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Sample records for adenine nucleotides

  1. Radiation and thermal stabilities of adenine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V V; Potaman, V N; Solyanina, I P; Trofimov, V I

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated in detail radiation and thermal stabilities and transformations of adenosine mono- and triphosphates in liquid and frozen solid aqueous solutions within a wide range of absorbed radiation dose (up to 75 kGy) and temperature (up to 160 degrees C). Dephosphorylation is the main pathway of high temperature hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of this process have been determined. Radiolysis of investigated compounds at room temperature results in scission of N-glycosidic bond with a radiation yield about of 1 mol/100 eV. Solution freezing significantly enhances radiation stability of nucleotides as well as other biomolecules. This circumstance is essential in the discussion of panspermia concepts.

  2. Adenine nucleotides of the stria vascularis.

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    Thalmann, I; Marcus, N Y; Thalmann, R

    1979-01-01

    The levels of the adenine nucleotides ATP, ADP, and AMP in the stria vascularis were measured under normal conditions, and following various durations of ischemia. The concentrations of these compounds were used for the calculation of the adenylate energy charge, the energy status and the phosphorylation state of the stria. Following 10 min of ischemia the adenylate energy charge had decreased three fold, the energy status seven fold and the phosphorylation state 14 fold. To study the potential for recovery of strial function following various brief and prolonged ischemic intervals, a method for the perfusion of the ear via the anterior inferior cerebellar artery was developed. For various reasons it was found advantageous to use "artifical blood" as perfusate, relying upon fluorocarbons as oxygen carriers. The endolymphatic potential was used as electrical indicator of strial function. Recovery of the endolymphatic potential following brief periods of ischemia was paralleled by a corresponding increase of the ATP levels and a drastic decrease of the AMP levels of the stria vascularis. Preliminary results on the effects of substrate-free perfusion are presented.

  3. Adenine nucleotide concentrations in patients with erythrocyte autoantibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Strong, V F; Sokol, R J; Rodgers, S A; Hewitt, S.

    1985-01-01

    Erythrocyte adenine nucleotide concentrations were measured in 154 patients with erythrocyte autoantibodies and 811 normal subjects using a luciferin-luciferase bioluminescent assay. The patients were initially divided into haemolysing and non-haemolysing groups. Red cell adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were significantly raised in the 96 patients with active haemolysis compared with the normal subjects and with the 58 patients in the non-haemolysing group. Although the patients c...

  4. Effects of hypobaric hypoxia on adenine nucleotide pools, adenine nucleotide transporter activity and protein expression in rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong-Yang Li; Jun-Ze Liu; Li-Ping Wu; Bing Li; Li-Fen Chen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of hypobaric hypoxia on mitochondrial energy metabolism in rat liver.METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to a hypobaric chamber simulating 5000 m high altitude for 23 h every day for 0 (HO), 1 (H1), 5 (HS), 15 (H15) and 30 d (H30) respectively. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation and liver was removed. Liver mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation program. The size of adenine nucleotide pool (ATP, ADP, and AMP) in tissue and mitochondria was separated and measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) activity was determined by isotopic technique. The ANT total protein level was determined by Western blot. RESULTS: Compared with HO group, intra-mitochondrial ATP content decreased in all hypoxia groups. However,the H5 group reached the lowest point (70.6%) (P< 0.01)when compared to the control group. Intra-mitochondrial ADP and AMP level showed similar change in all hypoxia groups and were significantly lower than that in HO group. In addition, extra-mitochondrial ATP and ADP content decreased significantly in all hypoxia groups.Furthermore, extra-mitochondrial AMP in groups H5, H15and H30 was significantly lower than that in HO group,whereas H1 group had no marked change compared to the control situation. The activity of ANT in hypoxia groups decreased significantly, which was the lowest in H5 group (55.7%) (P<0.01) when compared to HO group. ANT activity in H30 group was higher than in H15 group, but still lower than that in HO group. ANT protein level in H5, H15, H30 groups, compared with HO group decreased significantly, which in H5 group was the lowest, being 27.1% of that in HO group (P<0.01). ANT protein level in H30 group was higher than in H15 group,but still lower than in HO group.CONCLUSION: Hypobaric hypoxia decreases the mitochondrial ATP content in rat liver, while mitochondrial ATP level recovers during long-term hypoxia exposure.The lower

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopic study of the interaction of adenine and nucleotide with trichosanthin.

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    Hao, Q; Zhang, Y; Yang, H; Liu, G; Huang, Z; Liu, B; Yao, Q; Li, Q

    1995-07-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS) is an N-glycosidase that can attack the 28s rRNA of the ribosome at a highly conserved adenine residue. The interactions of adenine and its derivative nucleotides with TCS are reported. The fluorescence of Trp 192 of TCS is sensitive to the proximity of adenine, and produces a marked red shift indicative of trytophan in a more hydrophilic environment. By contrast AMP and ATP quench the maximal emission at 328nm. The binding of the adenine and ATP with TCS result in lower tryptophan accessibility to the quencher acrylamide, but higher tryptophan accessibility to the quencher iodide, while AMP caused higher tryptophan accessibility to acrylamide, and lower tryptophan accessibility to iodide. Also, the binding of nucleotides induces tryptophan heterogeneity in the protein. These findings lead us to propose that binding of nucleotides and adenine base cause different microenvironmental changes of the tryptophan residue, and Trp 192 may be involved in the active site of TCS.

  6. Two Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Paralogues Involved in Cell Proliferation and Spermatogenesis in the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Ryohei Sugahara; Akiya Jouraku; Takayo Nakakura; Takahiro Kusakabe; Takenori Yamamoto; Yasuo Shinohara; Hideto Miyoshi; Takahiro Shiotsuki

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) specifically acts in ADP/ATP exchange through the mitochondrial inner membrane. This transporter protein thereby plays a significant role in energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Most mammals have four paralogous ANT genes (ANT1-4) and utilize these paralogues in different types of cells. The fourth paralogue of ANT (ANT4) is present only in mammals and reptiles and is exclusively expressed in testicular germ cells where it is required for m...

  7. L-Arginine Intake Effect on Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism in Rat Parenchymal and Reproductive Tissues

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    G. Kocic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-arginine is conditionally essetcial amino acid, required for normal cell growth, protein synthesis, ammonia detoxification, tissue growth and general performance, proposed in the treatment of men sterility and prevention of male impotence. The aim of the present paper was to estimate the activity of the enzymes of adenine nucleotide metabolism: 5′-nucleotidase (5′-NU, adenosine deaminase (ADA, AMP deaminase, and xanthine oxidase (XO, during dietary intake of L-arginine for a period of four weeks of male Wistar rats. Adenosine concentration in tissues is maintained by the relative activities of the adenosine-producing enzyme, 5′-NU and the adenosine-degrading enzyme-ADA adenosine deaminase. Dietary L-arginine intake directed adenine nucleotide metabolism in liver, kidney, and testis tissue toward the activation of adenosine production, by increased 5′-NU activity and decreased ADA activity. Stimulation of adenosine accumulation could be of importance in mediating arginine antiatherosclerotic, vasoactive, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant effects. Assuming that the XO activity reflects the rate of purine catabolism in the cell, while the activity of AMP deaminase is of importance in ATP regeneration, reduced activity of XO, together with the increased AMP-deaminase activity, may suggest that adenine nucleotides are presumably directed to the ATP regenerating process during dietary L-arginine intake.

  8. White spot syndrome virus VP12 interacts with adenine nucleotide translocase of Litopenaeus vannamei.

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    Ma, Fang-fang; Chou, Zhi-guang; Liu, Qing-hui; Guan, Guangkuo; Li, Chen; Huang, Jie

    2014-05-01

    White spot syndrome virus VP12 contains cell attachment motif RGD which is considered to be critical for host cell binding. Until now, the function of this protein remains undefined. In this study, we explored the interaction of VP12 with host cells. A new shrimp protein (adenine nucleotide translocase of Litopenaeus vannamei, LvANT) is selected by far-western overlay assay. Tissue distribution of adenine nucleotide translocase mRNA showed that it was commonly spread in all the tissues detected. Cellular localization of LvANT in shrimp hemocytes showed that it was primarily located in the cytoplasm of hemocytes and colocalized with mitochondria. ELISA and far-western blot assay confirmed that VP12 interacted with LvANT. In vivo neutralization assay showed that anti-LvANT antibody can significantly reduce the mortality of shrimp challenged by WSSV at 48h post-treatment. Our results collectively showed that VP12 is involved in host cell binding via interaction with adenine nucleotide translocase.

  9. A novel missense adenine nucleotide translocator-1 gene mutation in a Greek adPEO family.

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    Napoli, L; Bordoni, A; Zeviani, M; Hadjigeorgiou, G M; Sciacco, M; Tiranti, V; Terentiou, A; Moggio, M; Papadimitriou, A; Scarlato, G; Comi, G P

    2001-12-26

    Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) is caused by mutations in at least three different genes: ANT1 (chromosome 4q34-35), TWINKLE, and POLG. The ANT1 gene encodes the adenine nucleotide translocator-1 (ANT1). We identified a heterozygous T293C mutation of the ANT1 gene in a Greek family with adPEO. The resulting leucine to proline substitution likely modifies the secondary structure of the ANT1 protein. ANT1 gene mutations may account for adPEO in families with different ethnic backgrounds.

  10. Adenine nucleotide effect on intraocular pressure: Involvement of the parasympathetic nervous system.

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    Peral, Assumpta; Gallar, Juana; Pintor, Jesús

    2009-06-15

    Nucleotides are present in the aqueous humor possibly exerting physiological effects on intraocular pressure (IOP). To determine the effect of nucleotides such as ATP and its related derivatives on IOP, New Zealand white rabbits were used. IOP was measured in rabbits treated topically either with saline (control) or with a single dose (10 microg/microL) of adenine nucleotides (ATP, 2-meS-ATP, ATP-gamma-S, alpha,beta-meADP, alpha,beta-meATP and beta,gamma-meATP). Those nucleotides reducing IOP (alpha,beta-meATP and beta,gamma-meATP) were then tested in concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 microg/microL to obtain the IC(50) value. Several antagonists for the P2 and adenosine A1 receptors (all at 10 microg/microL) were assayed 30 min before the application of the hypotensive nucleotide beta,gamma-meATP. To see whether the nucleotide was acting directly on the structures involved in aqueous humor dynamics or on the autonomic nerves controlling IOP, animal denervation and sympathetic (yohimbine and ICI-118,551 at 10 microg/microL) and parasympathetic (atropine and hexametonium at 10 microg/microL) receptors' antagonists were used 30 min before the instillation of beta,gamma-meATP. alpha,beta-meATP and beta,gamma-meATP decreased IOP to 60% of control value (basal IOP=23.2+/-1.3 mmHg), with IC(50) of 1.59+/-0.21 microg/microLand 0.56+/-0.62 microg/microL, which corresponds to 3mM and 1mM respectively. Denervation completely abolished the effect of beta,gamma-meATP. Sympathetic antagonists did not modify the hypotensive effect of beta,gamma-meATP, but parasympathetic antagonists were able to abolish it. Among the series of adenine nucleotide tested, alpha,beta-meATP and beta,gamma-meATP presented hypotensive actions on IOP. beta,gamma-meATP seems to stimulate cholinergic terminals being its final effect the IOP reduction. Therefore, these two nucleotides are interesting pharmacological tools for those pathologies related with high intraocular pressure.

  11. Role of adenine nucleotide translocator 1 in mtDNA maintenance.

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    Kaukonen, J; Juselius, J K; Tiranti, V; Kyttälä, A; Zeviani, M; Comi, G P; Keränen, S; Peltonen, L; Suomalainen, A

    2000-08-04

    Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a rare human disease that shows a Mendelian inheritance pattern, but is characterized by large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. We have identified two heterozygous missense mutations in the nuclear gene encoding the heart/skeletal muscle isoform of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT1) in five families and one sporadic patient. The familial mutation substitutes a proline for a highly conserved alanine at position 114 in the ANT1 protein. The analogous mutation in yeast caused a respiratory defect. These results indicate that ANT has a role in mtDNA maintenance and that a mitochondrial disease can be caused by a dominant mechanism.

  12. A distinct sequence in the adenine nucleotide translocase from Artemia franciscana embryos is associated with insensitivity to bongkrekate and atypical effects of adenine nucleotides on Ca2+ uptake and sequestration.

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    Konràd, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Töröcsik, Beata; Lábár, János L; Gerencser, Akos A; Mándi, Miklós; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2011-03-01

    Mitochondria isolated from embryos of the crustacean Artemia franciscana lack the Ca(2+)-induced permeability transition pore. Although the composition of the pore described in mammalian mitochondria is unknown, the impacts of several effectors of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) on pore opening are firmly established. Notably, ADP, ATP and bongkrekate delay, whereas carboxyatractyloside hastens, Ca(2+)-induced pore opening. Here, we report that adenine nucleotides decreased, whereas carboxyatractyloside increased, Ca(2+) uptake capacity in mitochondria isolated from Artemia embryos. Bongkrekate had no effect on either Ca(2+) uptake or ADP-ATP exchange rate. Transmission electron microscopy imaging of Ca(2+)-loaded Artemia mitochondria showed needle-like formations of electron-dense material in the absence of adenine nucleotides, and dot-like formations in the presence of adenine nucleotides or Mg(2+). Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy showed the material to be rich in calcium and phosphorus. Sequencing of the Artemia mRNA coding for ANT revealed that it transcribes a protein with a stretch of amino acids in the 198-225 region with 48-56% similarity to those from other species, including the deletion of three amino acids in positions 211, 212 and 219. Mitochondria isolated from the liver of Xenopus laevis, in which the ANT shows similarity to that in Artemia except for the 198-225 amino acid region, demonstrated a Ca(2+)-induced bongkrekate-sensitive permeability transition pore, allowing the suggestion that this region of ANT may contain the binding site for bongkrekate.

  13. Adenine nucleotide-dependent and redox-independent control of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Yoshida, Keisuke; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is important for sustaining cellular growth and maintenance; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying individual processes in plant mitochondria remain largely uncharacterized. Previous redox-proteomics studies have suggested that mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and redox shuttling, is under thiol-based redox regulation as a target candidate of thioredoxin (Trx). In addition, the adenine nucleotide status may be another factor controlling mitochondrial metabolism, as respiratory ATP production in mitochondria is believed to be influenced by several environmental stimuli. Using biochemical and reverse-genetic approaches, we addressed the redox- and adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of mMDH in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recombinant mMDH protein formed intramolecular disulfide bonds under oxidative conditions, but these bonds did not have a considerable effect on mMDH activity. Mitochondria-localized o-type Trx (Trx-o) did not facilitate re-reduction of oxidized mMDH. Determination of the in vivo redox state revealed that mMDH was stably present in the reduced form even in Trx-o-deficient plants. Accordingly, we concluded that mMDH is not in the class of redox-regulated enzymes. By contrast, mMDH activity was lowered by adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Each adenine nucleotide suppressed mMDH activity with different potencies and ATP exerted the largest inhibitory effect with a significantly lower K(I). Correspondingly, mMDH activity was inhibited by the increase in ATP/ADP ratio within the physiological range. These results suggest that mMDH activity is finely controlled in response to variations in mitochondrial adenine nucleotide balance.

  14. Human Adenine Nucleotide Translocase (ANT) Modulators Identified by High-Throughput Screening of Transgenic Yeast.

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    Zhang, Yujian; Tian, Defeng; Matsuyama, Hironori; Hamazaki, Takashi; Shiratsuchi, Takayuki; Terada, Naohiro; Hook, Derek J; Walters, Michael A; Georg, Gunda I; Hawkinson, Jon E

    2016-04-01

    Transport of ADP and ATP across mitochondria is one of the primary points of regulation to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. This process is mainly mediated by adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) located on the mitochondrial inner membrane. There are four human ANT isoforms, each having a unique tissue-specific expression pattern and biological function, highlighting their potential as drug targets for diverse clinical indications, including male contraception and cancer. In this study, we present a novel yeast-based high-throughput screening (HTS) strategy to identify compounds inhibiting the function of ANT. Yeast strains generated by deletion of endogenous proteins with ANT activity followed by insertion of individual human ANT isoforms are sensitive to cell-permeable ANT inhibitors, which reduce proliferation. Screening hits identified in the yeast proliferation assay were characterized in ADP/ATP exchange assays employing recombinant ANT isoforms expressed in isolated yeast mitochondria and Lactococcus lactis as well as by oxygen consumption rate in mammalian cells. Using this approach, closantel and CD437 were identified as broad-spectrum ANT inhibitors, whereas leelamine was found to be a modulator of ANT function. This yeast "knock-out/knock-in" screening strategy is applicable to a broad range of essential molecular targets that are required for yeast survival. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  15. Modulation of F0F1-ATP synthase activity by cyclophilin D regulates matrix adenine nucleotide levels.

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    Chinopoulos, Christos; Konràd, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Metelkin, Eugeniy; Töröcsik, Beata; Zhang, Steven F; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2011-04-01

    Cyclophilin D was recently shown to bind to and decrease the activity of F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase in submitochondrial particles and permeabilized mitochondria [Giorgio V et al. (2009) J Biol Chem, 284, 33982-33988]. Cyclophilin D binding decreased both ATP synthesis and hydrolysis rates. In the present study, we reaffirm these findings by demonstrating that, in intact mouse liver mitochondria energized by ATP, the absence of cyclophilin D or the presence of cyclosporin A led to a decrease in the extent of uncoupler-induced depolarization. Accordingly, in substrate-energized mitochondria, an increase in F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase activity mediated by a relief of inhibition by cyclophilin D was evident in the form of slightly increased respiration rates during arsenolysis. However, the modulation of F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase by cyclophilin D did not increase the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT)-mediated ATP efflux rate in energized mitochondria or the ATP influx rate in de-energized mitochondria. The lack of an effect of cyclophilin D on the ANT-mediated adenine nucleotide exchange rate was attributed to the ∼ 2.2-fold lower flux control coefficient of the F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase than that of ANT, as deduced from measurements of adenine nucleotide flux rates in intact mitochondria. These findings were further supported by a recent kinetic model of the mitochondrial phosphorylation system, suggesting that an ∼ 30% change in F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase activity in fully energized or fully de-energized mitochondria affects the ADP-ATP exchange rate mediated by the ANT in the range 1.38-1.7%. We conclude that, in mitochondria exhibiting intact inner membranes, the absence of cyclophilin D or the inhibition of its binding to F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase by cyclosporin A will affect only matrix adenine nucleotides levels. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  16. Ischemic preconditioning protects post-ischemic renal function in anesthetized dogs: role of adenosine and adenine nucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan-zhu LI; Shoji KIMURA; Akira NISHIYAMA; Matlubur RAHMAN; Guo-xing ZHANG; Youichi ABE

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of renal ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on both renal hemodynamics and the renal interstitial concentrations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury.Methods: Renal hemodynamics responses to ischemia-reperfusion injury in mongrel dog models were determined with or without multiple brief renal ischemic preconditioning treatments, as well as the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist (KW-3902),respectively.The renal interstitial concentrations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides in response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, either following 1-3 cycles of IPC or not, were measured simultaneously using microdialysis sampling technology.Results: One 10-min IPC, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist (KW3902) also shortened the recovery time of renal blood flow (RBF) and urine flow (UF), as well as mean blood pressure (BP).Advanced renal IPC attenuated the increment of adenosine and adenine nucleotides, as well as recovery time during the 60-min reperfusion which followed the 60-min renal ischemia.All of these recovery times were dependent on the cycles of 10-min IPC.The renal interstitial concentrations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides increased and decreased during renal ischemia and reperfusion, respectively.Conclusion: A significant relativity in dog models exists between the cycles of 10-min renal IPC and the recovery time of BP, UF, and RBF during the 60-min renal reperfusion following 60-min renal ischemia, respectively.Renal IPC can protect against ischemiareperfusion injury and the predominant effect of endogenous adenosine induced by prolonged renal ischemia; renal adenosine A1 receptor activation during the renal ischemia-reperfusion injury is detrimental to renal function.

  17. Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 4 Is Expressed Within Embryonic Ovaries and Dispensable During Oogenesis

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    Lim, Chae Ho; Brower, Jeffrey V.; Resnick, James L.; Oh, S. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) facilitates the exchange of adenosine triphosphate across the mitochondrial inner membrane and plays a critical role for bioenergetics in eukaryotes. Mice have 3 Ant paralogs, Ant1 (Slc25a4), Ant2 (Slc25a5), and Ant4 (Slc25a31), which are expressed in a tissue-dependent manner. We previously identified that Ant4 was expressed exclusively in testicular germ cells in adult mice and essential for spermatogenesis and subsequently male fertility. Further investigation into the process of spermatogenesis revealed that Ant4 was particularly highly expressed during meiotic prophase I and indispensable for normal progression of leptotene spermatocytes to the stages thereafter. In contrast, the expression and roles of Ant4 in female germ cells have not previously been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that the Ant4 gene is expressed during embryonic ovarian development during which meiotic prophase I occurs. We confirmed embryonic ovary-specific Ant4 expression using a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene. In contrast to male, however, Ant4 null female mice were fertile although the litter size was slightly decreased. They showed apparently normal ovarian development which was morphologically indistinguishable from the control animals. These data indicate that Ant4 is a meiosis-specific gene expressed during both male and female gametogenesis however indispensable only during spermatogenesis and not oogenesis. The differential effects of Ant4 depletion within the processes of male and female gametogenesis may be explained by meiosis-specific inactivation of the X-linked Ant2 gene in male, a somatic paralog of the Ant4 gene. PMID:25031318

  18. Two adenine nucleotide translocase paralogues involved in cell proliferation and spermatogenesis in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

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    Sugahara, Ryohei; Jouraku, Akiya; Nakakura, Takayo; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Takenori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Hideto; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) specifically acts in ADP/ATP exchange through the mitochondrial inner membrane. This transporter protein thereby plays a significant role in energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Most mammals have four paralogous ANT genes (ANT1-4) and utilize these paralogues in different types of cells. The fourth paralogue of ANT (ANT4) is present only in mammals and reptiles and is exclusively expressed in testicular germ cells where it is required for meiotic progression in the spermatocytes. Here, we report that silkworms harbor two ANT paralogues, the homeostatic paralogue (BmANTI1) and the testis-specific paralogue (BmANTI2). The BmANTI2 protein has an N-terminal extension in which the positions of lysine residues in the amino acid sequence are distributed as in human ANT4. An expression analysis showed that BmANTI2 transcripts were restricted to the testis, suggesting the protein has a role in the progression of spermatogenesis. By contrast, BmANTI1 was expressed in all tissues tested, suggesting it has an important role in homeostasis. We also observed that cultured silkworm cells required BmANTI1 for proliferation. The ANTI1 protein of the lepidopteran Plutella xylostella (PxANTI1), but not those of other insect species (or PxANTI2), restored cell proliferation in BmANTI1-knockdown cells suggesting that ANTI1 has similar energy metabolism functions across the Lepidoptera. Our results suggest that BmANTI2 is evolutionarily divergent from BmANTI1 and has developed a specific role in spermatogenesis similar to that of mammalian ANT4.

  19. Two adenine nucleotide translocase paralogues involved in cell proliferation and spermatogenesis in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Sugahara

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT specifically acts in ADP/ATP exchange through the mitochondrial inner membrane. This transporter protein thereby plays a significant role in energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Most mammals have four paralogous ANT genes (ANT1-4 and utilize these paralogues in different types of cells. The fourth paralogue of ANT (ANT4 is present only in mammals and reptiles and is exclusively expressed in testicular germ cells where it is required for meiotic progression in the spermatocytes. Here, we report that silkworms harbor two ANT paralogues, the homeostatic paralogue (BmANTI1 and the testis-specific paralogue (BmANTI2. The BmANTI2 protein has an N-terminal extension in which the positions of lysine residues in the amino acid sequence are distributed as in human ANT4. An expression analysis showed that BmANTI2 transcripts were restricted to the testis, suggesting the protein has a role in the progression of spermatogenesis. By contrast, BmANTI1 was expressed in all tissues tested, suggesting it has an important role in homeostasis. We also observed that cultured silkworm cells required BmANTI1 for proliferation. The ANTI1 protein of the lepidopteran Plutella xylostella (PxANTI1, but not those of other insect species (or PxANTI2, restored cell proliferation in BmANTI1-knockdown cells suggesting that ANTI1 has similar energy metabolism functions across the Lepidoptera. Our results suggest that BmANTI2 is evolutionarily divergent from BmANTI1 and has developed a specific role in spermatogenesis similar to that of mammalian ANT4.

  20. An alternative membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides in mitochondria and its possible function.

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    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1978-10-01

    This paper describes the properties and a possible biological role of a transport process across the inner membrane of rat liver mitochondria resulting in the exchange of ATP(4-) (out) for ADP(3-) (in) + 0.5 phosphate(2-) (in). This transmembrane exchange reaction, designated as the ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange, is specific for the ligands shown, electroneutral, insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibited by atractyloside, and appears to occur only in the direction as written. It is thus distinct from the well-known phosphate-hydroxide and phosphate-dicarboxylate exchange systems, which are inhibited by mersalyl, and from the ATP-ADP exchanger, which does not transport phosphate. During ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria, half of the phosphate formed from ATP passes from the matrix to the medium by the mersalyl-insensitive ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange and the other half by the well-known mersalyl-sensitive phosphate-hydroxide exchange. These and other considerations have led to a hypothesis for the pathway and stoichiometry of ATP-dependent reverse electron transport, characterized by a requirement of 1.33 molecules of ATP per pair of electrons reversed and by the utilization of a different membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides than is taken in forward electron flow and oxidative phosphorylation. The possible occurrence of independent pathways for ATP-forming forward electron flow and ATP-consuming reverse electron flow is consonant with the fact that the opposing degradative and synthetic pathways in the central routes of cell metabolism generally have different pathways that are independently regulated.

  1. Evaluation of Porin Interaction with Adenine Nucleotide Translocase and Cyclophilin-D Proteins after Brain Ischemia and Reperfusion

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    Mohammad Ali Atlasi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective (s Porin is a mitochondrial outer membrane channel, which usually functions as the pathway for the movement of various substances in and out of the mitochondria and is considered to be a component of the permeability transition (PT pore complex that plays a role in the PT. We addressed the hypothesis that porin interacts with other mitochondrial proteins after ischemic injury.Materials and MethodsFor this purpose, we used in vivo 4-vessel occlusion model of rat brain and porin purification method by hydroxyapatite column. After SDS gel electrophoresis and silver nitrate staining, Western blotting was done for porin, adenine nucleotide translocase and cyclophilin-D proteins.Results Porin was purified from mitochondrial mixture in ischemic brain and control groups. Investigation of interaction of adenine nucleotide transposes (ANT and cyclophilin-D with porin by Western blotting showed no proteins co-purified with porin from injured tissues.Conclusion The present study implies that there may not be interaction between porin, and ANT or cyclophilin-D, and if there is any, it is not maintained during the purification procedure.

  2. Persistent changes in the initial rate of pyruvate transport by isolated rat liver mitochondria after preincubation with adenine nucleotides and calcium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaartjes, W.J.; Breejen, J.N. den; Geelen, M.J.H.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1980-01-01

    1. Preincubation of isolated rat-liver mitochondria in the presence of adenine nucleotides or Ca2+ results in definite and persistent changes in the initial rate of pyruvate transport. 2. These changes in the rate of pyruvate transport are accompanied by equally persistent changes in the opposite d

  3. Metabolic control of mitochondrial properties by adenine nucleotide translocator determines palmitoyl-CoA effects - Implications for a mechanism linking obesity and type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciapaite, Jolita; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Diamant, Michaela; van Eikenhorst, Gerco; Heine, Robert J.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Krab, Klaas

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) by long-chain acyl-CoA esters has been proposed to contribute to cellular dysfunction in obesity and type 2 diabetes by increasing formation of reactive oxygen species and adenosine via effects on the coenzyme Q redox state, mitoc

  4. Effects of acute gamma-irradiation on extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in developing rat brain

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    Stanojević, I.; Drakulić, D.; Veličković, N.; Milošević, M.; Petrović, S.; Horvat, A.

    2009-09-01

    Cell membrane is highly sensitive to irradiation which, acting directly or indirectly, may disturb functions of constitutive proteins including membrane enzymes. Plasma membrane surface-located enzyme chain of ecto-nucleotide triphospho diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) and 5'-nucleotidase are involved in termination of cell purinergic signalization by hydrolyzing extracellular, excitatory adenosine triphosphate (ATP), as well as nucleotide di-, and mono-phosphate (ADP and AMP) to neuroprotective adenosine. Extracellular ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolyzes were examined in purified synaptic plasma membranes after whole-body acute irradiation. All measurements were done 24 h after irradiation of developing (15-, 30-day-old) and adult (90-day-old) rats with low (50 cGy) and high (2 Gy) dose of gamma-rays. Both, high and low doses inhibited nucleotide hydrolyses in 15-day-old rats; in 30-day-old rats low dose of radiation inhibited ADP and AMP hydrolyses while high dose inhibited only ATP hydrolyse. In adult rats high dose induced no effects, while low dose stimulated nucleotides hydrolyses. According to obtained results it was concluded that ecto-nucleotidases of young rats are more sensitive to irradiation, since even low dose induces inhibition of ecto-nucleotidases activities. Ionizing radiation, by decreasing brain nucleotide hydrolyses in developing rats, induces accumulation of ATP and decreases production of adenosine in synaptic cleft which could be neurocytotoxic. On the contrary, in adult rats low dose of radiation stimulates NTPDase and 5'-nucleotidase activity and protective adenosine production which indicates protective and adaptive mechanisms developed in adult brain neuronal cells.

  5. Exercise effects on activities of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, acetylcholinesterase and adenine nucleotides hydrolysis in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Juliana; Soares, Flávia Mahatma Schneider; Cechetti, Fernanda; Vuaden, Fernanda Cenci; Bonan, Carla Denise; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Wyse, Angela Terezinha de Souza

    2009-12-11

    Hormone deficiency following ovariectomy causes activation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that has been related to cognitive deficits in experimental animals. Considering that physical exercise presents neuroprotector effects, we decide to investigate whether exercise training would affect enzyme activation in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, as well as adenosine nucleotide hydrolysis in synaptosomes from cerebral cortex of ovariectomized rats. Female adult Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following groups: sham (submitted to surgery without removal of the ovaries), exercise, ovariectomized (Ovx) and Ovx plus exercise. Thirty days after surgery, animals were submitted to one month of exercise training, three times per week. After, rats were euthanized, blood serum was collected and hippocampus and cerebral cortex were dissected. Data demonstrated that exercise reversed the activation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and AChE activities both in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomy decreased AMP hydrolysis in cerebral cortex and did not alter adenine nucleotides hydrolysis in blood serum. Exercise per se decreased ADP and AMP hydrolysis in cerebral cortex. On the other hand, AMP hydrolysis in blood serum was increased by exercise in ovariectomized adult rats. Present data support that physical exercise might have beneficial effects and constitute a therapeutic alternative to hormone replacement therapy for estrogen deprivation.

  6. Nitric oxide interacts with oxygen free radicals to evoke the release of adenosine and adenine nucleotides from rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, R M; Fallahi, N; Fredholm, B B

    2000-07-01

    The present study examined some possible mechanisms underlying the previously demonstrated release of adenosine by nitric oxide (NO) donors. Perfusion with the NO-donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP; 300 microM) led to a significant increase in the release of [3H]purines from both unstimulated and electrically stimulated hippocampal slices prelabeled with [3H]adenine. The NO-donor also evoked the release of endogenous ATP and ADP from unstimulated slices and, when combined with electrical stimulation, the release of ATP, AMP and adenosine. The SNAP-induced [3H]purine release was calcium-dependent, but not affected by the glutamate receptor antagonists MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a, d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine;100 nM) and CNQX (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione; 10 microM). Zaprinast (5 microM), an inhibitor of the cyclic GMP-dependent phosphodiesterase and 8-Br-cyclic GMP (0.01-1 mM) failed to evoke the release of purines, whereas generation of oxygen free radicals by xanthine plus xanthine oxidase did evoke purine release. Coperfusion of SNAP with the free radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD; 60 microg/ml) and catalase (50 microg/ml) reduced or eliminated the ability of the NO-donor to enhance [3H]purine release, but the poly (ADP-ribosyl) synthetase (PARS) inhibitor benzamide (500 microM) did not affect it. These data indicate that NO interacts with superoxide, likely forming peroxynitrite, which subsequently acts to release adenosine and adenine nucleotides from hippocampal tissue.

  7. A CBS domain-containing pyrophosphatase of Moorella thermoacetica is regulated by adenine nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsen, Joonas; Tuominen, Heidi; Salminen, Anu; Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Magretova, Natalia N.; Baykov, Alexander A.; Lahti, Reijo

    2007-01-01

    CBS (cystathionine β-synthase) domains are found in proteins from all kingdoms of life, and point mutations in these domains are responsible for a variety of hereditary diseases in humans; however, the functions of CBS domains are not well understood. In the present study, we cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized a family II PPase (inorganic pyrophosphatase) from Moorella thermoacetica (mtCBS-PPase) that has a pair of tandem 60-amino-acid CBS domains within its N-terminal domain. Because mtCBS-PPase is a dimer and requires transition metal ions (Co2+ or Mn2+) for activity, it resembles common family II PPases, which lack CBS domains. The mtCBS-PPase, however, has lower activity than common family II PPases, is potently inhibited by ADP and AMP, and is activated up to 1.6-fold by ATP. Inhibition by AMP is competitive, whereas inhibition by ADP and activation by ATP are both of mixed types. The nucleotides are effective at nanomolar (ADP) or micromolar concentrations (AMP and ATP) and appear to compete for the same site on the enzyme. The nucleotide-binding affinities are thus 100–10000-fold higher than for other CBS-domain-containing proteins. Interestingly, genes encoding CBS-PPase occur most frequently in bacteria that have a membrane-bound H+-translocating PPase with a comparable PPi-hydrolysing activity. Our results suggest that soluble nucleotide-regulated PPases act as amplifiers of metabolism in bacteria by enhancing or suppressing ATP production and biosynthetic reactions at high and low [ATP]/([AMP]+[ADP]) ratios respectively. PMID:17714078

  8. Alterations of adenine nucleotide metabolism and function of blood platelets in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michno, Anna; Bielarczyk, Hanna; Pawełczyk, Tadeusz; Jankowska-Kulawy, Agnieszka; Klimaszewska, Joanna; Szutowicz, Andrzej

    2007-02-01

    Increased activity of blood platelets contributes to vascular complications in patients with diabetes. The aim of this work was to investigate whether persisting hyperglycemia in diabetic patients generates excessive accumulation of ATP/ADP, which may underlie platelet hyperactivity. Platelet ATP and ADP levels, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species synthesis, and aggregation of platelets from patients with diabetes were 18-82% higher than in platelets from healthy participants. In patients with diabetes, platelet stimulation with thrombin caused about two times greater release of ATP and ADP than in the healthy group while decreasing intraplatelet nucleotide content to similar levels in both groups. This indicates that the increased content of adenylate nucleotides in the releasable pool in the platelets of diabetic patients does not affect their level in metabolic cytoplasmic/mitochondrial compartments. Significant correlations between platelet ATP levels and plasma fructosamine, as well as between platelet ATP/ADP and platelet activities, have been found in diabetic patients. In conclusion, chronic hyperglycemia-evoked elevations of ATP/ADP levels and release from blood platelets of patients with diabetes may be important factors underlying platelet hyperactivity in the course of the disease.

  9. Activities of adenine nucleotide and nucleoside degradation enzymes in platelets of rats infected by Trypanosoma evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Camila B; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Vargas, Lara B; Bitencourt, Paula E R; Souza, Viviane C G; Costa, Marcio M; Leal, Claudio A M; Moretto, Maria B; Leal, Daniela B R; Lopes, Sonia T A; Monteiro, Silvia G

    2011-05-31

    Nucleotide and nucleoside-degrading enzymes, such as nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrose (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) are present in the surface membranes of platelets, involved in clotting disturbances of Trypanosoma evansi-infected animals. Thus, this study was aimed at evaluating the activities of these enzymes in platelets of rats experimentally infected with T. evansi. Animals were divided into four groups, according to the level of parasitemia. Blood samples were collected on days 3 (group A: at the beginning of parasitemia), 5 (group B: high parasitemia) and 15 (group C: chronic infection), post-infection. Group D (control group) was composed of non-infected animals for platelet count, separation and enzymatic assays. Animals from groups A and B showed marked thrombocytopenia, but platelet count was not affected in chronically infected rats. NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and ADA activities decreased (pplatelets from rats of groups A and B, when compared to the control group. In group C, only NTPDase and 5'-nucleoside activities decreased (pplatelet count and nucleotide/nucleoside hydrolysis were positive and statistically significant (pPlatelet aggregation was decreased in all infected groups, in comparison to the control group (pplatelets of T. evansi-infected animals might be related to thrombocytopenia, that by reducing the number of platelets, there was less release of ATP and ADP. Another possibility being suggested is that changes have occurred in the membrane of these cells, decreasing the expression of these enzymes in the cell membrane.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of yeast GDH1 encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, W S; Amuro, N; Rao, J K; Zalkin, H

    1985-07-15

    The yeast GDH1 gene encodes NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. This gene was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli glutamate auxotroph. NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was overproduced 6-10-fold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae bearing GDH1 on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the 1362-base pair coding region and 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Transcription start sites were located by S1 nuclease mapping. Regulation of GDH1 was not maintained when the gene was present on a multicopy plasmid. Protein secondary structure predictions identified a region with potential to form the dinucleotide-binding domain. The amino acid sequences of the yeast and Neurospora crassa enzymes are 63% conserved. Unlike the N. crassa gene, yeast GDH1 has no introns.

  11. The tumour metabolism inhibitors GSAO and PENAO react with cysteines 57 and 257 of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase

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    Park Danielle

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GSAO (4-(N-(S-glutathionylacetylamino phenylarsonous acid and PENAO (4-(N-(S-penicillaminylacetylamino phenylarsonous acid are tumour metabolism inhibitors that target adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT of the inner-mitochondrial membrane. Both compounds are currently being trialled in patients with solid tumours. The trivalent arsenical moiety of GSAO and PENAO reacts with two matrix facing cysteine residues of ANT, inactivating the transporter. This leads to proliferation arrest and death of tumour and tumour-supporting cells. Results The two reactive ANT cysteine residues have been identified in this study by expressing cysteine mutants of human ANT1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and measuring interaction with the arsenical moiety of GSAO and PENAO. The arsenic atom of both compounds cross-links cysteine residues 57 and 257 of human ANT1. Conclusions The sulphur atoms of these two cysteines are 20 Å apart in the crystal structures of ANT and the optimal spacing of cysteine thiolates for reaction with As (III is 3-4 Å. This implies that a significant conformational change in ANT is required for the organoarsenicals to react with cysteines 57 and 257. This conformational change may relate to the selectivity of the compounds for proliferating cells.

  12. The product of the Herpes simplex virus 1 UL7 gene interacts with a mitochondrial protein, adenine nucleotide translocator 2

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    Kawaguchi Yasushi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 UL7 gene is highly conserved among herpesviridae. Since the construction of recombinant HSV-1 with a mutation in the UL7 gene has not been reported, the involvement of HSV-1 UL7 in viral replication has been unclear. In this study, we succeeded in generating a UL7 null HSV-1 mutant virus, MT102, and characterized it. Our results were as follows. (i In Vero cells, MT102 was replication-competent, but formed smaller plaques and yielded 10- to 100-fold fewer progeny than the wild-type virus, depending on the multiplicity of infection. (ii Using mass spectrometry-based proteomics technology, we identified a cellular mitochondrial protein, adenine nucleotide translocator 2 (ANT2, as a UL7-interacting partner. (iii When ANT2 was transiently expressed in COS-7 cells infected with HSV-1, ANT2 was specifically co-precipitated with UL7. (iv Cell fractionation experiments with HSV-1-infected cells detected the UL7 protein in both the mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions, whereas ANT2 was detected only in the mitochondrial fraction. These results indicate the importance of HSV-1 UL7's involvement in viral replication and demonstrate that it interacts with ANT2 in infected cells. The potential biological significance of the interaction between UL7 and ANT2 is discussed.

  13. Caffeic acid treatment alters the extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in platelets and lymphocytes of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Javed; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Pimentel, Victor Camera; Gutierres, Jessié; Thomé, Gustavo; Cardoso, Andreia; Zanini, Daniela; Martins, Caroline; Palma, Heloisa Einloft; Bagatini, Margarete Dulce; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Schmatz, Roberta; Leal, Cláudio Alberto Martins; da Costa, Pauline; Morsch, Vera Maria; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of caffeic acid on ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase), Ecto-NPP (nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) in platelets and lymphocytes of rats, as well as in the profile of platelet aggregation. Animals were divided into five groups: I (control); II (oil); III (caffeic acid 10 mg/kg); IV (caffeic acid 50 mg/kg); and V (caffeic acid 100 mg/kg). Animals were treated with caffeic acid diluted in oil for 30 days. In platelets, caffeic acid decreased the ATP hydrolysis and increased ADP hydrolysis in groups III, IV and V when compared to control (P<0.05). The 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased, while E-NPP and ADA activities were increased in platelets of rats of groups III, IV and V (P<0.05). Caffeic acid reduced significantly the platelet aggregation in the animals of groups III, IV and V in relation to group I (P<0.05). In lymphocytes, the NTPDase and ADA activities were increased in all groups treated with caffeic acid when compared to control (P<0.05). These findings demonstrated that the enzymes were altered in tissues by caffeic acid and this compound decreased the platelet aggregation suggesting that caffeic acid should be considered a potentially therapeutic agent in disorders related to the purinergic system.

  14. The influence of calcium antagonists on the adenine nucleotide metabolism in the guinea-pig working heart during ischaemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugtenburg, J G; Mathy, M J; de Haan, N; Beckeringh, J J; van Zwieten, P A

    1991-05-01

    With the aim of gaining more insight into the metabolism of adenine nucleotides in working normoxic guinea-pigs and in hearts subjected to 45 min of global ischaemia and subsequent reperfusion for 25 min, we evaluated the effect of nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem, bepridil, CERM 11956, lidoflazine, mioflazine and dipyridamole on the adenine nucleotide catabolite levels in these hearts. The drugs were applied at the concentrations that reduced the aortic dP/dt of normoxic working hearts by 10% (EC10) and 30% (EC30). In globally ischaemic hearts there was a large accumulation of adenine nucleotide catabolites. Inosine proved to be the major catabolite. The drugs, with the exception of bepridil, CERM 11956 and dipyridamole (3 mumol/l), decreased the accumulation of catabolites. In hearts treated with mioflazine and dipyridamole the amount of adenosine increased. A deficit in the balance between adenine nucleotides and catabolites indicated that in globally ischaemic hearts there was a large accumulation of inosine monophosphate. Indeed, a substantial amount of inosine monophosphate was determined in untreated hearts, and hearts treated with nifedipine (EC30) and mioflazine (EC10). During the first 5 min of reperfusion a large quantity of catabolites, mainly inosine, was washed out. During 20 min of subsequent reperfusion in untreated hearts and in nifedipine and mioflazine-treated hearts the efflux of catabolites returned to normoxic values. Similar to the effect in ischaemic hearts, in early perfusate from lidoflazine, mioflazine and dipyridamole-treated hearts the adenosine/inosine ratio was increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Apigenin Sensitizes Prostate Cancer Cells to Apo2L/TRAIL by Targeting Adenine Nucleotide Translocase-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomoyuki; Goi, Wakana; Miki, Tsuneharu; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Apo2 ligand (Apo2L)/tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising cancer therapeutic agent. Recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL has been under clinical trials, whereas various kinds of malignant tumors have resistance to Apo2L/TRAIL. We and others have shown that several anticancer agents and flavonoids overcome resistance to Apo2L/TRAIL by upregulating death receptor 5 (DR5) in malignant tumor cells. However, the mechanisms by which these compounds induce DR5 expression remain unknown. Here we show that the dietary flavonoid apigenin binds and inhibits adenine nucleotide translocase-2 (ANT2), resulting in enhancement of Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis by upregulation of DR5. Apigenin and genistein, which are major flavonoids, enhanced Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Apigenin induced DR5 expression, but genistein did not. Using our method identifying the direct targets of flavonoids, we compared the binding proteins of apigenin with those of genistein. We discovered that ANT2 was a target of apigenin, but not genistein. Similarly to apigenin, knockdown of ANT2 enhanced Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis by upregulating DR5 expression at the post-transcriptional level. Moreover, silencing of ANT2 attenuated the enhancement of Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis by apigenin. These results suggest that apigenin upregulates DR5 and enhances Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis by binding and inhibiting ANT2. We propose that ANT2 inhibitors may contribute to Apo2L/TRAIL therapy. PMID:23431365

  16. Adenine nucleotides and intracellular Ca2+ regulate a voltage-dependent and glucose-sensitive potassium channel in neurosecretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onetti, C G; Lara, J; García, E

    1996-05-01

    Effects of membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ and adenine nucleotides on glucose-sensitive channels from X organ (XO) neurons of the crayfish were studied in excised inside-out patches. Glucose- sensitive channels were selective to K+ ions; the unitary conductance was 112 pS in symmetrical K+, and the K+ permeability (PK) was 1.3 x 10(-13) cm x s(-1). An inward rectification was observed when intracellular K+ was reduced. Using a quasi-physiological K+ gradient, a non-linear K+ current/voltage relationship was found showing an outward rectification and a slope conductance of 51 pS. The open-state probability (Po) increased with membrane depolarization as a result of an enhancement of the mean open time and a shortening of the longer period of closures. In quasi-physio- logical K+ concentrations, the channel was activated from a threshold of about -60 mV, and the activation midpoint was -2 mV. Po decreased noticeably at 50 microM internal adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), and single-channel activity was totally abolished at 1 mM ATP. Hill analysis shows that this inhibition was the result of simultaneous binding of two ATP molecules to the channel, and the half-blocking concentration of ATP was 174 microM. Internal application of 5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) as well as glibenclamide also decreased Po. By contrast, the application of internal ADP (0.1 to 2 mM) activated this channel. An optimal range of internal free Ca2+ ions (0.1 to 10 microM) was required for the activation of this channel. The glucose--sensitive K+ channel of XO neurons could be considered as a subtype of ATP-sensitive K+ channel, contributing substantially to macroscopic outward current.

  17. Hypothesis on skeletal muscle aging : mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator decreases reactive oxygen species production while preserving coupling efficiency

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    Philippe eDIOLEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane potential is the major regulator of mitochondrial functions, including coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Both functions are crucial for cell bioenergetics. We previously presented evidences for a specific modulation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT appearing during aging that results in a decrease in membrane potential - and therefore ROS production – but surprisingly increases coupling efficiency under conditions of low ATP turnover. Careful study of the bioenergetic parameters (oxidation and phosphorylation rates, membrane potential of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius of aged and young rats revealed a remodeling at the level of the phosphorylation system, in the absence of alteration of the inner mitochondrial membrane (uncoupling or respiratory chain complexes regulation. We further observed a decrease in mitochondrial affinity for ADP in aged isolated mitochondria, and higher sensitivity of ANT to its specific inhibitor atractyloside. This age-induced modification of ANT results in an increase in the ADP concentration required to sustain the same ATP turnover as compared to young muscle, and therefore in a lower membrane potential under phosphorylating - in vivo - conditions. Thus, for equivalent ATP turnover (cellular ATP demand, coupling efficiency is even higher in aged muscle mitochondria, due to the down-regulation of inner membrane proton leak caused by the decrease in membrane potential. In the framework of the radical theory of aging, these modifications in ANT function may be the result of oxidative damage caused by intra mitochondrial ROS and may appear like a virtuous circle where ROS induce a mechanism that reduces their production, without causing uncoupling, and even leading in improved efficiency. Because of the importance of ROS as therapeutic targets, this new mechanism deserves further studies.

  18. Regulation of Ca²⁺ release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors by adenine nucleotides in parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Seo; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Zhang, Yu; Yule, David I

    2012-01-01

    Secretagogue-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) signals are fundamentally important for initiating the secretion of the fluid and ion component of saliva from parotid acinar cells. The Ca(2+) signals have characteristic spatial and temporal characteristics, which are defined by the specific properties of Ca(2+) release mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)R). In this study we have investigated the role of adenine nucleotides in modulating Ca(2+) release in mouse parotid acinar cells. In permeabilized cells, the Ca(2+) release rate induced by submaximal [InsP(3)] was increased by 5 mM ATP. Enhanced Ca(2+) release was not observed at saturating [InsP(3)]. The EC(50) for the augmented Ca(2+) release was ∼8 μM ATP. The effect was mimicked by nonhydrolysable ATP analogs. ADP and AMP also potentiated Ca(2+) release but were less potent than ATP. In acini isolated from InsP(3)R-2-null transgenic animals, the rate of Ca(2+) release was decreased under all conditions but now enhanced by ATP at all [InsP(3)]. In addition the EC(50) for ATP potentiation increased to ∼500 μM. These characteristics are consistent with the properties of the InsP(3)R-2 dominating the overall features of InsP(3)R-induced Ca(2+) release despite the expression of all isoforms. Finally, Ca(2+) signals were measured in intact parotid lobules by multiphoton microscopy. Consistent with the release data, carbachol-stimulated Ca(2+) signals were reduced in lobules exposed to experimental hypoxia compared with control lobules only at submaximal concentrations. Adenine nucleotide modulation of InsP(3)R in parotid acinar cells likely contributes to the properties of Ca(2+) signals in physiological and pathological conditions.

  19. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria

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    Sergey M. Korotkov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT ‘c’ conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO, tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP, and carboxyatractyloside as well as thiol reagent (4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate (DIDS on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4], as well as an increase in Ca2+-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units, showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito, in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25–75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca2+. The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca2+ alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca2+-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide fixing the ANT in ‘m’ conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript “To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria” (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1].

  20. To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Saris, Nils-Erik L

    2016-04-01

    The conformation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) has a profound impact in opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane. Fixing the ANT in 'c' conformation by phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside as well as the interaction of 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) with mitochondrial thiols markedly attenuated the ability of ADP to inhibit the MPTP opening. We earlier found (Korotkov and Saris, 2011) that calcium load of rat liver mitochondria in medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3 stimulated the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The MPTP opening as well as followed increase in swelling, a drop in membrane potential (ΔΨmito), and a decrease in state 3, state 4, and 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration were visibly enhanced in the presence of PAO, tBHP, DIDS, and carboxyatractyloside. However, these effects were markedly inhibited by ADP and membrane-penetrant hydrophobic thiol reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) which fix the ANT in 'm' conformation. Cyclosporine A additionally potentiated these effects of ADP and NEM. Our data suggest that conformational changes of the ANT may be directly involved in the opening of the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria. Using the Tl(+)-induced MPTP model is discussed in terms finding new transition pore inhibitors and inducers among different chemical and natural compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quadracyclic adenine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierckx, Anke; Miannay, Francois-Alexandre; Ben Gaied, Nouha

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent-base analogues (FBAs) comprise a group of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics as well as of interactions between nucleic acids and other molecules. Here, we report on the synthesis, detailed spectroscopic characterisation...... fluorescent adenine analogues for future detailed studies of nucleic acid-containing systems....... and base-pairing properties of a new environment-sensitive fluorescent adenine analogue, quadracyclic adenine (qA). After developing an efficient route of synthesis for the phosphoramidite of qA it was incorporated into DNA in high yield by using standard solid-phase synthesis procedures. In DNA qA serves...

  2. TGF-β1 induction of the adenine nucleotide translocator 1 in astrocytes occurs through Smads and Sp1 transcription factors

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    Wallace Douglas C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (Ant1 is an inner mitochondrial membrane protein involved with energy mobilization during oxidative phosphorylation. We recently showed that rodent Ant1 is upregulated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β in reactive astrocytes following CNS injury. In the present study, we describe the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β1 regulates Ant1 gene expression in cultured primary rodent astrocytes. Results Transcription reporter analysis verified that TGF-β1 regulates transcription of the mouse Ant1 gene, but not the gene encoding the closely related Ant2 isoform. A 69 basepair TGF-β1 responsive element of the Ant1 promoter was also identified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that astrocyte nuclear proteins bind to this response element and TGF-β1 treatment recruits additional nuclear protein binding to this element. Antibody supershift and promoter deletion analyses demonstrated that Sp1 consensus binding sites in the RE are important for TGF-β1 regulation of Ant1 in astrocytes. Additionally, we demonstrate that Smad 2, 3 and 4 transcription factors are expressed in injured cerebral cortex and in primary astrocyte cultures. TGF-β1 activated Smad transcription factors also contribute to Ant1 regulation since transcription reporter assays in the presence of dominant negative (DN-Smads 3 and 4 significantly reduced induction of Ant1 by TGF-β1. Conclusion The specific regulation of Ant1 by TGF-β1 in astrocytes involves a cooperative interaction of both Smad and Sp1 binding elements located immediately upstream of the transcriptional start site. The first report of expression of Smads 2, 3 and 4 in astrocytes provided here is consistent with a regulation of Ant1 gene expression by these transcription factors in reactive astrocytes. Given the similarity in TGF-β1 regulation of Ant1 with other genes that are thought to promote neuronal survival, this interaction may

  3. Specificities and pH profiles of adenine and hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (nucleotide synthases) of the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Rasmussen, Mads Skytte

    2014-01-01

    Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransfe......Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine...... phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase), the protein product turned out to be a PRTase highly specific for adenine and we suggest that the reading frame should be renamed apT. The other reading frame SSO2424 (gpT-2) proved to be a true 6-oxopurine PRTase active with hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanine as substrates, and we...... suggest that the gene should be renamed gpT. Both enzymes exhibited unusual profiles of activity versus pH. The adenine PRTase showed the highest activity at pH 7.5-8.5, but had a distinct peak of activity also at pH 4.5. The 6-oxo PRTase showed maximal activity with hypoxanthine and guanine around pH 4...

  4. Specific and nonspecific metal ion-nucleotide interactions at aqueous/solid interfaces functionalized with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Joseph G; Malin, Jessica N; Jordan, David S; Morales, Esmeralda; Geiger, Franz M

    2011-03-02

    This article reports nonlinear optical measurements that quantify, for the first time directly and without labels, how many Mg(2+) cations are bound to DNA 21-mers covalently linked to fused silica/water interfaces maintained at pH 7 and 10 mM NaCl, and what the thermodynamics are of these interactions. The overall interaction of Mg(2+) with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine is found to involve -10.0 ± 0.3, -11.2 ± 0.3, -14.0 ± 0.4, and -14.9 ± 0.4 kJ/mol, and nonspecific interactions with the phosphate and sugar backbone are found to contribute -21.0 ± 0.6 kJ/mol for each Mg(2+) ion bound. The specific and nonspecific contributions to the interaction energy of Mg(2+) with oligonucleotide single strands is found to be additive, which suggests that within the uncertainty of these surface-specific experiments, the Mg(2+) ions are evenly distributed over the oligomers and not isolated to the most strongly binding nucleobase. The nucleobases adenine and thymine are found to bind only three Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide, while the bases cytosine and guanine are found to bind eleven Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide.

  5. Carboxyatractyloside effects on brown-fat mitochondria imply that the adenine nucleotide translocator isoforms ANT1 and ANT2 may be responsible for basal and fatty-acid-induced uncoupling respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalina, Irina G; Kramarova, Tatiana V; Nedergaard, Jan; Cannon, Barbara

    2006-11-01

    In brown-fat mitochondria, fatty acids induce thermogenic uncoupling through activation of UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1). However, even in brown-fat mitochondria from UCP1-/- mice, fatty-acid-induced uncoupling exists. In the present investigation, we used the inhibitor CAtr (carboxyatractyloside) to examine the involvement of the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator) in the mediation of this UCP1-independent fatty-acid-induced uncoupling in brown-fat mitochondria. We found that the contribution of ANT to fatty-acid-induced uncoupling in UCP1-/- brown-fat mitochondria was minimal (whereas it was responsible for nearly half the fatty-acid-induced uncoupling in liver mitochondria). As compared with liver mitochondria, brown-fat mitochondria exhibit a relatively high (UCP1-independent) basal respiration ('proton leak'). Unexpectedly, a large fraction of this high basal respiration was sensitive to CAtr, whereas in liver mitochondria, basal respiration was CAtr-insensitive. Total ANT protein levels were similar in brown-fat mitochondria from wild-type mice and in liver mitochondria, but the level was increased in brown-fat mitochondria from UCP1-/- mice. However, in liver, only Ant2 mRNA was found, whereas in brown adipose tissue, Ant1 and Ant2 mRNA levels were equal. The data are therefore compatible with a tentative model in which the ANT2 isoform mediates fatty-acid-induced uncoupling, whereas the ANT1 isoform may mediate a significant part of the high basal proton leak in brown-fat mitochondria.

  6. Short-hairpin RNA-induced suppression of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 in breast cancer cells restores their susceptibility to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by activating JNK and modulating TRAIL receptor expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chul-Woo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; apo2 ligand induces apoptosis in cancer cells but has little effect on normal cells. However, many cancer cell types are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, limiting the clinical utility of TRAIL as an anti-cancer agent. We previously reported that the suppression of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 (ANT2 by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA induces apoptosis of breast cancer cells, which frequently express high levels of ANT2. In the present study, we examined the effect of RNA shRNA-induced suppression of ANT2 on the resistance of breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Results ANT2 shRNA treatment sensitized MCF7, T47 D, and BT474 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of TRAIL death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5 and down-regulating the TRAIL decoy receptor 2 (DcR2. In MCF7 cells, ANT2 knockdown activated the stress kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, subsequently stabilizing and increasing the transcriptional activity of p53 by phosphorylating it at Thr81; it also enhanced the expression and activity of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1. ANT2 shRNA-induced overexpression of DR4/DR5 and TRAIL sensitization were blocked by a p53 inhibitor, suggesting that p53 activation plays an important role in the transcriptional up-regulation of DR4/DR5. However, ANT2 knockdown also up-regulated DR4/DR5 in the p53-mutant cell lines BT474 and T47 D. In MCF7 cells, ANT2 shRNA treatment led to DcR2 promoter methylation and concomitant down-regulation of DcR2 expression, consistent with the observed activation of DNMT1. Treatment of the cells with a demethylating agent or JNK inhibitor prevented the ANT2 shRNA-induced down-regulation of DcR2 and activation of both p53 and DNMT1. In in vivo experiments using nude mice, ANT2 shRNA caused TRAIL-resistant MCF7 xenografts to undergo TRAIL-induced cell death, up-regulated DR4/DR5

  7. Adenine nucleotides inhibit proliferation of the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line LXF-289 by activation of nuclear factor kappaB1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Rainer; Hartig, Roland; Sedehizade, Fariba; Welte, Tobias; Reiser, Georg

    2006-08-01

    Extracellular nucleotides have a profound role in the regulation of the proliferation of diseased tissue. We studied how extracellular nucleotides regulate the proliferation of LXF-289 cells, the adenocarcinoma-derived cell line from human lung bronchial tumor. ATP and ADP strongly inhibited LXF-289 cell proliferation. The nucleotide potency profile was ATP = ADP = ATPgammaS > > UTP, UDP, whereas alpha,beta-methylene-ATP, beta,gamma-methylene-ATP, 2',3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP, AMP and UMP were inactive. The nucleotide potency profile and the total blockade of the ATP-mediated inhibitory effect by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 clearly show that P2Y receptors, but not P2X receptors, control LXF-289 cell proliferation. Treatment of proliferating LXF-289 cells with 100 microm ATP or ADP induced significant reduction of cell number and massive accumulation of cells in the S phase. Arrest in S phase is also indicated by the enhancement of the antiproliferative effect of ATP by coapplication of the cytostatic drugs cisplatin, paclitaxel and etoposide. Inhibition of LXF-289 cell proliferation by ATP was completely reversed by inhibitors of extracellular signal related kinase-activating kinase/extracellular signal related kinase 1/2 (PD98059, U0126), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (SB203508), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (wortmannin), and nuclear factor kappaB1 (SN50). Western blot analysis revealed transient activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2, and nuclear factor kappaB1 and possibly new formation of p50 from its precursor p105. ATP-induced attenuation of LXF-289 cell proliferation was accompanied by transient translocation of p50 nuclear factor kappaB1 and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 to the nucleus in a similar time period. In summary, inhibition of LXF-289 cell proliferation is mediated via P2Y receptors by activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and nuclear

  8. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  9. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  10. Adenine N6-methylation in diverse fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Michael F

    2017-05-26

    A DNA modification-methylation of cytosines and adenines-has important roles in diverse processes such as regulation of gene expression and genome stability, yet until recently adenine methylation had been considered to be only a hallmark of prokaryotes. A new study identifies abundant adenine methylation of transcriptionally active genes in early-diverging fungi that, together with recent other work, emphasizes the importance of adenine methylation in eukaryotes.

  11. Adenine N6-methylation in diverse fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    A DNA modification - methylation of cytosines and adenines - has important roles in diverse processes such as regulation of gene expression and genome stability, yet until recently adenine methylation had been considered to be only a hallmark of prokaryotes. A new study identifies abundant

  12. Novel non-specific DNA adenine methyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdz, Marek; Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Radlinska, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The mom gene of bacteriophage Mu encodes an enzyme that converts adenine to N6-(1-acetamido)-adenine in the phage DNA and thereby protects the viral genome from cleavage by a wide variety of restriction endonucleases. Mu-like prophage sequences present in Haemophilus influenzae Rd (FluMu), Neisseria meningitidis type A strain Z2491 (Pnme1) and H. influenzae biotype aegyptius ATCC 11116 do not possess a Mom-encoding gene. Instead, at the position occupied by mom in Mu they carry an unrelated gene that encodes a protein with homology to DNA adenine N6-methyltransferases (hin1523, nma1821, hia5, respectively). Products of the hin1523, hia5 and nma1821 genes modify adenine residues to N6-methyladenine, both in vitro and in vivo. All of these enzymes catalyzed extensive DNA methylation; most notably the Hia5 protein caused the methylation of 61% of the adenines in λ DNA. Kinetic analysis of oligonucleotide methylation suggests that all adenine residues in DNA, with the possible exception of poly(A)-tracts, constitute substrates for the Hia5 and Hin1523 enzymes. Their potential ‘sequence specificity’ could be summarized as AB or BA (where B = C, G or T). Plasmid DNA isolated from Escherichia coli cells overexpressing these novel DNA methyltransferases was resistant to cleavage by many restriction enzymes sensitive to adenine methylation. PMID:22102579

  13. Bound anionic states of adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  14. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism....... The aim of this article is to provide knowledge of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation to facilitate interpretation of data arising from genetics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in connection with biotechnological processes and beyond....

  15. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism....... The aim of this article is to provide knowledge of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation to facilitate interpretation of data arising from genetics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in connection with biotechnological processes and beyond....

  16. The essential role of stacking adenines in a two-base-pair RNA kissing complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William; Asare-Okai, Papa Nii; Chen, Alan A; Keller, Sean; Santiago, Rachel; Tenenbaum, Scott A; Garcia, Angel E; Fabris, Daniele; Li, Pan T X

    2013-04-17

    In minimal RNA kissing complexes formed between hairpins with cognate GACG tetraloops, the two tertiary GC pairs are likely stabilized by the stacking of 5'-unpaired adenines at each end of the short helix. To test this hypothesis, we mutated the flanking adenines to various nucleosides and examined their effects on the kissing interaction. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to detect kissing dimers in a multiequilibria mixture, whereas optical tweezers were applied to monitor the (un)folding trajectories of single RNA molecules. The experimental findings were rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations. Together, the results showed that the stacked adenines are indispensable for the tertiary interaction. By shielding the tertiary base pairs from solvent and reducing their fraying, the stacked adenines made terminal pairs act more like interior base pairs. The purine double-ring of adenine was essential for effective stacking, whereas additional functional groups modulated the stabilizing effects through varying hydrophobic and electrostatic forces. Furthermore, formation of the kissing complex was dominated by base pairing, whereas its dissociation was significantly influenced by the flanking bases. Together, these findings indicate that unpaired flanking nucleotides play essential roles in the formation of otherwise unstable two-base-pair RNA tertiary interactions.

  17. Role of adenine in thymine-dimer repair by reduced flavin-adenine dinucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guifeng; Sichula, Vincent; Glusac, Ksenija D

    2008-08-28

    We present a study of excited-state behavior of reduced flavin cofactors using femtosecond optical transient absorption spectroscopy. The reduced flavin cofactors studied were in two protonation states: flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FADH2 and FADH-) and flavin-mononucleotide (FMNH2 and FMNH-). We find that FMNH- exhibits multiexponential decay dynamics due to the presence of two bent conformers of the isoalloxazine ring. FMNH2 exhibits an additional fast deactivation component that is assigned to an iminol tautomer. Reduced flavin cofactors also exhibit a long-lived component that is attributed to the semiquinone and the hydrated electron that are produced in photoinduced electron transfer to the solvent. The presence of adenine in FADH2 and FADH- further changes the excited-state dynamics due to intramolecular electron transfer from the isoalloxazine to the adenine moiety of cofactors. This electron transfer is more pronounced in FADH2 due to pi-stacking interactions between two moieties. We further studied cyclobutane thymine dimer (TT-dimer) repair via FADH- and FMNH- and found that the repair is much more efficient in the case of FADH-. These results suggest that the adenine moiety plays a significant role in the TT-dimer repair dynamics. Two possible explanations for the adenine mediation are presented: (i) a two-step electron transfer process, with the initial electron transfer occurring from flavin to adenine moiety of FADH-, followed by a second electron transfer from adenine to TT-dimer; (ii) the preconcentration of TT-dimer molecules around the flavin cofactor due to the hydrophobic nature of the adenine moiety.

  18. Differences in Electrostatic Potential Around DNA Fragments Containing Adenine and 8-oxo-Adenine. An Analysis Based on Regular Cylindrical Projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Miller, John H; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-07-01

    Changes of electrostatic potential (EP) around the DNA molecule resulting from chemical modifications of nucleotides may play a role in enzymatic recognition of damaged sites. Effects of chemical modifications of nucleotides on the structure of DNA have been characterized through large scale density functional theory computations. Quantum mechanical structural optimizations of DNA fragments with three pairs of nucleotides and accompanying counteractions were performed with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and 6-31G** basis sets. The “intact” DNA fragment contained adenine in the middle layer, while the “damaged” fragment had the adenine replaced with 8-oxo-adenine. The electrostatic potential around these DNA fragments was projected on a cylindrical surface around the double helix. The two-dimensional maps of EP of the intact and damaged DNA fragments were analyzed to identify these modifications of EP that result from the occurrence of 8-oxo-adenine (8oA). It was found that distortions of a phosphate group neighboring 8oA and displacements of the accompanying countercation are clearly reflected in the EP maps. Helpful discussions Michel Dupuis are gratefully acknowledged. Authors wish to thank Marcel Swart for directing us to a compilation of van der Waals radii. This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G. and M.H.), (ii) the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG03-02ER63470 (JHM), (iii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-6 (MG), (iv) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national

  19. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Modified with 2'-Amino-α-l-LNA Adenine Monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai K; Anderson, Brooke A; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    The development of conformationally restricted nucleotide building blocks continues to attract considerable interest because of their successful use within antisense, antigene, and other gene-targeting strategies. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) and its diastereomer α-l-LNA are two interesting examples...... (ONs) modified with 2'-amino-α-l-LNA adenine monomers W-Z. The synthesis of the target phosphoramidites 1-4 is initiated from pentafuranose 5, which upon Vorbrüggen glycosylation, O2'-deacylation, O2'-activation and C2'-azide introduction yields nucleoside 8. A one-pot tandem Staudinger...

  1. Gas-phase spectroscopy of protonated adenine, adenosine 5′-monophosphate and monohydrated ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S.O.; Støchkel, K.; Byskov, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Microsolvation of chromophore ions commonly has large effects on their electronic structure and as a result on their optical absorption spectra. Here spectroscopy of protonated adenine (AdeH+) and its complex with one water molecule isolated in vacuo was done using a home-built mass spectrometer...... in combination with a tuneable pulsed laser system. Experiments also included the protonated adenosine 5′-monophosphate nucleotide (AMPH+). In the case of bare AdeH+ ions, one-photon absorption leads to four dominant fragment ions corresponding to ammonium and ions formed after loss of either NH3, HCN, or NH2CN...

  2. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide-protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson-Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson-Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues.

  3. Spectroscopic assessment of argon gas discharge induced radiolysis of aqueous adenine and thymine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Xi [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1138, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China); Huang Qing, E-mail: huangq@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1138, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China); Dang Bingrong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Xiangqin; Yu Zengliang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1138, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Ionizing radiation influences life profoundly for it can modify genetic materials. It is a long-standing task to investigate the interaction between energetic particles and DNA together with its components such as nucleotides, nucleosides and bases so as to predict and assess the potential biological effects. In this study, argon gas discharge was employed to produce energetic ions and electrons. The gas discharge caused the radiolysis of aqueous bases and the involved reactions were analyzed by means of spectroscopic tools including UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, also assisted by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). It was found that the discharge resulted in the adenine-derived lesions such as 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine, 8-OH-Ade and 2-OH-Ade in the radiolysis of aqueous adenine, as well as the thymine-derived lesions such as thymine glycol, 5-hydroxy-6-hydrothymine and/or 6-hydroxy-5-hydrothymine, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and 5-formyluracil in the radiolysis of aqueous thymine. The study of radio-sensitivity showed that adenine was more resistant to the discharge. The mechanisms of the involved reactions were studied in detail, confirming that the hydroxyl radical played a dominant role. - Highlights: > Effective new way to study radiolysis of bases via a home-made argon discharge apparatus. > Quantitative analysis of base radiolysis employing spectroscopic tools combined with HPLC/MS. > Discovery of different radiolysis effect compared with other forms of ionizing radiations.

  4. Influence of Magnetic Microparticles Isolation on Adenine Homonucleotides Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kremplova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The electroactivity of purine and pyrimidine bases is the most important property of nucleic acids that is very useful for determining oligonucleotides using square wave voltammetry. This study was focused on the electrochemical behavior of adenine-containing oligonucleotides before and after their isolation using paramagnetic particles. Two peaks were detected—peak A related to the reduction of adenine base and another peak B involved in the interactions between individual adenine strands and contributes to the formation of various spatial structures. The influence of the number of adenine bases in the strand in the isolation process using paramagnetic particles was investigated too.

  5. What is adenine doing in photolyase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, Angela; Jones, Garth A; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2010-03-25

    The short answer to the title question is that it acts as an electrostatic bouncer that shoves the charge flow from flavin toward the DNA lesion that photolyase repairs. This explanation is provided by an explicit time-dependent quantum mechanical approach, which is used to investigate the electron transfer process that triggers the repair mechanism. The transfer occurs from the flavin photolyase cofactor to the cyclobutane ring of DNA, previously formed by light-induced cycloaddition of adjacent pyrimidine bases. The electron wave function dynamics accurately accounts for the previously proposed mechanism of transfer via the terminal methyl group of the flavin moiety present in the catalytic electron-donor cofactor, FADH(-), which also contains adenine. This latter moiety, which has often been assumed to be present mainly for structural reasons, instantaneously modifies the interaction between acceptor and donor by a variation of the electrostatic interactions so that the presence of its local atomic charges is necessary to trigger the transfer. In principle, knowledge of the details of the electron transfer dynamics and of the important role of polarization effects can be exploited to improve the efficiency of the repair mechanism in artificial systems.

  6. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis promotes liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Moffitt, Andrea; Ndungu, Joan; Dellinger, Ryan W; Davis, James G; Agarwal, Beamon; Baur, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    The regenerative capacity of the liver is essential for recovery from surgical resection or injuries induced by trauma or toxins. During liver regeneration, the concentration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) falls, at least in part due to metabolic competition for precursors. To test whether NAD availability restricts the rate of liver regeneration, we supplied nicotinamide riboside (NR), an NAD precursor, in the drinking water of mice subjected to partial hepatectomy. NR increased DNA synthesis, mitotic index, and mass restoration in the regenerating livers. Intriguingly, NR also ameliorated the steatosis that normally accompanies liver regeneration. To distinguish the role of hepatocyte NAD levels from any systemic effects of NR, we generated mice overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme for NAD synthesis, specifically in the liver. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase overexpressing mice were mildly hyperglycemic at baseline and, similar to mice treated with NR, exhibited enhanced liver regeneration and reduced steatosis following partial hepatectomy. Conversely, mice lacking nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in hepatocytes exhibited impaired regenerative capacity that was completely rescued by administering NR.

  7. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; Shock, David D.; Kim, Taejin; Schlick, Tamar; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, which is found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate Escherichia coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerases discriminate between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities, nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine and 8-oxo-dGTP(syn) uses its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine. Here we use time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite adenine or cytosine with human pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen-bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxo-dGTP uses charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.

  8. Dynamics of Excess-Electron Transfer through Alternating Adenine:Thymine Sequences in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-11-02

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the sequence-dependent excess-electron transfer (EET) dynamics in DNA, which plays an important role in DNA damage/repair. There are many published studies on EET in consecutive adenine:thymine (A:T) sequences (Tn), but those in alternating A:T sequences (ATn) remain limited. Here, two series of functionalized DNA oligomers, Tn and ATn, were synthesized with a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, a trimer of ethylenedioxythiophene (3 E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA). Laser flash photolysis experiments showed that the EET rate constant of AT3 is two times lower than that of T3 due to the lack of π-stacking of Ts in AT3. Thus, it was indicated that excess-electron hopping is affected by the interaction between LUMOs of nucleotides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Absence of Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition but presence of bongkrekate-sensitive nucleotide exchange in C. crangon and P. serratus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Konrad

    Full Text Available Mitochondria from the embryos of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana do not undergo Ca(2+-induced permeability transition in the presence of a profound Ca(2+ uptake capacity. Furthermore, this crustacean is the only organism known to exhibit bongkrekate-insensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide exchange, prompting the conjecture that refractoriness to bongkrekate and absence of Ca(2+-induced permeability transition are somehow related phenomena. Here we report that mitochondria isolated from two other crustaceans, brown shrimp (Crangon crangon and common prawn (Palaemon serratus exhibited bongkrekate-sensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport, but lacked a Ca(2+-induced permeability transition. Ca(2+ uptake capacity was robust in the absence of adenine nucleotides in both crustaceans, unaffected by either bongkrekate or cyclosporin A. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ca(2+-loaded mitochondria showed needle-like formations of electron-dense material strikingly similar to those observed in mitochondria from the hepatopancreas of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus and the embryos of Artemia franciscana. Alignment analysis of the partial coding sequences of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT expressed in Crangon crangon and Palaemon serratus versus the complete sequence expressed in Artemia franciscana reappraised the possibility of the 208-214 amino acid region for conferring sensitivity to bongkrekate. However, our findings suggest that the ability to undergo Ca(2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition and the sensitivity of adenine nucleotide translocase to bongkrekate are not necessarily related phenomena.

  10. Characterization of cytokinin and adenine transport in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedzich, Anna; Stransky, Harald; Schulz, Burkhard; Frommer, Wolf B

    2008-12-01

    Cytokinins are distributed through the vascular system and trigger responses of target cells via receptor-mediated signal transduction. Perception and transduction of the signal can occur at the plasma membrane or in the cytosol. The signal is terminated by the action of extra- or intracellular cytokinin oxidases. While radiotracer studies have been used to study transport and metabolism of cytokinins in plants, little is known about the kinetic properties of cytokinin transport. To provide a reference dataset, radiolabeled trans-zeatin (tZ) was used for uptake studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell culture. Uptake kinetics of tZ are multiphasic, indicating the presence of both low- and high-affinity transport systems. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone is an effective inhibitor of cytokinin uptake, consistent with H(+)-mediated uptake. Other physiological cytokinins, such as isopentenyl adenine and benzylaminopurine, are effective competitors of tZ uptake, whereas allantoin has no inhibitory effect. Adenine competes for zeatin uptake, indicating that the degradation product of cytokinin oxidases is transported by the same systems. Comparison of adenine and tZ uptake in Arabidopsis seedlings reveals similar uptake kinetics. Kinetic properties, as well as substrate specificity determined in cell cultures, are compatible with the hypothesis that members of the plant-specific purine permease family play a role in adenine transport for scavenging extracellular adenine and may, in addition, be involved in low-affinity cytokinin uptake.

  11. Recombination-dependent deletion formation in mammalian cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair gene ERCC1

    OpenAIRE

    Sargent, R. Geoffrey; Rolig, Rhonda L.; Kilburn, April E.; Adair, Gerald M.; Wilson, John H.; Nairn, Rodney S.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair proteins have been implicated in genetic recombination by experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster, but their role, if any, in mammalian cells is undefined. To investigate the role of the nucleotide excision repair gene ERCC1, the hamster homologue to the S. cerevisiae RAD10 gene, we disabled the gene by targeted knockout. Partial tandem duplications of the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) gene then were constructed at the endogeno...

  12. Mammalian mismatches in nucleotide metabolism: implications for xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalpey, Zain; Yuen, Ada H Y; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; McGregor, Christopher G A; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Yacoub, Magdi H; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2007-10-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) limits the clinical application of animal organs for xenotransplantation. Mammalian disparities in nucleotide metabolism may contribute significantly to the microvascular component in AHR; these, however remain ill-defined. We evaluated the extent of species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism. HPLC analysis was performed on venous blood samples (nucleotide metabolites) and heart biopsies (purine enzymes) from wild type mice, rats, pigs, baboons, and human donors.Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (E5'N) activities were 4-fold lower in pigs and baboon hearts compared to human and mice hearts while rat activity was highest. Similar differences between pigs and humans were also observed with kidneys and endothelial cells. More than 10-fold differences were observed with other purine enzymes. AMP deaminase (AMPD) activity was exceptionally high in mice but very low in pig and baboon hearts. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was highest in baboons. Adenosine kinase (AK) activity was more consistent across different species. Pig blood had the highest levels of hypoxanthine, inosine and adenine. Human blood uric acid concentration was almost 100 times higher than in other species studied. We conclude that species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism may affect compatibility of pig organs within a human metabolic environment. Furthermore, nucleotide metabolic mismatches may affect clinical relevance of animal organ transplant models. Supplementation of deficient precursors or application of inhibitors of nucleotide metabolism (e.g., allopurinol) or transgenic upregulation of E5'N may overcome some of these differences.

  13. DIETARY ADENINE ALLEVIATES FATTY LIVER INDUCED BY OROTIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Buang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of dietary adenine in fatty liver induced by orotic acid (OA were studied. Rats were paired-fed 1% OA-supplemented diets with/or without 0.25% adenine or a diet without OA for 10 days. Serum lipid profiles were measured using enzyme assay kits. Lipids of liver tissues were extracted and liver lipid contents were determined. A peach of liver was prepared to determine the activities of fatty acid synthase (FAS and fatty acid β-oxidation. The results showed that liver TG content of OA-fed rats increased markedly in comparison to basal group.  However, the addition of adenine to the diet reversed promotion of liver TG content to basal level. It was also found that FAS activities decreased. Furthermore, these diets reversed the inhibition of fatty acid β-oxidation to basal level and induced the serum lipid levels secretion. Therefore, the alleviation of fatty liver in OA-treated rats given dietary adenine is associated with the inhibition of FAS activities accompanied with the promotion of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation and the promotion of serum lipid secretion from the hepatic tissue into the bloodstream.

  14. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  15. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  16. Classifying Coding DNA with Nucleotide Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Carels

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we compared the success rate of classification of coding sequences (CDS vs. introns by Codon Structure Factor (CSF and by a method that we called Universal Feature Method (UFM. UFM is based on the scoring of purine bias (Rrr and stop codon frequency. We show that the success rate of CDS/intron classification by UFM is higher than by CSF. UFM classifies ORFs as coding or non-coding through a score based on (i the stop codon distribution, (ii the product of purine probabilities in the three positions of nucleotide triplets, (iii the product of Cytosine (C, Guanine (G, and Adenine (A probabilities in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd positions of triplets, respectively, (iv the probabilities of G in 1st and 2nd position of triplets and (v the distance of their GC3 vs. GC2 levels to the regression line of the universal correlation. More than 80% of CDSs (true positives of Homo sapiens (>250 bp, Drosophila melanogaster (>250 bp and Arabidopsis thaliana (>200 bp are successfully classified with a false positive rate lower or equal to 5%. The method releases coding sequences in their coding strand and coding frame, which allows their automatic translation into protein sequences with 95% confidence. The method is a natural consequence of the compositional bias of nucleotides in coding sequences.

  17. DNA damage induced by the environmental carcinogen butadiene: identification of a diepoxybutane-adenine adduct and its detection by 32P-postlabelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuratti, C; Jones, N J; Marafante, E; Kostiainen, R; Peltonen, K; Waters, R

    1994-09-01

    To date only a few studies have been undertaken on DNA adducts formed by epoxybutene (EB) and diepoxybutane (DEB), the two active metabolites of 1,3-butadiene. Our interests have focused on further investigating DNA alkylation by the two epoxides, especially in relation to the development of a method for human biomonitoring. Here, following the reaction of deoxyadenosine monophosphate and poly(dA-dT)(dA-dT) with DEB and subsequent HPLC, we have identified an adenine adduct. MS analyses indicate the structure of an adenine adducted by DEB at the N6 position. A HPLC/32P-postlabelling method was developed for its measurement in DNA samples and the adduct was detected in calf thymus DNA and DNA from Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to DEB. The 100% labelling efficiency during postlabelling, the amount of the adduct and its elution before the normal nucleotides during HPLC suggest it could be a suitable indicator of BUT exposure.

  18. Excited-State Deactivation of Adenine by Electron-Driven Proton-Transfer Reactions in Adenine-Water Clusters: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Karsili, Tolga N V; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-04

    The reactivity of photoexcited 9H-adenine with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the 9H-adenine-(H2 O)5 cluster is investigated by using ab initio electronic structure methods, focusing on the photoreactivity of the three basic sites of 9H-adenine. The energy profiles of excited-state reaction paths for electron/proton transfer from water to adenine are computed. For two of the three sites, a barrierless or nearly barrierless reaction path towards a low-lying S1 -S0 conical intersection is found. This reaction mechanism, which is specific for adenine in an aqueous environment, can explain the substantially shortened excited-state lifetime of 9H-adenine in water. Depending on the branching ratio of the nonadiabatic dynamics at the S1 -S0 conical intersection, the electron/proton transfer process can enhance the photostability of 9H-adenine in water or can lead to the generation of adenine-H(⋅) and OH(⋅) free radicals. Although the branching ratio is yet unknown, these findings indicate that adenine might have served as a catalyst for energy harvesting by water splitting in the early stages of the evolution of life. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Study on the oxidation form of adenine in phosphate buffer solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuan-Zhi; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Feng-Xia; Ye, Yong; Xie, Ji-Min

    2010-07-01

    The oxidation of adenine in phosphate buffer solution is investigated using square-wave voltammetry and in situ UV spectroelectrochemistry. The geometry of adenine and the derivatives optimized at DFTB3LYP-6-31G (d, p)-PCM level is in agreement with the crystal structure, and the imitated UV spectra of adenine and the product at electrode are consistent with the in situ UV spectra. The relationship between the electrochemical property and the molecular structure is also discussed. The experimental and theoretical results show that the adenine oxidation origins from the neutral adenine.

  20. B3LYP, BLYP and PBE DFT band structures of the nucleotide base stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres, Zs; Bogár, F.; Ladik, J.

    DFT crystal orbital (band structure) calculations have been performed for the nucleotide base stacks of cytosine, thymine, adenine, and guanine arranged in DNA B geometry. The band structures obtained with PBE, BLYP, and B3LYP functionals are presented and compared to other related experimental and theoretical results. The influence of the quality of the basis set on the fundamental gap values was also investigated using Clementi's double ζ, 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets.

  1. Main: Nucleotide Analysis [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -acting regulatory DNA elements Database kome_place_search_result.zip kome_place_search_result ... ...Nucleotide Analysis PLACE search result Result of signal search against PLACE : cis

  2. Main: Nucleotide Analysis [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nucleotide Analysis Japonica genome blast search result Result of blastn search against japon...ica genome sequence kome_japonica_genome_blast_search_result.zip kome_japonica_genome_blast_search_result ...

  3. Complete nucleotide sequences of two adjacent early vaccinia virus genes located within the inverted terminal repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, S; Gershowitz, A; Moss, B

    1982-11-01

    The proximal part of the 10,000-base pair (bp) inverted terminal repetition of vaccinia virus DNA encodes at least three early mRNAs. A 2,236-bp segment of the repetition was sequenced to characterize two of the genes. This task was facilitated by constructing a series of recombinants containing overlapping deletions; oligonucleotide linkers with synthetic restriction sites provided points for radioactive labeling before sequencing by the chemical degradation method of Maxam and Gilbert (Methods Enzymol. 65:499-560, 1980). The ends of the transcripts were mapped by hybridizing labeled DNA fragments to early viral RNA and resolving nuclease S1-protected fragments in sequencing gels, by sequencing cDNA clones, and from the lengths of the RNAs. The nucleotide sequences for at least 60 bp upstream of both transcriptional initiation sites are more than 80% adenine . thymine rich and contain long runs of adenines and thymines with some homology to procaryotic and eucaryotic consensus sequences. The gene transcribed in the rightward direction encodes an RNA of approximately 530 nucleotides with a single open reading frame of 420 nucleotides. Preceding the first AUG, there is a heptanucleotide that can hybridize to the 3' end of 18S rRNA with only one mismatch. The derived amino acid sequence of the protein indicated a molecular weight of 15,500. The gene transcribed in the leftward direction encodes an RNA 1,000 to 1,100 nucleotides long with an open reading frame of 996 nucleotides and a leader sequence of only 5 to 6 nucleotides. The derived amino acid sequence of this protein indicated a molecular weight of 38,500. The 3' ends of the two transcripts were located within 100 bp of each other. Although there are adenine . thymine-rich clusters near the putative transcriptional termination sites, specific AATAAA polyadenylic acid signal sequences are absent.

  4. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-02

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine).

  5. The family of N9-adenine: New entry for adenine-benzamide conjugates linked via versatile spacers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabhpreet Singh

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared 4-nitrobenzamide-adenine conjugates (8, 13 and 14) linked with versatile spacer such as triethylene glycol (TEG), aminocaproic acid and ethyl chains which were eventually reduced to obtain the corresponding 4-aminobenzamide-adenine conjugates (1-3) in good yields. These conjugates bear a nucleobase for DNA recognition or self-assembly through base-pair complementarity, a biocompatible linker for interfacing with biological system, and a p-aminobenzamide moiety for pharmacological applications. The use of hydrophilic or lipophilic linkers may tune the dispersibility of these conjugates in different solvents, as well as impart different properties. In the preliminary experiments the versatility and application of these linkers has been tested for functionalization of SWCNTs.

  6. Nucleotides upstream of the Kozak sequence strongly influence gene expression in the yeast S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liang, Qiang; Song, Wenjiang; Marchisio, Mario Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as in every eukaryotic organism, the mRNA 5(')-untranslated region (UTR) is important for translation initiation. However, the patterns and mechanisms that determine the efficiency with which ribozomes bind mRNA, the elongation of ribosomes through the 5(')-UTR, and the formation of a stable translation initiation complex are not clear. Genes that are highly expressed in S. cerevisiae seem to prefer a 5(')-UTR rich in adenine and poor in guanine, particularly in the Kozak sequence, which occupies roughly the first six nucleotides upstream of the START codon. We measured the fluorescence produced by 58 synthetic versions of the S. cerevisiae minimal CYC1 promoter (pCYC1min), each containing a different 5(')-UTR. First, we replaced with adenine the last 15 nucleotides of the original pCYC1min 5(')-UTR-a theoretically optimal configuration for high gene expression. Next, we carried out single and multiple point mutations on it. Protein synthesis was highly affected by both single and multiple point mutations upstream of the Kozak sequence. RNAfold simulations revealed that significant changes in the mRNA secondary structures occur by mutating more than three adenines into guanines between positions -15 and -9. Furthermore, the effect of point mutations turned out to be strongly context-dependent, indicating that adenines placed just upstream of the START codon do not per se guarantee an increase in gene expression, as previously suggested. New synthetic eukaryotic promoters, which differ for their translation initiation rate, can be built by acting on the nucleotides upstream of the Kozak sequence. Translation efficiency could, potentially, be influenced by another portion of the 5(')-UTR further upstream of the START codon. A deeper understanding of the role of the 5(')-UTR in gene expression would improve criteria for choosing and using promoters inside yeast synthetic gene circuits.

  7. The experimental and theoretical gas phase acidities of adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil, thymine and halouracils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edward C. M.; Herder, Charles; Chen, Edward S.

    2006-10-01

    The gas phase acidities GPA (Δ H (298) for deprotonation) of the most stable tautomers of adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil and thymine are evaluated. New GPA are obtained from electron impact spectra and acid dissociation constants measured in dimethylsulfoxide for A, U and 5-FU. The average experimental GPA are: [N1 sbnd H] C 340(2); T 333(2); U 333(2); 5-FU 329(4); [N9 sbnd H] A 333(1); G 332(4); all in kcal/mol. Only cytosine is a weaker acid than HCl in the gas phase. The most acidic hydrogens in the nucleotides are replaced by the sugar in DNA and RNA. The experimental N3 sbnd H GPA are G 334(4); U 347(2), T 347(4), while the predicted N3 sbnd H 5-FU GPA is 343 kcal/mol. The NH sbnd H GPA are: C 346(4); A 352(2); G 336(4) (all in kcal/mol). These are supported by semi-empirical multiconfiguration configuration interaction calculations. The predicted C8 sbnd H acidities of G and A and the C6 sbnd H of T are about the same, 360(2) kcal/mol. The remaining CH acidities are 370-380 kcal/mol. The 5-halouracils are predicted to be more acidic than HCl.

  8. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Pereira, Vania; Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent DNA sequence variations in the genome. They have been studied extensively in the last decade with various purposes in mind. In this chapter, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using SNPs for human identification and bri...

  9. Examination of tyrosine/adenine stacking interactions in protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kari L; Pellock, Samuel J; Cox, James R; Cafiero, Mauricio L; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2013-11-14

    The π-stacking interactions between tyrosine amino acid side chains and adenine-bearing ligands are examined. Crystalline protein structures from the protein data bank (PDB) exhibiting face-to-face tyrosine/adenine arrangements were used to construct 20 unique 4-methylphenol/N9-methyladenine (p-cresol/9MeA) model systems. Full geometry optimization of the 20 crystal structures with the M06-2X density functional theory method identified 11 unique low-energy conformations. CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limit interaction energies were estimated for all of the structures to determine the magnitude of the interaction between the two ring systems. CCSD(T) computations with double-ζ basis sets (e.g., 6-31G*(0.25) and aug-cc-pVDZ) indicate that the MP2 method overbinds by as much as 3.07 kcal mol(-1) for the crystal structures and 3.90 kcal mol(-1) for the optimized structures. In the 20 crystal structures, the estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy ranges from -4.00 to -6.83 kcal mol(-1), with an average interaction energy of -5.47 kcal mol(-1), values remarkably similar to the corresponding data for phenylalanine/adenine stacking interactions. Geometry optimization significantly increases the interaction energies of the p-cresol/9MeA model systems. The average estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy of the 11 optimized structures is 3.23 kcal mol(-1) larger than that for the 20 crystal structures.

  10. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules.

  11. Characterization of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in the iceman's mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Olivieri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The degradation of DNA represents one of the main issues in the genetic analysis of archeological specimens. In the recent years, a particular kind of post-mortem DNA modification giving rise to nucleotide misincorporation ("miscoding lesions" has been the object of extensive investigations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To improve our knowledge regarding the nature and incidence of ancient DNA nucleotide misincorporations, we have utilized 6,859 (629,975 bp mitochondrial (mt DNA sequences obtained from the 5,350-5,100-years-old, freeze-desiccated human mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Otzi. To generate the sequences, we have applied a mixed PCR/pyrosequencing procedure allowing one to obtain a particularly high sequence coverage. As a control, we have produced further 8,982 (805,155 bp mtDNA sequences from a contemporary specimen using the same system and starting from the same template copy number of the ancient sample. From the analysis of the nucleotide misincorporation rate in ancient, modern, and putative contaminant sequences, we observed that the rate of misincorporation is significantly lower in modern and putative contaminant sequence datasets than in ancient sequences. In contrast, type 2 transitions represent the vast majority (85% of the observed nucleotide misincorporations in ancient sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides a further contribution to the knowledge of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in DNA sequences obtained from freeze-preserved archeological specimens. In the Iceman system, ancient sequences can be clearly distinguished from contaminants on the basis of nucleotide misincorporation rates. This observation confirms a previous identification of the ancient mummy sequences made on a purely phylogenetical basis. The present investigation provides further indication that the majority of ancient DNA damage is reflected by type 2 (cytosine-->thymine/guanine-->adenine

  12. Sensitive and selective detection of adenine using fluorescent ZnS nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerabai Devi, L; Negi, Devendra P S, E-mail: dpsnegi@nehu.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Permanent Campus, Shillong 793022 (India)

    2011-06-17

    We have used fluorescent ZnS nanoparticles as a probe for the determination of adenine. A typical 2 x 10{sup -7} M concentration of adenine quenches 39.3% of the ZnS fluorescence. The decrease in ZnS fluorescence as a function of adenine concentration was found to be linear in the concentration range 5 x 10{sup -9}-2 x 10{sup -7} M. The limit of detection (LOD) of adenine by this method is 3 nM. Among the DNA bases, only adenine quenched the fluorescence of ZnS nanoparticles in the submicromolar concentration range, thus adding selectivity to the method. The amino group of adenine was important in determining the quenching efficiency. Steady-state fluorescence experiments suggest that one molecule of adenine is sufficient to quench the emission arising from a cluster of ZnS consisting of about 20 molecules. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements indicate that the adenine molecules block the sites on the surface of ZnS responsible for emission with the longest lifetime component. This method may be applied for the determination of adenine in biological samples since the measurements have been carried out at pH 7.

  13. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  14. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  15. Ubiquinol (QH(2)) functions as a negative regulator of purine nucleotide inhibition of Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial uncoupling protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2011-01-01

    We compared the influence of different adenine and guanine nucleotides on the free fatty acid-induced uncoupling protein (UCP) activity in non-phosphorylating Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondria when the membranous ubiquinone (Q) redox state was varied. The purine nucleotides exhibit an inhibitory effect in the following descending order: GTP>ATP>GDP>ADP≫GMP>AMP. The efficiency of guanine and adenine nucleotides to inhibit UCP-sustained uncoupling in A. castellanii mitochondria depends on the Q redox state. Inhibition by purine nucleotides can be increased with decreasing Q reduction level (thereby ubiquinol, QH₂ concentration) even with nucleoside monophosphates that are very weak inhibitors at the initial respiration. On the other hand, the inhibition can be alleviated with increasing Q reduction level (thereby QH₂ concentration). The most important finding was that ubiquinol (QH₂) but not oxidised Q functions as a negative regulator of UCP inhibition by purine nucleotides. For a given concentration of QH₂, the linoleic acid-induced GTP-inhibited H(+) leak was the same for two types of A. castellanii mitochondria that differ in the endogenous Q content. When availability of the inhibitor (GTP) or the negative inhibition modulator (QH₂) was changed, a competitive influence on the UCP activity was observed. QH₂ decreases the affinity of UCP for GTP and, vice versa, GTP decreases the affinity of UCP for QH₂. These results describe the kinetic mechanism of regulation of UCP affinity for purine nucleotides by endogenous QH₂ in the mitochondria of a unicellular eukaryote.

  16. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide–protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide–protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson–Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson–Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues. PMID:21737431

  17. Absorption spectroscopy of adenine, 9-methyladenine, and 2-aminopurine in helium nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Smolarek; A.M. Rijs; W.J. Buma; M. Drabbels

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution absorption spectra of adenine, 9-methyladenine and 2-aminopurine in helium nanodroplets have been recorded. In contrast to molecular beam experiments, large variations in linewidths are observed for adenine and 9-methyladenine. At the same time, the spectrum of 2-aminopurine remains

  18. Absorption by DNA single strands of adenine isolated in vacuo: The role of multiple chromophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L.M.; Pedersen, S.O.; Kirketerp, M.-B.S.;

    2012-01-01

    strands of adenine reveal sign of exciton coupling between stacked bases from blueshifted absorption bands (~3 nm) relative to that of the dAMP mononucleotide (one adenine base). The bands are blueshifted by about 10 nm compared to those of solvated strands, which is a shift similar...

  19. Suppression of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in vivo by 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Borst, M.; Niphuis, H.; Balzarini, J.; Neu, H.; Schellekens, H.; Clercq, H. de; Koolen, M.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The acyclic purine nucleoside analogue 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine [PMEA; formerly referred to as 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine] is a potent and selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and of Moloney murine sarcoma virus-induced tumor formation in mice.

  20. Flavin nucleotides in human lens: regional distribution in brunescent cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, K S; Nayak, S

    1998-12-01

    The biochemical mechanism(s) underlying brunescent cataracts remain unclear. Oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species may have a role in the pigmentation process in eye lens. We have analysed human cataractous lenses for flavins by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), since flavins are light sensitive and act as endogenous sensitizers generating reactive oxygen species in the eye. The most significant observation in this study is that higher levels of flavin nucleotides occur in brown lens compared to yellow lens. The concentration of flavin nucleotides (flavin monouncleotide, FMN + flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD) was highest in the nuclear region of the lens followed by the cortical and capsule-epithelial regions. However, the ratio of FAD/FMN was lowest in the nuclear region of the lens followed by other regions. On the other hand, riboflavin was not detected in any of the lens (cataractous) regions. These results suggest that the observed increase in flavin nucleotides in the ocular tissue could contribute towards deepening of lens pigmentation.

  1. Cytochrome b nucleotide sequence variation among the Atlantic Alcidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, V L; Montevecchi, W A; Davidson, W S

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of cytochrome b nucleotide sequences of the six extant species of Atlantic alcids and a gull revealed an excess of adenines and cytosines and a deficit of guanines at silent sites on the coding strand. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the sequences of the common (Uria aalge) and Brünnich's (U. lomvia) guillemots, followed by the razorbill (Alca torda) and little auk (Alle alle). The black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) sequence formed a sister taxon, and the puffin (Fratercula arctica) fell outside the other alcids. Phylogenetic comparisons of substitutions indicated that mutabilities of bases did not differ, but that C was much more likely to be incorporated than was G. Imbalances in base composition appear to result from a strand bias in replication errors, which may result from selection on secondary RNA structure and/or the energetics of codon-anticodon interactions.

  2. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-05

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of the Molecular Recognition of Nucleotides and Bases by a Novel Calixarene Derivative Containing Uracil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI,Hui-Jie; SHI,Xian-Fa; YAO,Tian-Ming; JI,Liang-Nian

    2008-01-01

    A calix[4]arene derivative containing uracil, 5-(uracil-N1-acetamido)-25,26,27,28-tetrahy droxycalix[4]-arene (UC), was designed and synthesized. The interaction with nucleotides and bases has also been studied by ESI-MS and π-A isotherms. The results of ESI-MS showed that UC could recognize adenine and adenosine from other nucleotides and bases. In addition, π-A isotherms at the air-water interface indicated that there was interaction between UC and the species in the subphase, and the respective complexes were formed in the monolayer. The mean molecular area at zero surface pressure increased with the sizes of the nucleotides and bases in the subphase in the order: water<adenine<adenosine<ATP·Na2.

  4. Statistical analysis of nucleotide runs in coding and noncoding DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprizhitsky YuA; Nechipurenko YuD; Alexandrov, A A; Volkenstein, M V

    1988-10-01

    A statistical analysis of the occurrence of particular nucleotide runs in DNA sequences of different species has been carried out. There are considerable differences of run distributions in DNA sequences of procaryotes, invertebrates and vertebrates. There is an abundance of short runs (1-2 nucleotides long) in the coding sequences and there is a deficiency of such runs in the noncoding regions. However, some interesting exceptions from this rule exist for the run distribution of adenine in procaryotes and for the arrangement of purine-pyrimidine runs in eucaryotes. The similarity in the distributions of such runs in the coding and noncoding regions may be due to some structural features of the DNA molecule as a whole. Runs of guanine (or cytosine) of three to six nucleotides occur predominantly in noncoding DNA regions in eucaryotes, especially in vertebrates.

  5. IRE1α nucleotide sequence cleavage specificity in the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Sopha, Pattarawut; Kaufman, Randal J; Tirasophon, Witoon

    2017-01-01

    Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) is a conserved sensor of the unfolded protein response that has protein kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase) enzymatic activities and thereby initiates HAC1/XBP1 splicing. Previous studies demonstrated that human IRE1α (hIRE1α) does not cleave Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAC1 mRNA. Using an in vitro cleavage assay, we show that adenine to cytosine nucleotide substitution at the +1 position in the 3' splice site of HAC1 RNA is required for specific cleavage by hIRE1α. A similar restricted nucleotide specificity in the RNA substrate was observed for XBP1 splicing in vivo. Together these findings underscore the essential role of cytosine nucleotide at +1 in the 3' splice site for determining cleavage specificity of hIRE1α.

  6. Gender differences in adenine-induced chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Vishal; Small, David; Kauter, Kate; Gobe, Glenda C; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-12-01

    Gender contributes to differences in incidence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease. To induce kidney damage in male and female Wistar rats (n = 12/group), a 0.25% adenine diet for 16 wk was used. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, proteinuria) and structure (glomerular damage, tubulointerstitial atrophy, fibrosis, inflammation); cardiovascular function (blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, vascular responses, echocardiography) and structure (cardiac fibrosis); plasma testosterone and estrogen concentrations; and protein expression for oxidative stress [heme oxygenase-1, inflammation (TNF-α), fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β), ERK1/2, and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α)] were compared in males and females. Adenine-fed females had less decline in kidney function than adenine-fed males, although kidney atrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis were similar. Plasma estrogen concentrations increased and plasma testosterone concentrations decreased in adenine-fed males, with smaller changes in females. CKD-associated molecular changes in kidneys were more pronounced in males than females except for expression of ER-α in the kidney, which was completely suppressed in adenine-fed males but unchanged in adenine-fed females. Both genders showed increased blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, and cardiac fibrosis with the adenine diet. Cardiovascular changes with adenine were similar in males and females, except males developed concentric, and females eccentric cardiac hypertrophy. In hearts from adenine-fed male and female rats, expression of ER-α and activation of the ERK1/2 pathway were increased, in part explaining changes in cardiac hypertrophy. In summary, adenine-induced kidney damage may be increased in males due to the suppression of ER-α.

  7. Degradation Products of Adenine Nucleotide in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Stored in Ice and in Modified Atmosphere Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZOĞUL, Yeşim; Özoğul, Fatih

    2002-01-01

    The breakdown products of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were separated using a rapid HPLC method. The K-value, Ki-value and H-value were also determined as a means of evaluating the quality of rainbow trout held in ice and modified atmosphere packaging comparing with sensory and microbiological analysis in terms of fresh fish quality. Results from the present research indicated that modified atmosphere did not extend the shelf life of trout but inhibited microbial growth compared to ice storag...

  8. File list: Oth.Lar.50.Adenine_N6-methylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model.

  8. Studies on yeast nucleoside triphosphate-nucleoside diphosphate transphosphorylase (nucleoside diphosphokinase). IV. Steady-state kinetic properties with thymidine nucleotides (including 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine analogues).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Alber, T; Richardson, D; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M

    1991-01-01

    A study of the steady-state kinetics of the crystalline brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces carlsbergensis) nucleoside diphosphokinase, with the magnesium complexes of the adenine and thymidine nucleotides as reactants, has led to a postulated kinetic mechanism which proceeds through a substituted enzyme. This agrees with the earlier conclusions of Garces and Cleland [Biochemistry 1969; 8:633-640] who characterized a reaction between the magnesium complexes of the adenine and uridine nucleotides. An advantage of using thymidine nucleotides as reactants is that they permit accurate, rapid and continuous assays of the enzymatic activity in coupled-enzymatic tests. Through measurements of the initial velocities and product inhibition studies, the Michaelis constants, maximum velocities, and inhibition constants could be evaluated for the individual substrates. Competitive substrate inhibition was encountered at relatively high substrate concentrations, which also permitted an evaluation of their ability to act as 'dead-end' inhibitors. The Michaelis constants for the 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AzT) analogues were also evaluated and, although these values were only somewhat higher than those of their natural substrates, the Km's for the adenine nucleotides as paired substrates were lower and the Vmax's were drastically reduced. The pharmacological implications of these observations are touched upon and extrapolated to the cases where therapeutic doses of AzT may be employed.

  9. Myocardial lipids and nucleotides of rats fed olive oil or rapeseed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare-Rogers, J L; Gordon, E

    1976-04-01

    After 1 week, the level of myocardial fatty acids was 4 times greater in young rats fed high erucic rapeseed oil than in those fed oliver oil. The proportion of erucic acid was 5.6% in the mitochondrial fraction, 15.1% in the microsomal fraction, and 34.8% in the floating fat fraction. This incorporation of erucic acid into triglycerides of the floating fat was evidence of esterification. The changes in the mitochondrial lipids did not alter the content of adenine nucleotides of the myocardium nor its apparent capacity to oxidize substrates.

  10. Design of laser pulses for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H bond of adenine and adenine-thymine base pair using optimal control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sitansh; Sharma, Purshotam; Singh, Harjinder; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G

    2009-06-01

    Time dependent quantum dynamics and optimal control theory are used for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H (amino N-H) bond in free adenine and in the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair. For the N6-H bond in free adenine we have used a one dimensional model while for the hydrogen bond, N6-H(A)...O4(T), present in the A-T base pair, a two mathematical dimensional model is employed. The conjugate gradient method is used for the optimization of the field dependent cost functional. Optimal laser fields are obtained for selective population transfer in both the model systems, which give virtually 100% excitation probability to preselected vibrational levels. The effect of the optimized laser field on the other hydrogen bond, N1(A)...H-N3(T), present in A-T base pair is also investigated.

  11. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  12. Suppression of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in vivo by 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine

    OpenAIRE

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H F; Borst, M.; Niphuis, H; Balzarini, J; Neu, H.; Schellekens, H.; De Clercq, H; Koolen, M.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The acyclic purine nucleoside analogue 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine [PMEA; formerly referred to as 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine] is a potent and selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and of Moloney murine sarcoma virus-induced tumor formation in mice. In the latter system PMEA has stronger antiretroviral potency and selectivity than 3'-azido-3'-thymidine (AZT). We have now investigated the effect of the drug in cats infected with the feline immu...

  13. Improved Growth and Stress Tolerance in the Arabidopsis oxt1 Mutant Triggered by Altered Adenine Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suchada Sukrong; Kil-Young Yun; Patrizia Stadler; Charan Kumar; Tony Facciuolo; Barbara A.Moffatt; Deane L.Falcone

    2012-01-01

    Plants perceive and respond to environmental stresses with complex mechanisms that are often associated with the activation of antioxidant defenses.A genetic screen aimed at isolating oxidative stress-tolerant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana has identified oxt1,a line that exhibits improved tolerance to oxidative stress and elevated temperature but displays no apparent deleterious growth effects under non-stress conditions.Oxt1 harbors a mutation that arises from the altered expression of a gene encoding adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APT1),an enzyme that converts adenine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP),indicating a link between purine metabolism,whole-plant growth responses,and stress acclimation.The oxt1 mutation results in decreased APT1 expression that leads to reduced enzymatic activity.Correspondingly,oxt1 plants possess elevated levels of adenine.Decreased APT enzyme activity directly correlates with stress resistance in transgenic lines that ectopically express APT1.The metabolic alteration in oxt1 plants also alters the expression of several antioxidant defense genes and the response of these genes to oxidative challenge.Finally,it is shown that manipulation of adenine levels can induce stress tolerance to wild-type plants.Collectively,these results show that alterations in cellular adenine levels can trigger stress tolerance and improve growth,leading to increases in plant biomass.The results also suggest that adenine might play a part in the signals that modulate responses to abiotic stress and plant growth.

  14. Determination of the base composition of deoxyribonucleic acid by measurement of the adenine/guanine ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J. T. O.

    1967-01-01

    A method is described for determination of the base composition (as guanine+cytosine or adenine+thymine content) of DNA by accurate measurement of the adenine/guanine ratio. The DNA is hydrolysed with 0·03n-hydrochloric acid for 40min. to release the purines. The hydrolysate is subjected to ion-exchange chromatography on Zeo-Karb 225. Apurinic acids are eluted with 0·03n-hydrochloric acid and then guanine and adenine are eluted separately with 2n-hydrochloric acid. Guanine and adenine are each collected as a single fraction, and the amount of base in each case is determined by measuring the volume and the extinction at suitable wavelengths. For use in the calculations, millimolar extinction coefficients in 2n-hydrochloric acid of 12·09 for adenine at 262mμ, and 10·77 for guanine at 248mμ, were determined with authentic samples of bases. The method gives extremely reproducible results: from 12 determinations with calf thymus DNA the adenine/guanine molar ratio had a standard deviation of 0·011; this corresponds to a standard deviation in guanine+cytosine content of 0·2% guanine+cytosine. PMID:5626094

  15. Determination of the base composition of deoxyribonucleic acid by measurement of the adenine-granine ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J T

    1967-11-01

    A method is described for determination of the base composition (as guanine+cytosine or adenine+thymine content) of DNA by accurate measurement of the adenine/guanine ratio. The DNA is hydrolysed with 0.03n-hydrochloric acid for 40min. to release the purines. The hydrolysate is subjected to ion-exchange chromatography on Zeo-Karb 225. Apurinic acids are eluted with 0.03n-hydrochloric acid and then guanine and adenine are eluted separately with 2n-hydrochloric acid. Guanine and adenine are each collected as a single fraction, and the amount of base in each case is determined by measuring the volume and the extinction at suitable wavelengths. For use in the calculations, millimolar extinction coefficients in 2n-hydrochloric acid of 12.09 for adenine at 262mmu, and 10.77 for guanine at 248mmu, were determined with authentic samples of bases. The method gives extremely reproducible results: from 12 determinations with calf thymus DNA the adenine/guanine molar ratio had a standard deviation of 0.011; this corresponds to a standard deviation in guanine+cytosine content of 0.2% guanine+cytosine.

  16. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K.

  17. Sequence-dependent folding landscapes of adenine riboswitch aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    Prediction of the functions of riboswitches requires a quantitative description of the folding landscape so that the barriers and time scales for the conformational change in the switching region in the aptamer can be estimated. Using a combination of all atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained model simulations we studied the response of adenine (A) binding add and pbuE A-riboswitches to mechanical force. The two riboswitches contain a structurally similar three-way junction formed by three paired helices, P1, P2, and P3, but carry out different functions. Using pulling simulations, with structures generated in MD simulations, we show that after P1 rips the dominant unfolding pathway in add A-riboswitch is the rupture of P2 followed by unraveling of P3. In the pbuE A-riboswitch, after P1 unfolds P3 ruptures ahead of P2. The order of unfolding of the helices, which is in accord with single molecule pulling experiments, is determined by the relative stabilities of the individual helices. Our results show that the stability of isolated helices determines the order of assembly and response to force in these non-coding regions. We use the simulated free energy profile for pbuE A-riboswitch to estimate the time scale for allosteric switching, which shows that this riboswitch is under kinetic control lending additional support to the conclusion based on single molecule pulling experiments. A consequence of the stability hypothesis is that a single point mutation (U28C) in the P2 helix of the add A-riboswitch, which increases the stability of P2, would make the folding landscapes of the two riboswitches similar. This prediction can be tested in single molecule pulling experiments.

  18. OTOTOXIC MODEL OF OXALIPLATIN AND PROTECTION FROM NICOTINAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Dalian; JIANG Haiyan; FU Yong; LI Yongqi; Richard Salvi; Shinichi Someya; Masaru Tanokura

    2013-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, an anticancer drug commonly used to treat colorectal cancer and other tumors, has a number of serious side effects, most notably neuropathy and ototoxicity. To gain insights into its ototoxic profile, oxaliplatin was applied to rat cochlear organ cultures. Consistent with it neurotoxic propensity, oxaliplatin selectively damaged nerve fibers at a very low dose 1 µM. In contrast, the dose required to damage hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons was 50 fold higher (50 µM). Oxailiplatin-induced cochlear lesions initial-ly increased with dose, but unexpectedly decreased at very high doses. This non-linear dose response could be related to depressed oxaliplatin uptake via active transport mechanisms. Previous studies have demon-strated that axonal degeneration involves biologically active processes which can be greatly attenuated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). To determine if NAD+would protect spiral ganglion axons and the hair cells from oxaliplatin damage, cochlear cultures were treated with oxaliplatin alone at doses of 10 µM or 50 µM respectively as controls or combined with 20 mM NAD+. Treatment with 10 µM oxaliplatin for 48 hours resulted in minor damage to auditory nerve fibers, but spared cochlear hair cells. However, when cochlear cultures were treated with 10 µM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+, most auditory nerve fibers were intact. 50 µM oxaliplatin destroyed most of spiral ganglion neurons and cochlear hair cells with apop-totic characteristics of cell fragmentations. However, 50 µM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+treatment great-ly reduced neuronal degenerations and hair cell missing. The results suggested that NAD+provides signifi-cant protection against oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, which may be due to its actions of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and energy supply.

  19. Dependence of the E.coli promoter strength and physical parameters upon the nucleotide sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEREZHNOY Andrey Y.; SHCKORBATOV Yuriy G.

    2005-01-01

    The energy of interaction between complementary nucleotides in promoter sequences ofE. coli was calculated and visualized. The graphic method for presentation of energy properties of promoter sequences was elaborated on. Data obtained indicated that energy distribution through the length of promoter sequence results in picture with minima at -35, -8 and +7 regions corresponding to areas with elevated AT (adenine-thymine) content. The most important difference from the random sequences area is related to -8. Four promoter groups and their energy properties were revealed. The promoters with minimal and maximal energy of interaction between complementary nucleotides have low strengths, the strongest promoters correspond to promoter clusters characterized by intermediate energy values.

  20. Structure of dimeric, recombinant Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: a bent dimer defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rune W; Leggio, Leila Lo; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-1-α-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (EC 2.7.6.1) catalyses the Mg(2+)-dependent transfer of a diphosphoryl group from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl group of ribose 5-phosphate resulting in the production of PRPP and AMP. A nucleotide sequence specifying Sulfolobus solfataricus PRPP synthase was synthesised in vitro with optimised codon usage for expression in Escherichia coli. Following expression of the gene in E. coli PRPP synthase was purified by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation and the structure of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A bent dimer oligomerisation was revealed, which seems to be an abundant feature among PRPP synthases for defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP. Molecular replacement was used to determine the S. solfataricus PRPP synthase structure with a monomer subunit of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii PRPP synthase as a search model. The two amino acid sequences share 35 % identity. The resulting asymmetric unit consists of three separated dimers. The protein was co-crystallised in the presence of AMP and ribose 5-phosphate, but in the electron density map of the active site only AMP and a sulphate ion were observed. Sulphate ion, reminiscent of the ammonium sulphate precipitation step of the purification, seems to bind tightly and, therefore, presumably occupies and blocks the ribose 5-phosphate binding site. The activity of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase is independent of phosphate ion.

  1. High information throughput analysis of nucleotides and their isotopically enriched isotopologues by direct-infusion FTICR-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Higashi, Richard M; Lane, Andrew N; Fan, Teresa W-M

    2012-01-01

    Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is capable of acquiring unmatched quality of isotopologue data for stable isotope resolved metabolomics (SIRM). This capability drives the need for a continuous ion introduction for obtaining optimal isotope ratios. Here we report the simultaneous analysis of mono and dinucleotides from crude polar extracts by FTICR-MS by adapting an ion-pairing sample preparation method for LC-MS analysis. This involves a rapid cleanup of extracted nucleotides on pipet tips containing a C(18) stationary phase, which enabled global analysis of nucleotides and their (13)C isotopologues at nanomolar concentrations by direct infusion nanoelectrospray FTICR-MS with 5 minutes of data acquisition. The resolution and mass accuracy enabled computer-assisted unambiguous assignment of most nucleotide species, including all phosphorylated forms of the adenine, guanine, uracil and cytosine nucleotides, NAD(+), NADH, NADP(+), NADPH, cyclic nucleotides, several UDP-hexoses, and all their (13)C isotopologues. The method was applied to a SIRM study on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells grown in [U-(13)C] glucose with or without the anti-cancer agent methylseleninic acid. At m/z resolving power of 400,000, (13)C-isotopologues of nucleotides were fully resolved from all other elemental isotopologues, thus allowing their (13)C fractional enrichment to be accurately determined. The method achieves both high sample and high information throughput analysis of nucleotides for metabolic pathway reconstruction in SIRM investigations.

  2. [Nucleotide receptors and renal function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney plays a key role in homeostasis of human body. It has heterogenic structure and is characterized by complicated vascular beds and numbers of sympathetic nerves endings. Nucleotides receptors are involved in the regulation of blood flow, a fundamental process for renal function. Plasma is filtrated in renal glomerulus and activity of nucleotides receptors located on cells of glomerular filter modifies the physi- cochemical properties of filter and affects the filtration process. Electrolytes, water and low molecular weight molecules are reabsorbed from tubular fluid or secreted into fluid in proximal and distal tubules. Glomerular filtration rate and activity of tubular processes are regulated via nucleotides receptors by glomerulotubularbalance and tubuloglomerular feedback. Nucleotides receptors are involved in systemic regulation of blood pressure and carbohydrate metabolism.

  3. Cessation of respiration after far-ultraviolet irradiation of Escherichia coli B/r: loss of unaltered pyridine nucleotides to the medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenley, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Swenson, P.A.; Joshi, J.G.

    1979-09-01

    Cessation of respiration of Escherichia coli B/r cells is initiated 30 min after irradiation at 254 nm and is linked to cell death. Pyridine nucleotides begin to disappear with the onset of respiratory failure and are almost completely absent from the cells by 90 min after irradiation. We studied the fate of these respiratory cofactors in a niacin-requiring mutant (RSI) grown on minimal medium containing (7-/sup 14/C)nicotinic acid. By 90 min after irradiation (52 J/m/sup 2/) nearly all of the acid-soluble radioactive counts appeared in the medium. Paper chromatographic studies and a spectrophotometric assay indicated that the material was nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. The loss of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide was not balanced by synthesis, despite the presence of appropriate active biosynthetic enzymes for at least 90 min after uv irradiation. Analysis of the amino acid and nucleotide pool of the cells showed that there was some loss of most of these small molecules; the levels of a few were almost completely depleted. We conclude that the pyridine nucleotides are lost from the cell to the medium and that the loss cannot be attributed to extensive general membrane damage.

  4. Binding of adenine to Stx2, the protein toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Marie E., E-mail: frasm@ucalgary.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 1N4 (Canada); Cherney, Maia M. [Group in Protein Structure and Function, Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Marcato, Paola [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Mulvey, George L.; Armstrong, Glen D. [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 4N1 (Canada); James, Michael N. G. [Group in Protein Structure and Function, Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of Stx2 were grown in the presence of adenosine and adenine. In both cases, the resulting electron density showed only adenine bound at the active site of the A subunit, proving that the holotoxin is an active N-glycosidase. Stx2 is a protein toxin whose catalytic subunit acts as an N-glycosidase to depurinate a specific adenine base from 28S rRNA. In the holotoxin, the catalytic portion, A1, is linked to the rest of the A subunit, A2, and A2 interacts with the pentameric ring formed by the five B subunits. In order to test whether the holotoxin is active as an N-glycosidase, Stx2 was crystallized in the presence of adenosine and adenine. The crystals diffracted to ∼1.8 Å and showed clear electron density for adenine in the active site. Adenosine had been cleaved, proving that Stx2 is an active N-glycosidase. While the holotoxin is active against small substrates, it would be expected that the B subunits would interfere with the binding of the 28S rRNA.

  5. Quercetin Attenuates Vascular Calcification through Suppressed Oxidative Stress in Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-ying Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study investigated whether quercetin could alleviate vascular calcification in experimental chronic renal failure rats induced by adenine. Methods. 32 adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups fed normal diet, normal diet with quercetin supplementation (25 mg/kg·BW/d, 0.75% adenine diet, or adenine diet with quercetin supplementation. All rats were sacrificed after 6 weeks of intervention. Serum renal functions biomarkers and oxidative stress biomarkers were measured and status of vascular calcification in aorta was assessed. Furthermore, the induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38MAPK pathway was determined to explore the potential mechanism. Results. Adenine successfully induced renal failure and vascular calcification in rat model. Quercetin supplementation reversed unfavorable changes of phosphorous, uric acid (UA and creatinine levels, malonaldehyde (MDA content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in serum and the increases of calcium and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity in the aorta (P<0.05 and attenuated calcification and calcium accumulation in the medial layer of vasculature in histopathology. Western blot analysis showed that iNOS/p38MAPK pathway was normalized by the quercetin supplementation. Conclusions. Quercetin exerted a protective effect on vascular calcification in adenine-induced chronic renal failure rats, possibly through the modulation of oxidative stress and iNOs/p38MAPK pathway.

  6. Electrochemical studies on the oxidation of guanine and adenine at cyclodextrin modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Noori, Abolhassan

    2008-12-01

    An electrochemical sensor for guanine and adenine using cyclodextrin-modified poly(N-acetylaniline) (PNAANI) on a carbon paste electrode has been developed. The oxidation mechanism of guanine and adenine on the surface of the electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the electrode processes are irreversible, pH dependent, and involve several reaction products. The electron transfer process occurs in consecutive steps with the formation of a strongly adsorbed intermediate on the electrode surface. Also, a new method for estimating the apparent formation constants of guanine and adenine with the immobilized cyclodextrins, through the change of surface coverage of studied analytes has been reported. Both guanine and adenine showed linear concentrations in the range of 0.1-10 microM by using differential pulse voltammetry, with an experimental limit of detection down to 0.05 microM. Linear concentration ranges of 2-150 microM for guanine and 6-104 microM for adenine have been found when cyclic voltammetry was used for determination of both analytes.

  7. Intramolecular interactions in aminoacyl nucleotides: Implications regarding the origin of genetic coding and protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Watkins, C. L.; Hall, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular organisms store information as sequences of nucleotides in double stranded DNA. This information is useless unless it can be converted into the active molecular species, protein. This is done in contemporary creatures first by transcription of one strand to give a complementary strand of mRNA. The sequence of nucleotides is then translated into a specific sequence of amino acids in a protein. Translation is made possible by a genetic coding system in which a sequence of three nucleotides codes for a specific amino acid. The origin and evolution of any chemical system can be understood through elucidation of the properties of the chemical entities which make up the system. There is an underlying logic to the coding system revealed by a correlation of the hydrophobicities of amino acids and their anticodonic nucleotides (i.e., the complement of the codon). Its importance lies in the fact that every amino acid going into protein synthesis must first be activated. This is universally accomplished with ATP. Past studies have concentrated on the chemistry of the adenylates, but more recently we have found, through the use of NMR, that we can observe intramolecular interactions even at low concentrations, between amino acid side chains and nucleotide base rings in these adenylates. The use of this type of compound thus affords a novel way of elucidating the manner in which amino acids and nucleotides interact with each other. In aqueous solution, when a hydrophobic amino acid is attached to the most hydrophobic nucleotide, AMP, a hydrophobic interaction takes place between the amino acid side chain and the adenine ring. The studies to be reported concern these hydrophobic interactions.

  8. Excited-state lifetime of adenine near the first electronic band origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyuk; Chang, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang Hak; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2010-10-21

    The excited-state lifetime of supersonically cooled adenine was measured in the gas phase by femtosecond pump-probe transient ionization as a function of excitation energy between 36 100 and 37 500cm(-1). The excited-state lifetime of adenine is ∼2ps around the 0-0 band of the (1)L(b) ππ(∗) state (36 105cm(-1)). The lifetime drops to ∼1ps when adenine is excited to the (1)L(a) ππ(∗) state with the pump energy at 36 800cm(-1) and above. The excited-state lifetimes of (1)L(a) and (1)L(b) ππ(∗) states are differentiated in accordance with previous frequency-resolved and computational studies.

  9. QSAR analysis for ADA upon interaction with a series of adenine derivatives as inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Safarian, S; Hakimelahi, G H; Ataei, G; Ajloo, D; Panjehpour, S; Riahi, S; Mousavi, M F; Mardanyan, S; Soltani, N; Khalafi-Nezhad, A; Sharghi, H; Moghadamnia, H; Saboury, A A

    2004-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of adenosine deaminase such as Km and Ki were determined in the absence and presence of adenine derivatives (R1-R24) in sodium phosphate buffer (50 mM; pH 7.5) solution at 27 degrees C. These kinetic parameters were used for QSAR analysis. As such, we found some theoretical descriptors to which the binding affinity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) towards several adenine nucleosides as inhibitors is correlated. QSAR analysis has revealed that binding affinity of the adenine nucleosides upon interaction with ADA depends on the molecular volume, dipole moment of the molecule, electric charge around the N1 atom, and the highest of positive charge for the related molecules.

  10. Bioenergetics and gene silencing approaches for unraveling nucleotide recognition by the human EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Kandeel

    Full Text Available Gene silencing and RNA interference are major cellular processes that control gene expression via the cleavage of target mRNA. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2C2 (EIF2C2, Argonaute protein 2, Ago2 is considered to be the major player of RNAi as it is the core component of RISC complexes. While a considerable amount of research has focused on RNA interference and its associated mechanisms, the nature and mechanisms of nucleotide recognition by the PAZ domain of EIF2C2/Ago2 have not yet been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain has an inherent lack of binding to adenine nucleotides, a feature that highlights the poor binding of 3'-adenylated RNAs with the PAZ domain as well as the selective high trimming of the 3'-ends of miRNA containing adenine nucleotides. We further show that the PAZ domain selectively binds all ribonucleotides (except adenosine, whereas it poorly recognizes deoxyribonucleotides. In this context, the modification of dTMP to its ribonucleotide analogue gave a drastic improvement of binding enthalpy and, hence, binding affinity. Additionally, higher in vivo gene silencing efficacy was correlated with the stronger PAZ domain binders. These findings provide new insights into the nature of the interactions of the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

  11. Bioenergetics and gene silencing approaches for unraveling nucleotide recognition by the human EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Al-Taher, Abdullah; Nakashima, Remi; Sakaguchi, Tomoya; Kandeel, Ali; Nagaya, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kitade, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Gene silencing and RNA interference are major cellular processes that control gene expression via the cleavage of target mRNA. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2C2 (EIF2C2, Argonaute protein 2, Ago2) is considered to be the major player of RNAi as it is the core component of RISC complexes. While a considerable amount of research has focused on RNA interference and its associated mechanisms, the nature and mechanisms of nucleotide recognition by the PAZ domain of EIF2C2/Ago2 have not yet been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain has an inherent lack of binding to adenine nucleotides, a feature that highlights the poor binding of 3'-adenylated RNAs with the PAZ domain as well as the selective high trimming of the 3'-ends of miRNA containing adenine nucleotides. We further show that the PAZ domain selectively binds all ribonucleotides (except adenosine), whereas it poorly recognizes deoxyribonucleotides. In this context, the modification of dTMP to its ribonucleotide analogue gave a drastic improvement of binding enthalpy and, hence, binding affinity. Additionally, higher in vivo gene silencing efficacy was correlated with the stronger PAZ domain binders. These findings provide new insights into the nature of the interactions of the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

  12. Efficacy of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, K; Kuffer, M; Balzarini, J; Naesens, L; Goldberg, M; Erfle, V; Goebel, F D; De Clercq, E; Jindrich, J; Holy, A; Bischofberger, N; Kraft, W

    1998-02-01

    The acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) were evaluated for their efficacy and side effects in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial using naturally occurring feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats. This natural retrovirus animal model is considered highly relevant for the pathogenesis and chemotherapy of HIV in humans. Both PMEA and FPMPA proved effective in ameliorating the clinical symptoms of FIV-infected cats, as measured by several clinical parameters including the incidence and severity of stomatitis, Karnofsky's score, immunologic parameters such as relative and absolute CD4+ lymphocyte counts, and virologic parameters including proviral DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of drug-treated animals. In contrast with PMEA, FPMPA showed no hematologic side effects at a dose that was 2.5-fold higher than PMEA.

  13. Fast kinetics of nucleotide binding to Clostridium perfringens family II pyrophosphatase containing CBS and DRTGG domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsen, J; Baykov, A A; Lahti, R

    2012-02-01

    We earlier described CBS-pyrophosphatase of Moorella thermoacetica (mtCBS-PPase) as a novel phosphohydrolase that acquired a pair of nucleotide-binding CBS domains during evolution, thus endowing the protein with the capacity to be allosterically regulated by adenine nucleotides (Jämsen, J., Tuominen, H., Salminen, A., Belogurov, G. A., Magretova, N. N., Baykov, A. A., and Lahti, R. (2007) Biochem. J., 408, 327-333). We herein describe a more evolved type of CBS-pyrophosphatase from Clostridium perfringens (cpCBS-PPase) that additionally contains a DRTGG domain between the two CBS domains in the regulatory part. cpCBS-PPase retained the ability of mtCBS-PPase to be inhibited by micromolar concentrations of AMP and ADP and activated by ATP and was additionally activated by diadenosine polyphosphates (AP(n)A) with n > 2. Stopped-flow measurements using a fluorescent nucleotide analog, 2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthranoyl)-AMP, revealed that cpCBS-PPase interconverts through two different conformations with transit times on the millisecond scale upon nucleotide binding. The results suggest that the presence of the DRTGG domain affords greater flexibility to the regulatory part, allowing it to more rapidly undergo conformational changes in response to binding.

  14. High-NaCl diet impairs dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aso; DiBona, Gerald F; Grimberg, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 2 wk of high-NaCl diet on kidney function and dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation (RBFA) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an identical diet without ad...

  15. Synthesis of 9-[1-(1 -hydroxyethyl)-3-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine and prodrug as possible antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ajit; El-Kattan, Yahya; Wu, Minwan; Lin, Tsu-Hsing; Vadlakonda, Satish; Kotian, Pravin L; Babu, Yarlagadda S; Chand, Pooran

    2005-01-01

    The appropriately protected C-1'-hydroxyethyl-3-hydroxypropyl-N9-adenine nucleoside was prepared from 1-pivaloyloxy-5-tert-butyldiphenylsilyloxy-3-pentanol and adenine through the Mitsunobu reaction. One of the terminal hydroxyls was converted to the phosphonomethoxy derivative and the prodrug.

  16. Different effects of guanine nucleotides (GDP and GTP on protein-mediated mitochondrial proton leak.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej M Woyda-Ploszczyca

    Full Text Available In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs, the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers, carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP.

  17. Different effects of guanine nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on protein-mediated mitochondrial proton leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP.

  18. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  19. Structural Analysis of a Stereochemical Modification of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide in Alcohol Oxidase from Methylotrophic Yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kellogg, Richard M.; Kruizinga, Wim; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Harder, Wim

    1992-01-01

    Alcohol oxidase (MOX), a major peroxisomal protein of methanol-utilizing yeasts, contains two different forms of flavin adenine dinucleotide, one of which is identical with natural FAD whereas the other (mFAD) is a stereochemical modification of the natural coenzyme. This modification occurs spontan

  20. Modification of flavin adenine dinucleotide in alcohol oxidase of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Harder, Willem

    1991-01-01

    Alcohol oxidase, a major peroxisomal protein of methanol-utilizing yeasts, may possess two different forms of flavin adenine dinucleotide, classical FAD and so-called modified FAD (mFAD). Conversion of FAD into mFAD was observed both in purified preparations of the enzyme and in cells grown in batch

  1. The effect of activated charcoal on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Badreldin H; Alza'abi, Mohamed; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa I; Beegam, Sumaya; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Brand, Susanne; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) is a sorbent that has been shown to remove urinary toxins like urea and indoxyl sulfate. Here, the influence of AC on kidney function of rats with experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) is investigated. CRF was induced in rats by feeding adenine (0.75%) for four weeks. As an intervention, AC was added to the feed at concentrations of 10%, 15% or 20%. Adenine treatment impaired kidney function: it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and vanin-1. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxins indoxyl sulfate, phosphate and uric acid. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were adversely affected. Most of these changes were significantly ameliorated by dietary administration of AC at a concentration of 20%, while effects induced by lower doses of dietary AC on adenine nephrotoxicity were not statistically significant. The results suggest that charcoal is a useful sorbent agent in dietary adenine-induced CRF in rats and that its usability as a nephroprotective agent in human kidney disease should be studied.

  2. Effect of atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C; Liu, C; Zhou, Q; Xie, Y C; Qiu, X M; Feng, X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the therapeutic effects of Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. Fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided in to 5 groups (n=10 rats per group): The normal control group, the chronic renal failure pathological control group, the dexamethasone treatment group and two Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide treatment groups, treated with two different concentrations of the polysaccharide, the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group. All the rats, except those in the normal control group were fed adenine-enriched diets, containing 10 g adenine per kg food for 3 weeks. After being fed with adenine, the dexamethasone treatment group, Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group rats were administered the drug orally for 2 weeks. On day 35, the kidney coefficient of the rats and the serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total protein and hemalbumin were determined. Subsequent to experimentation on a model of chronic renal failure in rats, the preparation was proven to be able to reduce serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and hemalbumin levels (Prenal function. Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide had reversed the majority of the indices of chronic renal failure in rats.

  3. Kinetic analysis of Yersinia pestis DNA adenine methyltransferase activity using a hemimethylated molecular break light oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Wood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA adenine methylation plays an important role in several critical bacterial processes including mismatch repair, the timing of DNA replication and the transcriptional control of gene expression. The dependence of bacterial virulence on DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam has led to the proposal that selective Dam inhibitors might function as broad spectrum antibiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we report the expression and purification of Yersinia pestis Dam and the development of a continuous fluorescence based assay for DNA adenine methyltransferase activity that is suitable for determining the kinetic parameters of the enzyme and for high throughput screening against potential Dam inhibitors. The assay utilised a hemimethylated break light oligonucleotide substrate containing a GATC methylation site. When this substrate was fully methylated by Dam, it became a substrate for the restriction enzyme DpnI, resulting in separation of fluorophore (fluorescein and quencher (dabcyl and therefore an increase in fluorescence. The assays were monitored in real time using a fluorescence microplate reader in 96 well format and were used for the kinetic characterisation of Yersinia pestis Dam, its substrates and the known Dam inhibitor, S-adenosylhomocysteine. The assay has been validated for high throughput screening, giving a Z-factor of 0.71+/-0.07 indicating that it is a sensitive assay for the identification of inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay is therefore suitable for high throughput screening for inhibitors of DNA adenine methyltransferases and the kinetic characterisation of the inhibition.

  4. Effect of AST-120 on Endothelial Dysfunction in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Inami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Chronic kidney disease (CKD represents endothelial dysfunction. Monocyte adhesion is recognized as the initial step of arteriosclerosis. Indoxyl sulfate (IS is considered to be a risk factor for arteriosclerosis in CKD. Oral adsorbent AST-120 retards deterioration of renal function, reducing accumulation of IS. In the present study, we determined the monocyte adhesion in the adenine-induced uremic rats in vivo and effects of AST-120 on the adhesion molecules. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into control, control+AST-120, adenine, and adenine+AST-120 groups. The number of monocytes adherent to the endothelium of thoracic aorta by imaging the entire endothelial surface and the mRNA expressions of adhesion and atherosclerosis-related molecules were examined on day 49. The mRNA expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were also examined. Results. Adenine increased the number of adherent monocytes, and AST-120 suppressed the increase. The monocyte adhesion was related to serum creatinine and IS in sera. Overexpression of VCAM-1 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the arterial walls was observed in uremic rats. IS induced increase of the ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA expressions in vitro. Conclusion. It appears that uremic condition introduces the monocyte adhesion to arterial wall and AST-120 might inhibit increasing of the monocyte adherence with CKD progression.

  5. Dietary phosphate restriction ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in adenine-induced kidney disease rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Tan Vu; Watari, Eriko; Taketani, Yutaka; Kitamura, Tomoyo; Shiota, Asuka; Tanaka, Terumi; Tanimura, Ayako; Harada, Nagakatsu; Nakaya, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Hironori; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia causes endothelial dysfunction as well as vascular calcification. Management of serum phosphate level by dietary phosphate restriction or phosphate binders is considered to be beneficial to prevent chronic kidney disease patients from cardiovascular disease, but it has been unclear whether keeping lower serum phosphate level can ameliorate endothelial dysfunction. In this study we investigated whether low-phosphate diet can ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in adenine-induced kidney disease rats, one of useful animal model of chronic kidney disease. Administration of 0.75% adenine-containing diet for 21 days induced renal failure with hyperphosphatemia, and impaired acetylcholine-dependent vasodilation of thoracic aortic ring in rats. Then adenine-induced kidney disease rats were treated with either control diet (1% phosphate) or low-phosphate diet (0.2% phosphate) for 16 days. Low-phosphate diet ameliorated not only hyperphosphatemia but also the impaired vasodilation of aorta. In addition, the activatory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1177 and Akt at serine 473 in the aorta were inhibited by in adenine-induced kidney disease rats. The inhibited phosphorylations were improved by the low-phosphate diet treatment. Thus, dietary phosphate restriction can improve aortic endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease with hyperphosphatemia by increase in the activatory phosphorylations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt. PMID:22798709

  6. SERS, XPS, and DFT Study of Adenine Adsorption on Silver and Gold Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliai, Marco; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Pratesi, Giovanni; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2012-01-19

    The adsorption of adenine on silver and gold surfaces has been investigated combining density functional theory calculations with surface-enhanced Raman scattering and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, obtaining useful insight into the orientation and interaction of the nucleobase with the metal surfaces.

  7. Probing electronic coupling between adenine bases in RNA strands from synchrotron radiation circular dichroism experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgård; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-01-01

    Circular dichroism spectra (176–330 nm) of RNA adenine oligomers, (rA)n (n = 1–10, 12, 15, and 20), reveal electronic coupling between two bases in short strands. The number of interacting bases in long strands is more and larger than that reported previously for the corresponding DNA strands....

  8. The effect of solvation on the radiation damage rate constants for adenine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    in calculations of Gibbs free energies and reaction rates for the reaction between the OH radical and the DNA nucleobase adenine using Density Functional Theory at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with the Eckart tunneling correction. The solvent, water, has been included through either the implicit...

  9. Structural Analysis of a Stereochemical Modification of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide in Alcohol Oxidase from Methylotrophic Yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kellogg, Richard M.; Kruizinga, Wim; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Harder, Wim

    1992-01-01

    Alcohol oxidase (MOX), a major peroxisomal protein of methanol-utilizing yeasts, contains two different forms of flavin adenine dinucleotide, one of which is identical with natural FAD whereas the other (mFAD) is a stereochemical modification of the natural coenzyme. This modification occurs spontan

  10. Arxula adeninivorans recombinant adenine deaminase and its application in the production of food with low purine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, D A; Faulwasser, K; Trautwein-Schult, A; Cordes, A; Hoferichter, P; Klein, C; Bode, R; Baronian, K; Kunze, G

    2013-11-01

    Construction of a transgenic Arxula adeninivorans strain that produces a high concentration of adenine deaminase and investigation into the application of the enzyme in the production of food with low purine content. The A. adeninivorans AADA gene, encoding adenine deaminase, was expressed in this yeast under the control of the strong inducible nitrite reductase promoter using the Xplor(®) 2 transformation/expression platform. The recombinant enzyme was biochemically characterized and was found to have a pH range of 5.5-7.5 and temperature range of 34-46 °C with medium thermostability. A beef broth was treated with the purified enzyme resulting in the concentration of adenine decreasing from 70.4 to 0.4 mg l(-1). It was shown that the production of adenine deaminase by A. adeninivorans can be increased and that the recombinant adenine deaminase can be used to lower the adenine content in the food. Adenine deaminase is one component of an enzymatic system that can reduce the production of uric acid from food constituents. This study gives details on the expression, characterization and application of the enzyme and thus provides evidence that supports the further development of the system. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Watson-Crick Base Pairing, Electronic and Photophysical Properties of Triazole Modified Adenine Analogues: A Computational Study

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Shubhajit

    2015-09-17

    We employ first-principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) to elucidate structural, electronic and optical properties of a few recently reported triazole adenine nucleobase analogues. The results are compared against the findings obtained for both natural adenine nucleobase and available experimental data. The optical absorption of these adenine analogues are calculated both in gas-phase and in solvent (methanol) using Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). We find that all the analogues show a red-shifted absorption profile as compared to adenine. Our simulated emission spectra in solvent compare fairly well with experimentally observed results. We investigate base paring ability of these adenine analogues with thymine. The calculations on the intrinsic stability of these base pairs ascertain that all the adenine analogues form the hydrogen bonded Watson-Crick base pair with similar H-bonding energy as obtained for natural adenine-thymine base pair. In our study, we provide a microscopic origin of the low-energy absorption and emission peaks, observed experimentally.

  12. Ribose Supplementation Alone or with Elevated Creatine Does Not Preserve High Energy Nucleotides or Cardiac Function in the Failing Mouse Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiterie M E Faller

    Full Text Available Reduced levels of creatine and total adenine nucleotides (sum of ATP, ADP and AMP are hallmarks of chronic heart failure and restoring these pools is predicted to be beneficial by maintaining the diseased heart in a more favourable energy state. Ribose supplementation is thought to support both salvage and re-synthesis of adenine nucleotides by bypassing the rate-limiting step. We therefore tested whether ribose would be beneficial in chronic heart failure in control mice and in mice with elevated myocardial creatine due to overexpression of the creatine transporter (CrT-OE.FOUR GROUPS WERE STUDIED: sham; myocardial infarction (MI; MI+ribose; MI+CrT-OE+ribose. In a pilot study, ribose given in drinking water was bioavailable, resulting in a two-fold increase in myocardial ribose-5-phosphate levels. However, 8 weeks post-surgery, total adenine nucleotide (TAN pool was decreased to a similar amount (8-14% in all infarcted groups irrespective of the treatment received. All infarcted groups also presented with a similar and substantial degree of left ventricular (LV dysfunction (3-fold reduction in ejection fraction and LV hypertrophy (32-47% increased mass. Ejection fraction closely correlated with infarct size independently of treatment (r(2 = 0.63, p<0.0001, but did not correlate with myocardial creatine or TAN levels.Elevating myocardial ribose and creatine levels failed to maintain TAN pool or improve post-infarction LV remodeling and function. This suggests that ribose is not rate-limiting for purine nucleotide biosynthesis in the chronically failing mouse heart and that alternative strategies to preserve TAN pool should be investigated.

  13. The influence of pH on the structure of adenine monolayers adsorbed at Au(110)/electrolyte interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowfield, A.; Smith, C.I.; Mansley, C.P.; Weightman, P. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    The pH of the solution is shown to significantly effect the reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) profiles of adenine adsorbed at Au(110)/electrolyte interfaces. At pH 12.8 the net adsorption is very weak due the formation of negative adenine ions in solution. The sensitivity of the RAS profiles to the pH of the solution is probably due to a change in the geometry of the adsorbed molecules caused by a disruption of the base stacking configuration that is adopted when adenine is adsorbed from solutions at pH 7.1. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Profiles of the biosynthesis and metabolism of pyridine nucleotides in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, Riko; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    As part of a research program on nucleotide metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.), profiles of pyridine (nicotinamide) metabolism were examined based on the in situ metabolic fate of radio-labelled precursors and the in vitro activities of enzymes. In potato tubers, [(3)H]quinolinic acid, which is an intermediate of de novo pyridine nucleotide synthesis, and [(14)C]nicotinamide, a catabolite of NAD, were utilised for pyridine nucleotide synthesis. The in situ tracer experiments and in vitro enzyme assays suggest the operation of multiple pyridine nucleotide cycles. In addition to the previously proposed cycle consisting of seven metabolites, we found a new cycle that includes newly discovered nicotinamide riboside deaminase which is also functional in potato tubers. This cycle bypasses nicotinamide and nicotinic acid; it is NAD --> nicotinamide mononucleotide --> nicotinamide riboside --> nicotinic acid riboside --> nicotinic acid mononucleotide --> nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide --> NAD. Degradation of the pyridine ring was extremely low in potato tubers. Nicotinic acid glucoside is formed from nicotinic acid in potato tubers. Comparative studies of [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid metabolism indicate that nicotinic acid is converted to nicotinic acid glucoside in all organs of potato plants. Trigonelline synthesis from [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid was also found. Conversion was greater in green parts of plants, such as leaves and stem, than in underground parts of potato plants. Nicotinic acid utilised for the biosynthesis of these conjugates seems to be derived not only from the pyridine nucleotide cycle, but also from the de novo synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide.

  15. Induction of nucleoside phosphorylase in Enterobacter aerogenes and enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Ding, Qing-Bao; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Yong-Li; Ou, Lin; Wang, Chang-Lu

    2008-07-01

    Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPases) were found to be induced in Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04, and cytidine and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) were the best inducers. Five mmol/L to fifteen mmol/L cytidine or CMP could distinctly increase the activities of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNPase), uridine phosphorylase (UPase) and thymidine phosphorylase (TPase) when they were added into medium from 0 to 8 h. In the process of enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside from adenine and uracil arabinoside with wet cells of Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04 induced by cytidine or CMP, the reaction time could be shortened from 36 to 6 h. After enzymatic reaction the activity of NPase in the cells induced remained higher than that in the cells uninduced.

  16. Induction of nucleoside phosphorylase in Enterobacter aerogenes and enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-kun WEI; Qing-bao DING; Lu ZHANG; Yong-li GUO; Lin OU; Chang-lu WANG

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPases) were found to be induced in Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04, and cytidine and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) were the best inducers. Five mmol/L to fifteen mmol/L cytidine or CMP could distinctly increase the activities of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNPase), uridine phosphorylase (UPase) and thymidine phosphorylase (TPase) when they were added into medium from 0 to 8 h. In the process of enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside from adenine and uracil arabinoside with wet cells ofEnterobacter aerogenes DCJO-04 induced by cytidine or CMP, the reaction time could be shortened from 36 to 6 h. After enzymatic reaction the activity of NPase in the cells induced remained higher than that in the cells uninduced.

  17. European Nucleotide Archive in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toribio, Ana Luisa; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tarrága, Ana; Clarke, Laura; Cleland, Iain; Fairley, Susan; Gibson, Richard; Goodgame, Neil; ten Hoopen, Petra; Jayathilaka, Suran; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Liu, Xin; Martínez-Villacorta, Josué; Pakseresht, Nima; Rajan, Jeena; Reddy, Kethi; Rosello, Marc; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2017-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) offers a rich platform for data sharing, publishing and archiving and a globally comprehensive data set for onward use by the scientific community. With a broad scope spanning raw sequencing reads, genome assemblies and functional annotation, the resource provides extensive data submission, search and download facilities across web and programmatic interfaces. Here, we outline ENA content and major access modalities, highlight major developments in 2016 and outline a number of examples of data reuse from ENA. PMID:27899630

  18. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-24

    DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes Eliot F. Gomez1, Vishak Venkatraman1, James G. Grote2 & Andrew J. Steckl1...45433-7707 USA. We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs are small molecules that are the basic...polymer has been a frequent natural material integrated in electronic devices. DNA has been used in organic light - emitting diodes (OLEDs)4,5,7–14

  19. Coulombic amino group-metal bonding: adsorption of adenine on Cu110.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, M; Schmidt, W G; Bechstedt, F

    2005-06-17

    The interaction between molecular amino groups and metal surfaces is analyzed from first-principles calculations using the adsorption of adenine on Cu110 as a model case. The amino group nitrogens are found to adsorb on top of the surface copper atoms. However, the bonding clearly cannot be explained in terms of covalent interactions. Instead, we find it to be largely determined by mutual polarization and Coulomb interaction between substrate and adsorbate.

  20. A computational study of adenine, uracil, and cytosine adsorption upon AlN and BN nano-cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baei, Mohammad T. [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Azadshahr Branch, Azadshahr, Golestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taghartapeh, Mohammad Ramezani [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan Branch, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lemeski, E. Tazikeh [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan Branch, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, Alireza, E-mail: alireza.soltani46@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan Branch, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Density-functional theory calculations are used to investigate the interaction of Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} and B{sub 12}N{sub 12} clusters with the adenine (A), uracil (U), and cytosine (C) molecules. The current calculations demonstrate that these hybrid adsorbent materials are able to adsorb the adenine, uracil, and cytosine molecules through exothermic processes. Our theoretical results reveal improvement in the adsorption of adenine, uracil, and cytosine on Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} and B{sub 12}N{sub 12}. It is observed that B{sub 12}N{sub 12} is highly sensitive to adenine, uracil, and cytosine compared with Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} to serve as a biochemical sensor.

  1. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  2. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  3. Design and synthesis of novel adenine fluorescence probe based on Eu(III) complexes with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fengyun; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Dou, Xuekai; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Song, Youtao

    2017-02-24

    A novel adenine (Ad) fluorescence probe (Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine)) was designed and synthesized by improving experimental method based on the Eu(III) complex and dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. The dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand was first synthesized by the acylation action between dtpaa and guanine (Gu), and the corresponding Eu(III) complex was successfully prepared through heat-refluxing method with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. As a novel fluorescence probe, the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) complex can detect adenine (Ad) with characteristics of strong targeting, high specificity and high recognition ability. The detection mechanism of the adenine (Ad) using this probe in buffer solution was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and fluorescence spectroscopy. When the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) was introduced to the adenine (Ad) solution, the fluorescence emission intensity was significantly enhanced. However, adding other bases such as guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) with similar composition and structure to that of adenine (Ad) to the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) solution, the fluorescence emission intensities are nearly invariable. Meanwhile, the interference of guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) on the detection of the adenine using Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) probe was also studied. It was found that presence of these bases does not affect the detection of adenine (Ad). A linear response of fluorescence emission intensities of Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) at 570nm as a function of adenine (Ad) concentration in the range of 0.00-5.00×10(-5)molL(-1) was observed. The detection limit is about 4.70×10(-7)molL(-1).

  4. Medium optimization for leaf numbers and shoot multiplication of lidah buaya (Aloe vera by BAP and adenine supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAELA SARI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Aloe vera of the Aloeaceae is originated from Canary Island (West Africa. This plant is commonly know in Indonesia and cultivated in large fields or in the house yard for many purposes, such as ornamental and medicine plant. The industries using it as the principle raw material has became more important due to the significant benefits of this plant. This study is purposed to obtain the medium optimization for leaf numbers and shoot multiplication of Aloe vera by BAP and adenine supplement. The shoot of Aloe vera was taken from green house of Biotechnology-LIPI. Shoots sterilized by clorox (sodium hypochlorite solution 35% and 20% for 30 and 15 min. until get aseptic shoot (in vitro plants. The shoot isolated from in vitro plant into MS (Murashige and Skoog medium in different concentration of BAP and adenine. The research used factorial Completely Randomized Design with two factors (BAP concentration: 0; 0.5; 1; 1.5; 2 mg/L and adenine concentration 0; 10; 20 mg/L with 5 replicates. The results obtained have showed that addition 20 mg/L adenine to MS raise the numbers of leaf. The shoot multiplication has been augmented by addition of BAP 1 mg/L and adenine 20 mg/L. The results showed that BAP has a positive role in increasing shoot multiplication rate and that adenine has a synergic effect when added together with BAP.

  5. Characterization of new G protein-coupled adenine receptors in mouse and hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimm, Dominik; Knospe, Melanie; Abdelrahman, Aliaa; Moutinho, Miguel; Alsdorf, Bernt B A; von Kügelgen, Ivar; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E

    2013-09-01

    The nucleobase adenine has previously been reported to activate G protein-coupled receptors in rat and mouse. Adenine receptors (AdeR) thus constitute a new family of purine receptors, for which the designation "P0-receptors" has been suggested. We now describe the cloning and characterization of two new members of the AdeR family from mouse (MrgA10, termed mAde1R) and hamster (cAdeR). Both receptors were expressed in Sf9 insect cells, and radioligand binding studies were performed using [(3)H]adenine. Specific binding of the radioligand was detected in transfected, but not in untransfected cells, and K D values of 286 nM (mAde1R, B max 1.18 pmol/mg protein) and 301 nM (cAdeR, B max 17.7 pmol/mg protein), respectively, were determined. A series of adenine derivatives was investigated in competition binding assays. Minor structural modifications generally led to a reduction or loss of affinity, with one exception: 2-fluoroadenine was at least as potent as adenine itself at the cAdeR. Structure-activity relationships at all AdeR orthologs and subtypes investigated so far were similar, but not identical. For functional analyses, the cAdeR was homologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, while the mAde1R was heterologously expressed in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Like the previously described AdeRs from rat (rAdeR) and mouse (mAde2R), the mAde1R (EC50 9.77 nM) and the cAdeR (EC50 51.6 nM) were coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. In addition, the cAdeR from hamster expressed in CHO cells produced an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations (EC50 6.24 nM) and was found to be additionally coupled to Gq proteins.

  6. Prolonged Pulmonary Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles Exacerbates Renal Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and DNA Damage in Mice with Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim Nemmar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Epidemiological evidence indicates that patients with chronic kidney diseases have increased susceptibility to adverse outcomes related to long-term exposure to particulate air pollution. However, mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. Methods: Presently, we assessed the effect of prolonged exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP on chronic renal failure induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 4 weeks, which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. DEP (0.5m/kg was intratracheally (i.t. instilled every 4th day for 4 weeks (7 i.t. instillation. Four days following the last exposure to either DEP or saline (control, various renal endpoints were measured. Results: While body weight was decreased, kidney weight increased in DEP+adenine versus saline+adenine or DEP. Water intake, urine volume, relative kidney weight were significantly increased in adenine+DEP versus DEP and adenine+saline versus saline. Plasma creatinine and urea increased and creatinine clearance decreased in adenine+DEP versus DEP and adenine+saline versus saline. Tumor necrosis factor α, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species were significantly increased in adenine+DEP compared with either DEP or adenine+saline. The antioxidant calase was significantly decreased in adenine+DEP compared with either adenine+saline or DEP. Notably, renal DNA damage was significantly potentiated in adenine+DEP compared with either adenine+saline or DEP. Similarly, systolic blood pressure was increased in adenine+DEP versus adenine+saline or DEP, and in DEP versus saline. Histological evaluation revealed more collagen deposition, higher number of necrotic cell counts and dilated tubules, cast formation and collapsing glomeruli in adenine+DEP versus adenine+saline or DEP. Conclusion: Prolonged pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles worsen renal oxidative stress, inflammation and DNA damage in mice with adenine-induced chronic

  7. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C.; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues—mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations—to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377720

  8. Enzymic capacities of purine de Novo and salvage pathways for nucleotide synthesis in normal and neoplastic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsumeda, Y; Prajda, N; Donohue, J P; Glover, J L; Weber, G

    1984-06-01

    The enzymic capacities of the de novo and the salvage pathways for purine nucleotide synthesis were compared in rat in normal, differentiating, and regenerating liver, and in three hepatomas of widely different growth rates. The activities of the key de novo and salvage enzymes were also determined in mouse lung and Lewis lung carcinoma, in human kidney and liver, and in renal cell carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinomas. A precise and reproducible assay was worked out for measuring the activities of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7) and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT; EC 2.4.2.8) in crude liver and hepatoma systems. Kinetic studies on the salvage enzymes were carried out in the crude 100,000 X g supernatant fluid from normal liver and rapidly growing hepatoma 3924A. In both tissue extracts, Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and HGPRT. The reciprocal plots for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) of liver and hepatoma enzymes gave apparent KmS of 2 microM for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and 4 microM for HGPRT, showing two orders of magnitude higher affinities for PRPP than that of the rate-limiting enzyme of de novo purine synthesis, amidophosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.14) (Km = 400 to 900 microM). The apparent Km values for adenine of liver and hepatoma adenine phosphoribosyltransferase were 0.6 to 0.9 microM, respectively. For both liver and hepatoma HGPRT, the reciprocal plots for hypoxanthine and guanine yielded the same Km of 3 microM. The specific activities of purine phosphoribosyltransferases were markedly higher than that of amidophosphoribosyltransferase in rat thymus, spleen, testis, bone marrow, colon, liver, kidney cortex, lung, heart, brain, and skeletal muscle, but were lower in the small intestine. In hepatomas and regenerating and differentiating liver, the activities of the salvage enzymes were 2.1- to 32-fold higher than that of

  9. Analysis of difference spectra of protonated DNA: determination of degree of protonation of nitrogen bases and the fractions of disordered nucleotide pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smol'janinova, T I; Zhidkov, V A; Sokolov, G V

    1982-01-01

    The titration curves of nitrogen bases and fractions of disordered nucleotide pairs are obtained during DNA protonation. It is shown that purine bases are the first sites of the DNA double helix protonation. The cytosine protonation is due to proton-induced conformational transition within GC pairs with the sequence proton transfer from (N-7) of guanine to (N-3) of cytosine. Within DNA with unwound regions the bases are protonated in the following order: cytosine, adenine, guanine. It is shown that GC pairs are the primary centres in which the unwinding of protonated DNAs occurs. PMID:7079177

  10. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  11. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-02-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  12. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  13. Dynamic simulation and metabolome analysis of long-term erythrocyte storage in adenine-guanosine solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiko Nishino

    Full Text Available Although intraerythrocytic ATP and 2,3-bisphophoglycerate (2,3-BPG are known as direct indicators of the viability of preserved red blood cells and the efficiency of post-transfusion oxygen delivery, no current blood storage method in practical use has succeeded in maintaining both these metabolites at high levels for long periods. In this study, we constructed a mathematical kinetic model of comprehensive metabolism in red blood cells stored in a recently developed blood storage solution containing adenine and guanosine, which can maintain both ATP and 2,3-BPG. The predicted dynamics of metabolic intermediates in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and purine salvage pathway were consistent with time-series metabolome data measured with capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry over 5 weeks of storage. From the analysis of the simulation model, the metabolic roles and fates of the 2 major additives were illustrated: (1 adenine could enlarge the adenylate pool, which maintains constant ATP levels throughout the storage period and leads to production of metabolic waste, including hypoxanthine; (2 adenine also induces the consumption of ribose phosphates, which results in 2,3-BPG reduction, while (3 guanosine is converted to ribose phosphates, which can boost the activity of upper glycolysis and result in the efficient production of ATP and 2,3-BPG. This is the first attempt to clarify the underlying metabolic mechanism for maintaining levels of both ATP and 2,3-BPG in stored red blood cells with in silico analysis, as well as to analyze the trade-off and the interlock phenomena between the benefits and possible side effects of the storage-solution additives.

  14. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaev, B. F., E-mail: bfmin@rambler.ru, E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se [Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University, 18031 Cherkasy (Ukraine); Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I. [Uzhgorod National University, 88000 Uzhgorod (Ukraine); Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A. [Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University, 18031 Cherkasy (Ukraine)

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  15. In vitro propagation of Calla lily: adenine sulphate and 6-benzilaminopurine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia De Nazaré Oliveira Ribeiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Calla lily [Zantedeschia aethiopica (L. Spreng.] belonging to the Araceae family is appreciated as cut flower and in com­position of gardens. However, the conventional propagation of this plants shows a poor productive. Thus, tissue culture besides allowing fast clonal propagation also provides healthy and uniforms plants. The aim was study the influence of the differents concentrations of 6-benzilaminopurine (BAP and adenine sulphate (AS on in vitro multiplication of Calla lily. The explants were maintained in MS medium added with BAP (0.0, 8.9, 17.8 and 26.7 μM and adenine sulphate (0, 54, 108 and 162 μM. The plants were transferred to growth room and maintained at 25±1ºC and photoperiod of 16 hours for 60 days, under luminous intensity of 35 μmol m-2 s-1, for a period of 60 days. The experimental design was entirely randomized with four repetitions of three seedlings each, resulting in twelve plants per treatment, each tube with one plant. The statistics analysis showed interactive effects for quantify of BAP and AS for leaves number and fresh mass of the aerial parts. The highest number of leaves (4.8 and fresh mass of aerial parts (0.73 g was obtained with 26.7 μM of BAP combined with 108 μM of AS, highest number of shoots (2.6 was obtained with 22,19 μM of BAP and highest lengh of sprouts (5.0 cm was observed in the absence of BAP. The addition of BAP increased the number of shoots per explant. The use of adenine sulphate in combination with BAP had a positive effect for the accumulation of fresh weight and number of leaves in vitro culture.

  16. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  17. Adenine arabinoside inhibition of adenovirus replication enhanced by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigand, R

    1979-01-01

    The inhibition of adenovirus multiplication by adenine arabinoside was determined by yield reduction in one-step multiplication cycle. Inhibition was greatly enhanced by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (2-deoxycoformycin) in concentrations down to 10 ng/ml. Adenovirus types from four subgroups showed similar results. However, the enhancing effect of adenosine deaminase inhibitor was great in HeLa cells, moderate in human fibroblasts, and negligible in Vero cells. This difference could be explained by different concentrations of adenosine deaminase found in cell homogenates.

  18. Association of flavin adenine dinucleotide with the Arabidopsis blue light receptor CRY1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.; Robertson, D.E.; Ahmad, M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-18

    The Arabidopsis thaliana HY4 gene encodes CRY1, a 75-kilodalton flavoprotein mediating blue light-dependent regulation of seedling development. CRY1 is demonstrated here to noncovalently bind stoichiometric amounts of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). The redox properties of FAD bound by CRY1 include an unexpected stability of the neutral radical flavosemiquinone (FADH{center_dot}). The absorption properties of this flavosemiquinone provide a likely explanation for the additional sensitivity exhibited by CRY1-mediated responses in the green region of the visible spectrum. Despite the sequence homology to microbial DNA photolyases, CRY1 was found to have no detectable photolyase activity. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Nucleotide variability in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene from Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J L; Wickneswari, R; Ismail, B S; Salmijah, S

    2008-02-01

    This study reports the results of the partial DNA sequence analysis of the 5-enolpyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene in glyphosate-resistant (R) and glyphosate-susceptible (S) biotypes of Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn from Peninsular Malaysia. Sequencing results revealed point mutation at nucleotide position 875 in the R biotypes of Bidor, Chaah and Temerloh. In the Chaah R population, substitution of cytosine (C) to adenine (A) resulted in the change of threonine (Thr106) to proline (Pro106) and from C to thymidine (T) in the Bidor R population, leading to serine (Ser106) from Pro106. As for the Temerloh R, C was substituted by T resulting in the change of Pro106 to Ser106. A new mutation previously undetected in the Temerloh R was revealed with C being substituted with A, resulting in the change of Pro106 to Thr106 indicating multiple founding events rather than to the spread of a single resistant allele. There was no point mutation recorded at nucleotide position 875 previously demonstrated to play a pivotal role in conferring glyphosate resistance to E. indica for the Lenggeng, Kuala Selangor, Melaka R populations. Thus, there may be another resistance mechanism yet undiscovered in the resistant Lenggeng, Kuala Selangor and Melaka populations.

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  1. Comparative study between transcriptionally- and translationally-acting adenine riboswitches reveals key differences in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Lemay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial mRNAs are regulated at the transcriptional or translational level by ligand-binding elements called riboswitches. Although they both bind adenine, the adenine riboswitches of Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio vulnificus differ by controlling transcription and translation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that, beyond the obvious difference in transcriptional and translational modulation, both adenine riboswitches exhibit different ligand binding properties and appear to operate under different regulation regimes (kinetic versus thermodynamic. While the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch fully depends on co-transcriptional binding of adenine to function, the V. vulnificus add riboswitch can bind to adenine after transcription is completed and still perform translation regulation. Further investigation demonstrates that the rate of transcription is critical for the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch to perform efficiently, which is in agreement with a co-transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the nature of gene regulation control, that is transcription or translation, may have a high importance in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms.

  2. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions.

  3. CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for electrochemical determination of guanine and adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Yan [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Department of Chemistry, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu 241002 (China); Huang Qinan [Department of Chemistry, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu 241002 (China); Li Maoguo [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Huang Xingjiu [Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Fang Bin, E-mail: binfang_47@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Wang Lun, E-mail: wanglun@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2011-10-01

    Sub-10 nm CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been constructed for electrochemial determination of guanine and adenine. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the nanoparticles CeO{sub 2}/MWCNTs. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterize the electrode modifying process. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were used to study the electrocatalytic activity toward the electrochemical oxidation of guanine and adenine. The detection limit (S/N = 3) for adenine and guanine was found to be 20 and 10 nM, respectively. The obtained sensitivity toward guanine and adenine was 1.26 and 1.13 {mu}A/{mu}M in the linear concentration range 5-50 {mu}M and 5-35 {mu}M, respectively. These results demonstrate that the carbon nanotubes could provide huge locations and facilitate the adsorptive accumulation of the guanine and adenine, and the CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles are promising substrates for the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for biosensing.

  4. Sublingual nucleotides and immune response to exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojic Sergej M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evidence exists regarding the potential role of exogenous nucleotides as regulators of the immune function in physically active humans, yet the potential use of nucleotides has been hindered by their low bioavailability after oral administration. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial to assess the effect of sublingual nucleotides (50 mg/day on salivary and serum immunity indicators as compared to placebo, both administered to healthy males aged 20 to 25 years for 14 days. Sublingual administration of nucleotides for 14 days increased serum immunoglobulin A, natural killer cells count and cytotoxic activity, and offset the post-exercise drop of salivary immunoglobulins and lactoferrin (P  0.05. It seems that sublingual administration of nucleotides for two weeks considerably affected immune function in healthy males.

  5. Adenine-functionalized Spongy Graphene for Green and High-Performance Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Dalia M.; Ghany, Nabil A. Abdel; El Sherbini, E. E. Foad; Allam, Nageh K.

    2017-02-01

    A simple method is demonstrated to prepare spongy adenine-functionalized graphene (SFG) as interconnected, porous 3-dimensional (3D) network crinkly sheets. Such 3D network structure provides better contact at the electrode/electrolyte interface and facilitates the charge transfer kinetics. The fabricated SFG was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV‑vis absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The synthesized materials have been evaluated as supercapacitor materials in 0.5 M H2SO4 using cyclic voltammetry (CV) at different potential scan rates, and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests at different current densities. The SFG electrodes showed a maximum specific capacitance of 333 F/g at scan rate of 1 mV/s and exhibited excellent cycling retention of 102% after 1000 cycles at 200 mV/s. The energy density was 64.42 Wh/kg with a power density of 599.8 W/kg at 1.0 A/g. Those figures of merit are much higher than those reported for graphene-based materials tested under similar conditions. The observed high performance can be related to the synergistic effects of the spongy structure and the adenine functionalization.

  6. DNA adenine methylation of sams1 gene in symbiont-bearing Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Taeck J

    2008-10-01

    The expression of amoeba sams genes is switched from sams1 to sams2 when amoebae are infected with Legionella jeonii. To elucidate the mechanism for the inactivation of host sams1 gene by endosymbiotic bacteria, methylation states of the sams1 gene of D and xD amoebae was compared in this study. The sams1 gene of amoebae was methylated at an internal adenine residue of GATC site in symbiont-bearing xD amoebae but not in symbiont-free D amoebae, suggesting that the modification might have caused the inactivation of sams1 in xD amoebae. The sams1 gene of xD amoebae was inactivated at the transcriptional level. Analysis of DNA showed that adenine residues in L. jeonii sams were also methylated, implying that L. jeonii bacteria belong to a Dam methylase-positive strain. In addition, both SAM and Met appeared to act as negative regulators for the expression of sams1 whereas the expression of sams2 was not affected in amoebae.

  7. Flavin adenine dinucleotide content of quinone reductase 2: analysis and optimization for structure-function studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kevin Ka Ki; Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) is a broadly expressed enzyme implicated in responses to a number of compounds, including protein kinase inhibitors, resveratrol, and antimalarial drugs. NQO2 includes a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, but X-ray crystallographic analysis of human NQO2 expressed in Escherichia coli showed that electron density for the isoalloxazine ring of FAD was weak and there was no electron density for the adenine mononucleotide moiety. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the NQO2 preparation indicated that FAD was not present and only 38% of the protomers contained flavin mononucleotide (FMN), explaining the weak electron density for FAD in the crystallographic analysis. A method for purifying NQO2 and reconstituting with FAD such that the final content approaches 100% occupancy with FAD is presented here. The enzyme prepared in this manner has a high specific activity, and there is strong electron density for the FAD cofactor in the crystal structure. Analysis of NQO2 crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank indicates that many may have sub-stoichiometric cofactor content and/or contain FMN rather than FAD. This method of purification and reconstitution will help to optimize structural and functional studies of NQO2 and possibly other flavoproteins.

  8. Role of Hydrogen Bonding in the Formation of Adenine Chains on Cu(110 Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanxia Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the adsorption properties of DNA bases on metal surfaces is fundamental for the rational control of surface functionalization leading to the realisation of biocompatible devices for biosensing applications, such as monitoring of particular parameters within bio-organic environments and drug delivery. In this study, the effects of deposition rate and substrate temperature on the adsorption behavior of adenine on Cu(110 surfaces have been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and density functional theory (DFT modeling, with a focus on the characterization of the morphology of the adsorbed layers. STM results revealed the formation of one-dimensional linear chains and ladder-like chains parallel to the [110] direction, when dosing at a low deposition rate at room temperature, followed by annealing to 490 K. Two mirror related, well-ordered chiral domains oriented at ±55° with respect to the [110] direction are formed upon deposition on a substrate kept at 490 K. The molecular structures observed via STM are rationalized and qualitatively described on the basis of the DFT modeling. The observation of a variety of ad-layer structures influenced by deposition rate and substrate temperature indicates that dynamic processes and hydrogen bonding play an important role in the self-assembly of adenine on the Cu(110 surface.

  9. The chemistry of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) analogues containing C-nucleosides related to nicotinamide riboside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Watanabe, Kyoichi A; Lesiak-Watanabe, Krystyna; Goldstein, Barry M; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2002-04-01

    Oncolytic C-nucleosides, tiazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) and benzamide riboside (3-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzamide) are converted in cell into active metabolites thiazole-4-carboxamide- and benzamide adenine dinucleotide, TAD and BAD, respectively. TAD and BAD as NAD analogues were found to bind at the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (cofactor NAD) site of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an important target in cancer treatment. The synthesis and evaluation of anticancer activity of a number of C-nucleosides related to tiazofurin and nicotinamide riboside then followed and are reviewed herein. Interestingly, pyridine C-nucleosides (such as C-nicotinamide riboside) are not metabolized into the corresponding NAD analogues in cell. Their conversion by chemical methods is described. As dinucleotides these compounds show inhibition of IMPDH in low micromolar level. Also, the synthesis of BAD in metabolically stable bis(phosphonate) form is discussed indicating the usefulness of such preformed inhibitors in drug development. Among tiazofurin analogues, Franchetti and Grifantini found, that the replacement of the sulfur by oxygen (as in oxazafurin) but not the removal of nitrogen (tiophenfurin) of the thiazole ring resulted in inactive compounds. The anti cancer activity of their synthetic dinucleotide analogues indicate that inactive compounds are not only poorly metabolized in cell but also are weak inhibitors of IMPDH as dinucleotides.

  10. Biofabrication of chitosan-silver composite SERS substrates enabling quantification of adenine by a spectroscopic shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, X L; Bentley, W E [Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research (IBBR), University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Buckhout-White, S; Rubloff, G W, E-mail: rubloff@umd.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has grown dramatically as an analytical tool for the sensitive and selective detection of molecules adsorbed on nano-roughened noble metal structures. Quantification with SERS based on signal intensity remains challenging due to the complicated fabrication process to obtain well-dispersed nanoparticles and well-ordered substrates. We report a new biofabrication strategy of SERS substrates that enable quantification through a newly discovered spectroscopic shift resulting from the chitosan-analyte interactions in solution. We demonstrate this phenomenon by the quantification of adenine, which is an essential part of the nucleic acid structure and a key component in pathways which generate signal molecules for bacterial communications. The SERS substrates were fabricated simply by sequential electrodeposition of chitosan on patterned gold electrodes and electroplating of a silver nitrate solution through the chitosan scaffold to form a chitosan-silver nanoparticle composite. Active SERS signals of adenine solutions were obtained in real time from the chitosan-silver composite substrates with a significant concentration-dependent spectroscopic shift. The Lorentzian curve fitting of the dominant peaks suggests the presence of two separate peaks with a concentration-dependent area percentage of the separated peaks. The chitosan-mediated composite SERS substrates can be easily biofabricated on predefined electrodes within microfluidic channels for real-time detection in microsystems.

  11. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (ɛΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs.

  12. Adenine-functionalized Spongy Graphene for Green and High-Performance Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Dalia M.; Ghany, Nabil A. Abdel; El Sherbini, E. E. Foad; Allam, Nageh K.

    2017-01-01

    A simple method is demonstrated to prepare spongy adenine-functionalized graphene (SFG) as interconnected, porous 3-dimensional (3D) network crinkly sheets. Such 3D network structure provides better contact at the electrode/electrolyte interface and facilitates the charge transfer kinetics. The fabricated SFG was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV−vis absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The synthesized materials have been evaluated as supercapacitor materials in 0.5 M H2SO4 using cyclic voltammetry (CV) at different potential scan rates, and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests at different current densities. The SFG electrodes showed a maximum specific capacitance of 333 F/g at scan rate of 1 mV/s and exhibited excellent cycling retention of 102% after 1000 cycles at 200 mV/s. The energy density was 64.42 Wh/kg with a power density of 599.8 W/kg at 1.0 A/g. Those figures of merit are much higher than those reported for graphene-based materials tested under similar conditions. The observed high performance can be related to the synergistic effects of the spongy structure and the adenine functionalization. PMID:28216668

  13. Thymine- and Adenine-Functionalized Polystyrene Form Self-Assembled Structures through Multiple Complementary Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shian Wu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the self-assembly of two homopolymers of the same molecular weight, but containing complementary nucleobases. After employing nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization to synthesize poly(vinylbenzyl chloride, we converted the polymer into poly(vinylbenzyl azide through a reaction with NaN3 and then performed click chemistry with propargyl thymine and propargyl adenine to yield the homopolymers, poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methylthymine (PVBT and poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methyladenine (PVBA, respectively. This PVBT/PVBA blend system exhibited a single glass transition temperature over the entire range of compositions, indicative of a miscible phase arising from the formation of multiple strong complementary hydrogen bonds between the thymine and adenine groups of PVBT and PVBA, respectively; Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the presence of these noncovalent interactions. In addition, dynamic rheology, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy provided evidence for the formation of supramolecular network structures in these binary PVBT/PVBA blend systems.

  14. Microwave-assisted stereospecific synthesis of novel tetrahydropyran adenine isonucleosides and crystal structures determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fábio P. L.; Cirqueira, Marilia L.; Martins, Felipe T.; Vasconcellos, Mário L. A. A.

    2013-11-01

    We describe in this article stereospecific syntheses for new isonucleosides analogs of adenine 5-7 from tosyl derivatives 2-4 accessing by microwave irradiations (50-80%). The adenine reacts entirely at the N(9) position. Compounds 2-4 were prepared in two steps from the corresponding alcohols 1, 8 and 9 (81-92%). These tetrahydropyrans alcohols 1, 8 and 9 are achiral (Meso compounds) and were prepared in two steps with complete control of 2,4,6-cis relative configuration by Prins cyclization reaction (60-63%) preceded by the Barbier reaction between allyl bromide with benzaldehyde, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde respectively under Lewis acid conditions (96-98%). The configurations and preferential conformations of 5-7 were determined by crystal structure of 6. These novel isonucleosides 5-7 present in silico potentiality to act as GPCR ligand, kinase inhibitor and enzyme inhibitor, evaluated by Molinspiration program, consistent with the expected antiviral and anticancer bioactivities.

  15. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fasullo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases.

  16. Development of a new model for the induction of chronic kidney disease via intraperitoneal adenine administration, and the effect of treatment with gum acacia thereon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Busaidi, Mahfouda; Yasin, Javid; Schupp, Nicole; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-01-01

    Oral adenine (0.75% w/w in feed), is an established model for human chronic kidney disease (CKD). Gum acacia (GA) has been shown to be a nephroprotective agent in this model. Here we aimed at developing a new adenine-induced CKD model in rats via a systemic route (intraperitoneal, i.p.) and to test it with GA to obviate the possibility of a physical interaction between GA and adenine in the gut. Adenine was injected i.p. (50 or 100 mg/Kg for four weeks), and GA was given concomitantly in drinking water at a concentration of 15%, w/v. Several plasma and urinary biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured and the renal damage was assessed histopathologically. Adenine, at the two given i.p. doses, significantly reduced body weight, and increased relative kidney weight, water intake and urine output. It dose-dependently increased plasma and urinary inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, and caused morphological and histological damage resembling that which has been reported with oral adenine. Concomitant treatment with GA significantly mitigated almost all the above measured indices. Administration of adenine i.p. induced CKD signs very similar to those induced by oral adenine. Therefore, this new model is quicker, more practical and accurate than the original (oral) model. GA ameliorates the CKD effects caused by adenine given i.p. suggesting that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties possessed by oral GA are the main mechanism for its salutary action in adenine-induced CKD, an action that is independent of its possible interaction with adenine in the gut.

  17. Nucleotides and inorganic phosphates as potential antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Yael; Fischer, Bilha

    2006-11-01

    Highly reactive OH radicals, formed in an iron-ion catalyzed Fenton reaction, are implicated in many pathological conditions. The quest for Fenton reaction inhibitors, either radical scavenger or metal-ion chelator antioxidants, spans the previous decades. Purine nucleotides were previously studied as natural modulators of the Fenton reaction; however, the modulatory role of purine nucleotides remained in dispute. Here, we have resolved this long-standing dispute and demonstrated a concentration-dependent biphasic modulation of the Fenton reaction by nucleotides. By electron spin resonance measurements with 0.1 mM Fe(II), we observed an increase of *OH production at low purine nucleotide concentrations (up to 0.15 mM), while at higher nucleotide concentrations, an exponential decay of *OH concentration was observed. We found that the phosphate moiety, not the nucleoside, determines the pro/antioxidant properties of a nucleotide, suggesting a chelation-based modulation. Furthermore, the biphasic modulation mode is probably due to diverse nucleotide-Fe(II) complexes formed in a concentration-dependent manner. At ATP concentrations much greater than Fe(II) concentrations, multiligand chelates are formed which inhibit the Fenton reaction owing to a full Fe(II) coordination sphere. In addition to natural nucleotides, we investigated a series of base- or phosphate-modified nucleotides, dinucleotides, and inorganic phosphates, as potential biocompatible antioxidants. Ap5A, inorganic thiophosphate and ATP-gamma-S proved highly potent antioxidants with IC50 values of 40, 30, and 10 microM, respectively. ATP-gamma-S proved 100 and 20 times more active than ATP and the potent antioxidant Trolox, respectively. In the presence of 30 microM ATP-gamma-S no *OH was detected after 5 min in the Fenton reaction mixture. The most potent antioxidants identified inhibit the Fenton reaction by forming full coordination sphere chelates.

  18. Progesterone-adenine hybrids as bivalent inhibitors of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug efflux: design, synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinyeh, Waël; Mahiout, Zahia; Radix, Sylvie; Lomberget, Thierry; Dumoulin, Axel; Barret, Roland; Grenot, Catherine; Rocheblave, Luc; Matera, Eva-Laure; Dumontet, Charles; Walchshofer, Nadia

    2012-10-01

    Bivalent ligands were designed on the basis of the described close proximity of the ATP-site and the putative steroid-binding site of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1). The syntheses of 19 progesterone-adenine hybrids are described. Their abilities to inhibit P-glycoprotein-mediated daunorubicin efflux in K562/R7 human leukemic cells overexpressing P-glycoprotein were evaluated versus progesterone. The hybrid with a hexamethylene linker chain showed the best inhibitory potency. The efficiency of these progesterone-adenine hybrids depends on two main factors: (i) the nature of the linker and (ii) its attachment point on the steroid skeleton.

  19. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-mediated calcium signalling in effector T cells regulates autoimmunity of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Kawakami, Naoto; Klinkert, Wolfgang E. F.; Lodygin, Dimtri; Lühder, Fred; Breunig, Esther; Schild, Detlev; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Dornmair, Klaus; Dammermann, Werner; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate represents a newly identified second messenger in T cells involved in antigen receptor-mediated calcium signalling. Its function in vivo is, however, unknown due to the lack of biocompatible inhibitors. Using a recently developed inhibitor, we explored the role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate in autoreactive effector T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model for multiple sclerosis. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that calcium signalling controlled by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate is relevant for the pathogenic potential of autoimmune effector T cells. Live two photon imaging and molecular analyses revealed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate signalling regulates T cell motility and re-activation upon arrival in the nervous tissues. Treatment with the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor significantly reduced both the number of stable arrests of effector T cells and their invasive capacity. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17 were strongly diminished. Consecutively, the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis were ameliorated. In vitro, antigen-triggered T cell proliferation and cytokine production were evenly suppressed. These inhibitory effects were reversible: after wash-out of the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate antagonist, the effector T cells fully regained their functions. The nicotinic acid derivative BZ194 induced this transient state of non-responsiveness specifically in post-activated effector T cells. Naïve and long-lived memory T cells, which express lower levels of the putative nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptor, type 1 ryanodine receptor, were not targeted. T cell priming and recall responses in vivo were not reduced. These data indicate that the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate

  20. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  1. On the existence of the H3 tautomer of adenine in aqueous solution. Rationalizations based on hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aidas, Kestutis; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Kongsted, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The (15)N NMR spectrum of adenine in aqueous solution has been modeled using high-level combined density functional theory/molecular mechanics techniques coupled to a dynamical averaging scheme. The explicit consideration of the three lowest-energy tautomers of adenine-H9, H7 and H3-allows...

  2. Nucleotide excision repair in the test tube.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe eukaryotic nucleotide excision-repair pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, an achievement that should hasten the full enzymological characterization of this highly complex DNA-repair pathway.

  3. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenov, Artur, E-mail: Artur.Nenov@unibo.it; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K. [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, IT-40126 Bologna (Italy); Rivalta, Ivan [Université de Lyon, CNRS, Institut de Chimie de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Cerullo, Giulio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, IT-20133 Milano (Italy); Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States); Garavelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.garavelli@unibo.it, E-mail: marco.garavelli@ens-lyon.fr [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, IT-40126 Bologna (Italy); Université de Lyon, CNRS, Institut de Chimie de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2015-06-07

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040–1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  4. Chronic kidney disease induced by adenine: a suitable model of growth retardation in uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramunt, Débora; Gil-Peña, Helena; Fuente, Rocío; García-López, Enrique; Loredo, Vanessa; Hernández-Frías, Olaya; Ordoñez, Flor A; Rodríguez-Suárez, Julián; Santos, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Growth retardation is a major manifestation of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in pediatric patients. The involvement of the various pathogenic factors is difficult to evaluate in clinical studies. Here, we present an experimental model of adenine-induced CKD for the study of growth failure. Three groups (n = 10) of weaning female rats were studied: normal diet (control), 0.5% adenine diet (AD), and normal diet pair fed with AD (PF). After 21 days, serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, parathyroid hormone (PTH), weight and length gains, femur osseous front advance as an index of longitudinal growth rate, growth plate histomorphometry, chondrocyte proliferative activity, bone structure, aorta calcifications, and kidney histology were analyzed. Results are means ± SE. AD rats developed renal failure (serum urea nitrogen: 70 ± 6 mg/dl and creatinine: 0.6 ± 0.1 mg/dl) and secondary hyperparathyroidism (PTH: 480 ± 31 pg/ml). Growth retardation of AD rats was demonstrated by lower weight (AD rats: 63.3 ± 4.8 g, control rats: 112.6 ± 4.7 g, and PF rats: 60.0 ± 3.8 g) and length (AD rats: 7.2 ± 0.2 cm, control rats: 11.1 ± 0.3 cm, and PF rats: 8.1 ± 0.3 cm) gains as well as lower osseous front advances (AD rats: 141 ± 13 μm/day, control rats: 293 ± 16 μm/day, and PF rats: 251 ± 10 μm/day). The processes of chondrocyte maturation and proliferation were impaired in AD rats, as shown by lower growth plate terminal chondrocyte height (21.7 ± 2.3 vs. 26.2 ± 1.9 and 23.9 ± 1.3 μm in control and PF rats) and proliferative activity index (AD rats: 30 ± 2%, control rats: 38 ± 2%, and PF rats: 42 ± 3%). The bone primary spongiosa structure of AD rats was markedly disorganized. In conclusion, adenine-induced CKD in young rats is associated with growth retardation and disturbed endochondral ossification. This animal protocol may be a useful new experimental model to study growth in CKD.

  5. Hydroxyl radical reactions with adenine: reactant complexes, transition states, and product complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qianyi; Gu, Jiande; Compaan, Katherine R; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-10-18

    In order to address problems such as aging, cell death, and cancer, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind reactions causing DNA damage. One specific reaction implicated in DNA oxidative damage is hydroxyl free-radical attack on adenine (A) and other nucleic acid bases. The adenine reaction has been studied experimentally, but there are few theoretical results. In the present study, adenine dehydrogenation at various sites, and the potential-energy surfaces for these reactions, are investigated theoretically. Four reactant complexes [A···OH]* have been found, with binding energies relative to A+OH* of 32.8, 11.4, 10.7, and 10.1 kcal mol(-1). These four reactant complexes lead to six transition states, which in turn lie +4.3, -5.4, (-3.7 and +0.8), and (-2.3 and +0.8) kcal mol(-1) below A+OH*, respectively. Thus the lowest lying [A···OH]* complex faces the highest local barrier to formation of the product (A-H)*+H(2)O. Between the transition states and the products lie six product complexes. Adopting the same order as the reactant complexes, the product complexes [(A-H)···H(2)O]* lie at -10.9, -22.4, (-24.2 and -18.7), and (-20.5 and -17.5) kcal mol(-1), respectively, again relative to separated A+OH*. All six A+OH* → (A-H)*+H(2)O pathways are exothermic, by -0.3, -14.7, (-17.4 and -7.8), and (-13.7 and -7.8) kcal mol(-1), respectively. The transition state for dehydrogenation at N(6) lies at the lowest energy (-5.4 kcal mol(-1) relative to A+OH*), and thus reaction is likely to occur at this site. This theoretical prediction dovetails with the observed high reactivity of OH radicals with the NH(2) group of aromatic amines. However, the high barrier (37.1 kcal mol(-1)) for reaction at the C(8) site makes C(8) dehydrogenation unlikely. This last result is consistent with experimental observation of the imidazole ring opening upon OH radical addition to C(8). In addition, TD-DFT computed electronic transitions of the N(6) product around 420 nm

  6. Few-layer graphene sheets with embedded gold nanoparticles for electrochemical analysis of adenine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biris AR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alexandru R Biris,1 Stela Pruneanu,1 Florina Pogacean,1 Mihaela D Lazar,1 Gheorghe Borodi,1 Stefania Ardelean,1 Enkeleda Dervishi,2 Fumiya Watanabe,2 Alexandru S Biris2 1National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; 2Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA Abstract: This work describes the synthesis of few-layer graphene sheets embedded with various amounts of gold nanoparticles (Gr-Au-x over an Aux/MgO catalytic system (where x = 1, 2, or 3 wt%. The sheet-like morphology of the Gr-Au-x nanostructures was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, which also demonstrated that the number of layers within the sheets varied from two to seven. The sample with the highest percentage of gold nanoparticles embedded within the graphitic layers (Gr-Au-3 showed the highest degree of crystallinity. This distinct feature, along with the large number of edge-planes seen in high resolution transmission electron microscopic images, has a crucial effect on the electrocatalytic properties of this material. The reaction yields (40%–50% and the final purity (96%–98% of the Gr-Au-x composites were obtained by thermogravimetric analysis. The Gr-Au-x composites were used to modify platinum substrates and subsequently to detect adenine, one of the DNA bases. For the bare electrode, no oxidation signal was recorded. In contrast, all of the modified electrodes showed a strong electrocatalytic effect, and a clear peak for adenine oxidation was recorded at approximately +1.05 V. The highest increase in the electrochemical signal was obtained using a platinum/Gr-Au-3-modified electrode. In addition, this modified electrode had an exchange current density (I0, obtained from the Tafel plot one order of magnitude higher than that of the bare platinum electrode, which also confirmed that

  7. Effects of nucleotides and nucleosides on coagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bune, Laurids; Thaning, Pia; Johansson, Pär I;

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotides, including ADP, ATP and uridine triphosphate (UTP), are discharged profusely in the circulation during many pathological conditions including sepsis. Sepsis can cause hypotension and systemic activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in humans, which may cause disseminated...... intravascular coagulation. We investigated whether nucleotide-induced cardiovascular collapse as provoked by systemic infusion of adenosine, ADP, ATP, UTP and nitric oxide affected the haemostatic system as assessed by whole blood thromboelastography (TEG) analysis. Ten pigs received a randomized infusion...

  8. Pyridine Nucleotide Cycling and Control of Intracellular Redox State in Relation to Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Activity and Nuclear Localization of Glutathione during Exponential Growth of Arabidopsis Cells in Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Till K.Pellny; Vittoria Locato; Pedro Diaz Vivancos; Jelena Markovic; Laura De Gara; Federico V.Pallardó; Christine H.Foyer

    2009-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides,ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells,with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle.However,the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized.The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate,glutathione,and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools.Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle,but glutathione was low at this point.The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased.The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information.Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed.Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide,ox-idized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide,reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate,oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate,reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes,and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected.The ascorbate,glutathi-one,and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended.We concludethat there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is main-rained by interplay

  9. Pyridine nucleotide cycling and control of intracellular redox state in relation to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and nuclear localization of glutathione during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellny, Till K; Locato, Vittoria; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Markovic, Jelena; De Gara, Laura; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2009-05-01

    Pyridine nucleotides, ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells, with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle. However, the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized. The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools. Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle, but glutathione was low at this point. The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased. The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information. Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed. Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes, and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected. The ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended. We conclude that there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is

  10. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency: an underdiagnosed cause of lithiasis and renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Giuseppina; Vercelloni, Paolo Gilles; Edefonti, Alberto; Manzoni, Gianantonio; Pavesi, Maria Angela; Fogazzi, Giovanni Battista; Garigali, Giuseppe; Mockel, Lionel; Picot, Irene Ceballos

    2012-01-01

    We describe an infant affected by adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency diagnosed at 18 months of age with a de novo mutation that has not been previously reported. APRT deficiency is a rare defect of uric acid catabolism that leads to the accumulation of 2,8 dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA), a highly insoluble substance excreted by the kidneys that may precipitate in urine and form stones. The child suffered from renal colic due to a stone found in the peno-scrotal junction of the bulbar urethra. Stone spectrophotometric analysis allowed us to diagnose the disease and start kidney-saving therapy in order to avoid irreversible chronic kidney damage. APRT deficiency should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of pediatric urolithiasis.

  11. Prebiotic Synthesis of Adenine and Amino Acids Under Europa-like Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Matthew; Miller, Stanley L.; Brinton, Karen; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    In order to simulate prebiotic synthetic processes on Europa and other ice-covered planets and satellites. we have investigated the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds from dilute solutions of NH4CN frozen for 25 year at -20 and -78 C. In addition the aqueous products of spark discharge reactions from a reducing atmosphere were frozen for 5 years at -20%. We find that both adenine and guanine, as well as a simple set of amino acids dominated by glycine, are produced in substantial yields under these conditions. These results indicate that some of the key components necessary for the origin of life may have been available on Europa throughout its history and suggest that the circumstellar zone where life might arise may be m der than previously thought.

  12. Simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in ruminant bacterial pellets by ion-pair HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Moral, Pilar; Arín, María Jesús; Resines, José Antonio; Díez, María Teresa

    2005-11-05

    An ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with gradient elution and UV detection was used to measure adenine (A) and guanine (G) in lyophilized bacterial pellets from ruminants using allopurinol as internal standard. The separation was performed on a Symmetry C18 column and the detection was monitored at 280 nm. Calibration curves were found to be linear in the concentration range from 5 to 50 mg/l with correlation coefficients (r2)>0.999. Mean recoveries of A and G standards added to bacterial samples were 102.2 and 98.2, respectively. The method proposed yielded sharp, well-resolved peaks within 25 min and was successfully applied for the determination of A and G in bacterial pellets.

  13. Animal models of pediatric chronic kidney disease. Is adenine intake an appropriate model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Claramunt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD has peculiar features. In particular, growth impairment is a major clinical manifestation of CKD that debuts in pediatric age because it presents in a large proportion of infants and children with CKD and has a profound impact on the self-esteem and social integration of the stunted patients. Several factors associated with CKD may lead to growth retardation by interfering with the normal physiology of growth plate, the organ where longitudinal growth rate takes place. The study of growth plate is hardly possible in humans and justifies the use of animal models. Young rats made uremic by 5/6 nephrectomy have been widely used as a model to investigate growth retardation in CKD. This article examines the characteristics of this model and analyzes the utilization of CKD induced by high adenine diet as an alternative research protocol.

  14. Substrate specificity and stereospecificity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked alcohol dehydrogenases from methanol-grown yeasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, C T; Patel, R; Laskin, A I; Barnabe, N; Marczak, I

    1981-01-01

    Nicotine adenine dinucleotide-linked primary alcohol dehydrogenase and a newly discovered secondary alcohol dehydrogenase coexist in most strains of methanol-grown yeasts. Alcohol dehydrogenases from methanol-grown yeasts oxidize (--)-2-butanol preferentially over its (+) enantiomorph. This is substantially different from alcohol dehydrogenases from bakers' yeast and horse liver.

  15. Simultaneous determination of adenine,uridine and adenosine in cordyceps sinensis and its substitutes by LC/ESI-MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄兰芳; 吴名剑; 孙贤军; 郭方遒; 梁逸曾; 李晓如

    2004-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and reproducible high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with electrospray ionization method for simultaneous separation and determination of adenine, adenosine and uridine was developed. The analytical column is a 2.0 mm× 150 mm Shimadzu VP-ODS column and volume fraction of the mobile phase is 86.5 %water, 12.0%methanol and 1.5%formic acid. 2-chloroadenosine was used as internal standard. Selective ion monitoring mode and selective ion monitoring ions at ratio of mass to electric charge of 136 for adenine, 268 for adenosine and 267 for uridine were chosen for quantitative analysis of the three active components. The results show that the regression equations and linear range are Y=0. 062X+0. 005 and 2.0 - 140.0μg · mL 1for adenine, Y=0. 049X+0. 004 and 4. 0 - 115.0 μg · mL-1 for uridine, Y=0. 154X+0. 014 and 1.0 - 125.0 μg · mL 1 for adenosine. The limits of detection are 0.6 μg · mL 1 for adenine, 1.0μg · mL-1 for uri dine and 0.2 μg · mL 1 for adenosine.The recoveries of the three constituents are from 96.6% to 103.2%.

  16. Adenine adsorption on Au(1 1 1) and Au(1 0 0) electrodes: Characterisation, surface reconstruction effects and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Cesar [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Sevilla, c/ Prof. Garcia Gonzalez n 2, Sevilla 41012 (Spain); Prieto, Francisco [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Sevilla, c/ Prof. Garcia Gonzalez n 2, Sevilla 41012 (Spain); Rueda, Manuela [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Sevilla, c/ Prof. Garcia Gonzalez n 2, Sevilla 41012 (Spain)]. E-mail: marueda@us.es; Feliu, Juan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Alicante, Apart 99, Alicante E-03080 (Spain); Aldaz, Antonio [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Alicante, Apart 99, Alicante E-03080 (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    Adsorption of adenine on Au(1 1 1) and Au(1 0 0) electrodes is studied by cyclic voltammetry, impedance and chronoamperometric measurements in 0.1 M and 0.01 M KClO{sub 4} and in 0.5 M NaF solutions. The experiments performed with flame-annealed electrodes at different contact potentials, scan potential limits and scan rates, suggest different adsorption behaviour on the unreconstructed and reconstructed surface domains. This is confirmed by comparing the results obtained with electrochemically annealed unreconstructed and with flame-annealed reconstructed surfaces. In both cases the initial electrode surface state is characterised by the E {sub pzc} values. The adsorption on reconstructed surfaces takes place at more positive potentials than on the unreconstructed surfaces and induces the lifting of the reconstruction. The thermodynamic analysis is performed on the chronoamperometric data for adenine desorption on well characterised unreconstructed Au(1 1 1) surfaces. To this end a new methodology of the chronoamperometric experiments is introduced. Quantitative thermodynamic adsorption parameters such as surface tension, Gibbs surface excess, Gibbs energy of adsorption, potential versus Gibbs excess slope and electrosorption valency are determined. Weak chemisorption of adenine is inferred with a molecular orientation independent on the coverage and on the electrode potential. It is proposed that adsorbed adenine molecules adopt a tilted orientation at the surface to facilitate the coordination to the gold atoms.

  17. Reduced Graphene Oxide/α-Cyclodextrin-Based Electrochemical Sensor: Characterization and Simultaneous Detection of Adenine, Guanine and Thymine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan ZOR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, the rising star of carbon nanomaterials, is a single layer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms patterned in a 2D honeycomb network. Thanks to its unique features, graphene has attracted enormous attention and it has arisen various applications in the fields of optical and electrochemical sensors. In the present work, reduced graphene oxide/alpha cyclodextrin (rGO/α-CD is proposed as a nanocomposite for individual and simultaneous detection of adenine, guanine and thymine. rGO/α-CD has been characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, AFM, HR-TEM and SEM techniques. Cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques were utilized for detection of adenine, guanine and thymine. The limit of detection (LOD values for adenine, guanine and thymine were calculated to be 145.5, 38.9 and 52.9 nmol L-1, respectively. The results show that the developed sensor can be utilized for the determination of adenine, guanine and thymine in human serum, indicating its promising application in the analysis of real samples.

  18. 3-Methyl-2-butenal: an enzymatic degradation product of the cytokinin, N-6-(delta-2 isopentenyl)adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, B G; Hall, R H; Whitty, C D

    1975-01-01

    An enzyme preparation from immature corn kernels catalyzed cleavage of N-6-(delta-2-isopentenyl)adenine to give the aldehyde, 3-methyl-2-butenal, as the major side-chain derived product. This product, in the form of the semicarbazone, was identical with an authentic product by several criteria: chromatographic behavior, mass and ultraviolet spectra.

  19. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight-Chitosan on the Adenine- Induced Chronic Renal Failure Ratsin vitro andin vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Xuan; HAN Baoqin; SUI Xianxian; HU Rui; LIU Wanshun

    2015-01-01

    Theeffects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan (LMWC) on chronic renal failure (CRF) rats induced by adenine were investigatedin vivoand in vitro. Chitosan were hydrolyzed using chitosanase at pH 6–7 and 37℃ for 24h to obtain LMWC.In vitro, the effect of LMWC on the proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) showed that it had no cytotoxic effect and could promote cell growth. For theinvivo experiment, chronic renal failure rats induced by adenine were randomly divided into control group, Niaoduqing group, and high-, medium- and low-dose LMWC groups. For each group, we detected serum creatinine (SCR), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione oxidase (GSH-Px) activities of renal tissue, and obtained the ratio of kidney weight/body weight, pathological changes of kidney. The levels of serum SCR, BUN were higher in the adenine-induced rats than those in the controlgroup, indicating that the rat chronic renal failure model worked successfully. The re-sults after treatment showed that LMWC could reduce the SCR and BUN levels and enhance the activities/levels of T-SOD and GSH-PX in kidney compared to control group. Histopathological examination revealed that adenine-induced renal alterations were restored by LMWC at three tested dosages, especially at the low dosage of 100mgkg−1d−1.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for identifying traces of adenine in different mineral and rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, B.; Navarro, R.; Sansano, A.; Rull, F.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the potentials of SERS as a technique for in-situ identification of life traces in Mars surface explorations using the Raman instrument (RLS), payload of the ESA Mars mission Exomars. This preliminary study focused on detection of adenine on a variety of rocks soils samples using macro-SERS detection.

  1. Flavin adenine dinucleotide binding is the crucial step in alcohol oxidase assembly in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Melchior E.; Titorenko, Vladimir; Harder, Wim; Klei, Ida van der; Veenhuis, Marten

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the role of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the in vivo assembly of peroxisomal alcohol oxidase (AO) in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. In previous studies, using a riboflavin (Rf) autotrophic mutant, an unequivocal judgement could not be made, since Rf-limitation led to a parti

  2. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the reaction between the •OH radical and adenine – a theoretical investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The accessibility of all possible reaction paths for the reaction between the nucleobase adenine and the •OH radical is investigated through quantum chemical calculations of barrier heights and rate constants at the wB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with Eckart tunneling corrections. First the comp......The accessibility of all possible reaction paths for the reaction between the nucleobase adenine and the •OH radical is investigated through quantum chemical calculations of barrier heights and rate constants at the wB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with Eckart tunneling corrections. First...... the computational method is validated by considering the hydrogen abstraction from the heterocyclic N9 nitrogen in adenine as a test system. Geometries for all molecules in the reaction are optimised with four different DFT exchange-correlation functionals (B3LYP, BHandHLYP, M06-2X and wB97X-D), in combination...... and with the Wigner, Bell and Eckart corrections. Compared to CCSD(T)//BHandHLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ reference results, the wB97XD/6-311++G(2df,2pd) method combined with Eckart tunneling corrections provides a sensible compromise between accuracy and time. Using this method all sub-reactions of the reaction between adenine...

  3. Expanding antitumor therapeutic windows by targeting cancer-specific nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-biogenesis pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti G

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaurab Chakrabarti,1,2,4 David E Gerber,3,4 David A Boothman1,2,4 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, 4Harold C Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH biogenesis is an essential mechanism by which both normal and cancer cells maintain redox balance. While antitumor approaches to treat cancers through elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS are not new ideas, depleting specific NADPH-biogenesis pathways that control recovery and repair pathways are novel, viable approaches to enhance cancer therapy. However, to elicit efficacious therapies exploiting NADPH-biogenic pathways, it is crucial to understand and specifically define the roles of NADPH-biogenesis pathways used by cancer cells for survival or recovery from cell stress. It is equally important to select NADPH-biogenic pathways that are expendable or not utilized in normal tissue to avoid unwanted toxicity. Here, we address recent literature that demonstrates specific tumor-selective NADPH-biogenesis pathways that can be exploited using agents that target specific cancer cell pathways normally not utilized in normal cells. Defining NADPH-biogenesis profiles of specific cancer-types should enable novel strategies to exploit these therapeutic windows for increased efficacy against recalcitrant neoplastic disease, such as pancreatic cancers. Accomplishing the goal of using ROS as a weapon against cancer cells will also require agents, such as NQO1 bioactivatable drugs, that selectively induce elevated ROS levels in cancer cells, while normal cells are protected. Keywords: reactive oxygen species (ROS, NQO1-bioactivatable drugs, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, glutathione (GSH, biogenic pathways, antioxidant

  4. Regulation of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 by DNA adenine methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Garrido, Javier; Casadesús, Josep

    2010-03-01

    DNA adenine methylase (Dam(-)) mutants of Salmonella enterica are attenuated in the mouse model and present multiple virulence-related defects. Impaired interaction of Salmonella Dam(-) mutants with the intestinal epithelium has been tentatively correlated with reduced secretion of pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) effectors. In this study, we show that S. enterica Dam(-) mutants contain lowered levels of the SPI-1 transcriptional regulators HilA, HilC, HilD, and InvF. Epistasis analysis indicates that Dam-dependent regulation of SPI-1 requires HilD, while HilA, HilC, and InvF are dispensable. A transcriptional hilDlac fusion is expressed at similar levels in Dam(+) and Dam(-) hosts. However, lower levels of hilD mRNA are found in a Dam(-) background, thus providing unsuspected evidence that Dam methylation might exert post-transcriptional regulation of hilD expression. This hypothesis is supported by the following lines of evidence: (i) lowered levels of hilD mRNA are found in Salmonella Dam(-) mutants when hilD is transcribed from a heterologous promoter; (ii) increased hilD mRNA turnover is observed in Dam(-) mutants; (iii) lack of the Hfq RNA chaperone enhances hilD mRNA instability in Dam(-) mutants; and (iv) lack of the RNA degradosome components polynucleotide phosphorylase and ribonuclease E suppresses hilD mRNA instability in a Dam(-) background. Our report of Dam-dependent control of hilD mRNA stability suggests that DNA adenine methylation plays hitherto unknown roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression.

  5. Excretory Function of Intestinal Tract Enhanced in Kidney Impaired Rats Caused by Adenine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yu; Gao, Tao; Li, Yue; Gao, Zhiyi; Duan, Jinlian; Yin, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to prove the compensative effect of intestine for renal function. Rat kidney was impaired by intragastrically administrating adenine (400 mg per day for 5 days). Intestinal tract was harvested and equally divided into 20 segments except cecum. Kidneys were harvested and histologically examined with hematoxylin-eosin staining kits. Uric acid, urea (BUN), and creatinine in serum were determined with assay kits, and BUN and creatinine in every intestinal segment were also determined. The results showed that adenine was able to increase uric acid level in serum from 20.98 ± 6.98 μg/mL to 40.77 ± 7.52 μg/mL and cause renal function damage with BUN (from 3.87 ± 0.62 mM to 12.33 ± 3.27 mM) and creatinine (from 51.48 ± 6.98 μM to 118.25 ± 28.63 μM) increasing in serum and with abnormally micromorphological changes in kidney. The amount of BUN and creatinine distributed in intestinal tract was positively correlated with those in blood. In impaired renal function rats, the amount of BUN (from 4.26 ± 0.21 μMole to 10.72 ± 0.55 μMole) and creatinine (from 681.4 ± 23.3 nMole to 928.7 ± 21.3 nMole) distributed in intestinal tract significantly increased. All the results proved that intestinal tract had excretory function compensative for renal function. PMID:27975080

  6. Lack of hepcidin ameliorates anemia and improves growth in an adenine-induced mouse model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, Oleh; Sureshbabu, Angara; Doty, Steve B; Zhu, Yuan-Shan; Patino, Edwin; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Choi, Mary E; Boskey, Adele; Rivella, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Growth delay is common in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), often associated with poor quality of life. The role of anemia in uremic growth delay is poorly understood. Here we describe an induction of uremic growth retardation by a 0.2% adenine diet in wild-type (WT) and hepcidin gene (Hamp) knockout (KO) mice, compared with their respective littermates fed a regular diet. Experiments were started at weaning (3 wk). After 8 wk, blood was collected and mice were euthanized. Adenine-fed WT mice developed CKD (blood urea nitrogen 82.8 ± 11.6 mg/dl and creatinine 0.57 ± 0.07 mg/dl) and were 2.1 cm shorter compared with WT controls. WT adenine-fed mice were anemic and had low serum iron, elevated Hamp, and elevated IL6 and TNF-α. WT adenine-fed mice had advanced mineral bone disease (serum phosphorus 16.9 ± 3.1 mg/dl and FGF23 204.0 ± 115.0 ng/ml) with loss of cortical and trabecular bone volume seen on microcomputed tomography. Hamp disruption rescued the anemia phenotype resulting in improved growth rate in mice with CKD, thus providing direct experimental evidence of the relationship between Hamp pathway and growth impairment in CKD. Hamp disruption ameliorated CKD-induced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis derangements and growth plate alterations. Disruption of Hamp did not mitigate the development of uremia, inflammation, and mineral and bone disease in this model. Taken together, these results indicate that an adenine diet can be successfully used to study growth in mice with CKD. Hepcidin appears to be related to pathways of growth retardation in CKD suggesting that investigation of hepcidin-lowering therapies in juvenile CKD is warranted.

  7. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  8. The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Takagi, Toshihisa; Sequence Database Collaboration, International Nucleotide

    2016-01-01

    The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC; http://www.insdc.org) comprises three global partners committed to capturing, preserving and providing comprehensive public-domain nucleotide sequence information. The INSDC establishes standards, formats and protocols for data and metadata to make it easier for individuals and organisations to submit their nucleotide data reliably to public archives. This work enables the continuous, global exchange of information about living things. Here we present an update of the INSDC in 2015, including data growth and diversification, new standards and requirements by publishers for authors to submit their data to the public archives. The INSDC serves as a model for data sharing in the life sciences. PMID:26657633

  9. Effects of nucleotides and nucleosides on coagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bune, Laurids; Thaning, Pia; Johansson, Pär I;

    2010-01-01

    intravascular coagulation. We investigated whether nucleotide-induced cardiovascular collapse as provoked by systemic infusion of adenosine, ADP, ATP, UTP and nitric oxide affected the haemostatic system as assessed by whole blood thromboelastography (TEG) analysis. Ten pigs received a randomized infusion......Nucleotides, including ADP, ATP and uridine triphosphate (UTP), are discharged profusely in the circulation during many pathological conditions including sepsis. Sepsis can cause hypotension and systemic activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in humans, which may cause disseminated.......7 ng/ml; P blood was evaluated by TEG. Circulating ADP induces hypocoagulation without signs of increased fibrinolysis as evaluated by TEG. The potential...

  10. Efficacy of Adenine in the Treatment of Leukopenia and Neutropenia Associated with an Overdose of Antipsychotics or Discontinuation of Lithium Carbonate Administration: Three Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Takashi; Goto, Hidekazu; Sumiya, Kenji; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tanaka, Katsuya; Kohda, Yukinao

    2016-01-01

    Because adenine is effective for managing cases of radiation-induced and drug-induced leukopenia, it may be effective in cases of antipsychotic-induced leukopenia and neutropenia. Here, we report our experience with patients with leukopenia and neutropenia caused by an antipsychotic overdose or discontinuation of lithium carbonate, in whom adenine administration ameliorated the white blood cell and neutrophil counts. The progress of patients suggests that adenine is effective in cases of leukopenia and neutropenia associated with lithium carbonate discontinuation and an antipsychotic overdose. PMID:27776394

  11. [Sublicons containing amino acids and nucleotides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaĭmakov, E A

    1979-01-01

    Sublicons have been obtained. Sublicons are threadlike structures appearing during sublimation of frozen solutions of small concentrations, containing racemate mixture of amino acids and nucleotides. It is suggested that close location of chains and their zonal distribution by the section of helix spire forming sublicon wall, should provide the formation of stereohomogenous and complementary successions of biomonomers of different clases.

  12. Detection of Guanine and Adenine Using an Aminated Reduced Graphene Oxide Functional Membrane-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new electrochemical sensor based on a Nafion, aminated reduced graphene oxide and chitosan functional membrane-modified glassy carbon electrode was proposed for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and electrochemical methods were utilized for the additional characterization of the membrane materials. The prepared electrode was utilized for the detection of guanine (G and adenine (A. The anodic peak currents to G and A were linear in the concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 120 μM and 0.2 to 110 μM, respectively. The detection limits were found to be 0.1 μM and 0.2 μM, respectively. Moreover, the modified electrode could also be used to determine G and A in calf thymus DNA.

  13. Electrochemical study in both classical cell and microreactors of flavin adenine dinucleotide as a redox mediator for NADH regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzedakis, Theodore, E-mail: tzedakis@chimie.ups-tlse.f [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR 5503, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse cedex 04 (France); Cheikhou, Kane [Ecole Superieure Polytechnique de Dakar BP: 16263 Dakar-Fann (Senegal); Jerome, Roche; Karine, Groenen Serrano; Olivier, Reynes [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR 5503, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse cedex 04 (France)

    2010-02-28

    The electrochemical reduction of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is studied in a classical electrochemical cell as well as in two types of microreactors: the first one is a one-channel reactor and the other one, a multichannel filter-press reactor. The ultimate goal is to use the reduced form of flavin (FADH{sub 2}), in the presence of formate dehydrogenase (FDH), in order to continuously regenerate the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) for chiral syntheses. Various voltammetric and adsorption measurements were carried out for a better understanding of the redox behavior of the FAD as well as its adsorption on gold. Diffusivity and kinetic electrochemical parameters of FAD were determined.

  14. Synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogen organic compounds by a Fischer-Tropsch-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. C.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the formation of purines, pyrimidines, and other bases from CO, H2, and NH3 under conditions similar to those used in the Fischer-Tropsch process. It is found that industrial nickel/iron alloy catalyzes the synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogenous compounds from mixtures of CO, H2, and NH3 at temperatures of about 600 C. Sufficient sample was accumulated to isolate as solid products adenine, guanine, and cytosine, which were identified by infrared spectrophotometry. In the absence of nickel/iron catalyst, at 650 C, or in the presence of this catalyst, at 450 C, no purines or pyrimidines were synthesized. These results confirm and extend some of the work reported by Kayatsu et al. (1968).

  15. The contribution of adenines in the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme improved by the 6-amino group modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junfei; Li, Zhiwen; Wang, Qi; Liu, Yang; He, Junlin

    2016-09-15

    In the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme, its five adenine residues are moderate conservative, but with highly conserved functional groups like 6-amino group and 7-nitrogen atom. It is this critical conservation that these two groups could be modified for better contribution. With 2'-deoxyadenosine analogues, several functional groups were introduced at the 6-amino group of the five adenine residues. 3-Aminopropyl substituent at 6-amino group of A15 resulted in a five-fold increase of kobs. More efficient DNAzymes are expected by delicate design of the linkage and the external functional groups for this 6-amino group of A15. With this modification approach, other functional groups or residues could be optimized for 10-23 DNAzyme.

  16. Temperate Myxococcus xanthus phage Mx8 encodes a DNA adenine methylase, Mox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, V; Salmi, D; Thomas, D; Herbert, S K; Hartzell, P L; Youderian, P

    1997-07-01

    Temperate bacteriophage Mx8 of Myxococcus xanthus encapsidates terminally repetitious DNA, packaged as circular permutations of its 49-kbp genome. During both lytic and lysogenic development, Mx8 expresses a nonessential DNA methylase, Mox, which modifies adenine residues in occurrences of XhoI and PstI recognition sites, CTCGAG and CTGCAG, respectively, on both phage DNA and the host chromosome. The mox gene is necessary for methylase activity in vivo, because an amber mutation in the mox gene abolishes activity. The mox gene is the only phage gene required for methylase activity in vivo, because ectopic expression of mox as part of the M. xanthus mglBA operon results in partial methylation of the host chromosome. The predicted amino acid sequence of Mox is related most closely to that of the methylase involved in the cell cycle control of Caulobacter crescentus. We speculate that Mox acts to protect Mx8 phage DNA against restriction upon infection of a subset of natural M. xanthus hosts. One natural isolate of M. xanthus, the lysogenic source of related phage Mx81, produces a restriction endonuclease with the cleavage specificity of endonuclease BstBI.

  17. Alteration of the Intestinal Environment by Lubiprostone Is Associated with Amelioration of Adenine-Induced CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Eikan; Fukuda, Shinji; Shima, Hisato; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Fukuda, Noriko N; Suzuki, Takehiro; Suzuki, Chitose; Yuri, Akinori; Kikuchi, Koichi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ito, Sadayoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-08-01

    The accumulation of uremic toxins is involved in the progression of CKD. Various uremic toxins are derived from gut microbiota, and an imbalance of gut microbiota or dysbiosis is related to renal failure. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between the gut microbiota and renal failure are still obscure. Using an adenine-induced renal failure mouse model, we evaluated the effects of the ClC-2 chloride channel activator lubiprostone (commonly used for the treatment of constipation) on CKD. Oral administration of lubiprostone (500 µg/kg per day) changed the fecal and intestinal properties in mice with renal failure. Additionally, lubiprostone treatment reduced the elevated BUN and protected against tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, and inflammation. Gut microbiome analysis of 16S rRNA genes in the renal failure mice showed that lubiprostone treatment altered their microbial composition, especially the recovery of the levels of the Lactobacillaceae family and Prevotella genus, which were significantly reduced in the renal failure mice. Furthermore, capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry-based metabolome analysis showed that lubiprostone treatment decreased the plasma level of uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate and hippurate, which are derived from gut microbiota, and a more recently discovered uremic toxin, trans-aconitate. These results suggest that lubiprostone ameliorates the progression of CKD and the accumulation of uremic toxins by improving the gut microbiota and intestinal environment.

  18. Laser pulse trains for controlling excited state dynamics of adenine in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jens; Wohlgemuth, Matthias; Sellner, Bernhard; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Lischka, Hans; Mitrić, Roland

    2012-04-14

    We investigate theoretically the control of the ultrafast excited state dynamics of adenine in water by laser pulse trains, with the aim to extend the excited state lifetime and to suppress nonradiative relaxation processes. For this purpose, we introduce the combination of our field-induced surface hopping method (FISH) with the quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical (QM/MM) technique for simulating the laser-driven dynamics in the condensed phase under explicit inclusion of the solvent environment. Moreover, we employ parametric pulse shaping in the frequency domain in order to design simplified laser pulse trains allowing to establish a direct link between the pulse parameters and the controlled dynamics. We construct pulse trains which achieve a high excitation efficiency and at the same time keep a high excited state population for a significantly extended time period compared to the uncontrolled dynamics. The control mechanism involves a sequential cycling of the population between the lowest and higher excited states, thereby utilizing the properties of the corresponding potential energy surfaces to avoid conical intersections and thus to suppress the nonradiative decay to the ground state. Our findings provide a means to increase the fluorescence yield of molecules with an intrinsically very short excited state lifetime, which can lead to novel applications of shaped laser fields in the context of biosensing.

  19. Decrease in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase is related to skin pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakama, Mitsuo; Murakami, Yuhko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru

    2012-03-01

    Skin pigmentation is caused by various physical and chemical factors. It might also be influenced by changes in the physiological function of skin with aging. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase is an enzyme related to the mitochondrial electron transport system and plays a key role in cellular energy production. It has been reported that the functional decrease in this system causes Parkinson's disease. Another study reports that the amount of NADH dehydrogenase in heart and skeletal muscle decreases with aging. A similar decrease in the skin would probably affect its physiological function. However, no reports have examined the age-related change in levels of NADH dehydrogenase in human skin. In this study, we investigated this change and its effect on skin pigmentation using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. The mRNA expression of NDUFA1, NDUFB7, and NDUFS2, subunits of NADH dehydrogenase, and its activity were significantly decreased in late passage keratinocytes compared to early passage cells. Conversely, the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines, interleukin-1 alpha and endothelin 1, was increased in late passage cells. On the other hand, the inhibition of NADH dehydrogenase upregulated the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines. Moreover, the level of NDUFB7 mRNA was lower in pigmented than in nonpigmented regions of skin in vivo. These results suggest the decrease in NADH dehydrogenase with aging to be involved in skin pigmentation.

  20. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide: An essential factor in preserving hearing in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Pandit, Arpana; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Song, Jeho; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2015-08-01

    Ototoxicity is an important issue in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. Numerous studies have demonstrated that several mechanisms, including oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses, are closely associated with cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Although much attention has been directed at identifying ways to protect the inner ear from cisplatin-induced damage, the precise underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) has emerged as an important regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. NAD(+) acts as a cofactor for various enzymes including sirtuins (SIRTs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), and therefore, maintaining adequate NAD(+) levels has therapeutic benefits because of its effect on NAD(+)-dependent enzymes. Recent studies demonstrated that disturbance in intracellular NAD(+) levels is critically involved in cisplatin-induced cochlear damage associated with oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the importance of NAD(+) in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and discuss potential strategies for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity with a particular focus on NAD(+)-dependent cellular pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies of yeast cell oxygenation and energetics by laser fluorometry of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fu-shih; Chen, Stephen; Mintzer, Robert A.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Schumacker, Paul

    1991-03-01

    It is of fundamental importance for biological scientists to assess cellular energetics. Under aerobic conditions, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is coupled with the mitochondrial electron cascade pathway to provide the cell with energy. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-conjugated pair (NAD and NADH) is the coenzyme in numerous important biomedical reactions which include several important dehydrogenase reactions in the TCA cycle. Based on Le Chatelier's principle, NADH will accumulate when this energy production mechanism is impaired. The relative amounts of NAD and NADH in a cell are defined as the redox state of the cell (Williamson et.al. 1967) which provides a valuable index of cellular energetics. The sum of the amounts of NAD and NADH in a cell may be assumed to be constant during a finite time; therefore, a reliable means of measuring the NADH concentration would provide us with a useful indicator of tissue viability. Traditionally, the quantities of NADH and NAD may be measured by chemical assay methods. We can avoid these tediois analyses by exploiting the significant difference between the ultraviolet absorption spectra of this redox pair. However, because of the opacity of biological samples and the interference of other biochemicals that also absorb ultraviolet radiation, measurement of NADH and NAD+ concentrations in vivo by absorption spectroscopy is not feasible.

  2. DNA adenine methylation is required to replicate both Vibrio cholerae chromosomes once per cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Demarre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA adenine methylation is widely used to control many DNA transactions, including replication. In Escherichia coli, methylation serves to silence newly synthesized (hemimethylated sister origins. SeqA, a protein that binds to hemimethylated DNA, mediates the silencing, and this is necessary to restrict replication to once per cell cycle. The methylation, however, is not essential for replication initiation per se but appeared so when the origins (oriI and oriII of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes were used to drive plasmid replication in E. coli. Here we show that, as in the case of E. coli, methylation is not essential for oriI when it drives chromosomal replication and is needed for once-per-cell-cycle replication in a SeqA-dependent fashion. We found that oriII also needs SeqA for once-per-cell-cycle replication and, additionally, full methylation for efficient initiator binding. The requirement for initiator binding might suffice to make methylation an essential function in V. cholerae. The structure of oriII suggests that it originated from a plasmid, but unlike plasmids, oriII makes use of methylation for once-per-cell-cycle replication, the norm for chromosomal but not plasmid replication.

  3. Magnitude of malate-aspartate reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide shuttle activity in intact respiring tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1977-11-01

    Measurements of respiration, CO2 and lactate production, and changes in the levels of various key metabolites of the glycolytic sequence and tricarboxylic acid cycle were made on five lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, Krebs II carcinoma, AS-30D carcinoma, and L1210 cells) incubated aerobically in the presence of uniformly labeled D-[14C]glucose. From these data, as well as earlier evidence demonstrating that the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) shuttle in these cells requires a transaminase step and is thus identified as the malate-aspartate shuttle (W.V.V. Greenhouse and A.L. Lehninger, Cancer Res., 36: 1392-1396, 1976), metabolic flux diagrams were constructed for the five cell lines. These diagrams show the relative rates of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and the malate-aspartate shuttle in these tumors. Large amounts of cytosolic NADH were oxidized by the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the NADH shuttle, comprising anywhere from about 20 to 80% of the total flow of reducing equivalents to oxygen in these tumors. Calculations of the sources of energy for adenosine triphosphate synthesis indicated that on the average about one-third of the respiratory adenosine triphosphate is generated by electron flow originating from cytosolic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  4. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  5. Eco-synthesis of graphene and its use in dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouzadeh Tabrizi, Mahmoud; Jalilzadeh Azar, Somayeh; Nadali Varkani, Javad

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report a green and eco-friendly approach to synthesize reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via a mild hydrothermal process using malt as a reduced agent. The proposed method is based on the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) in malt solution by making use of the reducing capability of phenolic compounds contained in malt solution. The obtained rGO was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis revealed that the charge transfer resistance of rGO modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was much lower than that of the GC electrode. The electrochemical behavior of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) on rGO modified GC electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. Electrochemical experiments indicated that rGO/GC electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the NADH, which can be attributed to excellent electrical conductivity and high specific surface area of the rGO composite. The resulting biosensor showed highly sensitive amperometric response to NADH with a low detection limit (0.33μM). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cross sections for low-energy electron scattering from adenine in the condensed phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panajotović, Radmila; Michaud, Marc; Sanche, Léon

    2007-01-07

    Measurements of the vibrational and electronic excitation of a sub-monolayer up to a monolayer film of adenine were performed with a high resolution electron energy-loss (HREEL) spectrometer. The integral cross sections (over the half-space angle) for excitation of the normal vibrational modes of the ground electronic state and electronically excited states are calculated from the measured reflectivity EEL spectra. Most cross sections for vibrational excitation are of the order of 10(-17) cm(2), the largest being the out-of-plane wagging of the amino-group and the six-member ring deformations. A wide resonance feature appears in the incident energy dependence of the vibrational cross sections at 3-5 eV, while a weak shoulder is present in this dependence for combined ring deformations and bending of hydrogen atoms. For the five excited electronic states, at 4.7, 5.0, 5.5, 6.1 and 6.6 eV, the cross sections are of the order of 10(-18) cm(2), except in the case of the state at the energy of 6.1 eV, for which it is two to three times higher.

  7. Interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) with a glassy carbon electrode surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haizhen; Omanovic, Sasha

    2008-08-01

    The interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) with a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface was investigated in terms of the FAD adsorption thermodynamics and kinetics, the subsequent electroreduction mechanism, and the corresponding electron-transfer rate. The kinetics of FAD electroreduction at the GCE was found to be an adsorption-controlled process. A set of electroreduction kinetic parameters was calculated: the true number of electrons involved in the FAD reduction, n=1.76, the apparent transfer coefficient, alpha(app)=0.41, and the apparent heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant, k(app)=1.4 s(-1). The deviation of the number of exchanged electrons from the theoretical value for the complete reduction of FAD to FADH(2) (n=2) indicates that a small portion of FAD goes to a semiquinone state during the redox process. The FAD adsorption was well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The large negative apparent Gibbs energy of adsorption (DeltaG(ads)=-39.7 +/-0.4 kJ mol(-1)) indicated a highly spontaneous and strong adsorption of FAD on the GCE. The energetics of the adsorption process was found to be independent of the electrode surface charge in the electrochemical double-layer region. The kinetics of FAD adsorption was modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetic model.

  8. Thermal stabilization of formaldehyde dehydrogenase by encapsulation in liposomes with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Yamashita, Takayuki; Kinoshita, Satoshi

    2011-07-10

    The thermal stability of formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FaDH) from Pseudomonas sp. was examined and controlled by encapsulation in liposomes with β-reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The activity of 4.8 μg/mL free FaDH at pH 8.5 in catalyzing the oxidation of 50mM formaldehyde was highly dependent on temperature so that the activity at 60 °C was 27 times larger than that at 25 °C. Thermal stability of the FaDH activity was examined with and without liposomes composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Rapid deactivation of free FaDH was observed at 60 °C because of its dissociation into two subunits. The rate of dissociative deactivation of POPC liposome-encapsulated FaDH was smaller than that of the free enzyme. The liposomal FaDH was however progressively deactivated for the incubation period of 60 min eventually leading to complete loss of its activity. The free FaDH and NADH molecules were revealed to form the thermostable binary complex. The thermal stability of POPC liposome-encapsulated FaDH and NADH system was significantly higher than the liposomal enzyme without cofactor. The above results clearly show that NADH is a key molecule that controls the activity and stability of FaDH in liposomes at high temperatures.

  9. Cellular localization of adenine receptors in the rat kidney and their functional significance in the inner medullary collecting duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Bellamkonda K; Zhang, Yue; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Kohan, Donald E; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-11-01

    The Gi-coupled adenine receptor (AdeR) binds adenine with high affinity and potentially reduces cellular cAMP levels. Since cAMP is an important second messenger in the renal transport of water and solutes, we localized AdeR in the rat kidney. Real-time RT-PCR showed higher relative expression of AdeR mRNA in the cortex and outer medulla compared with the inner medulla. Immunoblots using a peptide-derived and affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for an 18-amino acid COOH-terminal sequence of rat AdeR, which we generated, detected two bands between ∼30 and 40 kDa (molecular mass of native protein: 37 kDa) in the cortex, outer medulla, and inner medulla. These bands were ablated by preadsorption of the antibody with the immunizing peptide. Immunofluorescence labeling showed expression of AdeR protein in all regions of the kidney. Immunoperoxidase revealed strong labeling of AdeR protein in the cortical vasculature, including the glomerular arterioles, and less intense labeling in the cells of the collecting duct system. Confocal immunofluorescence imaging colocalized AdeR with aquaporin-2 protein to the apical plasma membrane in the collecting duct. Functionally, adenine (10 μM) significantly decreased (P < 0.01) 1-deamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (10 nM)-induced cAMP production in ex vivo preparations of inner medullary collecting ducts, which was reversed by PSB-08162 (20 μM, P < 0.01), a selective antagonist of AdeR. Thus, we demonstrated the expression of AdeR in the renal vasculature and collecting ducts and its functional relevance. This study may open a new avenue for the exploration of autocrine/paracrine regulation of renal vascular and tubular functions by the nucleobase adenine in health and disease.

  10. IR Vibrational spectra of H-bonded complexes of adenine, 2-aminopurine and 2-aminopurine+ with cytosine and thymine: Quantum-chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', O. O.; Hovorun, D. M.

    2011-11-01

    Using theoretical study on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, we have compared vibrational spectra of 2-aminopurine (as neutral or protonated at N1 atom species) with adenine and H-bonded complexes of 2-aminopurine (as neutral or protoned at N1 atom species) · cytosine or 2-aminopurine · thymine with adenine · cytosine and adenine · thymine base pairs. The nature of the base pairing between adenine, 2-aminopurine, 2-aminopurine+ and cytosine or thymine have been investigated by means of quantum-mechanical calculations. We have investigated the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the vibrational spectra of the investigated base pairs. The main differences in the vibrational spectra as for bases so for base pairs have been observed in the high-frequency region.

  11. High-NaCl diet impairs dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Aso; DiBona, Gerald F; Grimberg, Elisabeth; Nguy, Lisa; Mikkelsen, Minne Line Nedergaard; Marcussen, Niels; Guron, Gregor

    2014-03-15

    This study examined the effects of 2 wk of high-NaCl diet on kidney function and dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation (RBFA) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an identical diet without adenine (controls). After 10 wk, rats were randomized to either remain on the same diet (0.6% NaCl) or to be switched to high 4% NaCl chow. Two weeks after randomization, renal clearance experiments were performed under isoflurane anesthesia and dynamic RBFA, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), systolic arterial pressure variability (SAPV), and heart rate variability were assessed by spectral analytical techniques. Rats with ACRF showed marked reductions in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow (RBF), whereas mean arterial pressure and SAPV were significantly elevated. In addition, spontaneous BRS was reduced by ∼50% in ACRF animals. High-NaCl diet significantly increased transfer function fractional gain values between arterial pressure and RBF in the frequency range of the myogenic response (0.06-0.09 Hz) only in ACRF animals (0.3 ± 4.0 vs. -4.4 ± 3.8 dB; P renal failure by facilitating pressure transmission to the microvasculature.

  12. Electrochemical biosensor based on silver nanoparticles-polydopamine-graphene nanocomposite for sensitive determination of adenine and guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hai-Bo; Gan, Tian; Wu, Ying-Ying; Li, Jing; Liu, Yan-Ming

    2013-09-30

    A multifunctional Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs)-polydopamine (Pdop)@graphene (Gr) composite was prepared by a simple and mild procedure. Gr was easily coated with Pdop at room temperature and then AgNPs was deposited by mildly stirring. The nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Guanine and adenine as model moleculars were employed to study their electrochemical responses at the Ag-Pdop@Gr composite modified electrode, which showed more favorable electron transfer kinetics than Gr modified glassy carbon and AgNPs modified glassy carbon electrodes. The Ag-Pdop@Gr modified electrode exhibited linear ranges of 0.04-50 μM and 0.02-40 μM with detection limits of 4.0 nM and 2.0 nM for guanine and adenine, respectively. The developed method was applied for simultaneous determination of trace-level adenine and guanine in fish sperm. The results demonstrated that the AgNPs-Pdop@Gr nanocomposite was a promising substrate for the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for biosensing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A new microplatform based on titanium dioxide nanofibers/graphene oxide nanosheets nanocomposite modified screen printed carbon electrode for electrochemical determination of adenine in the presence of guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvand, Majid; Ghodsi, Navid; Zanjanchi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-03-15

    The current techniques for determining adenine have several shortcomings such as high cost, high time consumption, tedious pretreatment steps and the requirements for highly skilled personnel often restrict their use in routine analytical practice. This paper describes the development and utilization of a new nanocomposite consisting of titanium dioxide nanofibers (TNFs) and graphene oxide nanosheets (GONs) for screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modification. The synthesized GONs and TNFs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The modified electrode (TNFs/GONs/SPCE) was used for electrochemical characterization of adenine. The TNFs/GONs/SPCE exhibited an increase in peak current and the electron transfer kinetics and decrease in the overpotential for the oxidation reaction of adenine. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), the prepared sensor showed good sensitivity for determining adenine in two ranges from 0.1-1 and 1-10 μM, with a detection limit (DL) of 1.71 nM. Electrochemical studies suggested that the TNFs/GONs/SPCE provided a synergistic augmentation on the voltammetric behavior of electrochemical oxidation of adenine, which was indicated by the improvement of anodic peak current and a decrease in anodic peak potential. The amount of adenine in pBudCE4.1 plasmid was determined via the proposed sensor and the result was in good compatibility with the sequence data of pBudCE4.1 plasmid.

  14. Preparation of a sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode by microwave irradiation and its application for the determination of adenine and guanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim, E-mail: abbaspour@chem.susc.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars 71456-85464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaffarinejad, Ali [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars 71456-85464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, microwave irradiation was used for the fast preparation (min) of a sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode (MW-CNCE). For confirmation of the preparation of the ceramic by MW irradiation, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction spectra and scanning electron microscopy images of the produced ceramic were compared with those of conventional ceramic (which is produced by drying the ceramic in air for 48 h). The electrochemical behavior of MW-CNCE in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, L-cysteine, adenine and guanine was compared with that of a conventional sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode (CNCE). In all systems, similar peak potentials and lower background currents were obtained with respect to CNCE. Finally, the MW-CNCE was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine using differential pulse voltammetry. The linear ranges of 0.1-10 and 0.1-20 muM were obtained for adenine and guanine, respectively. These results are comparable with some modified electrodes that have recently been reported for the determination of adenine and guanine, with the advantage that the proposed electrode did not contain modifier. In addition, the proposed electrode was successfully used for the oxidation of adenine and guanine in DNA, and the detection limit for this measurement was 0.05 mug mL{sup -1} DNA.

  15. Nucleotide sequence of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, T L; Abouhaidar, M G; Holy, S

    1989-09-01

    The RNA genome of papaya mosaic virus is 6656 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] with six open reading frames (ORFs) more than 200 nucleotides long. The four nearest the 5' end each overlap with adjacent ORFs and could code for proteins with Mr 176307, 26248, 11949 and 7224 (ORFs 1 to 4). The fifth ORF produces the capsid protein of Mr 23043 and the sixth ORF, located completely within ORF1, could code for a protein with Mr 14113. The translation products of ORFs 1 to 3 show strong similarity with those of other potexviruses but the ORF 4 protein has only limited similarity with the other potexvirus ORF 4 proteins of 7K to 11K.

  16. Nucleotide Manipulatives to Illustrate the Central Dogma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja B. Yung

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma is a core concept that is critical for introductory biology and microbiology students to master. However, students often struggle to conceptualize the processes involved, and fail to move beyond simply memorizing the basic facts. To encourage critical thinking, we have designed a set of magnetic nucleotide manipulatives that allow students to model DNA structure, along with the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.

  17. Visualization of cyclic nucleotide dynamics in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill eGorshkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP transduce many neuromodulatory signals from hormones and neurotransmitters into specific functional outputs. Their production, degradation and signaling are spatiotemporally regulated to achieve high specificity in signal transduction. The development of genetically encodable fluorescent biosensors has provided researchers with useful tools to study these versatile second messengers and their downstream effectors with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution in cultured cells and living animals. In this review, we introduce the general design of these fluorescent biosensors and describe several of them in more detail. Then we discuss a few examples of using cyclic nucleotide fluorescent biosensors to study regulation of neuronal function and finish with a discussion of advances in the field. Although there has been significant progress made in understanding how the specific signaling of cyclic nucleotide second messengers is achieved, the mechanistic details in complex cell types like neurons are only just beginning to surface. Current and future fluorescent protein reporters will be essential to elucidate the role of cyclic nucleotide signaling dynamics in the functions of individual neurons and their networks.

  18. Nucleotide-Dependent Bioautocatalytic Timer Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Ru; Hsu, Ching-Fong; Chen, Chih-Lin; Witek, Henryk A; Urban, Pawel L

    2016-09-16

    We describe a biochemical timer composed of three biocatalytic reactions involving three types of adenylate nucleotides: adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). The timer is triggered by a small amount of ATP or ADP. An abrupt increase in the ATP concentration (following numerous amplification cycles) leads to a sudden increase of luminescence from the reaction mixture. The time point when the luminescence appears is found to be a function of the initial concentration of the triggering nucleotide (5.0 × 10(-8)-1.0 × 10(-6) M), even in the presence of a complex biological matrix. The mechanism of the observed dependence of the time of luminescence increase on the concentration has been confirmed with simple kinetic models. Due to the biocompatibility of the proposed trienzymatic reaction scheme (sensitivity to common nucleotides and occurrence in a neutral pH aqueous environment), the scheme can be used in bioengineered systems that require modulation of the response time (light emission) by concentration.

  19. Multiphasic interactions between nucleotides and target proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Nissen, Per

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) bind to target proteins to promote bacterial survival (Corrigan et al. 2016). Thus, the binding of the nucleotides to RsgA, a GTPase, inhibits the hydrolysis of GTP. The dose response, taken to be curvilinear with respect to the logarithm of the inhibitor concentration, is instead much better (P<0.001 when the 6 experiments are combined) represented as multiphasic, with high to exceedingly high absolute r values for the straight lines, and with transitions in the form of non-contiguities (jumps). Profiles for the binding of radiolabeled nucleotides to HprT and Gmk, GTP synthesis enzymes, were, similarly, taken to be curvilinear with respect to the logarithm of the protein concentration. However, the profiles are again much better represented as multiphasic than as curvilinear (the P values range from 0.047 to <0.001 for each of the 8 experiments for binding of ppGpp and pppGpp to HprT). The binding of GTP to HprT and ...

  20. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Joong-Won, E-mail: jshin@govst.edu [Division of Science, Governors State University, University Park, Illinois 60484-0975 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States); Bernstein, Elliot R., E-mail: erb@lamar.colostate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  1. Regenerative Neurogenesis After Ischemic Stroke Promoted by Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Guan, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Can-Can; Wang, Pei; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a ubiquitous fundamental metabolite. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian NAD salvage synthesis and has been shown to protect against acute ischemic stroke. In this study, we investigated the role of Nampt-NAD cascade in brain regeneration after ischemic stroke. Nampt transgenic (Nampt-Tg) mice and H247A mutant enzymatic-dead Nampt transgenic (ΔNampt-Tg) mice were subjected with experimental cerebral ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Activation of neural stem cells, neurogenesis, and neurological function recovery were measured. Besides, nicotinamide mononucleotide and NAD, two chemical enzymatic product of Nampt, were administrated in vivo and in vitro. Compared with wild-type mice, Nampt-Tg mice showed enhanced number of neural stem cells, improved neural functional recovery, increased survival rate, and accelerated body weight gain after middle cerebral artery occlusion, which were not observed in ΔNampt-Tg mice. A delayed nicotinamide mononucleotide administration for 7 days with the first dose at 12 hours post middle cerebral artery occlusion did not protect acute brain infarction and neuronal deficit; however, it still improved postischemic regenerative neurogenesis. Nicotinamide mononucleotide and NAD(+) promoted proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in vitro. Knockdown of NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and SIRT2 inhibited the progrowth action of Nampt-NAD axis, whereas knockdown of SIRT1, SIRT2, and SIRT6 compromised the prodifferentiation effect of Nampt-NAD axis. Our data demonstrate that the Nampt-NAD cascade may act as a centralizing switch in postischemic regeneration through controlling different sirtuins and therefore represent a promising therapeutic target for long-term recovery of ischemic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Loop-loop interaction in an adenine-sensing riboswitch: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allnér, Olof; Nilsson, Lennart; Villa, Alessandra

    2013-07-01

    Riboswitches are mRNA-based molecules capable of controlling the expression of genes. They undergo conformational changes upon ligand binding, and as a result, they inhibit or promote the expression of the associated gene. The close connection between structural rearrangement and function makes a detailed knowledge of the molecular interactions an important step to understand the riboswitch mechanism and efficiency. We have performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the adenine-sensing add A-riboswitch to study the breaking of the kissing loop, one key tertiary element in the aptamer structure. We investigated the aptamer domain of the add A-riboswitch in complex with its cognate ligand and in the absence of the ligand. The opening of the hairpins was simulated using umbrella sampling using the distance between two loops as the reaction coordinate. A two-step process was observed in all the simulated systems. First, a general loss of stacking and hydrogen bond interactions is seen. The last interactions that break are the two base pairs G37-C61 and G38-C60, but the break does not affect the energy profile, indicating their pivotal role in the tertiary structure formation but not in the structure stabilization. The junction area is partially organized before the kissing loop formation and residue A24 anchors together the loop helices. Moreover, when the distance between the loops is increased, one of the hairpins showed more flexibility by changing its orientation in the structure, while the other conserved its coaxial arrangement with the rest of the structure.

  3. Kissing loop interaction in adenine riboswitch: insights from umbrella sampling simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, Francesco; Bottaro, Sandro; Bussi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting regulatory RNA elements prevalently located in the leader sequences of bacterial mRNA. An adenine sensing riboswitch cis-regulates adeninosine deaminase gene (add) in Vibrio vulnificus. The structural mechanism regulating its conformational changes upon ligand binding mostly remains to be elucidated. In this open framework it has been suggested that the ligand stabilizes the interaction of the distal "kissing loop" complex. Using accurate full-atom molecular dynamics with explicit solvent in combination with enhanced sampling techniques and advanced analysis methods it could be possible to provide a more detailed perspective on the formation of these tertiary contacts. In this work, we used umbrella sampling simulations to study the thermodynamics of the kissing loop complex in the presence and in the absence of the cognate ligand. We enforced the breaking/formation of the loop-loop interaction restraining the distance between the two loops. We also assessed the convergence of the results by using two alternative initialization protocols. A structural analysis was performed using a novel approach to analyze base contacts. Contacts between the two loops were progressively lost when larger inter-loop distances were enforced. Inter-loop Watson-Crick contacts survived at larger separation when compared with non-canonical pairing and stacking interactions. Intra-loop stacking contacts remained formed upon loop undocking. Our simulations qualitatively indicated that the ligand could stabilize the kissing loop complex. We also compared with previously published simulation studies. Kissing complex stabilization given by the ligand was compatible with available experimental data. However, the dependence of its value on the initialization protocol of the umbrella sampling simulations posed some questions on the quantitative interpretation of the results and called for better converged enhanced sampling simulations.

  4. Clay catalysis of oligonucleotide formation: kinetics of the reaction of the 5'-phosphorimidazolides of nucleotides with the non-basic heterocycles uracil and hypoxanthine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.; Ferris, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The montmorillonite clay catalyzed condensation of activated monocleotides to oligomers of RNA is a possible first step in the formation of the proposed RNA world. The rate constants for the condensation of the phosphorimidazolide of adenosine were measured previously and these studies have been extended to the phosphorimidazolides of inosine and uridine in the present work to determine of substitution of neutral heterocycles for the basic adenine ring changes the reaction rate or regioselectivity. The oligomerization reactions of the 5'-phosphoromidazolides of uridine (ImpU) and inosine (ImpI) on montmorillonite yield oligo(U)s and oligo(I)s as long as heptamers. The rate constants for oligonucleotide formation were determined by measuring the rates of formation of the oligomers by HPLC. Both the apparent rate constants in the reaction mixture and the rate constants on the clay surface were calculated using the partition coefficients of the oligomers between the aqueous and clay phases. The rate constants for trimer formation are much greater than those dimer synthesis but there was little difference in the rate constants for the formation of trimers and higher oligomers. The overall rates of oligomerization of the phosphorimidazolides of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides in the presence of montmorillonite clay are the same suggesting that RNA formed on the primitive Earth could have contained a variety of heterocyclic bases. The rate constants for oligomerization of pyrimidine nucleotides on the clay surface are significantly higher than those of purine nucleotides since the pyrimidine nucleotides bind less strongly to the clay than do the purine nucleotides. The differences in the binding is probably due to Van der Waals interactions between the purine bases and the clay surface. Differences in the basicity of the heterocyclic ring in the nucleotide have little effect on the oligomerization process.

  5. Molecular characterization of Fasciola hepatica and phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial (nicotiamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit I and cytochrome oxidase subunit I) genes from the North-East of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaghi, Saber; Haghighi, Ali; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Spotin, Adel; Arzamani, Kourosh; Rouhani, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Fascioliasis is one of the most zoonotic diseases with global extension. As the epidemiological distribution of Fasciola may lead to various genetic patterns of the parasite, the aim of this study is to identify Fasciola hepatica based on spermatogenesis, and phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial (nicotiamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit I [ND1] and cytochrome oxidase subunit I) gene marker. Materials and Methods: In this study, 90 F. hepatica collected from 30 cattle at slaughterhouse located in three different geographical locations in the North-East of Iran were evaluated based on spermatogenetic ability and internal transcribed spacer 1 gene restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship using mtDNA gene marker for the isolates from the North-East of Iran, and other countries were then analyzed. Results: Partial sequences of mtDNA showed eight haplotypes in both genes. The phylogenic analysis using neighbor joining as well as maximum likelihood methods showed similar topologies of trees. Pairwise fixation index between different F. hepatica populations calculated from the nucleotide data set of ND1 gene are statistically significant and show the genetic difference. Conclusion: F. hepatica found in this region of Iran has different genetic structures through the other Fasciola populations in the world. PMID:27733809

  6. The GC-Rich Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Alga Coccomyxa Give Insight into the Evolution of Organelle DNA Nucleotide Landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David Roy; Burki, Fabien; Yamada, Takashi; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2011-05-13

    Most of the available mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences are biased towards adenine and thymine (AT) over guanine and cytosine (GC). Examples of GC-rich organelle DNAs are limited to a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green algae. Here, to gain insight in the evolution of organelle nucleotide landscape, we present the GC-rich mitochondrial and plastid DNAs from the trebouxiophyte green alga Coccomyxa sp. C-169. We compare these sequences with other GC-rich organelle DNAs and argue that the forces biasing them towards G and C are nonadaptive and linked to the metabolic and/or life history features of this species. The Coccomyxa organelle genomes are also used for phylogenetic analyses, which highlight the complexities in trying to resolve the interrelationships among the core chlorophyte green algae, but ultimately favour a sister relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae, with the Trebouxiophyceae branching at the base of the chlorophyte crown.

  7. Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y

    2001-12-01

    The Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors are multifunctional molecules that transduce diverse intracellular signals leading to the activation of Rho GTPases. The tandem Dbl-homology and pleckstrin-homology domains shared by all members of this family represent the structural module responsible for catalyzing the GDP-GTP exchange reaction of Rho proteins. Recent progress in genomic, genetic, structural and biochemical studies has implicated Dbl family members in diverse biological processes, including growth and development, skeletal muscle formation, neuronal axon guidance and tissue organization. The detailed pictures of their autoregulation, agonist-controlled activation and mechanism of interaction with Rho GTPase substrates, have begun to emerge.

  8. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism required for cellular resistance against UV light and toxic chemicals such as those found in tobacco smoke. In living cells, NER efficiently detects and removes DNA lesions within the large nuclear macromolecular complex called...... of histone variants and histone displacement (including nucleosome sliding). Here we review current knowledge, and speculate about current unknowns, regarding those chromatin remodeling activities that physically displace histones before, during and after NER. © 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel...

  9. Multiple Decay Mechanisms and 2D-UV Spectroscopic Fingerprints of Singlet Excited Solvated Adenine-Uracil Monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quansong; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Rivalta, Ivan; Voityuk, Alexander A; Mukamel, Shaul; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Garavelli, Marco; Blancafort, Lluís

    2016-05-23

    The decay channels of singlet excited adenine uracil monophosphate (ApU) in water are studied with CASPT2//CASSCF:MM potential energy calculations and simulation of the 2D-UV spectroscopic fingerprints with the aim of elucidating the role of the different electronic states of the stacked conformer in the excited state dynamics. The adenine (1) La state can decay without a barrier to a conical intersection with the ground state. In contrast, the adenine (1) Lb and uracil S(U) states have minima that are separated from the intersections by sizeable barriers. Depending on the backbone conformation, the CT state can undergo inter-base hydrogen transfer and decay to the ground state through a conical intersection, or it can yield a long-lived minimum stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the two ribose rings. This suggests that the (1) Lb , S(U) and CT states of the stacked conformer may all contribute to the experimental lifetimes of 18 and 240 ps. We have also simulated the time evolution of the 2D-UV spectra and provide the specific fingerprint of each species in a recommended probe window between 25 000 and 38 000 cm(-1) in which decongested, clearly distinguishable spectra can be obtained. This is expected to allow the mechanistic scenarios to be discerned in the near future with the help of the corresponding experiments. Our results reveal the complexity of the photophysics of the relatively small ApU system, and the potential of 2D-UV spectroscopy to disentangle the photophysics of multichromophoric systems.

  10. In Vitro Selection Using Modified or Unnatural Nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, Gwendolyn M.; Bedenbaugh, Robert S.; Singh, Shruti; Meyer, Adam J.; Hatala, Paul J.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Hall, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Incorporation of modified nucleotides into in vitro RNA or DNA selections offer many potential advantages, such as the increased stability of selected nucleic acids against nuclease degradation, improved affinities, expanded chemical functionality, and increased library diversity. This unit provides useful information and protocols for in vitro selection using modified nucleotides. It includes a discussion of when to use modified nucleotides; protocols for evaluating and optimizing transcription reactions, as well as confirming the incorporation of the modified nucleotides; protocols for evaluating modified nucleotide transcripts as template in reverse transcription reactions; protocols for the evaluation of the fidelity of modified nucleotides in the replication and the regeneration of the pool; and a protocol to compare modified nucleotide pools and selection conditions. PMID:25606981

  11. Adsorption of adenine and thymine on zeolites: FT-IR and EPR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry and SEM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baú, João Paulo T; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Souza Junior, Ivan G; de Souza, Cláudio M D; da Costa, Antonio C S; di Mauro, Eduardo; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Coronas, Joaquin; Casado, Clara; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2012-02-01

    The interactions of adenine and thymine with and adsorption on zeolites were studied using different techniques. There were two main findings. First, as shown by X-ray diffractometry, thymine increased the decomposition of the zeolites (Y, ZSM-5) while adenine prevented it. Second, zeolite Y adsorbed almost the same amount of adenine and thymine, thus both nucleic acid bases could be protected from hydrolysis and UV radiation and could be available for molecular evolution. The X-ray diffractometry and SEM showed that artificial seawater almost dissolved zeolite A. The adsorption of adenine on ZSM-5 zeolite was higher than that of thymine (Student-Newman-Keuls test-SNK pzeolite, when compared to other zeolites (SNK pzeolites was not statistically different (SNK p>0.05). The adsorption of adenine and thymine on zeolites did not depend on pore size or Si/Al ratio and it was not explained only by electrostatic forces; rather van der Waals interactions should also be considered.

  12. [Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in centenarians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Juan; Gimeno-Mallench, Lucía; Inglés, Marta; Olaso, Gloria; Abdelaziz, Kheira Mohamed; Avellana, Juan Antonio; Belenguer, Ángel; Cruz, Raquel; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Borras, Consuelo; Viña, José

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is determined by genetic and external factors, such as nutritional, environmental, social, etc. Nevertheless, when living conditions are optimal, longevity is determined by genetic variations between individuals. In a same population, with relative genotypic homogeneity, subtle changes in the DNA sequence affecting a single nucleotide can be observed. These changes, called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are present in 1-5% of the population. A total of 92 subjects were recruited, including 28 centenarians and 64 controls, in order to find SNP that maybe implicated in the extreme longevity, as in the centenarians. Blood samples were collected to isolate and amplify the DNA in order to perform the analysis of SPN by Axiom™ Genotyping of Affymetrix technology. Statistical analyses were performed using the Plink program and libraries SNPassoc and skatMeta. Our results show 12 mutations with a p<.001, where 5 of these (DACH1, LOC91948, BTB16, NFIL3 y HDAC4) have regulatory functions of the expressions of others genes. Therefore, these results suggest that the genetic variation between centenarians and controls occurs in five genes that are involved in the regulation of gene expression to adapt to environmental changes better than controls. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of evolutionary distances between nucleotide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkikh, A

    1994-09-01

    A formal mathematical analysis of the substitution process in nucleotide sequence evolution was done in terms of the Markov process. By using matrix algebra theory, the theoretical foundation of Barry and Hartigan's (Stat. Sci. 2:191-210, 1987) and Lanave et al.'s (J. Mol. Evol. 20:86-93, 1984) methods was provided. Extensive computer simulation was used to compare the accuracy and effectiveness of various methods for estimating the evolutionary distance between two nucleotide sequences. It was shown that the multiparameter methods of Lanave et al.'s (J. Mol. Evol. 20:86-93, 1984), Gojobori et al.'s (J. Mol. Evol. 18:414-422, 1982), and Barry and Hartigan's (Stat. Sci. 2:191-210, 1987) are preferable to others for the purpose of phylogenetic analysis when the sequences are long. However, when sequences are short and the evolutionary distance is large, Tajima and Nei's (Mol. Biol. Evol. 1:269-285, 1984) method is superior to others.

  14. Rasp21 sequences opposite the nucleotide binding pocket are required for GRF-mediated nucleotide release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardsen, L; DeClue, J E; Lybaek, H;

    1996-01-01

    , the sensitivity of H-Ras to GRF was abolished when residues 130-139 were replaced by proline-aspartic acid-glutamine, whereas substitution of the entire loop 8 (residues 123-130 replaced by leucine-isoleucine-arginine) had no effect on the stimulation of guanine nucleotide release by GRF. Substrate activity...

  15. Mutations of PKA cyclic nucleotide-binding domains reveal novel aspects of cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Robin; Moon, Eui-Whan; Kim, Jeong Joo; Schmidt, Sven H; Sankaran, Banumathi; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Kim, Choel; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2017-07-06

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP are ubiquitous second messengers that regulate the activity of effector proteins in all forms of life. The main effector proteins, the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), are preferentially activated by cAMP and cGMP, respectively. However, the molecular basis of this cyclic nucleotide selectivity is still not fully understood. Analysis of isolated cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains of PKA regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) reveals that the C-terminal CNB-B has a higher cAMP affinity and selectivity than the N-terminal CNB-A. Here, we show that introducing cGMP-specific residues using site-directed mutagenesis reduces the selectivity of CNB-B, while the combination of two mutations (G316R/A336T) results in a cGMP-selective binding domain. Furthermore, introducing the corresponding mutations (T192R/A212T) into the PKA RIα CNB-A turns this domain into a highly cGMP-selective domain, underlining the importance of these contacts for achieving cGMP specificity. Binding data with the generic purine nucleotide 3',5'-cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP) reveal that introduced arginine residues interact with the position 6 oxygen of the nucleobase. Co-crystal structures of an isolated CNB-B G316R/A336T double mutant with either cAMP or cGMP reveal that the introduced threonine and arginine residues maintain their conserved contacts as seen in PKG I CNB-B. These results improve our understanding of cyclic nucleotide binding and the molecular basis of cyclic nucleotide specificity. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Control of dinucleoside polyphosphates by the FHIT-homologous HNT2 gene, adenine biosynthesis and heat shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieganowski Pawel

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The FHIT gene is lost early in the development of many tumors. Fhit possesses intrinsic ApppA hydrolase activity though ApppA cleavage is not required for tumor suppression. Because a mutant form of Fhit that is functional in tumor suppression and defective in catalysis binds ApppA well, it was hypothesized that Fhit-substrate complexes are the active, signaling form of Fhit. Which substrates are most important for Fhit signaling remain unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that dinucleoside polyphosphate levels increase 500-fold to hundreds of micromolar in strains devoid of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of Fhit, Hnt2. Accumulation of dinucleoside polyphosphates is reversed by re-expression of Hnt2 and is active site-dependent. Dinucleoside polyphosphate levels depend on an intact adenine biosynthetic pathway and time in liquid culture, and are induced by heat shock to greater than 0.1 millimolar even in Hnt2+ cells. Conclusions The data indicate that Hnt2 hydrolyzes both ApppN and AppppN in vivo and that, in heat-shocked, adenine prototrophic yeast strains, dinucleoside polyphosphates accumulate to levels in which they may saturate Hnt2.

  17. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo, Julia S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados - Unidad Merida, Carretera antigua a Progreso Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Patino, Rodrigo, E-mail: rtarkus@mda.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados - Unidad Merida, Carretera antigua a Progreso Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2011-04-20

    Research highlights: {yields} The reaction catalyzed by one enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway was studied. {yields} A spectrophotometric method is proposed for kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. {yields} The pH and the temperature influences are reported on physical chemical properties. {yields} Relative concentrations of substrates are also important in the catalytic process. - Abstract: The enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC 1.1.1.49) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides has a dual coenzyme specificity with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sub ox}) and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as electron acceptors. The G6PD coenzyme selection is determined by the metabolic cellular prevailing conditions. In this study a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis is presented for the reaction catalyzed by G6PD from L. mesenteroides with NAD{sub ox} as coenzyme in phosphate buffer. For this work, an in situ spectrophotometric technique was employed based on the detection of one product of the reaction. Substrate and coenzyme concentrations as well as temperature and pH effects were evaluated. The apparent equilibrium constant, the Michaelis constant, and the turnover number were determined as a function of each experimental condition. The standard transformed Gibbs energy of reaction was determined from equilibrium constants at different initial conditions. For the product 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone, a value of the standard Gibbs energy of formation is proposed, {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o} = -1784 {+-} 5 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  18. Targeted disruption of the mouse adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene and the production of APRT-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, S.J.; Chen, J.; Tischfield, J.A. [Indiana Univ., School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT: EC 2.4.2.7), a ubiquitously expressed purine salvage enzyme, catalyzes the synthesis of AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate from existing adenine and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Deficiency of this enzyme in humans results in the accumulation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine leading to crystalluria and nephrolithiasis. In order to facilitate our study of this rare, autosomal recessive disorder, we applied the advances in gene targeting technology and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell culture to the production of APRT-deficient mice. A positive-negative targeting strategy was used. The tageting vector contain 5.6 kb of the mouse APRT gene, a neomycin resistance gene in exon 3 as a positive selection marker, and a HSV thymidine kinase gene at the 3{prime} end of the homology as a negative selection marker. The vector was introduced into D3 ES cells by electroporation and the cells were selected for G418 and ganciclovir (GANC) resistance. G418-GANC resistant clones were screened by Southern blot. One of several correctly targeted clones was expanded and used for blastocyst microinjection to produce chimeric mice. Chimeric animals were bred and agouti progeny heterozygous for the targeted allele were obtained. Heterozygous animals have been bred to produce APRT-deficient animals. Matings are currently underway to determine the phenotype of APRT/HPRT-deficient animals.

  19. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison E James

    Full Text Available DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam. To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence.

  20. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Allison E; Rogovskyy, Artem S; Crowley, Michael A; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence.

  1. A Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Dispersed Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Electrode for Direct and Selective Electrochemical Detection of Uric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Yiwei; Ma, Yaohong; Meng, Qingjun; Yan, Yan; Shi, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    A nanocomposite platform built with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) via a noncovalent interaction between the large π systems in NAD(+) molecules and MWCNTs on a glassy carbon substrate was successfully developed for the sensitive and selective detection of uric acid (UA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA). NAD(+) has an adenine subunit and a nicotinamide subunit, which enabled interaction with the purine subunit of UA through a strong π-π interaction to enhance the specificity of UA. Compared with a bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and MWCNTs/GCE, the MWCNTs-NAD(+)/GCE showed a low background current and a remarkable enhancement of the oxidation peak current of UA. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), a high sensitivity for the determination of UA was explored for the MWCNTs-NAD(+) modified electrode. A linear relationship between the DPV peak current of UA and its concentration could be obtained in the range of 0.05 - 10 μM with the detection limit as low as 10 nM (S/N = 3). This present strategy provides a novel and promising platform for the detection of UA in human urine and serum samples.

  2. Formation of amino acids and nucleotide bases in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörst, S M; Yelle, R V; Buch, A; Carrasco, N; Cernogora, G; Dutuit, O; Quirico, E; Sciamma-O'Brien, E; Smith, M A; Somogyi, A; Szopa, C; Thissen, R; Vuitton, V

    2012-09-01

    The discovery of large (>100 u) molecules in Titan's upper atmosphere has heightened astrobiological interest in this unique satellite. In particular, complex organic aerosols produced in atmospheres containing C, N, O, and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. In this work, aerosols produced in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment with enhanced CO (N(2)/CH(4)/CO gas mixtures of 96.2%/2.0%/1.8% and 93.2%/5.0%/1.8%) were found to contain 18 molecules with molecular formulae that correspond to biological amino acids and nucleotide bases. Very high-resolution mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled samples confirmed that C(4)H(5)N(3)O, C(4)H(4)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(5)N(5), and C(6)H(9)N(3)O(2) are produced by chemistry in the simulation chamber. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the non-isotopic samples confirmed the presence of cytosine (C(4)H(5)N(3)O), uracil (C(5)H(4)N(2)O(2)), thymine (C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2)), guanine (C(5)H(5)N(5)O), glycine (C(2)H(5)NO(2)), and alanine (C(3)H(7)NO(2)). Adenine (C(5)H(5)N(5)) was detected by GC-MS in isotopically labeled samples. The remaining prebiotic molecules were detected in unlabeled samples only and may have been affected by contamination in the chamber. These results demonstrate that prebiotic molecules can be formed by the high-energy chemistry similar to that which occurs in planetary upper atmospheres and therefore identifies a new source of prebiotic material, potentially increasing the range of planets where life could begin.

  3. Evaluation of the flanking nucleotide sequences of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy substitution mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Mealey, Katrina L

    2008-07-03

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a familial myocardial disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500. More than 400 causative mutations have been identified in 13 sarcomeric and myofilament related genes, 350 of these are substitution mutations within eight sarcomeric genes. Within a population, examples of recurring identical disease causing mutations that appear to have arisen independently have been noted as well as those that appear to have been inherited from a common ancestor. The large number of novel HCM mutations could suggest a mechanism of increased mutability within the sarcomeric genes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the most commonly reported HCM genes, beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7), myosin binding protein C, troponin I, troponin T, cardiac regulatory myosin light chain, cardiac essential myosin light chain, alpha tropomyosin and cardiac alpha-actin for sequence patterns surrounding the substitution mutations that may suggest a mechanism of increased mutability. The mutations as well as the 10 flanking nucleotides were evaluated for frequency of di-, tri- and tetranucleotides containing the mutation as well as for the presence of certain tri- and tetranculeotide motifs. The most common substitutions were guanine (G) to adenine (A) and cytosine (C) to thymidine (T). The CG dinucleotide had a significantly higher relative mutability than any other dinucleotide (pmutation was calculated; none were at a statistically higher frequency than the others. The large number of G to A and C to T mutations as well as the relative mutability of CG may suggest that deamination of methylated CpG is an important mechanism for mutation development in at least some of these cardiac genes.

  4. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair through ubiquitination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Audesh Bhat; Wei Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most versatile DNA-repair pathway in all organisms.While bacteria require only three proteins to complete the incision step of NER,eukaryotes employ about 30 proteins to complete the same step.Here we summarize recent studies demonstrating that ubiquitination,a post-translational modification,plays critical roles in regulating the NER activity either dependent on or independent of ubiquitin-proteolysis.Several NER components have been shown as targets of ubiquitination while others are actively involved in the ubiquitination process.We argue through this analysis that ubiquitination serves to coordinate various steps of NER and meanwhile connect NER with other related pathways to achieve the efficient global DNA-damage response.

  5. [Nucleotide receptors--structure and function, history and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barańska, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    First nucleotide receptors were discovered by Geoffrey Burnstock in 70ties of the last century, as a purinoreceptors activated by ATP. It was further found that they may be activated both by purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and their name was changed to nucleotide receptors. They are divided into two fsamilies: P1, activated by adenosine and P2, activated by nucleotides which are further divided into P2X and P2Y subfamilies. P2X are ionotropic receptors activated by ATP, P2Y (as the P1) are metabotropic receptors coupled with protein G. P2Y receptors are activated by ATP, ADP, UTP, UDP and UDP-sugar derivatives. This review describes early history of extracellular nucleotide signaling studies and presents current knowledge of the particular nucleotide receptors subtypes. The article also describes the structure and functional roles of these receptors and speculates about future research and therapeutic directions in this field.

  6. Frequency and Correlation of Nearest Neighboring Nucleotides in Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Neng-zhi; Liu, Zi-xian; Qiu, Wen-yuan

    2009-02-01

    Zipf's approach in linguistics is utilized to analyze the statistical features of frequency and correlation of 16 nearest neighboring nucleotides (AA, AC, AG, ..., TT) in 12 human chromosomes (Y, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 12). It is found that these statistical features of nearest neighboring nucleotides in human genome: (i) the frequency distribution is a linear function, and (ii) the correlation distribution is an inverse function. The coefficients of the linear function and inverse function depend on the GC content. It proposes the correlation distribution of nearest neighboring nucleotides for the first time and extends the descriptor about nearest neighboring nucleotides.

  7. Fluoride ion promoted deprotection and transesterification in nucleotide triesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K K; Beaucage, S L

    1979-10-10

    Tetrabutylammonium fluoride will remove phenyl, trichloroethyl and cyanoethyl groups from nucleotides. In addition to the desired nucleotide products other results including chain cleavage, phosphofluoridates and cyanoethylated thymidine units may be obtained depending on the conditions used. Fluoride ion has been used to successfully exchange phenyl and trichloroethyl groups for methyl, ethyl and butyl groups in nucleotide triesters. This represents a rapid high yield route to a variety of phosphate esters. The synthesis of a novel nucleotide analogue in which two chains are bridged through their phosphates is described.

  8. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)--short nucleotide sequences flanking introns--are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints.

  9. Cyclic nucleotide specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linder Markus

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania represent a complex of important human pathogens that belong to the systematic order of the kinetoplastida. They are transmitted between their human and mammalian hosts by different bloodsucking sandfly vectors. In their hosts, the Leishmania undergo several differentiation steps, and their coordination and optimization crucially depend on numerous interactions between the parasites and the physiological environment presented by the fly and human hosts. Little is still known about the signalling networks involved in these functions. In an attempt to better understand the role of cyclic nucleotide signalling in Leishmania differentiation and host-parasite interaction, we here present an initial study on the cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major. Results This paper presents the identification of three class I cyclic-nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs from L. major, PDEs whose catalytic domains exhibit considerable sequence conservation with, among other, all eleven human PDE families. In contrast to other protozoa such as Dictyostelium, or fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida ssp or Neurospora, no genes for class II PDEs were found in the Leishmania genomes. LmjPDEA contains a class I catalytic domain at the C-terminus of the polypeptide, with no other discernible functional domains elsewhere. LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 are coded for by closely related, tandemly linked genes on chromosome 15. Both PDEs contain two GAF domains in their N-terminal region, and their almost identical catalytic domains are located at the C-terminus of the polypeptide. LmjPDEA, LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were further characterized by functional complementation in a PDE-deficient S. cerevisiae strain. All three enzymes conferred complementation, demonstrating that all three can hydrolyze cAMP. Recombinant LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were shown to be cAMP-specific, with Km values in the low micromolar range

  10. Recombination-dependent deletion formation in mammalian cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair gene ERCC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, R G; Rolig, R L; Kilburn, A E; Adair, G M; Wilson, J H; Nairn, R S

    1997-11-25

    Nucleotide excision repair proteins have been implicated in genetic recombination by experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster, but their role, if any, in mammalian cells is undefined. To investigate the role of the nucleotide excision repair gene ERCC1, the hamster homologue to the S. cerevisiae RADIO gene, we disabled the gene by targeted knockout. Partial tandem duplications of the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) gene then were constructed at the endogenous APRT locus in ERCC1- and ERCC1+ cells. To detect the full spectrum of gene-altering events, we used a loss-of-function assay in which the parental APRT+ tandem duplication could give rise to APRT- cells by homologous recombination, gene rearrangement, or point mutation. Measurement of rates and analysis of individual APRT- products indicated that gene rearrangements (principally deletions) were increased at least 50-fold, whereas homologous recombination was affected little. The formation of deletions is not caused by a general effect of the ERCC1 deficiency on gene stability, because ERCC1- cell lines with a single wild-type copy of the APRT gene yielded no increase in deletions. Thus, deletion formation is dependent on the tandem duplication, and presumably the process of homologous recombination. Recombination-dependent deletion formation in ERCC1- cells is supported by a significant decrease in a particular class of crossover products that are thought to arise by repair of a heteroduplex intermediate in recombination. We suggest that the ERCC1 gene product in mammalian cells is involved in the processing of heteroduplex intermediates in recombination and that the misprocessed intermediates in ERCC1- cells are repaired by illegitimate recombination.

  11. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in Exon 6 of Lecithin Cholesterol Acyltransferase (LCAT Gene in Indonesian Local Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT is a soluble enzyme that converts cholesterol and lecithin to cholesteryl esters and lysolecithins on the surface of high density lipoprotein and plays an important role in lipoprotein metabolism. The research was aimed to explore single nucleotide polymorphisms of LCAT gene in Indonesian local sheep. A total of 118 genomic DNA of Indonesian local sheep were used in this research, consisted of Sumatera Thin Tail (43 heads, Garut (19 heads, Javanese Thin Tail (17 heads, Javanese Fat Tail (6 heads, Rote Island (7 heads, Kissar (7 heads, Sumbawa (10 heads, and Lembah Palu (9 heads. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify genomic DNA for exon 6 (250 bp and direct sequencing method was used to identify polymorphism sequences. The sequences were analyzed with BioEdit and MEGA 5.2 software. The BLAST sequence was obtained from Gene Bank GQ 150556.1. The results showed three novel SNPs, i.e. c.742C>T, c.770 T>A and c.882C>T. Substitution of cytosine to thymine c.742 is a synonymous mutation; thymine to adenine c.770 and cytosine to thymine c.882 are non-synonymous mutations. Polymorphisms of LCAT gene exon 6 was found in Sumatera Thin Tail, Javanese Thin Tail, Javanese Fat Tail, Garut, Lembah Palu, and Rote Island.

  12. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Lans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER plays an essential role in many organisms across life domains to preserve and faithfully transmit DNA to the next generation. In humans, NER is essential to prevent DNA damage-induced mutation accumulation and cell death leading to cancer and aging. NER is a versatile DNA repair pathway that repairs many types of DNA damage which distort the DNA helix, such as those induced by solar UV light. A detailed molecular model of the NER pathway has emerged from in vitro and live cell experiments, particularly using model systems such as bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cell cultures. In recent years, the versatility of the nematode C. elegans to study DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms including NER has become increasingly clear. In particular, C. elegans seems to be a convenient tool to study NER during the UV response in vivo, to analyze this process in the context of a developing and multicellular organism, and to perform genetic screening. Here, we will discuss current knowledge gained from the use of C. elegans to study NER and the response to UV-induced DNA damage.

  13. Human molecular cytogenetics: From cells to nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Mariluce

    2014-03-01

    The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The field of cytogenetics is particularly important for medical diagnostics and research as well as for gene ordering and mapping. Furthermore, the increased application of molecular biology techniques, such as array-based technologies, has led to improved resolution, extending the recognized range of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and genomic disorders. In adopting these newly expanded methods, cytogeneticists have used a range of technologies to study the association between visible chromosome rearrangements and defects at the single nucleotide level. Overall, molecular cytogenetic techniques offer a remarkable number of potential applications, ranging from physical mapping to clinical and evolutionary studies, making a powerful and informative complement to other molecular and genomic approaches. This manuscript does not present a detailed history of the development of molecular cytogenetics; however, references to historical reviews and experiments have been provided whenever possible. Herein, the basic principles of molecular cytogenetics, the technologies used to identify chromosomal rearrangements and copy number changes, and the applications for cytogenetics in biomedical diagnosis and research are presented and discussed.

  14. Human molecular cytogenetics: from cells to nucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluce Riegel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The field of cytogenetics is particularly important for medical diagnostics and research as well as for gene ordering and mapping. Furthermore, the increased application of molecular biology techniques, such as array-based technologies, has led to improved resolution, extending the recognized range of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and genomic disorders. In adopting these newly expanded methods, cytogeneticists have used a range of technologies to study the association between visible chromosome rearrangements and defects at the single nucleotide level. Overall, molecular cytogenetic techniques offer a remarkable number of potential applications, ranging from physical mapping to clinical and evolutionary studies, making a powerful and informative complement to other molecular and genomic approaches. This manuscript does not present a detailed history of the development of molecular cytogenetics; however, references to historical reviews and experiments have been provided whenever possible. Herein, the basic principles of molecular cytogenetics, the technologies used to identify chromosomal rearrangements and copy number changes, and the applications for cytogenetics in biomedical diagnosis and research are presented and discussed.

  15. Simultaneous quantitation of nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in milk by a novel enzyme-coupled assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummarino, Simone; Mozzon, Massimo; Zamporlini, Federica; Amici, Adolfo; Mazzola, Francesca; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2017-04-15

    Nicotinamide riboside, the most recently discovered form of vitamin B3, and its phosphorylated form nicotinamide mononucleotide, have been shown to be potent supplements boosting intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) levels, thus preventing or ameliorating metabolic and mitochondrial diseases in mouse models. Here we report for the first time on the simultaneous quantitation of nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide and NAD in milk by means of a fluorometric, enzyme-coupled assay. Application of this assay to milk from different species revealed that the three vitamers were present in human and donkey milk, while being selectively distributed in the other milks. Human milk was the richest source of nicotinamide mononucleotide. Overall, the three vitamers accounted for a significant fraction of total vitamin B3 content. Pasteurization did not affect the bovine milk content of nicotinamide riboside, whereas UHT processing fully destroyed the vitamin. In human milk, NAD levels were significantly affected by the lactation time.

  16. Isolation, synthesis, and biological activity of aphrocallistin, an adenine-substituted bromotyramine metabolite from the Hexactinellida sponge Aphrocallistes beatrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Amy E; Roth, Gregory P; Hoffman, Jennifer K; Divlianska, Daniela B; Pechter, Diana; Sennett, Susan H; Guzmán, Esther A; Linley, Patricia; McCarthy, Peter J; Pitts, Tara P; Pomponi, Shirley A; Reed, John K

    2009-06-01

    A new adenine-substituted bromotyrosine-derived metabolite designated as aphrocallistin (1) has been isolated from the deep-water Hexactinellida sponge Aphrocallistes beatrix. Its structure was elucidated on the basis of spectral data and confirmed through a convergent, modular total synthetic route that is amenable toward future analogue preparation. Aphrocallistin inhibits the growth of a panel of human tumor cell lines with IC(50) values ranging from 7.5 to >100 microM and has been shown to induce G1 cell cycle arrest in the PANC-1 pancreatic carcinoma cell line. Aphrocallistin has been fully characterized in the NCI cancer cell line panel and has undergone in vitro ADME pharmacological profiling.

  17. ISOLATION, SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF APHROCALLISTIN, AN ADENINE SUBSTITUTED BROMOTYRAMINE METABOLITE FROM THE HEXACTINELLIDA SPONGE APHROCALLISTES BEATRIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Amy E.; Roth, Gregory P.; Hoffman, Jennifer K.; Divlianska, Daniela B.; Pechter, Diana; Sennett, Susan H.; Guzmán, Esther A.; Linley, Patricia; McCarthy, Peter J.; Pitts, Tara P.; Pomponi, Shirley A.; Reed, John K.

    2010-01-01

    A new adenine substituted bromotyrosine derived metabolite designated as aphrocallistin (1) has been isolated from the deep-water Hexactinellida sponge Aphrocallistes beatrix beatrix Gray, 1858 (Order Hexactinosida, Family Aphrocallistidae). Its structure was elucidated on the basis of spectral data and confirmed through a convergent, modular total synthetic route that is amenable towards future analog preparation. Aphrocallistin inhibits the growth of a panel of human tumor cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 7.5 to >100 μM and has been shown to induce G1 cell cycle arrest in the PANC-1 pancreatic carcinoma cell line. Aphrocallistin has been fully characterized in the NCI cancer cell line panel and has undergone in vitro ADME pharmacological profiling. PMID:19459694

  18. Immobilization of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) onto carbon cloth and its application as working electrode in an electroenzymatic bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, R; Sathishkumar, M; Jeong, E S; Mun, S P; Yun, S E

    2012-11-01

    A high porosity carbon cloth with immobilized FAD was employed as working electrode in electrochemical NADH-regeneration procedure. Carbon cloth was oxidized with hot acids to create surface carboxyl group and then coupled by adenine amino group of FAD with carbodiimide in the presence of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide. The bioelectrocatalytic NADH-regeneration was coupled to the conversion of achiral substrate pyruvate into chiral product l-lactate by l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH) within the same reactor. The conversion was completed at 96h in bioreactor with FAD-modified carbon cloth, resulting in about 6mM of l-lactate from 10mM of pyruvate. While with bare carbon cloth, the yield at 120h was around 5mM. Immobilized FAD on the surface of carbon cloth electrode facilitated it to carry electrons from electrode to electron transfer enzymes; thereby NADH-regeneration was accelerated to drive the enzymatic reaction efficiently.

  19. Condensing the information in DNA with double-headed nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mick; Sharma, Pawan K; Reslow-Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    A normal duplex holds as many Watson-Crick base pairs as the number of nucleotides in its constituent strands. Here we establish that single nucleotides can be designed to functionally imitate dinucleotides without compromising binding affinity. This effectively allows sequence information to be ...

  20. Supplementary Material for: The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  1. Prebiotic nucleotide synthesis demonstration of a geologically plausible pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, A.W.; Veen, van der M.; Bisseling, T.; Chittenden, G.J.

    1975-01-01

    Mineral phosphate (apatite) is activated for the synthesis of nucleotides when dilute solutions containing nucleoside and ammonium oxalate are evaporated in its presence. A natural, igneous fluorapatite was found to be even more effective in nucleotide synthesis than the more soluble hydroxylapatite

  2. A label-free fluorescence DNA probe based on ligation reaction with quadruplex formation for highly sensitive and selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjin; Zhang, Liangliang; Jiang, Jianhui; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2012-05-11

    A simple label-free fluorescent sensing scheme for sensitive and selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) has been developed based on DNA ligation reaction with ligand-responsive quadruplex formation. This approach can detect 0.5 nM NAD(+) with high selectivity against other NAD(+) analogs.

  3. Dynamics of dipole- and valence bound anions in iodide-adenine binary complexes: A time-resolved photoelectron imaging and quantum mechanical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephansen, Anne B; King, Sarah B; Yokoi, Yuki; Minoshima, Yusuke; Li, Wei-Li; Kunin, Alice; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Neumark, Daniel M

    2015-09-14

    Dipole bound (DB) and valence bound (VB) anions of binary iodide-adenine complexes have been studied using one-color and time-resolved photoelectron imaging at excitation energies near the vertical detachment energy. The experiments are complemented by quantum chemical calculations. One-color spectra show evidence for two adenine tautomers, the canonical, biologically relevant A9 tautomer and the A3 tautomer. In the UV-pump/IR-probe time-resolved experiments, transient adenine anions can be formed by electron transfer from the iodide. These experiments show signals from both DB and VB states of adenine anions formed on femto- and picosecond time scales, respectively. Analysis of the spectra and comparison with calculations suggest that while both the A9 and A3 tautomers contribute to the DB signal, only the DB state of the A3 tautomer undergoes a transition to the VB anion. The VB anion of A9 is higher in energy than both the DB anion and the neutral, and the VB anion is therefore not accessible through the DB state. Experimental evidence of the metastable A9 VB anion is instead observed as a shape resonance in the one-color photoelectron spectra, as a result of UV absorption by A9 and subsequent electron transfer from iodide into the empty π-orbital. In contrast, the iodide-A3 complex constitutes an excellent example of how DB states can act as doorway state for VB anion formation when the VB state is energetically available.

  4. Determination of Activity of the Enzymes Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HPRT) and Adenine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (APRT) in Blood Spots on Filter Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auler, Kasie; Broock, Robyn; Nyhan, William L

    2015-07-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) deficiency is the cause of Lesch-Nyhan disease. Adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase (APRT) deficiency causes renal calculi. The activity of each enzyme is readily determined on spots of whole blood on filter paper. This unit describes a method for detecting deficiencies of HPRT and APRT. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Effects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan on the adenine-induced chronic renal failure rats in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xuan; Han, Baoqin; Sui, Xianxian; Hu, Rui; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-02-01

    The effects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan (LMWC) on chronic renal failure (CRF) rats induced by adenine were investigated in vivo and in vitro. Chitosan were hydrolyzed using chitosanase at pH 6-7 and 37° for 24 h to obtain LMWC. In vitro, the effect of LMWC on the proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) showed that it had no cytotoxic effect and could promote cell growth. For the in vivo experiment, chronic renal failure rats induced by adenine were randomly divided into control group, Niaoduqing group, and high-, medium- and low-dose LMWC groups. For each group, we detected serum creatinine (SCR), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione oxidase (GSH-Px) activities of renal tissue, and obtained the ratio of kidney weight/body weight, pathological changes of kidney. The levels of serum SCR, BUN were higher in the adenine-induced rats than those in the control group, indicating that the rat chronic renal failure model worked successfully. The results after treatment showed that LMWC could reduce the SCR and BUN levels and enhance the activities/levels of T-SOD and GSH-PX in kidney compared to control group. Histopathological examination revealed that adenine-induced renal alterations were restored by LMWC at three tested dosages, especially at the low dosage of 100 mg kg-1 d-1.

  6. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) using an adenine-induced quenching probe and an intercalator dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouguchi, Y; Teramoto, M; Kuramoto, M

    2010-11-01

    We found that an adenine base caused fluorescence quenching of a fluorescein (FL)-labelled probe in DNA:RNA hybrid sequences, and applied this finding to a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) method. The present NASBA method employed a probe containing an FL-modified thymine at its 3' end and ethidium bromide (EtBr) on the basis of a combination of adenine-induced quenching and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the FL donor and EtBr acceptor. This NASBA was used to detect Shiga toxin (STX) stx-specific mRNA in STX-producing Escherichia coli, demonstrating rapid quantification of the target gene with high sensitivity. Although the inherent quenching effect of adenine was inferior to that of guanine, FRET between the FL and EtBr moieties enhanced the adenine-induced quenching, allowing rapid and sensitive real-time NASBA detection. This study gives a novel real-time diagnostic system based on NASBA for a sensitive mRNA (or viral RNA) detection. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. A concise and simple synthesis of 1-hydroxy-phenethylamine derivatives: Formal synthesis of naturally occurring norephedrine, virolin and 3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl adenine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Saha; P Chakraborty; S C Roy

    2014-05-01

    A concise and simple synthesis of 1-hydroxy-phenethylamine derivatives has been achieved following classical organic transformations using commercially available chiral pools. The said derivatives were explored for the synthesis of naturally occurring bio-active small molecules. Formal synthesis of norephedrine, virolin and 3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl adenine has been demonstrated.

  8. Mismatch base pairing of the mutagen 8-oxoguanine and its derivatives with adenine: A theoretical search for possible antimutagenic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    Molecular geometries of 8-oxoguanine (8OG), those of its substituted derivatives with the substitutions CH2, CF2, CO, CNH, O, and S in place of the N7H7 group, adenine (A), and the base pairs of 8OG and its substituted derivatives with adenine were optimized using the RHF/6-31+G* and B3LYP/6-31+G* methods in gas phase. All the molecules and their hydrogen-bonded complexes were solvated in aqueous media employing the polarized continuum model (PCM) of the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) theory using the RHF/6-31+G* and B3LYP/6-31+G* methods. The optimized geometrical parameters of the 8OG-A base pair at the RHF/6-31+G* and B3LYP/6-31+G* levels of theory agree satisfactorily with those of an oligonucleotide containing the base pair found from X-ray crystallography. The pattern of hydrogen bonding in the CF2- and O-substituted 8OG-A base pair is of Watson-Crick type and that in the unsubstituted and CH2-, CNH-, and S-substituted base pairs is of Hoogsteen type. In the CO-substituted base pair, the hydrogen bonding pattern is of neither Watson-Crick nor Hoogsteen type. The CF2-substitution appears to introduce steric hindrance for stacking of DNA bases. On the basis of these results, it appears that among all the substituted 8OG molecules considered here, the O-substituted derivative may be useful as an antimutagenic drug. It is, however, subject to experimental verification. Content:text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

  9. Nucleotide sequence of the Dpn II DNA methylase gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its relationship to the dam gene of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannarelli, B.M.; Balganesh, T.S.; Greenberg, B.; Springhorn, S.S.; Lacks, S.A.

    1985-07-01

    The structural gene (dpnM) for the Dpn II DNA methylase of Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is part of the Dpn II restriction system and methylates adenine in the sequence 5'-G-A-T-C-3', was identified by subcloning fragments of a chromosomal segment from a Dpn II-producing strain in an S. pneumoniae host/vector cloning system and demonstrating function of the gene also in Bacillus subtilis. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the gene and adjacent DNA indicates that it encodes a polypeptide of 32,903 daltons. A putative promoter for transcription of the gene lies within a hundred nucleotides of the polypeptide start codon. Comparison of the coding sequence to that of the dam gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes a similar methylase, revealed 30% of the amino acid residues in the two enzymes to be identical. This homology presumably reflects a common origin of the two genes prior to the divergence of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It is suggested that the restriction function of the gene is primitive, and that the homologous restriction system in E. coli has evolved to play an accessory role in heteroduplex DNA base mismatch repair.

  10. Changes in Adenylate Nucleotides Concentration and Na+, K+-ATPase Activities in Erythrocytes of Horses in Function of Breed and Sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Suska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between the concentrations of ATP, ADP, AMP (HPLC methods, total nucleotide pool (TAN, adenylate energy charge (AEC and Na+, K+-ATPase erythrocytic activities (by Choi's method of horses as a function of breed and sex. The studies were conducted on 54 horses (stallions and mares of different constitution types: breathing constitution (Wielkopolska and Hanoverian breed and digestive constitution (Ardenian breed. Horse erythrocytes, independently of examined breed, present low ATP concentration in comparison to other mammal species while retaining relatively high AEC. Erythrocytes of breathing constitution type horses appear to have a more intensive glucose metabolism and a more efficient energetic metabolism when compared to digestive constitution type horses. The conclusions may be proven by significantly higher ATP concentration, higher TAN and significantly higher AEC in breathing constitution type horses compared to the digestive constitution type. Sex does not significantly influence adenine nucleotides concentration in the erythrocytes of the examined horses, however, stallions have slightly higher values in comparison to mares. A positive correlation was found between Na+, K+, -ATPase activity, ATP, ADP and AMP concentration and TAN in Wielkopolska and Ardenian breeds, which was not confirmed for the Hanoverian breed.

  11. Effect of base stacking on the acid-base properties of the adenine cation radical [A*+] in solution: ESR and DFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Khanduri, Deepti; Sevilla, Michael D

    2008-08-06

    In this study, the acid-base properties of the adenine cation radical are investigated by means of experiment and theory. Adenine cation radical (A*(+)) is produced by one-electron oxidation of dAdo and of the stacked DNA-oligomer (dA)6 by Cl2*(-) in aqueous glass (7.5 M LiCl in H2O and in D2O) and investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Theoretical calculations and deuterium substitution at C8-H and N6-H in dAdo aid in our assignments of structure. We find the pKa value of A*(+) in this system to be ca. 8 at 150 K in seeming contradiction to the accepted value of or = 160 K, complete deprotonation of A*(+) occurs in dAdo in these glassy systems even at pH ca. 3. A*(+) found in (dA)6 at 150 K also deprotonates on thermal annealing. The stability of A*(+) at 150 K in these systems is attributed to charge delocalization between stacked bases. Theoretical calculations at various levels (DFT B3LYP/6-31G*, MPWB95, and HF-MP2) predict binding energies for the adenine stacked dimer cation radical of 12 to 16 kcal/mol. Further DFT B3LYP/6-31G* calculations predict that, in aqueous solution, monomeric A*(+) should deprotonate spontaneously (a predicted pKa of ca. -0.3 for A*(+)). However, the charge resonance stabilized dimer AA*(+) is predicted to result in a significant barrier to deprotonation and a calculated pKa of ca. 7 for the AA*(+) dimer which is 7 pH units higher than the monomer. These theoretical and experimental results suggest that A*(+) isolated in solution and A*(+) in adenine stacks have highly differing acid-base properties resulting from the stabilization induced by hole delocalization within adenine stacks.

  12. Empirical Bayes analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ickstadt Katja

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important goal of whole-genome studies concerned with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs is the identification of SNPs associated with a covariate of interest such as the case-control status or the type of cancer. Since these studies often comprise the genotypes of hundreds of thousands of SNPs, methods are required that can cope with the corresponding multiple testing problem. For the analysis of gene expression data, approaches such as the empirical Bayes analysis of microarrays have been developed particularly for the detection of genes associated with the response. However, the empirical Bayes analysis of microarrays has only been suggested for binary responses when considering expression values, i.e. continuous predictors. Results In this paper, we propose a modification of this empirical Bayes analysis that can be used to analyze high-dimensional categorical SNP data. This approach along with a generalized version of the original empirical Bayes method are available in the R package siggenes version 1.10.0 and later that can be downloaded from http://www.bioconductor.org. Conclusion As applications to two subsets of the HapMap data show, the empirical Bayes analysis of microarrays cannot only be used to analyze continuous gene expression data, but also be applied to categorical SNP data, where the response is not restricted to be binary. In association studies in which typically several ten to a few hundred SNPs are considered, our approach can furthermore be employed to test interactions of SNPs. Moreover, the posterior probabilities resulting from the empirical Bayes analysis of (prespecified interactions/genotypes can also be used to quantify the importance of these interactions.

  13. Nucleotide excision repair in differentiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wees, Caroline van der [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Jansen, Jacob [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarse, Arnoud van der [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Zeeland, Albert van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: l.mullenders@lumc.nl

    2007-01-03

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the principal pathway for the removal of a wide range of DNA helix-distorting lesions and operates via two NER subpathways, i.e. global genome repair (GGR) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Although detailed information is available on expression and efficiency of NER in established mammalian cell lines, little is known about the expression of NER pathways in (terminally) differentiated cells. The majority of studies in differentiated cells have focused on repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4-photoproducts (6-4PP) because of the high frequency of photolesions at low level of toxicity and availability of sensitive technologies to determine photolesions in defined regions of the genome. The picture that emerges from these studies is blurred and rather complex. Fibroblasts and terminally differentiated myocytes of the rat heart display equally efficient GGR of 6-4PP but poor repair of CPD due to the absence of p48 expression. This repair phenotype is clearly different from human terminal differentiated neurons. Furthermore, both cell types were found to carry out TCR of CPD, thus mimicking the repair phenotype of established rodent cell lines. In contrast, in intact rat spermatogenic cells repair was very inefficient at the genome overall level and in transcriptionally active genes indicating that GGR and TCR are non-functional. Also, non-differentiated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit low levels of NER after UV irradiation. However, the mechanisms that lead to low NER activity are clearly different: in differentiated spermatogenic cells differences in chromatin compaction and sequestering of NER proteins may underlie the lack of NER activity in pre-meiotic cells, whereas in non-differentiated ES cells NER is impaired by a strong apoptotic response.

  14. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Cellular Chromatin: Studies with Yeast from Nucleotide to Gene to Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Reed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we review our development of, and results with, high resolution studies on global genome nucleotide excision repair (GGNER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have focused on how GGNER relates to histone acetylation for its functioning and we have identified the histone acetyl tranferase Gcn5 and acetylation at lysines 9/14 of histone H3 as a major factor in enabling efficient repair. We consider results employing primarily MFA2 as a model gene, but also those with URA3 located at subtelomeric sequences. In the latter case we also see a role for acetylation at histone H4. We then go on to outline the development of a high resolution genome-wide approach that enables one to examine correlations between histone modifications and the nucleotide excision repair (NER of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers throughout entire genomes. This is an approach that will enable rapid advances in understanding the complexities of how compacted chromatin in chromosomes is processed to access DNA damage and then returned to its pre-damaged status to maintain epigenetic codes.

  15. Identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites by integrating nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Tang, Hua; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-06-01

    2'-O-methylationation is an important post-transcriptional modification and plays important roles in many biological processes. Although experimental technologies have been proposed to detect 2'-O-methylationation sites, they are cost-ineffective. As complements to experimental techniques, computational methods will facilitate the identification of 2'-O-methylationation sites. In the present study, we proposed a support vector machine-based method to identify 2'-O-methylationation sites. In this method, RNA sequences were formulated by nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions. In the jackknife cross-validation test, the proposed method obtained an accuracy of 95.58% for identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites in the human genome. Moreover, the model was also validated by identifying 2'-O-methylation sites in the Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes, and the obtained accuracies are also satisfactory. These results indicate that the proposed method will become a useful tool for the research on 2'-O-methylation.

  16. Frequency and Correlation of Nearest Neighboring Nucleotides in Human Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neng-zhi Jin; Zi-xian Liu; Wen-yuan Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Zipf's approach in linguistics is utilized to analyze the statistical features of frequency and mosomes (Y, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 12). It is found that these statistical features of nearest neighboring nucleotides in human genome: (ⅰ) the frequency distribution is a linear function, and (ⅱ) the correlation distribution is an inverse function. The coeffi-cients of the linear function and inverse function depend on the GC content. It proposes the correlation distribution of nearest neighboring nucleotides for the first time and extends the descriptor about nearest neighboring nucleotides.

  17. Building phylogenetic trees by using gene Nucleotide Genomic Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Paul Dan

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide genomic signal (NuGS) methodology allows a molecular level approach to determine distances between homologous genes or between conserved equivalent non-coding genome regions in various species or individuals of the same species. Therefore, distances between the genes of species or individuals can be computed and phylogenetic trees can be built. The paper illustrates the use of the nucleotide imbalance (N) and nucleotide pair imbalance (P) signals to determine the distances between the genes of several Hominidae. The results are in accordance with those of other genetic or phylogenetic approaches to establish distances between Hominidae species.

  18. Overview of the application of nucleotide in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Do Huu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although long history application in infant formula, dietary nucleotide supplementation has been used only recently in the evaluation of growth performance, stress and pathogen resistance in aquaculture species. This paper addresses the present knowledge of the use of nucleotide supplemented in the diet for culture species. Research reveals that dietary nucleotide may have significant impact and is recommended to add to the feed of aquatic species to get better performance. However, more studies should also be conducted to have better understandings on dose requirement, duration of application, impact on different life stage and under different environmental stress and pathogens. Further study should also examine the effects of dietary nucleotide supplementation of intestinal microbiota and gut morphology, and immune response of aquaculture species.

  19. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  20. Overview of the application of nucleotide in aquaculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoang Do Huu

    2016-01-01

    Although long history application in infant formula, dietary nucleotide supplementation has been used only recently in the evaluation of growth performance, stress and pathogen resistance in aquaculture species. This paper addresses the present knowledge of the use of nucleotide supplemented in the diet for culture species. Research reveals that dietary nucleotide may have significant impact and is recommended to add to the feed of aquatic species to get better performance. However, more studies should also be conducted to have better understandings on dose requirement, duration of application, impact on different life stage and under different environmental stress and pathogens. Further study should also examine the effects of dietary nucleotide supplementation of intestinal microbiota and gut morphology, and immune response of aquaculture species.

  1. Association study of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrera, Noa; Arrojo, Manuel; Sanjuán, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies using several hundred thousand anonymous markers present limited statistical power. Alternatively, association studies restricted to common nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) have the advantage of strongly reducing the multiple testing problem, ...

  2. The electrochemical reduction of the purines guanine and adenine at platinum electrodes in several room temperature ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin, E-mail: boldrinv@iq.unesp.br [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo State, Araraquara, R. Prof. Francisco Degni, CP 355, 14801-970, SP (Brazil); Rogers, Emma I. [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Hardacre, Christopher, E-mail: c.hardacre@qub.ac.uk [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering/QUILL, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Compton, Richard G., E-mail: richard.compton@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-05

    The reduction of guanine was studied by microelectrode voltammetry in the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-hexyltriethylammonium bis (trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][N(Tf){sub 2}], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorosphosphate [C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C{sub 4}mpyrr][N(Tf){sub 2}], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C{sub 4}mim][N(Tf){sub 2}], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium dicyanamide [C{sub 4}mpyrr][N(NC){sub 2}] and tris(P-hexyl)-tetradecylphosphonium trifluorotris(pentafluoroethyl)phosphate [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP] on a platinum microelectrode. In [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][NTf{sub 2}] and [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP], but not in the other ionic liquids studied, guanine reduction involves a one-electron, diffusion-controlled process at very negative potential to produce an unstable radical anion, which is thought to undergo a dimerization reaction, probably after proton abstraction from the cation of the ionic liquid. The rate of this subsequent reaction depends on the nature of the ionic liquid, and it is faster in the ionic liquid [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP], in which the formation of the resulting dimer can be voltammetrically monitored at less negative potentials than required for the reduction of the parent molecule. Adenine showed similar behaviour to guanine but the pyrimidines thymine and cytosine did not; thymine was not reduced at potentials less negative than required for solvent (RTIL) decomposition while only a poorly defined wave was seen for cytosine. The possibility for proton abstraction from the cation in [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][NTf{sub 2}] and [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP] is noted and this is thought to aid the electrochemical dimerization process. The resulting rapid reaction is thought to shift the reduction potentials for guanine and adenine to lower values than observed in RTILs where the scope for proton abstraction is not present. Such shifts are

  3. The effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on cytosolic nucleotide metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Lykke, Anne; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2010-01-01

    of cytosolic ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides, which in turn can result in aberrant RNA and DNA synthesis. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to genomic instability, and it is possible that the limiting effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on the levels of nucleotides and resulting aberrant RNA...... and DNA synthesis in part can be responsible for this link. This paper summarizes the parts of the metabolic pathways responsible for nucleotide metabolism that can be affected by mitochondrial dysfunction....

  4. Nucleotide binding switches the information flow in ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; Fanelli, Francesca

    2011-03-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. The guanine nucleotide-dependent intrinsic flexibility patterns of five G proteins were investigated in atomic detail through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the GDP- and GTP-bound states (S(GDP) and S(GTP), respectively). For all the considered systems, the intrinsic flexibility of S(GDP) was higher than that of S(GTP), suggesting that Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF) recognition and nucleotide switch require higher amplitude motions than effector recognition or GTP hydrolysis. Functional mode, dynamic domain, and interaction energy correlation analyses highlighted significant differences in the dynamics of small G proteins and Gα proteins, especially in the inactive state. Indeed, S(GDP) of Gα(t), is characterized by a more extensive energy coupling between nucleotide binding site and distal regions involved in GEF recognition compared to small G proteins, which attenuates in the active state. Moreover, mechanically distinct domains implicated in nucleotide switch could be detected in the presence of GDP but not in the presence of GTP. Finally, in small G proteins, functional modes are more detectable in the inactive state than in the active one and involve changes in solvent exposure of two highly conserved amino acids in switches I and II involved in GEF recognition. The average solvent exposure of these amino acids correlates in turn with the rate of GDP release, suggesting for them either direct or indirect roles in the process of nucleotide switch. Collectively, nucleotide binding changes the information flow through the conserved Ras-like domain, where GDP enhances the flexibility of mechanically distinct portions involved in nucleotide switch, and favors long distance allosteric communication (in Gα proteins), compared to GTP.

  5. Nucleotide binding switches the information flow in ras GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Raimondi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. The guanine nucleotide-dependent intrinsic flexibility patterns of five G proteins were investigated in atomic detail through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the GDP- and GTP-bound states (S(GDP and S(GTP, respectively. For all the considered systems, the intrinsic flexibility of S(GDP was higher than that of S(GTP, suggesting that Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF recognition and nucleotide switch require higher amplitude motions than effector recognition or GTP hydrolysis. Functional mode, dynamic domain, and interaction energy correlation analyses highlighted significant differences in the dynamics of small G proteins and Gα proteins, especially in the inactive state. Indeed, S(GDP of Gα(t, is characterized by a more extensive energy coupling between nucleotide binding site and distal regions involved in GEF recognition compared to small G proteins, which attenuates in the active state. Moreover, mechanically distinct domains implicated in nucleotide switch could be detected in the presence of GDP but not in the presence of GTP. Finally, in small G proteins, functional modes are more detectable in the inactive state than in the active one and involve changes in solvent exposure of two highly conserved amino acids in switches I and II involved in GEF recognition. The average solvent exposure of these amino acids correlates in turn with the rate of GDP release, suggesting for them either direct or indirect roles in the process of nucleotide switch. Collectively, nucleotide binding changes the information flow through the conserved Ras-like domain, where GDP enhances the flexibility of mechanically distinct portions involved in nucleotide switch, and favors long distance allosteric communication (in Gα proteins, compared to GTP.

  6. Nucleotide-sugar transporters: structure, function and roles in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handford M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycosylation of glycoconjugates and the biosynthesis of polysaccharides depend on nucleotide-sugars which are the substrates for glycosyltransferases. A large proportion of these enzymes are located within the lumen of the Golgi apparatus as well as the endoplasmic reticulum, while many of the nucleotide-sugars are synthesized in the cytosol. Thus, nucleotide-sugars are translocated from the cytosol to the lumen of the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum by multiple spanning domain proteins known as nucleotide-sugar transporters (NSTs. These proteins were first identified biochemically and some of them were cloned by complementation of mutants. Genome and expressed sequence tag sequencing allowed the identification of a number of sequences that may encode for NSTs in different organisms. The functional characterization of some of these genes has shown that some of them can be highly specific in their substrate specificity while others can utilize up to three different nucleotide-sugars containing the same nucleotide. Mutations in genes encoding for NSTs can lead to changes in development in Drosophila melanogaster or Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as alterations in the infectivity of Leishmania donovani. In humans, the mutation of a GDP-fucose transporter is responsible for an impaired immune response as well as retarded growth. These results suggest that, even though there appear to be a fair number of genes encoding for NSTs, they are not functionally redundant and seem to play specific roles in glycosylation.

  7. Theoretical Investigation on the Substituent Effect of Halogen Atoms at the C8 Position of Adenine: Relative Stability, Vibrational Frequencies, and Raman Spectra of Tautomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Li; Wu, De-Yin; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2016-06-16

    We have theoretically investigated the substituent effect of adenine at the C8 position with a substituent X = H, F, Cl, and Br by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d, p) level. The aim is to study the substituent effect of halogen atoms on the relative stability, vibrational frequencies, and solvation effect of tautomers. Our calculated results show that for substituted adenine molecules the N9H8X tautomer to be the most stable structure in gas phase at the present theoretical level. Here N9H8X denotes the hydrogen atom binds to the N9 position of imidazole ring and X denotes H, F, Cl, and Br atoms. The influence of the induced attraction of the fluorine substituent is significantly larger than chlorine and bromine ones. The halogen substituent effect has a significant influence on changes of vibrational frequencies and Raman intensities.

  8. Photosensitized oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by diethoxyphosphorus(V)tetraphenylporphyrin and its fluorinated derivative: Possibility of chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Murata, Atsushi

    2017-07-31

    Water-soluble porphyrins, diethoxyphosphorus(V)tetraphenylporphyrin (EtP(V)TPP) and its fluorinated analogue (FEtP(V)TPP), decreased the typical absorption around 340nm of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) under visible light irradiation, indicating oxidative decomposition. A singlet oxygen quencher, sodium azide, and a triplet quencher, potassium iodide, slightly inhibited photosensitized NADH oxidation. However, these inhibitory effects were very small. Furthermore, the fluorescence lifetime of these P(V)porphyrins was decreased by NADH, suggesting the contribution of electron transfer to the singlet excited (S1) state of P(V)porphyrin. The redox potential measurement supports the electron transfer-mediated oxidation of NADH. The quantum yields of NADH photodecomposition by P(V)porphyrins could be estimated from the kinetic data and the effect of these quenchers on NADH oxidation. The obtained values suggest that the electron accepting by the S1 states of P(V)porphyrins triggers a chain reaction of NADH oxidation. This photosensitized reaction may play an important role in the photocytotoxicity of P(V)porphyrins. The axial ligand fluorination of P(V)porphyrins improved electron accepting ability. However, fluorination slightly suppressed static interaction with NADH, resulting in decreased oxidation quantum yield. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Continuing Exposure to Low-Dose Nonylphenol Aggravates Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Dysfunction and Role of Rosuvastatin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Chia-Hung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonylphenol (NP, an environmental organic compound, has been demonstrated to enhance reactive-oxygen species (ROS synthesis. Chronic exposure to low-dose adenine (AD has been reported to induce chronic kidney disease (CKD. Methods In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic exposure to NP will aggravate AD-induced CKD through increasing generations of inflammation, ROS, and apoptosis that could be attenuated by rosuvastatin. Fifty male Wistar rats were equally divided into group 1 (control, group 2 (AD in fodder at a concentration of 0.25%, group 3 (NP: 2 mg/kg/day, group 4 (combined AD & NP, and group 5 (AD-NP + rosuvastatin: 20 mg/kg/day. Treatment was continued for 24 weeks for all animals before being sacrificed. Results By the end of 24 weeks, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine levels were increased in group 4 than in groups 1–3, but significantly reduced in group 5 as compared with group 4 (all p  Conclusion NP worsened AD-induced CKD that could be reversed by rosuvastatin therapy.

  10. Study of the chemical evolution and spectral signatures of some interstellar precursor molecules of adenine, glycine alanine

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Chakrabarti, Sonali; 10.1016/j.newast.2012.09.002

    2012-01-01

    We carry out a quantum chemical calculation to obtain the infrared and electronic absorption spectra of several complex molecules of the interstellar medium (ISM). These molecules are the precursors of adenine, glycine & alanine. They could be produced in the gas phase as well as in the ice phase. We carried out a hydro-chemical simulation to predict the abundances of these species in the gas as well as in the ice phase. Gas and grains are assumed to be interacting through the accretion of various species from the gas phase on to the grain surface and desorption (thermal evaporation and photo-evaporation) from the grain surface to the gas phase. Depending on the physical properties of the cloud, the calculated abundances varies. The influence of ice on vibrational frequencies of different pre-biotic molecules was obtained using Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) model with the integral equation formalism variant (IEFPCM) as default SCRF method with a dielectric constant of 78.5. Time dependent density func...

  11. Yeast species utilizing uric acid, adenine, n-alkylamines or diamines as sole source of carbon and energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelhoven, W J; De Kievit, H; Biesbroek, A L

    1985-01-01

    Yeast strains utilizing uric acid, adenine, monoamines or diamines as sole source of carbon and energy were isolated from several soil samples by the enrichment culture method. The most common species was Trichosporon cutaneum. Strains of Candida catenulata, C. famata, C. parapsilosis, C. rugosa, Cryptococcus laurentii, Stephanoascus ciferrii and Tr. adeninovorans were also isolated. All strains utilizing uric acid as sole carbon source utilized some primary n-alkyl-l-amines, hydroxyamines or diamines as well. The ascomycetous yeast strains showing these characteristics all belonged to species known to assimilate hydrocarbons. Type strains of hydrocarbon-positive yeast species which were not found in the enrichment cultures generally assimilated putrescine, some type strains also butylamine or pentylamine, but none assimilated uric acid. Methanol-positive species were not isolated. Type strains of methanol-positive and of hydrocarbon-negative species did not assimilate uric acid, butylamine or putrescine. Assimilation of putrescine as sole source of carbon and energy may be a valuable diagnostic criterion in yeast taxonomy.

  12. Purification and characterization of the enzymes involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide degradation by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Thanaa Hamed; El-Ghonemy, Dina Helmy

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate a new pathway for the degradation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829 extracts. Enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of NAD, i.e. alkaline phosphatase, aminohydrolase and glycohydrolase were determined. Alkaline phosphatase was found to catalyse the sequential hydrolysis of two phosphate moieties of NAD molecule to nicotinamide riboside plus adenosine. Adenosine was then deaminated by aminohydrolase to inosine and ammonia. While glycohydrolase catalyzed the hydrolysis of the nicotinamide-ribosidic bond of NAD+ to produce nicotinamide and ADP-ribose in equimolar amounts, enzyme purification through a 3-step purification procedure revealed the existence of two peaks of alkaline phosphatases, and one peak contained deaminase and glycohydrolase activities. NAD deaminase was purified to homogeneity as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an apparent molecular mass of 91 kDa. Characterization and determination of some of NAD aminohydrolase kinetic properties were conducted due to its biological role in the regulation of cellular NAD level. The results also revealed that NAD did not exert its feedback control on nicotinamide amidase produced by P. brevicompactum.

  13. Synthesis, biological activity, and DNA-damage profile of platinum-threading intercalator conjugates designed to target adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddneppanavar, Rajsekhar; Saluta, Gilda; Kucera, Gregory L; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    PT-ACRAMTU {[PtCl(en)(ACRAMTU)](NO3)2, 2; ACRAMTU = 1-[2-(acridin-9-ylamino)ethyl]-1,3-dimethylthiourea, 1, en = ethane-1,2-diamine} is the prototype of a series of DNA-targeted adenine-affinic dual intercalating/platinating agents. Several novel 4,9-disubstituted acridines and the corresponding platinum-acridine conjugates were synthesized. The newly introduced 4-carboxamide side chains contain H-bond donor/acceptor functions designed to promote groove- and sequence-specific platinum binding. In HL-60 (leukemia) and H460 (lung) cancer cells, IC50 values in the micromolar to millimolar range were observed. Several of the intercalators show enhanced cytotoxicity compared to prototype 1, but conjugate 2 appears to be the most potent hybrid agent. Enzymatic digestion assays in conjunction with liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry analysis indicate that the new conjugates produce PT-ACRAMTU-type DNA damage. Platinum-modified 2'-deoxyguanosine, dG, and several dinucleotide fragments, d(NpN)*, were detected. One of the conjugates showed significantly higher levels of binding to A-containing sites than conjugate 2 (35 +/- 3% vs 24 +/- 3%). Possible structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  14. Multi-pathway excited state relaxation of adenine oligomers in aqueous solution: a joint theoretical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyasz, Akos; Gustavsson, Thomas; Onidas, Delphine; Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2013-03-11

    The singlet excited states of adenine oligomers, model systems widely used for the understanding of the interaction of ultraviolet radiation with DNA, are investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. Fluorescence decays, fluorescence anisotropy decays, and time-resolved fluorescence spectra are recorded from the femtosecond to the nanosecond timescales for single strand (dA)20 in aqueous solution. These experimental observations and, in particular, the comparison of the fluorescence behavior upon UVC and UVA excitation allow the identification of various types of electronic transitions with different energy and polarization. Calculations performed for up to five stacked 9-methyladenines, taking into account the solvent, show that different excited states are responsible for the absorption in the UVC and UVA spectral domains. Independently of the number of bases, bright excitons may evolve toward two types of excited dimers having π-π* or charge-transfer character, each one distinguished by its own geometry and spectroscopic signature. According to the picture arising from the joint experimental and theoretical investigation, UVC-induced fluorescence contains contribution from 1) exciton states with a different degree of localization, decaying within a few ps, 2) "neutral" excited dimers decaying on the sub-nanosecond timescale, being the dominant species, and 3) charge-transfer states decaying on the nanosecond timescale. The majority of the photons emitted upon UVA excitation are related to charge-transfer states.

  15. Amidate prodrugs of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine as inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvoráková, Alexandra; Tloust'ová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is the key virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis that facilitates its invasion into the mammalian body. 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine diphosphate (PMEApp), the active metabolite of the antiviral drug bis(POM)PMEA (adefovir dipivoxil), has been shown to inhibit ACT. The objective of this study was to evaluate six novel amidate prodrugs of PMEA, both phenyloxy phosphonamidates and phosphonodiamidates, for their ability to inhibit ACT activity in the J774A.1 macrophage cell line. The two phenyloxy phosphonamidate prodrugs exhibited greater inhibitory activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 22 and 46 nM) than the phosphonodiamidates (IC50 = 84 to 3,960 nM). The inhibitory activity of the prodrugs correlated with their lipophilicity and the degree of their hydrolysis into free PMEA in J774A.1 cells. Although the prodrugs did not inhibit ACT as effectively as bis(POM)PMEA (IC50 = 6 nM), they were significantly less cytotoxic. Moreover, they all reduced apoptotic effects of ACT and prevented an ACT-induced elevation of intracellular [Ca(2+)]i. The amidate prodrugs were less susceptible to degradation in Caco-2 cells compared to bis(POM)PMEA, while they exerted good transepithelial permeability in this assay. As a consequence, a large amount of intact amidate prodrug is expected to be available to target macrophages in vivo. This feature makes nontoxic amidate prodrugs attractive candidates for further investigation as novel antimicrobial agents.

  16. Activation of protein kinase C and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase in leukocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kensaku; Yasunari, Kenichi; Sato, Eisuke F; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Inoue, Masayasu

    2003-12-01

    The involvement of oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the pathogenesis of hypertension remains to be elucidated. We analyzed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the circulating and peritoneally infiltrating PMN from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). Flow cytometric analysis revealed that ROS generation by PMN from SHR was higher than that from WKY before (at 6 weeks of age) and after (at 16 weeks of age) the onset of hypertension. In vivo, ROS generation by PMN from SHR, but not that by PMN from WKY, was significantly suppressed by 10-week treatment with 50 mg/kg/day carvedilol, and this treatment did not affect blood pressure. Western blotting analysis revealed that protein kinase C alpha (PKCalpha), but not PKCbetaI or betaII, was activated more strongly in PMN from SHR than in PMN from WKY. Furthermore, expression of p47phox of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, but not of p67phox, in PMN from SHR was higher than that in PMN from WKY. These results suggest that ROS generation by PMN is principally enhanced in SHR through activation of PKCalpha and p47phox.

  17. An extended version of Boyd's force field method applicable to heteroatomic molecules. Part 1. Adenine and uracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Müller, A. W.; Bravo, A. N.

    The force field method developed by Boyd is extended to include molecules containing atoms other than C and H (e.g., N, O, P, S, Cl, Br,…). A new set of force field parameters is determined in order to redefine the potential energy functions that govern the dynamics of the internal (valence coordinates) degrees of freedom of a molecule. It is shown that the minimum of the partial potential energy surface is significantly affected by electrostatic intramolecular interactions. In this regard the non-bonded interactions appears to be less important than the dipole-dipole type interactions for a given interatomic distance when heteroatoms are present in the molecular framework. The reliability of the extended method as regards minimized structure, vibrational spectra and thermodynamic properties has been checked for more than 20 polyatomic molecules. From the correlation between calculated and experimental properties it is concluded that the method has good potential for further applications on polyatomic molecules with increasing size and topological compexities such as adenine and uracil.

  18. Interaction between thymine dimer and flavin-adenine dinucleotide: a DFT and direct ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2008-06-19

    The interaction between the fully reduced flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FADH (-)) and thymine dimer (T) 2 has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The charges of FADH (-) and (T) 2 were calculated to be -0.9 and -0.1, respectively, at the ground state. By photoirradiation, an electron transfer occurred from FADH (-) to (T) 2 at the first excited state. Next, the reaction dynamics of electron capture of (T) 2 have been investigated by means of the direct ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) method (HF/3-21G(d) and B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels) in order to elucidate the mechanism of the repair process of thymine dimer caused by the photoenzyme. The thymine dimer has two C-C single bonds between thymine rings (C 5-C 5' and C 6-C 6' bonds) at the neutral state, which is expressed by (T) 2. After the electron capture of (T) 2, the C 5-C 5' bond was gradually elongated and then it was preferentially broken. The time scale of the C-C bond breaking and formation of the intermediate with a single bond (T) 2 (-) was estimated to be 100-150 fs. The present calculations confirmed that the repair reaction of thymine dimer takes place efficiently via an electron-transfer process from the FADH (-) enzyme.

  19. Ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitial injury in adenine-induced CKD rats by mediating Nrf2 and NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study aims to determine the effects of ozone therapy on restoring impaired Nrf2 activation to ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitial injury in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Materials and Methods: Sprague–Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and chronic tubulointerstitial injury. Ozone therapy was administered by rectal insufflation. After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected and analyzed. Renal function and systemic electrolyte level were detected. Pathological changes in kidney were assessed by hematoxylin–eosin staining and Masson trichrome staining. Nrf2 activation was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. The levels of SOD, CAT, GSH, PCO, and MDA were detected in the kidney. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR analyses were performed to evaluate the activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB P65 pathway and inflammation infiltration in the tubulointerstitium of the rats. Results: Ozone therapy improved severe renal insufficiency and tubulointerstitial morphology injury as well as restored Nrf2 activation and inhibited the NF-κB pathway in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Ozone therapy also up-regulated anti-oxidation enzymes (SOD, CAT, and GSH and down-regulated oxidation products (PCO and MDA, as well as inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 in the kidney. Conclusion:These findings indicated that ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitial injury in rats with adenine-induced CKD by mediating Nrf2 and NF-κB.

  20. Ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitial injury in adenine-induced CKD rats by mediating Nrf2 and NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gang; Liu, Xiuheng; Chen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aims to determine the effects of ozone therapy on restoring impaired Nrf2 activation to ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitial injury in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Materials and Methods: Sprague–Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and chronic tubulointerstitial injury. Ozone therapy was administered by rectal insufflation. After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected and analyzed. Renal function and systemic electrolyte level were detected. Pathological changes in kidney were assessed by hematoxylin–eosin staining and Masson trichrome staining. Nrf2 activation was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. The levels of SOD, CAT, GSH, PCO, and MDA were detected in the kidney. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR analyses were performed to evaluate the activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) P65 pathway and inflammation infiltration in the tubulointerstitium of the rats. Results: Ozone therapy improved severe renal insufficiency and tubulointerstitial morphology injury as well as restored Nrf2 activation and inhibited the NF-κB pathway in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Ozone therapy also up-regulated anti-oxidation enzymes (SOD, CAT, and GSH) and down-regulated oxidation products (PCO and MDA), as well as inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and ICAM-1) in the kidney. Conclusion: These findings indicated that ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitial injury in rats with adenine-induced CKD by mediating Nrf2 and NF-κB. PMID:27872711

  1. Can an excess electron localize on a purine moiety in the adenine-thymine Watson-Crick base pair? A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurkiewicz, Kamil; Harańczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej; Rak, Janusz

    The electron affinity and the propensity to electron-induced proton transfer (PT) of hydrogen-bonded complexes between the Watson-Crick adenine-thymine pair (AT) and simple organic acid (HX), attached to adenine in the Hoogsteen-type configuration, were studied at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level. Although the carboxyl group is deprotonated at physiological pH, its neutral form, COOH, resembles the peptide bond or the amide fragment in the side chain of asparagine (Asn) or glutamine (Gln). Thus, these complexes mimic the interaction between the DNA environment (e.g., proteins) and nucleobase pairs incorporated in the biopolymer. Electron attachment is thermodynamically feasible and adiabatic electron affinities range from 0.41 to 1.28 eV, while the vertical detachment energies of the resulting anions span the range of 0.39-2.88 eV. Low-energy activation barriers separate the anionic minima: aHX(AT) from the more stable single-PT anionic geometry, aHX(AT)-SPT, and aHX(AT)-SPT from the double-PT anionic geometry, aHX(AT)-DPT. Interaction between the adenine of the Watson-Crick AT base pair with an acidic proton donor probably counterbalances the larger EA of isolated thymine, as SOMO is almost evenly delocalized over both types of nucleic bases in the aHX(AT) anions. Moreover, as a result of PT the excess electron localizes entirely on adenine. Thus, in DNA interacting with its physiological environment, damage induced by low-energy electrons could begin, contrary to the current view, with the formation of purine anions, which are not formed in isolated DNA because of the greater stability of anionic pyrimidines.0

  2. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D.; Knox, B; Jackson, D.; Hruban, R; Olson, J.; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-01-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the le...

  3. Uncaria tomentosa extract alters the catabolism of adenine nucleotides and expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 and P2X7 and A1 receptors in the MDA-MB-231 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Karen Freitas; Gutierres, Jessié Martins; Pillat, Micheli Mainardi; Rissi, Vitor Braga; Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo Dos; Bertol, Gustavo; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina; Morsch, Vera Maria

    2016-12-24

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC. (Rubiaceae) (Ut), also known as cat's claw, is a woody liana widely spread throughout the Amazon rainforest of Central and South America, containing many chemical constituents such as oxindole alkaloids, which are responsible for various biological activities. Since ancient times, the indigenous people of Peru have used it as a bark infusion for the treatment of a wide range of health problems gastric ulcers, arthritis and rheumatism. Recently, Ut is distributed worldwide and used as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory herbal remedy. Additionally, U. tomentosa also has antitumural activity. However, little is known about the action of U. tomentosa on the purinergic system mechanisms, which is involved in tumor progression. Considering the pharmacological properties of U. tomentosa, we sought to evaluate the hydroalcoholic extract U tomentosa is able to influence the purinergic system in breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. Through the activity and expression of ectonucleotidases (NTPDase - CD39; Ecto-5'-nucleotidase - CD73) and purinergic repceptores (P2X7 and A1). A hydroalcoholic extract was prepared in two concentrations, 250 and 500μg/mL. (Ut250; Ut500). The effect of these concentrations on the activity and expression of ectonucleotidases, as well as on the density of purinergic receptors were investigated in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Cells were treated with the hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa and/or doxorubicin (Doxo 1μM; Ut250+Doxo; Ut500+Doxo) for 24h. Although the results were not significant for the hydrolysis of the ATP, they presented an increase in the ADP hydrolysis in the Ut500+Doxo group when compared to the control group. Additionally, the activity of 5'-nucleotidase was inhibited in all groups when compared with the untreated group of cells. Inhibition of the enzyme was more evident in groups with U. tomentosa per se. The expression of CD39 was increased in the Ut250 and Ut250+Doxo groups when compared to the control group. No changes were found in the CD73 expression. Furthermore, a reduction in the density of the P2X7 receptor in all treated groups was detected. On the other hand, the density of the A1 receptor increased in all groups compared to the control group, with the exception of the Ut500+Doxo group. Therefore, we conclude that hydroalcoholic extract of U. tomentosa may be responsible for the reduction of adenosine levels in the extracellular medium, which accelerates tumor progression. Interestingly, the dysregulation of A1 and P2X7 receptors in the MDA-MB-231 cells exacerbate the proliferation of this cells and U. tomentosa treatment may be stimulate the antitumor activity of adenosine A1 receptor and control the P2X7 effects. Our study demonstrates the significant participation of purinergic pathway in the regulation of MDA-MB-231 progression; additionally, U. tomentosa treatment alone or combined with chemotherapy may favor the action of doxorubicin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 心肌线粒体腺苷酸配体门控钙离子释放通道%A pathway for adenine nucleotide ligand gating Ca2+ efflux of myocadial mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康少平; 李旭光; 董嘉良; 张艳君; 康英姿; 于公元

    2008-01-01

    目的:探讨心肌线粒体腺苷酸配体门控钙离子释放通道.方法:32只Wistar大鼠随机分成4组:ATP组、ADP组、NaCl组和咖啡因(Caffeine)组,每组8只.利用差速离心的方法提取心肌细胞线粒体.分别用ATP、ADP、NaCl和Caffeine启动线粒体Ca2+释放反应.紫外分光光度计监测线粒体的Ca2+释放.结果:ATP、ADP组线粒体Ca2+释放速度及最大释放量显著高于NaCl、Caffeine组(P<0.01),差异有统计学意义.结论:ATP、ADP能够触发心肌线粒体Ca2+释放,而NaCl、Caffeine则不可以.该实验数据提示心肌线粒体存在一种腺苷酸配体门控钙离子释放通道.

  5. Urea induced unfolding dynamics of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD): spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation studies from femto-second to nanosecond regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Abhigyan; Singh, Reman K; Gavvala, Krishna; Koninti, Raj Kumar; Mukherjee, Arnab; Hazra, Partha

    2014-02-20

    Here, we investigate the effect of urea in the unfolding dynamics of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), an important enzymatic cofactor, through steady state, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. Steady state results indicate the possibility of urea induced unfolding of FAD, inferred from increasing emission intensity of FAD with urea. The TCSPC and up-conversion results suggest that the stack-unstack dynamics of FAD severely gets affected in the presence of urea and leads to an increase in the unstack conformation population from 15% in pure water to 40% in 12 M urea. Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to understand the nature of the interaction between FAD and urea at the molecular level. Results depict that urea molecules replace many of the water molecules around adenine and isoalloxazine rings of FAD. However, the major driving force for the stability of this unstack conformations arises from the favorable stacking interaction of a significant fraction of the urea molecules with adenine and isoalloxazine rings of FAD, which overcomes the intramolecular stacking interaction between themselves observed in pure water.

  6. Phosphate-Modified Nucleotides for Monitoring Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, Susanne; Marx, Andreas; Hacker, Stephan M

    2017-04-01

    Nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been proven to be interesting entities to study the activity of a variety of different protein classes. In this chapter, we present various types of modifications that were attached as reporter molecules to the phosphate chain of nucleotides and briefly describe the chemical reactions that are frequently used to synthesize them. Furthermore, we discuss a variety of applications of these molecules. Kinase activity, for instance, was studied by transfer of a phosphate modified with a reporter group to the target proteins. This allows not only studying the activity of kinases, but also identifying their target proteins. Moreover, kinases can also be directly labeled with a reporter at a conserved lysine using acyl-phosphate probes. Another important application for phosphate-modified nucleotides is the study of RNA and DNA polymerases. In this context, single-molecule sequencing is made possible using detection in zero-mode waveguides, nanopores or by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based mechanism between the polymerase and a fluorophore-labeled nucleotide. Additionally, fluorogenic nucleotides that utilize an intramolecular interaction between a fluorophore and the nucleobase or an intramolecular FRET effect have been successfully developed to study a variety of different enzymes. Finally, also some novel techniques applying electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based detection of nucleotide cleavage or the detection of the cleavage of fluorophosphates are discussed. Taken together, nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been applied to study the activity of a large diversity of proteins and are valuable tools to enhance the knowledge of biological systems.

  7. Evolution of Nucleotide Punctuation Marks: From Structural to Linear Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Houmami, Nawal; Seligmann, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    We present an evolutionary hypothesis assuming that signals marking nucleotide synthesis (DNA replication and RNA transcription) evolved from multi- to unidimensional structures, and were carried over from transcription to translation. This evolutionary scenario presumes that signals combining secondary and primary nucleotide structures are evolutionary transitions. Mitochondrial replication initiation fits this scenario. Some observations reported in the literature corroborate that several signals for nucleotide synthesis function in translation, and vice versa. (a) Polymerase-induced frameshift mutations occur preferentially at translational termination signals (nucleotide deletion is interpreted as termination of nucleotide polymerization, paralleling the role of stop codons in translation). (b) Stem-loop hairpin presence/absence modulates codon-amino acid assignments, showing that translational signals sometimes combine primary and secondary nucleotide structures (here codon and stem-loop). (c) Homopolymer nucleotide triplets (AAA, CCC, GGG, TTT) cause transcriptional and ribosomal frameshifts. Here we find in recently described human mitochondrial RNAs that systematically lack mono-, dinucleotides after each trinucleotide (delRNAs) that delRNA triplets include 2x more homopolymers than mitogenome regions not covered by delRNA. Further analyses of delRNAs show that the natural circular code X (a little-known group of 20 translational signals enabling ribosomal frame retrieval consisting of 20 codons {AAC, AAT, ACC, ATC, ATT, CAG, CTC, CTG, GAA, GAC, GAG, GAT, GCC, GGC, GGT, GTA, GTC, GTT, TAC, TTC} universally overrepresented in coding versus other frames of gene sequences), regulates frameshift in transcription and translation. This dual transcription and translation role confirms for X the hypothesis that translational signals were carried over from transcriptional signals.

  8. {sup 19}F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sochor, F. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany); Silvers, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory (United States); Müller, D.; Richter, C.; Fürtig, B., E-mail: fuertig@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de; Schwalbe, H., E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus {sup 19}F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5′-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the {sup 19}F isotope. The thermal stability of the {sup 19}F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson–Crick base paired uridine signals and the {sup 19}F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of {sup 19}F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides.

  9. Insertions/deletions-associated nucleotide polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although high levels of within-species variation are commonly observed, a general mechanism for the origin of such variation is still lacking. Insertions and deletions (indels are a widespread feature of genomes and we hypothesize that there might be an association between indels and patterns of nucleotide polymorphism. Here, we investigate flanking sequences around 18 indels (>100bp among a large number of accessions of the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We found two distinct haplotypes, i.e. a nucleotide dimorphism, present around each of these indels and dimorphic haplotypes always corresponded to the indel-present/-absent patterns. In addition, the peaks of nucleotide diversity between the two divergent alleles were closely associated with these indels. Thus, there exists a close association between indels and dimorphisms. Further analysis suggests that indel-associated substitutions could be an important component of genetic variation shaping nucleotide polymorphism in Arabidopsis. Finally, we suggest a mechanism by which indels might generate these highly divergent haplotypes. This study provides evidence that nucleotide dimorphisms, which are frequently regarded as evidence of frequency-dependent selection, could be explained simply by structural variation in the genome.

  10. Moss Phylogeny Reconstruction Using Nucleotide Pangenome of Complete Mitogenome Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryunov, D V; Nagaev, B E; Nikolaev, M Yu; Alexeevski, A V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    Stability of composition and sequence of genes was shown earlier in 13 mitochondrial genomes of mosses (Rensing, S. A., et al. (2008) Science, 319, 64-69). It is of interest to study the evolution of mitochondrial genomes not only at the gene level, but also on the level of nucleotide sequences. To do this, we have constructed a "nucleotide pangenome" for mitochondrial genomes of 24 moss species. The nucleotide pangenome is a set of aligned nucleotide sequences of orthologous genome fragments covering the totality of all genomes. The nucleotide pangenome was constructed using specially developed new software, NPG-explorer (NPGe). The stable part of the mitochondrial genome (232 stable blocks) is shown to be, on average, 45% of its length. In the joint alignment of stable blocks, 82% of positions are conserved. The phylogenetic tree constructed with the NPGe program is in good correlation with other phylogenetic reconstructions. With the NPGe program, 30 blocks have been identified with repeats no shorter than 50 bp. The maximal length of a block with repeats is 140 bp. Duplications in the mitochondrial genomes of mosses are rare. On average, the genome contains about 500 bp in large duplications. The total length of insertions and deletions was determined in each genome. The losses and gains of DNA regions are rather active in mitochondrial genomes of mosses, and such rearrangements presumably can be used as additional markers in the reconstruction of phylogeny.

  11. Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms of NADPH oxidase p22phox gene and ischemic stroke in Shanghai Han population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei XU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective This paper aims to investigate the distribution of genotypes and alleles of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase p22phox -930A/G, 242C/T and -675A/T, so as to evaluate the association between three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and risk of atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in permanent resident population of Han nationality living in Shanghai area. Methods The genotypes and allele frequencies of NADPH oxidase p22phox subunit -930A/G, 242C/T and -675A/T were detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in 205 patients with ischemic stroke and 136 healthy controls. Results In patients with ischemic stroke, the results of PCR-RFLP in variant genetic loci were different. For -930A/G, one band appeared at 268 bp of genotype AA; 2 bands appeared at 197 and 71 bp of genotype GG; 3 bands appeared at 268, 197 and 71 bp of genotype AG. For 242C/T, one band appeared at 348 bp of genotype CC; 2 bands appeared at 188 and 160 bp of genotype TT; 3 bands appeared at 348, 188 and 160 bp of genotype CT. For -675A/T, 2 bands appeared at 158 and 54 bp of genotype TT; 3 bands appeared at 212, 158 and 54 bp of genotype AT. The genotypes and allele frequency of all three SNPs of NADPH oxidase p22phox gene had no significant difference between ischemic stroke patients and healthy controls (P > 0.05. Conclusions The genetic polymorphism of NADPH oxidase p22phox gene -930A/G, 242C/T and -675A/T might have no association with ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.09.011

  12. Palladium-Catalyzed Modification of Unprotected Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin H. Shaughnessy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  13. Compositions and methods for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-11-22

    Described herein are nucleic acid based probes and methods for discriminating and detecting single nucleotide variants in nucleic acid molecules (e.g., DNA). The methods include use of a pair of probes can be used to detect and identify polymorphisms, for example single nucleotide polymorphism in DNA. The pair of probes emit a different fluorescent wavelength of light depending on the association and alignment of the probes when hybridized to a target nucleic acid molecule. Each pair of probes is capable of discriminating at least two different nucleic acid molecules that differ by at least a single nucleotide difference. The methods can probes can be used, for example, for detection of DNA polymorphisms that are indicative of a particular disease or condition.

  14. Dynamics of Charge Transfer in Ordered and Chaotic Nucleotide Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Fialko, N S

    2013-01-01

    Charge transfer is considered in systems composed of a donor, an acceptor and bridge sites of (AT) nucleotide pairs. For a bridge consisting of 180 (AT) pairs, three cases are dealt with: a uniform case, when all the nucleotides in each strand are identical; an ordered case, when nucleotides in each DNA strand are arranged in an orderly fashion; a chaotic case, when (AT) and (TA) pairs are arranged randomly. It is shown that in all the cases a charge transfer from a donor to an acceptor can take place. All other factors being equal, the transfer is the most efficient in the uniform case, the ordered and chaotic cases are less and the least efficient, accordingly. The results obtained are in agreement with experimental data on long-range charge transfer in DNA.

  15. Extracellular nucleotide derivatives protect cardiomyctes against hypoxic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golan, O; Issan, Y; Isak, A

    2011-01-01

    in cardioprotection against hypoxic stress has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and nucleosides in protective effects in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia. METHODS AND RESULTS: Rat cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with various extracellular nucleotides...... and nucleosides, before or during hypoxic stress. The results revealed that GTP or CTP exhibit cardioprotective ability, as revealed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, by propidium iodide (PI) staining, by cell morphology, and by preserved mitochondrial activity. Pretreatment with various P2 antagonists...... (suramin, RB-2, or PPADS) did not abolish the cardioprotective effect of the nucleotides. Moreover, P2Y₂ -/- , P2Y₄ -/-, and P2Y₂ -/-/P2Y₄ -/- receptor knockouts mouse cardiomyocytes were significantly protected against hypoxic stress when treated with UTP. These results indicate that the protective effect...

  16. Effect of nucleotides on broiler performance and carcass yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VC Pelícia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the effect of nucleotides on the performance and carcass yield of broilers fed diets with no antibiotic growth promoters (AGP, anticoccidials, or animal feedstuffs. In the trial, 600 Ross 308 male broilers were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design into six treatments with four replicates of 25 birds each. Treatments consisted of a control diet (CD, CD + AGP, CD + 0.04%, CD + 0.05%, CD + 0.06%, and CD + 0.07% nucleotides. The experimental diets did not contain anticoccidials, and birds were vaccinated against coccidiosis at three days of age. No significant differences were detected among broilers submitted to the different treatments in none of the studied parameters. Under the conditions of this experiment, diets supplemented with nucleotides did not influence broiler performance or carcass yield at 42 days of age, and were not different from the feeds not containing any additive or with AGP.

  17. Fixed-gap tunnel junction for reading DNA nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Pei; Ashcroft, Brian Alan; Song, Weisi; Zhang, Peiming; Biswas, Sovan; Qing, Quan; Yang, Jialing; Nemanich, Robert J; Bai, Jingwei; Smith, Joshua T; Reuter, Kathleen; Balagurusamy, Venkat S K; Astier, Yann; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-12-23

    Previous measurements of the electronic conductance of DNA nucleotides or amino acids have used tunnel junctions in which the gap is mechanically adjusted, such as scanning tunneling microscopes or mechanically controllable break junctions. Fixed-junction devices have, at best, detected the passage of whole DNA molecules without yielding chemical information. Here, we report on a layered tunnel junction in which the tunnel gap is defined by a dielectric layer, deposited by atomic layer deposition. Reactive ion etching is used to drill a hole through the layers so that the tunnel junction can be exposed to molecules in solution. When the metal electrodes are functionalized with recognition molecules that capture DNA nucleotides via hydrogen bonds, the identities of the individual nucleotides are revealed by characteristic features of the fluctuating tunnel current associated with single-molecule binding events.

  18. Nucleotide frequencies in human genome and fibonacci numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Michel E Beleza; Shimabukuro, Alex Itiro

    2008-04-01

    This work presents a mathematical model that establishes an interesting connection between nucleotide frequencies in human single-stranded DNA and the famous Fibonacci's numbers. The model relies on two assumptions. First, Chargaff's second parity rule should be valid, and second, the nucleotide frequencies should approach limit values when the number of bases is sufficiently large. Under these two hypotheses, it is possible to predict the human nucleotide frequencies with accuracy. This result may be used as evidence to the Fibonacci string model that was proposed to the sequence growth of DNA repetitive sequences. It is noteworthy that the predicted values are solutions of an optimization problem, which is commonplace in many of nature's phenomena.

  19. A comparative cluster analysis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase histochemistry in the brains of amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Claudia; Rastogi, Rakesh K; Scandurra, Anna; Jadhao, Arun G; Aria, Massimo; D'Aniello, Biagio

    2014-09-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of the gaseous neurotransmitter nitric oxide. We compare the distribution of NADPH-d in the brain of four species of hylid frogs. NADPH-d-positive fibers are present throughout much of the brain, whereas stained cell groups are distributed in well-defined regions. Whereas most brain areas consistently show positive neurons in all species, in some areas species-specific differences occur. We analyzed our data and those available for other amphibian species to build a matrix on NADPH-d brain distribution for a multivariate analysis. Brain dissimilarities were quantified by using the Jaccard index in a hierarchical clustering procedure. The whole brain dendrogram was compared with that of its main subdivisions by applying the Fowlkes-Mallows index for dendrogram similarity, followed by bootstrap replications and a permutation test. Despite the differences in the distribution map of the NADPH-d system among species, cluster analysis of data from the whole brain and hindbrain faithfully reflected the evolutionary history (framework) of amphibians. Dendrograms from the secondary prosencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, and isthmus showed some deviation from the main scheme. Thus, the present analysis supports the major evolutionary stability of the hindbrain. We provide evidence that the NADPH-d system in main brain subdivisions should be cautiously approached for comparative purposes because specific adaptations of a single species could occur and may affect the NADPH-d distribution pattern in a brain subdivision. The minor differences in staining pattern of particular subdivisions apparently do not affect the general patterns of staining across species. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A QM/QTAIM microstructural analysis of the tautomerisationviathe DPT of the hypoxanthine·adenine nucleobase pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Zhurakivsky, Roman O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-08-01

    We provide a pathway for the tautomerisation of the biologically important hypoxanthine.adenine (Hyp.Ade) nucleobase pair (Cs) formed by the keto tautomer of the Hyp and the amino tautomer of the Ade into the Hyp*.Ade* base pair (Cs) formed by the enol tautomer of the Hyp and the imino tautomer of the Ade by applying quantum-mechanical calculations and Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis. It was found out that the dipole active Hyp.Ade↔Hyp*.Ade* tautomerisation occurs via the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT) through the TSHyp.Ade↔Hyp*.Ade* (Cs). Based on the sweeps of the energies of the intermolecular H-bonds along the intrinsic reaction coordinate, it was established that the N6H...O6 H-bond (5.40) is cooperative with the N1H...N1 H-bond (6.99) in the Hyp.Ade base pair, as well as the O6H...N6 H-bond (11.50) is cooperative with the N1H...N1 H-bond (7.28 kcal.mol-1) in the Hyp*.Ade* base pair, mutually strengthening each other. The Hyp*.Ade* base pair possesses an extremely short lifetime 2.68.10-14 s, which is predetermined by the negative value of the Gibbs free energy of the reverse barrier of its tautomerisation, and all of the six low-frequency intermolecular vibrations cannot develop during this period of time. Consequently, the Hyp.Ade→Hyp*.Ade* DPT tautomerisation cannot serve as a source of the rare tautomers of the bases.

  1. Induction of ischemic tolerance in rat liver via reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase in Kupffer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the mechanisms of hepatocyte preconditioning by H2O2 to better understand the pathophysiology of ischemic preconditioning.METHODS: The in vitro effect of H2O2 pretreatment was investigated in rat isolated hepatocytes subjected to anoxia/reoxygenation. Cell viability was assessed with propidium iodide fluorometry. In other experiments, rat livers were excised and subjected to warm ischemia/reperfusion in an isolated perfused liver system to determine leakage of liver enzymes. Preconditioning was performed by H2O2 perfusion, or by stopping the perfusion for 10 min followed by 10 min of reperfusion.To inhibit Kupffer cell function or reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase,gadolinium chloride was injected prior to liver excision, or diphenyleneiodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, was added to the perfusate, respectively. Histological detection of o~gen radical formation in Kupffer cells was performed by perfusion with nitro blue tetrazolium.RESULTS: Anoxia/reoxygenation decreased hepatocyte viability compared to the controls. Pretreatment with H2O2 did not improve such hepatocyte injury. In liver perfusion experiments, however, H2O2 preconditioning reduced warm ischemia/reperfusion injury, which was reversed by inhibition of Kupffer cell function or NADPH oxidase. Histological examination revealed that H2O2 preconditioning induced oxygen radical formation in Kupffer cells. NADPH oxidase inhibition also reversed hepatoprotection by ischemic preconditioning.CONCLUSION: H2O2 preconditioning protects hepatocytes against warm ischemia/reperfusion injury via NADPH oxidase in Kupffer cells, and not directly. NADPH oxidase also mediates hepatoprotection by ischemic preconditioning.

  2. Association of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase p22phox gene 549C>T polymorphism with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tong-tao; WANG Li-li; FANG Sheng-xia; JIA Chong-qi

    2012-01-01

    Background The p22phox is a critical component of the superoxide-generating vascular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase.Several polymorphisms in p22phox gene are studied for their association with cardiovascular diseases.However,no publication is available to assess the relation of 549C>T polymorphism in p22phox gene to coronary artery disease (CAD) risk.This study was to investigate the effect of the p22phox gene 549C>T polymorphism on CAD risk.Methods Hospital-based case-control study was conducted with 297 CAD patients and 343 healthy persons as the control group.Polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing using PSQ 96 MA Pyrosequencer (Biotage AB) were used to detect the polymorphisms.Multiple Logistic regression model was used to adjust the potential confounders and to estimate odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (Cls).Results The observed genotype frequencies of this polymorphism obeyed the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both cases (P=0.439) and controls (P=0.668).The frequency of mutant genotypes (TT+CT) in cases (41.08%) was higher than that in controls (36.73%) with an OR=-1.20 (95% CI=0.87-1.65).After the adjustment of the potential confounders,there was a significant association of the mutant genotypes with increased risk of CAD (OR=1.57,95% CI=1.01-2.46,P=0.047).Conclusions The mutant genotypes of the p22phox gene 549C>T polymorphism had a significant effect on the increased risk of CAD in this studied population.

  3. MAC: identifying and correcting annotation for multi-nucleotide variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Liu, Lu T; Conroy, Jacob R; Hu, Qiang; Conroy, Jeffrey M; Morrison, Carl D; Johnson, Candace S; Wang, Jianmin; Liu, Song

    2015-08-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have rapidly advanced our understanding of human variation in cancer. To accurately translate the raw sequencing data into practical knowledge, annotation tools, algorithms and pipelines must be developed that keep pace with the rapidly evolving technology. Currently, a challenge exists in accurately annotating multi-nucleotide variants (MNVs). These tandem substitutions, when affecting multiple nucleotides within a single protein codon of a gene, result in a translated amino acid involving all nucleotides in that codon. Most existing variant callers report a MNV as individual single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), often resulting in multiple triplet codon sequences and incorrect amino acid predictions. To correct potentially misannotated MNVs among reported SNVs, a primary challenge resides in haplotype phasing which is to determine whether the neighboring SNVs are co-located on the same chromosome. Here we describe MAC (Multi-Nucleotide Variant Annotation Corrector), an integrative pipeline developed to correct potentially mis-annotated MNVs. MAC was designed as an application that only requires a SNV file and the matching BAM file as data inputs. Using an example data set containing 3024 SNVs and the corresponding whole-genome sequencing BAM files, we show that MAC identified eight potentially mis-annotated SNVs, and accurately updated the amino acid predictions for seven of the variant calls. MAC can identify and correct amino acid predictions that result from MNVs affecting multiple nucleotides within a single protein codon, which cannot be handled by most existing SNV-based variant pipelines. The MAC software is freely available and represents a useful tool for the accurate translation of genomic sequence to protein function.

  4. Fluorescence chemosensors with pyrene and their interaction with nucleotide phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华平; 汪鹏飞; 吴世康

    1999-01-01

    A group of fluorescence chemosensor with pyrene, compounds (Ⅰ), (Ⅱ) and (Ⅲ), were synthesized The fluorescence spectra and the lifetime of these compounds were carefully measured. The fluorescence quenching spec tra of pyrenyl butyric acid, compounds (Ⅰ), (Ⅱ) and (Ⅲ) by different nucleotide phosphates, AMP ADP, ATP dTTP, were also recorded and studied. The quenching and the stability constants were calculated by Stern-Volmer equa tion and eq. (2), respectively. The mechanism of interaction between fluorescence chemosensor and nucleotide phos phate was didscussed based on the comparison of the results obtained with the CPK model of free molecules of these com pounds in the ground state.

  5. Effect of nucleotides on broiler performance and carcass yield

    OpenAIRE

    VC Pelícia; JR Sartori; KC Zavarize; AC Pezzato; AC Stradiotti; PC Araujo; MAO Mituo; LA Madeira

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of nucleotides on the performance and carcass yield of broilers fed diets with no antibiotic growth promoters (AGP), anticoccidials, or animal feedstuffs. In the trial, 600 Ross 308 male broilers were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design into six treatments with four replicates of 25 birds each. Treatments consisted of a control diet (CD), CD + AGP, CD + 0.04%, CD + 0.05%, CD + 0.06%, and CD + 0.07% nucleotides. The experimental ...

  6. Role of a GAG hinge in the nucleotide-induced conformational change governing nucleotide specificity by T7 DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhinan; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2011-01-14

    A nucleotide-induced change in DNA polymerase structure governs the kinetics of polymerization by high fidelity DNA polymerases. Mutation of a GAG hinge (G542A/G544A) in T7 DNA polymerase resulted in a 1000-fold slower rate of conformational change, which then limited the rate of correct nucleotide incorporation. Rates of misincorporation were comparable to that seen for wild-type enzyme so that the net effect of the mutation was a large decrease in fidelity. We demonstrate that a presumably modest change from glycine to alanine 20 Å from the active site can severely restrict the flexibility of the enzyme structure needed to recognize and incorporate correct substrates with high specificity. These results emphasize the importance of the substrate-induced conformational change in governing nucleotide selectivity by accelerating the incorporation of correct base pairs but not mismatches.

  7. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-01

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  8. Nucleotide excision repair: ERCC1 and TFIIH complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Vuuren (Hanneke)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractDNA is the carrier of genetic information in living organisms. The information stored in the nucleotide sequence of DNA is transmitted to the offspring by generating identical copies of the parental DNA molecules. Damage in DNA can cause loss of genetic information. Nevertheless, the DNA

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with rat expressed sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, Victor; Berezikov, Eugene; Malik, Rainer; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Cuppen, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation in populations and are thus most likely to account for the majority of phenotypic and behavioral differences between individuals or strains. Although the rat is extensively studied for the latter, data on naturall

  10. Nucleotide excision repair syndromes: molecular basis and clinical symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); G. Weeda (Geert); W. Vermeulen (Wim); H. van Vuuren; C. Troelstra (Christine); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P.J. van der Spek (Peter)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe phenotypic consequences of a nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect in man are apparent from three distinct inborn diseases characterized by hypersensitivity of the skin to ultraviolet light and a remarkable clinical and genetic heterogeneity. These are the prototype repair

  11. Nucleotide Sequence of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus Anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-02

    Montie, S. Kadis, and S. I. Ajl (ed.), Microbial toxins, vol. 3. Academic Press, Inc., New York. 23. Little, S. F., and G. B. Knudaon. 1986...Takkinen, and L. Kaariainen. 1981. Nucleotide sequence of the promoter and NHa-terminal signal peptide region of the a- amylase gene from Bacillus

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphism in genome-wide association of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohd Fareed

    2012-09-25

    Sep 25, 2012 ... The arrival of new technologies that type more than millions of the single nucleotide polymor- .... and quality control now permit affordable, reliable genotyping of up to 1 million ... disease. Such pooled studies, like all genetic association stud- .... to researchers interested in evolutionary biology, and hence.

  13. Environmental heat stress, hyperammonemia and nucleotide metabolism during intermittent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Peter; Drust, Barry

    2006-01-01

    Abstract  This study investigated the influence of environmental heat stress on ammonia (NH3) accumulation in relation to nucleotide metabolism and fatigue during intermittent exercise. Eight males performed 40 min of intermittent exercise (15 s at 306±22 W alternating with 15 s of unloaded cycli...

  14. Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... 3Technical Center for Inspection and Quarantine, Beijing Entry-Exit Inspection ... differentiation related to geographical distribution in C. japonica ... gene sequences of C. japonica in China to assess nucleotide ... Map of China with locations from which Caligula japonica was sampled indicated a black dot.

  15. THE NUCLEOTIDE RECEPTORS ON MOUSE C2C12 MYOTUBES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENNING, RH; NELEMANS, A; VANDENAKKER, J; DENHERTOG, A

    1992-01-01

    1 The response of C2C12 mouse myotubes to stimulation with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and other nucleotides was studied by measuring changes in membrane potential. 2 A transient hyperpolarization followed by a slowly declining depolarization of the cells was observed in the presence of ATP (10-mu-

  16. Increased nucleotide diversity with transient Y linkage in Drosophila americana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant F McAllister

    Full Text Available Recombination shapes nucleotide variation within genomes. Patterns are thought to arise from the local recombination landscape, influencing the degree to which neutral variation experiences hitchhiking with selected variation. This study examines DNA polymorphism along Chromosome 4 (element B of Drosophila americana to identify effects of hitchhiking arising as a consequence of Y-linked transmission. A centromeric fusion between the X and 4(th chromosomes segregates in natural populations of D. americana. Frequency of the X-4 fusion exhibits a strong positive correlation with latitude, which has explicit consequences for unfused 4(th chromosomes. Unfused Chromosome 4 exists as a non-recombining Y chromosome or as an autosome proportional to the frequency of the X-4 fusion. Furthermore, Y linkage along the unfused 4 is disrupted as a function of the rate of recombination with the centromere. Inter-population and intra-chromosomal patterns of nucleotide diversity were assayed using six regions distributed along unfused 4(th chromosomes derived from populations with different frequencies of the X-4 fusion. No difference in overall level of nucleotide diversity was detected among populations, yet variation along the chromosome exhibits a distinct pattern in relation to the X-4 fusion. Sequence diversity is inflated at loci experiencing the strongest Y linkage. These findings are inconsistent with the expected reduction in nucleotide diversity resulting from hitchhiking due to background selection or selective sweeps. In contrast, excessive polymorphism is accruing in association with transient Y linkage, and furthermore, hitchhiking with sexually antagonistic alleles is potentially responsible.

  17. Nucleotide excision repair of DNA: The very early history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2011-07-15

    This article, taken largely from the book Correcting the Blueprint of Life: An Historical Account of the Discovery of DNA Repair Mechanisms, summarizes the very early history of the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes from soybean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, O; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Jensen, E O

    1982-01-01

    We present the complete nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes isolated from soybean DNA. Both genes contain three intervening sequences in identical positions. Comparison of the coding sequences with known amino-acid sequences of soybean leghemoglobins suggest that the two genes...

  19. [Tabular excel editor for analysis of aligned nucleotide sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkin, V V

    2010-01-01

    Excel platform was used for transition of results of multiple aligned nucleotide sequences obtained using the BLAST network service to the form appropriate for visual analysis and editing. Two macros operators for MS Excel 2007 were constructed. The array of aligned sequences transformed into Excel table and processed using macros operators is more appropriate for analysis than initial html data.

  20. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Predict Symptom Severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yun; Chen, Rong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Lu; Chu, Kangkang; Lu, Zuhong; Herskovits, Edward H.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is widely believed to be a heterogeneous disorder; diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical criteria, although genetic, as well as environmental, influences are thought to be prominent factors in the etiology of most forms of autism. Our goal is to determine whether a predictive model based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)…

  1. THE NUCLEOTIDE RECEPTORS ON MOUSE C2C12 MYOTUBES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENNING, RH; NELEMANS, A; VANDENAKKER, J; DENHERTOG, A

    1 The response of C2C12 mouse myotubes to stimulation with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and other nucleotides was studied by measuring changes in membrane potential. 2 A transient hyperpolarization followed by a slowly declining depolarization of the cells was observed in the presence of ATP

  2. Synthesis, bioanalysis and pharmacology of nucleoside and nucleotide analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs are an important class of drugs in anticancer and antiviral therapy. The compounds are, however, only active after intracellular conversion to their mono-, di- and triphosphate nucleotide form. In this thesis the development of sensitive liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mas

  3. DNA Nucleotides Detection via capacitance properties of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadempar, Nahid; Berahman, Masoud; Yazdanpanah, Arash

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper a new method is suggested to detect the DNA nucleotides on a first-principles calculation of the electronic features of DNA bases which chemisorbed to a graphene sheet placed between two gold electrodes in a contact-channel-contact system. The capacitance properties of graphene in the channel are surveyed using non-equilibrium Green's function coupled with the Density Functional Theory. Thus, the capacitance properties of graphene are theoretically investigated in a biological environment, and, using a novel method, the effect of the chemisorbed DNA nucleotides on electrical charges on the surface of graphene is deciphered. Several parameters in this method are also extracted including Electrostatic energy, Induced density, induced electrostatic potential, Electron difference potential and Electron difference density. The qualitative and quantitative differences among these parameters can be used to identify DNA nucleotides. Some of the advantages of this approach include its ease and high accuracy. What distinguishes the current research is that it is the first experiment to investigate the capacitance properties of gaphene changes in the biological environment and the effect of chemisorbed DNA nucleotides on the surface of graphene on the charge.

  4. A Laboratory Exercise for Genotyping Two Human Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, James; Carlson, Bradley; LeBard, Timothy; McCarthy, Michael; Umali, Finianne; Ashton, Bryce; Rose, Ferrill F., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic decrease in the cost of sequencing a human genome is leading to an era in which a wide range of students will benefit from having an understanding of human genetic variation. Since over 90% of sequence variation between humans is in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a laboratory exercise has been devised in order to…

  5. Mining for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Pig genome sequence data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, H.H.D.; Kollers, S.; Kommandath, A.; Rosario, del M.; Dibbits, B.W.; Kinders, S.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are ideal genetic markers due to their high abundance and the highly automated way in which SNPs are detected and SNP assays are performed. The number of SNPs identified in the pig thus far is still limited. Results - A total of 4.8 million whole g

  6. De novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis mainly occurs outside of plastids, but a previously undiscovered nucleobase importer provides substrates for the essential salvage pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, Sandra; Jung, Benjamin; Fürst, Sarah; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2012-04-01

    Nucleotide de novo synthesis is highly conserved among organisms and represents an essential biochemical pathway. In plants, the two initial enzymatic reactions of de novo pyrimidine synthesis occur in the plastids. By use of green fluorescent protein fusions, clear support is provided for a localization of the remaining reactions in the cytosol and mitochondria. This implies that carbamoyl aspartate, an intermediate of this pathway, must be exported and precursors of pyrimidine salvage (i.e., nucleobases or nucleosides) are imported into plastids. A corresponding uracil transport activity could be measured in intact plastids isolated from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) buds. PLUTO (for plastidic nucleobase transporter) was identified as a member of the Nucleobase:Cation-Symporter1 protein family from Arabidopsis thaliana, capable of transporting purine and pyrimidine nucleobases. A PLUTO green fluorescent protein fusion was shown to reside in the plastid envelope after expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Heterologous expression of PLUTO in an Escherichia coli mutant lacking the bacterial uracil permease uraA allowed a detailed biochemical characterization. PLUTO transports uracil, adenine, and guanine with apparent affinities of 16.4, 0.4, and 6.3 μM, respectively. Transport was markedly inhibited by low concentrations of a proton uncoupler, indicating that PLUTO functions as a proton-substrate symporter. Thus, a protein for the absolutely required import of pyrimidine nucleobases into plastids was identified.

  7. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  8. Global regulation of nucleotide biosynthetic genes by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chun Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The c-Myc transcription factor is a master regulator and integrates cell proliferation, cell growth and metabolism through activating thousands of target genes. Our identification of direct c-Myc target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP coupled with pair-end ditag sequencing analysis (ChIP-PET revealed that nucleotide metabolic genes are enriched among c-Myc targets, but the role of Myc in regulating nucleotide metabolic genes has not been comprehensively delineated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that the majority of genes in human purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway were induced and directly bound by c-Myc in the P493-6 human Burkitt's lymphoma model cell line. The majority of these genes were also responsive to the ligand-activated Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein, Myc-ER, in a Myc null rat fibroblast cell line, HO.15 MYC-ER. Furthermore, these targets are also responsive to Myc activation in transgenic mouse livers in vivo. To determine the functional significance of c-Myc regulation of nucleotide metabolism, we sought to determine the effect of loss of function of direct Myc targets inosine monophosphate dehydrogenases (IMPDH1 and IMPDH2 on c-Myc-induced cell growth and proliferation. In this regard, we used a specific IMPDH inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA and found that MPA dramatically inhibits c-Myc-induced P493-6 cell proliferation through S-phase arrest and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results demonstrate the direct induction of nucleotide metabolic genes by c-Myc in multiple systems. Our finding of an S-phase arrest in cells with diminished IMPDH activity suggests that nucleotide pool balance is essential for c-Myc's orchestration of DNA replication, such that uncoupling of these two processes create DNA replication stress and apoptosis.

  9. Can an Excess Electron Localise on a Purine Moiety in the Adenine-thymine Watson-Crick Base Pair? A Computational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurkiewicz, Kamil; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Rak, Janusz

    2007-04-17

    The electron affinity and the propensity to electron-induced proton transfer (PT) of hydrogen-bonded complexes between the Watson–Crick adenine–thymine pair (AT) and simple organic acid (HX), attached to adenine in the Hoogsteen-type configuration, were studied at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level. Although the carboxyl group is deprotonated at physiological pH, its neutral form, COOH, resembles the peptide bond or the amide fragment in the side chain of asparagine (Asn) or glutamine (Gln). Thus, these complexes mimic the interaction between the DNA environment (e.g., proteins) and nucleobase pairs incorporated in the biopolymer. Electron attachment is thermodynamically feasible and adiabatic electron affinities range from 0.41 to 1.28 eV, while the vertical detachment energies of the resulting anions span the range of 0.39 –2.88 eV. Low-energy activation barriers separate the anionic minima: aHX(AT) from the more stable single-PT anionic geometry, aHX(AT)-SPT, and aHX(AT)-SPT from the double-PT anionic geometry, aHX(AT)-DPT. Interaction between the adenine of the Watson–Crick AT base pair with an acidic proton donor probably counterbalances the larger EA of isolated thymine, as SOMO is almost evenly delocalized over both types of nucleic bases in the aHX(AT) anions. Moreover, as a result of PT the excess electron localizes entirely on adenine. Thus, in DNA interacting with its physiological environment, damage induced by low-energy electrons could begin, contrary to the current view, with the formation of purine anions, which are not formed in isolated DNA because of the greater stability of anionic pyrimidines.

  10. New Dihydro OO'Bis(Salicylidene 2,2' Aminobenzothiazolyl Borate Complexes: Kinetic and Voltammetric Studies of Dimethyltin Copper Complex with Guanine, Adenine, and Calf Thymus DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The newly synthesized ligand, dihydro OO'bis(salicylidene 2,2' aminobenzothiazolyl borate (2, was derived from the reaction of Schiff base of 2-aminobenzothiazole and salicylaldehyde with KBH 4 . Cu II (3 and Zn II (4 complexes of (2 were synthesized and further metallated with dimethyltindichloride to yield heterobimetallic complexes (5 and (6. All complexes have been thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, and IR, NMR, EPR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy and conductance measurements. The spectroscopic data support square planar environment around the Cu II atom, while the Sn IV atom acquires pentacoordinate geometry. The interaction of complex (5 with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA was studied by spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and kinetic methods. The absorption spectra of complex (5 exhibit a remarkable "hyperchromic effect" in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA. Indicative of strong binding of the complex to calf thymus DNA preferentially binds through N 7 position of guanine base, while the adenine shows binding to a lesser extent. The kinetic data were obtained from the rate constants, k obs , values under pseudo-first-order conditions. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to study the interaction of complex (5 with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA. The CV of complex (5 in the absence and in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA altered drastically, with a positive shift in formal peak potential E pa and E pc values and a significant increase in peak current. The positive shift in formal potentials with increase in peak current favours strong interaction of complex (5 with calf thymus DNA. The net shift in E 1/2 has been used to estimate the ratio of equilibrium constants for the binding of Cu(II and Cu(I complexes to calf thymus DNA.

  11. New Dihydro OO'Bis(Salicylidene) 2,2' Aminobenzothiazolyl Borate Complexes: Kinetic and Voltammetric Studies of Dimethyltin Copper Complex with Guanine, Adenine, and Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Farukh; Mohani, Bhawana; Parveen, Shamima

    2006-01-01

    The newly synthesized ligand, dihydro OO'bis(salicylidene) 2,2' aminobenzothiazolyl borate (2), was derived from the reaction of Schiff base of 2-aminobenzothiazole and salicylaldehyde with KBH(4). Cu(II) (3) and Zn(II) (4) complexes of (2) were synthesized and further metallated with dimethyltindichloride to yield heterobimetallic complexes (5) and (6). All complexes have been thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, and IR, NMR, EPR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy and conductance measurements. The spectroscopic data support square planar environment around the Cu(II) atom, while the Sn(IV) atom acquires pentacoordinate geometry. The interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA was studied by spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and kinetic methods. The absorption spectra of complex (5) exhibit a remarkable "hyperchromic effect" in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA. Indicative of strong binding of the complex to calf thymus DNA preferentially binds through N(7) position of guanine base, while the adenine shows binding to a lesser extent. The kinetic data were obtained from the rate constants, k(obs), values under pseudo-first-order conditions. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to study the interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA. The CV of complex (5) in the absence and in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA altered drastically, with a positive shift in formal peak potential E(pa) and E(pc) values and a significant increase in peak current. The positive shift in formal potentials with increase in peak current favours strong interaction of complex (5) with calf thymus DNA. The net shift in E(1/2) has been used to estimate the ratio of equilibrium constants for the binding of Cu(II) and Cu(I) complexes to calf thymus DNA.

  12. Degradation of Adenine on the Martian Surface in the Presence of Perchlorates and Ionizing Radiation: A Reflectron Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góbi, Sándor; Bergantini, Alexandre; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to unravel the radiolytic decomposition of adenine (C5H5N5) under conditions relevant to the Martian surface. Being the fundamental building block of (deoxy)ribonucleic acids, the possibility of survival of this biomolecule on the Martian surface is of primary importance to the astrobiology community. Here, neat adenine and adenine–magnesium perchlorate mixtures were prepared and irradiated with energetic electrons that simulate the secondary electrons originating from the interaction of the galactic cosmic rays with the Martian surface. Perchlorates were added to the samples since they are abundant—and therefore relevant oxidizers on the surface of Mars—and they have been previously shown to facilitate the radiolysis of organics such as glycine. The degradation of the samples were monitored in situ via Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy and the electron ionization quadruple mass spectrometric method; temperature-programmed desorption profiles were then collected by means of the state-of-the-art single photon photoionization reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-ReTOF-MS), allowing for the detection of the species subliming from the sample. The results showed that perchlorates do increase the destruction rate of adenine by opening alternative reaction channels, including the concurrent radiolysis/oxidation of the sample. This new pathway provides a plethora of different radiolysis products that were identified for the first time. These are carbon dioxide (CO2), isocyanic acid (HNCO), isocyanate (OCN‑), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen monoxide (NO); an oxidation product containing carbonyl groups (R1R2–C=O) with a constrained five-membered cyclic structure could also be observed. Cyanamide (H2N–C≡N) was detected in both irradiated samples as well.

  13. Catalytic activity of iron hexacyanoosmate(II) towards hydrogen peroxide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and its use in amperometric biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzian, Petr; Janku, Tereza [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Pardubice, Nam. Cs. Legii 565, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Kalcher, Kurt [Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Karl-Franzens University, Universitaetsplatz 1, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vytras, Karel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Pardubice, Nam. Cs. Legii 565, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic)], E-mail: karel.vytras@upce.cz

    2007-09-19

    Hydrogen peroxide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) may be determined amperometrically using screen-printed electrodes chemically modified with iron(III) hexacyanoosmate(II) (Osmium purple) in flow injection analysis (FIA). The determination is based on the exploitation of catalytic currents resulting from the oxidation/reduction of the modifier. The performance of the sensor was characterized and optimized by controlling several operational parameters (applied potential, pH and flow rate of the phosphate buffer). Comparison has been made with analogous complexes of ruthenium (Ruthenium purple) and iron (Prussian blue). Taking into account the sensitivity and stability of corresponding sensors, the best results were obtained with the use of Osmium purple. The sensor exhibited a linear increase of the amperometric signal with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 0.1-100 mg L{sup -1} with a detection limit (evaluated as 3{sigma}) of 0.024 mg L{sup -1} with a R.S.D. 1.5% for 10 mg L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under optimized flow rate of 0.4 mL min{sup -1} in 0.1 M phosphate buffer carrier (pH 6) and a working potential of +0.15 V versus Ag/AgCl. Afterwards, a biological recognition element - either glucose oxidase or ethanol dehydrogenase - was incorporated to achieve a sensor facilitating the determination of glucose or ethanol, respectively. The glucose sensor gave linearity between current and concentration in the range from 1 to 250 mg L{sup -1} with a R.S.D. 2.4% for 100 mg L{sup -1} glucose, detection limit 0.02 mg L{sup -1} (3{sigma}) and retained its original activity after 3 weeks when stored at 6 deg. C. Optimal parameters in the determination of ethanol were selected as: applied potential +0.45 V versus Ag/AgCl, flow rate 0.2 mL min{sup -1} in 0.1 M phosphate buffer carrier (pH 7). Different structural designs of the ethanol sensor were tested and linearity obtained was up to 1000 mg L{sup -1} with a maximum R.S.D. of 5

  14. High negative ion production yield in 30 keV F{sup 2+} + adenine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, B; Ma, X; Zhu, X L; Zhang, S F; Liu, H P; Feng, W T; Qian, D B; Zhang, D C [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen, L; Bredy, R; Montagne, G; Bernard, J; Martin, S [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France) and Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne; CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France)], E-mail: chen@univ-lyon1.fr

    2009-04-14

    In collisions between slow F{sup 2+} ions (30 keV) and molecular targets, adenine, scattered particle production yields have been measured directly by simultaneous detection of neutrals, positive and negative ions. The relative cross-section for a negative ion formation channel was measured to be 1%. Despite a slight decrease compared to a larger target, the fullerene C{sub 60}, the measured negative ion formation cross section is still at least one order of magnitude larger than the yield in ion-atom interactions.

  15. Changes of collagen and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in human cancerous and normal prostate tissues studied using native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Tang, Guichen; Alfano, Robert R.

    2010-07-01

    The fluorescence spectra of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues obtained by the selective excitation wavelength of 340 nm were measured. The contributions of principle biochemical components to tissue fluorescence spectra were investigated using the method of multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares. The results show that there is a reduced contribution from the emission of collagen and increased contribution from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in cancerous tissues as compared with normal tissue. This difference is attributed to the changes of relative contents of NADH and collagen during cancer development. This research may present a potential native biomarker for prostate cancer detection.

  16. XRD and optical microscopic studies of Co(III) complexes containing 5-cyano-6-(4-pyridyl)-2-thiouracil, thymine and adenine bases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lallan Mishra; Brajesh Pathak; R K Mandal

    2001-06-01

    Multifunctional ligand 5-cyano-6-(-4-pyridyl)-2-thiouracil (L) was prepared and allowed to react with trans [Co(en)2Cl2]+Cl– resulting into [Co(en)2LCl]2+.2Cl– which upon further reaction with equimolar ratio of ligand [L] gave the complex [Co(en)2L2]3+.3Cl–. These metal complexes were then separately reacted with thymine and adenine bases. Complexes thus prepared after characterization by their elemental analysis, FAB mass and spectral (IR, 1HNMR, UV-visible) data were studied for their powder X-ray diffraction and optical microscopic characteristics.

  17. Characterization of 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-Hydroxylase (HpaB) of Escherichia coli as a Reduced Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Utilizing Monooxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase (HpaB and HpaC) of Escherichia coli W has been reported as a two-component flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase that attacks a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds. However, the function of each component in catalysis is unclear. The large component (HpaB) was demonstrated here to be a reduced FAD (FADH2)-utilizing monooxygenase. When an E. coli flavin reductase (Fre) having no apparent homology with HpaC was used to generate FADH2 in ...

  18. Identification of cyclic nucleotide gated channels using regular expressions

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2013-09-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are nonselective cation channels found in plants, animals, and some bacteria. They have a six-transmembrane/one- pore structure, a cytosolic cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, and a cytosolic calmodulin-binding domain. Despite their functional similarities, the plant CNGC family members appear to have different conserved amino acid motifs within corresponding functional domains than animal and bacterial CNGCs do. Here we describe the development and application of methods employing plant CNGC-specific sequence motifs as diagnostic tools to identify novel candidate channels in different plants. These methods are used to evaluate the validity of annotations of putative orthologs of CNGCs from plant genomes. The methods detail how to employ regular expressions of conserved amino acids in functional domains of annotated CNGCs and together with Web tools such as PHI-BLAST and ScanProsite to identify novel candidate CNGCs in species including Physcomitrella patens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  19. The nucleotide exchange factors of Hsp70 molecular chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBracher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 family form an important hub in the cellular protein folding networks in bacteria and eukaryotes, connecting translation with the downstream machineries of protein folding and degradation. The Hsp70 folding cycle is driven by two types of cochaperones: J-domain proteins stimulate ATP hydrolysis by Hsp70, while nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs promote replacement of Hsp70-bound ADP with ATP. Bacteria and organelles of bacterial origin have only one known NEF type for Hsp70, GrpE. In contrast, a large diversity of Hsp70 NEFs has been discovered in the eukaryotic cell. These NEFs belong to the Hsp110/Grp170, HspBP1/Sil1 and BAG domain protein families. In this short review we compare the structures and molecular mechanisms of nucleotide exchange factors for Hsp70 and discuss how these cochaperones contribute to protein folding and quality control in the cell.

  20. Genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism in domesticated rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caicedo, Ana L; Williamson, Scott H; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2007-01-01

    Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments......, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models...... explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection...

  1. Exonuclease activity and P nucleotide addition in the generation of the expressed immunoglobulin repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sewell William

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunoglobulin rearrangement involves random and imprecise processes that act to both create and constrain diversity. Two such processes are the loss of nucleotides through the action of unknown exonuclease(s and the addition of P nucleotides. The study of such processes has been compromised by difficulties in reliably aligning immunoglobulin genes and in the partitioning of nucleotides between segment ends, and between N and P nucleotides. Results A dataset of 294 human IgM sequences was created and partitioned with the aid of a probabilistic model. Non-random removal of nucleotides is seen between the three IGH gene types with the IGHV gene averaging removals of 1.2 nucleotides compared to 4.7 for the other gene ends (p Conclusions The loss of nucleotides due to the action of exonucleases is not random, but is influenced by the nucleotide composition of the genes. P nucleotides do not make a significant contribution to diversity of immunoglobulin sequences. Although palindromic sequences are present in 10% of immunologlobulin rearrangements, most of the 'palindromic' nucleotides are likely to have been inserted into the junction during the process of N nucleotide addition. P nucleotides can only be stated with confidence to contribute to diversity of less than 1% of sequences. Any attempt to identify P nucleotides in immunoglobulins is therefore likely to introduce errors into the partitioning of such sequences.

  2. Mechanisms of the Formation of Adenine, Guanine, and Their Analogues in UV-Irradiated Mixed NH3:H2O Molecular Ices Containing Purine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Stein, Tamar; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the formation mechanisms of the nucleobases adenine and guanine and the nucleobase analogues hypoxanthine, xanthine, isoguanine, and 2,6-diaminopurine in a UV-irradiated mixed 10:1 H2O:NH3 ice seeded with precursor purine by using ab initio and density functional theory computations. Our quantum chemical investigations suggest that a multistep reaction mechanism involving purine cation, hydroxyl and amino radicals, together with water and ammonia, explains the experimentally obtained products in an independent study. The relative abundances of these products appear to largely follow from relative thermodynamic stabilities. The key role of the purine cation is likely to be the reason why purine is not functionalized in pure ammonia ice, where cations are promptly neutralized by free electrons from NH3 ionization. Amine group addition to purine is slightly favored over hydroxyl group attachment based on energetics, but hydroxyl is much more abundant due to higher abundance of H2O. The amino group is preferentially attached to the 6 position, giving 6-aminopurine, that is, adenine, while the hydroxyl group is preferentially attached to the 2 position, leading to 2-hydroxypurine. A second substitution by hydroxyl or amino group occurs at either the 6 or the 2 position depending on the first substitution. Given that H2O is far more abundant than NH3 in the experimentally studied ices (as well as based on interstellar abundances), xanthine and isoguanine are expected to be the most abundant bi-substituted photoproducts.

  3. Post-synthetic modification of mesoporous zinc-adeninate framework with tris(2,2′-biprydine) ruthenium(II) complex and its electrochemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun; Shin, Ik Soo [Dept. of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Hye Jae; An, Ji Hyun [Dept. of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Herein we report a redox-active metal-organic framework (MOF) via post-synthetic cation exchange with tris(2,2′-biprydine) ruthenium(II) complex (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}). A porous anionic zinc-adeninate framework (bMOF-100) is spacious enough to easily entrap 2.43 of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} cations within the mesopore. The encapsulation supported the framework structure preventing any distortion from a rapid solvent evaporation under SEM observation. Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}@bMOF-100 was then immobilized on the surface of glassy carbon electrode, and its electrocatalytic and electrochemiluminescent (ECL) properties were investigated in aqueous and organic solution. Especially, Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}@bMOF-100 showed the excellent electrochemical properties of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, but gradual decomposition of the MOF structure was observed under electrochemical measurements because of the sluggish oxidation of adeninate ligand.

  4. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  5. Acidity and complex formation studies of 3-(adenine-9-yl)-propionic and 3-(thymine-1-yl)-propionic acids in ethanol-water media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammud, Hassan H.; El Shazly, Shawky; Sonji, Ghassan; Sonji, Nada; Bouhadir, Kamal H.

    2015-05-01

    The ligands 3-(adenine-9-yl)propionic acid (AA) and 3-(thymine-1-yl)propionic acid (TA) were prepared by N9-alkylation of adenine and N1-alkylation of thymine with ethylacrylate in presence of a base catalyst, followed by acid hydrolysis of the formed ethyl esters to give the corresponding propionic acid derivatives. The products were characterized by spectral methods (FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR), which confirm their structures. The dissociation constants of ligands, were potentiometrically determined in 0.3 M KCl at 20-50 °C temperature range. The work was extended to study complexation behavior of AA and TA with various biologically important divalent metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+) in 50% v/v water-ethanol medium at four different temperatures, keeping ionic strength constant (0.3 M KCl). The order of the stability constants of the formed complexes decreases in the sequence Cu2+ > Pb2+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+ > Co2+ > Mn2+ > Cd2+ for both ligands. The effect of temperature was also studied and the corresponding thermodynamic functions (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) were derived and discussed. The formation of metal complexes has been found to be spontaneous, and the stability constants were dependant markedly on the basicity of the ligands.

  6. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation

    KAUST Repository

    Rose, Nicholas D.

    2015-12-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP+, respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  7. Genetic code correlations - Amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The data here show direct correlations between both the hydrophobicity and the hydrophilicity of the homocodonic amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides. While the differences between properties of uracil and cytosine derivatives are small, further data show that uracil has an affinity for charged species. Although these data suggest that molecular relationships between amino acids and anticodons were responsible for the origin of the code, it is not clear what the mechanism of the origin might have been.

  8. Nucleotide Sequence - KOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us ..._db.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/kome/LATEST/kome_ine_full_se...quence_db.zip File size: 19 MB File name: FASTA: kome_ine_full_sequence_db.fasta.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archiv...rtio About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Nucleotide Sequence - KOME | LSDB Archive ...

  9. Nucleotide sequence composition and method for detection of neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, A.; Yang, H.L.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes a composition of matter that is specific for {ital Neisseria gonorrhoeae}. It comprises: at least one nucleotide sequence for which the ratio of the amount of the sequence which hybridizes to chromosomal DNA of {ital Neisseria gonorrhoeae} to the amount of the sequence which hybridizes to chromosomal DNA of {ital Neisseria meningitidis} is greater than about five. The ratio being obtained by a method described.

  10. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen

    2015-01-01

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5......-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and adenine or the product AMP or the inhibitor ADP in each active site. The individual subunit adopts an overall structure that resembles a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) more than known APRTases implying that APRT functionality in Crenarchaeotae has its...... undergoes a conformational change upon binding of adenine and phosphate resulting in a slight contraction of the active site. The inhibitor, ADP binds like the product AMP with both the α- and β-phosphates occupying the 5’-phosphoribosyl binding site. The enzyme shows activity over a wide p...

  11. Bijective transformation circular codes and nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Christian J; Seligmann, Hervé

    2014-04-01

    The C(3) self-complementary circular code X identified in genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is a set of 20 trinucleotides enabling reading frame retrieval and maintenance, i.e. a framing code (Arquès and Michel, 1996; Michel, 2012, 2013). Some mitochondrial RNAs correspond to DNA sequences when RNA transcription systematically exchanges between nucleotides (Seligmann, 2013a,b). We study here the 23 bijective transformation codes ΠX of X which may code nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription as suggested by this mitochondrial observation. The 23 bijective transformation codes ΠX are C(3) trinucleotide circular codes, seven of them are also self-complementary. Furthermore, several correlations are observed between the Reading Frame Retrieval (RFR) probability of bijective transformation codes ΠX and the different biological properties of ΠX related to their numbers of RNAs in GenBank's EST database, their polymerization rate, their number of amino acids and the chirality of amino acids they code. Results suggest that the circular code X with the functions of reading frame retrieval and maintenance in regular RNA transcription, may also have, through its bijective transformation codes ΠX, the same functions in nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription. Associations with properties such as amino acid chirality suggest that the RFR of X and its bijective transformations molded the origins of the genetic code's machinery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nucleotide Sequencing and Identification of Some Wild Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Kumar Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rDNA-ITS (Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers fragment of the genomic DNA of 8 wild edible mushrooms (collected from Eastern Chota Nagpur Plateau of West Bengal, India was amplified using ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 and ITS2 primers and subjected to nucleotide sequence determination for identification of mushrooms as mentioned. The sequences were aligned using ClustalW software program. The aligned sequences revealed identity (homology percentage from GenBank data base of Amanita hemibapha [CN (Chota Nagpur 1, % identity 99 (JX844716.1], Amanita sp. [CN 2, % identity 98 (JX844763.1], Astraeus hygrometricus [CN 3, % identity 87 (FJ536664.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 4, % identity 90 (JF746992.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 5, % identity 99 (GU001667.1], T. microcarpus [CN 6, % identity 82 (EF421077.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 7, % identity 76 (JF746993.1], and Volvariella volvacea [CN 8, % identity 100 (JN086680.1]. Although out of 8 mushrooms 4 could be identified up to species level, the nucleotide sequences of the rest may be relevant to further characterization. A phylogenetic tree is constructed using Neighbor-Joining method showing interrelationship between/among the mushrooms. The determined nucleotide sequences of the mushrooms may provide additional information enriching GenBank database aiding to molecular taxonomy and facilitating its domestication and characterization for human benefits.

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and linkage disequilibrium in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkman, Judith M; Berry, Simon T; Leon, Alberto J; Slabaugh, Mary B; Tang, Shunxue; Gao, Wenxiang; Shintani, David K; Burke, John M; Knapp, Steven J

    2007-09-01

    Genetic diversity in modern sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars (elite oilseed inbred lines) has been shaped by domestication and breeding bottlenecks and wild and exotic allele introgression(-)the former narrowing and the latter broadening genetic diversity. To assess single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies, nucleotide diversity, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) in modern cultivars, alleles were resequenced from 81 genic loci distributed throughout the sunflower genome. DNA polymorphisms were abundant; 1078 SNPs (1/45.7 bp) and 178 insertions-deletions (INDELs) (1/277.0 bp) were identified in 49.4 kbp of DNA/genotype. SNPs were twofold more frequent in noncoding (1/32.1 bp) than coding (1/62.8 bp) sequences. Nucleotide diversity was only slightly lower in inbred lines ( = 0.0094) than wild populations ( = 0.0128). Mean haplotype diversity was 0.74. When extraploted across the genome ( approximately 3500 Mbp), sunflower was predicted to harbor at least 76.4 million common SNPs among modern cultivar alleles. LD decayed more slowly in inbred lines than wild populations (mean LD declined to 0.32 by 5.5 kbp in the former, the maximum physical distance surveyed), a difference attributed to domestication and breeding bottlenecks. SNP frequencies and LD decay are sufficient in modern sunflower cultivars for very high-density genetic mapping and high-resolution association mapping.

  14. Electrochemical Quantification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Using Nanoparticle Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-08-29

    We report a new approach for electrochemical quantification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using nanoparticle probes. The principle is based on DNA polymerase I (klenow fragment)-induced coupling of the nucleotide-modified nanoparticle probe to the mutant sites of duplex DNA under the Watson-Crick base pairing rule. After liquid hybridization events occurred among biotinylated DNA probes, mutant DNA, and complementary DNA, the resulting duplex DNA helixes were captured to the surface of magnetic beads through a biotin-avidin affinity reaction and magnetic separation. A cadmium phosphate-loaded apoferritin nanoparticle probe, which is modified with nucleotides and is complementary to the mutant site, is coupled to the mutant sites of the formed duplex DNA in the presence of DNA polymerase. Subsequent electrochemical stripping analysis of the cadmium component of coupled nanoparticle probes provides a means to quantify the concentration of mutant DNA. The method is sensitive enough to detect 21.5 attomol mutant DNA, which will enable the quantitative analysis of nucleic acid without polymerase chain reaction pre-amplification. The approach was challenged with constructed samples containing mutant and complementary DNA. The results indicated that it was possible to accurately determine SNPs with frequencies as low 0.01. The proposed approach has a great potential for realizing an accurate, sensitive, rapid, and low-cost method of SNP detection.

  15. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Linkage Disequilibrium in Sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkman, Judith M.; Berry, Simon T.; Leon, Alberto J.; Slabaugh, Mary B.; Tang, Shunxue; Gao, Wenxiang; Shintani, David K.; Burke, John M.; Knapp, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic diversity in modern sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars (elite oilseed inbred lines) has been shaped by domestication and breeding bottlenecks and wild and exotic allele introgression−the former narrowing and the latter broadening genetic diversity. To assess single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies, nucleotide diversity, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) in modern cultivars, alleles were resequenced from 81 genic loci distributed throughout the sunflower genome. DNA polymorphisms were abundant; 1078 SNPs (1/45.7 bp) and 178 insertions-deletions (INDELs) (1/277.0 bp) were identified in 49.4 kbp of DNA/genotype. SNPs were twofold more frequent in noncoding (1/32.1 bp) than coding (1/62.8 bp) sequences. Nucleotide diversity was only slightly lower in inbred lines (θ = 0.0094) than wild populations (θ = 0.0128). Mean haplotype diversity was 0.74. When extraploted across the genome (∼3500 Mbp), sunflower was predicted to harbor at least 76.4 million common SNPs among modern cultivar alleles. LD decayed more slowly in inbred lines than wild populations (mean LD declined to 0.32 by 5.5 kbp in the former, the maximum physical distance surveyed), a difference attributed to domestication and breeding bottlenecks. SNP frequencies and LD decay are sufficient in modern sunflower cultivars for very high-density genetic mapping and high-resolution association mapping. PMID:17660563

  16. Nucleotide sequencing and identification of some wild mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudip Kumar; Mandal, Aninda; Datta, Animesh K; Gupta, Sudha; Paul, Rita; Saha, Aditi; Sengupta, Sonali; Dubey, Priyanka Kumari

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA-ITS (Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers) fragment of the genomic DNA of 8 wild edible mushrooms (collected from Eastern Chota Nagpur Plateau of West Bengal, India) was amplified using ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacers 1) and ITS2 primers and subjected to nucleotide sequence determination for identification of mushrooms as mentioned. The sequences were aligned using ClustalW software program. The aligned sequences revealed identity (homology percentage from GenBank data base) of Amanita hemibapha [CN (Chota Nagpur) 1, % identity 99 (JX844716.1)], Amanita sp. [CN 2, % identity 98 (JX844763.1)], Astraeus hygrometricus [CN 3, % identity 87 (FJ536664.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 4, % identity 90 (JF746992.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 5, % identity 99 (GU001667.1)], T. microcarpus [CN 6, % identity 82 (EF421077.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 7, % identity 76 (JF746993.1)], and Volvariella volvacea [CN 8, % identity 100 (JN086680.1)]. Although out of 8 mushrooms 4 could be identified up to species level, the nucleotide sequences of the rest may be relevant to further characterization. A phylogenetic tree is constructed using Neighbor-Joining method showing interrelationship between/among the mushrooms. The determined nucleotide sequences of the mushrooms may provide additional information enriching GenBank database aiding to molecular taxonomy and facilitating its domestication and characterization for human benefits.

  17. Genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism in domesticated rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Caicedo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models to explain contemporary patterns of polymorphisms in rice, including a (i selectively neutral population bottleneck model, (ii bottleneck plus migration model, (iii multiple selective sweeps model, and (iv bottleneck plus selective sweeps model. We find that a simple bottleneck model, which has been the dominant demographic model for domesticated species, cannot explain the derived nucleotide polymorphism site frequency spectrum in rice. Instead, a bottleneck model that incorporates selective sweeps, or a more complex demographic model that includes subdivision and gene flow, are more plausible explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection results only in a local signature of variation.

  18. Broadening the scope of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed sugar nucleotide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Richard W; Peltier-Pain, Pauline; Singh, Shanteri; Zhou, Maoquan; Thorson, Jon S

    2013-05-07

    We described the integration of the general reversibility of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions, artificial glycosyl donors, and a high throughput colorimetric screen to enable the engineering of glycosyltransferases for combinatorial sugar nucleotide synthesis. The best engineered catalyst from this study, the OleD Loki variant, contained the mutations P67T/I112P/T113M/S132F/A242I compared with the OleD wild-type sequence. Evaluated against the parental sequence OleD TDP16 variant used for screening, the OleD Loki variant displayed maximum improvements in k(cat)/K(m) of >400-fold and >15-fold for formation of NDP-glucoses and UDP-sugars, respectively. This OleD Loki variant also demonstrated efficient turnover with five variant NDP acceptors and six variant 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl glycoside donors to produce 30 distinct NDP-sugars. This study highlights a convenient strategy to rapidly optimize glycosyltransferase catalysts for the synthesis of complex sugar nucleotides and the practical synthesis of a unique set of sugar nucleotides.

  19. The Role of Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling Pathways in Cancer: Targets for Prevention and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Alexandra M.; Piazza, Gary A. [Drug Discovery Research Center, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, 1660 Springhill Ave, Suite 3029, Mobile, AL 36604 (United States); Tinsley, Heather N., E-mail: htinsley@montevallo.edu [Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics, University of Montevallo, Station 6480, Montevallo, AL 35115 (United States)

    2014-02-26

    For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms—induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors—is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers.

  20. Spontaneous formation and base pairing of plausible prebiotic nucleotides in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafferty, Brian J; Fialho, David M; Khanam, Jaheda; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Hud, Nicholas V

    2016-04-25

    The RNA World hypothesis presupposes that abiotic reactions originally produced nucleotides, the monomers of RNA and universal constituents of metabolism. However, compatible prebiotic reactions for the synthesis of complementary (that is, base pairing) nucleotides and mechanisms for their mutual selection within a complex chemical environment have not been reported. Here we show that two plausible prebiotic heterocycles, melamine and barbituric acid, form glycosidic linkages with ribose and ribose-5-phosphate in water to produce nucleosides and nucleotides in good yields. Even without purification, these nucleotides base pair in aqueous solution to create linear supramolecular assemblies containing thousands of ordered nucleotides. Nucleotide anomerization and supramolecular assemblies favour the biologically relevant β-anomer form of these ribonucleotides, revealing abiotic mechanisms by which nucleotide structure and configuration could have been originally favoured. These findings indicate that nucleotide formation and selection may have been robust processes on the prebiotic Earth, if other nucleobases preceded those of extant life.

  1. The nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Plasmopara halstedii virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göpfert Jens C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only very few viruses of Oomycetes have been studied in detail. Isometric virions were found in different isolates of the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii, the downy mildew pathogen of sunflower. However, complete nucleotide sequences and data on the genome organization were lacking. Methods Viral RNA of different P. halstedii isolates was subjected to nucleotide sequencing and analysis of the viral genome. The N-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein was determined using Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The complete nucleotide sequences of both single-stranded RNA segments (RNA1 and RNA2 were established. RNA1 consisted of 2793 nucleotides (nt exclusive its 3' poly(A tract and a single open-reading frame (ORF1 of 2745 nt. ORF1 was framed by a 5' untranslated region (5' UTR of 18 nt and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of 30 nt. ORF1 contained motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp and showed similarities to RdRp of Scleropthora macrospora virus A (SmV A and viruses within the Nodaviridae family. RNA2 consisted of 1526 nt exclusive its 3' poly(A tract and a second ORF (ORF2 of 1128 nt. ORF2 coded for the single viral coat protein (CP and was framed by a 5' UTR of 164 nt and a 3' UTR of 234 nt. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 was verified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS experiments. Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the N-terminal sequence of the CP. The N-terminal sequence represented a region within ORF2 suggesting a proteolytic processing of the CP in vivo. The CP showed similarities to CP of SmV A and viruses within the Tombusviridae family. Fragments of RNA1 (ca. 1.9 kb and RNA2 (ca. 1.4 kb were used to analyze the nucleotide sequence variation of virions in different P. halstedii isolates. Viral sequence variation was 0.3% or less regardless of their host's pathotypes, the geographical origin and the sensitivity towards the fungicide metalaxyl. Conclusions The results showed the presence of a single and new

  2. The nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Plasmopara halstedii virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Only very few viruses of Oomycetes have been studied in detail. Isometric virions were found in different isolates of the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii, the downy mildew pathogen of sunflower. However, complete nucleotide sequences and data on the genome organization were lacking. Methods Viral RNA of different P. halstedii isolates was subjected to nucleotide sequencing and analysis of the viral genome. The N-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein was determined using Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The complete nucleotide sequences of both single-stranded RNA segments (RNA1 and RNA2) were established. RNA1 consisted of 2793 nucleotides (nt) exclusive its 3' poly(A) tract and a single open-reading frame (ORF1) of 2745 nt. ORF1 was framed by a 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of 18 nt and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of 30 nt. ORF1 contained motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) and showed similarities to RdRp of Scleropthora macrospora virus A (SmV A) and viruses within the Nodaviridae family. RNA2 consisted of 1526 nt exclusive its 3' poly(A) tract and a second ORF (ORF2) of 1128 nt. ORF2 coded for the single viral coat protein (CP) and was framed by a 5' UTR of 164 nt and a 3' UTR of 234 nt. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 was verified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS experiments. Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the N-terminal sequence of the CP. The N-terminal sequence represented a region within ORF2 suggesting a proteolytic processing of the CP in vivo. The CP showed similarities to CP of SmV A and viruses within the Tombusviridae family. Fragments of RNA1 (ca. 1.9 kb) and RNA2 (ca. 1.4 kb) were used to analyze the nucleotide sequence variation of virions in different P. halstedii isolates. Viral sequence variation was 0.3% or less regardless of their host's pathotypes, the geographical origin and the sensitivity towards the fungicide metalaxyl. Conclusions The results showed the presence of a single and new virus type in

  3. n-Nucleotide circular codes in graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmel, Elena; Michel, Christian J; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-13

    The circular code theory proposes that genes are constituted of two trinucleotide codes: the classical genetic code with 61 trinucleotides for coding the 20 amino acids (except the three stop codons {TAA,TAG,TGA}) and a circular code based on 20 trinucleotides for retrieving, maintaining and synchronizing the reading frame. It relies on two main results: the identification of a maximal C(3) self-complementary trinucleotide circular code X in genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses (Michel 2015 J. Theor. Biol. 380, 156-177. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.04.009); Arquès & Michel 1996 J. Theor. Biol. 182, 45-58. (doi:10.1006/jtbi.1996.0142)) and the finding of X circular code motifs in tRNAs and rRNAs, in particular in the ribosome decoding centre (Michel 2012 Comput. Biol. Chem. 37, 24-37. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2011.10.002); El Soufi & Michel 2014 Comput. Biol. Chem. 52, 9-17. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2014.08.001)). The univerally conserved nucleotides A1492 and A1493 and the conserved nucleotide G530 are included in X circular code motifs. Recently, dinucleotide circular codes were also investigated (Michel & Pirillo 2013 ISRN Biomath. 2013, 538631. (doi:10.1155/2013/538631); Fimmel et al. 2015 J. Theor. Biol. 386, 159-165. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.08.034)). As the genetic motifs of different lengths are ubiquitous in genes and genomes, we introduce a new approach based on graph theory to study in full generality n-nucleotide circular codes X, i.e. of length 2 (dinucleotide), 3 (trinucleotide), 4 (tetranucleotide), etc. Indeed, we prove that an n-nucleotide code X is circular if and only if the corresponding graph [Formula: see text] is acyclic. Moreover, the maximal length of a path in [Formula: see text] corresponds to the window of nucleotides in a sequence for detecting the correct reading frame. Finally, the graph theory of tournaments is applied to the study of dinucleotide circular codes. It has full equivalence between the combinatorics

  4. Performance-enhancing effects of dietary nucleotides: do mitochondria play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergej M. Ostojic

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotides are group of natural biomonomeric molecules and novel dietary supplements with performance-enhancing attributes. However, their mechanisms of action and target biological structures are poorly understood and identified. This short paper overviews the possible role of mitochondria during the utilization of nucleotides for exercise performance. Mitochondria-related effects of nucleotides have been identified, along with obstacles for dietary nucleotides delivery to the organelle.

  5. Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella and methods for the detection of Brucella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCready, Paula M [Tracy, CA; Radnedge, Lyndsay [San Mateo, CA; Andersen, Gary L [Berkeley, CA; Ott, Linda L [Livermore, CA; Slezak, Thomas R [Livermore, CA; Kuczmarski, Thomas A [Livermore, CA

    2009-02-24

    Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium were identified. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  6. Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella and methods for the detection of Brucella

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCready, Paula M.; Radnedge, Lyndsay; Andersen, Gary L.; Ott, Linda L.; Slezak, Thomas R.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.

    2009-02-24

    Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium were identified. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  7. A preliminary study on adenine-limited control during the ribavirin fermentation%利巴韦林发酵过程中腺嘌呤限量供应的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉; 王法松; 李燕军; 谢希贤; 陈宁

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TA208-LM is a guanosine producer with adenine auxotrophy.The adenine concentration in the fermentation broth is a critical factor because too little adenine will affect the growth of bacteria,while too much will restrain the synthesis of keyenzymes.Firstly the type of adenine donor and its appropriate concentration were optimized.The results indicated that Springer 2506 was the best adenine donor,and 15 g/L was optimal for ribavirin accumulation.However,the concentration of adenine released from this dose of Springer 2506 was too high at the end of fermentation.Therefore,the initial quantity of Springer 2506 was reduced and extra adenine was added.The results indicated that the activity of PRPP amidotransferase and the titer of ribavirin were both highest when the optimal initial adenine concentration was 47.95 mg/L and accordingly the adenine in the fermentation liquid was maintained at 40 ~ 50 mg/L.This data indicated that controlling the initial addition of yeast extract and further feeding appropriate quantity of yeast extract was likely a feasible way to control adenine concentration in the fermentation.Springer 2506 fed-batch fermentation in 7.5 L fermentation tank was studied.When 7.5 g/L Springer 2506 was used as substrate and another 7.5 g/L Springer 2506 was fed into the fermentation broth,the ribavirin production increased by 11.29% compared to one-time addition of 15 g/L Springer 2506.The study on limited control of adenine would provide some useful guidance for industrial production of ribavirin.%解淀粉芽孢杆菌(Bacillus amyloliquefaciens)TA208-LM是腺嘌呤缺陷型突变株,腺嘌呤浓度过低会影响菌体生长,过高又会反馈阻遏关键酶的合成.首先对腺嘌呤供体的种类和用量进行了研究,摇瓶发酵结果表明Springer 2506是最佳的腺嘌呤供体,用量在15 g/L时最有利于利巴韦林积累,但发酵后期腺嘌呤浓度过高.因此在降低Springer 2506的初始浓度的基

  8. Binding of the human nucleotide excision repair proteins XPA and XPC/HR23B to the 5R-thymine glycol lesion and structure of the cis-(5R,6S) thymine glycol epimer in the 5′-GTgG-3′ sequence: destabilization of two base pairs at the lesion site

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kyle L.; Roginskaya, Marina; Zou, Yue; Altamirano, Alvin; Basu, Ashis K.; Stone, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The 5R thymine glycol (5R-Tg) DNA lesion exists as a mixture of cis-(5R,6S) and trans-(5R,6R) epimers; these modulate base excision repair. We examine the 7:3 cis-(5R,6S):trans-(5R,6R) mixture of epimers paired opposite adenine in the 5′-GTgG-3′ sequence with regard to nucleotide excision repair. Human XPA recognizes the lesion comparably to the C8-dG acetylaminoflourene (AAF) adduct, whereas XPC/HR23B recognition of Tg is superior. 5R-Tg is processed by the Escherichia coli UvrA and UvrABC p...

  9. Bioinformatics comparison of sulfate-reducing metabolism nucleotide sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremberger, G.; Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria can be traced back to 3.5 billion years ago. The thermodynamics details of the sulfur cycle have been well documented. A recent sulfate-reducing bacteria report (Robator, Jungbluth, et al , 2015 Jan, Front. Microbiol) with Genbank nucleotide data has been analyzed in terms of the sulfite reductase (dsrAB) via fractal dimension and entropy values. Comparison to oil field sulfate-reducing sequences was included. The AUCG translational mass fractal dimension versus ATCG transcriptional mass fractal dimension for the low temperature dsrB and dsrA sequences reported in Reference Thirteen shows correlation R-sq ~ 0.79 , with a probably of about 3% in simulation. A recent report of using Cystathionine gamma-lyase sequence to produce CdS quantum dot in a biological method, where the sulfur is reduced just like in the H2S production process, was included for comparison. The AUCG mass fractal dimension versus ATCG mass fractal dimension for the Cystathionine gamma-lyase sequences was found to have R-sq of 0.72, similar to the low temperature dissimilatory sulfite reductase dsr group with 3% probability, in contrary to the oil field group having R-sq ~ 0.94, a high probable outcome in the simulation. The other two simulation histograms, namely, fractal dimension versus entropy R-sq outcome values, and di-nucleotide entropy versus mono-nucleotide entropy R-sq outcome values are also discussed in the data analysis focusing on low probability outcomes.

  10. Y-Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Diversity in Chinese Indigenous Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haoyuan; Zhang, Qin; Gao, Kexin; Yue, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Tao; Dang, Ruihua; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Lei, Chuzhao

    2015-08-01

    In contrast to high genetic diversity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), equine Y chromosome shows extremely low variability, implying limited patrilines in the domesticated horse. In this study, we applied direct sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods to investigate the polymorphisms of 33 Y chromosome specific loci in 304 Chinese indigenous horses from 13 breeds. Consequently, two Y-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (Y-45701/997 and Y-50869) and one Y-indel (Y-45288) were identified. Of those, the Y-50869 (T>A) revealed the highest variation frequency (24.67%), whereas it was only 3.29% and 1.97% in Y-45288 (T/-) and Y-45701/997 (G>T) locus, respectively. These three mutations accounted for 27.96% of the total samples and identified five Y-SNP haplotypes, demonstrating genetic diversity of Y chromosome in Chinese horses. In addition, all the five Y-SNP haplotypes were shared by different breeds. Among 13 horse breeds analyzed, Balikun horse displayed the highest nucleotide diversity (π = 5.6×10(-4)) and haplotype diversity (h = 0.527), while Ningqiang horse showed the lowest nucleotide diversity (π = 0.00000) and haplotype diversity (h = 0.000). The results also revealed that Chinese horses had a different polymorphic pattern of Y chromosome from European and American horses. In conclusion, Chinese horses revealed genetic diversity of Y chromosome, however more efforts should be made to better understand the domestication and paternal origin of Chinese indigenous horses.

  11. Y-Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Diversity in Chinese Indigenous Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyuan Han

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to high genetic diversity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, equine Y chromosome shows extremely low variability, implying limited patrilines in the domesticated horse. In this study, we applied direct sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP methods to investigate the polymorphisms of 33 Y chromosome specific loci in 304 Chinese indigenous horses from 13 breeds. Consequently, two Y-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (Y-45701/997 and Y-50869 and one Y-indel (Y-45288 were identified. Of those, the Y-50869 (T>A revealed the highest variation frequency (24.67%, whereas it was only 3.29% and 1.97% in Y-45288 (T/- and Y-45701/997 (G>T locus, respectively. These three mutations accounted for 27.96% of the total samples and identified five Y-SNP haplotypes, demonstrating genetic diversity of Y chromosome in Chinese horses. In addition, all the five Y-SNP haplotypes were shared by different breeds. Among 13 horse breeds analyzed, Balikun horse displayed the highest nucleotide diversity (π = 5.6×10−4 and haplotype diversity (h = 0.527, while Ningqiang horse showed the lowest nucleotide diversity (π = 0.00000 and haplotype diversity (h = 0.000. The results also revealed that Chinese horses had a different polymorphic pattern of Y chromosome from European and American horses. In conclusion, Chinese horses revealed genetic diversity of Y chromosome, however more efforts should be made to better understand the domestication and paternal origin of Chinese indigenous horses.

  12. Pinched flow fractionation devices for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Asger Vig; Poulsen, Lena; Birgens, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a new and flexible micro fluidic based method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs). The method relies on size separation of selectively hybridized polystyrene microspheres in a micro fluidic pinched flow fractionation (PFF) device. The micro fluidic PFF devices...... with 13 mu m deep channels were fabricated by thermal nanoimprint lithography ( NIL) in a thin film of cyclic-olefin copolymer (mr-I T85) on a silicon wafer substrate, and the channels were sealed by thermal polymer bonding. Streptavidin coated polystyrene microspheres with a mean diameter of 3.09 mu m...

  13. Human sapovirus classification based on complete capsid nucleotide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Mori, Kohji; Iritani, Nobuhiro; Harada, Seiya; Ueki, You; Iizuka, Setsuko; Mise, Keiji; Murakami, Kosuke; Wakita, Takaji; Katayama, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    The genetically diverse sapoviruses (SaVs) are a significant cause of acute human gastroenteritis. Human SaV surveillance is becoming more critical, and a better understanding of the diversity and distribution of the viral genotypes is needed. In this study, we analyzed 106 complete human SaV capsid nucleotide sequences to provide a better understanding of their diversity. Based on those results, we propose a novel standardized classification scheme that meets the requirements of the International Calicivirus Scientific Committee. We believe the classification scheme and strains described here will be of value for the molecular characterization and classification of newly detected SaV genotypes and for comparing data worldwide.

  14. Patterns of nucleotides that flank substitutions in human orthologous genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhuoran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence context is an important aspect of base mutagenesis, and three-base periodicity is an intrinsic property of coding sequences. However, how three-base periodicity is influenced in the vicinity of substitutions is still unclear. The effect of context on mutagenesis should be revealed in the usage of nucleotides that flank substitutions. Relative entropy (also known as Kullback-Leibler divergence is useful for finding unusual patterns in biological sequences. Results Using relative entropy, we visualized the periodic patterns in the context of substitutions in human orthologous genes. Neighbouring patterns differed both among substitution categories and within a category that occurred at three codon positions. Transition tended to occur in periodic sequences relative to transversion. Periodic signals were stronger in a set of flanking sequences of substitutions that occurred at the third-codon positions than in those that occurred at the first- or second-codon positions. To determine how the three-base periodicity was affected near the substitution sites, we fitted a sine model to the values of the relative entropy. A sine of period equal to 3 is a good approximation for the three-base periodicity at sites not in close vicinity to some substitutions. These periods were interrupted near the substitution site and then reappeared away from substitutions. A comparative analysis between the native and codon-shuffled datasets suggested that the codon usage frequency was not the sole origin of the three-base periodicity, implying that the native order of codons also played an important role in this periodicity. Synonymous codon shuffling revealed that synonymous codon usage bias was one of the factors responsible for the observed three-base periodicity. Conclusions Our results offer an efficient way to illustrate unusual periodic patterns in the context of substitutions and provide further insight into the origin of three

  15. Copper intoxication inhibits aerobic nucleotide synthesis in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D. L.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Rosch, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    Copper is universally toxic in excess, a feature exploited by the human immune system to facilitate bacterial clearance. The mechanism of copper intoxication remains unknown for many bacterial species. Here, we demonstrate that copper toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae is independent from oxidative stress but, rather, is the result of copper inhibiting the aerobic dNTP biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, we show that copper-intoxicated S. pneumoniae is rescued by manganese, which is an essential metal in the aerobic nucleotide synthesis pathway. These data provide insight into new targets to enhance copper-mediated toxicity during bacterial clearance. PMID:25730343

  16. The complete nucleotide sequence of pelargonium leaf curl virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGavin, Wendy J; MacFarlane, Stuart A

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of a tombusvirus isolated from tulip plants in Scotland revealed that it was pelargonium leaf curl virus (PLCV) rather than the originally suggested tomato bushy stunt virus. The complete sequence of the PLCV genome was determined for the first time, revealing it to be 4789 nucleotides in size and to have an organization similar to that of the other, previously described tombusviruses. Primers derived from the sequence were used to construct a full-length infectious clone of PLCV that recapitulates the disease symptoms of leaf curling in systemically infected pelargonium plants.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection on a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dufva, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We present a magnetoresistive sensor platform for hybridization assays and demonstrate its applicability on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The sensor relies on anisotropic magnetoresistance in a new geometry with a local negative reference and uses the magnetic field from...... the sensor bias current to magnetize magnetic beads in the vicinity of the sensor. The method allows for real-time measurements of the specific bead binding to the sensor surface during DNA hybridization and washing. Compared to other magnetic biosensing platforms, our approach eliminates the need...... for external electromagnets and thus allows for miniaturization of the sensor platform....

  18. Electroanalysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism by hairpin DNA architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi, Alireza; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2013-04-01

    Genetic analysis of infectious and genetic diseases and cancer diagnostics require the development of efficient tools for fast and reliable analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in targeted DNA and RNA sequences often responsible for signalling disease onset. Here, we highlight the main trends in the development of electrochemical genosensors for sensitive and selective detection of SNP that are based on hairpin DNA architectures exhibiting better SNP recognition properties compared with linear DNA probes. SNP detection by electrochemical hairpin DNA beacons is discussed, and comparative analysis of the existing SNP sensing strategies based on enzymatic and nanoparticle signal amplification schemes is presented.

  19. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016.

  20. Dietary nucleotides influence immune responses and intestinal morphology of red drum Sciaenops ocellatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenyan; Buentello, Alejandro; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2011-01-01

    Dietary nucleotides have been shown to benefit many physiological and nutritional functions in higher vertebrates and fish. Therefore, a 6-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of graded levels of a commercial nucleotide product on growth performance, immune responses and intestinal morphology of juvenile red drum (initial average weight of 7.1g). The basal diet was formulated to contain 40% protein, 10% lipid and a digestible energy level of 3.5 kcal g(-1). Two levels of nucleotide (Ascogen P(®), 0.5% and 1% of diet) were added to the basal diet with menhaden fishmeal and menhaden oil adjusted to provide isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets. Nucleotide supplementation tended to improve weight gain and survival of red drum, but not at a significant level. Neutrophil oxidative radical anion production and serum lysozyme activity tended to be higher for fish fed diets supplemented with nucleotide, while extracellular superoxide anion production of head kidney macrophages from fish fed diets with 1% nucleotide was significantly (Pfish fed 0.5% nucleotide diet and the basal diet. Nucleotide supplementation significantly (Pfish fed with diets supplemented with nucleotides. It is therefore possible to use dietary nucleotides supplementation to significantly enhance the intestinal structure of red drum. Likewise, nucleotides in the diet may improve some components of the non-specific immune response of this sciaenid fish.

  1. Selective inhibitory effect of (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine and 2'-nor-cyclic GMP on adenovirus replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, M; Mori, S; Shigeta, S; De Clercq, E

    1987-02-01

    The inhibitory effects of 20 selected antiviral compounds on the replication of adenoviruses (types 1 to 8) in vitro were investigated. While 18 compounds were ineffective, 2 compounds, namely (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA] and 9-[(2-hydroxy-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)oxymethyl]guanine P-oxide (2'-nor-cyclic GMP), were highly effective against all adenovirus types assayed in human embryonic fibroblast cultures. Their 50% inhibitory doses were 1.1 microgram/ml for (S)-HPMPA and 4.1 micrograms/ml for 2'-nor-cyclic GMP. They were nontoxic for the host cells at the effective antiviral doses.

  2. Solid-state NMR [13C,15N] resonance assignments of the nucleotide-Binding Domain of a bacterial Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cukkemane, A.A.; Nand, D.; Gradmann, S.H.E.; Weingarth, M.H.; Kaupp, U.B.; Baldus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Channels regulated by cyclic nucleotides are key signalling proteins in several biological pathways. The regulatory aspect is conferred by a C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). We report resonance assignments of the CNBD of a bacterial mlCNG channel obtained using 2D and 3D solid-sta

  3. Two novel mutations in the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-cytochrome b5 reductase gene of a patient with generalized type, hereditary methemoglobinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, J; Arya, R; Sumimoto, H; Yubisui, T; Bellingham, A J; Layton, D M; Fukumaki, Y

    1996-10-15

    Hereditary methemoglobinemia due to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) cytochrome b5 reductase (b5R) deficiency is classified into two types, an erythrocyte (type I) and a generalized (type II). We investigated the b5R gene of a patient with type II from a white United Kingdom (UK) family and found that the patient was a compound heterozygote for two novel mutations. The first mutation was a C-to-A transversion changing codon 42 (TAC: Tyr) to a stop codon in the one allele. From this mutant allele, the product without the catalytic portion of the enzyme is generated. The second one was a missense mutation at codon 95 (CCC-->CAC) in the other allele with the result that Pro changed to His within the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding domain of the enzyme. To characterize effects of this missense mutation on the enzyme function, we compared glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fused b5R with the GST-fused mutant enzyme with the codon 95 missense mutation (P95H) expressed in Escherichia coll. The mutant enzyme showed less catalytic activity, less thermostability, and a greater susceptibility to trypsin than did the normal counterpart. The absorption spectrum of the mutant enzyme in the visual region differed from that of the wild-type. These results suggest that this amino acid substitution influences both secondary structure and catalytic activity of the enzyme. The compound heterozygosity for the nonsense and the missense mutations apparently caused hereditary methemoglobinemia type II in this patient.

  4. Specificity of the ModA11, ModA12 and ModD1 epigenetic regulator N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases of Neisseria meningitidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, Kate L.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; Tan, Aimee; Scott, Adeana L.; Kumar, Ritesh; Power, Peter M.; Chen, Li-Tzu; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Hill, Dorothea M. C.; Luyten, Yvette A.; Morgan, Richard D.; Roberts, Richard J.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Rao, Desirazu N.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Phase variation (random ON/OFF switching) of gene expression is a common feature of host-adapted pathogenic bacteria. Phase variably expressed N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases (Mod) alter global methylation patterns resulting in changes in gene expression. These systems constitute phase variable regulons called phasevarions. Neisseria meningitidis phasevarions regulate genes including virulence factors and vaccine candidates, and alter phenotypes including antibiotic resistance. The target site recognized by these Type III N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases is not known. Single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis was used to identify the recognition site for three key N. meningitidis methyltransferases: ModA11 (exemplified by M.NmeMC58I) (5′-CGYm6AG-3′), ModA12 (exemplified by M.Nme77I, M.Nme18I and M.Nme579II) (5′-ACm6ACC-3′) and ModD1 (exemplified by M.Nme579I) (5′-CCm6AGC-3′). Restriction inhibition assays and mutagenesis confirmed the SMRT methylome analysis. The ModA11 site is complex and atypical and is dependent on the type of pyrimidine at the central position, in combination with the bases flanking the core recognition sequence 5′-CGYm6AG-3′. The observed efficiency of methylation in the modA11 strain (MC58) genome ranged from 4.6% at 5′-GCGCm6AGG-3′ sites, to 100% at 5′-ACGTm6AGG-3′ sites. Analysis of the distribution of modified sites in the respective genomes shows many cases of association with intergenic regions of genes with altered expression due to phasevarion switching. PMID:25845594

  5. An important role for adenine, cholera toxin, hydrocortisone and triiodothyronine in the proliferation, self-renewal and differentiation of limbal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Bojic, Sanja; Figueiredo, Gustavo S; Rooney, Paul; de Havilland, Julian; Dickinson, Anne; Figueiredo, Francisco C; Lako, Majlinda

    2016-11-01

    The cornea is a self-renewing tissue located at the front of the eye. Its transparency is essential for allowing light to focus onto the retina for visual perception. The continuous renewal of corneal epithelium is supported by limbal stem cells (LSCs) which are located in the border region between conjunctiva and cornea known as the limbus. Ex vivo expansion of LSCs has been successfully applied in the last two decades to treat patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Various methods have been used for their expansion, yet the most widely used culture media contains a number of ingredients derived from animal sources which may compromise the safety profile of human LSC transplantation. In this study we sought to understand the role of these components namely adenine, cholera toxin, hydrocortisone and triiodothyronine with the aim of re-defining a safe and GMP compatible minimal media for the ex vivo expansion of LSCs on human amniotic membrane. Our data suggest that all four components play a critical role in maintaining LSC proliferation and promoting LSC self-renewal. However removal of adenine and triiodothyronine had a more profound impact and led to LSC differentiation and loss of viability respectively, suggesting their essential role for ex vivo expansion of LSCs. Replacement of each of the components with GMP-grade reagents resulted in equal growth to non-GMP grade media, however an enhanced differentiation of LSCs was observed, suggesting that additional combinations of GMP grade reagents need to be tested to achieve similar or better level of LSC maintenance in the same manner as the traditional LSC media.

  6. Structure and function of nucleotide sugar transporters: Current progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hadley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The proteomes of eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea are highly diverse due, in part, to the complex post-translational modification of protein glycosylation. The diversity of glycosylation in eukaryotes is reliant on nucleotide sugar transporters to translocate specific nucleotide sugars that are synthesised in the cytosol and nucleus, into the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus where glycosylation reactions occur. Thirty years of research utilising multidisciplinary approaches has contributed to our current understanding of NST function and structure. In this review, the structure and function, with reference to various disease states, of several NSTs including the UDP-galactose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine, GDP-fucose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine/UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose and CMP-sialic acid transporters will be described. Little is known regarding the exact structure of NSTs due to difficulties associated with crystallising membrane proteins. To date, no three-dimensional structure of any NST has been elucidated. What is known is based on computer predictions, mutagenesis experiments, epitope-tagging studies, in-vitro assays and phylogenetic analysis. In this regard the best-characterised NST to date is the CMP-sialic acid transporter (CST. Therefore in this review we will provide the current state-of-play with respect to the structure–function relationship of the (CST. In particular we have summarised work performed by a number groups detailing the affect of various mutations on CST transport activity, efficiency, and substrate specificity.

  7. Allosteric interactions of DNA and nucleotides with S. cerevisiae RSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shuja Shafi; Rich, Evan; Viswanathan, Ramya; Cairns, Bradley R; Fischer, Christopher J

    2011-09-20

    RSC (remodel the structure of chromatin) is an essential chromatin remodeler of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that has been shown to have DNA translocase properties. We studied the DNA binding properties of a "trimeric minimal RSC" (RSCt) of the RSC chromatin remodeling complex and the effect of nucleotides on this interaction using fluorescence anisotropy. RSCt binds to 20 bp fluorescein-labeled double-stranded DNA with a K(d) of ∼100 nM. The affinity of RSCt for DNA is reduced in the presence of AMP-PNP and ADP in a concentration-dependent manner with the addition of AMP-PNP having more pronounced effect. These differences in the magnitude at which the binding of ADP and AMP-PNP affects the affinity of DNA binding by RSCt suggest that the physical movement of the enzyme along DNA begins between the binding of ATP and its subsequent hydrolysis. Furthermore, the fact that the highest affinity for DNA binding by RSCt occurs in the absence of bound nucleotide offers a mechanistic explanation for the apparent low processivity of DNA translocation by the enzyme.

  8. Nucleotide Docking: Prediction of Reactant State Complexes for Ribonuclease Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Fels, Gregor

    2010-12-01

    Ribonuclease enzymes (RNases) play key roles in the maturation and metabolism of all RNA molecules. Computational simulations of the processes involved can help to elucidate the underlying enzymatic mechanism and is often employed in a synergistic approach together with biochemical experiments. Theoretical calculations require atomistic details regarding the starting geometries of the molecules involved, which, in the absence of crystallographic data, can only be achieved from computational docking studies. Fortunately, docking algorithms have improved tremendously in recent years, so that reliable structures of enzyme-ligand complexes can now be successfully obtained from computation. However, most docking programs are not particularly optimized for nucleotide docking. In order to assist our studies on the cleavage of RNA by the two most important ribonuclease enzymes, RNase A and RNase H, we evaluated four docking tools - MOE2009, Glide 5.5, QXP-Flo+0802, and Autodock 4.0 - for their ability to simulate complexes between these enzymes and RNA oligomers. To validate our results, we analyzed the docking results with respect to the known key interactions between the protein and the nucleotide. In addition, we compared the predicted complexes with X-ray structures of the mutated enzyme as well as with structures obtained from previous calculations. In this manner, we were able to prepare the desired reaction state complex so that it could be used as the starting structure for further DFT/B3LYP QM/MM reaction mechanism studies.

  9. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  10. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis of Protamine Genes in Infertile Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamad Salamian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs are considered as one of the underlyingcauses of male infertility. Proper sperm chromatin packaging which involves replacement ofhistones with protamines has profound effect on male fertility. Over 20 SNPs have been reportedfor the protamine 1 and 2.Materials and Methods: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of two previouslyreported SNPs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP approach in 35, 96 and 177 normal, oligozoospermic and azoospermic individuals. TheseSNPs are: 1. A base pair substitution (G at position 197 instead of T in protamine type 1 Openreading frame (ORF including untranslated region, which causes an Arg residue change to Serresidue in a highly conserved region. 2. cytidine nucleotide change to thymidine in position of 248of protamine type 2 ORF which caused a nonsense point mutation.Results: The two mentioned SNPs were not present in the studied population, thus concluding thatthese SNPs can not serves as molecular markers for male infertility diagnosis.Conclusion: The results of our study reveal that in a selected Iranian population, the SNP G197Tand C248T are completely absent and are not associated with male infertility and therefore theseSNPs may not represent a molecular marker for genetic diagnosis of male infertility.

  11. Bayesian selection of nucleotide substitution models and their site assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Suchard, Marc A; Drummond, Alexei J

    2013-03-01

    Probabilistic inference of a phylogenetic tree from molecular sequence data is predicated on a substitution model describing the relative rates of change between character states along the tree for each site in the multiple sequence alignment. Commonly, one assumes that the substitution model is homogeneous across sites within large partitions of the alignment, assigns these partitions a priori, and then fixes their underlying substitution model to the best-fitting model from a hierarchy of named models. Here, we introduce an automatic model selection and model averaging approach within a Bayesian framework that simultaneously estimates the number of partitions, the assignment of sites to partitions, the substitution model for each partition, and the uncertainty in these selections. This new approach is implemented as an add-on to the BEAST 2 software platform. We find that this approach dramatically improves the fit of the nucleotide substitution model compared with existing approaches, and we show, using a number of example data sets, that as many as nine partitions are required to explain the heterogeneity in nucleotide substitution process across sites in a single gene analysis. In some instances, this improved modeling of the substitution process can have a measurable effect on downstream inference, including the estimated phylogeny, relative divergence times, and effective population size histories.

  12. Thoroughbred Horse Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Expression Database: HSDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Ho Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetics is important for breeding and selection of horses but there is a lack of well-established horse-related browsers or databases. In order to better understand horses, more variants and other integrated information are needed. Thus, we construct a horse genomic variants database including expression and other information. Horse Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Expression Database (HSDB (http://snugenome2.snu.ac.kr/HSDB provides the number of unexplored genomic variants still remaining to be identified in the horse genome including rare variants by using population genome sequences of eighteen horses and RNA-seq of four horses. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were confirmed by comparing them with SNP chip data and variants of RNA-seq, which showed a concordance level of 99.02% and 96.6%, respectively. Moreover, the database provides the genomic variants with their corresponding transcriptional profiles from the same individuals to help understand the functional aspects of these variants. The database will contribute to genetic improvement and breeding strategies of Thoroughbreds.

  13. Detecting Single-Nucleotide Substitutions Induced by Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Chan, Amanda H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-08-01

    The detection of genome editing is critical in evaluating genome-editing tools or conditions, but it is not an easy task to detect genome-editing events-especially single-nucleotide substitutions-without a surrogate marker. Here we introduce a procedure that significantly contributes to the advancement of genome-editing technologies. It uses droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) and allele-specific hydrolysis probes to detect single-nucleotide substitutions generated by genome editing (via homology-directed repair, or HDR). HDR events that introduce substitutions using donor DNA are generally infrequent, even with genome-editing tools, and the outcome is only one base pair difference in 3 billion base pairs of the human genome. This task is particularly difficult in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, in which editing events can be very rare. Therefore, the technological advances described here have implications for therapeutic genome editing and experimental approaches to disease modeling with iPS cells.

  14. Multi-nucleotide de novo Mutations in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Besenbacher

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutation of the DNA molecule is one of the most fundamental processes in biology. In this study, we use 283 parent-offspring trios to estimate the rate of mutation for both single nucleotide variants (SNVs and short length variants (indels in humans and examine the mutation process. We found 17812 SNVs, corresponding to a mutation rate of 1.29 × 10-8 per position per generation (PPPG and 1282 indels corresponding to a rate of 9.29 × 10-10 PPPG. We estimate that around 3% of human de novo SNVs are part of a multi-nucleotide mutation (MNM, with 558 (3.1% of mutations positioned less than 20kb from another mutation in the same individual (median distance of 525bp. The rate of de novo mutations is greater in late replicating regions (p = 8.29 × 10-19 and nearer recombination events (p = 0.0038 than elsewhere in the genome.

  15. Identification of novel cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Adriana V; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Mild, Jesica G; Mc Cormack, Bárbara; Pantano, Sergio; Altschuler, Daniel L; Edreira, Martin M

    2014-12-01

    Cyclic AMP has been implicated as second messenger in a wide range of cellular processes. In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, cAMP is involved in the development of the parasite's life cycle. While cAMP effectors have been widely studied in other eukaryotic cells, little is known about cAMP's mechanism of action in T. cruzi. To date, only a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) has been cloned and characterised in this parasite; however experimental evidence indicates the existence of cAMP-dependent, PKA-independent events. In order to identify new cAMP binding proteins as potential cAMP effectors, we carried out in silico studies using the predicted T. cruzi proteome. Using a combination of search methods 27 proteins with putative cNMP binding domains (CBDs) were identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the CBDs presented a homogeneous distribution, with sequences segregated into two main branches: one containing kinases-like proteins and the other gathering hypothetical proteins with different function or no other known. Comparative modelling of the strongest candidates provides support for the hypothesis that these proteins may give rise to structurally viable cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Pull-down and nucleotide displacement assays strongly suggest that TcCLB.508523.80 could bind cAMP and eventually be a new putative PKA-independent cAMP effector in T. cruzi.

  16. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  17. Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides-ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular nucleotides, and ATP in particular, are cellular signal substances involved in the control of numerous (patho)physiological mechanisms. They provoke nucleotide receptor-mediated mechanisms in select target cells. But nucleotides can considerably expand their range of action. They function as primary messengers in intercellular communication by stimulating the release of other extracellular messenger substances. These in turn activate additional cellular mechanisms through their own receptors. While this applies also to other extracellular messengers, its omnipresence in the vertebrate organism is an outstanding feature of nucleotide signaling. Intercellular messenger substances released by nucleotides include neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors, a considerable variety of other proteins including enzymes, numerous cytokines, lipid mediators, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species. Moreover, nucleotides activate or co-activate growth factor receptors. In the case of hormone release, the initially paracrine or autocrine nucleotide-mediated signal spreads through to the entire organism. The examples highlighted in this commentary suggest that acting as ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release is one of the major functional roles of extracellular nucleotides. While initiation of messenger release by nucleotides has been unraveled in many contexts, it may have been overlooked in others. It can be anticipated that additional nucleotide-driven messenger functions will be uncovered with relevance for both understanding physiology and development of therapy.

  18. Benchmarks for measurement of duplicate detection methods in nucleotide databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-08

    Duplication of information in databases is a major data quality challenge. The presence of duplicates, implying either redundancy or inconsistency, can have a range of impacts on the quality of analyses that use the data. To provide a sound basis for research on this issue in databases of nucleotide sequences, we have developed new, large-scale validated collections of duplicates, which can be used to test the effectiveness of duplicate detection methods. Previous collections were either designed primarily to test efficiency, or contained only a limited number of duplicates of limited kinds. To date, duplicate detection methods have been evaluated on separate, inconsistent benchmarks, leading to results that cannot be compared and, due to limitations of the benchmarks, of questionable generality. In this study, we present three nucleotide sequence database benchmarks, based on information drawn from a range of resources, including information derived from mapping to two data sections within the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL. Each benchmark has distinct characteristics. We quantify these characteristics and argue for their complementary value in evaluation. The benchmarks collectively contain a vast number of validated biological duplicates; the largest has nearly half a billion duplicate pairs (although this is probably only a tiny fraction of the total that is present). They are also the first benchmarks targeting the primary nucleotide databases. The records include the 21 most heavily studied organisms in molecular biology research. Our quantitative analysis shows that duplicates in the different benchmarks, and in different organisms, have different characteristics. It is thus unreliable to evaluate duplicate detection methods against any single benchmark. For example, the benchmark derived from UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot mappings identifies more diverse types of duplicates, showing the importance of expert curation, but

  19. Myocarditis in CD8-depleted SIV-infected rhesus macaques after short-term dual therapy with nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmanan Annamalai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has dramatically reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV infection, a number of antiretroviral toxicities have been described, including myocardial toxicity resulting from the use of nucleotide and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs. Current treatment guidelines recommend the use of HAART regimens containing two NRTIs for initial therapy of HIV-1 positive individuals; however, potential cardiotoxicity resulting from treatment with multiple NRTIs has not been addressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined myocardial tissue from twelve CD8 lymphocyte-depleted adult rhesus macaques, including eight animals infected with simian immunodeficiency virus, four of which received combined antiretroviral therapy (CART consisting of two NRTIs [(9-R-2-Phosphonomethoxypropyl Adenine (PMPA and (+/--beta-2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluoro-3'-thiacytidine (RCV] for 28 days. Multifocal infiltrates of mononuclear inflammatory cells were present in the myocardium of all macaques that received CART, but not untreated SIV-positive animals or SIV-negative controls. Macrophages were the predominant inflammatory cells within lesions, as shown by immunoreactivity for the macrophage markers Iba1 and CD68. Heart specimens from monkeys that received CART had significantly lower virus burdens than untreated animals (p<0.05, but significantly greater quantities of TNF-α mRNA than either SIV-positive untreated animals or uninfected controls (p<0.05. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ, IL-1β and CXCL11 mRNA were upregulated in heart tissue from SIV-positive monkeys, independent of antiretroviral treatment, but CXCL9 mRNA was only upregulated in heart tissue from macaques that received CART. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that short-term treatment with multiple NRTIs may be associated with myocarditis, and demonstrate that the CD8-depleted SIV-positive rhesus monkey is a useful

  20. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-11-02

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  1. Complete nucleotide sequence of primitive vertebrate immunoglobulin light chain genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1989-06-01

    Antibody to Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) immunoglobulin light chain was used to screen a spleen cDNA expression library, and recombinant clones encoding light chain genes were isolated. The complete sequences of the mature coding regions of two light chain genes in this phylogenetically distant vertebrate have been determined and are reported here. Comparisons of the sequences are consistent with the presence of mammalian-like framework and complementarity-determining regions. The predicted amino acid sequences of the genes are more related to mammalian lambda than to kappa light chains. The nucleotide sequences of the genes are most related to mammalian T-cell antigen receptor beta chain. Heterodontus light chain genes may reflect characteristics of the common ancestor of immunoglobulin and T-cell antigen receptors before its evolutionary diversification.

  2. Milestones in the discovery of antiviral agents: nucleosides and nucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik de Clercq

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, a number of milestones in the antiviral research field on nucleosides and nucleotides are reviewed in which the author played a significant part, especially in the initial stages of their development. Highlighted are the amino acyl esters of acyclovir, particularly valacyclovir (VACV, brivudin (BVDU and the valine ester of Cf1743 (FV-100, the 2′,3′-dideoxynucleosides (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, NRTIs, the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S-HPMPA, (S-HPMPC (cidofovir and alkoxyalkyl esters thereof (HDP-, ODE-CDV, adefovir and adefovir dipivoxil, tenofovir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF, combinations containing TDF and emtricitabine, i.e., Truvada®, Atripla®, Complera®/Eviplera® and the Quad pill, and the phosphonoamidate derivatives GS-7340, GS-9131, GS-9191 and GS-9219.

  3. iCLIP: protein-RNA interactions at nucleotide resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Ina; Attig, Jan; D'Ambrogio, Andrea; Easton, Laura E; Sibley, Christopher R; Sugimoto, Yoichiro; Tajnik, Mojca; König, Julian; Ule, Jernej

    2014-02-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are key players in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Precise knowledge about their binding sites is therefore critical to unravel their molecular function and to understand their role in development and disease. Individual-nucleotide resolution UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) identifies protein-RNA crosslink sites on a genome-wide scale. The high resolution and specificity of this method are achieved by an intramolecular cDNA circularization step that enables analysis of cDNAs that truncated at the protein-RNA crosslink sites. Here, we describe the improved iCLIP protocol and discuss critical optimization and control experiments that are required when applying the method to new RBPs.

  4. Large nucleotide-dependent conformational change in Rab28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Haeng; Baek, Kyuwon; Dominguez, Roberto (UPENN-MED)

    2008-12-01

    Rab GTPases are essential regulators of membrane trafficking. We report crystal structures of Rab28 in the active (GppNHp-bound) and inactive (GDP-3'P-bound) forms at 1.5 and 1.1 {angstrom} resolution. Rab28 is a distant member of the Rab family. While the overall fold of Rab28 resembles that of other Rab GTPases, it undergoes a larger nucleotide-dependent conformational change than other members of this family. Added flexibility resulting from a double-glycine motif at the beginning of switch 2 might partially account for this observation. The double-glycine motif, which is conserved in the Arf family, only occurs in Rab28 and Rab7B of the Rab family, and may have a profound effect on their catalytic activities.

  5. Efficient fidelity control by stepwise nucleotide selection in polymerase elongation

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Polymerases select nucleotides before incorporating them for chemical synthesis during gene replication or transcription. How the selection proceeds stepwise efficiently to achieve sufficiently high fidelity and speed is essential for polymerase function. We examined step-by-step selections that have conformational transition rates tuned one at time in the polymerase elongation cycle, with a controlled differentiation free energy at each checkpoint. The elongation is sustained at non-equilibrium steady state with constant free energy input and heat dissipation. It is found that error reduction capability does not improve for selection checkpoints down the reaction path. Hence, it is essential to select early to achieve an efficient fidelity control. In particular, for two consecutive selections that reject the wrong substrate back and inhibit it forward from a same kinetic state, the same error rates are obtained at the same free energy differentiation. The initial screening is indispensible for maintaining t...

  6. Nucleosome positioning, nucleotide excision repair and photoreactivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guintini, Laetitia; Charton, Romain; Peyresaubes, François; Thoma, Fritz; Conconi, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The position of nucleosomes on DNA participates in gene regulation and DNA replication. Nucleosomes can be repressors by limiting access of factors to regulatory sequences, or activators by facilitating binding of factors to exposed DNA sequences on the surface of the core histones. The formation of UV induced DNA lesions, like cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), is modulated by DNA bending around the core histones. Since CPDs are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photolyase repair, it is of paramount importance to understand how DNA damage and repair are tempered by the position of nucleosomes. In vitro, nucleosomes inhibit NER and photolyase repair. In vivo, nucleosomes slow down NER and considerably obstruct photoreactivation of CPDs. However, over-expression of photolyase allows repair of nucleosomal DNA in a second time scale. It is proposed that the intrinsic abilities of nucleosomes to move and transiently unwrap could facilitate damage recognition and repair in nucleosomal DNA.

  7. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  8. A nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of RNA

    CERN Document Server

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Doye, Jonathan P K; Louis, Ard A

    2014-01-01

    We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.

  9. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Aloysius; Gehring, Chris

    2013-01-01

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants.

  10. A nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Louis, Ard A. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K. [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.

  11. A model for the evolution of nucleotide polymerase directionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Ballanco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In all known living organisms, every enzyme that synthesizes nucleic acid polymers does so by adding nucleotide 5′-triphosphates to the 3′-hydroxyl group of the growing chain. This results in the well known 5'→3' directionality of all DNA and RNA Polymerases. The lack of any alternative mechanism, e.g. addition in a 3'→5' direction, may indicate a very early founder effect in the evolution of life, or it may be the result of a selective pressure against such an alternative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an attempt to determine whether the lack of an alternative polymerase directionality is the result of a founder effect or evolutionary selection, we have constructed a basic model of early polymerase evolution. This model is informed by the essential chemical properties of the nucleotide polymerization reaction. With this model, we are able to simulate the growth of organisms with polymerases that synthesize either 5'→3' or 3'→5' in isolation or in competition with each other. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have found that a competition between organisms with 5'→3' polymerases and 3'→5' polymerases only results in a evolutionarily stable strategy under certain conditions. Furthermore, we have found that mutations lead to a much clearer delineation between conditions that lead to a stable coexistence of these populations and conditions which ultimately lead to success for the 5'→3' form. In addition to presenting a plausible explanation for the uniqueness of enzymatic polymerization reactions, we hope these results also provide an example of how whole organism evolution can be understood based on molecular details.

  12. Morphine enhances purine nucleotide catabolism in rive and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang LIU; Jian-kai LIU; Mu-jie KAN; Lin GAO; Hai-ying FU; Hang ZHOU; Min HONG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and mechanism of morphine on purine nucleotide catabolism. Methods: The rat model of morphine dependence and withdrawal and rat C6 glioma cells in culture were used. Concentrations of uric acid in the plasma were measured by the uricase-rap method, adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xan- thine oxidase (XO) in the plasma and tissues were measured by the ADA and XO test kit. RT-PCR and RT-PCR-Southern blotting were used to examine the relative amount of ADA and XO gene transcripts in tissues and C6 cells. Results: (i) the concentration of plasma uric acid in the morphine-administered group was signifi-cantly higher (P<0.05) than the control group; (ii) during morphine administration and withdrawal periods, the ADA and XO concentrations in the plasma increased significantly (P<0.05); (iii) the amount of ADA and XO in the parietal lobe, liver, small intestine, and skeletal muscles of the morphine-administered groups increased, while the level of ADA and XO in those tissues of the withdrawal groups decreased; (iv) the transcripts of the ADA and XO genes in the parietal lobe, liver, small intestine, and skeletal muscles were higher in the morphine-administered group. The expression of the ADA and XO genes in those tissues returned to the control level during morphine withdrawal, with the exception of the skeletal muscles; and (v) the upregulation of the expression of the ADA and XO genes induced by morphine treatment could be reversed by naloxone. Conclusion: The effects of morphine on purine nucleotide metabolism might be an important, new biochemical pharmacological mechanism of morphine action.

  13. ENGINES: exploring single nucleotide variation in entire human genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation ultra-sequencing technologies are starting to produce extensive quantities of data from entire human genome or exome sequences, and therefore new software is needed to present and analyse this vast amount of information. The 1000 Genomes project has recently released raw data for 629 complete genomes representing several human populations through their Phase I interim analysis and, although there are certain public tools available that allow exploration of these genomes, to date there is no tool that permits comprehensive population analysis of the variation catalogued by such data. Description We have developed a genetic variant site explorer able to retrieve data for Single Nucleotide Variation (SNVs, population by population, from entire genomes without compromising future scalability and agility. ENGINES (ENtire Genome INterface for Exploring SNVs uses data from the 1000 Genomes Phase I to demonstrate its capacity to handle large amounts of genetic variation (>7.3 billion genotypes and 28 million SNVs, as well as deriving summary statistics of interest for medical and population genetics applications. The whole dataset is pre-processed and summarized into a data mart accessible through a web interface. The query system allows the combination and comparison of each available population sample, while searching by rs-number list, chromosome region, or genes of interest. Frequency and FST filters are available to further refine queries, while results can be visually compared with other large-scale Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP repositories such as HapMap or Perlegen. Conclusions ENGINES is capable of accessing large-scale variation data repositories in a fast and comprehensive manner. It allows quick browsing of whole genome variation, while providing statistical information for each variant site such as allele frequency, heterozygosity or FST values for genetic differentiation. Access to the data mart

  14. Development of a nucleotide sugar purification method using a mixed mode column & mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Heather; Xia, Fang; Lo, Mei-Chu; Zhou, Jing; Jordan, John B; McCarter, John; Barnhart, Wesley W; Gahm, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-11-10

    Analysis of nucleotide sugars, nucleoside di- and triphosphates and sugar-phosphates is an essential step in the process of understanding enzymatic pathways. A facile and rapid separation method was developed to analyze these compounds present in an enzymatic reaction mixture utilized to produce nucleotide sugars. The Primesep SB column explored in this study utilizes hydrophobic interactions as well as electrostatic interactions with the phosphoric portion of the nucleotide sugars. Ammonium formate buffer was selected due to its compatibility with mass spectrometry. Negative ion mode mass spectrometry was adopted for detection of the sugar phosphate (fucose-1-phophate), as the compound is not amenable to UV detection. Various mobile phase conditions such as pH, buffer concentration and organic modifier were explored. The semi-preparative separation method was developed to prepare 30mg of the nucleotide sugar. (19)F NMR was utilized to determine purity of the purified fluorinated nucleotide sugar. The collected nucleotide sugar was found to be 99% pure.

  15. High-speed droplet-allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide alternations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or single nucleotide mutations are useful genetic markers for molecular diagnosis, prognosis, drug response, and predisposition to diseases. Rapid identification of SNPs or mutations is clinically important, especially for determining drug responses and selection of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we describe a rapid genotyping assay based on the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) by using our droplet-PCR machine (droplet-AS-PCR).

  16. The Coding of Biological Information: From Nucleotide Sequence to Protein Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štambuk, Nikola

    The paper reviews the classic results of Swanson, Dayhoff, Grantham, Blalock and Root-Bernstein, which link genetic code nucleotide patterns to the protein structure, evolution and molecular recognition. Symbolic representation of the binary addresses defining particular nucleotide and amino acid properties is discussed, with consideration of: structure and metric of the code, direct correspondence between amino acid and nucleotide information, and molecular recognition of the interacting protein motifs coded by the complementary DNA and RNA strands.

  17. Cyclic nucleotides and radioresistance. Report 2. Effect of cyclic nucleotides on mammalian radioresistance and tissular oxygen tension. [X rays; mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulinskii, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    In experiments on mice, 3',5'-AMP, N/sup 6/,O/sup 2/-dibutyryl-3',5'-AMP (DB), 2',3'-AMP, theophylline, papaverine, imidazole, and nicotinate presented neither a sensitizing or radioprotective (RPE) effect. However, preadministration of ..beta..-adrenolytic agents revealed a moderate RPE in DB. Probably, along with the RPE, there is an antiprotective component in the action of cyclic nucleotides (CN), which is expressed via ..beta..-receptors. The absence of RPE in 3',5'-AMP, 2',3'-AMP, DB, theophylline, and phentolamine is combined with decline of tissular pO/sub 2/. The significance of this phenomenon is discussed.

  18. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  19. Kinetic properties of a single nucleotide binding site on chloroplast coupling factor 1 (CF1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, S; Huchzermeyer, B

    1998-12-01

    The kinetics of nucleotide binding to spinach chloroplast coupling factor CF1 in a fully inhibited state were investigated by stopped-flow experiments using the fluorescent trinitrophenyl analogue (NO2)3Ph-ADP. The CF1 was in a state in which two of the three binding sites on the beta subunits were irreversibly blocked with ADP, Mg2+ and fluoroaluminate, while the three binding sites on the alpha subunits were occupied by nucleotides [Garin, J., Vincon, M., Gagnon, J. & Vignais, P. V. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 3772-3777)]. Thus, it was possible to characterise a single nucleotide-binding site without superimposed nucleotide exchange or binding to an additional site. (NO2)3Ph-ADP binding to the remaining site on the third beta subunit was characterised by a high dissociation rate of 15 s(-1), leading to a very low affinity (dissociation constant higher than 150 microM). Subsequent to isolation, CF1 preparations contained two endogenously bound nucleotides. Pre-loading with ATP yielded CF1 with five tightly bound nucleotides and one free nucleotide-binding site on a beta subunit. Pre-loading with ADP, however, resulted in a CF1 preparation containing four tightly bound nucleotides and two free nucleotide binding sites. One of the two free binding sites was located on a beta subunit, while the other was probably located on an alpha subunit.

  20. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.