNA-MWCNTs ip administration induce oxidative stress in plasma and liver. ► ss-DNA-MWCNTs ip administration determine liver inflammation. ► ERK1/2 and p65 phosphorylated NF

  8. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Mepham, Kathryn; Sebag, Igal A.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5–14.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ► Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ► Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ► DES

  9. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Lifeng [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Zhou, Yong [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yu, Shanhe [Shanghai Institute of Hematology, RuiJin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Ji, Guixiang [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences/Key Laboratory of Pesticide Environmental Assessment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing 210042 (China); Wang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Liu, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Gu, Aihua, E-mail: aihuagu@njmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  10. Novel base-functionalized DNA. Efficient methodology for construction and bioanalytical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal; Vrábel, Milan; Cahová, Hana; Riedl, Jan; Kalachová, Lubica; Pivoňková, Hana; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Havran, Luděk; Fojta, Miroslav

    -, č. 52 (2008), s. 53-54 ISSN 0261-3166. [Joint Symposium of the International Roundtable on Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids /18./ and the International Symposium on Nucleic Acid Chemistry /35./. Kyoto, 08.09.2008-12.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/1195; GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : cross-coupling reactions * nucleoside triphosphates * DNA Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  11. A Novel Rrm3 Function in Restricting DNA Replication via an Orc5-Binding Domain Is Genetically Separable from Rrm3 Function as an ATPase/Helicase in Facilitating Fork Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syed, Salahuddin; Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene J.

    2016-01-01

    In response to replication stress cells activate the intra-S checkpoint, induce DNA repair pathways, increase nucleotide levels, and inhibit origin firing. Here, we report that Rrm3 associates with a subset of replication origins and controls DNA synthesis during replication stress. The N...... Rrm3 function are distinct. Although both lesion types activate the DNA-damage checkpoint, we find that the resultant increase in nucleotide levels is not sufficient for continued DNA synthesis under replication stress. Together, our findings suggest a role of Rrm3, via its Orc5-binding domain...

  12. Highly functionalized piperidines: Free radical scavenging, anticancer activity, DNA interaction and correlation with biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvankar Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five piperidines were studied as potential radical scavengers and antitumor agents. Quantitative interaction of compounds with ctDNA using spectroscopic techniques was also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the evaluated piperidines possesses different abilities to scavenge the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and the anion radical superoxide (·O2−. The piperidine 19 was the most potent radical DPPH scavenger, while the most effective to ·O2− scavenger was piperidine 10. In general, U251, MCF7, NCI/ADR-RES, NCI-H460 and HT29 cells were least sensitive to the tested compounds and all compounds were considerably more toxic to the studied cancer cell lines than to the normal cell line HaCaT. The binding mode of the compounds and ctDNA was preferably via intercalation. In addition, these results were confirmed based on theoretical studies. Finally, a linear and exponential correlation between interaction constant (Kb and GI50 for several human cancer cell was observed.

  13. Genomewide discovery of DNA polymorphisms in rice cultivars with contrasting drought and salinity stress response and their functional relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mukesh; Moharana, Kanhu Charan; Shankar, Rama; Kumari, Romika; Garg, Rohini

    2014-02-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies provide opportunities to understand the genetic basis of phenotypic differences, such as abiotic stress response, even in the closely related cultivars via identification of large number of DNA polymorphisms. We performed whole-genome resequencing of three rice cultivars with contrasting responses to drought and salinity stress (sensitive IR64, drought-tolerant Nagina 22 and salinity-tolerant Pokkali). More than 356 million 90-bp paired-end reads were generated, which provided about 85% coverage of the rice genome. Applying stringent parameters, we identified a total of 1 784 583 nonredundant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 154 275 InDels between reference (Nipponbare) and the three resequenced cultivars. We detected 401 683 and 662 509 SNPs between IR64 and Pokkali, and IR64 and N22 cultivars, respectively. The distribution of DNA polymorphisms was found to be uneven across and within the rice chromosomes. One-fourth of the SNPs and InDels were detected in genic regions, and about 3.5% of the total SNPs resulted in nonsynonymous changes. Large-effect SNPs and InDels, which affect the integrity of the encoded protein, were also identified. Further, we identified DNA polymorphisms present in the differentially expressed genes within the known quantitative trait loci. Among these, a total of 548 SNPs in 232 genes, located in the conserved functional domains, were identified. The data presented in this study provide functional markers and promising target genes for salinity and drought tolerance and present a valuable resource for high-throughput genotyping and molecular breeding for abiotic stress traits in rice. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Regulation of segmentation and segmental identity by Drosophila homeoproteins: the role of DNA binding in functional activity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggin, M D; McGinnis, W

    1997-11-01

    Recent advances have shed new light on how the Q50 homeoproteins act in Drosophila. These transcription factors have remarkably similar and promiscuous DNA-binding specificities in vitro; yet they each specify distinct developmental fates in vivo. One current model suggests that, because the Q50 homeoproteins have distinct biological functions, they must each regulate different target genes. According to this 'co-selective binding' model, significant binding of Q50 homeoproteins to functional DNA elements in vivo would be dependent upon cooperative interactions with other transcription factors (cofactors). If the Q50 homeoproteins each interact differently with cofactors, they could be selectively targeted to unique, limited subsets of their in vitro recognition sites and thus control different genes. However, a variety of experiments question this model. Molecular and genetic experiments suggest that the Q50 homeoproteins do not regulate very distinct sets of genes. Instead, they mostly control the expression of a large number of shared targets. The distinct morphogenic properties of the various Q50 homeoproteins may principally result from the different manners in which they either activate or repress these common targets. Further, in vivo binding studies indicate that at least two Q50 homeoproteins have very broad and similar DNA-binding specificities in embryos, a result that is inconsistent with the 'co-selective binding' model. Based on these and other data, we suggest that Q50 homeoproteins bind many of their recognition sites without the aid of cofactors. In this 'widespread binding' model, cofactors act mainly by helping to distinguish the way in which homeoproteins regulate targets to which they are already bound.

  15. Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity of Total (DNA) and Expressed (RNA) Bacterial Communities in Urban Green Infrastructure Bioswale Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Angela; McGuire, Krista L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT New York City (NYC) is pioneering green infrastructure with the use of bioswales and other engineered soil-based habitats to provide stormwater infiltration and other ecosystem functions. In addition to avoiding the environmental and financial costs of expanding traditional built infrastructure, green infrastructure is thought to generate cobenefits in the form of diverse ecological processes performed by its plant and microbial communities. Yet, although plant communities in these habitats are closely managed, we lack basic knowledge about how engineered ecosystems impact the distribution and functioning of soil bacteria. We sequenced amplicons of the 16S ribosomal subunit, as well as seven genes associated with functional pathways, generated from both total (DNA-based) and expressed (RNA) soil communities in the Bronx, NYC, NY, in order to test whether bioswale soils host characteristic bacterial communities with evidence for enriched microbial functioning, compared to nonengineered soils in park lawns and tree pits. Bioswales had distinct, phylogenetically diverse bacterial communities, including taxa associated with nutrient cycling and metabolism of hydrocarbons and other pollutants. Bioswale soils also had a significantly greater diversity of genes involved in several functional pathways, including carbon fixation (cbbL-R [cbbL gene, red-like subunit] and apsA), nitrogen cycling (noxZ and amoA), and contaminant degradation (bphA); conversely, no functional genes were significantly more abundant in nonengineered soils. These results provide preliminary evidence that urban land management can shape the diversity and activity of soil communities, with positive consequences for genetic resources underlying valuable ecological functions, including biogeochemical cycling and degradation of common urban pollutants. IMPORTANCE Management of urban soil biodiversity by favoring taxa associated with decontamination or other microbial metabolic processes is a

  16. Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity of Total (DNA) and Expressed (RNA) Bacterial Communities in Urban Green Infrastructure Bioswale Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Aman S; Lee, Angela; McGuire, Krista L

    2017-08-15

    New York City (NYC) is pioneering green infrastructure with the use of bioswales and other engineered soil-based habitats to provide stormwater infiltration and other ecosystem functions. In addition to avoiding the environmental and financial costs of expanding traditional built infrastructure, green infrastructure is thought to generate cobenefits in the form of diverse ecological processes performed by its plant and microbial communities. Yet, although plant communities in these habitats are closely managed, we lack basic knowledge about how engineered ecosystems impact the distribution and functioning of soil bacteria. We sequenced amplicons of the 16S ribosomal subunit, as well as seven genes associated with functional pathways, generated from both total (DNA-based) and expressed (RNA) soil communities in the Bronx, NYC, NY, in order to test whether bioswale soils host characteristic bacterial communities with evidence for enriched microbial functioning, compared to nonengineered soils in park lawns and tree pits. Bioswales had distinct, phylogenetically diverse bacterial communities, including taxa associated with nutrient cycling and metabolism of hydrocarbons and other pollutants. Bioswale soils also had a significantly greater diversity of genes involved in several functional pathways, including carbon fixation ( cbbL-R [ cbbL gene, red-like subunit] and apsA ), nitrogen cycling ( noxZ and amoA ), and contaminant degradation ( bphA ); conversely, no functional genes were significantly more abundant in nonengineered soils. These results provide preliminary evidence that urban land management can shape the diversity and activity of soil communities, with positive consequences for genetic resources underlying valuable ecological functions, including biogeochemical cycling and degradation of common urban pollutants. IMPORTANCE Management of urban soil biodiversity by favoring taxa associated with decontamination or other microbial metabolic processes is a

  17. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2- or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2'-alkylated RNA monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas S; Guenther, Dale C; Gibbons, Bradley C; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2014-10-21

    Despite advances with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, polyamides and--more recently--engineered proteins, there remains an urgent need for synthetic ligands that enable specific recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA to accelerate studies aiming at detecting, regulating and modifying genes. Invaders, i.e., energetically activated DNA duplexes with interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides, are emerging as an attractive approach toward this goal. Here, we characterize and compare Invaders based on 1-, 2- and 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2'-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA hairpins with single nucleotide fidelity. Intercalator-mediated unwinding and activation of the double-stranded probe, coupled with extraordinary stabilization of probe-target duplexes (ΔT(m)/modification up to +14.0 °C), provides the driving force for dsDNA recognition. In contrast, Z-modified Invaders show much lower dsDNA recognition efficiency. Thus, even very conservative changes in the chemical makeup of the intercalator-functionalized nucleotides used to activate Invader duplexes, affects dsDNA-recognition efficiency of the probes, which highlights the importance of systematic structure-property studies. The insight from this study will guide future design of Invaders for applications in molecular biology and nucleic acid diagnostics.

  18. GB3.0: a platform for plant bio-design that connects functional DNA elements with associated biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Quijano-Rubio, Alfredo; Fernandez-Del-Carmen, Asun; Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Ochoa-Fernandez, Rocio; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2017-02-28

    Modular DNA assembly simplifies multigene engineering in Plant Synthetic Biology. Furthermore, the recent adoption of a common syntax to facilitate the exchange of plant DNA parts (phytobricks) is a promising strategy to speed up genetic engineering. Following this lead, here, we present a platform for plant biodesign that incorporates functional descriptions of phytobricks obtained under pre-defined experimental conditions, and systematically registers the resulting information as metadata for documentation. To facilitate the handling of functional descriptions, we developed a new version (v3.0) of the GoldenBraid (GB) webtool that integrates the experimental data and displays it in the form of datasheets. We report the use of the Luciferase/Renilla (Luc/Ren) transient agroinfiltration assay in Nicotiana benthamiana as a standard to estimate relative transcriptional activities conferred by regulatory phytobricks, and show the consistency and reproducibility of this method in the characterization of a synthetic phytobrick based on the CaMV35S promoter. Furthermore, we illustrate the potential for combinatorial optimization and incremental innovation of the GB3.0 platform in two separate examples, (i) the development of a collection of orthogonal transcriptional regulators based on phiC31 integrase and (ii) the design of a small genetic circuit that connects a glucocorticoid switch to a MYB/bHLH transcriptional activation module. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Structural and functional analysis of DNA sequences with potential for forming G-quadruplex

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Souto Mofatto

    2013-01-01

    Resumo: Os G-quadruplexes são estruturas secundárias de DNA altamente organizadas, constituídas por sequências ricas em guaninas capazes de formar tétrades ligadas por pontes de hidrogênio. Essas sequências são capazes de modular a transcrição gênica e o splicing alternativo de éxons. Além disso, estudos também mostraram que os G-quadruplexes estão presentes na região promotora de oncogenes (como c-MYC) e nas regiões terminais dos telômeros, indicando que o G-quadruplex pode ser um possível a...

  20. CDK2 and PKA mediated-sequential phosphorylation is critical for p19INK4d function in the DNA damage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela C Marazita

    Full Text Available DNA damage triggers a phosphorylation-based signaling cascade known as the DNA damage response. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK4/6 inhibitors, has been reported to participate in the DNA damage response promoting DNA repair and cell survival. Here, we provide mechanistic insight into the activation mechanism of p19INK4d linked to the response to DNA damage. Results showed that p19INK4d becomes phosphorylated following UV radiation, β-amyloid peptide and cisplatin treatments. ATM-Chk2/ATR-Chk1 signaling pathways were found to be differentially involved in p19INK4d phosphorylation depending on the type of DNA damage. Two sequential phosphorylation events at serine 76 and threonine 141 were identified using p19INK4d single-point mutants in metabolic labeling assays with (32P-orthophosphate. CDK2 and PKA were found to participate in p19INK4d phosphorylation process and that they would mediate serine 76 and threonine 141 modifications respectively. Nuclear translocation of p19INK4d induced by DNA damage was shown to be dependent on serine 76 phosphorylation. Most importantly, both phosphorylation sites were found to be crucial for p19INK4d function in DNA repair and cell survival. In contrast, serine 76 and threonine 141 were dispensable for CDK4/6 inhibition highlighting the independence of p19INK4d functions, in agreement with our previous findings. These results constitute the first description of the activation mechanism of p19INK4d in response to genotoxic stress and demonstrate the functional relevance of this activation following DNA damage.

  1. SVD identifies transcript length distribution functions from DNA microarray data and reveals evolutionary forces globally affecting GBM metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Bertagnolli

    Full Text Available To search for evolutionary forces that might act upon transcript length, we use the singular value decomposition (SVD to identify the length distribution functions of sets and subsets of human and yeast transcripts from profiles of mRNA abundance levels across gel electrophoresis migration distances that were previously measured by DNA microarrays. We show that the SVD identifies the transcript length distribution functions as "asymmetric generalized coherent states" from the DNA microarray data and with no a-priori assumptions. Comparing subsets of human and yeast transcripts of the same gene ontology annotations, we find that in both disparate eukaryotes, transcripts involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism are significantly shorter than typical, and in particular, significantly shorter than those involved in glucose metabolism. Comparing the subsets of human transcripts that are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM or normal brain tissue samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we find that GBM maintains normal brain overexpression of significantly short transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism, but suppresses normal overexpression of significantly longer transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in glucose metabolism and brain activity. These global relations among transcript length, cellular metabolism and tumor development suggest a previously unrecognized physical mode for tumor and normal cells to differentially regulate metabolism in a transcript length-dependent manner. The identified distribution functions support a previous hypothesis from mathematical modeling of evolutionary forces that act upon transcript length in the manner of the restoring force of the harmonic oscillator.

  2. Contribution of phenylalanine side chain intercalation to the TATA-box binding protein-DNA interaction: molecular dynamics and dispersion-corrected density functional theory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Manas; Mukherjee, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-11-01

    Deformation of DNA takes place quite often due to binding of small molecules or proteins with DNA. Such deformation is significant due to minor groove binding and, besides electrostatic interactions, other non-covalent interactions may also play an important role in generating such deformation. TATA-box binding protein (TBP) binds to the minor groove of DNA at the TATA box sequence, producing a large-scale deformation in DNA and initiating transcription. In order to observe the interactions of protein residues with DNA in the minor groove that produce the deformation in the DNA structure, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the TBP-DNA system. The results reveal consistent partial intercalation of two Phe residues, distorting stacking interactions at two dinucleotide step sites. We carried out calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory to understand the source of such stabilization. We observed favorable interaction energies between the Phe residues and the base pairs with which they interact. We suggest that salt-bridge interactions between the phosphate groups and Lys or Arg residues, along with the intercalation of Phe residues between two base pair stacks, stabilize the kinked and opened-up DNA conformation.

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana Y-family DNA polymerase eta catalyses translesion synthesis and interacts functionally with PCNA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Heather J; Vonarx, Edward J; Pastushok, Landon; Nakagawa, Mayu; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Gruz, Petr; Di Rubbo, Antonio; Grice, Desma M; Osmond, Megan J; Sakamoto, Ayako N; Nohmi, Takehiko; Xiao, Wei; Kunz, Bernard A

    2008-09-01

    Upon blockage of chromosomal replication by DNA lesions, Y-family polymerases interact with monoubiquitylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to catalyse translesion synthesis (TLS) and restore replication fork progression. Here, we assessed the roles of Arabidopsis thaliana POLH, which encodes a homologue of Y-family polymerase eta (Poleta), PCNA1 and PCNA2 in TLS-mediated UV resistance. A T-DNA insertion in POLH sensitized the growth of roots and whole plants to UV radiation, indicating that AtPoleta contributes to UV resistance. POLH alone did not complement the UV sensitivity conferred by deletion of yeast RAD30, which encodes Poleta, although AtPoleta exhibited cyclobutane dimer bypass activity in vitro, and interacted with yeast PCNA, as well as with Arabidopsis PCNA1 and PCNA2. Co-expression of POLH and PCNA2, but not PCNA1, restored normal UV resistance and mutation kinetics in the rad30 mutant. A single residue difference at site 201, which lies adjacent to the residue (lysine 164) ubiquitylated in PCNA, appeared responsible for the inability of PCNA1 to function with AtPoleta in UV-treated yeast. PCNA-interacting protein boxes and an ubiquitin-binding motif in AtPoleta were found to be required for the restoration of UV resistance in the rad30 mutant by POLH and PCNA2. These observations indicate that AtPoleta can catalyse TLS past UV-induced DNA damage, and links the biological activity of AtPoleta in UV-irradiated cells to PCNA2 and PCNA- and ubiquitin-binding motifs in AtPoleta.

  4. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caselle Michele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield, a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary

  5. Cloning, Characterization, and Functional Expression of Phospholipase Dα cDNA from Banana (Musa acuminate L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D (PLD plays a key role in adaptive responses of postharvest fruits. A cDNA clone of banana (Musa acuminate L. PLDα (MaPLDα was obtained by RT-PCR in this study. The MaPLDα gene contains a complete open reading frame (ORF encoding a 92-kDa protein composed of 832 amino acid residues and possesses a characteristic C2 domain and two catalytic H×K×××D (abbr. HKD motifs. The two HKD motifs are separated by 341 amino acid residues in the primary structure. Relatively higher PLD activity and expression of MaPLDα mRNA were detected in developing tissues compared to senescent or mature tissues in individual leaves, flower, stem, and fruit organs, respectively. The expression profile of PLDα mRNA in postharvest banana fruits at different temperatures was determined, and the MaPLDα mRNA reached the highest expression peak on day 5 at 25°C and on day 7 at 12°C. The results provide useful information for maintaining postharvest quality and extending the storage life of banana fruit.

  6. Functional characterization of an acidic SK(3) dehydrin isolated from an Opuntia streptacantha cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Alfaro, A E; Rodríguez-Kessler, M; Pérez-Morales, M B; Delgado-Sánchez, P; Cuevas-Velazquez, C L; Gómez-Anduro, G; Jiménez-Bremont, J F

    2012-03-01

    Cactus pears are succulent plants of the Cactaceae family adapted to extremely arid, hot and cold environments, making them excellent models for the study of molecular mechanisms underlying abiotic stress tolerance. Herein, we report a directional cDNA library from 12-month-old cladodes of Opuntia streptacantha plants subjected to abiotic stresses. A total of 442 clones were sequenced, representing 329 cactus pear unigenes, classified into eleven functional categories. The most abundant EST (unigen 33) was characterized under abiotic stress. This cDNA of 905 bp encodes a SK(3)-type acidic dehydrin of 248 amino acids. The OpsDHN1 gene contains an intron inserted within the sequence encoding the S-motif. qRT-PCR analysis shows that the OpsDHN1 transcript is specifically accumulated in response to cold stress, and induced by abscisic acid. Over-expression of the OpsDHN1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to enhanced tolerance to freezing treatment, suggesting that OpsDHN1 participates in freezing stress responsiveness. Generation of the first EST collection for the characterization of cactus pear genes constitutes a useful platform for the understanding of molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance in Opuntia and other CAM plants.

  7. Deoxyribonucleotide pool analysis: functional association of thymidylate synthase with the other enzymes of DNA biosynthesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, G.P.V.; Christiansen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Allosteric interaction between thymidylate synthase (TS) and the other enzymes of DNA biosynthesis was suggested from the authors observation that inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase, topoisomerase of DNA polymerase-α inhibit TS in intact S phase CHEF/18 cells, but not in their soluble extracts. In addition the authors observed that 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA), a poison of topoisomerase II, had similar effects on TS activity in mammalian cells. They have examined if the inhibitory effects of these antimetabolites on TS is due to the accumulation of thymidine nucleotide(s) in intact cells, rather than to an allosteric interaction in the replitase complex. A novel method of nucleotide pool analysis revealed that in the presence of these antimetabolites the incorporation of radioactivity from 3 H-deoxyuridine (dUrd) into thymidine nucleotide pools inside the cell did not increase as compared to the control. Furthermore, TS activity as measured in-vitro was not inhibited by supraphysiological concentrations (50μM) of thymidine mono- or tri-phosphates. None of these antimetabolites dramatically influenced the uptake of dUrd and its subsequent phosphorylation to deoxyuridine monophosphate. Therefore, they suggest that the inhibitory effect of these antimetabolites is due to the functional association of their target enzymes with TS

  8. Distribution and functional impact of DNA copy number variation in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, V.; Saar, K.; Adamovic, T.; Verheul, M.; van Heesch, S.; Cook, S.; Pravenec, M.; Aitman, T.; Jacob, H.; Shull, J.D.; Hubner, N.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    The abundance and dynamics of copy number variants (CNVs) in mammalian genomes poses new challenges in the identification of their impact on natural and disease phenotypes. We used computational and experimental methods to catalog CNVs in rat and found that they share important functional

  9. Nucleobase-functionalized grapheme nanoribbons for accurate high-speed DNA sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulechka, Eugene; Wassenaar, Tsjerk; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Kazakov, Andrei; Smolyanitsky, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We propose a water-immersed nucleobase-functionalized suspended graphene nanoribbon as an intrinsically selective device for nucleotide detection. The proposed sensing method combines Watson–Crick selective base pairing with graphene's capacity for converting anisotropic lattice strain to changes in

  10. Genomic and functional integrity of the hematopoietic system requires tolerance of oxidative DNA lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martín-Pardillos, Ana; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Chen, Si

    2017-01-01

    , the collapse of the Rev1Xpc bone marrow was associated with progressive mitochondrial dysfunction and consequent exacerbation of oxidative stress. These data reveal that, to protect its genomic and functional integrity, the hematopoietic system critically depends on the combined activities of repair...

  11. Proteomic and functional analyses of protein-DNA complexes during gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badding, Melissa A; Lapek, John D; Friedman, Alan E; Dean, David A

    2013-04-01

    One of the barriers to successful nonviral gene delivery is the crowded cytoplasm, which plasmids need to actively traverse for gene expression. Relatively little is known about how this process occurs, but our lab and others have shown that the microtubule network and motors are required for plasmid movement to the nucleus. To further investigate how plasmids exploit normal physiological processes to transfect cells, we have taken a proteomics approach to identify the proteins that comprise the plasmid-trafficking complex. We have developed a live cell DNA-protein pull-down assay to isolate complexes at certain time points post-transfection (15 minutes to 4 hours) for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). Plasmids containing promoter sequences bound hundreds of unique proteins as early as 15 minutes post-electroporation, while a plasmid lacking any eukaryotic sequences failed to bind many of the proteins. Specific proteins included microtubule-based motor proteins (e.g., kinesin and dynein), proteins involved in protein nuclear import (e.g., importin 1, 2, 4, and 7, Crm1, RAN, and several RAN-binding proteins), a number of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP)- and mRNA-binding proteins, and transcription factors. The significance of several of the proteins involved in protein nuclear localization and plasmid trafficking was determined by monitoring movement of microinjected fluorescently labeled plasmids via live cell particle tracking in cells following protein knockdown by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) or through the use of specific inhibitors. While importin β1 was required for plasmid trafficking and subsequent nuclear import, importin α1 played no role in microtubule trafficking but was required for optimal plasmid nuclear import. Surprisingly, the nuclear export protein Crm1 also was found to complex with the transfected plasmids and was necessary for plasmid trafficking along microtubules and nuclear import. Our results show that various proteins

  12. A hotspot in the glucocorticoid receptor DNA-binding domain susceptible to loss of function mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banuelos, Jesus; Shin, Soon Cheon; Lu, Nick Z

    2015-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used to treat a variety of inflammatory disorders and certain cancers. However, GC resistance occurs in subsets of patients. We found that EL4 cells, a GC-resistant mouse thymoma cell line, harbored a point mutation in their GC receptor (GR) gene, resulting in the substitution of arginine 493 by a cysteine in the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Allelic discrimination analyses revealed that the R493C mutation occurred on both alleles. In the absence of GCs, the GR in EL4 cells localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and upon dexamethasone treatment underwent nuclear translocation, suggesting that the ligand binding ability of the GR in EL4 cells was intact. In transient transfection assays, the R493C mutant could not transactivate the MMTV-luciferase reporter. Site-directed mutagenesis to revert the R493C mutation restored the transactivation activity. Cotransfection experiments showed that the R493C mutant did not inhibit the transcriptional activities of the wild-type GR. In addition, the R493C mutant did not repress either the AP-1 or NF-κB reporters as effectively as WT GR. Furthermore, stable expression of the WT GR in the EL4 cells enabled GC-mediated gene regulation, specifically upregulation of IκBα and downregulation of interferon γ and interleukin 17A. Arginine 493 is conserved among multiple species and all human nuclear receptors and its mutation has also been found in the human GR, androgen receptor, and mineralocorticoid receptor. Thus, R493 is necessary for the transcriptional activity of the GR and a hotspot for mutations that result in GC resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An amphioxus RAG1-like DNA fragment encodes a functional central domain of vertebrate core RAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanni; Xu, Ke; Deng, Anqi; Fu, Xing; Xu, Anlong; Liu, Xiaolong

    2014-01-07

    The highly diversified repertoire of antigen receptors in the vertebrate immune system is generated via proteins encoded by the recombination activating genes (RAGs) RAG1 and RAG2 by a process known as variable, diversity, and joining [V(D)J] gene recombination. Based on the study of vertebrate RAG proteins, many hypotheses have been proposed regarding the origin and evolution of RAG. This issue remains unresolved, leaving a significant gap in our understanding of the evolution of adaptive immunity. Here, we show that the amphioxus genome contains an ancient RAG1-like DNA fragment (bfRAG1L) that encodes a virus-related protein that is much shorter than vertebrate RAG1 and harbors a region homologous to the central domain of core RAG1 (cRAG1). bfRAG1L also contains an unexpected retroviral type II nuclease active site motif, DXN(D/E)XK, and is capable of degrading both DNA and RNA. Moreover, bfRAG1L shares important functional properties with the central domain of cRAG1, including interaction with RAG2 and localization to the nucleus. Remarkably, the reconstitution of bfRAG1L into a cRAG1-like protein yielded an enzyme capable of recognizing recombination signal sequences and performing V(D)J recombination in the presence of mouse RAG2. Moreover, this reconstituted cRAG1-like protein could mediate the assembly of antigen receptor genes in RAG1-deficient mice. Together, our results demonstrate that amphioxus bfRAG1L encodes a protein that is functionally equivalent to the central domain of cRAG1 and is well prepared for further evolution to mediate V(D)J recombination. Thus, our findings provide unique insights into the evolutionary origin of RAG1.

  14. Characterization of the p53 cistrome--DNA binding cooperativity dissects p53's tumor suppressor functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Schlereth

    Full Text Available p53 protects us from cancer by transcriptionally regulating tumor suppressive programs designed to either prevent the development or clonal expansion of malignant cells. How p53 selects target genes in the genome in a context- and tissue-specific manner remains largely obscure. There is growing evidence that the ability of p53 to bind DNA in a cooperative manner prominently influences target gene selection with activation of the apoptosis program being completely dependent on DNA binding cooperativity. Here, we used ChIP-seq to comprehensively profile the cistrome of p53 mutants with reduced or increased cooperativity. The analysis highlighted a particular relevance of cooperativity for extending the p53 cistrome to non-canonical binding sequences characterized by deletions, spacer insertions and base mismatches. Furthermore, it revealed a striking functional separation of the cistrome on the basis of cooperativity; with low cooperativity genes being significantly enriched for cell cycle and high cooperativity genes for apoptotic functions. Importantly, expression of high but not low cooperativity genes was correlated with superior survival in breast cancer patients. Interestingly, in contrast to most p53-activated genes, p53-repressed genes did not commonly contain p53 binding elements. Nevertheless, both the degree of gene activation and repression were cooperativity-dependent, suggesting that p53-mediated gene repression is largely indirect and mediated by cooperativity-dependently transactivated gene products such as CDKN1A, E2F7 and non-coding RNAs. Since both activation of apoptosis genes with non-canonical response elements and repression of pro-survival genes are crucial for p53's apoptotic activity, the cistrome analysis comprehensively explains why p53-induced apoptosis, but not cell cycle arrest, strongly depends on the intermolecular cooperation of p53 molecules as a possible safeguard mechanism protecting from accidental cell

  15. Phenolic extracts of brewers' spent grain (BSG) as functional ingredients - assessment of their DNA protective effect against oxidant-induced DNA single strand breaks in U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Aoife L; O'Callaghan, Yvonne C; Connolly, Alan; Piggott, Charles O; Fitzgerald, Richard J; O'Brien, Nora M

    2012-09-15

    Brewers' spent grain (BSG), a by-product of the brewing industry, contains high amounts of phenolic acids, which have antioxidant effects. The present study examined the ability of BSG extracts to protect against the genotoxic effects of oxidants, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1), 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO) and tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) in U937 cells. Four pale (P1-P4) and four black (B1-B4) BSG extracts were investigated. U937 cells were pre-incubated with BSG extracts, exposed to the oxidants and the DNA damage was measured by the Comet assay. The black BSG extracts (B1-B4) significantly protected against H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage. Extract B2, which had the highest phenol content, provided the greatest protection. Extracts P2, B2, B3 and B4 provided significant protection against SIN-1-induced DNA damage. None of the extracts protected against DNA damage induced by t-BOOH and 4-NQO. The DNA protective effects of the BSG phenolic extracts may be related to iron chelation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of acupuncture on cognitive function and markers of oxidative DNA damage in patients with vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-xia; Liu, Cun-zhi; Li, Qian-qian; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lin-peng

    2012-06-01

    To test the influence of acupuncture on cognitive function and a marker of oxidative DNA damage in patients with vascular dementia (VD). Sixteen VD patients were evaluated before and after acupuncture, using the Folstein mini-mental state examination-revised (MMSE-R) to assess cognitive function, and the ADL-R scale to assess independence in activities of daily living (ADL). Life quality was evaluated using the DEMQOL (Dementia quality of life questionnaire) questionnaire, and syndromes and expression of vascular dementia were evaluated with the Scale for the differentiation of syndromes of vascular dementia (SDSVD). In addition, the urine concentration of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)--a marker of oxidative damage--was quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The MMSE-R and DEMQOL scores were higher after acupuncture than before (P 0.05). The 8-OHdG content in urine significantly decreased after acupuncture (P Acupuncture reduces the levels of 8-OHdG and improves cognitive function and quality of life in VD patients, suggesting that acupuncture is beneficial at least in part by preventing oxidative damage.

  17. Human Rad51 filaments on double- and single-stranded DNA : Correlating regular and irregular forms with recombination function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristic, D.; Modesti, M.; Van der Heijden, T.; Van Noort, J.; Dekker, C.; Kanaar, R.; Wyman, C.

    Recombinase proteins assembled into helical filaments on DNA are believed to be the catalytic core of homologous recombination. The assembly, disassembly and dynamic rearrangements of this structure must drive the DNA strand exchange reactions of homologous recombination. The sensitivity of

  18. Hybridization State Detection of DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Murdock

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging has the unique ability of capturing spectral data for multiple wavelengths at each pixel in an image. This gives the ability to distinguish, with certainty, different nanomaterials and/or distinguish nanomaterials from biological materials. In this study, 4 nm and 13 nm gold nanoparticles (Au NPs were synthesized, functionalized with complimentary oligonucleotides, and hybridized to form large networks of NPs. Scattering spectra were collected from each sample (unfunctionalized, functionalized, and hybridized and evaluated. The spectra showed unique peaks for each size of Au NP sample and also exhibited narrowing and intensifying of the spectra as the NPs were functionalized and then subsequently hybridized. These spectra are different from normal aggregation effects where the LSPR and reflected spectrum broaden and are red-shifted. Rather, this appears to be dependent on the ability to control the interparticle distance through oligonucleotide length, which is also investigated through the incorporation of a poly-A spacer. Also, hybridized Au NPs were exposed to cells with no adverse effects and retained their unique spectral signatures. With the ability to distinguish between hybridization states at nearly individual NP levels, this could provide a new method of tracking the intracellular actions of nanomaterials as well as extracellular biosensing applications.

  19. DNA in a Tunnel: A Comfy Spot for Recognition - or -The Structure of BsoBI Complexed with DNA. What can we Learn about Function via Structure Determination and how can this be Applied to Bone or Muscle Biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The structure and function of a biologically active molecule are related. To understand its function, it is necessary (but not always sufficient) to know the structure of the molecule. There are many ways of relating the molecular function with the structure. Mutation analysis can identify pertinent amino acids of an enzyme, or alternatively structure comparison of the of two similar molecules with different function may lead to understanding which parts are responsible for a functional aspect, or a series of "structural cartoons" - enzyme structure, enzyme plus substrate, enzyme with transition state analog, and enzyme with product - may give insight in the function of a molecule. As an example we will discuss the structure and function of the restriction enzyme BsoBI from Bacillus stearothemzophilus in complex with its cognate DNA. The enzyme forms a unique complex with DNA in that it completely encircles the DNA. The structure reveals the enzyme-DNA contacts, how the DNA is distorted compared with the canonical forms, and elegantly shows how two distinct DNA sequences can be recognized with the same efficiency. Based on the structure we may also propose a hypothesis how the enzymatic mechanism works. The knowledge gained thru studies such as this one can be used to alter the function by changing the molecular structure. Usually this is done by design of inhibitors specifically active against and fitting into an active site of the enzyme of choice. In the case of BsoBI one of the objectives of the study was to alter the enzyme specificity. In bone biology there are many candidates available for molecular study in order to explain, alter, or (temporarily) suspend activity. For example, the understanding of a pathway that negatively regulates bone formation may be a good target for drug design to stimulate bone formation and have good potential as the basis for new countermeasures against bone loss. In principle the same approach may aid muscle atrophy, radiation

  20. Crystal structure of the WOPR-DNA complex and implications for Wor1 function in white-opaque switching of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shicheng; Zhang, Tianlong; Yan, Minghui; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Jiangye

    2014-09-01

    Wor1 (white-opaque switching regulator 1) is a master regulator of the white-opaque switching in Candida albicans, an opportunistic human fungal pathogen, and is associated with its pathogenicity and commensality. Wor1 contains a conserved DNA-binding region at the N-terminus, consisting of two conserved segments (WOPRa and WOPRb) connected by a non-conserved linker that can bind to specific DNA sequences of the promoter regions and then regulates the transcription. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C. albicans Wor1 WOPR segments in complex with a double-stranded DNA corresponding to one promoter region of WOR1. The sequentially separated WOPRa and WOPRb are structurally interwound together to form a compact globular domain that we term the WOPR domain. The WOPR domain represents a new conserved fungal-specific DNA-binding domain which uses primarily a conserved loop to recognize and interact specifically with a conserved 6-bp motif of the DNA in both minor and major grooves. The protein-DNA interactions are essential for WOR1 transcriptional regulation and white-to-opaque switching. The structural and biological data together reveal the molecular basis for the recognition and binding specificity of the WOPR domain with its specific DNA sequences and the function of Wor1 in the activation of transcription.

  1. A Novel Aspect of Tumorigenesis?BMI1 Functions in Regulating DNA Damage Response

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Ojo, Diane; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; Gu, Yan; Tang, Damu

    2015-01-01

    BMI1 plays critical roles in maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic, neural, intestinal stem cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) for a variety of cancer types. BMI1 promotes cell proliferative life span and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Upregulation of BMI1 occurs in multiple cancer types and is associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistically, BMI1 is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), and binds the catalytic RING2/RING1b subunit to form a functional E...

  2. uvsF RFC1, the large subunit of replication factor C in Aspergillus nidulans, is essential for DNA replication, functions in UV repair and is upregulated in response to MMS-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafer, Etta; Chae, Suhn-Kee

    2008-09-01

    uvsF201 was the first highly UV-sensitive repair-defective mutation isolated in Aspergillus nidulans. It showed epistasis only with postreplication repair mutations, but caused lethal interactions with many other repair-defective strains. Unexpectedly, closest homology of uvsF was found to the large subunit of human DNA replication factor RFC that is essential for DNA replication. Sequencing of the uvsF201 region identified changes at two close base pairs and the corresponding amino acids in the 5'-region of uvsF(RFC1). This viable mutant represents a novel and possibly important type. Additional sequencing of the uvsF region confirmed a mitochondrial ribosomal protein gene, mrpA(L16), closely adjacent, head-to-head with a 0.2kb joint promoter region. MMS-induced transcription of both the genes, but especially uvsF(RFC1), providing evidence for a function in DNA damage response.

  3. A Viral Satellite DNA Vector (TYLCCNV) for Functional Analysis of miRNAs and siRNAs in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zheng; Cao, Dongyan; Gao, Chao; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhai, Baiqiang; Li, Shan; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2017-04-01

    With experimental and bioinformatical methods, numerous small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), have been found in plants, and they play vital roles in various biological regulation processes. However, most of these small RNAs remain to be functionally characterized. Until now, only several viral vectors were developed to overexpress miRNAs with limited application in plants. In this study, we report a new small RNA overexpression system via viral satellite DNA associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) vector, which could highly overexpress not only artificial and endogenous miRNAs but also endogenous siRNAs in Nicotiana benthamiana First, we constructed basic TYLCCNV-amiRPDS(319L) vector with widely used AtMIR319a backbone, but the expected photobleaching phenotype was very weak. Second, through comparing the effect of backbones ( AtMIR319a , AtMIR390a , and SlMIR159 ) on specificity and significance of generating small RNAs, the AtMIR390a backbone was optimally selected to construct the small RNA overexpression system. Third, through sRNA-Seq and Degradome-Seq, the small RNAs from AtMIR390a backbone in TYLCCNV-amiRPDS(390) vector were confirmed to highly overexpress amiRPDS and specifically silence targeted PDS gene. Using this system, rapid functional analysis of endogenous miRNAs and siRNAs was carried out, including miR156 and athTAS3a 5'D8(+). Meanwhile, through designing corresponding artificial miRNAs, this system could also significantly silence targeted endogenous genes and show specific phenotypes, including PDS , Su , and PCNA These results demonstrated that this small RNA overexpression system could contribute to investigating not only the function of endogenous small RNAs, but also the functional genes in plants. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Unbiased mutagenesis of MHV68 LANA reveals a DNA-binding domain required for LANA function in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton R Paden

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA, encoded by ORF73, is a conserved gene among the γ2-herpesviruses (rhadinoviruses. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV LANA is consistently expressed in KSHV-associated malignancies. In the case of the rodent γ2-herpesvirus, murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68, the LANA homolog (mLANA is required for efficient virus replication, reactivation from latency and immortalization of murine fetal liver-derived B cells. To gain insights into mLANA function(s, knowing that KSHV LANA binds DNA and can modulate transcription of a variety of promoters, we sought out and identified a mLANA-responsive promoter which maps to the terminal repeat (TR of MHV68. Notably, mLANA strongly repressed activity from this promoter. We extended these analyses to demonstrate direct, sequence-specific binding of recombinant mLANA to TR DNA by DNase I footprinting. To assess whether the DNA-binding and/or transcription modulating function is important in the known mLANA phenotypes, we generated an unbiased library of mLANA point mutants using error-prone PCR, and screened a large panel of mutants for repression of the mLANA-responsive promoter to identify loss of function mutants. Notably, among the mutant mLANA proteins recovered, many of the mutations are in a predicted EBNA-1-like DNA-binding domain. Consistent with this prediction, those tested displayed loss of DNA binding activity. We engineered six of these mLANA mutants into the MHV68 genome and tested the resulting mutant viruses for: (i replication fitness; (ii efficiency of latency establishment; and (iii reactivation from latency. Interestingly, each of these mLANA-mutant viruses exhibited phenotypes similar to the mLANA-null mutant virus, indicating that DNA-binding is critical for mLANA function.

  5. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  6. [Cloning and functional characterization of a cDNA encoding isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase involved in taxol biosynthesis in Taxus media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tian; Qiu, Fei; Chen, Min; Lan, Xiao-zhong; Liao, Zhi-hua

    2015-05-01

    Taxol is one of the most potent anti-cancer agents, which is extracted from the plants of Taxus species. Isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IPI) catalyzes the reversible transformation between IPP and DMAPP, both of which are the general 5-carbon precursors for taxol biosynthesis. In the present study, a new gene encoding IPI was cloned from Taxus media (namely TmIPI with the GenBank Accession Number KP970677) for the first time. The full-length cDNA of TmIPI was 1 232 bps encoding a polypeptide with 233 amino acids, in which the conserved domain Nudix was found. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the sequence of TmIPI was highly similar to those of other plant IPI proteins, and the phylogenetic analysis showed that there were two clades of plant IPI proteins, including IPIs of angiosperm plants and IPIs of gymnosperm plants. TmIPI belonged to the clade of gymnosperm plant IPIs, and this was consistent with the fact that Taxus media is a plant species of gymnosperm. Southern blotting analysis demonstrated that there was a gene family of IPI in Taxus media. Finally, functional verification was applied to identify the function of TmIPI. The results showed that biosynthesis of β-carotenoid was enhanced by overexpressing TmIPI in the engineered E. coli strain, and this suggested that TmIPI might be a key gene involved in isoprenoid/terpenoid biosynthesis.

  7. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2- or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2′-alkylated RNA monomers†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas S.; Guenther, Dale C.; Gibbons, Bradley C.; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, polyamides and - more recently - engineered proteins, there remains an urgent need for synthetic ligands that enable specific recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA to accelerate studies aiming at detecting, regulating and modifying genes. Invaders, i.e., energetically activated DNA duplexes with interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides, are emerging as an attractive approach toward this goal. Here, we characterize and compare Invaders based on 1-, 2- and 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2′-alkylated uridine monomers X–Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA hairpins with single nucleotide fidelity. Intercalator-mediated unwinding and activation of the double-stranded probe, coupled with extraordinary stabilization of probe-target duplexes (ΔTm/modification up to +14.0 °C), provides the driving force for dsDNA recognition. In contrast, Z-modified Invaders show much lower dsDNA recognition efficiency. Thus, even very conservative changes in the chemical makeup of the intercalator-functionalized nucleotides used to activate Invader duplexes, affects dsDNA-recognition efficiency of the probes, which highlights the importance of systematic structure-property studies. The insight from this study will guide future design of Invaders for applications in molecular biology and nucleic acid diagnostics. PMID:25144705

  8. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  9. Assessment of sperm function parameters and DNA fragmentation in ejaculated alpaca sperm (Lama pacos) by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuquemán, C; Merino, O; Giojalas, L; Von Baer, A; Sánchez, R; Risopatrón, J

    2013-06-01

    Flow cytometry has been shown to be an accurate and highly reproducible tool for the analysis of sperm function. The main objective of this study was to assess sperm function parameters in ejaculated alpaca sperm by flow cytometry. Semen samples were collected from six alpaca males and processed for flow cytometric analysis of sperm viability and plasma membrane integrity using SYBR-14⁄PI staining; acrosomal membrane integrity using FITC-conjugated Pisum Sativum Agglutinin⁄PI labelling; mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) by staining with JC-1 and DNA Fragmentation Index (DFI) by TUNEL. The results indicate that the mean value for sperm viability was 57 ± 8 %. Spermatozoa with intact acrosome membrane was 87.9 ± 5%, and viable sperm with intact acrosomal membrane was 46.8 ± 9%, high mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was detected in 66.32 ± 9.51% of spermatozoa and mean DFI value was 0.91 ± 0.9%. The DFI was inversely correlated with high Δψm (p = 0.04; r = -0.41) and with plasma membrane integrity (p = 0.01; r = -0.47). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the assessment on the same sample of several parameters of sperm function in ejaculated alpaca sperm by flow cytometry. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Response to Comments on "The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport".

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Elizabeth; Holt, Marilyn E; Thompson, Matthew K; Salay, Lauren E; Ehlinger, Aaron C; Chazin, Walter J; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2017-07-21

    Baranovskiy et al and Pellegrini argue that, based on structural data, the path for charge transfer through the [4Fe4S] domain of primase is not feasible. Our manuscript presents electrochemical data directly showing charge transport through DNA to the [4Fe4S] cluster of a primase p58C construct and a reversible switch in the DNA-bound signal with oxidation/reduction, which is inhibited by mutation of three tyrosine residues. Although the dispositions of tyrosines differ in different constructs, all are within range for microsecond electron transfer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  11. Real-Time Study of the Interaction between G-Rich DNA Oligonucleotides and Lead Ion on DNA Tetrahedron-Functionalized Sensing Platform by Dual Polarization Interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Lu, Shasha; Zhao, Jiahui; Huang, Jianshe; Yang, Xiurong

    2017-11-29

    G-quadruplex plays roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes of organisms. Due to the unique properties of G-quadruplex (e.g., forming G4/hemin complexes with catalytic activity and electron acceptability, binding with metal ions, proteins, fluorescent ligands, and so on), it has been widely applied in biosensing. But the formation process of G-quadruplex is not yet fully understood. Here, a DNA tetrahedron platform with higher reproducibility, regenerative ability, and time-saving building process was coupled with dual polarization interferometry technique for the real-time and label-free investigation of the specific interaction process of guanine-rich singled-stranded DNA (G-rich ssDNA) and Pb 2+ . The oriented immobilization of probes greatly decreased the spatial hindrance effect and improved the accessibility of the probes to the Pb 2+ ions. Through real-time monitoring of the whole formation process of the G-quadruplex, we speculated that the probes on the tetrahedron platform initially stood on the sensing surface with a random coil conformation, then the G-rich ssDNA preliminarily formed unstable G-quartets by H-bonding and cation binding, subsequently forming a completely folded and stable quadruplex structure through relatively slow strand rearrangements. On the basis of these studies, we also developed a novel sensing platform for the specific and sensitive determination of Pb 2+ and its chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. This study not only provides a proof-of-concept for conformational dynamics of G-quadruplex-related drugs and pathogenes, but also enriches the biosensor tools by combining nanomaterial with interfaces technique.

  12. G-Quadruplexes Involving Both Strands of Genomic DNA Are Highly Abundant and Colocalize with Functional Sites in the Human Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej S Kudlicki

    Full Text Available The G-quadruplex is a non-canonical DNA structure biologically significant in DNA replication, transcription and telomere stability. To date, only G4s with all guanines originating from the same strand of DNA have been considered in the context of the human nuclear genome. Here, I discuss interstrand topological configurations of G-quadruplex DNA, consisting of guanines from both strands of genomic DNA; an algorithm is presented for predicting such structures. I have identified over 550,000 non-overlapping interstrand G-quadruplex forming sequences in the human genome--significantly more than intrastrand configurations. Functional analysis of interstrand G-quadruplex sites shows strong association with transcription initiation, the results are consistent with the XPB and XPD transcriptional helicases binding only to G-quadruplex DNA with interstrand topology. Interstrand quadruplexes are also enriched in origin of replication sites. Several topology classes of interstrand quadruplex-forming sequences are possible, and different topologies are enriched in different types of structural elements. The list of interstrand quadruplex forming sequences, and the computer program used for their prediction are available at the web address http://moment.utmb.edu/allquads.

  13. Long-term Air Pollution Exposure, Genome-wide DNA Methylation and Lung Function in the LifeLines Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de F C Lichtenfels, Ana Julia; van der Plaat, Diana A; de Jong, Kim; van Diemen, Cleo C; Postma, Dirkje S; Nedeljkovic, Ivana; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Amin, Najaf; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; de Vries, Maaike; Ward-Caviness, Cavin K; Wolf, Kathrin; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Stolk, Ronald P; Brunekreef, Bert; Boezen, H Marike; Vonk, Judith M

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term air pollution exposure is negatively associated with lung function, yet the mechanisms underlying this association not fully clear. Differential DNA methylation may explain this association. OBJECTIVES: Our main aim was to study the association between long-term air pollution

  14. A functional IFN-λ4-generating DNA polymorphism could protect older asthmatic women from aeroallergen sensitization and associate with clinical features of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinnaswamy, Sreedhar; Wardzynska, Aleksandra; Pawelczyk, Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Lambda interferons (IFNLs) have immunomodulatory functions at epithelial barrier surfaces. IFN-λ4, a recent member of this family is expressed only in a subset of the population due to a frameshift-causing DNA polymorphism rs368234815. We examined the association of this polymorphism with atopy (...

  15. Long-term air pollution exposure, genome-wide DNA methylation and lung function in the LifeLines cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Long-term air pollution exposure is negatively associated with lung function, yet the mechanisms underlying this association are not·­ fully clear.Differential DNA methylation may explain this association. OBJECTIVES: Our main aim was to study the associati...

  16. Trans-activation function of a 3' truncated X gene-cell fusion product from integrated hepatitis B virus DNA in chronic hepatitis tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shinako; Koike, Katsuro

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the expression and transactivation function of the X gene in integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from chronic hepatitis tissues, a series of transfectants containing cloned integrated HBV DNAs was made and analyzed for X mRNA expression and trans-activation activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Most of the integrated HBV DNAs expressed X mRNA and encoded a product with trans-activation activity in spite of the loss of the 3' end region of the X gene due to integration. From cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of X mRNA transcribed from native or integrated HBV DNA, the X protein was found to be translated from the X open reading frame without splicing. For integrated HBV DNA, transcription was extended to a cellular flanking DNA and an X gene-cell fusion transcript was terminated by using a cellular poly(A) signal. The amino acid sequence deduced from an X-cell fusion transcript indicated truncation of the carboxyl-terminal five amino acids, but the upstream region of seven amino acids conserved among hepadnaviruses was retained in the integrated HBV DNA, suggesting that this conserved region is essential for the transactivation function of the X protein. These findings support the following explanation for hepatocarcinogenesis by HBV DNA integration: the expression of a cellular oncogene(s) is transactivated at the time of chronic infection by the increasing amounts of the integrated HBV gene product(s), such as the X-cell fusion product

  17. ATP- and NAD+-dependent DNA ligases share an essential function in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, A.; Gray, F. C; MacNeill, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligases join the ends of DNA molecules during replication, repair and recombination. ATP-dependent ligases are found predominantly in the eukarya and archaea whereas NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found only in the eubacteria and in entomopoxviruses. Using the genetically tractable halophile....... volcanii also encodes an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase family member, LigN, the first such enzyme to be identified in the archaea, and present phylogenetic analysis indicating that the gene encoding this protein has been acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT) from eubacteria. As with LigA, we show that Lig...

  18. Effect of transfection and co-incubation of bovine sperm with exogenous DNA on sperm quality and functional parameters for its use in sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, María Elena; Sánchez-Villalba, Esther; Delgado, Andrea; Felmer, Ricardo

    2017-02-01

    Sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is based on the capacity of sperm to bind exogenous DNA and transfer it into the oocyte during fertilization. In bovines, the progress of this technology has been slow due to the poor reproducibility and efficiency of the production of transgenic embryos. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different sperm transfection systems on the quality and functional parameters of sperm. Additionally, the ability of sperm to bind and incorporate exogenous DNA was assessed. These analyses were carried out by flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy, and motility parameters were also evaluated by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). Transfection was carried out using complexes of plasmid DNA with Lipofectamine, SuperFect and TurboFect for 0.5, 1, 2 or 4 h. The results showed that all of the transfection treatments promoted sperm binding and incorporation of exogenous DNA, similar to sperm incorporation of DNA alone, without affecting the viability. Nevertheless, the treatments and incubation times significantly affected the motility parameters, although no effect on the integrity of DNA or the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed. Additionally, we observed that transfection using SuperFect and TurboFect negatively affected the acrosome integrity, and TurboFect affected the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm. In conclusion, we demonstrated binding and incorporation of exogenous DNA by sperm after transfection and confirmed the capacity of sperm to spontaneously incorporate exogenous DNA. These findings will allow the establishment of the most appropriate method [intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF)] of generating transgenic embryos via SMGT based on the fertilization capacity of transfected sperm.

  19. Rad4 mainly functions in Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint pathway as a scaffold protein in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yue

    Full Text Available Rad4/Cut5 is a scaffold protein in the Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint in S. pombe. However, whether it contains a robust ATR-activation domain (AAD required for checkpoint signaling like its orthologs TopBP1 in humans and Dpb11 in budding yeast has been incompletely clear. To identify the putative AAD in Rad4, we carried out an extensive genetic screen looking for novel mutants with an enhanced sensitivity to replication stress or DNA damage in which the function of the AAD can be eliminated by the mutations. Two new mutations near the N-terminus were identified that caused significantly higher sensitivities to DNA damage or chronic replication stress than all previously reported mutants, suggesting that most of the checkpoint function of the protein is eliminated. However, these mutations did not affect the activation of Rad3 (ATR in humans yet eliminated the scaffolding function of the protein required for the activation of Chk1. Several mutations were also identified in or near the recently reported AAD in the C-terminus of Rad4. However, all mutations in the C-terminus only slightly sensitized the cells to DNA damage. Interestingly, a mutant lacking the whole C-terminus was found resistant to DNA damage and replication stress almost like the wild type cells. Consistent with the resistance, all known Rad3 dependent phosphorylations of checkpoint proteins remained intact in the C-terminal deletion mutant, indicating that unlike that in Dpb11, the C-terminus of Rad4 does not contain a robust AAD. These results, together with those from the biochemical studies, show that Rad4 mainly functions as a scaffold protein in the Chk1, not the Cds1(CHK2 in humans, checkpoint pathway. It plays a minor role or is functionally redundant with an unknown factor in Rad3 activation.

  20. Identification and functional analysis of a new glyphosate resistance gene from a fungus cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Bo; Shao, Bai-Hui; Qiao, Yu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Chang, Shu-Jun; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2017-08-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used broad spectrum herbicide; however, this limits its use once crops are planted. If glyphosate-resistant crops are grown, glyphosate can be used for weed control in crops. While several glyphosate resistance genes are used in commercial glyphosate tolerant crops, there is interest in identifying additional genes for glyphosate tolerance. This research constructed a high-quality cDNA library form the glyphosate-resistant fungus Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 to identify genes that may confer resistance to glyphosate. Using a medium containing glyphosate (120mM), we screened several clones from the library. Based on a nucleotide sequence analysis, we identified a gene of unknown function (GenBank accession number: XM_001826835.2) that encoded a hypothetical 344-amino acid protein. The gene was named MFS40. Its ORF was amplified to construct an expression vector, pGEX-4T-1-MFS40, to express the protein in Escherichia coli BL21. The gene conferred glyphosate tolerance to E. coli ER2799 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional genomics indicates yeast requires Golgi/ER transport, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair for low dose DMSO tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon David Gaytán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO is frequently utilized as a solvent in toxicological and pharmaceutical investigations. It is therefore important to establish the cellular and molecular targets of DMSO in order to differentiate its intrinsic effects from those elicited by a compound of interest. We performed a genome-wide functional screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify deletion mutants exhibiting sensitivity to 1% DMSO, a concentration standard to yeast chemical profiling studies. We report that mutants defective in Golgi/ER transport are sensitive to DMSO, including those lacking components of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG complex. Moreover, strains deleted for members of the SWR1 histone exchange complex are hypersensitive to DMSO, with additional chromatin remodeling mutants displaying a range of growth defects. We also identify DNA repair genes important for DMSO tolerance. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of histone H2A.Z, which replaces chromatin-associated histone H2A in a SWR1-catalyzed reaction, confers resistance to DMSO. Many yeast genes described in this study have homologs in more complex organisms, and the data provided is applicable to future investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DMSO toxicity.

  2. Detecting variants with Metabolic Design, a new software tool to design probes for explorative functional DNA microarray development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravelat Fabrice

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microorganisms display vast diversity, and each one has its own set of genes, cell components and metabolic reactions. To assess their huge unexploited metabolic potential in different ecosystems, we need high throughput tools, such as functional microarrays, that allow the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes. However, most classical functional microarrays use specific probes that monitor only known sequences, and so fail to cover the full microbial gene diversity present in complex environments. We have thus developed an algorithm, implemented in the user-friendly program Metabolic Design, to design efficient explorative probes. Results First we have validated our approach by studying eight enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the model strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis sp. EPA505 using a designed microarray of 8,048 probes. As expected, microarray assays identified the targeted set of genes induced during biodegradation kinetics experiments with various pollutants. We have then confirmed the identity of these new genes by sequencing, and corroborated the quantitative discrimination of our microarray by quantitative real-time PCR. Finally, we have assessed metabolic capacities of microbial communities in soil contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. Results show that our probe design (sensitivity and explorative quality can be used to study a complex environment efficiently. Conclusions We successfully use our microarray to detect gene expression encoding enzymes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation for the model strain. In addition, DNA microarray experiments performed on soil polluted by organic pollutants without prior sequence assumptions demonstrate high specificity and sensitivity for gene detection. Metabolic Design is thus a powerful, efficient tool that can be used to design explorative probes and monitor metabolic pathways in complex environments

  3. Engineering of DNA templated tri-functional nano-chain of Fecore–Aushell and a preliminary study for cancer cell labeling and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Mandal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Here DNA has been used as templating and self-assembling reagent to grow the chain like nanostructure. We have designed the composite in such a fashion that we obtained optical and magnetic properties together in a single biological material. Optical properties characterized by UV–visible absorption, Circular Dichroism (CD and their analysis show no denaturization of DNA. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM indicate formation of chain like structure of the nanoparticles. Particles were functionalized with folic acid for labeling and treatment of cancer cell.

  4. Human Rad51 filaments on double- and single-stranded DNA: correlating regular and irregular forms with recombination function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Ristic (Dejan); M. Modesti (Mauro); T. van der Heijden (Thijn); J. Noort (John); C. Dekker (Cees); R. Kanaar (Roland); C. Wyman (Claire)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRecombinase proteins assembled into helical filaments on DNA are believed to be the catalytic core of homologous recombination. The assembly, disassembly and dynamic rearrangements of this structure must drive the DNA strand exchange reactions of homologous recombination. The sensitivity

  5. Functional anatomy of the immunoglobulin heavy chain 3΄ super-enhancer needs not only core enhancer elements but also their unique DNA context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Noir, Sandrine; Boyer, François; Lecardeur, Sandrine; Brousse, Mylène; Oruc, Zeliha; Cook-Moreau, Jeanne; Denizot, Yves; Cogné, Michel

    2017-06-02

    Cis-regulatory elements feature clustered sites for transcription factors, defining core enhancers and have inter-species homology. The mouse IgH 3΄ regulatory region (3'RR), a major B-cell super-enhancer, consists of four of such core enhancers, scattered throughout more than 25 kb of packaging 'junk DNA', the sequence of which is not conserved but follows a unique palindromic architecture which is conserved in all mammalian species. The 3'RR promotes long-range interactions and potential IgH loops with upstream promoters, controlling class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). It was thus of interest to determine whether this functional architecture also involves the specific functional structure of the super-enhancer itself, potentially promoted by its symmetric DNA shell. Since many transgenic 3'RR models simply linked core enhancers without this shell, it was also important to compare such a 'core 3'RR' (c3'RR) with the intact full-length super-enhancer in an actual endogenous IgH context. Packaging DNA between 3'RR core enhancers proved in fact to be necessary for optimal SHM, CSR and IgH locus expression in plasma cells. This reveals that packaging DNA can matter in the functional anatomy of a super-enhancer, and that precise evaluation of such elements requires full consideration of their global architecture. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Comment on "The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Luca

    2017-07-21

    O'Brien et al (Research Article, 24 February 2017, eaag1789) report that the iron-sulfur cluster of primase has a redox role in enzyme activity. Their analysis is based on a partially misfolded structure of the iron-sulfur cluster domain of primase. In the correctly folded structure, two of the three tyrosines putatively involved in electron transfer, Y345 and Y347, contact the RNA/DNA helix, providing an alternative explanation for the data of O'Brien et al . Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Structural and Functional Analysis of the H19Y Mutated Primary DNA Recognition Subdomain of Sleeping Beauty Transposase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Gage O.

    The Sleeping Beauty transposon system, consisting of the transposon DNA and the transposase enzyme, is a member of the Tc1/mariner family of DNA transposons. Although it is an important tool in genetic applications and has been adapted for human gene therapy, its molecular mechanism remains obscure. Here, we use an experimental biophysics approach to study the molecular mechanism of the Sleeping Beauty transposon. We investigate the folding of the specific DNA recognition subdomain of the Sleeping Beauty transposase, the PAI subdomain. We show that only the folded PAI binds to DNA, however the amount of unfolded conformation is significant at close to physiologic conditions. We identify amino acid substitutions that result in stabilization of its folded conformation. Overall, our results provide a mechanistic insight into DNA recognition by the Sleeping Beauty transposase and suggest modifications to improve its activity.

  8. RNA binding to APOBEC3G induces the disassembly of functional deaminase complexes by displacing single-stranded DNA substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polevoda, Bogdan; McDougall, William M.; Tun, Bradley N.; Cheung, Michael; Salter, Jason D.; Friedman, Alan E.; Smith, Harold C.

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) DNA deaminase activity requires a holoenzyme complex whose assembly on nascent viral reverse transcripts initiates with A3G dimers binding to ssDNA followed by formation of higher-order A3G homo oligomers. Catalytic activity is inhibited when A3G binds to RNA. Our prior studies suggested that RNA inhibited A3G binding to ssDNA. In this report, near equilibrium binding and gel shift analyses showed that A3G assembly and disassembly on ssDNA was an ordered process involving A3G dimers and multimers thereof. Although, fluorescence anisotropy showed that A3G had similar nanomolar affinity for RNA and ssDNA, RNA stochastically dissociated A3G dimers and higher-order oligomers from ssDNA, suggesting a different modality for RNA binding. Mass spectrometry mapping of A3G peptides cross-linked to nucleic acid suggested ssDNA only bound to three peptides, amino acids (aa) 181–194 in the N-terminus and aa 314–320 and 345–374 in the C-terminus that were part of a continuous exposed surface. RNA bound to these peptides and uniquely associated with three additional peptides in the N- terminus, aa 15–29, 41–52 and 83–99, that formed a continuous surface area adjacent to the ssDNA binding surface. The data predict a mechanistic model of RNA inhibition of ssDNA binding to A3G in which competitive and allosteric interactions determine RNA-bound versus ssDNA-bound conformational states. PMID:26424853

  9. Functional studies of ssDNA binding ability of MarR family protein TcaR from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available The negative transcription regulator of the ica locus, TcaR, regulates proteins involved in the biosynthesis of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG. Absence of TcaR increases PNAG production and promotes biofilm formation in Staphylococci. Previously, the 3D structure of TcaR in its apo form and its complex structure with several antibiotics have been analyzed. However, the detailed mechanism of multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR family proteins such as TcaR is unclear and only restricted on the binding ability of double-strand DNA (dsDNA. Here we show by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, electron microscopy (EM, circular dichroism (CD, and Biacore analysis that TcaR can interact strongly with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, thereby identifying a new role in MarR family proteins. Moreover, we show that TcaR preferentially binds 33-mer ssDNA over double-stranded DNA and inhibits viral ssDNA replication. In contrast, such ssDNA binding properties were not observed for other MarR family protein and TetR family protein, suggesting that the results from our studies are not an artifact due to simple charge interactions between TcaR and ssDNA. Overall, these results suggest a novel role for TcaR in regulation of DNA replication. We anticipate that the results of this work will extend our understanding of MarR family protein and broaden the development of new therapeutic strategies for Staphylococci.

  10. Functional roles of the DNA-binding HMGB domain in the histone chaperone FACT in nucleosome reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laura L; Connell, Zaily; Xin, Hua; Studitsky, Vasily M; Feofanov, Alexey V; Valieva, Maria E; Formosa, Tim

    2018-03-07

    The essential histone chaperone FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription (FACT) promotes both nucleosome assembly and disassembly. FACT is a heterodimer of Spt16 with either SSRP1 or Pob3, differing primarily by the presence of a high-mobility group B (HMGB) DNA-binding domain furnished only by SSRP1. Yeast FACT lacks the intrinsic HMGB domain found in SSRP1-based homologs such as human FACT, but yeast FACT activity is supported by Nhp6, which is a freestanding, single HMGB domain protein. The importance of histone binding by FACT domains has been established, but the roles of DNA binding activity remain poorly understood. Here, we examined these roles by fusing single or multiple HMGB modules to Pob3 to mimic SSRP1 or to test the effects of extended DNA-binding capacity. Human FACT and a yeast mimic both required Nhp6 to support nucleosome reorganization in vitro, indicating that a single intrinsic DNA-binding HMGB module is insufficient for full FACT activity. Three fused HMGB modules supported activity without Nhp6 assistance, but this FACT variant did not efficiently release from nucleosomes and was toxic in vivo. Notably, intrinsic DNA-binding HMGB modules reduced the DNA accessibility and histone H2A-H2B dimer loss normally associated with nucleosome reorganization. We propose that DNA bending by HMGB domains promotes nucleosome destabilization and reorganization by exposing FACT's histone binding sites, but DNA bending also produces DNA curvature needed to accommodate nucleosome assembly. Intrinsic DNA bending activity therefore favors nucleosome assembly by FACT over nucleosome reorganization, but excessive activity impairs FACT release, suggesting a quality control checkpoint during nucleosome assembly. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. DNA nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Nadrian C Seeman

    2003-01-01

    Since Watson and Crick’s determination of its structure nearly 50 years ago, DNA has come to fill our lives in many areas, from genetic counseling to forensics, from genomics to gene therapy. These, and other ways in which DNA affects human activities, are related to its function as genetic material, not just our genetic material, but the genetic material of all living organisms. Here, we will ignore DNA’s biological role; rather, we will discuss how the properties that make it so successful ...

  12. Insights into the functional characteristics of geminivirus rolling-circle replication initiator protein and its interaction with host factors affecting viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Irum; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-02-01

    Geminiviruses are DNA viruses that infect several economically important crops, resulting in a reduction in their overall yield. These plant viruses have circular, single-stranded DNA genomes that replicate mainly by a rolling-circle mechanism. Geminivirus infection results in crosstalk between viral and cellular factors to complete the viral life cycle or counteract the infection as part of defense mechanisms of host plants. The geminiviral replication initiator protein Rep is the only essential viral factor required for replication. It is multifunctional and is known to interact with a number of host factors to modulate the cellular environment or to function as a part of the replication machinery. This review provides a holistic view of the research related to the viral Rep protein and various host factors involved in geminiviral DNA replication. Studies on the promiscuous nature of geminiviral satellite DNAs are also reviewed.

  13. EFFECT OF PROSTATILEN® AC ON SPERM DNA FRAGMENTATION DURING TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC NONBACTERIAL PROSTATITIS AND CONCOMITANT DISORDERS OF THE REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Borovets

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study objective is to analyze the effect of Prostatilen® AC on sperm DNA fragmentation during treatment of patients with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis and concomitant disorders of the reproductive function.Materials and methods. The study is based on the results of treatment of 25 men aged 24 to 45 years (mean age 35.3 ± 4.4 years with a verified diagnosis of chronic nonbacterial prostatitis and complaints of early-stage missed miscarriage in a spouse/sexual partner. All patients received Prostatilen® AC daily in rectal suppositories formulation. The duration of treatment was 10 days with retreatment after 20 days. In all patients before treatment and 20 days after it, spermiogram parameters (5th ed., WHO, 2010 and sperm DNA fragmentation level using SCSA (sperm chromatin structure assay by FACSCantoll with monoclonal antibodies (Roche, Germany were determined, and all patients underwent the MAR (mixed antiglobulin reaction test with normal value considered to be 10 % or less. The normal value of sperm DNA fragmentation was considered to be 15 % or less (low risk of fertility impairment. The analysis of the obtained data was carried out using the IBM SPSS Statistics program 22.Results. Before the treatment, pathologic level of sperm DNA fragmentation was observed in 6 (43 % of 14 patients with normozoospermia and in 7 (63 % of 11 patients with pathozoospermia (χ² = 1.06; p <0.3. Thus, there weren’t any significant difference between the rates of occurrence of increased sperm DNA fragmentation in patients with normo- and pathozoospermia. A correlation was found between the level of sperm DNA fragmentation and the results of MAR test before treatment (r = 0.8, p <0.05, which varied between 0 and 99 % (mean 16.48 ± 31.64 %. Meanwhile, increased sperm DNA fragmentation was observed in 7 (53 % of 13 patients with pathological MAR test results, and in 2 (40 % of 5 patients with normal MAR test results (χ² = 0.67; p <0.01. The level

  14. CDK5-mediated phosphorylation of p19INK4d avoids DNA damage-induced neurodegeneration in mouse hippocampus and prevents loss of cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogara, María Florencia; Belluscio, Laura M; de la Fuente, Verónica; Berardino, Bruno G; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Byk, Laura; Marazita, Mariela; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2014-07-01

    DNA damage, which perturbs genomic stability, has been linked to cognitive decline in the aging human brain, and mutations in DNA repair genes have neurological implications. Several studies have suggested that DNA damage is also increased in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the precise mechanisms connecting DNA damage with neurodegeneration remain poorly understood. CDK5, a critical enzyme in the development of the central nervous system, phosphorylates a number of synaptic proteins and regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis, synaptic plasticity and learning. In addition to these physiological roles, CDK5 has been involved in the neuronal death initiated by DNA damage. We hypothesized that p19INK4d, a member of the cell cycle inhibitor family INK4, is involved in a neuroprotective mechanism activated in response to DNA damage. We found that in response to genotoxic injury or increased levels of intracellular calcium, p19INK4d is transcriptionally induced and phosphorylated by CDK5 which provides it with greater stability in postmitotic neurons. p19INK4d expression improves DNA repair, decreases apoptosis and increases neuronal survival under conditions of genotoxic stress. Our in vivo experiments showed that decreased levels of p19INK4d rendered hippocampal neurons more sensitive to genotoxic insult resulting in the loss of cognitive abilities that rely on the integrity of this brain structure. We propose a feedback mechanism by which the neurotoxic effects of CDK5-p25 activated by genotoxic stress or abnormal intracellular calcium levels are counteracted by the induction and stabilization of p19INK4d protein reducing the adverse consequences on brain functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Amplified amperometric aptasensor for selective detection of protein using catalase-functional DNA-PtNPs dendrimer as a synergetic signal amplification label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Yuan, Yali; biXie, Shun; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2014-10-15

    In this work, we present a new strategy to construct an electrochemical aptasensor for sensitive detection of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) based on the synergetic amplification of a three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale catalase (CAT) enzyme-functional DNA-platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) dendrimer through autonomous layer-by-layer assembly. Firstly, polyamidoaminedendrimer (PAMAM) with a hyper-branched and three-dimensional structure was served as nanocarriers to coimmobilize a large number of PDGF-BB binding aptamer (PBA II) and ssDNA 1 (S1) to form PBA II-PAMAM-S1 bioconjugate. In the presence of PDGF-BB, the bioconjugate was self-assembled on the electrode by sandwich assay. Following that, the carried S1 propagated a chain reaction of hybridization events between CAT-PtNPs-S1 and CAT-PtNPs-ssDNA 2 (S2) to form a 3D nanoscale CAT-functional PtNPs-DNA dendrimer, which successfully immobilized substantial CAT enzyme and PtNPs with superior catalysis activity. In this process, the formed negatively charged double-helix DNA could cause the intercalation of hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex) into the groove via electrostatic interactions. Thus, numerous RuHex redox probes and CAT were decorated inside/outside of the dendrimer. In the presence of H2O2 in electrolytic cell, the synergistic reaction of CAT and PtNPs towards electrocatalysis could further amplify electrochemical signal. Under optimal condition, the CAT-PtNPs-DNA dendrimer-based sensing system presented a linear dependence between the reduction peak currents and logarithm of PDGF-BB concentrations in the range of 0.00005-35 nM with a relatively low detection limit of 0.02 pM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure-function relationships in human testis-determining factor SRY: an aromatic buttress underlies the specific DNA-bending surface of a high mobility group (HMG) box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, Joseph D; Chen, Yen-Shan; Maloy, James D; Wickramasinghe, Nalinda; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A

    2014-11-21

    Human testis determination is initiated by SRY, a Y-encoded architectural transcription factor. Mutations in SRY cause 46 XY gonadal dysgenesis with female somatic phenotype (Swyer syndrome) and confer a high risk of malignancy (gonadoblastoma). Such mutations cluster in the SRY high mobility group (HMG) box, a conserved motif of specific DNA binding and bending. To explore structure-function relationships, we constructed all possible substitutions at a site of clinical mutation (W70L). Our studies thus focused on a core aromatic residue (position 15 of the consensus HMG box) that is invariant among SRY-related HMG box transcription factors (the SOX family) and conserved as aromatic (Phe or Tyr) among other sequence-specific boxes. In a yeast one-hybrid system sensitive to specific SRY-DNA binding, the variant domains exhibited reduced (Phe and Tyr) or absent activity (the remaining 17 substitutions). Representative nonpolar variants with partial or absent activity (Tyr, Phe, Leu, and Ala in order of decreasing side-chain volume) were chosen for study in vitro and in mammalian cell culture. The clinical mutation (Leu) was found to markedly impair multiple biochemical and cellular activities as respectively probed through the following: (i) in vitro assays of specific DNA binding and protein stability, and (ii) cell culture-based assays of proteosomal degradation, nuclear import, enhancer DNA occupancy, and SRY-dependent transcriptional activation. Surprisingly, however, DNA bending is robust to this or the related Ala substitution that profoundly impairs box stability. Together, our findings demonstrate that the folding, trafficking, and gene-regulatory function of SRY requires an invariant aromatic "buttress" beneath its specific DNA-bending surface. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Biochemical studies on the DNA binding function of the cyclic-amp reactor protein of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is an allosteric protein in which binding of cAMP effects a conformational change with a consequent increased affinity for DNA. Binding of double-stranded deoxyribopolynucleotides and calf thymus DNA by cAMP-CRP confers protection against attack by trypsin, subtilisin, Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Of the single-stranded deoxy- and ribopolynucleotides tested, only r(I)/sub n/ and r(A)/sub n/ gave significant protection against attack by these proteases. In the absence of cAMP, CRP is resistant to proteolysis. Incubation of CRP-DNA with trypsin results in the accumulation of two novel fragments. CRP-DNA is partially sensitive to digestion by chymotrypsin but resistant to attack by subtilisin, the Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Cleavage of CRP-DNA to fragments is accompanied by the loss of /sup 3/H-cAMP binding activity. Modification of the arginines with phenylglyoxal or butanedione results in loss of DNA binding activity. cAMP-CRP incorporates more /sup 14/C-phenylglyoxal than unliganded CRP. Titration of the arginines with /sup 14/C-phenylglyoxal to where over 90% of the DNA binding activity is lost results in incorporation of one mole of reagent per mole of subunit.

  18. Improved description of the structural and optoelectronic properties of DNA/RNA nucleobase anhydrous crystals: Experiment and dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, M. B.; Francisco, T. S.; Maia, F. F.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.

    2017-08-01

    The development of low cost and environmentally friendly organic electronic/optoelectronic devices has attracted a lot of interest. The integration of DNA and RNA nucleobases to improve the performance of organic light-emitting diodes has been proposed recently [Gomez et al., Sci. Rep. 4, 7105 (2014), 10.1038/srep07105], notwithstanding limited experimental and theoretical information on the optoelectronic properties of DNA/RNA thin films. As a contribution to an improved understanding of DNA/RNA-based devices in the solid state, we have performed in this paper dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations to obtain the optimized geometries, Kohn-Sham band structures and orbitals, charge distribution, optical absorption, Frenkel exciton binding energies, and complex dielectric functions of the five DNA/RNA nucleobase anhydrous crystals, namely cytosine, guanine, adenine, thymine, and uracil. Optical absorption measurements on DNA/RNA nucleobase powders were also performed for comparison with the simulations. An improvement on the local density approximation (LDA) description of the lattice parameter estimates was achieved considering the generalized gradient approach (GGA) with a semiempirical dispersion correction scheme in comparison with structural x-ray data found in the literature. Energy gap correction using the Δ-sol methodology provided a good agreement between theory and experimental estimates from our optical absorption data, greatly surpassing the quality of previous simulations. Effective masses for the carriers were also found, indicating that the guanine crystal as well as the cytosine one (although with some drawbacks) has potential applications in optoelectronics as a direct gap semiconductor, with the other nucleobases presenting either a semiconductor or an insulator character depending on the carrier type. The complex dielectric function exhibits a high degree of anisotropy for different states

  19. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  20. K-mer Content, Correlation, and Position Analysis of Genome DNA Sequences for the Identification of Function and Evolutionary Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sievers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In genome analysis, k-mer-based comparison methods have become standard tools. However, even though they are able to deliver reliable results, other algorithms seem to work better in some cases. To improve k-mer-based DNA sequence analysis and comparison, we successfully checked whether adding positional resolution is beneficial for finding and/or comparing interesting organizational structures. A simple but efficient algorithm for extracting and saving local k-mer spectra (frequency distribution of k-mers was developed and used. The results were analyzed by including positional information based on visualizations as genomic maps and by applying basic vector correlation methods. This analysis was concentrated on small word lengths (1 ≤ k ≤ 4 on relatively small viral genomes of Papillomaviridae and Herpesviridae, while also checking its usability for larger sequences, namely human chromosome 2 and the homologous chromosomes (2A, 2B of a chimpanzee. Using this alignment-free analysis, several regions with specific characteristics in Papillomaviridae and Herpesviridae formerly identified by independent, mostly alignment-based methods, were confirmed. Correlations between the k-mer content and several genes in these genomes have been found, showing similarities between classified and unclassified viruses, which may be potentially useful for further taxonomic research. Furthermore, unknown k-mer correlations in the genomes of Human Herpesviruses (HHVs, which are probably of major biological function, are found and described. Using the chromosomes of a chimpanzee and human that are currently known, identities between the species on every analyzed chromosome were reproduced. This demonstrates the feasibility of our approach for large data sets of complex genomes. Based on these results, we suggest k-mer analysis with positional resolution as a method for closing a gap between the effectiveness of alignment-based methods (like NCBI BLAST and the

  1. A new set of ESTs and cDNA clones from full-length and normalized libraries for gene discovery and functional characterization in citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M Carmen; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Forment, Javier; Arribas, Raquel; Alamar, Santiago; Conejero, Vicente; Perez-Amador, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    Background Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. Indeed, nearly 40% of genes in plants encode proteins of unknown function. Functional characterization of these genes is one of the main challenges in modern biology. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones may fill in the gap created between sequence information and biological knowledge. Full-length cDNA clones facilitate functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression in heterologous systems and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. In addition, the development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation. Results We developed an integrated method to generate a new normalized EST collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts of different citrus species from multiple tissues and developmental stages. We constructed a total of 15 cDNA libraries, from which we isolated 10,898 high-quality ESTs representing 6142 different genes. Percentages of redundancy and proportion of full-length clones range from 8 to 33, and 67 to 85, respectively, indicating good efficiency of the approach employed. The new EST collection adds 2113 new citrus ESTs, representing 1831 unigenes, to the collection of citrus genes available in the public databases. To facilitate functional analysis, cDNAs were introduced in a Gateway-based cloning vector for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta. Herein, we describe the technical methods used in the library construction, sequence analysis of clones and the overexpression of CitrSEP, a citrus homolog to the Arabidopsis SEP3 gene, in Arabidopsis as an example of a practical application of the engineered Gateway vector for functional analysis. Conclusion The new EST collection denotes an

  2. A new set of ESTs and cDNA clones from full-length and normalized libraries for gene discovery and functional characterization in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamar Santiago

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. Indeed, nearly 40% of genes in plants encode proteins of unknown function. Functional characterization of these genes is one of the main challenges in modern biology. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones may fill in the gap created between sequence information and biological knowledge. Full-length cDNA clones facilitate functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression in heterologous systems and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. In addition, the development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation. Results We developed an integrated method to generate a new normalized EST collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts of different citrus species from multiple tissues and developmental stages. We constructed a total of 15 cDNA libraries, from which we isolated 10,898 high-quality ESTs representing 6142 different genes. Percentages of redundancy and proportion of full-length clones range from 8 to 33, and 67 to 85, respectively, indicating good efficiency of the approach employed. The new EST collection adds 2113 new citrus ESTs, representing 1831 unigenes, to the collection of citrus genes available in the public databases. To facilitate functional analysis, cDNAs were introduced in a Gateway-based cloning vector for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta. Herein, we describe the technical methods used in the library construction, sequence analysis of clones and the overexpression of CitrSEP, a citrus homolog to the Arabidopsis SEP3 gene, in Arabidopsis as an example of a practical application of the engineered Gateway vector for functional analysis. Conclusion The new

  3. A new set of ESTs and cDNA clones from full-length and normalized libraries for gene discovery and functional characterization in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M Carmen; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Forment, Javier; Arribas, Raquel; Alamar, Santiago; Conejero, Vicente; Perez-Amador, Miguel A

    2009-09-11

    Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. Indeed, nearly 40% of genes in plants encode proteins of unknown function. Functional characterization of these genes is one of the main challenges in modern biology. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones may fill in the gap created between sequence information and biological knowledge. Full-length cDNA clones facilitate functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression in heterologous systems and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. In addition, the development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation. We developed an integrated method to generate a new normalized EST collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts of different citrus species from multiple tissues and developmental stages. We constructed a total of 15 cDNA libraries, from which we isolated 10,898 high-quality ESTs representing 6142 different genes. Percentages of redundancy and proportion of full-length clones range from 8 to 33, and 67 to 85, respectively, indicating good efficiency of the approach employed. The new EST collection adds 2113 new citrus ESTs, representing 1831 unigenes, to the collection of citrus genes available in the public databases. To facilitate functional analysis, cDNAs were introduced in a Gateway-based cloning vector for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta. Herein, we describe the technical methods used in the library construction, sequence analysis of clones and the overexpression of CitrSEP, a citrus homolog to the Arabidopsis SEP3 gene, in Arabidopsis as an example of a practical application of the engineered Gateway vector for functional analysis. The new EST collection denotes an important step towards the

  4. Inhibition of exportin-1 function results in rapid cell cycle-associated DNA damage in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Russell T; Marcus, Joshua M; Orth, James D

    2017-06-13

    Selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) are small molecules in development as anti-cancer agents. The first-in-class SINE, selinexor, is in clinical trials for blood and solid cancers. Selinexor forms a covalent bond with exportin-1 at cysteine-528, and blocks its ability to export cargos. Previous work has shown strong cell cycle effects and drug-induced cell death across many different cancer-derived cell lines. Here, we report strong cell cycle-associated DNA double-stranded break formation upon the treatment of cancer cells with SINE. In multiple cell models, selinexor treatment results in the formation of clustered DNA damage foci in 30-40% of cells within 8 hours that is dependent upon cysteine-528. DNA damage strongly correlates with G1/S-phase and decreased DNA replication. Live cell microscopy reveals an association between DNA damage and cell fate. Cells that form damage in G1-phase more often die or arrest, while those damaged in S/G2-phase frequently progress to cell division. Up to half of all treated cells form damage foci, and most cells that die after being damaged, were damaged in G1-phase. By comparison, non-transformed cell lines show strong cell cycle effects but little DNA damage and less death than cancer cells. Significant drug combination effects occur when selinexor is paired with different classes of agents that either cause DNA damage or that diminish DNA damage repair. These data present a novel effect of exportin-1 inhibition and provide a strong rationale for multiple combination treatments of selinexor with agents that are currently in use for the treatment of different solid cancers.

  5. Cardiac Myocyte De Novo DNA Methyltransferases 3a/3b Are Dispensable for Cardiac Function and Remodeling after Chronic Pressure Overload in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Nührenberg

    Full Text Available Recent studies reported altered DNA methylation in failing human hearts. This may suggest a role for de novo DNA methylation in the development of heart failure. Here, we tested whether cardiomyocyte-specific loss of de novo DNA methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b altered cardiac function and remodeling after chronic left ventricular pressure overload.Mice with specific ablation of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b expression in cardiomyocytes were generated by crossing floxed Dnmt3afl and Dnmt3bfl alleles with mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the atrial myosin light chain gene promoter. The efficacy of combined Dnmt3a/3b ablation (DKO was characterized on cardiomyocyte-specific genomic DNA and mRNA levels. Cardiac phenotyping was carried out without (sham or with left ventricular pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC. Under similar conditions, cardiac genome-wide transcriptional profiling was performed and DNA methylation levels of promoters of differentially regulated genes were assessed by pyrosequencing.DKO cardiomyocytes showed virtual absence of targeted Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b mRNA transcripts. Cardiac phenotyping revealed no significant differences between DKO and control mice under sham and TAC conditions. Transcriptome analyses identified upregulation of 44 and downregulation of 9 genes in DKO as compared with control sham mice. TAC mice showed similar changes with substantial overlap of regulated genes compared to sham. Promoters of upregulated genes were largely unmethylated in DKO compared to control mice.The absence of cardiac pathology in the presence of the predicted molecular phenotype suggests that de novo DNA methylation in cardiomyocytes is dispensable for adaptive mechanisms after chronic cardiac pressure overload.

  6. Cardiac Myocyte De Novo DNA Methyltransferases 3a/3b Are Dispensable for Cardiac Function and Remodeling after Chronic Pressure Overload in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnick, Tilman; Preißl, Sebastian; Witten, Anika; Stoll, Monika; Gilsbach, Ralf; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Hein, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies reported altered DNA methylation in failing human hearts. This may suggest a role for de novo DNA methylation in the development of heart failure. Here, we tested whether cardiomyocyte-specific loss of de novo DNA methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b altered cardiac function and remodeling after chronic left ventricular pressure overload. Methods Mice with specific ablation of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b expression in cardiomyocytes were generated by crossing floxed Dnmt3afl and Dnmt3bfl alleles with mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the atrial myosin light chain gene promoter. The efficacy of combined Dnmt3a/3b ablation (DKO) was characterized on cardiomyocyte-specific genomic DNA and mRNA levels. Cardiac phenotyping was carried out without (sham) or with left ventricular pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Under similar conditions, cardiac genome-wide transcriptional profiling was performed and DNA methylation levels of promoters of differentially regulated genes were assessed by pyrosequencing. Results DKO cardiomyocytes showed virtual absence of targeted Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b mRNA transcripts. Cardiac phenotyping revealed no significant differences between DKO and control mice under sham and TAC conditions. Transcriptome analyses identified upregulation of 44 and downregulation of 9 genes in DKO as compared with control sham mice. TAC mice showed similar changes with substantial overlap of regulated genes compared to sham. Promoters of upregulated genes were largely unmethylated in DKO compared to control mice. Conclusion The absence of cardiac pathology in the presence of the predicted molecular phenotype suggests that de novo DNA methylation in cardiomyocytes is dispensable for adaptive mechanisms after chronic cardiac pressure overload. PMID:26098432

  7. Analysis of bacterial core communities in the central Baltic by comparative RNA-DNA-based fingerprinting provides links to structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettar, Ingrid; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-01-01

    Understanding structure-function links of microbial communities is a central theme of microbial ecology since its beginning. To this end, we studied the spatial variability of the bacterioplankton community structure and composition across the central Baltic Sea at four stations, which were up to 450 km apart and at a depth profile representative for the central part (Gotland Deep, 235 m). Bacterial community structure was followed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)- and 16S rRNA gene-based fingerprints using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis. Species composition was determined by sequence analysis of SSCP bands. High similarities of the bacterioplankton communities across several hundred kilometers were observed in the surface water using RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints. In these surface communities, the RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints resulted in very different pattern, presumably indicating large difference between the active members of the community as represented by RNA-based fingerprints and the present members represented by the DNA-based fingerprints. This large discrepancy changed gradually over depth, resulting in highly similar RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints in the anoxic part of the water column below 130 m depth. A conceivable mechanism explaining this high similarity could be the reduced oxidative stress in the anoxic zone. The stable communities on the surface and in the anoxic zone indicate the strong influence of the hydrography on the bacterioplankton community structure. Comparative analysis of RNA- and DNA-based community structure provided criteria for the identification of the core community, its key members and their links to biogeochemical functions.

  8. A trans-activator function is generated by integration of hepatitis B virus preS/S sequences in human hepatocellular carcinoma DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caselmann, W.H.; Meyer, M.; Kekule, A.S.; Lauer, U.; Hofschneider, P.H.; Koshy, R.

    1990-01-01

    The X gene of wild-type hepatitis B virus or integrated DNA has recently been shown to stimulate transcription of a variety of enhancers and promoters. To further delineate the viral sequences responsible for trans-activation in hepatomas, the authors cloned the single hepatitis B virus insert from human hepatocellular carcinoma DNA M1. The plasmid pM1 contains 2004 base of hepatitis B virus DNA subtype adr, including truncated preS/S sequences and the enhancer element. The X promoter and 422 nucleotides of the X coding region are present. The entire preC/C gene is deleted. In transient cotransfection assays using Chang liver cells (CCL 13), pM1 DNA exerts a 6- to 10-fold trans-activating effect on the expression of the pSV2CAT reporter plasmid. The transactivation occurs by stimulation of transcription and is dependent on the simian virus 40 enhancer in the reporter plasmid. Deletion analysis of pM1 subclones reveals that the transactivator is encoded by preS/S and not by X sequences. A frameshift mutation within the preS2 open reading frame shows that this portion is indispensable for the trans-activating function. Initiation of transcription has been mapped to the S1 promoter. A comparable trans-activating effect is also observed with cloned wild-type hepatitis B virus sequences similarly truncated. These results show that a transcriptional trans-activator function not present in the intact gene is generated by 3' truncation of integrated hepatitis B virus DNA preS/S sequences

  9. Gene transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells with a nano-hydroxyapatite-collagen scaffold containing DNA-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkumo, Taichi; Vanegas Sáenz, Juan Ramón; Takada, Yukyo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Rotan, Olga; Sokolova, Viktoriya; Epple, Matthias; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to fabricate a growth factor-releasing biodegradable scaffold for tissue regeneration. We prepared multishell calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles functionalized with DNA, polyethyleneimine (PEI), protamine and octa-arginine (R8) and compared their respective transfection activity and cell viability measures using human mesenchymal stem cells. DNA-protamine complexes improved the transfection efficiency of CaP nanoparticles with the exception of those functionalized with R8. These complexes also greatly reduced the cytotoxicity of PEI. In addition, we also fabricated DNA-protamine-functionalized CaP nanoparticle-loaded nano-hydroxyapatite-collagen scaffolds and investigated their gene transfection efficiencies. These experiments showed that the scaffolds were associated with moderate hMSC cell viability and were capable of releasing the BMP-2 protein into hMSCs following gene transfection. In particular, the scaffold loaded with protamine-containing CaP nanoparticles showed the highest cell viability and transfection efficiency in hMSCs; thus, it might be suitable to serve as an efficient growth factor-releasing scaffold. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fumarase is involved in DNA double-strand break resection through a functional interaction with Sae2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leshets, Michael; Ramamurthy, Dharanidharan; Lisby, Michael

    2018-01-01

    One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are the......One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ...

  12. Biophysics of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Surveying the last sixty years of research, this book describes the physical properties of DNA in the context of its biological functioning. It is designed to enable both students and researchers of molecular biology, biochemistry and physics to better understand the biophysics of DNA, addressing key questions and facilitating further research. The chapters integrate theoretical and experimental approaches, emphasising throughout the importance of a quantitative knowledge of physical properties in building and analysing models of DNA functioning. For example, the book shows how the relationship between DNA mechanical properties and the sequence specificity of DNA-protein binding can be analyzed quantitatively by using our current knowledge of the physical and structural properties of DNA. Theoretical models and experimental methods in the field are critically considered to enable the reader to engage effectively with the current scientific literature on the physical properties of DNA.

  13. Short-term exposure to PM2.5and vanadium and changes in asthma gene DNA methylation and lung function decrements among urban children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Torrone, David; Lovinsky-Desir, Stephanie; Perzanowski, Matthew; Bautista, Joshua; Jezioro, Jacqueline R; Hoepner, Lori; Ross, Jamie; Perera, Frederica P; Chillrud, Steven N; Miller, Rachel L

    2017-04-19

    Both short and long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollutants have been associated with asthma and reduced lung function. We hypothesized that short-term indoor exposure to fine particulate matter vanadium (V) would be associated with altered buccal cell DNA methylation of targeted asthma genes and decreased lung function among urban children in a nested subcohort of African American and Dominican children. Six day integrated levels of air pollutants were measured from children's homes (age 9-14; n = 163), repeated 6 months later (n = 98). Buccal samples were collected repeatedly during visits. CpG promoter loci of asthma genes (i.e., interleukin 4 (IL4), interferon gamma (IFNγ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2A), arginase 2 (ARG2)) were pyrosequenced and lung function was assessed. Exposure to V, but not PM 2.5 , was associated with lower DNA methylation of IL4 and IFNγ. In exploratory analyses, V levels were associated with lower methylation of the proinflammatory NOS2A-CpG +5099 among asthmatic overweight or obese children but not nonasthmatics. Short-term exposure to PM 2.5 , but not V, appeared associated with lower lung function (i.e., reduced z-scores for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 , FEV 1 / forced vital capacity [FEV 1 /FVC] and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of FVC [FEF 25-75 ]). Exposure to V was associated with altered DNA methylation of allergic and proinflammatory asthma genes implicated in air pollution related asthma. However, short-term exposure to PM 2.5, but not V, appeared associated with decrements in lung function among urban children.

  14. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  15. Cloning and functional characterization of a testicular TSH receptor cDNA from the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vischer, H F; Bogerd, J.

    A cDNA encoding a putative thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (cfTSH-R) was cloned from the testis of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). The cfTSH-R showed the highest amino acid sequence identity with the TSH-Rs of other fish species. In addition, an insertion of approximately 50 amino

  16. Optimal functional levels of activation-induced deaminase specifically require the Hsp40 DnaJa1

    OpenAIRE

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Zahn, Astrid; Methot, Stephen P; Godin, David; Conticello, Silvestro G; Terada, Kazutoyo; Di Noia, Javier M

    2011-01-01

    AID deaminates deoxycytidine at immunoglobulin genes to generate an antibody response. AID misregulation can contribute to cancer and autoimmune disease. Here, the chaperone DnaJa1 is shown to determine AID protein levels and biological activity during the murine immune response.

  17. Monoterpene biosynthesis in lemon (Citrus limon) cDNA isolation and functional analysis of four monoterpene synthases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lücker, J.; Tamer, El M.K.; Schwab, W.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Plas, van der L.H.W.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Verhoeven, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Citrus limon possesses a high content and large variety of monoterpenoids, especially in the glands of the fruit flavedo. The genes responsible for the production of these monoterpenes have never been isolated. By applying a random sequencing approach to a cDNA library from mRNA isolated from the

  18. An SGS3-like protein functions in RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Zhimin

    2010-01-06

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an important epigenetic mechanism for silencing transgenes and endogenous repetitive sequences such as transposons. The RD29A promoter-driven LUCIFERASE transgene and its corresponding endogenous RD29A gene are hypermethylated and silenced in the Arabidopsis DNA demethylase mutant ros1. By screening for second-site suppressors of ros1, we identified the RDM12 locus. The rdm12 mutation releases the silencing of the RD29A-LUC transgene and the endogenous RD29A gene by reducing the promoter DNA methylation. The rdm12 mutation also reduces DNA methylation at endogenous RdDM target loci, including transposons and other repetitive sequences. In addition, the rdm12 mutation affects the levels of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from some of the RdDM target loci. RDM12 encodes a protein with XS and coiled-coil domains, and is similar to SGS3, which is a partner protein of RDR6 and can bind to double-stranded RNAs with a 5′ overhang, and is required for several post-transcriptional gene silencing pathways. Our results show that RDM12 is a component of the RdDM pathway, and suggest that RdDM may involve double-stranded RNAs with a 5′ overhang and the partnering between RDM12 and RDR2. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Implications of fast-time scale dynamics of human DNA/RNA cytosine methyltransferases (DNMTs) for protein function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Evans, D. A.; Bronowska, Agnieszka Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 125, 3/6 (2010), s. 407-418 ISSN 1432-881X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : MD simulations * DNA/RNA methyltransferase * enthalpy-entropy compensation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2010

  20. Synthesis of nucleoside and nucleotide conjugates of bile acids, and polymerase construction of bile acid-functionalized DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ikonen, Satu; Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Šanda, Miloslav; Hocek, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2010), s. 1194-1201 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/09/0317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : steroids * nucleosides * nucleoside triphosphates * DNA polymerase Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.451, year: 2010

  1. From Function to Phenotype: Impaired DNA Binding and Clustering Correlates with Clinical Severity in Males with Missense Mutations in MECP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Taimoor I; Ausió, Juan; Faghfoury, Hannah; Silver, Josh; Lane, Jane B; Eubanks, James H; MacLeod, Patrick; Percy, Alan K; Vincent, John B

    2016-12-08

    Mutations in the MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT). MeCP2 binds to chromocentric DNA through its methyl CpG-binding domain (MBD) to regulate gene expression. In heterozygous females the variable phenotypic severity is modulated by non-random X-inactivation, thus making genotype-phenotype comparisons unreliable. However, genotype-phenotype correlations in males with hemizygousMECP2 mutations can provide more accurate insights in to the true biological effect of specific mutations. Here, we compared chromatin organization and binding dynamics for twelve MeCP2 missense mutations (including two novel and the five most common MBD missense RTT mutations) and identifiedacorrelation with phenotype in hemizygous males. We observed impaired interaction of MeCP2-DNA for mutations around the MBD-DNA binding interface, and defective chromatin clustering for distal MBD mutations. Furthermore, binding and mobility dynamics show a gradient of impairment depending on the amino acid properties and tertiary structure within the MBD. Interestingly, a wide range of phenotypic/clinical severity, ranging from neonatal encephalopathy to mild psychiatric abnormalities were observed and all are consistent with our functional/molecular results. Overall, clinical severity showed a direct correlation with the functional impairment of MeCP2. These mechanistic and phenotypic correlations of MeCP2 mutations will enable improved and individualized diagnostics, and may lead to personalized therapeutic interventions.

  2. Effects of antiviral therapy on post-hepatectomy HBV reactivation and liver function in HBV DNA-negative patients with HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wen-Feng; Zhong, Jian-Hong; Lu, Shi-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Qiu-Ming; Ma, Liang; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun

    2017-02-28

    The ability of antiviral therapy to reduce risk of post-hepatectomy hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in patients negative for viral DNA is unclear. This prospective study involved 174 consecutive patients with hepatitis B virus related hepatocellular carcinoma who were negative for hepatitis B virus DNA in serum and who underwent hepatic resection. Hepatitis B virus reactivation occurred in 30 patients in the non-antiviral group (27.8%) but in only 2 patients in the antiviral group (3.0%, P antiviral therapy. Liver function indicators at one week after resection did not differ significantly between the two groups, or between patients who experienced hepatitis B virus reactivation or not. Nevertheless, alanine aminotransferase and albumin at 1 month after resection were significantly higher in the antiviral group than in the non-antiviral group, and they were significantly higher in patients who did not experience hepatitis B virus reactivation than in those who did. Therefore, patients with hepatitis B virus related hepatocellular carcinoma face substantial risk of hepatitis B virus reactivation after hepatectomy, even if they are negative for viral DNA at baseline. Antiviral therapy can reduce the risk of reactivation, helping improve liver function after surgery.

  3. Loss-of-function mutations in ISCA2 disrupt 4Fe-4S cluster machinery and cause a fatal leukodystrophy with hyperglycinemia and mtDNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Joseph T; Besse, Arnaud; Alston, Charlotte L; Pang, Ki; Appadurai, Vivek; Samanta, Monisha; Smpokou, Patroula; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Bonnen, Penelope E

    2018-04-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential cofactors for proteins that participate in fundamental cellular processes including metabolism, DNA replication and repair, transcriptional regulation, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). ISCA2 plays a role in the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters and a recent report described subjects displaying infantile-onset leukodystrophy due to bi-allelic mutation of ISCA2. We present two additional unrelated cases, and provide a more complete clinical description that includes hyperglycinemia, leukodystrophy of the brainstem with longitudinally extensive spinal cord involvement, and mtDNA deficiency. Additionally, we characterize the role of ISCA2 in mitochondrial bioenergetics and Fe-S cluster assembly using subject cells and ISCA2 cellular knockdown models. Loss of ISCA2 diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, the mitochondrial network, basal and maximal respiration, ATP production, and activity of ETC complexes II and IV. We specifically tested the impact of loss of ISCA2 on 2Fe-2S proteins versus 4Fe-4S proteins and observed deficits in the functioning of 4Fe-4S but not 2Fe-2S proteins. Together these data indicate loss of ISCA2 impaired function of 4Fe-4S proteins resulting in a fatal encephalopathy accompanied by a relatively unusual combination of features including mtDNA depletion alongside complex II deficiency and hyperglycinemia that may facilitate diagnosis of ISCA2 deficiency patients. © 2018 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Functional analysis of the interdependence between DNA uptake sequence and its cognate ComP receptor during natural transformation in Neisseria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie-Lee Berry

    Full Text Available Natural transformation is the widespread biological process by which "competent" bacteria take up free DNA, incorporate it into their genomes, and become genetically altered or "transformed". To curb often deleterious transformation by foreign DNA, several competent species preferentially take up their own DNA that contains specific DUS (DNA uptake sequence watermarks. Our recent finding that ComP is the long sought DUS receptor in Neisseria species paves the way for the functional analysis of the DUS-ComP interdependence which is reported here. By abolishing/modulating ComP levels in Neisseria meningitidis, we show that the enhancement of transformation seen in the presence of DUS is entirely dependent on ComP, which also controls transformation in the absence of DUS. While peripheral bases in the DUS were found to be less important, inner bases are essential since single base mutations led to dramatically impaired interaction with ComP and transformation. Strikingly, naturally occurring DUS variants in the genomes of human Neisseria commensals differing from DUS by only one or two bases were found to be similarly impaired for transformation of N. meningitidis. By showing that ComPsub from the N. subflava commensal specifically binds its cognate DUS variant and mediates DUS-enhanced transformation when expressed in a comP mutant of N. meningitidis, we confirm that a similar mechanism is used by all Neisseria species to promote transformation by their own, or closely related DNA. Together, these findings shed new light on the molecular events involved in the earliest step in natural transformation, and reveal an elegant mechanism for modulating horizontal gene transfer between competent species sharing the same niche.

  5. DNA damage response (DDR) induced by topoisomerase II poisons requires nuclear function of the small GTPase Rac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartlick, Friedrich; Bopp, Anita; Henninger, Christian; Fritz, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Here, we investigated the influence of Rac family small GTPases on mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR) stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons. To this end, we examined the influence of the Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 on Ser139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a widely used marker of the DDR triggered by DNA double-strand breaks. EHT1864 attenuated the doxorubicin-stimulated DDR in a subset of cell lines tested, including HepG2 hepatoma cells. EHT1864 reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and increased viability following treatment of HepG2 cells with topo II poisons. Protection by EHT1864 was observed in both p53 wildtype (HepG2) and p53 deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cells and, furthermore, remained unaffected upon pharmacological inhibition of p53 in HepG2. Apparently, the impact of Rac on the DDR is independent of p53. Protection from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage by EHT1864 comprises both S and G2 phase cells. The inhibitory effect of EHT1864 on doxorubicin-stimulated DDR was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of various protein kinases, including JNK, ERK, PI3K, PAK and CK1. EHT1864 and protein kinase inhibitors also attenuated the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Moreover, EHT1864 mitigated the constitutive phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at positions S1106, S1213 and S1247. Doxorubicin transport, nuclear import/export of topoisomerase II and Hsp90-related mechanisms are likely not of relevance for doxorubicin-stimulated DDR impaired by EHT1864. We suggest that multiple kinase-dependent but p53- and heat shock protein-independent Rac-regulated nuclear mechanisms are required for activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II poisons. © 2013.

  6. A rare DNA contact mutation in cancer confers p53 gain-of-function and tumor cell survival via TNFAIP8 induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Jessica A; Mellert, Hestia; Sammons, Morgan A; Kuswanto, Laudita A; Sykes, Stephen M; Resnick-Silverman, Lois; Manfredi, James J; Berger, Shelley L; McMahon, Steven B

    2016-10-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene encodes a sequence-specific transcription factor. Mutations in the coding sequence of p53 occur frequently in human cancer and often result in single amino acid substitutions (missense mutations) in the DNA binding domain (DBD), blocking normal tumor suppressive functions. In addition to the loss of canonical functions, some missense mutations in p53 confer gain-of-function (GOF) activities to tumor cells. While many missense mutations in p53 cluster at six "hotspot" amino acids, the majority of mutations in human cancer occur elsewhere in the DBD and at a much lower frequency. We report here that mutations at K120, a non-hotspot DNA contact residue, confer p53 with the previously unrecognized ability to bind and activate the transcription of the pro-survival TNFAIP8 gene. Mutant K120 p53 binds the TNFAIP8 locus at a cryptic p53 response element that is not occupied by wild-type p53. Furthermore, induction of TNFAIP8 is critical for the evasion of apoptosis by tumor cells expressing the K120R variant of p53. These findings identify induction of pro-survival targets as a mechanism of gain-of-function activity for mutant p53 and will likely broaden our understanding of this phenomenon beyond the limited number of GOF activities currently reported for hotspot mutants. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Potent functional antibody responses elicited by HIV-I DNA priming and boosting with heterologous HIV-1 recombinant MVA in healthy Tanzanian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agricola Joachim

    Full Text Available Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA virus boosting (HIVIS03. The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK cells from PBMC (p=0.006, indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development.Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080.

  8. A comparative approach for the investigation of biological information processing: An examination of the structure and function of computer hard drives and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The robust storage, updating and utilization of information are necessary for the maintenance and perpetuation of dynamic systems. These systems can exist as constructs of metal-oxide semiconductors and silicon, as in a digital computer, or in the "wetware" of organic compounds, proteins and nucleic acids that make up biological organisms. We propose that there are essential functional properties of centralized information-processing systems; for digital computers these properties reside in the computer's hard drive, and for eukaryotic cells they are manifest in the DNA and associated structures. Methods Presented herein is a descriptive framework that compares DNA and its associated proteins and sub-nuclear structure with the structure and function of the computer hard drive. We identify four essential properties of information for a centralized storage and processing system: (1) orthogonal uniqueness, (2) low level formatting, (3) high level formatting and (4) translation of stored to usable form. The corresponding aspects of the DNA complex and a computer hard drive are categorized using this classification. This is intended to demonstrate a functional equivalence between the components of the two systems, and thus the systems themselves. Results Both the DNA complex and the computer hard drive contain components that fulfill the essential properties of a centralized information storage and processing system. The functional equivalence of these components provides insight into both the design process of engineered systems and the evolved solutions addressing similar system requirements. However, there are points where the comparison breaks down, particularly when there are externally imposed information-organizing structures on the computer hard drive. A specific example of this is the imposition of the File Allocation Table (FAT) during high level formatting of the computer hard drive and the subsequent loading of an operating system (OS). Biological

  9. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongzhi; Feng, Shuwei; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Mingxiao; Zhong, Zhendong; Li, Ying; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP). However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6) and Hegu (LI4) in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP. PMID:24991226

  10. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP. However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6 and Hegu (LI4 in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  11. Multi-step surface functionalization of polyimide based evanescent wave photonic biosensors and application for DNA hybridization by Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Eva [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Bruck, Roman [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Hainberger, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.hainberger@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Laemmerhofer, Michael, E-mail: michael.laemmerhofer@univie.ac.at [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} We realize a biosensing platform for polyimide evanescent photonic wave sensors. {yields} We show that the surface functionalization via silanisation and biotinylation followed by streptavidin immobilization do not destroy or damage the thin polyimide film. {yields} A highly dense streptavidin layer enables the immobilisation of biotinylated ligands such as biotinylated ssDNA for the selective measurement of DNA hybridization. - Abstract: The process of surface functionalization involving silanization, biotinylation and streptavidin bonding as platform for biospecific ligand immobilization was optimized for thin film polyimide spin-coated silicon wafers, of which the polyimide film serves as a wave guiding layer in evanescent wave photonic biosensors. This type of optical sensors make great demands on the materials involved as well as on the layer properties, such as the optical quality, the layer thickness and the surface roughness. In this work we realized the binding of a 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on an oxygen plasma activated polyimide surface followed by subsequent derivatization of the reactive thiol groups with maleimide-PEG{sub 2}-biotin and immobilization of streptavidin. The progress of the functionalization was monitored by using different fluorescence labels for optimization of the chemical derivatization steps. Further, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized for the characterization of the modified surface. These established analytical methods allowed to derive information like chemical composition of the surface, surface coverage with immobilized streptavidin, as well as parameters of the surface roughness. The proposed functionalization protocol furnished a surface density of 144 fmol mm{sup -2} streptavidin with good reproducibility (13.9% RSD, n = 10) and without inflicted damage to the surface. This surface modification was applied to polyimide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer

  12. PGC-1α Modulates Telomere Function and DNA Damage in Protecting against Aging-Related Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqin Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence and organismal aging predispose age-related chronic diseases, such as neurodegenerative, metabolic, and cardiovascular disorders. These diseases emerge coincidently from elevated oxidative/electrophilic stress, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage, and telomere dysfunction and shortening. Mechanistic linkages are incompletely understood. Here, we show that ablation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α accelerates vascular aging and atherosclerosis, coinciding with telomere dysfunction and shortening and DNA damage. PGC-1α deletion reduces expression and activity of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and increases p53 levels. Ectopic expression of PGC-1α coactivates TERT transcription and reverses telomere malfunction and DNA damage. Furthermore, alpha lipoic acid (ALA, a non-dispensable mitochondrial cofactor, upregulates PGC-1α-dependent TERT and the cytoprotective Nrf-2-mediated antioxidant/electrophile-responsive element (ARE/ERE signaling cascades, and counteracts high-fat-diet-induced, age-dependent arteriopathy. These results illustrate the pivotal importance of PGC-1α in ameliorating senescence, aging, and associated chronic diseases, and may inform novel therapeutic approaches involving electrophilic specificity.

  13. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid') built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging' is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein. PMID:28134243

  14. Construction of a full-length cDNA library from castor endosperm for high-throughput functional screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chaofu; Wallis, James G; Browse, John

    2011-01-01

    It is desirable to produce high homogeneity of novel fatty acids in oilseeds through genetic engineering to meet increasing demands by the oleo-chemical industry. However, expression of key enzymes for biosynthesis of industrial fatty acids usually results in low levels of desired fatty acids in transgenic oilseeds. The abundance of unusual fatty acids in their natural species suggests that additional genes are needed for high production in transgenic plants. We used the model oilseed plant Arabidopsis thaliana expressing a castor fatty acid hydroxylase (FAH12) to identify genes that can boost hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in transgenic seeds. We described previously a high-throughput approach that in principle can allow testing of the entire transcriptome of developing castor seed endosperm by shotgun transforming a full-length cDNA library into a FAH12-expressing Arabidopsis line. The resulting transgenic seeds can be screened by high-throughput gas chromatography. The most critical step of the approach is the construction of a full-length cDNA library. In this chapter, we describe in detail the construction of the cloning vectors and a full-length cDNA library from developing castor seed endosperms. The approach we describe has broad applicability in many areas of biology.

  15. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino (Rutgers); (LBNL); (Connecticut); (TJU); (MSU)

    2017-01-30

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid’) built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging’ is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein.

  16. Animal Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Grzegorz L.; Oliveira, Marcos T.; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication highlight the diversity of both the mechanisms utilized and the structural and functional organization of the proteins at mtDNA replication fork, despite the simplicity of the animal mtDNA genome. DNA polymerase γ, mtDNA helicase and mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein- the key replisome proteins, have evolved distinct structural features and biochemical properties. These appear to be correlated with mtDNA genomic features in different metazoan taxa and with their modes of DNA replication, although a substantial integrative research is warranted to establish firmly these links. To date, several modes of mtDNA replication have been described for animals: rolling circle, theta, strand-displacement, and RITOLS/bootlace. Resolution of a continuing controversy relevant to mtDNA replication in mammals/vertebrates will have a direct impact on the mechanistic interpretation of mtDNA-related human diseases. Here we review these subjects, integrating earlier and recent data to provide a perspective on the major challenges for future research. PMID:27241933

  17. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  18. A single portion of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L) improves protection against DNA damage but not vascular function in healthy male volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Bo, Cristian; Riso, Patrizia; Campolo, Jonica

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that anthocyanin-rich foods may exert antioxidant effects and improve vascular function as demonstrated mainly in vitro and in the animal model. Blueberries are rich sources of anthocyanins and we hypothesized that their intake could improve cell protection against oxidative...... stress and affect endothelial function in humans. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of one portion (300 g) of blueberries on selected markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant protection (endogenous and oxidatively induced DNA damage) and of vascular function (changes in peripheral...... arterial tone and plasma nitric oxide levels) in male subjects. In a randomized cross-over design, separated by a wash out period ten young volunteers received one portion of blueberries ground by blender or one portion of a control jelly. Before and after consumption (at 1, 2, and 24 hours), blood samples...

  19. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  20. Surface functionalized Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}SnS{sub 4} quinternary alloyed nanostructure for DNA sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibraheam, A.S.; Voon, C.H.; Foo, K.L.; Azizah, N. [University Malaysia Perlis, Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Al-Douri, Y. [University of Sidi-Bel-Abbes, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sidi Bel-Abbes (Algeria); Gopinath, S.C.B. [University Malaysia Perlis, Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Universiti Malaysia Perlis, School of Bioprocess Engineering, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Ameri, M. [Universite Djilali Liabes de Sidi Bel-Abbes, Laboratoire Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Avances (LPCMA), Sidi Bel-Abbes (Algeria); Ibrahim, Sattar S. [University of Anbar, Chemisty Department, College of Science, Al Rumadi (Iraq)

    2017-03-15

    A sensing plate of extended Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}SnS{sub 4} quinternary alloy nanostructures, fabricated on an oxidized silicon substrate by the sol-gel method, is reported in this paper. The fabricated device was characterized and analyzed via field emission-scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and photoluminescence (PL). The XRD peaks shifted towards the lower angle side alongside increasing concentration of cadmium. The average diameter of the Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}SnS{sub 4} quinternary alloy nanostructures falls between 21.55 and 43.12 nm, while the shift of the PL bandgap was from 1.81 eV (x = 0) to 1.72 eV (x = 1). The resulting Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}SnS{sub 4} quinternary alloy nanostructures components were functionalized with oligonucleotides probe DNA molecules and interacted with the target, exhibiting good sensing capabilities due to its large surface-to-volume ratio. The fabrication, immobilization, and hybridization processes were analyzed via representative current-voltage (I-V) plots. Its electrical profile shows that the device is capable to distinguish biomolecules. Its high performance was evident from the linear relationship between the probe DNA from cervical cancer and the target DNA, showing its applicability for medical applications. (orig.)

  1. Designing a nine cysteine-less DNA packaging motor from bacteriophage T4 reveals new insights into ATPase structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondabagil, Kiran; Dai, Li; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Ha, Taekjip; Draper, Bonnie; Rao, Venigalla B

    2014-11-01

    The packaging motor of bacteriophage T4 translocates DNA into the capsid at a rate of up to 2000 bp/s. Such a high rate would require coordination of motor movements at millisecond timescale. Designing a cysteine-less gp17 is essential to generate fluorescently labeled motors and measure distance changes between motor domains by FRET analyses. Here, by using sequence alignments, structural modeling, combinatorial mutagenesis, and recombinational rescue, we replaced all nine cysteines of gp17 and introduced single cysteines at defined positions. These mutant motors retained in vitro DNA packaging activity. Single mutant motors translocated DNA molecules in real time as imaged by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discovered, unexpectedly, that a hydrophobic or nonpolar amino acid next to Walker B motif is essential for motor function, probably for efficient generation of OH(-) nucleophile. The ATPase Walker B motif, thus, may be redefined as "β-strand (4-6 hydrophobic-rich amino acids)-DE-hydrophobic/nonpolar amino acid". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes S Gach

    Full Text Available Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5 boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART. Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir.

  3. DNA-based machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  4. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA- REVOLUTIONARY EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidhehi Narayan Nayak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Mitochondrion, the sausage-shaped organelle residing in the cytoplasm of all eukaryotic cells, apart from being the power house, represents endosymbiotic evolution of a free living organism to intracellular structure. Anthropologically, mitochondrial DNA is the fossilised source to trace the human ancestry particularly of maternal lineage. This article attempts to highlight the various biological functions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA with a note on its forensic application.

  5. Mechanisms of recombination and function of DNA in bacteria. Progress report, May 3, 1975--May 5, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guild, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    Results of investigations on phages were obtained with regard to the finding of transfection and characterizing the mode of entry of transfecting DNA; the characterization of a DNAase-resistant gene transfer agent from phage-infected cells which has some of the properties of a generalized transducing phage; and the study of multiplicity reactivation of uv-irradiated phage in a uv-sensitive pneumococcal host. Progress is also reported on a new gene transfer process, cell mutants, fine structure mapping, and stimulated recombination

  6. Recent progress in DNA origami technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology for designing defined two-dimensional DNA nanostructures. In this review, we focus on and describe several types of DNA origami-related studies, as follows: (1) programmed DNA origami assembly, (2) DNA origami-templated molecular assembly, (3) design and construction of various three-dimensional DNA origami structures, (4) programmed functionalization of DNA origami and combination with top-down nanotechnology, (5) single molecular observation on a designed DNA origami, and (6) DNA nanomachines working on a DNA origami. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Aging and DNA repair capability. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tice, R R

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature on DNA repair processes in relation to aging is presented under the following headings: DNA repair processes; age-related occurrence of unrepaired DNA lesions; DNA repair capability as a function of age; tissue-specific DNA repair capability; acceleration of the aging process by exposure to DNA damaging agents; human genetic syndromes; and longevity and DNA repair processes. (HLW)

  8. Time-Dependent and Organ-Specific Changes in Mitochondrial Function, Mitochondrial DNA Integrity, Oxidative Stress and Mononuclear Cell Infiltration in a Mouse Model of Burn Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Szczesny

    Full Text Available Severe thermal injury induces a pathophysiological response that affects most of the organs within the body; liver, heart, lung, skeletal muscle among others, with inflammation and hyper-metabolism as a hallmark of the post-burn damage. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a key component in development of inflammatory and metabolic responses induced by burn. The goal of the current study was to evaluate several critical mitochondrial functions in a mouse model of severe burn injury. Mitochondrial bioenergetics, measured by Extracellular Flux Analyzer, showed a time dependent, post-burn decrease in basal respiration and ATP-turnover but enhanced maximal respiratory capacity in mitochondria isolated from the liver and lung of animals subjected to burn injury. Moreover, we detected a tissue-specific degree of DNA damage, particularly of the mitochondrial DNA, with the most profound effect detected in lungs and hearts of mice subjected to burn injury. Increased mitochondrial biogenesis in lung tissue in response to burn injury was also observed. Burn injury also induced time dependent increases in oxidative stress (measured by amount of malondialdehyde and neutrophil infiltration (measured by myeloperoxidase activity, particularly in lung and heart. Tissue mononuclear cell infiltration was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The amount of poly(ADP-ribose polymers decreased in the liver, but increased in the heart in later time points after burn. All of these biochemical changes were also associated with histological alterations in all three organs studied. Finally, we detected a significant increase in mitochondrial DNA fragments circulating in the blood immediately post-burn. There was no evidence of systemic bacteremia, or the presence of bacterial DNA fragments at any time after burn injury. The majority of the measured parameters demonstrated a sustained elevation even at 20-40 days post injury suggesting a long-lasting effect of thermal

  9. Condensin HEAT subunits required for DNA repair, kinetochore/centromere function and ploidy maintenance in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingya Xu

    Full Text Available Condensin, a central player in eukaryotic chromosomal dynamics, contains five evolutionarily-conserved subunits. Two SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes subunits contain ATPase, hinge, and coiled-coil domains. One non-SMC subunit is similar to bacterial kleisin, and two other non-SMC subunits contain HEAT (similar to armadillo repeats. Here we report isolation and characterization of 21 fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants for three non-SMC subunits, created using error-prone mutagenesis that resulted in single-amino acid substitutions. Beside condensation, segregation, and DNA repair defects, similar to those observed in previously isolated SMC and cnd2 mutants, novel phenotypes were observed for mutants of HEAT-repeats containing Cnd1 and Cnd3 subunits. cnd3-L269P is hypersensitive to the microtubule poison, thiabendazole, revealing defects in kinetochore/centromere and spindle assembly checkpoints. Three cnd1 and three cnd3 mutants increased cell size and doubled DNA content, thereby eliminating the haploid state. Five of these mutations reside in helix B of HEAT repeats. Two non-SMC condensin subunits, Cnd1 and Cnd3, are thus implicated in ploidy maintenance.

  10. Transgenerational adaptation of Arabidopsis to stress requires DNA methylation and the function of Dicer-like proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Boyko

    Full Text Available Epigenetic states and certain environmental responses in mammals and seed plants can persist in the next sexual generation. These transgenerational effects have potential adaptative significance as well as medical and agronomic ramifications. Recent evidence suggests that some abiotic and biotic stress responses of plants are transgenerational. For example, viral infection of tobacco plants and exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to UVC and flagellin can induce transgenerational increases in homologous recombination frequency (HRF. Here we show that exposure of Arabidopsis plants to stresses, including salt, UVC, cold, heat and flood, resulted in a higher HRF, increased global genome methylation, and higher tolerance to stress in the untreated progeny. This transgenerational effect did not, however, persist in successive generations. Treatment of the progeny of stressed plants with 5-azacytidine was shown to decrease global genomic methylation and enhance stress tolerance. Dicer-like (DCL 2 and DCL3 encode Dicer activities important for small RNA-dependent gene silencing. Stress-induced HRF and DNA methylation were impaired in dcl2 and dcl3 deficiency mutants, while in dcl2 mutants, only stress-induced stress tolerance was impaired. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that stress-induced transgenerational responses in Arabidopsis depend on altered DNA methylation and smRNA silencing pathways.

  11. DNA Polymerase Gamma in Mitochondrial DNA Replication and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Copeland

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA are associated with aging, and they can cause tissue degeneration and neuromuscular pathologies known as mitochondrial diseases. Because DNA polymerase γ (pol γ is the enzyme responsible for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA, the burden of faithful duplication of mitochondrial DNA, both in preventing spontaneous errors and in DNA repair synthesis, falls on pol γ. Investigating the biological functions of pol γ and its inhibitors aids our understanding of the sources of mtDNA mutations. In animal cells, pol γ is composed of two subunits, a larger catalytic subunit of 125–140 kDa and second subunit of 35–55 kDa. The catalytic subunit contains DNA polymerase activity, 3’-5’ exonuclease activity, and a 5’-dRP lyase activity. The accessory subunit is required for highly processive DNA synthesis and increases the affinity of pol gamma to the DNA.

  12. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  13. DNA Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium marinum non-homologous end-joining proteins can function together to join DNA ends in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Douglas G; Castore, Reneau; Shi, Runhua; Mallick, Amrita; Ennis, Don G; Harrison, Lynn

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis express a Ku protein and a DNA ligase D and are able to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). This pathway protects against DNA damage when bacteria are in stationary phase. Mycobacterium marinum is a member of this mycobacterium family and like M. tuberculosis is pathogenic. M. marinum lives in water, forms biofilms and infects fish and frogs. M. marinum is a biosafety level 2 (BSL2) organism as it can infect humans, although infections are limited to the skin. M. marinum is accepted as a model to study mycobacterial pathogenesis, as M. marinum and M. tuberculosis are genetically closely related and have similar mechanisms of survival and persistence inside macrophage. The aim of this study was to determine whether M. marinum could be used as a model to understand M. tuberculosis NHEJ repair. We identified and cloned the M. marinum genes encoding NHEJ proteins and generated E. coli strains that express the M. marinum Ku (Mm-Ku) and ligase D (Mm-Lig) individually or together (LHmKumLig strain) from expression vectors integrated at phage attachment sites in the genome. We demonstrated that Mm-Ku and Mm-Lig are both required to re-circularize Cla I-linearized plasmid DNA in E. coli. We compared repair of strain LHmKumLig with that of an E. coli strain (BWKuLig#2) expressing the M. tuberculosis Ku (Mt-Ku) and ligase D (Mt-Lig), and found that LHmKumLig performed 3.5 times more repair and repair was more accurate than BWKuLig#2. By expressing the Mm-Ku with the Mt-Lig, or the Mt-Ku with the Mm-Lig in E. coli, we have shown that the NHEJ proteins from M. marinum and M. tuberculosis can function together to join DNA DSBs. NHEJ repair is therefore conserved between the two species. Consequently, M. marinum is a good model to study NHEJ repair during mycobacterial pathogenesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen

  15. Function of chromatin structure and dynamics in DNA damage, repair and misrepair: gamma-rays and protons in action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježková, L.; Falk, Martin; Falková, Iva; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Štefančíková, Lenka; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Lukášová, Emilie; Boreyko, A.; Krasavin, E.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 83, SI (2014), s. 128-136 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12039; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12008 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : DNA double- strand breaks * Higher-order chromatin structure and DSB repair * Formation of chromosomal translocations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  16. DNA damage response and senescence in endothelial cells of human cerebral cortex and relation to Alzheimer's neuropathology progression: a population-based study in the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC-CFAS) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Claire J; Simpson, Julie E; Al Mashhadi, Sufana; Axe, Claire; Wilson, Suzanna; Heath, Pamela R; Shaw, Pamela J; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B

    2014-12-01

    Abnormalities of the brain microvasculature in Alzheimer's disease have led to the vascular hypothesis of the disease, which predicts that vascular changes precede neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. To determine the spectrum of endothelial injury in the elderly and its relation to Alzheimer-type neuropathology we investigated DNA damage in a population-based sample derived from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. We examined endothelial damage in frontal and temporal cortex (n = 97) using immunohistochemistry for γH2AX and DNA-protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). To determine the effects of endothelial DNA damage at the earliest stages of Alzheimer's pathology we further focused our analysis on cases classified as Braak 0-II and examined endothelial senescence using histochemistry for β-galactosidase and the expression of genes related to DNA damage and senescence using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We demonstrated large variation in endothelial DNA damage which was not associated with Alzheimer's neuropathology. Endothelial DNA-PKcs correlated with neuronal and glial DNA-PKcs counts. Focusing our further analysis on Braak 0-II cases, qPCR analysis demonstrated a trend to increased TP53 (P = 0.064) in cases with high compared with low endothelial DNA damage which was supported by immunohistochemical analysis of p53. Endothelial β-galactosidase expression was associated with increased neuronal (P = 0.033) and glial (P = 0.038), but not endothelial DNA-PKcs expression. Damage to brain endothelial cells occurs early in relation to, or independently of, Alzheimer pathology, and parallels that in neurones and glia. Endothelial DNA damage and senescence are a brain ageing process that may contribute to dysfunction of the neurovascular unit in some elderly individuals. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  17. A functional yeast survival screen of tumor-derived cDNA libraries designed to identify anti-apoptotic mammalian oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eißmann, Moritz; Schwamb, Bettina; Melzer, Inga Maria; Moser, Julia; Siele, Dagmar; Köhl, Ulrike; Rieker, Ralf Joachim; Wachter, David Lukas; Agaimy, Abbas; Herpel, Esther; Baumgarten, Peter; Mittelbronn, Michel; Rakel, Stefanie; Kögel, Donat; Böhm, Stefanie; Gutschner, Tony; Diederichs, Sven; Zörnig, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Yeast cells can be killed upon expression of pro-apoptotic mammalian proteins. We have established a functional yeast survival screen that was used to isolate novel human anti-apoptotic genes overexpressed in treatment-resistant tumors. The screening of three different cDNA libraries prepared from metastatic melanoma, glioblastomas and leukemic blasts allowed for the identification of many yeast cell death-repressing cDNAs, including 28% of genes that are already known to inhibit apoptosis, 35% of genes upregulated in at least one tumor entity and 16% of genes described as both anti-apoptotic in function and upregulated in tumors. These results confirm the great potential of this screening tool to identify novel anti-apoptotic and tumor-relevant molecules. Three of the isolated candidate genes were further analyzed regarding their anti-apoptotic function in cell culture and their potential as a therapeutic target for molecular therapy. PAICS, an enzyme required for de novo purine biosynthesis, the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 and the MAST2 kinase are overexpressed in certain tumor entities and capable of suppressing apoptosis in human cells. Using a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model, we also demonstrated that glioblastoma tumor growth requires MAST2 expression. An additional advantage of the yeast survival screen is its universal applicability. By using various inducible pro-apoptotic killer proteins and screening the appropriate cDNA library prepared from normal or pathologic tissue of interest, the survival screen can be used to identify apoptosis inhibitors in many different systems.

  18. Bombyx mori DNA/RNA non-specific nuclease: expression of isoforms in insect culture cells, subcellular localization and functional assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jisheng; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas; Huvenne, Hanneke; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-08-01

    A DNA/RNA non-specific alkaline nuclease (BmdsRNase) was isolated from the digestive juice of Bombyx mori. While originally reported to be produced by the midgut only, in this project it was found that the mRNA of this enzyme was also expressed in the epidermis, fat body, gut, thoracic muscles, Malpighian tubules, brain, and silk glands of 5th instar larvae, indicating additional functions to its reported role in nucleic acid digestion in the midgut. In order to study the functional properties of BmdsRNase, three pEA-BmdsRNase expression constructs were generated, characterized by presence or absence of a signal peptide and a propeptide, and used for expression in lepidopteran Hi5 tissue culture cells. Western blot indicated that these different forms of BmdsRNase protein were not secreted into the growth medium, while they were detected in the pellets and supernatants of Hi5 cell extracts. Nucleic acids cleavage experiments indicated that full-length BmdsRNase could digest dsRNA and that the processed form (absence of signal peptide and propeptide) of BmdsRNase could degrade both DNA and dsRNA in Hi5 cell culture. Using a reporter assay targeted by transfected homologous dsRNA, it was shown that the digestive property of the processed form could interfere with the RNAi response. Immunostaining of processed BmdsRNase protein showed asymmetric localization in the cellular cytoplasm and co-localization with Flag-tagged Dicer-2 was also observed. In conclusion, our in vitro studies indicated that intracellular protein isoforms of BmdsRNase can be functional and involved in the regulation of nucleic acid metabolism in the cytoplasm. In particular, because of its propensity to degrade dsRNA, the enzyme might be involved in the innate immune response against invading nucleic acids such as RNA viruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional annotation, genome organization and phylogeny of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) terpene synthase gene family based on genome assembly, FLcDNA cloning, and enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane M; Aubourg, Sébastien; Schouwey, Marina B; Daviet, Laurent; Schalk, Michel; Toub, Omid; Lund, Steven T; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2010-10-21

    Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS) were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome assembly 1. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information about gene structure and phylogeny for the entire currently

  20. Research trends in radiobiology since 40 years. a new approach: the enzymatic repair function of DNA, internal factor in evolution of biological systems under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouton, R.

    1968-01-01

    In the first part of the report, the author attempts to draw an historical scheme of successive research working hypotheses in radiobiology since 1924. Less than a generation ago the effect of radiation exposure were viewed as being direct, immediate, irreparable and unmodifiable. Now it is generally accepted that radiation lesion can also be indirect, delayed, reparable and often modified with appropriate chemical or biochemical treatment. It was however in 1962-1964 that came the decisive breakthrough in radiobiology with the discovery that the cell possesses a natural active self-defense mechanism against whatever stress would affect the integrity of the genetic message contained in the DNA structure itself. The existence of what could be considered as a fourth DNA function i.e. self-repair by enzymatic action under genetic control-brings at least to radiobiology the missing molecular biology basis it needed to get out of its 'phenomenological night' after abandon of the generalization of Lea's theory through lack of experimental evidence. In the second part, which is a prospective one, the author tries to set an enlarged synthesis considering the possible role of DNA repair system not only in cell survival - in presence or absence of dose modifiers or mutagens - but also in the artificial and natural evolution of biological system exposed to sub-lethal doses of radiation. Most recent data from the literature fit well with what must be still considered as a general working hypothesis. Studies dealing with phenotypic and genotypic characters linked with the acquisition of gamma and UV radiation resistance in 'Escherichia coli K12' has been started by the author, in collaboration with O. Tremeau, in order to bring a new experimental contribution in this respect. (author) [fr

  1. The interrelations between malfunctioning DNA damage response (DDR) and the functionality of the neuro-glio-vascular unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilai, Ari

    2013-08-01

    A hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases is impairment of certain aspects of "brain functionality". Brain functionality is defined as the total input and output of the brain's neural circuits and networks. A given brain degenerative disorder does not deregulate total brain functionality but rather the activity of specific circuits in a given network, affecting their organization and topology, their cell numbers, their cellular functionality, and the interactions between neural circuits. Similarly, our concept of neurodegenerative diseases, which for many years revolved around neural survival or death, has now been extended to emphasize the role of glia. In particular, the role of glial cells in neuro-vascular communication is now known to be central to the effect of insults to the nervous system. In addition, a malfunctioning vascular system likely plays a role in the etiology of certain neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the symptoms of neurodegenerative or more correctly brain degenerative disease are, to a very large extent, a result of impairment in glial cells that lead to pathological neuro-vascular interactions that, in turn, generate a rather "hostile" environment in which the neurons fail to function. These events lead to systematic neural cell death on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. EFFECTOR OF TRANSCRIPTION2 is involved in xylem differentiation and includes a functional DNA single strand cutting domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Rumen; Tiedemann, Jens; Czihal, Andreas; Schallau, Anna; Diep, Le Hong; Mock, Hans-Peter; Claus, Bernhard; Tewes, Annegret; Bäumlein, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    EFFECTORS OF TRANSCRIPTION2 (ET) are plant-specific regulatory proteins characterized by the presence of two to five C-terminal DNA- and Zn-binding repeats, and a highly conserved cysteine pattern. We describe the structural characterization of the three member Arabidopsis thaliana ET gene family and reveal some allelic sequence polymorphisms. A mutation analysis showed that AtET2 affects the expression of various KNAT genes involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of cambial meristem cells. It also plays a role in the regulation of GA5 (gibberellin 3-beta-dioxygenase) and the cell-cycle-related GASA4. A correlation was established between AtET2 expression and the cellular differentiation state. AtET-GFP fusion proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus, with the AtET2 product prevented from entering the nucleus in non-differentiating cells. Within the nucleus, AtET2 probably acts via a single strand cutting domain. A more general regulatory role for ET factors is proposed, governing cell differentiation in cambial meristems, a crucial process for the development of plant vascular tissues.

  3. The sequential hypothesis on sleep function. II. A correlative study between sleep variables and newly synthesized brain DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, M V; Sadile, A G; Gironi Carnevale, U A; Mattiaccio, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-01-01

    The information acquired by brain during wakefulness (W) may be processed in two sequential steps occurring during synchronized sleep (SS) and paradoxical sleep (PS), respectively. On the assumption that brain molecules synthesized during the acquisition step undergo a comparable sleep processing, we have designed an experiment aimed at the verification of the sequential hypothesis. Groups of adult female Wistar rats received [3H-methyl] thymidine by intraventricular injection 30 min before being exposed to a 4 hr session of a two-way active avoidance training. Animals failing to achieve the learning criterion were further allowed a period of 3 hr during which they were left free to sleep, or were deprived of PS or of total sleep. Control rats were similarly treated, but were left in their home cages in the same training room during the period of acquisition. The results of correlative study among behavioral, sleep and biochemical variables demonstrate that the specific radioactivity of DNA in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brainstem is correlated with several variables of postacquisition sleep, mostly SS parameters. The correlations depend on the previous waking experience of the rats. The data substantiate the two main consequences of the hypothesis, i.e., (1) the involvement of SS in brain information processing; and (2) the dependence of the operations performed by the sleeping brain on the nature of the previous waking experience. The results also provide some insight into the kind of processing which occurs in the sleeping brain.

  4. An Approach to Elucidate NBS1 Function in DNA Repair Using Frequent Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in Wild Medaka (Oryzias latipes Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kento Igarashi

    Full Text Available Nbs1 is one of the genes responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, which is marked with high radiosensitivity. In human NBS1 (hNBS1, Q185E polymorphism is known as the factor to cancer risks, although its DSB repair defect has not been addressed. Here we investigated the genetic variations in medaka (Oryzias latipes wild populations, and found 40 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in medaka nbs1 (olnbs1 gene within 5 inbred strains. A mutation to histidine in Q170 residue in olNbs1, which corresponds to Q185 residue of hNBS1, was widely distributed in the closed colonies derived from the eastern Korean population of medaka. Overexpression of H170 type olNbs1 in medaka cultured cell lines resulted in the increased accumulation of olNbs1 at laser-induced DSB sites. Autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase at T2609 was suppressed after the γ-ray irradiation, which was followed by prolonged formation of γ-H2AX foci and delayed DSB repair. These findings suggested that the nonsynonymous SNP (Q170H in olnbs1, which induced DSB repair defects, is specifically distributed in the eastern Korean population of medaka. Furthermore, examination using the variation within wild populations might provide a novel method to characterize a driving force to spread the disease risk alleles.

  5. An Approach to Elucidate NBS1 Function in DNA Repair Using Frequent Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in Wild Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kento; Kobayashi, Junya; Katsumura, Takafumi; Urushihara, Yusuke; Hida, Kyohei; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oota, Hiroki; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Nbs1 is one of the genes responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, which is marked with high radiosensitivity. In human NBS1 (hNBS1), Q185E polymorphism is known as the factor to cancer risks, although its DSB repair defect has not been addressed. Here we investigated the genetic variations in medaka (Oryzias latipes) wild populations, and found 40 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in medaka nbs1 (olnbs1) gene within 5 inbred strains. A mutation to histidine in Q170 residue in olNbs1, which corresponds to Q185 residue of hNBS1, was widely distributed in the closed colonies derived from the eastern Korean population of medaka. Overexpression of H170 type olNbs1 in medaka cultured cell lines resulted in the increased accumulation of olNbs1 at laser-induced DSB sites. Autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase at T2609 was suppressed after the γ-ray irradiation, which was followed by prolonged formation of γ-H2AX foci and delayed DSB repair. These findings suggested that the nonsynonymous SNP (Q170H) in olnbs1, which induced DSB repair defects, is specifically distributed in the eastern Korean population of medaka. Furthermore, examination using the variation within wild populations might provide a novel method to characterize a driving force to spread the disease risk alleles.

  6. A microcantilever-based silver ion sensor using DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles as a mass amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Juneseok; Song, Yeongjin; Park, Chanho; Jang, Kuewhan; Na, Sungsoo

    2017-06-01

    Silver ions have been used to sterilize many products, however, it has recently been demonstrated that silver ions can be toxic. This toxicity has been studied over many years with the lethal concentration at 10 μM. Silver ions can accumulate through the food chain, causing serious health problems in many species. Hence, there is a need for a commercially available silver ion sensor, with high detection sensitivity. In this work, we develop an ultra-sensitive silver ion sensor platform, using cytosine based DNA and gold nanoparticles as the mass amplifier. We achieve a lower detection limit for silver ions of 10 pM; this detection limit is one million times lower than the toxic concentration. Using our sensor platform we examine highly selective characteristics of other typical ions in water from natural sources. Furthermore, our sensor platform is able to detect silver ions in a real practical sample of commercially available drinking water. Our sensor platform, which we have termed a ‘MAIS’ (mass amplifier ion sensor), with a simple detection procedure, high sensitivity, selectivity and real practical applicability has shown potential as an early toxicity assessment of silver ions in the environment.

  7. A functional SNP in the promoter region of TCOF1 is associated with reduced gene expression and YY1 DNA-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, Cibele; Armelin-Correa, Lucia M; Splendore, Alessandra; Lin, Chin J; Barbosa, Angela; Sogayar, Mari C; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2005-10-10

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant craniofacial malformation caused by null mutations in the TCOF1 gene. High inter and intra familial clinical variability, ranging from mild malar hypoplasia to perinatal death due to airway collapse is observed, but, to date, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been reported. Considering haploinsufficiency as the molecular mechanism underlying the disease, we have hypothesized that mutations in the promoter region of the gene, which has never been previously characterized, in trans with a pathogenic mutation, could modulate the phenotype. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to determine the TCOF1 gene's core promoter and to identify mutations in this region that could contribute to the phenotypic variation observed in this syndrome. We have delimitated the minimal promoter to a region of less than 150 bp, with 63% of identity among 5 different species. We screened 1.2 kbp of the TCOF1 5' flanking sequence in the DNA obtained from 21 patients and 51 controls and identified four new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), one of which (-346C>T), was proved to be functional, as it decreased the promoter activity by 38%. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) analysis demonstrated that the -346T allele impairs DNA-binding to the YY1 transcription factor. This promoter variant represents a candidate allele to explain the clinical variability in patients bearing TCS.

  8. Electron Resonance Decay into a Biological Function: Decrease in Viability of E. coli Transformed by Plasmid DNA Irradiated with 0.5-18 eV Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouass Sahbani, S; Cloutier, P; Bass, A D; Hunting, D J; Sanche, L

    2015-10-01

    Transient negative ions (TNIs) are ubiquitous in electron-molecule scattering at low electron impact energies (0-20 eV) and are particularly effective in damaging large biomolecules. Because ionizing radiation generates mostly 0-20 eV electrons, TNIs are expected to play important roles in cell mutagenesis and death during radiotherapeutic cancer treatment, although this hypothesis has never been directly verified. Here, we measure the efficiency of transforming E. coli bacteria by inserting into the cells, pGEM-3ZfL(-) plasmid DNA that confers resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin. Before transformation, plasmids are irradiated with electrons of specific energies between 0.5 and 18 eV. The loss of transformation efficiency plotted as a function of irradiation energy reveals TNIs at 5.5 and 9.5 eV, corresponding to similar states observed in the yields of DNA double strand breaks. We show that TNIs are detectable in the electron-energy dependence of a biological process and can decrease cell viability.

  9. DNA Replication Arrest and DNA Damage Responses Induced by Alkylating Minor Groove Binders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuo, Shue-Ru

    2001-01-01

    .... Both DNA-PK and the unknown factor are functioned as trans-acting inhibitors. RPA is the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA binding protein required for DNA replication, repair and recombination...

  10. The Reliability and Predictive Ability of a Biomarker of Oxidative DNA Damage on Functional Outcomes after Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Hsieh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the reliability of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, and determined its ability to predict functional outcomes in stroke survivors. The rehabilitation effect on 8-OHdG and functional outcomes were also assessed. Sixty-one stroke patients received a 4-week rehabilitation. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were determined by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. The test-retest reliability of 8-OHdG was good (interclass correlation coefficient = 0.76. Upper-limb motor function and muscle power determined by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA and Medical Research Council (MRC scales before rehabilitation showed significant negative correlation with 8-OHdG (r = −0.38, r = −0.30; p < 0.05. After rehabilitation, we found a fair and significant correlation between 8-OHdG and FMA (r = −0.34 and 8-OHdG and pain (r = 0.26, p < 0.05. Baseline 8-OHdG was significantly correlated with post-treatment FMA, MRC, and pain scores (r = −0.34, −0.31, and 0.25; p < 0.05, indicating its ability to predict functional outcomes. 8-OHdG levels were significantly decreased, and functional outcomes were improved after rehabilitation. The exploratory study findings conclude that 8-OHdG is a reliable and promising biomarker of oxidative stress and could be a valid predictor of functional outcomes in patients. Monitoring of behavioral indicators along with biomarkers may have crucial benefits in translational stroke research.

  11. Making the Bend: DNA Tertiary Structure and Protein-DNA Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Harteis; Sabine Schneider

    2014-01-01

    DNA structure functions as an overlapping code to the DNA sequence. Rapid progress in understanding the role of DNA structure in gene regulation, DNA damage recognition and genome stability has been made. The three dimensional structure of both proteins and DNA plays a crucial role for their specific interaction, and proteins can recognise the chemical signature of DNA sequence (“base readout”) as well as the intrinsic DNA structure (“shape recognition”). These recognition mechanisms do not e...

  12. Mitochondrial histone-like DNA-binding proteins are essential for normal cell growth and mitochondrial function in Crithidia fasciculata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Avliyakulov, N. K.; Lukeš, Julius; Ray, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2004), s. 518-526 ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5022302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : cell growth * mitochondrial function * Kinetoplastida Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.954, year: 2004

  13. The Reliability and Predictive Ability of a Biomarker of Oxidative DNA Damage on Functional Outcomes after Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Lin, Keh-Chung; Korivi, Mallikarjuna; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Wu, Ching-Yi; Wu, Kuen-Yuh

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the reliability of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and determined its ability to predict functional outcomes in stroke survivors. The rehabilitation effect on 8-OHdG and functional outcomes were also assessed. Sixty-one stroke patients received a 4-week rehabilitation. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were determined by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. The test-retest reliability of 8-OHdG was good (interclass correlation coefficient = 0.76). Upper-limb motor function and muscle power determined by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Medical Research Council (MRC) scales before rehabilitation showed significant negative correlation with 8-OHdG (r = −0.38, r = −0.30; p rehabilitation, we found a fair and significant correlation between 8-OHdG and FMA (r = −0.34) and 8-OHdG and pain (r = 0.26, p post-treatment FMA, MRC, and pain scores (r = −0.34, −0.31, and 0.25; p rehabilitation. The exploratory study findings conclude that 8-OHdG is a reliable and promising biomarker of oxidative stress and could be a valid predictor of functional outcomes in patients. Monitoring of behavioral indicators along with biomarkers may have crucial benefits in translational stroke research. PMID:24743892

  14. Effect of heavy metals on nitrification activity as measured by RNA- and DNA-based function-specific assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavy metals can inhibit nitrification, a key process for nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment. The transcriptional responses of functional genes (amoA, hao, nirK and norB) were measured in conjunction with specific oxygen uptake rate (sOUR) for nitrifying enrichment cultures...

  15. Concatenated logic circuits based on a three-way DNA junction: a keypad-lock security system with visible readout and an automatic reset function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junhua; Zhou, Shungui; Wen, Junlin

    2015-01-07

    Concatenated logic circuits operating as a biocomputing keypad-lock security system with an automatic reset function have been successfully constructed on the basis of toehold-mediated strand displacement and three-way-DNA-junction architecture. In comparison with previously reported keypad locks, the distinctive advantage of the proposed security system is that it can be reset and cycled spontaneously a large number of times without an external stimulus, thus making practical applications possible. By the use of a split-G-quadruplex DNAzyme as the signal reporter, the output of the keypad lock can be recognized readily by the naked eye. The "lock" is opened only when the inputs are introduced in an exact order. This requirement provides defense against illegal invasion to protect information at the molecular scale. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Protein and DNA technologies for functional expression of membrane-associated cytochromes P450 in bacterial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez Albacete, Dario

    The heavy dependence and massive consumption of fossil fuels by humans is changing our environment very rapidly. Some of the side effects of industrial activity include the pollution of the natural resources we rely on, and the reduction of biodiversity. Some chemicals found in nature exhibit great....... In most of biosynthetic pathways leading to these chemicals the cytochrome P450 enzyme family (P450s) is responsible for their final functionalization. However, the membrane-bound nature of P450s, makes their expression in microbial hosts a challenge. In order to meet the global demand for these natural......450 engineering guidelines and serves as platform to improve performance of microbial cells, thereby boosting recombinant production of complex plant P450-derived biochemicals. The knowledge generated, could guide future reconstruction of functional plant metabolic pathways leading to high valuable...

  17. A Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based genetic sensor for functional screening of vitamin D3 analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Sharma, Nynne; Bak, Rasmus Otkjær

    2011-01-01

    Analogues of vitamin D3 are extensively used in the treatment of various illnesses, such as osteoporosis, inflammatory skin diseases, and cancer. Functional testing of new vitamin D3 analogues and formulations for improved systemic and topical administration is supported by sensitive screening...... methods that allow a comparative evaluation of drug properties. As a new tool in functional screening of vitamin D3 analogues, we describe a genomically integratable sensor for sensitive drug detection. This system facilitates assessment of the pharmacokinetic and pharmadynamic properties of vitamin D3...... analogues. The tri-cistronic genetic sensor encodes a drug-sensoring protein, a reporter protein expressed from an activated sensor-responsive promoter, and a resistance marker....

  18. DNA-based Artificial Nanostructures: Fabrication, Properties, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Young; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2005-01-01

    Table of Content 1. Introduction 2. DNA fundamentals 3. Attachment of DNA to surface 4. Fabrication of nanostructures using DNA 4.1 Nanostructures of pure DNA 4.2 DNA-based assembly of metal nanoparticles 4.3 Construction of semiconductor particle arrays using DNA 4.4 DNA-directed nanowires 4.5 DNA-functionalized carbon nanotubes 4.6 Field-transistor based on DNA 4.7 Nanofabrication using artificial DNA 5. DNA-based nanostructures as biosensors 6. Properties of DNA-linked gold nanoparticles 6...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  20. Modeling DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is life's most amazing molecule. It carries the genetic instructions that almost every organism needs to develop and reproduce. In the human genome alone, there are some three billion DNA base pairs. The most difficult part of teaching DNA structure, however, may be getting students to visualize something as small as a…

  1. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation introduces an m1G37 modification into tRNAMet, altering its structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Xue, Ling; Chen, Yaru; Li, Haiying; He, Qiufen; Wang, Bibin; Meng, Feilong; Wang, Meng; Guan, Min-Xin

    2018-01-26

    Defective nucleotide modifications of mitochondrial tRNAs have been associated with several human diseases, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we investigated the pathogenic molecular mechanism underlying a hypertension-associated 4435A→G mutation in mitochondrial tRNA Met The m.4435A→G mutation affected a highly conserved adenosine at position 37, 3' adjacent to the tRNA's anticodon, which is important for the fidelity of codon recognition and stabilization. We hypothesized that the m.4435A→G mutation introduced an m 1 G37 modification of tRNA Met , altering its structure and function. Primer extension and methylation activity assays indeed confirmed that the m.4435A→G mutation created a tRNA methyltransferase 5 (TRMT5)-catalyzed m 1 G37 modification of tRNA Met We found that this mutation altered the tRNA Met structure, indicated by an increased melting temperature and electrophoretic mobility of the mutated tRNA compared with the wildtype molecule. We demonstrated that cybrid cell lines carrying the m.4435A→G mutation exhibited significantly decreased efficiency in aminoacylation and steady-state levels of tRNA Met , as compared with those of control cybrids. The aberrant tRNA Met metabolism resulted in variable decreases in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded polypeptides in the mutant cybrids. Furthermore, we found that the m.4435A→G mutation caused respiratory deficiency, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in mutant cybrids. These results demonstrated that an aberrant m 1 G37 modification of mitochondrial tRNA Met affected the structure and function of its tRNA and consequently altered mitochondrial function. Our findings provide critical insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension, which is manifested by the deficient tRNA nucleotide modification. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and

  2. Functional Annotation, Genome Organization and Phylogeny of the Grapevine (Vitis vinifera Terpene Synthase Gene Family Based on Genome Assembly, FLcDNA Cloning, and Enzyme Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toub Omid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome assembly 1. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. Results We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. Conclusions The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information

  3. Contribution of transcription-coupled DNA repair to MMS-induced mutagenesis in E. coli strains deficient in functional AlkB protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesiński, Michał; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Sikora, Anna; Mielecki, Damian; Chojnacka, Aleksandra; Kozłowski, Marek; Krwawicz, Joanna; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta

    2010-06-01

    In Escherichia coli the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces defense systems (adaptive and SOS responses), DNA repair pathways, and mutagenesis. We have previously found that AlkB protein induced as part of the adaptive (Ada) response protects cells from the genotoxic and mutagenic activity of MMS. AlkB is a non-heme iron (II), alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that oxidatively demethylates 1meA and 3meC lesions in DNA, with recovery of A and C. Here, we studied the impact of transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) on MMS-induced mutagenesis in E. coli strain deficient in functional AlkB protein. Measuring the decline in the frequency of MMS-induced argE3-->Arg(+) revertants under transient amino acid starvation (conditions for TCR induction), we have found a less effective TCR in the BS87 (alkB(-)) strain in comparison with the AB1157 (alkB(+)) counterpart. Mutation in the mfd gene encoding the transcription-repair coupling factor Mfd, resulted in weaker TCR in MMS-treated and starved AB1157 mfd-1 cells in comparison to AB1157 mfd(+), and no repair in BS87 mfd(-) cells. Determination of specificity of Arg(+) revertants allowed to conclude that MMS-induced 1meA and 3meC lesions, unrepaired in bacteria deficient in AlkB, are the source of mutations. These include AT-->TA transversions by supL suppressor formation (1meA) and GC-->AT transitions by supB or supE(oc) formation (3meC). The repair of these lesions is partly Mfd-dependent in the AB1157 mfd-1 and totally Mfd-dependent in the BS87 mfd-1 strain. The nucleotide sequence of the mfd-1 allele shows that the mutated Mfd-1 protein, deprived of the C-terminal translocase domain, is unable to initiate TCR. It strongly enhances the SOS response in the alkB(-)mfd(-) bacteria but not in the alkB(+)mfd(-) counterpart. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Knockdown of SCF(Skp2 function causes double-parked accumulation in the nucleus and DNA re-replication in Drosophila plasmatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Kroeger

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, circulating hemocytes are derived from the cephalic mesoderm during the embryonic wave of hematopoiesis. These cells are contributed to the larva and persist through metamorphosis into the adult. To analyze this population of hemocytes, we considered data from a previously published RNAi screen in the hematopoietic niche, which suggested several members of the SCF complex play a role in lymph gland development. eater-Gal4;UAS-GFP flies were crossed to UAS-RNAi lines to knockdown the function of all known SCF complex members in a plasmatocyte-specific fashion, in order to identify which members are novel regulators of plasmatocytes. This specific SCF complex contains five core members: Lin-19-like, SkpA, Skp2, Roc1a and complex activator Nedd8. The complex was identified by its very distinctive large cell phenotype. Furthermore, these large cells stained for anti-P1, a plasmatocyte-specific antibody. It was also noted that the DNA in these cells appeared to be over-replicated. Gamma-tubulin and DAPI staining suggest the cells are undergoing re-replication as they had multiple centrioles and excessive DNA content. Further experimentation determined enlarged cells were BrdU-positive indicating they have progressed through S-phase. To determine how these cells become enlarged and undergo re-replication, cell cycle proteins were analyzed by immunofluorescence. This analysis identified three proteins that had altered subcellular localization in these enlarged cells: Cyclin E, Geminin and Double-parked. Previous research has shown that Double-parked must be degraded to exit S-phase, otherwise the DNA will undergo re-replication. When Double-parked was titrated from the nucleus by an excess of its inhibitor, geminin, the enlarged cells and aberrant protein localization phenotypes were partially rescued. The data in this report suggests that the SCF(Skp2 complex is necessary to ubiquitinate Double-parked during plasmatocyte cell division

  5. DNA polymerases eta and theta function in the same genetic pathway to generate mutations at A/T during somatic hypermutation of Ig genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Keiji; Ouchida, Rika; Hikida, Masaki; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Yokoi, Masayuki; Masutani, Chikahide; Seki, Mineaki; Wood, Richard D; Hanaoka, Fumio; O-Wang, Jiyang

    2007-06-15

    Somatic hypermutation of the Ig genes requires the activity of multiple DNA polymerases to ultimately introduce mutations at both A/T and C/G base pairs. Mice deficient for DNA polymerase eta (POLH) exhibited an approximately 80% reduction of the mutations at A/T, whereas absence of polymerase (POLQ) resulted in approximately 20% reduction of both A/T and C/G mutations. To investigate whether the residual A/T mutations observed in the absence of POLH are generated by POLQ and how these two polymerases might cooperate or compete with each other to generate A/T mutations, here we have established mice deficient for both POLH and POLQ. Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) mice, however, did not show a further decrease of A/T mutations as compared with Polh(-/-) mice, suggesting that POLH and POLQ function in the same genetic pathway in the generation of these mutations. Frequent misincorporation of nucleotides, in particular opposite template T, is a known feature of POLH, but the efficiency of extension beyond the misincorporation differs significantly depending on the nature of the mispairing. Remarkably, we found that POLQ catalyzed extension more efficiently than POLH from all types of mispaired termini opposite A or T. Moreover, POLQ was able to extend mispaired termini generated by POLH albeit at a relatively low efficiency. These results reveal genetic and biochemical interactions between POLH and POLQ and suggest that POLQ might cooperate with POLH to generate some of the A/T mutations during the somatic hypermutation of Ig genes.

  6. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  7. DNA nanomechanical devices for molecular biology and DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hongzhou

    The aim of nanotechnology is to put specific atomic and molecular species where we want them, when we want them there. Achieving such a dynamic and functional control could lead to molecular programming. Structural DNA nanotechnology offers a powerful route to this goal by combining stable branched DNA motifs with cohesive ends to produce objects, programmed nanomechanical devices and fixed or modified patterned lattices. In Chapter II, a two-armed nanorobotic device is built based on a DNA origami substrate. The arms face each other, ready to capture different DNA nanostructures into distinguishable nanopatterns. Combining with a simple error-correction protocol, we are able to achieve this goal in a nearly flawless fashion. In Chapter III, a DNA-based programmable assembly line is developed by combining three PX/JX2 cassettes and a novel DNA walker on a DNA origami substrate. This programmable assembly line can generate eight products by switching the cassettes to PX (ON) or JX2 (OFF) state when the DNA walker passes by. DNA nanomechanical devices hold the promise of controlling structure and performing exquisitely fine measurements on the molecular scale. Several DNA nanomechanical devices based on different biochemistry phenomena have been reported before. In Chapter IV, a scissors-based DNA device is built to measure the work that can be done by a DNA-bending protein (MutS) when it binds to DNA.

  8. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Goettel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to

  9. DNA Mismatch Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  10. Alternative end-joining of DNA breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schendel, Robin van

    2016-01-01

    DNA is arguably the most important molecule found in any organism, as it contains all information to perform cellular functions and enables continuity of species. It is continuously exposed to DNA-damaging agents both from endogenous and exogenous sources. To protect DNA against these sources of DNA

  11. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation alters the tertiary interaction and function of tRNALeu(UUR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Wang, Meng; Xue, Ling; Lin, Zhi; He, Qiufen; Shi, Wenwen; Chen, Yaru; Jin, Xiaofen; Li, Haiying; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Min-Xin

    2017-08-25

    Several mitochondrial tRNA mutations have been associated with hypertension, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we identified a novel homoplasmic 3253T→C mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) gene in a Han Chinese family with maternally inherited hypertension. The m.3253T→C mutation affected a highly conserved uridine at position 22 at the D-stem of tRNA Leu(UUR) , introducing a G-C base pairing (G13-C22) at the D-stem and a tertiary base pairing (C22-G46) between the D-stem and the variable loop. We therefore hypothesized that the m.3253T→C mutation altered both the structure and function of tRNA Leu(UUR) Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell lines derived from this Chinese family, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation perturbed the conformation and stability of tRNA Leu(UUR) , as suggested by faster electrophoretic mobility of mutated tRNA relative to the wild-type molecule. Northern blot analysis revealed an ∼45% decrease in the steady-state level of tRNA Leu(UUR) in the mutant cell lines carrying the m.3253T→C mutation, as compared with control cell lines. Moreover, an ∼35% reduction in aminoacylation efficiency of tRNA Leu(UUR) was observed in the m.3253T→C mutant cells. These alterations in tRNA Leu(UUR) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for those polypeptides with a high proportion of Leu(UUR) codons, such as ND6. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation decreased the activities of mitochondrial complexes I and V, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the cells. In conclusion, our findings may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. PEX12, the pathogenic gene of group III Zellweger syndrome: cDNA cloning by functional complementation on a CHO cell mutant, patient analysis, and characterization of PEX12p

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okumoto, K.; Shimozawa, N.; Kawai, A.; Tamura, S.; Tsukamoto, T.; Osumi, T.; Moser, H.; Wanders, R. J.; Suzuki, Y.; Kondo, N.; Fujiki, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Rat PEX12 cDNA was isolated by functional complementation of peroxisome deficiency of a mutant CHO cell line, ZP109 (K. Okumoto, A. Bogaki, K. Tateishi, T. Tsukamoto, T. Osumi, N. Shimozawa, Y. Suzuki, T. Orii, and Y. Fujiki, Exp. Cell Res. 233:11-20, 1997), using a transient transfection assay and

  13. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  14. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching Between Two DNA Bound States†

    OpenAIRE

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases DNA nick-joining and intermolecular DNA ligation. Yet, the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small angle x-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD)...

  15. Familial hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in cloned minipigs created by DNA transposition of a human PCSK9 gain-of-function mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Sørensen, Charlotte B; Kragh, Peter M; Christoffersen, Christina; Mortensen, Martin B; Tolbod, Lars P; Thim, Troels; Du, Yutao; Li, Juan; Liu, Ying; Moldt, Brian; Schmidt, Mette; Vajta, Gabor; Larsen, Torben; Purup, Stig; Bolund, Lars; Nielsen, Lars B; Callesen, Henrik; Falk, Erling; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Bentzon, Jacob F

    2013-01-02

    Lack of animal models with human-like size and pathology hampers translational research in atherosclerosis. Mouse models are missing central features of human atherosclerosis and are too small for intravascular procedures and imaging. Modeling the disease in minipigs may overcome these limitations, but it has proven difficult to induce rapid atherosclerosis in normal pigs by high-fat feeding alone, and genetically modified models similar to those created in mice are not available. D374Y gain-of-function mutations in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene cause severe autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia and accelerates atherosclerosis in humans. Using Sleeping Beauty DNA transposition and cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer, we created Yucatan minipigs with liver-specific expression of human D374Y-PCSK9. D374Y-PCSK9 transgenic pigs displayed reduced hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor levels, impaired LDL clearance, severe hypercholesterolemia, and spontaneous development of progressive atherosclerotic lesions that could be visualized by noninvasive imaging. This model should prove useful for several types of translational research in atherosclerosis.

  16. cDNA isolation, functional expression, and characterization of (+)-alpha-pinene synthase and (-)-alpha-pinene synthase from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda): stereocontrol in pinene biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael A; Wildung, Mark R; Williams, David C; Hyatt, David C; Croteau, Rodney

    2003-03-15

    The complex mixture of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes that comprises oleoresin provides the primary defense of conifers against bark beetles and their associated fungal pathogens. Monoterpene synthases produce the turpentine fraction of oleoresin, which allows mobilization of the diterpene resin acid component (rosin) and is also toxic toward invading insects; this is particularly the case for alpha-pinene, a prominent bicyclic monoterpene of pine turpentine. The stereochemistry of alpha-pinene is a critical determinant of host defense capability and has implications for host selection, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and tritrophic-level interactions. Pines produce both enantiomers of alpha-pinene, which appear to arise through antipodal reaction mechanisms by distinct enzymes. Using a cDNA library constructed with mRNA from flushing needles of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), we employed a homology-based cloning strategy to isolate, and confirm by functional expression, the genes encoding (+)-(3R:5R)-alpha-pinene synthase, (-)-(3S:5S)-alpha-pinene synthase, and several other terpene synthases. The pinene synthases, which produce mirror-image products, share only 66% amino acid identity (72% similarity) but are similar in general properties to other monoterpene synthases of gymnosperms. The stereochemical control of monoterpene cyclization reactions, the evolution of "antipodal" enzymes, and the implications of turpentine composition in ecological interactions are discussed.

  17. The Arginine/Lysine-Rich Element within the DNA-Binding Domain Is Essential for Nuclear Localization and Function of the Intracellular Pathogen Resistance 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kezhen; Wu, Yongyan; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zihan; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The mouse intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) gene plays important roles in mediating host immunity and previous work showed that it enhances macrophage apoptosis upon mycobacterium infection. However, to date, little is known about the regulation pattern of Ipr1 action. Recent studies have investigated the protein-coding genes and microRNAs regulated by Ipr1 in mouse macrophages, but the structure and the functional motif of the Ipr1 protein have yet to be explored. In this study, we analyzed the domains and functional motif of the Ipr1 protein. The resulting data reveal that Ipr1 protein forms a homodimer and that the Sp100-like domain mediates the targeting of Ipr1 protein to nuclear dots (NDs). Moreover, we found that an Ipr1 mutant lacking the classic nuclear localization signal (cNLS) also translocated into the nuclei, suggesting that the cNLS is not the only factor that directs Ipr1 nuclear localization. Additionally, mechanistic studies revealed that an arginine/lysine-rich element within the DNA-binding domain (SAND domain) is critical for Ipr1 binding to the importin protein receptor NPI-1, demonstrating that this element plays an essential role in mediating the nuclear localization of Ipr1 protein. Furthermore, our results show that this arginine/lysine-rich element contributes to the transcriptional regulation and apoptotic activity of Ipr1. These findings highlight the structural foundations of Ipr1 action and provide new insights into the mechanism of Ipr1-mediated resistance to mycobacterium.

  18. Tumor cell heterogeneity in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC: phenotypical and functional differences associated with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT and DNA methylation changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krohn

    Full Text Available Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC is a specific subtype of lung cancer presenting as highly metastatic disease with extremely poor prognosis. Despite responding initially well to chemo- or radiotherapy, SCLC almost invariably relapses and develops resistance to chemotherapy. This is suspected to be related to tumor cell subpopulations with different characteristics resembling stem cells. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT is known to play a key role in metastatic processes and in developing drug resistance. This is also true for NSCLC, but there is very little information on EMT processes in SCLC so far. SCLC, in contrast to NSCLC cell lines, grow mainly in floating cell clusters and a minor part as adherent cells. We compared these morphologically different subpopulations of SCLC cell lines for EMT and epigenetic features, detecting significant differences in the adherent subpopulations with high levels of mesenchymal markers such as Vimentin and Fibronectin and very low levels of epithelial markers like E-cadherin and Zona Occludens 1. In addition, expression of EMT-related transcription factors such as Snail/Snai1, Slug/Snai2, and Zeb1, DNA methylation patterns of the EMT hallmark genes, functional responses like migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteases secretion, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drug treatment all differed significantly between the sublines. This phenotypic variability might reflect tumor cell heterogeneity and EMT during metastasis in vivo, accompanied by the development of refractory disease in relapse. We propose that epigenetic regulation plays a key role during phenotypical and functional changes in tumor cells and might therefore provide new treatment options for SCLC patients.

  19. Gene structure, cDNA characterization and RNAi-based functional analysis of a myeloid differentiation factor 88 homolog in Tenebrio molitor larvae exposed to Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Patnaik, Hongray Howrelia; Seo, Gi Won; Jo, Yong Hun; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Bok Luel; Han, Yeon Soo

    2014-10-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), an intracellular adaptor protein involved in Toll/Toll-like receptor (TLR) signal processing, triggers activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) transcription factors. In the present study, we analyzed the gene structure and biological function of MyD88 in a coleopteran insect, Tenebrio molitor (TmMyD88). The TmMyD88 gene was 1380 bp in length and consisted of five exons and four introns. The 5'-flanking sequence revealed several putative transcription factor binding sites, such as STAT-4, AP-1, cJun, cfos, NF-1 and many heat shock factor binding elements. The cDNA contained a typical death domain, a conservative Toll-like interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain, and a C-terminal extension (CTE). The TmMyD88 TIR domain showed three significantly conserved motifs for interacting with the TIR domain of TLRs. TmMyD88 was grouped within the invertebrate cluster of the phylogenetic tree and shared 75% sequence identity with the TIR domain of Tribolium castaneum MyD88. Homology modeling of the TmMyD88 TIR domain revealed five parallel β-strands surrounded by five α-helices that adopted loop conformations to function as an adaptor. TmMyD88 expression was upregulated 7.3- and 4.79-fold after 12 and 6h, respectively, of challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and fungal β-1,3 glucan. Silencing of the TmMyD88 transcript by RNA interference led to reduced resistance of the host to infection by S. aureus. These results indicate that TmMyD88 is required for survival against Staphylococcus infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Using DNA looping to measure sequence dependent DNA elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandinov, Alan; Raghunathan, Krishnan; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2012-10-01

    We are using tethered particle motion (TPM) microscopy to observe protein-mediated DNA looping in the lactose repressor system in DNA constructs with varying AT / CG content. We use these data to determine the persistence length of the DNA as a function of its sequence content and compare the data to direct micromechanical measurements with constant-force axial optical tweezers. The data from the TPM experiments show a much smaller sequence effect on the persistence length than the optical tweezers experiments.

  1. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  2. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL I ARTICLE. DNA Vaccines. P N Rangarajan. History of Vaccine Development. The year 1996 marked the 200th anniversary of the first vaccine developed against smallpox by Edward Jenner. In the now- famous 1796 experiment, Jenner scratched ...

  3. Hyperstretching DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, Koen; Biebricher, Andreas S.; Sebregts, Maarten; Ten Bensel, Brian; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heller, Iddo; Storm, Cornelis; Van Der Schoot, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA is highly susceptible to changes by mechanical and biochemical cues in vivo and in vitro. In particular, large increases in base pair spacing compared to regular B-DNA are effected by mechanical (over)stretching and by intercalation of compounds that are widely

  4. Studies of viral DNA packaging motors with optical tweezers: a comparison of motor function in bacteriophages φ29, λ, and T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas E.; Fuller, Derek N.; Raymer, Dorian M.; Rickgauer, Peter; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Catalano, Carlos E.; Kottadiel, Vishal; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2007-09-01

    A key step in the assembly of many viruses is the packaging of double-stranded DNA into a viral procapsid (an empty protein shell) by the action of an ATP-powered portal motor complex. We have developed methods to measure the packaging of single DNA molecules into single viral proheads in real time using optical tweezers. We can measure DNA binding and initiation of translocation, the DNA translocation dynamics, and the filling of the capsid against resisting forces. In addition to studying bacteriophage φ29, we have recently extended these methods to study the E. coli bacteriophages λ and T4, two important model systems in molecular biology. The three systems have different capsid sizes/shapes, genome lengths, and biochemical and structural differences in their packaging motors. Here, we compare and contrast these three systems. We find that all three motors translocate DNA processively and generate very large forces, each exceeding 50 piconewtons, ~20x higher force than generated by the skeletal muscle myosin 2 motor. This high force generation is required to overcome the forces resisting the confinement of the stiff, highly charged DNA at high density within the viral capsids. However, there are also striking differences between the three motors: they exhibit different DNA translocation rates, degrees of static and dynamic disorder, responses to load, and pausing and slipping dynamics.

  5. Sequence specific cleavage of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 gene by a hammer-head ribozyme and a DNA-enzyme: inhibition of the coreceptor function by DNA-enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goila, R; Banerjea, A C

    1998-10-02

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is used as a major coreceptor for fusion and entry by non-syncytia inducing macrophage tropic isolates of HIV-1, which is mainly involved in transmission. Individuals who are homozygous for the delta32 allele of CCR5 are usually resistant to HIV-1 infection and continue to lead a normal healthy life. Thus this gene is dispensable and is, therefore, an attractive target in the host cell for interfering specifically with the virus-host interaction. With the aim to develop a specific antiviral approach at the molecular level, we have synthesized a hammer-head ribozyme and a DNA-enzyme. Both ribozyme and DNA-enzyme cleaved the CCR5 RNA in a sequence specific manner. This cleavage was protein independent but Mg2+ dependent. The extent of cleavage increased with increasing concentration of magnesium chloride. DNA-enzyme was more effective in cleaving a full length (1376 bases) in vitro generated transcript of CCR5 gene. In this communication, we show that the DNA-enzyme when introduced into a mammalian cell, results in decreased CD4-CCR5-gp160 mediated fusion of cell membranes. Potential applications of these trans acting molecules are discussed.

  6. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  7. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, polyamides and more recently engineered proteins, there remains an urgent need for synthetic ligands that enable specific recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA to accelerate studies aiming at detecting, regulating......'-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...

  8. Dancing on DNA : Kinetic Aspects of Search Processes on DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafvizi, Anahita; Mirny, Leonid A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition and binding of specific sites on DNA by proteins is central for many cellular functions such as transcription, replication, and recombination. In the search for its target site, the DNA-associated protein is facing both thermodynamic and kinetic difficulties. The thermodynamic challenge

  9. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  10. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  11. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom (Scripps); (Maryland-MED); (WU-MED); (LBNL)

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  12. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed...

  13. Toward larger DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Alexandria N; Saaem, Ishtiaq; Vogen, Briana N; Brown, Stanley; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-10-08

    Structural DNA nanotechnology, and specifically scaffolded DNA origami, is rapidly developing as a versatile method for bottom-up fabrication of novel nanometer-scale materials and devices. However, lengths of conventional single-stranded scaffolds, for example, 7,249-nucleotide circular genomic DNA from the M13mp18 phage, limit the scales of these uniquely addressable structures. Additionally, increasing DNA origami size generates the cost burden of increased staple-strand synthesis. We addressed this 2-fold problem by developing the following methods: (1) production of the largest to-date biologically derived single-stranded scaffold using a λ/M13 hybrid virus to produce a 51 466-nucleotide DNA in a circular, single-stranded form and (2) inexpensive DNA synthesis via an inkjet-printing process on a chip embossed with functionalized micropillars made from cyclic olefin copolymer. We have experimentally demonstrated very efficient assembly of a 51-kilobasepair origami from the λ/M13 hybrid scaffold folded by chip-derived staple strands. In addition, we have demonstrated two-dimensional, asymmetric origami sheets with controlled global curvature such that they land on a substrate in predictable orientations that have been verified by atomic force microscopy.

  14. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  15. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  16. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  17. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  18. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed......Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...

  19. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  20. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Satellite DNA and related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich J.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite DNA, also known as tandemly repeated DNA, consists of clusters of repeated sequences and represents a diverse class of highly repetitive elements. Satellite DNA can be divided into several classes according to the size of an individual repeat: microsatellites, minisatellites, midisatellites, and macrosatellites. Originally considered as «junk» DNA, satellite DNA has more recently been reconsidered as having various functions. Moreover, due to the repetitive nature of the composing elements, their presence in the genome is associated with high frequency mutations, epigenetic changes and modifications in gene expression patterns, with a potential to lead to human disease. Therefore, the satellite DNA study will be beneficial for developing a treatment of satellite-related diseases, such as FSHD, neurological, developmental disorders and cancers.

  2. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  3. Exposure to 1.8 GHz electromagnetic fields affects morphology, DNA-related Raman spectra and mitochondrial functions in human lympho-monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalvia, M; Scrima, R; Perna, G; Piccoli, C; Capitanio, N; Biagi, P F; Schiavulli, L; Ligonzo, T; Centra, M; Casamassima, G; Ermini, A; Capozzi, V

    2018-01-01

    Blood is a fluid connective tissue of human body, where it plays vital functions for the nutrition, defense and well-being of the organism. When circulating in peripheral districts, it is exposed to some physical stresses coming from outside the human body, as electromagnetic fields (EMFs) which can cross the skin. Such fields may interact with biomolecules possibly inducing non thermal-mediated biological effects at the cellular level. In this study, the occurrence of biochemical/biological modifications in human peripheral blood lympho-monocytes exposed in a reverberation chamber for times ranging from 1 to 20 h to EMFs at 1.8 GHz frequency and 200 V/m electric field strength was investigated. Morphological analysis of adherent cells unveiled, in some of these, appearance of an enlarged and deformed shape after EMFs exposure. Raman spectra of the nuclear compartment of cells exposed to EMFs revealed the onset of biochemical modifications, mainly consisting in the reduction of the DNA backbone-linked vibrational modes. Respirometric measurements of mitochondrial activity in intact lympho-monocytes resulted in increase of the resting oxygen consumption rate after 20 h of exposure, which was coupled to a significant increase of the FoF1-ATP synthase-related oxygen consumption. Notably, at lower time-intervals of EMFs exposure (i.e. 5 and 12 h) a large increase of the proton leak-related respiration was observed which, however, recovered at control levels after 20 h exposure. Confocal microscopy analysis of the mitochondrial membrane potential supported the respiratory activities whereas no significant variations in the mitochondrial mass/morphology was observed in EMFs-exposed lympho-monocytes. Finally, altered redox homeostasis was shown in EMFs-exposed lympho-monocytes, which progressed differently in nucleated cellular subsets. This results suggest the occurrence of adaptive mechanisms put in action, likely via redox signaling, to compensate for early impairments

  4. Structural, molecular and cellular functions of MSH2 and MSH6 during DNA mismatch repair, damage signaling and other noncanonical activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelbrock, Michael A.; Kaliyaperumal, Saravanan; Williams, Kandace J.

    2013-01-01

    The field of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) has rapidly expanded after the discovery of the MutHLS repair system in bacteria. By the mid 1990s yeast and human homologues to bacterial MutL and MutS had been identified and their contribution to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome) was under intense investigation. The human MutS homologue 6 protein (hMSH6), was first reported in 1995 as a G:T binding partner (GTBP) of hMSH2, forming the hMutSα mismatch-binding complex. Signal transduction from each DNA-bound hMutSα complex is accomplished by the hMutLα heterodimer (hMLH1 and hPMS2). Molecular mechanisms and cellular regulation of individual MMR proteins are now areas of intensive research. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms associated with mismatch binding, as well as emerging evidence that MutSα and in particular, MSH6, is a key protein in MMR-dependent DNA damage response and communication with other DNA repair pathways within the cell. MSH6 is unstable in the absence of MSH2, however it is the DNA lesion-binding partner of this heterodimer. MSH6, but not MSH2, has a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif that recognizes and binds several different DNA structural distortions, initiating different cellular responses. hMSH6 also contains the nuclear localization sequences required to shuttle hMutSα into the nucleus. For example, upon binding to O6meG:T, MSH6 triggers a DNA damage response that involves altered phosphorylation within the N-terminal disordered domain of this unique protein. While many investigations have focused on MMR as a post-replication DNA repair mechanism, MMR proteins are expressed and active in all phases of the cell cycle. There is much more to be discovered about regulatory cellular roles that require the presence of MutSα and, in particular, MSH6. PMID:23391514

  5. Chl12 (Ctf18) Forms a Novel Replication Factor C-Related Complex and Functions Redundantly with Rad24 in the DNA Replication Checkpoint Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Naiki, Takahiro; Kondo, Tae; Nakada, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Sugimoto, Katsunori

    2001-01-01

    RAD24 has been identified as a gene essential for the DNA damage checkpoint in budding yeast. Rad24 is structurally related to subunits of the replication factor C (RFC) complex, and forms an RFC-related complex with Rfc2, Rfc3, Rfc4, and Rfc5. The rad24Δ mutation enhances the defect of rfc5-1 in the DNA replication block checkpoint, implicating RAD24 in this checkpoint. CHL12 (also called CTF18) encodes a protein that is structurally related to the Rad24 and RFC proteins. We show here that a...

  6. DNA nanovehicles and the biological barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Anders Hauge; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    DNA is emerging as a smart material to construct nanovehicles for targeted drug delivery. The programmability of Watson-Crick base paring enables construction of defined and dynamic DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shape and DNA can readily be functionalized with a variety of molecular...... be overcome. Here, we highlight recent strategies for DNA nanostructures in drug delivery, DNA nanovehicles, to facilitate targeting and crossing of the biological barriers. In light of this, we discuss future solutions and challenges for DNA nanovehicles to unravel their great potential to facilitate...

  7. DNA nanochannels [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianming Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane proteins are mostly nanochannels playing a highly important role in metabolism. Understanding their structures and functions is vital for revealing life processes. It is of fundamental interest to develop chemical devices to mimic biological channels. Structural DNA nanotechnology has been proven to be a promising method for the preparation of fine DNA nanochannels as a result of the excellent properties of DNA molecules. This review presents the development history and current situation of three different types of DNA nanochannel: tile-based nanotube, DNA origami nanochannel, and DNA bundle nanochannel.

  8. Structural and Functional Insights into WRKY3 and WRKY4 Transcription Factors to Unravel the WRKY–DNA (W-Box Complex Interaction in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.. A Computational Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Aamir

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The WRKY transcription factors (TFs, play crucial role in plant defense response against various abiotic and biotic stresses. The role of WRKY3 and WRKY4 genes in plant defense response against necrotrophic pathogens is well-reported. However, their functional annotation in tomato is largely unknown. In the present work, we have characterized the structural and functional attributes of the two identified tomato WRKY transcription factors, WRKY3 (SlWRKY3, and WRKY4 (SlWRKY4 using computational approaches. Arabidopsis WRKY3 (AtWRKY3: NP_178433 and WRKY4 (AtWRKY4: NP_172849 protein sequences were retrieved from TAIR database and protein BLAST was done for finding their sequential homologs in tomato. Sequence alignment, phylogenetic classification, and motif composition analysis revealed the remarkable sequential variation between, these two WRKYs. The tomato WRKY3 and WRKY4 clusters with Solanum pennellii showing the monophyletic origin and evolution from their wild homolog. The functional domain region responsible for sequence specific DNA-binding occupied in both proteins were modeled [using AtWRKY4 (PDB ID:1WJ2 and AtWRKY1 (PDBID:2AYD as template protein structures] through homology modeling using Discovery Studio 3.0. The generated models were further evaluated for their accuracy and reliability based on qualitative and quantitative parameters. The modeled proteins were found to satisfy all the crucial energy parameters and showed acceptable Ramachandran statistics when compared to the experimentally resolved NMR solution structures and/or X-Ray diffracted crystal structures (templates. The superimposition of the functional WRKY domains from SlWRKY3 and SlWRKY4 revealed remarkable structural similarity. The sequence specific DNA binding for two WRKYs was explored through DNA-protein interaction using Hex Docking server. The interaction studies found that SlWRKY4 binds with the W-box DNA through WRKYGQK with Tyr408, Arg409, and Lys419 with the

  9. Functional capacity of XRCC1 protein variants identified in DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines and the human population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berquist, Brian R; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Fan, Jinshui

    2010-01-01

    XRCC1 operates as a scaffold protein in base excision repair, a pathway that copes with base and sugar damage in DNA. Studies using recombinant XRCC1 proteins revealed that: a C389Y substitution, responsible for the repair defects of the EM-C11 CHO cell line, caused protein instability; a V86R mu...

  10. An efficient method for the construction of functionalized DNA bearing amino acid groups through cross-coupling reactions of nucleoside triphosphates followed by primer extension or PCR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, Petr; Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal; Gloeckner, Ch.; Marx, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 21 (2007), s. 6196-6203 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/05/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleoside triphosphates * cross-coupling * DNA Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.330, year: 2007

  11. The protective immune response against Pseudorabies virus induced by DNA vaccination is impaired if the plasmid harbors a functional Porcine circovirus type 2 rep and origin of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurez, Florence; Grasland, Béatrice; Béven, Véronique; Cariolet, Roland; Keranflec'h, André; Henry, Aurélie; Jestin, André; Dory, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    A plasmid rendered replicative in mammalian cells by inserting the Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) origin of replication and replicase gene (Ori-rep) has been previously constructed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if the replication capacity of this plasmid could be advantageously used to improve the protective immunity induced by DNA vaccination. In this case we used the porcine Pseudorabies virus (PrV) DNA vaccination model. The replicative capacity of the DNA vaccine did not improve the protective immunity against PrV in pigs, but on the contrary the presence of the PCV2 Ori-rep sequence was harmful in the induction of this immunity compared to an equivalent but non-replicative DNA vaccine. In addition, the distribution and the persistence of the replicative and non-replicative plasmids inside the body were the same. This is the first study showing an in vivo deleterious effect of the replicative active PCV2 Ori-rep on the natural and specific protection against PrV infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Negative regulation of DNA methylation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saze, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Taku; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    Cytosine methylation of repeats and genes is important for coordination of genome stability and proper gene function. In plants, DNA methylation is regulated by DNA methyltransferases, chromatin remodeling factors and RNAi machinery. Ectopic DNA hypermethylation at genes causes transcriptional repression and silencing, and the methylation patterns often become heritable over generations. DNA methylation is antagonized by the DNA demethylation enzymes. Recently, we identified a novel jmjC-domain containing gene IBM1 (increase in bonsai methylation1) that also negatively regulates DNA methylation in Arabidopsis. The ibm1 plants show a variety of developmental phenotypes. IBM1 prevents ectopic accumulation of DNA methylation at the BNS genic region, likely through removal of heterochromatic H3K9 methylation mark. DNA and histone demethylation pathways are important for genome-wide patterning of DNA methylation and for epigenetic regulation of plant development.

  13. A biosensing of Toxoplasma gondii DNA with CdTe/Fe3O4 dual functional quantum dot as reporter group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chu; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Tielin; Zi, Yan; Liu, Jingwei; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intestinal coccidium that parasitizes members of the cat family as definitive hosts and has a wide range of intermediate hosts. Infection is common in many warm-blooded animals, including humans, the early detection of Toxoplasma gondii was concerned in recent years. In the current research, we presented a fast, specific, and sensitive sensing probe to detect Toxoplasma gondii DNA based on mechanism of fluorescence energy transfer (FRET), and a magnetic-fluorescent CdTe/Fe3O4 core-shell quantum dots (mQDs) was utilized as energy donor, and a commercial quencher (BHQ-2) was used as energy acceptor, respectively. The CdTe/Fe3O4 mQDs were prepared by layer-by-layer (LBL) process at ambient temperature. The sensing probe was fabricated through labeling a stem-loop Toxoplasma gondii DNA oligonucleotide with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively, and the resulting sensing probe can be simply isolated and purified from the reactant with a common magnet. Properties of mQDs and sensing probe were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectrum (FS). The TEM data demonstrated that the size of mQDs was ~20nm. the FS data indicated fluorescence intensity (FI) was doubled after the complete complimentary target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was introduced comparing with the FI before addition of target Toxoplasma gondii DNA. Moreover, only weak FI change was observed when the target DNA with one-mismatch base pair was added, this result revealed the sensing probe has high sensitivity and specificity. The current sensing probe will has great potential applications in the life science and related research.

  14. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Eric; Verkaik, Nicole S; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van Gent, Dik C

    2003-12-15

    DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks the action of exonucleases and ligases. The DNA termini become accessible after autophosphorylation of DNA-PK(CS), which we demonstrate to require synapsis of DNA ends. Interestingly, the presence of DNA-PK prevents ligation of the two synapsed termini, but allows ligation to another DNA molecule. This alteration of the ligation route is independent of the type of ligase that we used, indicating that the intrinsic architecture of the DNA-PK complex itself is not able to support ligation of the synapsed DNA termini. We present a working model in which DNA-PK creates a stable molecular bridge between two DNA ends that is remodeled after DNA-PK autophosphorylation in such a way that the extreme termini become accessible without disrupting synapsis. We infer that joining of synapsed DNA termini would require an additional protein factor.

  15. Mechanisms for radiation damadge in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    A comprehensive report is provided of the author`s research since 1986 on radiolysis of DNA as well as current state of knowledge in this area. In particular study areas such as the influence of hydration on the absolute yield of primary ionic free radicals in irradiated DNA at 77K, Ab Initio molecular orbital calculations of DNA base pairs and their radical ions, and radiation-induced DNA damage as a function of hydration are discussed.

  16. DNA Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  17. Master equation approach to DNA breathing in heteropolymer DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Banik, Suman K; Lomholt, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    After crossing an initial barrier to break the first base-pair (bp) in double-stranded DNA, the disruption of further bps is characterized by free energies up to a few k(B)T. Thermal motion within the DNA double strand therefore causes the opening of intermittent single-stranded denaturation zones......, the DNA bubbles. The unzipping and zipping dynamics of bps at the two zipper forks of a bubble, where the single strand of the denatured zone joins the still intact double strand, can be monitored by single molecule fluorescence or NMR methods. We here establish a dynamic description of this DNA breathing...... in a heteropolymer DNA with given sequence in terms of a master equation that governs the time evolution of the joint probability distribution for the bubble size and position along the sequence. The transfer coefficients are based on the Poland-Scheraga free energy model. We derive the autocorrelation function...

  18. From Function to Phenotype: Impaired DNA Binding and Clustering Correlates with Clinical Severity in Males with Missense Mutations in MECP2

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh, Taimoor I.; Ausi?, Juan; Faghfoury, Hannah; Silver, Josh; Lane, Jane B.; Eubanks, James H.; MacLeod, Patrick; Percy, Alan K.; Vincent, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT). MeCP2 binds to chromocentric DNA through its methyl CpG-binding domain (MBD) to regulate gene expression. In heterozygous females the variable phenotypic severity is modulated by non-random X-inactivation, thus making genotype-phenotype comparisons unreliable. However, genotype-phenotype correlations in males with hemizygousMECP2 mutations can provide more accurate insights in to the true biological effect of specific mutations. Here, we ...

  19. Higher-order organisation of extremely amplified, potentially functional and massively methylated 5S rDNA in European pikes (Esox sp.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Symonová, R.; Ocalewicz, K.; Kirtiklis, L.; Delmastro, G. B.; Pelikánová, Šárka; Garcia, S.; Kovařík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 391 (2017), č. článku 391. ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-02940S; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : rDNA * evolution * chromosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 3.729, year: 2016

  20. Nanomechanical molecular devices made of DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Ohya, Yuichi

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Eight years have passed since the striking debut of the DNA origami technique ( Rothemund, P. W. K. Nature 2006 , 440 , 297 - 302 ), in which long single-stranded DNA is folded into a designed nanostructure, in either 2D or 3D, with the aid of many short staple strands. The number of proposals for new design principles for DNA origami structures seems to have already reached a peak. It is apparent that DNA origami study is now entering the second phase of creating practical applications. The development of functional nanomechanical molecular devices using the DNA origami technique is one such application attracting significant interest from researchers in the field. Nanomechanical DNA origami devices, which maintain the characteristics of DNA origami structures, have various advantages over conventional DNA nanomachines. Comparatively high assembly yield, relatively large size visible via atomic force microscopy (AFM) or transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the capability to assemble multiple functional groups with precision using multiple staple strands are some of the advantages of the DNA origami technique for constructing sophisticated molecular devices. This Account describes the recent developments of such nanomechanical DNA origami devices and reviews the emerging target of DNA origami studies. First, simple "dynamic" DNA origami structures with transformation capability, such as DNA origami boxes and a DNA origami hatch with structure control, are briefly summarized. More elaborate nanomechanical DNA origami devices are then reviewed. The first example describes DNA origami pinching devices that can be used as "single-molecule" beacons to detect a variety of biorelated molecules, from metal ions at the size of a few tens of atomic mass number units to relatively gigantic proteins with a molecular mass greater than a hundred kilodaltons, all on a single platform. Clamshell-like DNA nanorobots equipped with logic gates can discriminate

  1. Evolution of DNA Methylation across Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kevin J.; Moore, Allen J.; Schmitz, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation contributes to gene and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, and therefore has been hypothesized to facilitate the evolution of plastic traits such as sociality in insects. However, DNA methylation is sparsely studied in insects. Therefore, we documented patterns of DNA methylation across a wide diversity of insects. We predicted that underlying enzymatic machinery is concordant with patterns of DNA methylation. Finally, given the suggestion that DNA methylation facilitated social evolution in Hymenoptera, we tested the hypothesis that the DNA methylation system will be associated with presence/absence of sociality among other insect orders. We found DNA methylation to be widespread, detected in all orders examined except Diptera (flies). Whole genome bisulfite sequencing showed that orders differed in levels of DNA methylation. Hymenopteran (ants, bees, wasps and sawflies) had some of the lowest levels, including several potential losses. Blattodea (cockroaches and termites) show all possible patterns, including a potential loss of DNA methylation in a eusocial species whereas solitary species had the highest levels. Species with DNA methylation do not always possess the typical enzymatic machinery. We identified a gene duplication event in the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) that is shared by some Hymenoptera, and paralogs have experienced divergent, nonneutral evolution. This diversity and nonneutral evolution of underlying machinery suggests alternative DNA methylation pathways may exist. Phylogenetically corrected comparisons revealed no evidence that supports evolutionary association between sociality and DNA methylation. Future functional studies will be required to advance our understanding of DNA methylation in insects. PMID:28025279

  2. Combining reactive triblock copolymers with functional cross-linkers: A versatile pathway to disulfide stabilized-polyplex libraries and their application as pDNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Philipp; Hobernik, Dominika; Lächelt, Ulrich; Schinnerer, Meike; Weber, Benjamin; Schmidt, Manfred; Wagner, Ernst; Bros, Matthias; Barz, Matthias

    2017-07-28

    Therapeutic nucleic acids such as pDNA hold great promise for the treatment of multiple diseases. These therapeutic interventions are, however, compromised by the lack of efficient and safe non-viral delivery systems, which guarantee stability during blood circulation together with high transfection efficiency. To provide these desired properties within one system, we propose the use of reactive triblock copolypept(o)ides, which include a stealth-like block for