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Sample records for adenine nucleotides

  1. Relation between energy production and adenine nucleotide metabolism in human blood platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Jan Willem N.; Gorter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The relation between ATP production and adenine nucleotide metabolism was investigated in human platelets which were starved by incubation in glucose-free, CN−-containing medium and subsequently incubated with different amounts of glucose. In the absence of mitochondrial energy production (blocked

  2. Mitochondrial DNA deletion associated with the reduction of adenine nucleotides in human atrium and atrial fibrillation.

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    Tsuboi, M; Hisatome, I; Morisaki, T; Tanaka, M; Tomikura, Y; Takeda, S; Shimoyama, M; Ohtahara, A; Ogino, K; Igawa, O; Shigemasa, C; Ohgi, S; Nanba, E

    2001-06-01

    Structural changes in the number, size, and shape of mitochondria (mt) have been observed in the atrial muscles of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and of animals with rapid atrial pacing, however, it is not known whether the mitochondrial function is impaired in human atrium with AF. We determined adenine nucleotides concentrations and mtDNA deletions in 26 human right atria obtained at the time of cardiac surgery, using HPLC and PCR amplification, and studied the relationship between mtDNA deletions and clinical manifestations, the haemodynamic parameters of the patients and adenine nucleotide concentrations in their atrium. The age and the prevalence of AF were significantly higher in the patients with a mtDNA deletion of 7.4 kb than in those without a deletion; there were no significant differences regarding haemodynamic parameters between the two groups. The concentrations of ATP, ADP, AMP and total adenine nucleotides in the right atrium were significantly lower in the patients with mtDNA deletions than the patients without a deletion. In a gender- and diseased-matched population, the mtDNA deletion was still significantly associated with age and a decreased concentration of adenine nucleotides in the atrium. Using quantitative PCR analysis, the proportion of mtDNA deletion to normal mtDNA of the atrium, was estimated to be 0.3-2% in four cases. These results suggest that the deletion of mtDNA associated with ageing or AF can lead to a bioenergetic deficiency due to an impaired ATP synthesis in the human atrium; however, no conclusion can be made whether mtDNA deletion were the result or the cause of an impaired ATP synthesis, ageing, hemodynamic deterioration, or AF.

  3. Pulmonary preservation studies: effects on endothelial function and pulmonary adenine nucleotides.

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    Paik, Hyo Chae; Hoffmann, Steven C; Egan, Thomas M

    2003-02-27

    Lung transplantation is an effective therapy plagued by a high incidence of early graft dysfunction, in part because of reperfusion injury. The optimal preservation solution for lung transplantation is unknown. We performed experiments using an isolated perfused rat lung model to test the effect of lung preservation with three solutions commonly used in clinical practice. Lungs were retrieved from Sprague-Dawley rats and flushed with one of three solutions: modified Euro-Collins (MEC), University of Wisconsin (UW), or low potassium dextran and glucose (LPDG), then stored cold for varying periods before reperfusion with Earle's balanced salt solution using the isolated perfused rat lung model. Outcome measures were capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), wet-to-dry weight ratio, and lung tissue levels of adenine nucleotides and cyclic AMP. All lungs functioned well after 4 hr of storage. By 6 hr, UW-flushed lungs had a lower Kfc than LPDG-flushed lungs. After 8 hr of storage, only UW-flushed lungs had a measurable Kfc. Adenine nucleotide levels were higher in UW-flushed lungs after prolonged storage. Cyclic AMP levels correlated with Kfc in all groups. Early changes in endothelial permeability seemed to be better attenuated in lungs flushed with UW compared with LPDG or MEC; this was associated with higher amounts of adenine nucleotides. MEC-flushed lungs failed earlier than LPDG-flushed or UW-flushed lungs. The content of the solution may be more important for lung preservation than whether the ionic composition is intracellular or extracellular.

  4. L-Arginine Intake Effect on Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism in Rat Parenchymal and Reproductive Tissues

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    G. Kocic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-arginine is conditionally essetcial amino acid, required for normal cell growth, protein synthesis, ammonia detoxification, tissue growth and general performance, proposed in the treatment of men sterility and prevention of male impotence. The aim of the present paper was to estimate the activity of the enzymes of adenine nucleotide metabolism: 5′-nucleotidase (5′-NU, adenosine deaminase (ADA, AMP deaminase, and xanthine oxidase (XO, during dietary intake of L-arginine for a period of four weeks of male Wistar rats. Adenosine concentration in tissues is maintained by the relative activities of the adenosine-producing enzyme, 5′-NU and the adenosine-degrading enzyme-ADA adenosine deaminase. Dietary L-arginine intake directed adenine nucleotide metabolism in liver, kidney, and testis tissue toward the activation of adenosine production, by increased 5′-NU activity and decreased ADA activity. Stimulation of adenosine accumulation could be of importance in mediating arginine antiatherosclerotic, vasoactive, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant effects. Assuming that the XO activity reflects the rate of purine catabolism in the cell, while the activity of AMP deaminase is of importance in ATP regeneration, reduced activity of XO, together with the increased AMP-deaminase activity, may suggest that adenine nucleotides are presumably directed to the ATP regenerating process during dietary L-arginine intake.

  5. Direct Visualization of Asymmetric Adenine Nucleotide-Induced Conformational Changes in MutLα

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    Sacho, Elizabeth J; Kadyrov, Farid A; Modrich, Paul; Kunkel, Thomas A; Erie, Dorothy A

    2010-01-01

    Summary MutLα, the heterodimeric eukaryotic MutL homolog, is required for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in vivo. It has been suggested that conformational changes, modulated by adenine nucleotides, mediate the interactions of MutLα with other proteins in the MMR pathway, coordinating the recognition of DNA mismatches by MutSα and the activation of MutLα with the downstream events that lead to repair. Thus far, the only evidence for these conformational changes has come from x-ray crystallography of isolated domains, indirect biochemical analyses, and comparison to other members of the GHL ATPase family to which MutLα belongs. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), coupled with biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that adenine nucleotides induce large asymmetric conformational changes in full-length yeast and human MutLα, and that these changes are associated with significant increases in secondary structure. These data reveal an ATPase cycle where sequential nucleotide binding, hydrolysis, and release modulate the conformational states of MutLα. PMID:18206974

  6. Dynamics of energy charge and adenine nucleotides during uncoupling of catabolism and anabolism in Penicillium ochrochloron.

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    Vrabl, Pamela; Mutschlechner, Wolfgang; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Filamentous fungi are able to spill energy when exposed to energy excess by uncoupling catabolism from anabolism, e.g. via overflow metabolism. In current study we tested the hypothesis that overflow metabolism is regulated via the energetic status of the hyphae (i.e. energy charge, ATP concentration). This hypothesis was studied in Penicillium ochrochloron during the steady state of glucose- or ammonium-limited chemostat cultures as well as during three transient states ((i) glucose pulse to a glucose-limited chemostat, (ii) shift from glucose-limited to ammonium-limited conditions in a chemostat, and (iii) ammonium exhaustion in batch culture). Organic acids were excreted under all conditions, even during exponential growth in batch culture as well as under glucose-limited conditions in a chemostat. Partial uncoupling of catabolism and anabolism via overflow metabolism was thus constitutively present. Under all tested conditions, overflow metabolism was independent of the energy charge or the ATP concentration of the hyphae. There was a reciprocal correlation between glucose uptake rate and intracellular adenine nucleotide content. During all transients states a rapid decrease in energy charge and the concentrations of nucleotides was observed shortly after a change in glycolytic flux ("ATP paradoxon"). A possible connection between the change in adenine nucleotide concentrations and the purine salvage pathway is discussed.

  7. Fluid flow modulates vascular endothelial cytosolic calcium responses to adenine nucleotides.

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    Shen, J; Luscinskas, F W; Gimbrone, M A; Dewey, C F

    1994-04-01

    To determine whether fluid flow influences the action of soluble vasoactive agonists on vascular endothelium. Confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were cultured on glass coverslips, prelabeled with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fura-2, and placed in a parallel-plate flow chamber designed to generate defined laminar fluid flow. Cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in individual BAEC was monitored during perfusion with medium containing adenine nucleotide under defined flow conditions. Continuous perfusion with ATP (0.3-3.0 microM) or ADP (0.1-1.0 microM) evoked repetitive oscillations in [Ca2+]i in individual BAEC. The frequency of the [Ca2+]i oscillations was dependent on both nucleotide concentration and levels of applied shear stress; at constant bulk concentration of nucleotide, the frequency increased with shear stress. Stopping flow in the continuous presence of agonists immediately extinguished the oscillatory response. Elimination of extracellular Ca2+ did not inhibit the [Ca2+]i oscillations. In the presence of nonhydrolyzable nucleotide analog, ATP gamma S or ADP beta S, application of flow resulted in similar shear-dependent [Ca2+]i oscillations, suggesting that flow modulation of the [Ca2+]i response was not simply due to depletion of ATP or ADP in the vicinity of BAEC monolayers as a result of hydrolysis of nucleotides by ectonucleotidases. These findings suggest that local hemodynamic conditions may modulate the action of vasoactive agents on the vascular endothelium in vivo.

  8. New insights on the regulation of the adenine nucleotide pool of erythrocytes in mouse models

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    O’Brien, William G.; Ling, Han Shawn; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2017-01-01

    The observation that induced torpor in non-hibernating mammals could result from an increased AMP concentration in circulation led our investigation to reveal that the added AMP altered oxygen transport of erythrocytes. To further study the effect of AMP in regulation of erythrocyte function and systemic metabolism, we generated mouse models deficient in key erythrocyte enzymes in AMP metabolism. We have previously reported altered erythrocyte adenine nucleotide levels corresponding to altered oxygen saturation in mice deficient in both CD73 and AMPD3. Here we further investigate how these Ampd3-/-/Cd73-/- mice respond to the administered dose of AMP in comparison with the control models of single enzyme deficiency and wild type. We found that Ampd3-/-/Cd73-/- mice are more sensitive to AMP-induced hypometabolism than mice with a single enzyme deficiency, which are more sensitive than wild type. A dose-dependent rightward shift of erythrocyte p50 values in response to increasing amounts of extracellular AMP was observed. We provide further evidence for the direct uptake of AMP by erythrocytes that is insensitive to dipyridamole, a blocker for ENT1. The uptake of AMP by the erythrocytes remained linear at the highest concentration tested, 10mM. We also observed competitive inhibition of AMP uptake by ATP and ADP but not by the other nucleotides and metabolites tested. Importantly, our studies suggest that AMP uptake is associated with an erythrocyte ATP release that is partially sensitive to inhibition by TRO19622 and Ca++ ion. Taken together, our study suggests a novel mechanism by which erythrocytes recycle and maintain their adenine nucleotide pool through AMP uptake and ATP release. PMID:28746349

  9. Metabolism of the Pyridine Nucleotides Involved in Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Biosynthesis by Clostridium butylicum

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    Kasǎrov, Luka B.; Moat, Albert G.

    1973-01-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of the accumulation of considerable amounts of free nicotinic acid (NA) in the culture medium of Clostridium butylicum, this organism was investigated with regard to its ability to metabolize nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its immediate biosynthetic precursors, nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (deamido-NAD). Cell-free extracts of C. butylicum were found to degrade NAMN and deamido-NAD to NA. NAMN, in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), was converted to deamido-NAD, but only at high concentrations of ATP (20 mM) was significant synthetic activity observed in competition with NAMN degradation. Degradation of both NAMN and deamido-NAD was activated by ATP at concentrations of 5 and 10 mm. Anaerobiosis markedly enhanced the degradation of the nucleotides. The data indicate that the synthesis of NAMN and deamido-NAD prevails over their degradation only in the presence of high concentrations of ATP. NAD was degraded to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) by a pyrophosphatase. Phosphate markedly inhibited both the deamido-NAD and NAD pyrophosphatases. Under anaerobic conditions there was practically no further degradation of NMN to NA, whereas barely measurable amounts of NA were formed under aerobic conditions. All of these observations suggest that, under the given conditions of anaerobiosis and physiological phosphate concentrations, there is very little degradation of NAD to NMN and practically no degradation to NA by C. butylicum. Thus, NAD represents an insignificant source of the NA accumulated in the culture medium. The intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway (NAMN and deamido-NAD) have been shown to be the major source of the NA which is accumulated by C. butylicum. PMID:4352177

  10. Dynamic evolution of the adenine nucleotide translocase interactome during chemotherapy-induced apoptosis.

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    Verrier, Florence; Deniaud, Aurélien; Lebras, Morgane; Métivier, Didier; Kroemer, Guido; Mignotte, Bernard; Jan, Gwenaël; Brenner, Catherine

    2004-10-21

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex (PTPC) is involved in the control of the mitochondrial membrane permeabilization during apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Indeed, the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), two major components of PTPC, are the targets of a variety of proapoptotic inducers. Using co-immunoprecipitation and proteomic analysis, we identified some of the interacting partners of ANT in several normal tissues and human cancer cell lines. During chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, some of these interactions were constant (e.g. ANT-VDAC), whereas others changed strongly concomitantly with the dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and until nuclear degradation occurred (e.g. Bax, Bcl-2, subunits of the respiratory chain, a subunit of the phosphatase PP2A, phospholipase PLC beta 4 and IP3 receptor). In addition, a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) interacts with ANT in normal tissue, in colon carcinoma cells and in vitro. This interaction is lost during apoptosis induction, suggesting that GST behaves as an endogenous repressor of PTPC and ANT pore opening. Thus, ANT is connected to mitochondrial proteins as well as to proteins from other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum forming a dynamic polyprotein complex. Changes within this ANT interactome coordinate the lethal response of cells to apoptosis induction.

  11. Functional expression of human adenine nucleotide translocase 4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Takashi Hamazaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT mediates the exchange of ADP and ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The human genome encodes multiple ANT isoforms that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Recently a novel germ cell-specific member of the ANT family, ANT4 (SLC25A31 was identified. Although it is known that targeted depletion of ANT4 in mice resulted in male infertility, the functional biochemical differences between ANT4 and other somatic ANT isoforms remain undetermined. To gain insight into ANT4, we expressed human ANT4 (hANT4 in yeast mitochondria. Unlike the somatic ANT proteins, expression of hANT4 failed to complement an AAC-deficient yeast strain for growth on media requiring mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, overexpression of hANT4 from a multi-copy plasmid interfered with optimal yeast growth. However, mutation of specific amino acids of hANT4 improved yeast mitochondrial expression and supported growth of the AAC-deficient yeast on non-fermentable carbon sources. The mutations affected amino acids predicted to interact with phospholipids, suggesting the importance of lipid interactions for function of this protein. Each mutant hANT4 and the somatic hANTs exhibited similar ADP/ATP exchange kinetics. These data define common and distinct biochemical characteristics of ANT4 in comparison to ANT1, 2 and 3 providing a basis for study of its unique adaptation to germ cells.

  12. Two adenine nucleotide translocase paralogues involved in cell proliferation and spermatogenesis in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

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    Ryohei Sugahara

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT specifically acts in ADP/ATP exchange through the mitochondrial inner membrane. This transporter protein thereby plays a significant role in energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Most mammals have four paralogous ANT genes (ANT1-4 and utilize these paralogues in different types of cells. The fourth paralogue of ANT (ANT4 is present only in mammals and reptiles and is exclusively expressed in testicular germ cells where it is required for meiotic progression in the spermatocytes. Here, we report that silkworms harbor two ANT paralogues, the homeostatic paralogue (BmANTI1 and the testis-specific paralogue (BmANTI2. The BmANTI2 protein has an N-terminal extension in which the positions of lysine residues in the amino acid sequence are distributed as in human ANT4. An expression analysis showed that BmANTI2 transcripts were restricted to the testis, suggesting the protein has a role in the progression of spermatogenesis. By contrast, BmANTI1 was expressed in all tissues tested, suggesting it has an important role in homeostasis. We also observed that cultured silkworm cells required BmANTI1 for proliferation. The ANTI1 protein of the lepidopteran Plutella xylostella (PxANTI1, but not those of other insect species (or PxANTI2, restored cell proliferation in BmANTI1-knockdown cells suggesting that ANTI1 has similar energy metabolism functions across the Lepidoptera. Our results suggest that BmANTI2 is evolutionarily divergent from BmANTI1 and has developed a specific role in spermatogenesis similar to that of mammalian ANT4.

  13. Adenine nucleotide translocase 4 is expressed within embryonic ovaries and dispensable during oogenesis.

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    Lim, Chae Ho; Brower, Jeffrey V; Resnick, James L; Oh, S Paul; Terada, Naohiro

    2015-02-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) facilitates the exchange of adenosine triphosphate across the mitochondrial inner membrane and plays a critical role for bioenergetics in eukaryotes. Mice have 3 Ant paralogs, Ant1 (Slc25a4), Ant2 (Slc25a5), and Ant4 (Slc25a31), which are expressed in a tissue-dependent manner. We previously identified that Ant4 was expressed exclusively in testicular germ cells in adult mice and essential for spermatogenesis and subsequently male fertility. Further investigation into the process of spermatogenesis revealed that Ant4 was particularly highly expressed during meiotic prophase I and indispensable for normal progression of leptotene spermatocytes to the stages thereafter. In contrast, the expression and roles of Ant4 in female germ cells have not previously been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that the Ant4 gene is expressed during embryonic ovarian development during which meiotic prophase I occurs. We confirmed embryonic ovary-specific Ant4 expression using a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene. In contrast to male, however, Ant4 null female mice were fertile although the litter size was slightly decreased. They showed apparently normal ovarian development which was morphologically indistinguishable from the control animals. These data indicate that Ant4 is a meiosis-specific gene expressed during both male and female gametogenesis however indispensable only during spermatogenesis and not oogenesis. The differential effects of Ant4 depletion within the processes of male and female gametogenesis may be explained by meiosis-specific inactivation of the X-linked Ant2 gene in male, a somatic paralog of the Ant4 gene. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Evolutionarily conserved mammalian adenine nucleotide translocase 4 is essential for spermatogenesis.

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    Brower, Jeffrey V; Rodic, Nemanja; Seki, Tsugio; Jorgensen, Marda; Fliess, Naime; Yachnis, Anthony T; McCarrey, John R; Oh, S Paul; Terada, Naohiro

    2007-10-05

    The adenine nucleotide translocases (Ant) facilitate the transport of ADP and ATP by an antiport mechanism across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thus playing an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. We recently identified a novel member of the Ant family in mouse, Ant4, of which gene configuration as well as amino acid homology is well conserved among mammals. The conservation of Ant4 in mammals, along with the absence of Ant4 in nonmammalian species, suggests a unique and indispensable role for this ADP/ATP carrier in mammalian development. Of interest, in contrast to its paralog Ant2, which is encoded by the X chromosome and ubiquitously expressed in somatic cells, Ant4 is encoded by an autosome and selectively expressed in testicular germ cells. Immunohistochemical examination as well as RNA expression analysis using separated spermatogenic cell types revealed that Ant4 expression was particularly high in spermatocytes. When we generated Ant4-deficient mice by targeted disruption, a significant reduction in testicular size was observed without any other distinguishable abnormalities in the mice. Histological examination as well as stage-specific gene expression analysis in adult and neonatal testes revealed a severe reduction of spermatocytes accompanied by increased apoptosis. Subsequently, the Ant4-deficient male mice were infertile. Taken together, these data elucidated the indispensable role of Ant4 in murine spermatogenesis. Considering the unique conservation and chromosomal location of the Ant family genes in mammals, the Ant4 gene may have arisen in mammalian ancestors and been conserved in mammals to serve as the sole and essential mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier during spermatogenesis where the sex chromosome-linked Ant2 gene is inactivated.

  15. Combined RNA interference of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 and ganciclovir therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Kim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Mi-Hye; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer effects of combined RNA interference (RNAi) of the adenine nucleotide translocase-2 (ANT2) gene and ganciclovir (GCV) therapy for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Huh 7) in an animal model. The Huh 7/NTG stable cell line was established by transfection of a vector with the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS), HSV1-sr39 thymidine kinase (tk), and enhanced green florescent protein (EGFP) fusion gene into Huh 7 cells. mRNA expressions of these genes were evaluated by RT-PCR analysis. The functions of hNIS and HSV1-sr39tk were verified with (125)I uptake and (3)H-penciclovir (PCV) uptake tests. EGFP and hNIS expression was confirmed with confocal microscopy after immunocytochemical staining. We treated the tumor cells with ANT2 shRNA or GCV or both ANT2 shRNA and GCV and treated the in vivo mouse model with a Huh 7/NTG tumor xenograft. The therapeutic effects of the in vivo study were assessed with caliper measurements and gamma camera imaging using (99m)Tc-pertechnetate. Huh 7/NTG cells showed a cell number-dependent increase in (125)I uptake and a 24-fold higher (3)H-PCV uptake compared to parent Huh 7 cells. Huh 7/NTG cells transfected with ANT2 shRNA had lower ANT2 mRNA expression and more impaired proliferation activity than cells transfected with scramble shRNA. Proliferation of Huh 7/NTG cells was also inhibited by GCV treatment. Combined GCV and ANT2 shRNA therapy further inhibited cell proliferation in the in vitro study. The combined therapy with GCV and ANT2 shRNA showed a further decrease in tumor growth in the mouse model. Our results suggest that the combined RNA interference with ANT2 and GCV therapy inhibited hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation more than single GCV therapy or ANT2 shRNA therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore it could be applied treating incurable hepatocellular carcinoma. © 2013.

  16. When does the lung die? Kfc, cell viability, and adenine nucleotide changes in the circulation-arrested rat lung.

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    Jones, D R; Becker, R M; Hoffmann, S C; Lemasters, J J; Egan, T M

    1997-07-01

    Lungs harvested from cadaveric circulation-arrested donors may increase the donor pool for lung transplantation. To determine the degree and time course of ischemia-reperfusion injury, we evaluated the effect of O2 ventilation on capillary permeability [capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc)], cell viability, and total adenine nucleotide (TAN) levels in in situ circulation-arrested rat lungs. Kfc increased with increasing postmortem ischemic time (r = 0.88). Lungs ventilated with O2 1 h postmortem had similar Kfc and wet-to-dry ratios as controls. Nonventilated lungs had threefold (P Kfc at 30 and 60 min postmortem compared with controls. Cell viability decreased in all groups except for 30-min postmortem O2-ventilated lungs. TAN levels decreased with increasing ischemic time, particularly in nonventilated lungs. Loss of adenine nucleotides correlated with increasing Kfc values (r = 0.76). This study indicates that lungs retrieved 1 h postmortem may have normal Kfc with preharvest O2 ventilation. The relationship between Kfc and TAN suggests that vascular permeability may be related to lung TAN levels.

  17. A minimum structured adenine nucleotide for ADP/ATP transport in mitochondria.

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    Schlimme, E; Boos, K S; Renz, H

    1988-10-01

    An ADP analogue, i.e. 3H- or 14C-labeled 5'-diphosphate of 6-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl-methyl)-4-pyrimidinamine, was synthesized, the structure of which was deduced from structure-activity studies on the substrate specificity of the nucleotide-binding center of the inner mitochondrial membrane integrated ADP/ATP carrier protein. Bearing only the minimal but substrate-essential recognition structures, minimum structured ADP (msADP) is bound to the cytosol-facing active center and transported by the highly specific carrier system across the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  18. The silencing of adenine nucleotide translocase isoform 1 induces oxidative stress and programmed cell death in ADF human glioblastoma cells.

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    Lena, Annalisa; Rechichi, Mariarosa; Salvetti, Alessandra; Vecchio, Donatella; Evangelista, Monica; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Gremigni, Vittorio; Rossi, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) are multitask proteins involved in several aspects of cell metabolism, as well as in the regulation of cell death/survival processes. We investigated the role played by ANT isoforms 1 and 2 in the growth of a human glioblastoma cell line (ADF cells). The silencing of ANT2 isoform, by small interfering RNA, did not produce significant changes in ADF cell viability. By contrast, the silencing of ANT1 isoform strongly reduced ADF cell viability by inducing a non-apoptotic cell death process resembling paraptosis. We demonstrated that cell death induced by ANT1 depletion cannot be ascribed to the loss of the ATP/ADP exchange function of this protein. By contrast, our findings indicate that ANT1-silenced cells experience oxidative stress, thus allowing us to hypothesize that the effect of ANT1-silencing on ADF is mediated by the loss of the ANT1 uncoupling function. Several studies ascribe a pro-apoptotic role to ANT1 as a result of the observation that ANT1 overexpression sensitizes cells to mitochondrial depolarization or to apoptotic stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate that, despite its pro-apoptotic function at a high expression level, the reduction of ANT1 density below a physiological baseline impairs fundamental functions of this protein in ADF cells, leading them to undertake a cell death process.

  19. Over-expression of Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 1 (ANT1 Induces Apoptosis and Tumor Regression in vivo

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    Kim Chul-Woo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and catalyzes the exchange of mitochondrial ATP for cytosolic ADP. ANT has been known to be a major component of the permeability transition pore complex of mitochondria and contributes to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Human ANT has four isoforms (ANT1, ANT2, ANT3, and ANT4, and the expression of the ANT isoforms is variable depending on the tissue and cell type, developmental stage, and proliferation status. Among the isoforms, ANT1 is highly expressed in terminally-differentiated tissues, but expressed in low levels in proliferating cells, such as cancer cells. In particular, over-expression of ANT1 induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. Methods We applied an ANT1 gene transfer approach to induce apoptosis and to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of ANT1 in a nude mouse model. Results We demonstrated that ANT1 transfection induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells, inactivated NF-κB activity, and increased Bax expression. ANT1-inducing apoptosis was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and the activation of caspases-9 and -3. Moreover, ANT1 transfection significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Conclusion Our results suggest that ANT1 transfection may be a useful therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer.

  20. Dependence of flux size and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation on external osmolarity in isolated rat liver mitochondria: role of adenine nucleotide carrier.

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    Devin, A; Guérin, B; Rigoulet, M

    1996-01-11

    The aim of this work was a thermodynamic and kinetic study of the influence of varying external osmolarity on overall oxidative phosphorylations in isolated rat liver mitochondria. When external osmolarity is increased from 100 to 400 mosM by using a non-penetrant sugar: (i) matrix volume diminishes, (ii) state 3 respiratory rate decreases when state 4 slightly varies, (iii) states 3 and 4 protonmotive force and NAD(P)H level increase, whereas oxidative phosphorylation efficiency (ATP/O) decreases. Indeed, respiratory flux versus protonmotive force relationships depend on the osmolarity considered: the lower the external osmolarity, the higher the span of overall driving force necessary for the same respiratory rate. To further investigate the mechanism of the decrease in respiratory and ATP synthesis flux leading to a lowering in oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, we determined the adenine nucleotide carrier control coefficient on respiratory and ATP synthesis rates respectively. The main result is that the adenine nucleotide carrier control coefficient on respiratory rate decreases, and conversely that adenine nucleotide carrier control on ATP synthesis rate increases, from iso- to hyperosmolarity. Furthermore, whatever the osmolarity, when state 3 respiratory rate is titrated with carboxyatractyloside, the same relationship is observed between ATP/O ratio and respiratory flux. From many previous studies, it has been shown that an increase in external osmolarity and a consequent decrease in matrix volume inhibits almost all mitochondrial proton pumps (coupling site 1 and 2 of respiratory chain, ATPase) in different ways. In this work, we show that in phosphorylating mitochondria, the adenine nucleotide carrier plays a key role: its inhibition as the external osmolarity increases lowers the state 3 respiration close to state 4 level and consequently leads to a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation efficiency.

  1. Hypothesis on skeletal muscle aging : mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator decreases reactive oxygen species production while preserving coupling efficiency

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    Philippe eDIOLEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane potential is the major regulator of mitochondrial functions, including coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Both functions are crucial for cell bioenergetics. We previously presented evidences for a specific modulation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT appearing during aging that results in a decrease in membrane potential - and therefore ROS production – but surprisingly increases coupling efficiency under conditions of low ATP turnover. Careful study of the bioenergetic parameters (oxidation and phosphorylation rates, membrane potential of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius of aged and young rats revealed a remodeling at the level of the phosphorylation system, in the absence of alteration of the inner mitochondrial membrane (uncoupling or respiratory chain complexes regulation. We further observed a decrease in mitochondrial affinity for ADP in aged isolated mitochondria, and higher sensitivity of ANT to its specific inhibitor atractyloside. This age-induced modification of ANT results in an increase in the ADP concentration required to sustain the same ATP turnover as compared to young muscle, and therefore in a lower membrane potential under phosphorylating - in vivo - conditions. Thus, for equivalent ATP turnover (cellular ATP demand, coupling efficiency is even higher in aged muscle mitochondria, due to the down-regulation of inner membrane proton leak caused by the decrease in membrane potential. In the framework of the radical theory of aging, these modifications in ANT function may be the result of oxidative damage caused by intra mitochondrial ROS and may appear like a virtuous circle where ROS induce a mechanism that reduces their production, without causing uncoupling, and even leading in improved efficiency. Because of the importance of ROS as therapeutic targets, this new mechanism deserves further studies.

  2. Strategies for quantitation of endogenous adenine nucleotides in human plasma using novel ion-pair hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

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    Zhang, Guodong; Walker, Annie D; Lin, Zhaosheng; Han, Xiaogang; Blatnik, Matthew; Steenwyk, Rick C; Groeber, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-17

    We present here a novel and highly sensitive ion-pair hydrophilic interaction chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (IP-HILIC-MS/MS) method for quantitation of highly polar acid metabolites like adenine nucleotides. A mobile phase based on diethylamine (DEA) and hexafluoro-2-isopropanol (HFIP) and an aminopropyl (NH2) column were applied for a novel chromatographic separation for the determination of AMP, ADP and ATP in biological matrices. This novel IP-HILIC mechanism could be hypothesized by the ion-pairing reagent (DEA) in the mobile phase forming neutral and hydrophilic complexes with the analytes of polar organic acids. The IP-HILIC-MS/MS assay for adenine nucleotides was successfully validated with satisfactory linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, reproducibility and matrix effects. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) at 2.00ng/mL obtained for ATP showed a least 10-fold higher sensitivity than previous LC-MS/MS assays except nano-LC-MS/MS assay. In summary, this novel IP-HILIC-MS/MS assay provides a sensitive method for nucleotides bioanalysis and shows great potential to determine a number of organic acids in biological matrices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry: pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides--illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensonides, Femke I C; Bakker, Barbara M; Cremazy, Frederic; Messiha, Hanan L; Mendes, Pedro; Boogerd, Fred C; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2013-09-02

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular monitors of the state of living cells, such as ATP, affect multiple enzymes of the former and that these interactions have gone unnoticed in enzymology. We test this hypothesis in terms of the effect that ATP, ADP, and AMP might have on the major free-energy delivering pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Assaying cell-free extracts, we collected a comprehensive set of quantitative kinetic data concerning the enzymes of the glycolytic and the ethanol fermentation pathways. We determined systematically the extent to which the enzyme activities depend on the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. We found that the effects of the adenine nucleotides on enzymes catalysing reactions in which they are not directly involved as substrate or product, are substantial. This includes effects on the Michaelis-Menten constants, adding new perspective on these, 100 years after their introduction. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Effect of treated-sewage contamination upon bacterial energy charge, adenine nucleotides, and DNA content in a sandy aquifer on cape cod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metge, D.W.; Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in adenylate energy charge (EC(A)) and in total adenine nucleotides (A(T)) and DNA content (both normalized to the abundance of free- living, groundwater bacteria) in response to carbon loading were determined for a laboratory-grown culture and for a contaminated aquifer. The latter study involved a 3-km-long transect through a contaminant plume resulting from continued on-land discharge of secondary sewage to a shallow, sandy aquifer on Cape Cod, Mass. With the exception of the most contaminated groundwater immediately downgradient from the contaminant source, DNA and adenylate levels correlated strongly with bacterial abundance and decreased exponentially with increasing distance downgradient. EC(A)s (0.53 to 0.60) and the ratios of ATP to DNA (0.001 to 0.003) were consistently low, suggesting that the unattached bacteria in this groundwater study are metabolically stressed, despite any eutrophication that might have occurred. Elevated EC(A)s (up to 0.74) were observed in glucose-amended groundwater, confirming that the metabolic state of this microbial community could be altered. In general, per-bacterium DNA and ATP contents were approximately twofold higher in the plume than in surrounding groundwater, although EC(A) and per-bacterium levels of A(T) differed little in the plume and the surrounding uncontaminated groundwater. However, per-bacterium levels of DNA and A(T) varied six- and threefold, respectively, during a 6-h period of decreasing growth rate for an unidentified pseudomonad isolated from contaminated groundwater and grown in batch culture. These data suggest that the DNA content of groundwater bacteria may be more sensitive than their A(T) to the degree of carbon loading, which may have significant ramifications in the use of nucleic acids and adenine nucleotides for estimating the metabolic status of bacterial communities within more highly contaminated aquifers.

  5. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey M. Korotkov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT ‘c’ conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO, tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP, and carboxyatractyloside as well as thiol reagent (4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate (DIDS on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4], as well as an increase in Ca2+-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units, showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito, in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25–75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca2+. The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca2+ alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca2+-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide fixing the ANT in ‘m’ conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript “To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria” (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1].

  6. The effect of holding live sea urchins (Evechinus chloroticus) in air prior to gonad removal on gonad adenine nucleotide profiles during storage at 4°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verachia, Wasseela; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Niven, Brian; Bremer, Philip J

    2013-11-15

    Sea urchin gonads are usually sold as a fresh chilled product. Thus, to evaluate the effect of live urchin's post-harvest conditions on gonad shelf-life, gonads were extracted either immediately after harvesting or after holding urchins in air at either 4 or 15°C for 144 and 72h, respectively. Gonads were subsequently washed in brine and stored at 4°C for 10days prior to adenine nucleotide (nmol/gw/w) profile determination. A decline in ATP (control: 376.16; urchins held in air: 231.58 and 245.16) and build-up of its degradation products, mainly inosine (control: 13.25; urchins held in air: 82.87 and 52.95), was observed in gonads recovered from urchins held in air. A faster increase in ATP degradation products was detected during storage of gonads recovered from urchins held in air, with final K-values (%) of 59.34 and 48.18 being significantly higher than K-values obtained from the controls (29.69, p<0.05), suggesting that post-harvest handling can negatively impact on gonad shelf-life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 2-O-β-D-Glucopyranosyl-carboxyatractyligenin from Coffea L. inhibits adenine nucleotide translocase in isolated mitochondria but is quantitatively degraded during coffee roasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Roman; Fromme, Tobias; Beusch, Anja; Wahl, Anika; Klingenspor, Martin; Hofmann, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Atractyloside (1) and carboxyatractyloside (2) are well-known inhibitors of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) in mitochondria, thus effectively blocking oxidative phosphorylation. Structurally related derivatives atractyligenin (3), 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-atractyligenin (4), 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-atractyligenin)-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), and 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-carboxyatractyligenin (6) were isolated from raw beans of Coffea L. and the impact of 1-6 on ANT activity was evaluated in isolated mitochondria. Among the coffee components, 6 significantly inhibited ANT activity leading to reduced respiration. Quantitative analysis in commercial coffees, experimental roastings of coffee, and model experiments using purified compound 6 consistently revealed a complete degradation during thermal treatment. In comparison, raw coffee extracts were found to contain high levels of 6, which are therefore expected to be present in food products enriched with raw coffee extracts. This implies the necessity of analytically controlling the levels of 6 in raw coffee extracts when used as additives for food products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of extracellular adenine nucleotides hydrolysis in platelets and biomarkers of oxidative stress in Down syndrome individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maurício; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Motta, Elise; Debom, Gabriela; Soares, Fabiano; de Mattos, Bruna da Silveira; Machado, Caroline; Stefanello, Francieli Moro; da Silva, Tatiane Morgana; Martins, Caroline Curry; Dalenogare, Diéssica; Morsch, Vera Maria; Braganhol, Elizandra; Spanevello, Roselia Maria

    2015-08-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the triplication of chromosome 21. Studies have demonstrated platelets abnormalities and oxidative stress in DS subjects. The enzymes NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) represent an important therapeutic target since they interfere in the extracellular nucleotide pool altering platelet functions. In this study, we evaluated the ectonucleotidases activities and oxidative stress parameters in samples of DS and healthy individuals. The population consisted of 28 subjects with DS and 28 healthy subjects as a control group. Blood was obtained from each subject and used for platelet and serum preparation. NTPDase activity using ATP as substrate was increased in platelets of DS patients in relation to the control group; however, no alterations were observed in the ADP hydrolysis. A decrease in the 5'-nucleotidase activity and an increase in the ADA activity was observed in platelet of DS subjects when compared to healthy individuals (P<0.05). The lipid peroxidation and total thiol content was decreased in serum of DS individuals. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased in whole blood of this group (P<0.05). Alterations in the ectonucleotidase activities in platelets as well as changes in the oxidative stress parameters may contribute to the clinical features of DS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of antimycin A and 2-deoxyglucose on secretion in human platelets. Differential inhibition of the secretion of acid hydrolases and adenine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmsen, H; Robkin, L; Day, H J

    1979-08-15

    1. Shape change, aggregation and secretion of dense-granule constituents in platelets differ in their dependence on cellular energy metabolism. The possibility that such a difference also exists between secretion of dense-granule constituents and acid hydrolases was investigated. 2. Human platelets were incubated with [(14)C]adenine in plasma, and then washed and resuspended in salt solutions. The effects of incubating the cells with antimycin A and 2-deoxyglucose on the concentrations of [(14)C]ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP and inosine plus hypoxanthine and on thrombin-induced secretion of ATP plus ADP and acid hydrolases were studied. The metabolic inhibitors only affected (14)C-labelled nucleotides, whereas thrombin only liberated unlabelled ATP and ADP. 3. The extent of secretion decreased progressively with time during incubation with the metabolic inhibitors. At any time the secretion of acid hydrolases, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, beta-glucuronidase and beta-galactosidase was inhibited to a greater extent than secretion of ATP plus ADP (dense-granule secretion). 4. Incubation with the metabolic inhibitors shifted the log (dose)-response relationship to higher thrombin concentrations, and with a greater shift for acid hydrolase secretion than for dense-granule secretion. 5. Antimycin, when present alone, caused a marked decrease in the rate of acid hydrolase secretion, but had no effect on dense-granule secretion. 6. These results further support the view that acid hydrolase secretion and dense-granule secretion are separate processes with different requirements for ATP energy. Acid hydrolase secretion, but not dense-granule secretion, appears to depend on a simultaneous rapid generation of ATP, which can be accomplished by oxidative, but not by glycolytic, ATP production.

  10. Ectopic adenine nucleotide translocase activity controls extracellular ADP levels and regulates the F1-ATPase-mediated HDL endocytosis pathway on hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardouat, G; Duparc, T; Fried, S; Perret, B; Najib, S; Martinez, L O

    2017-09-01

    Ecto-F 1 -ATPase is a complex related to mitochondrial ATP synthase which has been identified as a plasma membrane receptor for apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the major protein of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and has been shown to contribute to HDL endocytosis in several cell types. On hepatocytes, apoA-I binding to ecto-F 1 -ATPase stimulates extracellular ATP hydrolysis into ADP, which subsequently activates a P2Y 13 -mediated HDL endocytosis pathway. Interestingly, other mitochondrial proteins have been found to be expressed at the plasma membrane of several cell types. Among these, adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is an ADP/ATP carrier but its role in controlling extracellular ADP levels and F 1 -ATPase-mediated HDL endocytosis has never been investigated. Here we confirmed the presence of ANT at the plasma membrane of human hepatocytes. We then showed that ecto-ANT activity increases or reduces extracellular ADP level, depending on the extracellular ADP/ATP ratio. Interestingly, ecto-ANT co-localized with ecto-F 1 -ATPase at the hepatocyte plasma membrane and pharmacological inhibition of ecto-ANT activity increased extracellular ADP level when ecto-F 1 -ATPase was activated by apoA-I. This increase in the bioavailability of extracellular ADP accordingly translated into an increase of HDL endocytosis on human hepatocytes. This study thus uncovered a new location and function of ANT for which activity at the cell surface of hepatocytes modulates the concentration of extracellular ADP and regulates HDL endocytosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Amino acid sequence of the nucleotide-binding site of D-(-)-beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase labeled with arylazido-beta-(3-/sup 3/H)alanylnicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Chen, S.; Hatefi, Y.

    1986-08-26

    In the dark, arylazido-beta-alanylnicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (N3-NAD) can replace NAD as cofactor for D-(-)-beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) purified from bovine heart mitochondria. When photoirradiated with visible light, N3-NAD forms a nitrene species that binds covalently to BDH and inhibits the enzyme. NAD(H) protects BDH against photolabeling and inhibition by N3-NAD (Yamaguchi, M., Chen, S., and Hatefi, Y. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4912-4916). In the present study, a tryptic peptide of purified BDH photolabeled with arylazido-beta-(3-/sup 3/H) alanyl-NAD ((/sup 3/H)N3-NAD) was isolated and sequenced. The same tryptic peptide was also isolated from BDH not labeled with (/sup 3/H)N3-NAD and sequenced. Both peptides indicated the sequence Met-Glu-Ser-Tyr-Cys-Thr-Ser-Gly-Ser-Thr-Asp-Thr-Ser-Pro-Val-Ile-Lys. The residue labeled with (/sup 3/H)N3-NAD was Cys. This heptadecapeptide contains 14 uncharged residues and is marked by having in an undecapeptide segment 8 hydroxy amino acids located symmetrically around a central glycine.

  12. Short-hairpin RNA-induced suppression of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 in breast cancer cells restores their susceptibility to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by activating JNK and modulating TRAIL receptor expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chul-Woo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; apo2 ligand induces apoptosis in cancer cells but has little effect on normal cells. However, many cancer cell types are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, limiting the clinical utility of TRAIL as an anti-cancer agent. We previously reported that the suppression of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 (ANT2 by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA induces apoptosis of breast cancer cells, which frequently express high levels of ANT2. In the present study, we examined the effect of RNA shRNA-induced suppression of ANT2 on the resistance of breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Results ANT2 shRNA treatment sensitized MCF7, T47 D, and BT474 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of TRAIL death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5 and down-regulating the TRAIL decoy receptor 2 (DcR2. In MCF7 cells, ANT2 knockdown activated the stress kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, subsequently stabilizing and increasing the transcriptional activity of p53 by phosphorylating it at Thr81; it also enhanced the expression and activity of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1. ANT2 shRNA-induced overexpression of DR4/DR5 and TRAIL sensitization were blocked by a p53 inhibitor, suggesting that p53 activation plays an important role in the transcriptional up-regulation of DR4/DR5. However, ANT2 knockdown also up-regulated DR4/DR5 in the p53-mutant cell lines BT474 and T47 D. In MCF7 cells, ANT2 shRNA treatment led to DcR2 promoter methylation and concomitant down-regulation of DcR2 expression, consistent with the observed activation of DNMT1. Treatment of the cells with a demethylating agent or JNK inhibitor prevented the ANT2 shRNA-induced down-regulation of DcR2 and activation of both p53 and DNMT1. In in vivo experiments using nude mice, ANT2 shRNA caused TRAIL-resistant MCF7 xenografts to undergo TRAIL-induced cell death, up-regulated DR4/DR5

  13. Preparation of /sup 14/C-labelled AMP, ADP and ATP from adenine-8-/sup 14/C by using Brevibacterium ammoniagenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pande, V.N. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Biochemistry and Food Technology Div.)

    1985-04-01

    High radiochemical yields of /sup 14/C-labelled adenine nucleotides (AMP, 4.6%, ADP, 15.5% and ATP 59.5%) could be obtained by growing the cells of Brevibacterium ammoniagenes in the presence of /sup 14/C-adenine. The specific radioactivity of the adenine nucleotides almost reached that of /sup 14/C-adenine indicating negligible dilution of the label. The procedure is convenient and especially suited for commercial preparation of the radiolabelled nucleotides directly from labelled adenine. Preliminary results indicate that the organism could also be used for the preparation of radiolabelled guanine nucleotides.

  14. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  15. Caffeine biosynthesis and adenine metabolism in transgenic Coffea canephora plants with reduced expression of N-methyltransferase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Katahira, Riko; Morimoto, Masayuki; Ogita, Shinjiro; Sano, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    In anti-sense and RNA interference transgenic plants of Coffea canephora in which the expression of CaMXMT1 was suppressed, caffeine biosynthesis from [8-(14)C]adenine was investigated, together with the overall metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine. Compared with wild type control plants, total purine alkaloid biosynthesis from adenine and conversion of theobromine to caffeine were both reduced in the transgenic plants. As found previously, [8-(14)C]adenine was metabolised to salvage products (nucleotides and RNA), to degradation products (ureides and CO(2)) and to purine alkaloids (theobromine and caffeine). In the transgenic plants, metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine shifted from purine alkaloid synthesis to purine catabolism or salvage for nucleotides. HPLC analysis revealed a significantly reduced caffeine content in the transgenic plants. A small quantity (less than 20 nmol g(-1) fresh weight) of xanthosine had accumulated in at least one of the transgenic plants.

  16. Adenine nucleotide pool variations in intact Nitrobacter winogradskyi cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigener, U

    1975-03-10

    1. The ATP pool in Nitrobacter winogradskyi cells was determined by means of the luciferin-luciferase enzyme system and the ADP and AMP pools were measured after enzymatic conversion into ATP. 2. In the first 10 min after addition of nitrite to endogenously respiring cells, which had stood for 5--16 days after completion of the nitrite oxidation, the ATP pool dropped about 60%. 3. During the log phase the ATP pool was approx. 20--40 pmoles/5 mug cell-N. During growth it increased exponentially by 3--4 times the amount until the nitrite had been used up. Subsquently the ATP pool decreased at first rapidly and then more slowly without sinking to 0 in the first 2 months after nitrification. 4. Nitrite oxidizing cells had an energy charge of 0.37 during the log-phase. After approx. 90% of the substrate had been used up the energy charge had reached 0.57. 5. If the CO2 assimilation was inhibited in growing cultures by increased oxygen partial pressure, nitrite oxidation continued but the ATP pool increased. 6. The ATP pool and the activity of the endogenous respiration decreased by more than 50% during the first hours after the substrate had been used up.

  17. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism....... The aim of this article is to provide knowledge of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation to facilitate interpretation of data arising from genetics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in connection with biotechnological processes and beyond....

  18. Adenine N6-methylation in diverse fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    A DNA modification - methylation of cytosines and adenines - has important roles in diverse processes such as regulation of gene expression and genome stability, yet until recently adenine methylation had been considered to be only a hallmark of prokaryotes. A new study identifies abundant

  19. Bound anionic states of adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  20. Radioresistance of Adenine to Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoli Muniz, Gabriel S.; Mejía, Christian F.; Martinez, Rafael; Auge, Basile; Rothard, Hermann; Domaracka, Alicja; Boduch, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The presence of nucleobases in carbonaceous meteorites on Earth is an indication of the existence of this class of molecules in outer space. However, space is permeated by ionizing radiation, which can have damaging effects on these molecules. Adenine is a purine nucleobase that amalgamates important biomolecules such as DNA, RNA, and ATP. Adenine has a unique importance in biochemistry and therefore life. The aim of this work was to study the effects of cosmic ray analogues on solid adenine and estimate its survival when exposed to corpuscular radiation. Adenine films were irradiated at GANIL (Caen, France) and GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) by 820 MeV Kr33+, 190 MeV Ca10+, 92 MeV Xe23+, and 12 MeV C4+ ion beams at low temperature. The evolution of adenine molecules under heavy ion irradiation was studied by IR absorption spectroscopy as a function of projectile fluence. It was found that the adenine destruction cross section (σd) follows an electronic stopping power (Se) power law under the form: CSen; C is a constant, and the exponential n is a dimensionless quantity. Using the equation above to fit our results, we determined σd = 4 × 10-17 Se1.17, with Se in kiloelectronvolts per micrometer (keV μm-1). New IR absorption bands arise under irradiation of adenine and can be attributed to HCN, CN-, C2H4N4, CH3CN, and (CH3)3CNC. These findings may help to understand the stability and chemistry related to complex organic molecules in space. The half-life of solid adenine exposed to the simulated interstellar medium cosmic ray flux was estimated as (10 ± 8) × 106 years.

  1. The biased nucleotide composition of the HIV genome: a constant factor in a highly variable virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; Berkhout, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Viruses often deviate from their hosts in the nucleotide composition of their genomes. The RNA genome of the lentivirus family of retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), contains e. g. an above average percentage of adenine (A) nucleotides, while being extremely poor in cytosine

  2. Effects of purine nucleotide administration on purine nucleotide metabolism in brains of heroin-dependent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Heroin is known to enhance catabolism and inhibit anabolism of purine nucleotides, leading to purine nucleotide deficiencies in rat brains. Here, we determined the effect of exogenous purine nucleotide administration on purine nucleotide metabolism in the brains of heroin-dependent rats. Heroin was administrated in increasing doses for 9 consecutive days to induce addiction, and the biochemical changes associated with heroin and purine nucleotide administration were compared among the treated groups. HPLC was performed to detect the absolute concentrations of purine nucleotides in the rat brain cortices. The enzymatic activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA and xanthine oxidase (XO in the treated rat cortices were analyzed, and qRT-PCR was performed to determine the relative expression of ADA, XO, adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT, hypoxanthine-guaninephosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT, and adenosine kinase (AK. Heroin increased the enzymatic activity of ADA and XO, and up-regulated the transcription of ADA and XO. Alternatively, heroin decreased the transcription of AK, APRT, and HGPRT in the rat cortices. Furthermore, purine nucleotide administration alleviated the effect of heroin on purine nucleotide content, activity of essential purine nucleotide metabolic enzymes, and transcript levels of these genes. Our findings therefore represent a novel, putative approach to the treatment of heroin addiction.

  3. Role of adenine in thymine-dimer repair by reduced flavin-adenine dinucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guifeng; Sichula, Vincent; Glusac, Ksenija D

    2008-08-28

    We present a study of excited-state behavior of reduced flavin cofactors using femtosecond optical transient absorption spectroscopy. The reduced flavin cofactors studied were in two protonation states: flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FADH2 and FADH-) and flavin-mononucleotide (FMNH2 and FMNH-). We find that FMNH- exhibits multiexponential decay dynamics due to the presence of two bent conformers of the isoalloxazine ring. FMNH2 exhibits an additional fast deactivation component that is assigned to an iminol tautomer. Reduced flavin cofactors also exhibit a long-lived component that is attributed to the semiquinone and the hydrated electron that are produced in photoinduced electron transfer to the solvent. The presence of adenine in FADH2 and FADH- further changes the excited-state dynamics due to intramolecular electron transfer from the isoalloxazine to the adenine moiety of cofactors. This electron transfer is more pronounced in FADH2 due to pi-stacking interactions between two moieties. We further studied cyclobutane thymine dimer (TT-dimer) repair via FADH- and FMNH- and found that the repair is much more efficient in the case of FADH-. These results suggest that the adenine moiety plays a significant role in the TT-dimer repair dynamics. Two possible explanations for the adenine mediation are presented: (i) a two-step electron transfer process, with the initial electron transfer occurring from flavin to adenine moiety of FADH-, followed by a second electron transfer from adenine to TT-dimer; (ii) the preconcentration of TT-dimer molecules around the flavin cofactor due to the hydrophobic nature of the adenine moiety.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Modified with 2'-Amino-α-l-LNA Adenine Monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai K; Anderson, Brooke A; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    The development of conformationally restricted nucleotide building blocks continues to attract considerable interest because of their successful use within antisense, antigene, and other gene-targeting strategies. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) and its diastereomer α-l-LNA are two interesting examples...... (ONs) modified with 2'-amino-α-l-LNA adenine monomers W-Z. The synthesis of the target phosphoramidites 1-4 is initiated from pentafuranose 5, which upon Vorbrüggen glycosylation, O2'-deacylation, O2'-activation and C2'-azide introduction yields nucleoside 8. A one-pot tandem Staudinger....... ONs modified with pyrene-functionalized 2'-amino-α-l-LNA adenine monomers X-Z display greatly increased affinity toward DNA targets (ΔTm/modification up to +14 °C). Results from absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that the duplex stabilization is a result of pyrene intercalation...

  5. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide-protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson-Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson-Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues.

  6. Differences in Electrostatic Potential Around DNA Fragments Containing Adenine and 8-oxo-Adenine. An Analysis Based on Regular Cylindrical Projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Miller, John H; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-07-01

    Changes of electrostatic potential (EP) around the DNA molecule resulting from chemical modifications of nucleotides may play a role in enzymatic recognition of damaged sites. Effects of chemical modifications of nucleotides on the structure of DNA have been characterized through large scale density functional theory computations. Quantum mechanical structural optimizations of DNA fragments with three pairs of nucleotides and accompanying counteractions were performed with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and 6-31G** basis sets. The “intact” DNA fragment contained adenine in the middle layer, while the “damaged” fragment had the adenine replaced with 8-oxo-adenine. The electrostatic potential around these DNA fragments was projected on a cylindrical surface around the double helix. The two-dimensional maps of EP of the intact and damaged DNA fragments were analyzed to identify these modifications of EP that result from the occurrence of 8-oxo-adenine (8oA). It was found that distortions of a phosphate group neighboring 8oA and displacements of the accompanying countercation are clearly reflected in the EP maps. Helpful discussions Michel Dupuis are gratefully acknowledged. Authors wish to thank Marcel Swart for directing us to a compilation of van der Waals radii. This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G. and M.H.), (ii) the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG03-02ER63470 (JHM), (iii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-6 (MG), (iv) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national

  7. Metabolism of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide in Human and Bovine Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasǎrov, Luka B.; Moat, Albert G.

    1972-01-01

    A marked difference was found to exist between the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) glycohydrolase activity of human strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as compared with bovine strains. Human strains had from 6- to 20-fold higher NAD glycohydrolase activity than bovine strains. This finding explains the accumulation of free nicotinic acid in the culture medium by human strains and not by bovine strains. The biosynthetic intermediates nicotinic acid mononucleotide and deamido-NAD were not degraded by either human or bovine strains of M. tuberculosis; hence these nucleotides do not represent a source of the nicotinic acid accumulated by the human strains. PMID:4336690

  8. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  9. Influence of Magnetic Microparticles Isolation on Adenine Homonucleotides Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kremplova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The electroactivity of purine and pyrimidine bases is the most important property of nucleic acids that is very useful for determining oligonucleotides using square wave voltammetry. This study was focused on the electrochemical behavior of adenine-containing oligonucleotides before and after their isolation using paramagnetic particles. Two peaks were detected—peak A related to the reduction of adenine base and another peak B involved in the interactions between individual adenine strands and contributes to the formation of various spatial structures. The influence of the number of adenine bases in the strand in the isolation process using paramagnetic particles was investigated too.

  10. [Methylation of adenine residues in DNA of eukaryotes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniushin, B F

    2005-01-01

    Like in bacteria, DNA in these organisms is subjected to enzymatic modification (methylation) both at adenine and cytosine residues. There is an indirect evidence that adenine DNA methylation takes place also in animals. In plants m6A was detected in total, mitochondrial and nuclear DNAs; in plants one and the same gene (DRM2) can be methylated both at adenine and cytosine residues. ORF homologous to bacterial adenine DNA-methyltransferases are present in nuclear DNA of protozoa, yeasts, insects, nematodes, higher plants, vertebrates and other eukaryotes. Thus, adenine DNA-methyltransferases can be found in the various evolutionary distant eukaryotes. First N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (wadmtase) of higher eukaryotes was isolated from vacuolar fraction of vesicles obtained from aging wheat coleoptiles; in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine this Mg2+ -, Ca2+ -dependent enzyme de novo methylates first adenine residue in TGATCA sequence in single- and double-stranded DNA but it prefers single-stranded DNA structures. Adenine DNA methylation in eukaryotes seems to be involved in regulation of both gene expression and DNA replication including replication of mitochondrial DNA. It can control persistence of foreign DNA in a cell and seems to be an element of R-M system in plants. Thus, in eukaryotic cell there are, at least, two different systems of the enzymatic DNA methylations (adenine and cytosine ones) and a special type of regulation of gene functioning based on the combinatory hierarchy of these interdependent genome modifications.

  11. NUCLEOTIDES IN INFANT FEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G. Mamonova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the application of nucleotides-metabolites, playing a key role in many biological processes, for the infant feeding. The researcher provides the date on the nucleotides in the women's milk according to the lactation stages. She also analyzes the foreign experience in feeding newborns with nucleotides-containing milk formulas. The article gives a comparison of nucleotides in the adapted formulas represented in the domestic market of the given products.Key words: children, feeding, nucleotides.

  12. Femtosecond Charge Transfer Dynamics of a Modified DNA Base: 2-Aminopurine in Complexes with Nucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Fiebig, Torsten; Wan, Chaozhi; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2002-01-01

    As a fluorescent isomer of adenine, 2-aminopurine (Ap) is a powerful probe of DNA dynamics and DNA-mediated charge transfer processes. Here, we report studies with femtosecond resolution of the excited-state dynamics of Ap in various solvents and in bimolecular complexes with nucleotides. Using time-resolved transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion methods we identify charge transfer as the origin for the quenching of the Ap fluorescence by all four DNA nucleotides. The direction o...

  13. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; Shock, David D.; Kim, Taejin; Schlick, Tamar; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, which is found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate Escherichia coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerases discriminate between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities, nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine and 8-oxo-dGTP(syn) uses its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine. Here we use time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite adenine or cytosine with human pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen-bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxo-dGTP uses charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.

  14. Absence of Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition but presence of bongkrekate-sensitive nucleotide exchange in C. crangon and P. serratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Torocsik, Beata; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria from the embryos of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) do not undergo Ca(2+)-induced permeability transition in the presence of a profound Ca(2+) uptake capacity. Furthermore, this crustacean is the only organism known to exhibit bongkrekate-insensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide exchange, prompting the conjecture that refractoriness to bongkrekate and absence of Ca(2+)-induced permeability transition are somehow related phenomena. Here we report that mitochondria isolated from two other crustaceans, brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) and common prawn (Palaemon serratus) exhibited bongkrekate-sensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport, but lacked a Ca(2+)-induced permeability transition. Ca(2+) uptake capacity was robust in the absence of adenine nucleotides in both crustaceans, unaffected by either bongkrekate or cyclosporin A. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria showed needle-like formations of electron-dense material strikingly similar to those observed in mitochondria from the hepatopancreas of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) and the embryos of Artemia franciscana. Alignment analysis of the partial coding sequences of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) expressed in Crangon crangon and Palaemon serratus versus the complete sequence expressed in Artemia franciscana reappraised the possibility of the 208-214 amino acid region for conferring sensitivity to bongkrekate. However, our findings suggest that the ability to undergo Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition and the sensitivity of adenine nucleotide translocase to bongkrekate are not necessarily related phenomena.

  15. Absence of Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition but presence of bongkrekate-sensitive nucleotide exchange in C. crangon and P. serratus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Konrad

    Full Text Available Mitochondria from the embryos of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana do not undergo Ca(2+-induced permeability transition in the presence of a profound Ca(2+ uptake capacity. Furthermore, this crustacean is the only organism known to exhibit bongkrekate-insensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide exchange, prompting the conjecture that refractoriness to bongkrekate and absence of Ca(2+-induced permeability transition are somehow related phenomena. Here we report that mitochondria isolated from two other crustaceans, brown shrimp (Crangon crangon and common prawn (Palaemon serratus exhibited bongkrekate-sensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport, but lacked a Ca(2+-induced permeability transition. Ca(2+ uptake capacity was robust in the absence of adenine nucleotides in both crustaceans, unaffected by either bongkrekate or cyclosporin A. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ca(2+-loaded mitochondria showed needle-like formations of electron-dense material strikingly similar to those observed in mitochondria from the hepatopancreas of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus and the embryos of Artemia franciscana. Alignment analysis of the partial coding sequences of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT expressed in Crangon crangon and Palaemon serratus versus the complete sequence expressed in Artemia franciscana reappraised the possibility of the 208-214 amino acid region for conferring sensitivity to bongkrekate. However, our findings suggest that the ability to undergo Ca(2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition and the sensitivity of adenine nucleotide translocase to bongkrekate are not necessarily related phenomena.

  16. Differential stabilization of adenine quartets by anions and cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wijst, Tushar; Lippert, Bernhard; Swart, Marcel; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated the structures and stabilities of four different adenine quartets with alkali and halide ions in the gas phase and in water, using dispersion-corrected density functional theory at the BLYP-D/TZ2P level. First, we examine the empty quartets and how they interact with alkali cations and halide anions with formation of adenine quartet-ion complexes. Second, we examine the interaction in a stack, in which a planar adenine quartet interacts with a cation or anion in the periphery as well as in the center of the quartet. Interestingly, for the latter situation, we find that both cations and anions can stabilize a planar adenine quartet in a stack.

  17. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis promotes liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Moffitt, Andrea; Ndungu, Joan; Dellinger, Ryan W; Davis, James G; Agarwal, Beamon; Baur, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    The regenerative capacity of the liver is essential for recovery from surgical resection or injuries induced by trauma or toxins. During liver regeneration, the concentration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) falls, at least in part due to metabolic competition for precursors. To test whether NAD availability restricts the rate of liver regeneration, we supplied nicotinamide riboside (NR), an NAD precursor, in the drinking water of mice subjected to partial hepatectomy. NR increased DNA synthesis, mitotic index, and mass restoration in the regenerating livers. Intriguingly, NR also ameliorated the steatosis that normally accompanies liver regeneration. To distinguish the role of hepatocyte NAD levels from any systemic effects of NR, we generated mice overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme for NAD synthesis, specifically in the liver. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase overexpressing mice were mildly hyperglycemic at baseline and, similar to mice treated with NR, exhibited enhanced liver regeneration and reduced steatosis following partial hepatectomy. Conversely, mice lacking nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in hepatocytes exhibited impaired regenerative capacity that was completely rescued by administering NR. NAD availability is limiting during liver regeneration, and supplementation with precursors such as NR may be therapeutic in settings of acute liver injury. (Hepatology 2017;65:616-630). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. Phosphoribulokinase from Nitrobacter winogradskyi: activation by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and inhibition by pyridoxal phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesow, L A; Lindsley, B F; Bless, J W

    1977-04-01

    CO2 fixation by particle-free extracts from Nitrobacter winogradskyi increased by addition of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, however, increased CO2 fixation, even in the absence of NADH. Phosphoribulokinase (EC 2.7.1.19) was the enzyme of Nitrobacter extracts that was activated specifically by NADH. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate inhibited both CO2 fixation and NADH-activated phosphoribulokinase from Nitrobacter. However, it did not affect phosphoribulokinase from spinach leaves. Since the spinach enzyme had also no requirement for reduced pyridine nucleotides, it appears that pyridoxal phosphate interferes only with the binding of NADH and not with the binding of ribulose-5-phosphate and adenosine-5'-triphosphate. The regulation of phosphoribulokinase activity by NADH provided Nitrobacter with an energy-dependent control mechanism of CO2 assimilation.

  19. Evidence of formation of adenine dimer cation radical in DNA: the importance of adenine base stacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuo

    2010-04-29

    Deprotonation of the adenine (A) base in both mononucleotide and oligonucleotide (ODN) was measured by nanosecond pulse radiolysis. The cation radical (A(+*)) of deoxyadenosine (dA), produced by oxidation with SO(4)(-*), rapidly deprotonated to form the neutral A radical (A(- H)(*)) with a rate constant of 2.0 x 10(7) s(-1) and a pK(a) value of 4.2, as determined by transient spectroscopy. A similar process was observed in experiments performed on a variety of double-stranded ODNs containing adenine x thymine (A x T) base pairs. The transient spectrum of A(+)(*) in an ODN composed of alternating A x T pairs was essentially identical to that of free dA and differed from the spectra of ODNs containing AA and AAA. In contrast, the spectra of A(- H)(*) were not affected by the sequence. These results suggest that the positive charge on A(+)(*) in ODNs is delocalized as the dimer is stabilized by pi-orbital stacking between adjacent A's. The rate constants for deprotonation of A(+)(*) in ODNs containing AA and AAA (0.9-1.1 x 10(7) s(-1)) were a factor of 2 smaller than the rate constants for deprotonation of A(+)(*) in ODNs containing alternating A x T and dA (2.0 x 10(7) s(-1)). This suggests that the formation of a charge resonance stabilized dimer AA(+)(*) in DNA produced a significant barrier to deprotonation.

  20. Nucleotide Metabolism in Salt-Stressed Zea mays L. Root Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Todd A.; Nieman, Richard H.; Clark, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Corn plants (Zea mays L. cv Pioneer 3906) were grown in a glass house on control and saline nutrient solutions, in winter and summer. There were two saline treatments, both with osmotic potential = −0.4 megapascal but with different Ca2+/Na+ ratios: 0.03 and 0.73. Root tips and shoot meristems (culm tissue) of 26 day-old plants were analyzed for nucleotides to ascertain if there were correlations between nucleotide pool size and the reduced growth on saline cultures. Several other cell components also were determined. Plants grown in winter were only half as large as those grown in summer mainly because of the lower light intensity and lower temperature. But the relative yield reduction on salt treatment compared to the control was similar in winter and summer. The two different salt treatments caused similar yield reductions. Neither salt treatment affected nucleotide pools in culm tissue, with the possible exception of UDPG in winter. In the case of root tips, salt treatment had little or no effect on nucleotide pool sizes in winter when many already seemed near a critical minimum, but in summer it reduced several pools including ATP, total adenine nucleotide, UTP, total uridine nucleotide, and UDP-glucose. The reductions were greatest on the salt treatment with low Ca2+/Na+. There was no simple correlation between the effects of salt stress on growth and on nucleotide pool size. The nucleotide pools of culm tissue indicated that in some respects this tissue was effectively insulated from the salt stress. Roots that were in direct contact with the saline solution indicated significant reductions in nucleotide pools only in the summer whereas growth was reduced both summer and winter. It is possible that the nucleotide concentrations of root cells in winter were already near a critical minimum so that nucleotide synthesis and growth were tightly linked. Significant reductions in nucleotide pools that would be expected to affect growth were more evident in summer

  1. Classifying Coding DNA with Nucleotide Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Carels

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we compared the success rate of classification of coding sequences (CDS vs. introns by Codon Structure Factor (CSF and by a method that we called Universal Feature Method (UFM. UFM is based on the scoring of purine bias (Rrr and stop codon frequency. We show that the success rate of CDS/intron classification by UFM is higher than by CSF. UFM classifies ORFs as coding or non-coding through a score based on (i the stop codon distribution, (ii the product of purine probabilities in the three positions of nucleotide triplets, (iii the product of Cytosine (C, Guanine (G, and Adenine (A probabilities in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd positions of triplets, respectively, (iv the probabilities of G in 1st and 2nd position of triplets and (v the distance of their GC3 vs. GC2 levels to the regression line of the universal correlation. More than 80% of CDSs (true positives of Homo sapiens (>250 bp, Drosophila melanogaster (>250 bp and Arabidopsis thaliana (>200 bp are successfully classified with a false positive rate lower or equal to 5%. The method releases coding sequences in their coding strand and coding frame, which allows their automatic translation into protein sequences with 95% confidence. The method is a natural consequence of the compositional bias of nucleotides in coding sequences.

  2. DNA adenine hypomethylation leads to metabolic rewiring in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaiwale, Nayana S; Basu, Bhakti; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Apte, Shree K

    2015-08-03

    The protein encoded by DR_0643 gene from Deinococcus radiodurans was shown to be an active N-6 adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase (Dam). Deletion of corresponding protein reduced adenine methylation in the genome by 60% and resulted in slow-growth phenotype. Proteomic changes induced by DNA adenine hypomethylation were mapped by two-dimensional protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. As compared to wild type D. radiodurans cells, at least 54 proteins were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. Among these, 39 metabolic enzymes were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. The most prominent change was DNA adenine hypomethylation induced de-repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E1 component (aceE) gene resulting in 10 fold increase in the abundance of corresponding protein. The observed differential expression profile of metabolic enzymes included increased abundance of enzymes involved in fatty acid and amino acid degradation to replenish acetyl Co-A and TCA cycle intermediates and diversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate into amino acid biosynthesis, a metabolic rewiring attempt by Δdam mutant to restore energy generation via glycolysis-TCA cycle axis. This is the first report of DNA adenine hypomethylation mediated rewiring of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Main: Nucleotide Analysis [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -acting regulatory DNA elements Database kome_place_search_result.zip kome_place_search_result ... ...Nucleotide Analysis PLACE search result Result of signal search against PLACE : cis

  4. Main: Nucleotide Analysis [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nucleotide Analysis Japonica genome blast search result Result of blastn search against japon...ica genome sequence kome_japonica_genome_blast_search_result.zip kome_japonica_genome_blast_search_result ...

  5. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of recombinant adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyna, E. V.; Timofeev, V. I.; Tuzova, E. S.; Kostromina, M. A.; Murav'eva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2017-07-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) belongs to the type I phosphoribosyltransferase family and catalyzes the formation of adenosine monophosphate via transfer of the 5-phosphoribosyl group from phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate to the nitrogen atom N9 of the adenine base. Proteins of this family are involved in a salvage pathway of nucleotide synthesis, thus providing purine base utilization and maintaining the optimal level of purine bases in the body. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from the extremely thermophilic Thermus thermophilus strain HB27 was produced using a highly efficient E. coli producer strain and was then purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. This enzyme was successfully employed as a catalyst for the cascade biosynthesis of biologically important nucleotides. The screening of crystallization conditions for recombinant APRT from T. thermophilus HB27 was performed in order to determine the enzyme structure by X-ray diffraction. The crystallization conditions, which were found by the vapor-diffusion technique, were then optimized to apply the counter-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P1211 and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 69.86 Å, b = 82.16 Å, c = 91.39 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 102.58°. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the APRT structure at 2.6 Å resolution was collected from the crystals at the SPring-8 synchrotron facility (Japan).

  7. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of the Complexes of Silver with Adenine and dAMP

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Cornelis; Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; Greve, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP) at positive surface potentials of a silver working electrode was investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The use of positive potentials in the presence of adenine or dAMP leads to a rapid accumulation of an intense spectrum. It is proposed that complexes of adenine (dAMP) with silver generate the observed spectra. Adenine and dAMP can be distinguished spectroscopically due to various different complexe...

  8. Protection of Chinese herbs against Adenine-induced chronic renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of Chinese herbs (Angelica sinensis, Ligusticum wallichii, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Rhizoma dioscoreae, Rhodiola crenilata, Astragalus membranaceus and Angelica sinensis) on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. 30 age-matched male Wistar rats were divided into three ...

  9. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  10. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  11. Characterization of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in the iceman's mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Olivieri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The degradation of DNA represents one of the main issues in the genetic analysis of archeological specimens. In the recent years, a particular kind of post-mortem DNA modification giving rise to nucleotide misincorporation ("miscoding lesions" has been the object of extensive investigations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To improve our knowledge regarding the nature and incidence of ancient DNA nucleotide misincorporations, we have utilized 6,859 (629,975 bp mitochondrial (mt DNA sequences obtained from the 5,350-5,100-years-old, freeze-desiccated human mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Otzi. To generate the sequences, we have applied a mixed PCR/pyrosequencing procedure allowing one to obtain a particularly high sequence coverage. As a control, we have produced further 8,982 (805,155 bp mtDNA sequences from a contemporary specimen using the same system and starting from the same template copy number of the ancient sample. From the analysis of the nucleotide misincorporation rate in ancient, modern, and putative contaminant sequences, we observed that the rate of misincorporation is significantly lower in modern and putative contaminant sequence datasets than in ancient sequences. In contrast, type 2 transitions represent the vast majority (85% of the observed nucleotide misincorporations in ancient sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides a further contribution to the knowledge of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in DNA sequences obtained from freeze-preserved archeological specimens. In the Iceman system, ancient sequences can be clearly distinguished from contaminants on the basis of nucleotide misincorporation rates. This observation confirms a previous identification of the ancient mummy sequences made on a purely phylogenetical basis. The present investigation provides further indication that the majority of ancient DNA damage is reflected by type 2 (cytosine-->thymine/guanine-->adenine

  12. Bioinspired Adhesive Hydrogel Driven by Adenine and Thymine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Qin; Gao, Zijian; Hou, Ruibin; Gao, Guanghui

    2017-05-24

    Bioinspired strategies have drawn much attention for designing intelligent hydrogels with promising performance. Herein, we present a bioinspired adhesive hydrogel driven by adenine and thymine, which are the basic units of DNA. The adhesive hydrogel exhibited promising adhesive property for the surface of various solid materials, including muscle tissues, plastics, rubbers, glasses, metals, ceramics, carnelians, and woods. The maximum peeling strength of hydrogels was 330 N m-1 on aluminum, superior to that of PAAm hydrogels with 70 N m-1. The strong adhesive behavior remained more than 30 times repeated peeling tests. Moreover, the swelling behavior, morphological structure, mechanical strength, and peeling adhesive strength were also investigated and confirmed the formation and various characteristics of adhesive hydrogels driven by adenine and thymine. Thus, the biomimetic strategy to design promising adhesive hydrogels can provide various opportunities in tissue engineering, such as wound dressing, bioglues, and tissue adhesives.

  13. Weurotoxicologic profile of new adenine substances with antiviral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.G. Kovalev

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to study pharmacological properties and to determine safety effect diapason, toxico-logical properties of new adenine substances 9-[2-(4-isopropylphenopxy aethyl] adenine under laboratory code VMA-99-82 which obtains antiviral activity in vitro. the results of the research of neurotoxicologic profile of combination of VMA-99-82 are presented in the work using technique of multistage testing according to «S.lrvin». while performing the research it has been established that safety level of substance VMA-99-82 refers to the class of low toxic combination. the diapason of doses (from 18,7 to 300 mg/kg of substance evident therapeutic effect has been determined. Side-effects are not expressed significantly. therapeutic effect of the combination VMA-99-82 has behavioral reactions. thus the given substance must be further studied for psychotropic effect and its mechanism action

  14. Dynamics and reactivity in Thermus aquaticus N6-adenine methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Juan; Zinovjev, Kirill; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-11-19

    M.TaqI is a DNA methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N6 position of an adenine, a process described only in prokaryotes. We have used full atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the protein-SAM-DNA ternary complex where the target adenine is flipped out into the active site. Key protein-DNA interactions established by the target adenine in the active site are described in detail. The relaxed structure was used for a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics exploration of the reaction mechanism using the string method. According to our free energy calculations the reaction takes place through a stepwise mechanism where the methyl transfer precedes the abstraction of the proton from the exocyclic amino group. The methyl transfer is the rate-determining step, and the obtained free energy barrier is in good agreement with the value derived from the experimental rate constant. Two possible candidates to extract the leftover proton have been explored: a water molecule found in the active site and Asn105, a residue activated by the hydrogen bonds formed through the amide hydrogens. The barrier for the proton abstraction is smaller when Asn105 acts as a base. The reaction mechanisms can be different in other N6-DNA-methyltransferases, as determined from the exploration of the reaction mechanism in the Asn105Asp M.TaqI mutant.

  15. Sequencing of adenine in DNA by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2017-08-01

    The development of DNA sequencing technology utilizing the detection of a tunnel current is important for next-generation sequencer technologies based on single-molecule analysis technology. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, we previously reported that dI/dV measurements and dI/dV mapping revealed that the guanine base (purine base) of DNA adsorbed onto the Cu(111) surface has a characteristic peak at V s = -1.6 V. If, in addition to guanine, the other purine base of DNA, namely, adenine, can be distinguished, then by reading all the purine bases of each single strand of a DNA double helix, the entire base sequence of the original double helix can be determined due to the complementarity of the DNA base pair. Therefore, the ability to read adenine is important from the viewpoint of sequencing. Here, we report on the identification of adenine by STM topographic and spectroscopic measurements using a synthetic DNA oligomer and viral DNA.

  16. Fragmentation mechanisms of cytosine, adenine and guanine ionized bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr-Arani, Leila; Mignon, Pierre; Chermette, Henry; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2015-05-07

    The different fragmentation channels of cytosine, adenine and guanine have been studied through DFT calculations. The electronic structure of bases, their cations, and the fragments obtained by breaking bonds provides a good understanding of the fragmentation process that can complete the experimental approach. The calculations allow assigning various fragments to the given peaks. The comparison between the energy required for the formation of fragments and the peak intensity in the mass spectrum is used. For cytosine and guanine the elimination of the HNCO molecule is a major route of dissociation, while for adenine multiple loss of HCN or HNC can be followed up to small fragments. For cytosine, this corresponds to the initial bond cleavage of N3-C4/N1-C2, which represents the main dissociation route. For guanine the release of HNCO is obtained through the N1-C2/C5-C6 bond cleavage (reverse order also possible) leading to the largest peak of the spectrum. The corresponding energies of 3.5 and 3.9 eV are typically in the range available in the experiments. The loss of NH3 or HCN is also possible but requires more energy. For adenine, fragmentation consists of multiple loss of the HCN molecule and the main route corresponding to HC8N9 loss is followed by the release of HC2N1.

  17. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide–protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide–protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson–Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson–Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues. PMID:21737431

  18. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Pereira, Vania; Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent DNA sequence variations in the genome. They have been studied extensively in the last decade with various purposes in mind. In this chapter, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using SNPs for human identification...... technologies (also called next generation sequencing or NGS) have the potential to completely transform forensic genetic investigations as we know them today. Here, we will make a short introduction to NGS and explain how NGS may combine analysis of the traditional forensic genetic markers with analysis...

  19. Complete nucleotide sequence of minicircle kinetoplast DNA from Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrois, M; Riou, G; Galibert, F

    1981-06-01

    The kinetoplast DNA of Trypanosoma equiperdum is composed of about 3000 supercoiled minicircles of 1000 base pairs and about 50 supercoiled maxicircles of 23,000 base pairs topologically interlocked so as to form a compact network. Minicircles of T. equiperdum, which are homogeneous in base sequence, were purified by equilibrium CsCl centrifugation and used as starting material for DNA sequence analysis. One minicircle is composed of 1012 base pairs and has an adenine.thymine base pair content of 72.8%. The termination codons are uniformly distributed along the molecule and restrict the coding potentiality of the molecule to oligopeptides of about 20 amino acids. The molecule contains three dyad symmetries and a sequence of 12 nucleotides is repeated six times. We also noted the presence of a region of about 130 base pairs that is almost perfectly homologous with that of the minicircles from the closely related species T. brucei.

  20. The Controversial Orientation of Adenine on Gold and Silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harroun, Scott G

    2018-01-22

    In which orientation does adenine adsorb on gold and silver surfaces? This question has been a matter of debate for over 30 years. Since the dawn of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), it and other techniques such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (DFT) simulations, and more, have been used in numerous attempts to answer this seemingly straightforward yet important question. Herein, the timeline and recent advances on this topic are explored, and the frequently contradictory findings are put into context and discussed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  2. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  3. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  4. Statistical properties of nucleotides in human chromosomes 21 and 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Linxi [Department of Physics, Wenzhou Normal College, Wenzhou 325027 (China)]. E-mail: Lxzhang@hzcnc.com; Sun Tingting [Department of Physics, Wenzhou Normal College, Wenzhou 325027 (China); Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2005-02-01

    In this paper the statistical properties of nucleotides in human chromosomes 21 and 22 are investigated. The n-tuple Zipf analysis with n = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 is used in our investigation. It is found that the most common n-tuples are those which consist only of adenine (A) and thymine (T), and the rarest n-tuples are those in which GC or CG pattern appears twice. With the n-tuples become more and more frequent, the double GC or CG pattern becomes a single GC or CG pattern. The percentage of four nucleotides in the rarest ten and the most common ten n-tuples are also considered in human chromosomes 21 and 22, and different behaviors are found in the percentage of four nucleotides. Frequency of appearance of n-tuple f(r) as a function of rank r is also examined. We find the n-tuple Zipf plot shows a power-law behavior for r < 4{sup n-1} and a rapid decrease for r > 4{sup n-1}. In order to explore the interior statistical properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 in detail, we divide the chromosome sequence into some moving windows and we discuss the percentage of {xi}{eta} ({xi}, {eta} = A, C, G, T) pair in those moving windows. In some particular regions, there are some obvious changes in the percentage of {xi}{eta} pair, and there maybe exist functional differences. The normalized number of repeats N{sub 0}(l) can be described by a power law: N{sub 0}(l) {approx} l{sup -{mu}}. The distance distributions P{sub 0}(S) between two nucleotides in human chromosomes 21 and 22 are also discussed. A two-order polynomial fit exists in those distance distributions: log P{sub 0}(S) = a + bS + cS{sup 2}, and it is quite different from the random sequence.

  5. Charges of Nicotinamide Adenine nucleotides and Adenylate Energy Charge as regulatory parameters of the metabolism in Eschericia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Bahl; von Meyenburg, Kaspar

    1977-01-01

    NADH/(NADH+NAD), NADPH/(NADPH+NADP) and (ATP+½ADP)/(ATP+ADP+AMP) respectively has the values 0.05, 0.45 and 0.9 during steady state growth. The changes of the charges during changes of growth are examined.......NADH/(NADH+NAD), NADPH/(NADPH+NADP) and (ATP+½ADP)/(ATP+ADP+AMP) respectively has the values 0.05, 0.45 and 0.9 during steady state growth. The changes of the charges during changes of growth are examined....

  6. Silver-induced reconstruction of an adeninate-based metal-organic framework for encapsulation of luminescent adenine-stabilized silver clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Dries; Coutino-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Baekelant, Wouter; Bueken, Bart; Reinsch, Helge; Stassen, Ivo; Fenwick, Oliver; Richard, Fanny; Samorì, Paolo; Ameloot, Rob; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; De Vos, Dirk E

    2016-05-21

    Bright luminescent silver-adenine species were successfully stabilized in the pores of the MOF-69A (zinc biphenyldicarboxylate) metal-organic framework, starting from the intrinsically blue luminescent bio-MOF-1 (zinc adeninate 4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylate). Bio-MOF-1 is transformed to the MOF-69A framework by selectively leaching structural adenine linkers from the original framework using silver nitrate solutions in aqueous ethanol. Simultaneously, bright blue-green luminescent silver-adenine clusters are formed inside the pores of the recrystallized MOF-69A matrix in high local concentrations. The structural transition and concurrent changes in optical properties were characterized using a range of structural, physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques (steady-state and time-resolved luminescence, quantum yield determination, fluorescence microscopy). The presented results open new avenues for exploring the use of MOFs containing luminescent silver clusters for solid-state lighting and sensor applications.

  7. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  8. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of the Complexes of Silver with Adenine and dAMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Cornelis; Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; Greve, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP) at positive surface potentials of a silver working electrode was investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The use of positive potentials in the presence of adenine or dAMP leads to a rapid accumulation of an

  9. Absorption spectroscopy of adenine, 9-methyladenine, and 2-aminopurine in helium nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Rijs, A. M.; Buma, W. J.; Drabbels, M.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution absorption spectra of adenine, 9-methyladenine and 2-aminopurine in helium nanodroplets have been recorded. In contrast to molecular beam experiments, large variations in linewidths are observed for adenine and 9-methyladenine. At the same time, the spectrum of 2-aminopurine remains

  10. Studies on yeast nucleoside triphosphate-nucleoside diphosphate transphosphorylase (nucleoside diphosphokinase). IV. Steady-state kinetic properties with thymidine nucleotides (including 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine analogues).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Alber, T; Richardson, D; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M

    1991-01-01

    A study of the steady-state kinetics of the crystalline brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces carlsbergensis) nucleoside diphosphokinase, with the magnesium complexes of the adenine and thymidine nucleotides as reactants, has led to a postulated kinetic mechanism which proceeds through a substituted enzyme. This agrees with the earlier conclusions of Garces and Cleland [Biochemistry 1969; 8:633-640] who characterized a reaction between the magnesium complexes of the adenine and uridine nucleotides. An advantage of using thymidine nucleotides as reactants is that they permit accurate, rapid and continuous assays of the enzymatic activity in coupled-enzymatic tests. Through measurements of the initial velocities and product inhibition studies, the Michaelis constants, maximum velocities, and inhibition constants could be evaluated for the individual substrates. Competitive substrate inhibition was encountered at relatively high substrate concentrations, which also permitted an evaluation of their ability to act as 'dead-end' inhibitors. The Michaelis constants for the 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AzT) analogues were also evaluated and, although these values were only somewhat higher than those of their natural substrates, the Km's for the adenine nucleotides as paired substrates were lower and the Vmax's were drastically reduced. The pharmacological implications of these observations are touched upon and extrapolated to the cases where therapeutic doses of AzT may be employed.

  11. OCCURRENCE OF NUCLEOTIDES IN CULTURE FLUIDS OF MICROORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Tadashi; Yoshimoto, Akihiro; Ide, Misao

    1963-01-01

    Okabayashi, Tadashi (Shionogi & Co., Ltd., Fukushima-ku, Osaka, Japan), Akihiro Yoshimoto, and Misao Ide. Occurrence of nucleotides in culture fluids of microorganisms. V. Excretion of adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-phosphate by Brevibacterium liquefaciens sp. n. J. Bacteriol. 86:930–936. 1963.—Brevibacterium liquefaciens sp. n., when grown in a medium containing amino acids as the nitrogen source, excreted a considerable amount of an adenine ribonucleotide, which had not previously been noticed. The nucleotide was identified as adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-phosphate by analysis, ultraviolet-absorption spectra, infrared-absorption spectra, paper chromatography, paper electrophoresis, and by comparison of behavior in hydrolysis by HCl, NaOH, and Ba(OH)2; also, behavior in digestion with a crude enzyme preparation of adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-phosphate phosphodiesterase was compared with that of an authentic sample. Preliminary examination of culture conditions revealed that, at least superficially, the substitution of dl-alanine for Casamino Acids (as nitrogen source) is one of the causes of the excretion of adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-phosphate. PMID:14080803

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  10. File list: Oth.Lar.10.Adenine_N6-methylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. Cessation of respiration after far-ultraviolet irradiation of Escherichia coli B/r: loss of unaltered pyridine nucleotides to the medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenley, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Swenson, P.A.; Joshi, J.G.

    1979-09-01

    Cessation of respiration of Escherichia coli B/r cells is initiated 30 min after irradiation at 254 nm and is linked to cell death. Pyridine nucleotides begin to disappear with the onset of respiratory failure and are almost completely absent from the cells by 90 min after irradiation. We studied the fate of these respiratory cofactors in a niacin-requiring mutant (RSI) grown on minimal medium containing (7-/sup 14/C)nicotinic acid. By 90 min after irradiation (52 J/m/sup 2/) nearly all of the acid-soluble radioactive counts appeared in the medium. Paper chromatographic studies and a spectrophotometric assay indicated that the material was nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. The loss of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide was not balanced by synthesis, despite the presence of appropriate active biosynthetic enzymes for at least 90 min after uv irradiation. Analysis of the amino acid and nucleotide pool of the cells showed that there was some loss of most of these small molecules; the levels of a few were almost completely depleted. We conclude that the pyridine nucleotides are lost from the cell to the medium and that the loss cannot be attributed to extensive general membrane damage.

  12. The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanz, Carola; Aldebert, Philippe; Althorpe, Nicola; Baker, Wendy; Baldwin, Alastair; Bates, Kirsty; Browne, Paul; van den Broek, Alexandra; Castro, Matias; Cochrane, Guy; Duggan, Karyn; Eberhardt, Ruth; Faruque, Nadeem; Gamble, John; Diez, Federico Garcia; Harte, Nicola; Kulikova, Tamara; Lin, Quan; Lombard, Vincent; Lopez, Rodrigo; Mancuso, Renato; McHale, Michelle; Nardone, Francesco; Silventoinen, Ville; Sobhany, Siamak; Stoehr, Peter; Tuli, Mary Ann; Tzouvara, Katerina; Vaughan, Robert; Wu, Dan; Zhu, Weimin; Apweiler, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl), maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK, is a comprehensive collection of nucleotide sequences and annotation from available public sources. The database is part of an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA). Data are exchanged daily between the collaborating institutes to achieve swift synchrony. Webin is the preferred tool for individual submissions of nucleotide sequences, including Third Party Annotation (TPA) and alignments. Automated procedures are provided for submissions from large-scale sequencing projects and data from the European Patent Office. New and updated data records are distributed daily and the whole EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database is released four times a year. Access to the sequence data is provided via ftp and several WWW interfaces. With the web-based Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) it is also possible to link nucleotide data to other specialist molecular biology databases maintained at the EBI. Other tools are available for sequence similarity searching (e.g. FASTA and BLAST). Changes over the past year include the removal of the sequence length limit, the launch of the EMBLCDSs dataset, extension of the Sequence Version Archive functionality and the revision of quality rules for TPA data.

  13. Protonation mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malic enzyme reaction from isotope effects and pH studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiick, D.M.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1986-01-14

    The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and the primary deuterium isotope effects with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and also thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) as the nucleotide substrates were determined in order to obtain information about the chemical mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction. The maximum velocity with thio-NAD as the nucleotide is pH-independent from pH 4.2 to 9.6, while with NAD, V decreases below a pK of 4.8. V/K for both nucleotides decreases below a pK of 5.6 and above a pK of 8.9. Both the tartronate pKi and V/Kmalate decrease below a pK of 4.8 and above a pK of 8.9. Oxalate is competitive vs. malate above pH 7 and noncompetitive below pH 7 with NAD as the nucleotide. The oxalate Kis increases from a constant value above a pK of 4.9 to another constant value above a pK of 6.7. The oxalate Kii also increases above a pK of 4.9, and this inhibition is enhanced by NADH. In the presence of thio-NAD the inhibition by oxalate is competitive vs. malate below pH 7. For thio-NAD, both DV and D(V/K) are pH-independent and equal to 1.7. With NAD as the nucleotide, DV decreases to 1.0 below a pK of 4.9, while D(V/KNAD) and D(V/Kmalate) are pH-independent. Above pH 7 the isotope effects on V and the V/K values for NAD and malate are equal to 1.45, the pH-independent value of DV above pH 7. Results indicate that substrates bind to only the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Two enzyme groups are necessary for binding of substrates and catalysis. Both NAD and malate are released from the Michaelis complex at equal rates which are equal to the rate of NADH release from E-NADH above pH 7. Below pH 7 NADH release becomes more rate-determining as the pH decreases until at pH 4.0 it completely limits the overall rate of the reaction.

  14. The biased nucleotide composition of the HIV genome: a constant factor in a highly variable virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Kuyl Antoinette C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viruses often deviate from their hosts in the nucleotide composition of their genomes. The RNA genome of the lentivirus family of retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, contains e.g. an above average percentage of adenine (A nucleotides, while being extremely poor in cytosine (C. Such a deviant base composition has implications for the amino acids that are encoded by the open reading frames (ORFs, both in the requirement of specific tRNA species and in the preference for amino acids encoded by e.g. A-rich codons. Nucleotide composition does obviously affect the secondary and tertiary structure of the RNA genome and its biological functions, but it does also influence phylogenetic analysis of viral genome sequences, and possibly the activity of the integrated DNA provirus. Over time, the nucleotide composition of the HIV-1 genome is exceptionally conserved, varying by less than 1% per base position per isolate within either group M, N, or O during 1983–2009. This extreme stability of the nucleotide composition may possibly be achieved by negative selection, perhaps conserving semi-stable RNA secondary structure as reverse transcription would be significantly affected for a less A-rich genome where secondary structures are expected to be more stable and thus more difficult to unfold. This review will discuss all aspects of the lentiviral genome composition, both of the RNA and of its derived double-stranded DNA genome, with a focus on HIV-1, the nucleotide composition over time, the effects of artificially humanized codons as well as contributions of immune system pressure on HIV nucleotide bias.

  15. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K.

  16. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  17. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  18. Guanine nucleotide regulation of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptors of muscle and kidney eptihelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terman, B.I.; Hughes, R.J.; Slivka, S.R.; Insel, P.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the effect of guanine nucleotides on the interaction of adrenergic agents with ..cap alpha../sup 1/-adrenergic receptors of two cell lines, the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and BC3H-1 muscle cells. While gaunylylimidodiphosphoate (Gpp(NH)p) had no effect on the affinity or the total number of (/sup -3/H)prazosin binding sites in membranes prepared from these cells, the nucleotide decreased the apparent affinity of the agonist epinephrine in competing for (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding sites in both cell types. The EC/sub 50/ of Gpp(NH)p was approx.100 ..mu..M, and a maximal effect was seen at 500 ..mu..M. In contrast, 100 ..mu..M Gpp(NH)p yielding maximal shifts in binding of epinephrine to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in BC3H-1 cell membranes. Guanine nucleotides were significantly more effective than adenine nucleotides in shifting agonist affinity for the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptor and Mg/sup + +/ was required to observe a maximal effect. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptor agonists activated phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis in both cell types, but have no direct effect on membrane adenylate cyclase activity. In intact BC3H-1 cells, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-agonists inhibited ..beta..-adrenergic cAMP production, an effect which appears in preliminary studies not to result from enhanced phosphodieterase activity. These results show that agonist binding to ..cap alpha../sup 1/-adrenergic receptors in mammalian kidney and muscle cells is regulated by guanine nucleotides. This regulation and inturn transmembrane signalling (PI hydrolysis) by these receptors appear to involve a guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein, which may be different than G/sub s/ and G/sub i/.

  19. Glibenclamide improves kidney and heart structure and function in the adenine-diet model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Vishal; Gobe, Glenda; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease involves free radical damage and inflammation. Addition of adenine to the diet induces inflammation followed by CKD and cardiovascular disease. NOD-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP-3) is pro-inflammatory in the kidney; glibenclamide inhibits production of NLRP-3. Male Wistar rats were fed either control rat food or adenine (0.25%) in this food for 16 weeks. Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to two groups with and without adenine for the final 8 weeks. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen/BUN, plasma creatinine/PCr, plasma uric acid, proteinuria), kidney structure (fibrosis, inflammation), cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, left ventricular stiffness, vascular responses and echocardiography) and protein expression of markers for oxidative stress (HO-1), and inflammation (TNF-α, NLRP-3) were assessed. In adenine-fed rats, glibenclamide decreased BUN (controls: 6±0.6; adenine: 56.6±5.4; adenine+glibenclamide: 19.4±2.7 mmol/L), PCr (controls: 42±2.8; adenine: 268±23; adenine+glibenclamide: 81±10 μmol/L), proteinuria (controls: 150±7.4; adenine: 303±19; adenine+glibenclamide: 220±13 μmol/L) (all pchronic inflammatory cells, fibrosis, tubular damage and expression of HO-1, TNF-α and NLRP-3 in the kidney. Glibenclamide did not alter plasma uric acid concentrations (controls: 38±1; adenine: 63±4; adenine+glibenclamide: 69±14 μmol/L). Cardiovascular changes included decreased systolic blood pressure and improved vascular responses although cardiac fibrosis, left ventricular stiffness and hypertrophy were not reduced. Glibenclamide improved kidney structure and function in CKD and decreased some cardiovascular parameters. Inflammatory markers and cell populations were attenuated by glibenclamide in kidneys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region.

  1. Adenine: an important drug scaffold for the design of antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changyuan; Song, Zhendong; Yu, Haiqing; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-09-01

    Adenine derivatives, in particular the scaffold bearing the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPS), possess significant antiviral and cytostatic activity. Till now, several effective adenine derivatives have been marketed for the treatment of HIV, HBV, CMV and other virus-infected diseases. These compounds are represented by tenofovir (PMPA), a medicine for both HIV and HBV, and adefovir as an anti-HBV agent. More than this, other analogs, such as GS9148, GS9131, and GS7340, are also well-known anti-viral agents that have been progressed to the clinical studies for their excellent activity. In general, the structures of these compounds include an adenine nucleobase linked to a phosphonate side chain. Considerable structural modifications on the scaffold itself and the peripheral sections were made. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of this skeleton will provide valuable clues to identify more effective adenine derivatives as antiviral drugs. Here, we systematically summarized the SARs of the adenine derivatives, and gave important information for further optimizing this template.

  2. Quercetin Attenuates Vascular Calcification through Suppressed Oxidative Stress in Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-ying Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study investigated whether quercetin could alleviate vascular calcification in experimental chronic renal failure rats induced by adenine. Methods. 32 adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups fed normal diet, normal diet with quercetin supplementation (25 mg/kg·BW/d, 0.75% adenine diet, or adenine diet with quercetin supplementation. All rats were sacrificed after 6 weeks of intervention. Serum renal functions biomarkers and oxidative stress biomarkers were measured and status of vascular calcification in aorta was assessed. Furthermore, the induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38MAPK pathway was determined to explore the potential mechanism. Results. Adenine successfully induced renal failure and vascular calcification in rat model. Quercetin supplementation reversed unfavorable changes of phosphorous, uric acid (UA and creatinine levels, malonaldehyde (MDA content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in serum and the increases of calcium and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity in the aorta (P<0.05 and attenuated calcification and calcium accumulation in the medial layer of vasculature in histopathology. Western blot analysis showed that iNOS/p38MAPK pathway was normalized by the quercetin supplementation. Conclusions. Quercetin exerted a protective effect on vascular calcification in adenine-induced chronic renal failure rats, possibly through the modulation of oxidative stress and iNOs/p38MAPK pathway.

  3. Binding of adenine to Stx2, the protein toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Marie E., E-mail: frasm@ucalgary.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 1N4 (Canada); Cherney, Maia M. [Group in Protein Structure and Function, Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Marcato, Paola [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Mulvey, George L.; Armstrong, Glen D. [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 4N1 (Canada); James, Michael N. G. [Group in Protein Structure and Function, Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of Stx2 were grown in the presence of adenosine and adenine. In both cases, the resulting electron density showed only adenine bound at the active site of the A subunit, proving that the holotoxin is an active N-glycosidase. Stx2 is a protein toxin whose catalytic subunit acts as an N-glycosidase to depurinate a specific adenine base from 28S rRNA. In the holotoxin, the catalytic portion, A1, is linked to the rest of the A subunit, A2, and A2 interacts with the pentameric ring formed by the five B subunits. In order to test whether the holotoxin is active as an N-glycosidase, Stx2 was crystallized in the presence of adenosine and adenine. The crystals diffracted to ∼1.8 Å and showed clear electron density for adenine in the active site. Adenosine had been cleaved, proving that Stx2 is an active N-glycosidase. While the holotoxin is active against small substrates, it would be expected that the B subunits would interfere with the binding of the 28S rRNA.

  4. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  5. High-resolution electron spectroscopy and structures of lithium-nucleobase (adenine, uracil, and thymine) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A; Lee, Jung Sup; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2010-01-28

    Li complexes of adenine, uracil, and thymine were produced by laser vaporization of rods made of Li and nucleobase powders in a metal-cluster beam source and studied by pulsed-field-ionization zero-electron-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The ZEKE measurements determined the adiabatic ionization energies of the three neutral complexes and frequencies of several vibrational modes for the metal-adenine and -uracil ions. The measured spectra were compared with spectral simulations to determine the preferred metal binding sites. For adenine, the most stable structure is formed by Li/Li(+) bidentately binding to both the N7 atom of the imidazole ring and the NH(2) group of the pyrimidine ring. For uracil and thymine, the ideal site for Li/Li(+) coordination is the O4 atom. Although it has only a small effect on the geometries of uracil and thymine, lithium coordination forces the rotation of the NH(2) group out of the adenine plane. The adiabatic ionization energies of the three complexes follow the trend of uracil (33910+/-5 cm(-1))>thymine (33386+/-5 cm(-1))>adenine (32240+/-5 cm(-1)), whereas their metal-ligand bond dissociation energies are about the same, (92-97) +/-6 kJ mol(-1). For all three complexes, the neutral bond energies are smaller than those of the corresponding ions due to a weaker electrostatic interaction and stronger electron repulsion.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphism of prolactin gene exon two in ducks of Pekin, Mojosari and Pekin Mojosari crossbred

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin gene plays crucial role in the reproduction and egg production of birds. The objectives of this study were to characterize single nucleotide polymorphism in partial intron and coding region of duck prolactin gene. Blood samples were collected from 168 ducks consisted of 19 Pekin, 36 Mojosari, and 113 of their crossbreds collected from Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production (IRIAP. Primer pairs for the coding regions in prolactin gene were self designed based on the duck genomic sequence database (GeneBank: AB158611.1. PCR products based on DNA of prolactin gene exon two was amplified approximately 400 bp. There is one base insertion of Adenin at the position of 2001 bp intron two region of duck prolactin. Homology test based on BLAST method indicated 99% identity with duck refference (Code Access GeneBank: AB158611.1. Adenin composition in all of duck samples was higher than refference. Triplet hydrogen bonds between Guanine and Cytosin pairs was higher than those at duplet hydrogen bonds between Adenine and Thymine. All duck samples were homozigous and monomorphyc.

  7. Necessary relations for nucleotide frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Robert

    2015-06-07

    Genome composition analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies is known to be evolutionarily informative, and useful in metagenomic studies, where binning of raw sequence data is often an important first step. Patterns appearing in genome composition analysis may be due to evolutionary processes or purely mathematical relations. For example, the total number of dinucleotides in a sequence is equal to the sum of the individual totals of the sixteen types of dinucleotide, and this is entirely independent of any assumptions made regarding mutation or selection, or indeed any physical or chemical process. Before any statistical analysis can be attempted, a knowledge of all necessary mathematical relations is required. I show that 25% of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies can be written as simple sums and differences of the remainder. The vast majority of organisms have circular genomes, for which these relations are exact and necessary. In the case of linear molecules, the absolute error is very nearly zero, and does not grow with contiguous sequence length. As a result of the new, necessary relations presented here, the foundations of the statistical analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies, and k-mer analysis in general, need to be revisited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Absorption spectroscopy of adenine, 9-methyladenine, and 2-aminopurine in helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Szymon; Rijs, Anouk M; Buma, Wybren Jan; Drabbels, Marcel

    2010-12-28

    High-resolution absorption spectra of adenine, 9-methyladenine and 2-aminopurine in helium nanodroplets have been recorded. In contrast to molecular beam experiments, large variations in linewidths are observed for adenine and 9-methyladenine. At the same time, the spectrum of 2-aminopurine remains sharp upon solvation in helium droplets. The line broadening observed for adenine and 9-methyladenine is attributed to a significant decrease of the lifetime of the (1)L(b)(ππ*) state and of (1)nπ* levels vibronically coupled to this state. The origin of the lifetime reduction is argued to be related to the increased accessibility of the (1)nπ*/(1)L(b)(ππ*) conical intersection upon solvation of these molecules in liquid helium.

  9. Tomenphantadenine, an unprecedented germacranolide-adenine hybrid heterodimer from the medicinal plant Elephantopus tomentosus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi Kai; Wang, Bei; Cai, Cai Hong; Huang, Sheng Zhuo; Yuan, Jing Zhe; Mei, Wen Li; Dai, Hao Fu

    2018-03-01

    An unusual adenine-substituted germacrane sesquiterpene lactone, tomenphantadenine (1), has been isolated from the whole plant of Elephantopus tomentosus L. The structure of this compound was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis including high resolution (HR) ESI-MS, 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic data. This compound features novel hybrid pattern of germacrane sesquiterpene with adenine through C-N linkage, and a possible biosynthetic pathway for it was proposed. Compound 1 showed potent antibacterial activity against the gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and weak acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of microRNAs in Horse Plasma and Their Characteristic Nucleotide Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwoo Lee

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs in blood plasma are stable under high levels of ribonuclease activity and could function in tissue-to-tissue communication, suggesting that they may have distinctive structural characteristics compared with non-circulating miRNAs. In this study, the expression of miRNAs in horse plasma and their characteristic nucleotide composition were examined and compared with non-plasma miRNAs. Highly expressed plasma miRNA species were not part of the abundant group of miRNAs in non-plasma tissues, except for the eca-let-7 family. eca-miR-486-5p, -92a, and -21 were among the most abundant plasma miRNAs, and their human orthologs also belong to the most abundant group of miRNAs in human plasma. Uracil and guanine were the most common nucleotides of both plasma and non-plasma miRNAs. Cytosine was the least common in plasma and non-plasma miRNAs, although levels were higher in plasma miRNAs. Plasma miRNAs also showed higher expression levels of miRNAs containing adenine and cytosine repeats, compared with non-plasma miRNAs. These observations indicate that miRNAs in the plasma have a unique nucleotide composition.

  11. Profiles of the biosynthesis and metabolism of pyridine nucleotides in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, Riko; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    As part of a research program on nucleotide metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.), profiles of pyridine (nicotinamide) metabolism were examined based on the in situ metabolic fate of radio-labelled precursors and the in vitro activities of enzymes. In potato tubers, [(3)H]quinolinic acid, which is an intermediate of de novo pyridine nucleotide synthesis, and [(14)C]nicotinamide, a catabolite of NAD, were utilised for pyridine nucleotide synthesis. The in situ tracer experiments and in vitro enzyme assays suggest the operation of multiple pyridine nucleotide cycles. In addition to the previously proposed cycle consisting of seven metabolites, we found a new cycle that includes newly discovered nicotinamide riboside deaminase which is also functional in potato tubers. This cycle bypasses nicotinamide and nicotinic acid; it is NAD --> nicotinamide mononucleotide --> nicotinamide riboside --> nicotinic acid riboside --> nicotinic acid mononucleotide --> nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide --> NAD. Degradation of the pyridine ring was extremely low in potato tubers. Nicotinic acid glucoside is formed from nicotinic acid in potato tubers. Comparative studies of [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid metabolism indicate that nicotinic acid is converted to nicotinic acid glucoside in all organs of potato plants. Trigonelline synthesis from [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid was also found. Conversion was greater in green parts of plants, such as leaves and stem, than in underground parts of potato plants. Nicotinic acid utilised for the biosynthesis of these conjugates seems to be derived not only from the pyridine nucleotide cycle, but also from the de novo synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide.

  12. Effect of AST-120 on Endothelial Dysfunction in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Inami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Chronic kidney disease (CKD represents endothelial dysfunction. Monocyte adhesion is recognized as the initial step of arteriosclerosis. Indoxyl sulfate (IS is considered to be a risk factor for arteriosclerosis in CKD. Oral adsorbent AST-120 retards deterioration of renal function, reducing accumulation of IS. In the present study, we determined the monocyte adhesion in the adenine-induced uremic rats in vivo and effects of AST-120 on the adhesion molecules. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into control, control+AST-120, adenine, and adenine+AST-120 groups. The number of monocytes adherent to the endothelium of thoracic aorta by imaging the entire endothelial surface and the mRNA expressions of adhesion and atherosclerosis-related molecules were examined on day 49. The mRNA expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were also examined. Results. Adenine increased the number of adherent monocytes, and AST-120 suppressed the increase. The monocyte adhesion was related to serum creatinine and IS in sera. Overexpression of VCAM-1 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the arterial walls was observed in uremic rats. IS induced increase of the ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA expressions in vitro. Conclusion. It appears that uremic condition introduces the monocyte adhesion to arterial wall and AST-120 might inhibit increasing of the monocyte adherence with CKD progression.

  13. Probing electronic coupling between adenine bases in RNA strands from synchrotron radiation circular dichroism experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgård; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-01-01

    Circular dichroism spectra (176–330 nm) of RNA adenine oligomers, (rA)n (n = 1–10, 12, 15, and 20), reveal electronic coupling between two bases in short strands. The number of interacting bases in long strands is more and larger than that reported previously for the corresponding DNA strands....

  14. Prevention of injury by resveratrol in a rat model of adenine-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cartilage degradation in animal models of arthritis. [11]. This study examined the utility of resveratrol for treating CKD by suppressing the expression of inorganic phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and FGF-23 in a rat model. METHODS. Chemicals and reagents. The adenine and resveratrol used in this study were obtained ...

  15. Prevention of injury by resveratrol in a rat model of adenine-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the preventive effect of resveratrol against renal pathological changes in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: CKD was induced by daily intragastric administration of adenine (200 mg/kg) for 1 month. The effect of 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg doses of resveratrol on the levels of ...

  16. Prevention of injury by resveratrol in a rat model of adenine-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: CKD was induced by ... mg/kg doses of resveratrol after adenine, urine protein/creatinine ratio was reduced to 5, 675.6 ±. 2453.7, 4, 789.8 ... Keyword: Parathyroid hormone, Phosphate, Creatinine, Monocytes, Chronic kidney disease, Fibroblast growth factor-23. Tropical ...

  17. Modification of flavin adenine dinucleotide in alcohol oxidase of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Harder, Willem

    1991-01-01

    Alcohol oxidase, a major peroxisomal protein of methanol-utilizing yeasts, may possess two different forms of flavin adenine dinucleotide, classical FAD and so-called modified FAD (mFAD). Conversion of FAD into mFAD was observed both in purified preparations of the enzyme and in cells grown in batch

  18. Severe hyperparathyroidism with bone abnormalities and metastatic calcification in rats with adenine-induced uraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagaki, Keiichi; Yuan, Qunsheng; Ohkawa, Hiroyuki; Imazeki, Ikuo; Moriguchi, Yoshiyuki; Imai, Nobuo; Sasaki, Susumu; Takeda, Kazuo; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2006-03-01

    Marked parathyroid hyperplasia with bone diseases and vascular calcification are unsolved issues in dialysis patients. In this study, we made azotemic model rats by adenine feeding and analyzed the development and progression of the abnormalities. Renal failure was induced in 8-week-old male Wistar rats by feeding 0.75% adenine-containing diet for 6 weeks. Serum parameters, parathyroid hyperplasia, bone changes and metastatic calcification were examined at 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Progressive increase of serum creatinine and inorganic phosphate, and decreased levels of serum calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 were confirmed. Markedly enlarged parathyroid glands and extremely high PTH levels were observed in all adenine-fed rats compared with the control (PTH: 199.3+/-58.0 vs 10.5+/-3.0 pmol/l, Prats. Uraemic rats made by adenine diet developed severe abnormalities of calcium metabolism in a relatively short period and therefore they may serve as a useful model for the analysis of parathyroid hyperplasia and vascular calcification in chronic renal failure.

  19. Kinetic analysis of Yersinia pestis DNA adenine methyltransferase activity using a hemimethylated molecular break light oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Wood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA adenine methylation plays an important role in several critical bacterial processes including mismatch repair, the timing of DNA replication and the transcriptional control of gene expression. The dependence of bacterial virulence on DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam has led to the proposal that selective Dam inhibitors might function as broad spectrum antibiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we report the expression and purification of Yersinia pestis Dam and the development of a continuous fluorescence based assay for DNA adenine methyltransferase activity that is suitable for determining the kinetic parameters of the enzyme and for high throughput screening against potential Dam inhibitors. The assay utilised a hemimethylated break light oligonucleotide substrate containing a GATC methylation site. When this substrate was fully methylated by Dam, it became a substrate for the restriction enzyme DpnI, resulting in separation of fluorophore (fluorescein and quencher (dabcyl and therefore an increase in fluorescence. The assays were monitored in real time using a fluorescence microplate reader in 96 well format and were used for the kinetic characterisation of Yersinia pestis Dam, its substrates and the known Dam inhibitor, S-adenosylhomocysteine. The assay has been validated for high throughput screening, giving a Z-factor of 0.71+/-0.07 indicating that it is a sensitive assay for the identification of inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay is therefore suitable for high throughput screening for inhibitors of DNA adenine methyltransferases and the kinetic characterisation of the inhibition.

  20. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the mediation of TLR4.

  1. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a series of 9-substituted adenine derivatives as selective phosphodiesterase type-4 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboisson, Pierre; Lugnier, Claire; Muller, Christian; Reimund, Jean-Marie; Schultz, Dominique; Pinna, Guillaume; Le Bec, Alain; Basaran, Hélène; Desaubry, Laurent; Gaudiot, François; Seloum, Mohamed; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques

    2003-02-01

    Adenine derivatives substituted in position 9 have been demonstrated to have potent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition properties with high selectivity toward PDE-4. Starting from our initial lead compound 9-(2-fluorobenzyl)-N(6)-methyl-2-trifluoromethyladenine (4, NCS613), we designed and synthesized a new series of 9-substituted derivatives for developing structure-activity relationship studies. This new series of derivatives showed increased potencies and better selectivity profiles. Structural modifications were achieved in parallel on three different positions of the adenine ring, and led to the following observations: (i) introduction of a lipophilic substituent such as trifluoromethyl, n-propyl group or iodine in the C-2 position is favourable for both the PDE-4 inhibitory activity and the selectivity towards other isoenzymes; (ii) functionalization of the N9 benzyl group with a 2-methoxy substituent led to remarkably more active compounds; (iii) replacement of the N(6)-methylamino moiety by other amino groups is detrimental to the activity. Among all derivatives prepared, the 9-(2-methoxybenzyl)-N(6)-methyl-2-trifluoromethyladenine (9r), 9-(2-methoxybenzyl)-N(6)-methyl-2-n-propyladenine (9s), and the 2-iodo-9-(2-methoxybenzyl)-N(6)-methyladenine (13b) were found to be the most potent inhibitors within this series (PDE-4-IC(50)=1.4, 7.0, and 0.096 nM, respectively). Compared to our reference compound 4, which showed an IC(50) of 42 nM, the derivative 13b was found 450-fold more potent. Moreover, 2-iodo-9-(2-methoxybenzyl)-N(6)-methyladenine (13b) and 9-(2-methoxybenzyl)-N(6)-methyl-2-trifluoromethyladenine (9r), were at least 50000-150000 times more selective for the PDE-4 than for the other PDE families. Additionally, these new derivatives showed improved efficiency in inhibiting the TNFalpha release from mononuclear cells from healthy subjects (e.g. adenines 7l, 9s and 13b). Thus, compounds 7l, 9r, 9s and 13b are among the most potent and

  2. Watson-Crick Base Pairing, Electronic and Photophysical Properties of Triazole Modified Adenine Analogues: A Computational Study

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Shubhajit

    2015-09-17

    We employ first-principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) to elucidate structural, electronic and optical properties of a few recently reported triazole adenine nucleobase analogues. The results are compared against the findings obtained for both natural adenine nucleobase and available experimental data. The optical absorption of these adenine analogues are calculated both in gas-phase and in solvent (methanol) using Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). We find that all the analogues show a red-shifted absorption profile as compared to adenine. Our simulated emission spectra in solvent compare fairly well with experimentally observed results. We investigate base paring ability of these adenine analogues with thymine. The calculations on the intrinsic stability of these base pairs ascertain that all the adenine analogues form the hydrogen bonded Watson-Crick base pair with similar H-bonding energy as obtained for natural adenine-thymine base pair. In our study, we provide a microscopic origin of the low-energy absorption and emission peaks, observed experimentally.

  3. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  5. Communication: Site-selective bond excision of adenine upon electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, T; Mendes, M; Ferreira da Silva, F; Eden, S; García, G; Limão-Vieira, P

    2018-01-14

    This work demonstrates that selective excision of hydrogen atoms at a particular site of the DNA base adenine can be achieved in collisions with electronegative atoms by controlling the impact energy. The result is based on analysing the time-of-flight mass spectra yields of potassium collisions with a series of labeled adenine derivatives. The production of dehydrogenated parent anions is consistent with neutral H loss either from selective breaking of C-H or N-H bonds. These unprecedented results open up a new methodology in charge transfer collisions that can initiate selective reactivity as a key process in chemical reactions that are dominant in different areas of science and technology.

  6. Sensitive determination of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and ethanol with a nano-porous carbon electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIAOQIN LIU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A nano-porous carbon electrode, fabricated in 0.1 mol L-1 NaOH by the electrochemical technique, was used for the electrochemical detection of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NADH, with an overpotential decrease of about 270 mV and a linear range from 1.0×10-6 to 1.0×10-4 mol L-1. Amperometric sensing of ethanol cooperating with alcohol dehydrogenase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide was successfully demonstrated. A linear response in the range from 5.0×10-5 mol L-1 to 1.0×10-2 mol L-1 was obtained, with a detection limit of 1.0×10-5 mol L-1. The method was successfully employed to determine ethanol in beer with high precision.

  7. Electronic excitation and structural relaxation of the adenine dinucleotide in gas phase and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasser, Felix; Lischka, Hans

    2013-08-01

    The excited states and potential surfaces of the adenine dinucleotide are analyzed in gas phase and in solution using a correlated ab initio methodology in a QM/MM framework. In agreement with previous studies, a rather flat S1 surface with a number of minima of different character is found. Specifically, our results suggest that exciplexes with remarkably short intermolecular separation down to ~2.0 Å are formed. A detailed analysis shows that due to strong orbital interactions their character differs significantly from any states present in the Franck-Condon region. The lowest S1 energy minimum is a ππ* exciplex with only a small amount of charge transfer. It possesses appreciable oscillator strength with a polarization almost perpendicular to the planes of the two adenine molecules.

  8. Communication: Site-selective bond excision of adenine upon electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, T.; Mendes, M.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Eden, S.; García, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2018-01-01

    This work demonstrates that selective excision of hydrogen atoms at a particular site of the DNA base adenine can be achieved in collisions with electronegative atoms by controlling the impact energy. The result is based on analysing the time-of-flight mass spectra yields of potassium collisions with a series of labeled adenine derivatives. The production of dehydrogenated parent anions is consistent with neutral H loss either from selective breaking of C-H or N-H bonds. These unprecedented results open up a new methodology in charge transfer collisions that can initiate selective reactivity as a key process in chemical reactions that are dominant in different areas of science and technology.

  9. Analysis of ultrafast relaxation in photoexcited DNA base pairs of adenine and thymine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, E.; Schultz, T.; Hertel, I. V.; Radloff, W.

    2008-05-01

    The photoinduced dynamics in base pairs of adenine and thymine were analyzed by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. On the short-time scale up to a few picoseconds, the characteristic time constants for the dimers are quite similar to the corresponding values of the monomers. This leads to the conclusion that ultrafast intramolecular relaxation proceeds via ππ ∗ and nπ ∗ states of one component within the dimer. On the long-time scale, we obtained a novel time constant of roughly 40 ps for the thymine dimer and the adenine-thymine base pair. This time constant was never observed in the monomers and is tentatively assigned to an intermolecular relaxation process, possibly via a hydrogen transfer state.

  10. Thermodynamic Potential for the Abiotic Synthesis of Adenine, Cytosine, Guanine, Thymine, Uracil, Ribose, and Deoxyribose in Hydrothermal Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LaRowe, D.E.; Regnier, P.

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamic potential for the abiotic synthesis of the five common nucleobases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine, and uracil) and two monosaccharides (ribose and deoxyribose) from formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide has been quantified under temperature, pressure, and bulk composition

  11. Determination of cellular nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) levels.

    OpenAIRE

    Churamani, Dev; Carrey, Elizabeth A; Dickinson, George D.; Patel, Sandip

    2004-01-01

    Nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is fast emerging as a new intracellular Ca2+-mobilizing messenger. In sea urchin egg homogenates, binding of NAADP to its receptor is not readily reversible; hence, prior incubation with low concentrations of NAADP is more effective in inhibiting subsequent binding of radiolabelled NAADP than incubating the preparation with the two ligands simultaneously [Patel, Churchill and Galione (2000) Biochem. J. 352, 725-729]. We extend this finding...

  12. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Eliot F. Gomez; Venkatraman, Vishak; Grote, James G.; Steckl, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs are small molecules that are the basic building blocks of the larger DNA polymer. NBs readily thermally evaporate and integrate well into the vacuum deposited OLED fabrication. Adenine (A) and thymine (T) were deposited as electron-blocking/hole-transport layers (EBL/HTL) that resulted in increases in performance over the reference OLED containing the standard EBL material NPB. A-based OLEDs reached...

  13. The Role of the Plant Hormone Benzyl Adenine to Promote Growth for the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez Franco, D.; Vernet, M.; Walters, R. J.; Tan, M.

    2016-02-01

    This study was inspired by the establishment of autoinduction in the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, and the identification of the cytokinin plant hormone benzyl adenine (BA) as a potential autoinducer in this species via comparative genome studies. The effects of a wide range (0.0017518 mg/L-500 mg/L) of concentrations of benzyl adenine on the growth dynamics of T. pseudonana have been explored. The results suggest that a concentration of 5 mg BA/L has the highest positive effect on the growth rate of T. pseudonana batch cultures, compared to the other concentrations tested. Furthermore, concentrations of >100 mg BA/L were lethal. No marked effects on the lag phase length were observed. However, it is possible that some trade-offs between growth rate and lag phase length exist as a result of benzyl adenine. For instance, the BA concentration that exhibited the highest growth rate (5mg BA/L; µ=1.06 d-1) had a negative effect on the lag phase length (6 days), as compared to our control (lag phase length = 5 d; µ=0.81 d-1). On the other hand, at 10 mg BA/L, a slightly smaller growth rate of 1.01 d-1 was observed, with a shorter lag phase length of 4 days, suggesting that benzyl adenine may not have a positive effect on all growth parameters at once. These results provide insight into the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication employed by diatoms, and supports the hypothesis that hormones may play an important role in bloom development.

  14. Long-Range Charge Transport in Adenine-Stacked RNA:DNA Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-01-27

    An extremely important biological component, RNA:DNA can also be used to design nanoscale structures such as molecular wires. The conductance of single adenine-stacked RNA:DNA hybrids is rapidly and reproducibly measured using the break junction approach. The conductance decreases slightly over a large range of molecular lengths, suggesting that RNA:DNA can be used as an oligonucleotide wire. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Femtosecond charge transfer dynamics of a modified DNA base: 2-aminopurine in complexes with nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Torsten; Wan, Chaozhi; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2002-09-16

    As a fluorescent isomer of adenine, 2-aminopurine (Ap) is a powerful probe of DNA dynamics and DNA-mediated charge transfer processes. Here, we report studies with femtosecond resolution of the excited-state dynamics of Ap in various solvents and in bimolecular complexes with nucleotides. Using time-resolved transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion methods we identify charge transfer as the origin for the quenching of the Ap fluorescence by all four DNA nucleotides. The direction of the redox process is, however, dependent on the base, and from the rates we deduce the nature of the transfer, hole versus electron transfer. The pH and the kinetic isotope effects of these charge transfer reactions revealed no evidence for proton transfer involvement in the rate-determining step. From the measured rates and using electron transfer theory we estimate the driving force for charge transfer between all four nucleobases and Ap. The results are important for the studies of dynamics using Ap in DNA assemblies.

  16. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  17. Medium optimization for leaf numbers and shoot multiplication of lidah buaya (Aloe vera by BAP and adenine supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAELA SARI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Aloe vera of the Aloeaceae is originated from Canary Island (West Africa. This plant is commonly know in Indonesia and cultivated in large fields or in the house yard for many purposes, such as ornamental and medicine plant. The industries using it as the principle raw material has became more important due to the significant benefits of this plant. This study is purposed to obtain the medium optimization for leaf numbers and shoot multiplication of Aloe vera by BAP and adenine supplement. The shoot of Aloe vera was taken from green house of Biotechnology-LIPI. Shoots sterilized by clorox (sodium hypochlorite solution 35% and 20% for 30 and 15 min. until get aseptic shoot (in vitro plants. The shoot isolated from in vitro plant into MS (Murashige and Skoog medium in different concentration of BAP and adenine. The research used factorial Completely Randomized Design with two factors (BAP concentration: 0; 0.5; 1; 1.5; 2 mg/L and adenine concentration 0; 10; 20 mg/L with 5 replicates. The results obtained have showed that addition 20 mg/L adenine to MS raise the numbers of leaf. The shoot multiplication has been augmented by addition of BAP 1 mg/L and adenine 20 mg/L. The results showed that BAP has a positive role in increasing shoot multiplication rate and that adenine has a synergic effect when added together with BAP.

  18. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fasullo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases.

  19. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry : pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides--illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensonides, F.I.C.; Bakker, B.M.; Cremazy, F.; Messiha, H.L.; Mendes, P.; Boogerd, F.C.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular

  20. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry : Pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides - Illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensonides, Femke I. C.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Cremazy, Frederic; Messiha, Hanan L.; Mendes, Pedro; Boogerd, Fred C.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular

  1. Specificities and pH profiles of adenine and hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (nucleotide synthases) of the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Rasmussen, Mads Skytte

    2014-01-01

    Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransfe...

  2. Effects of nucleotides and nucleosides on coagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bune, Laurids; Thaning, Pia; Johansson, Pär I

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotides, including ADP, ATP and uridine triphosphate (UTP), are discharged profusely in the circulation during many pathological conditions including sepsis. Sepsis can cause hypotension and systemic activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in humans, which may cause disseminated...... intravascular coagulation. We investigated whether nucleotide-induced cardiovascular collapse as provoked by systemic infusion of adenosine, ADP, ATP, UTP and nitric oxide affected the haemostatic system as assessed by whole blood thromboelastography (TEG) analysis. Ten pigs received a randomized infusion...

  3. Ab initio electron propagator calculations of transverse conduction through DNA nucleotide bases in 1-nm nanopore corroborate third generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletsov, Aleksey A; Glukhovskoy, Evgeny G; Chumakov, Aleksey S; Ortiz, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    The conduction properties of DNA molecule, particularly its transverse conductance (electron transfer through nucleotide bridges), represent a point of interest for DNA chemistry community, especially for DNA sequencing. However, there is no fully developed first-principles theory for molecular conductance and current that allows one to analyze the transverse flow of electrical charge through a nucleotide base. We theoretically investigate the transverse electron transport through all four DNA nucleotide bases by implementing an unbiased ab initio theoretical approach, namely, the electron propagator theory. The electrical conductance and current through DNA nucleobases (guanine [G], cytosine [C], adenine [A] and thymine [T]) inserted into a model 1-nm Ag-Ag nanogap are calculated. The magnitudes of the calculated conductance and current are ordered in the following hierarchies: gA>gG>gC>gT and IG>IA>IT>IC correspondingly. The new distinguishing parameter for the nucleobase identification is proposed, namely, the onset bias magnitude. Nucleobases exhibit the following hierarchy with respect to this parameter: Vonset(A)DNA translocation through an electrode-equipped nanopore. The results represent interest for the theorists and practitioners in the field of third generation sequencing techniques as well as in the field of DNA chemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaev, B. F., E-mail: bfmin@rambler.ru, E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se [Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University, 18031 Cherkasy (Ukraine); Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I. [Uzhgorod National University, 88000 Uzhgorod (Ukraine); Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A. [Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University, 18031 Cherkasy (Ukraine)

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  5. In vitro propagation of Calla lily: adenine sulphate and 6-benzilaminopurine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia De Nazaré Oliveira Ribeiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Calla lily [Zantedeschia aethiopica (L. Spreng.] belonging to the Araceae family is appreciated as cut flower and in com­position of gardens. However, the conventional propagation of this plants shows a poor productive. Thus, tissue culture besides allowing fast clonal propagation also provides healthy and uniforms plants. The aim was study the influence of the differents concentrations of 6-benzilaminopurine (BAP and adenine sulphate (AS on in vitro multiplication of Calla lily. The explants were maintained in MS medium added with BAP (0.0, 8.9, 17.8 and 26.7 μM and adenine sulphate (0, 54, 108 and 162 μM. The plants were transferred to growth room and maintained at 25±1ºC and photoperiod of 16 hours for 60 days, under luminous intensity of 35 μmol m-2 s-1, for a period of 60 days. The experimental design was entirely randomized with four repetitions of three seedlings each, resulting in twelve plants per treatment, each tube with one plant. The statistics analysis showed interactive effects for quantify of BAP and AS for leaves number and fresh mass of the aerial parts. The highest number of leaves (4.8 and fresh mass of aerial parts (0.73 g was obtained with 26.7 μM of BAP combined with 108 μM of AS, highest number of shoots (2.6 was obtained with 22,19 μM of BAP and highest lengh of sprouts (5.0 cm was observed in the absence of BAP. The addition of BAP increased the number of shoots per explant. The use of adenine sulphate in combination with BAP had a positive effect for the accumulation of fresh weight and number of leaves in vitro culture.

  6. Functional analysis of an acid adaptive DNA adenine methyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori 26695.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Banerjee

    Full Text Available HP0593 DNA-(N(6-adenine-methyltransferase (HP0593 MTase is a member of a Type III restriction-modification system in Helicobacter pylori strain 26695. HP0593 MTase has been cloned, overexpressed and purified heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recognition sequence of the purified MTase was determined as 5'-GCAG-3'and the site of methylation was found to be adenine. The activity of HP0593 MTase was found to be optimal at pH 5.5. This is a unique property in context of natural adaptation of H. pylori in its acidic niche. Dot-blot assay using antibodies that react specifically with DNA containing m6A modification confirmed that HP0593 MTase is an adenine-specific MTase. HP0593 MTase occurred as both monomer and dimer in solution as determined by gel-filtration chromatography and chemical-crosslinking studies. The nonlinear dependence of methylation activity on enzyme concentration indicated that more than one molecule of enzyme was required for its activity. Analysis of initial velocity with AdoMet as a substrate showed that two molecules of AdoMet bind to HP0593 MTase, which is the first example in case of Type III MTases. Interestingly, metal ion cofactors such as Co(2+, Mn(2+, and also Mg(2+ stimulated the HP0593 MTase activity. Preincubation and isotope partitioning analyses clearly indicated that HP0593 MTase-DNA complex is catalytically competent, and suggested that DNA binds to the MTase first followed by AdoMet. HP0593 MTase shows a distributive mechanism of methylation on DNA having more than one recognition site. Considering the occurrence of GCAG sequence in the potential promoter regions of physiologically important genes in H. pylori, our results provide impetus for exploring the role of this DNA MTase in the cellular processes of H. pylori.

  7. SVOP is a nucleotide binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2 and SV2-related protein (SVOP are transporter-like proteins that localize to neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. Both proteins share structural similarity with the major facilitator (MF family of small molecule transporters. We recently reported that SV2 binds nucleotides, a feature that has also been reported for another MF family member, the human glucose transporter 1 (Glut1. In the case of Glut1, nucleotide binding affects transport activity. In this study, we determined if SVOP also binds nucleotides and assessed its nucleotide binding properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed in vitro photoaffinity labeling experiments with the photoreactive ATP analogue, 8-azido-ATP[gamma] biotin and purified recombinant SVOP-FLAG fusion protein. We found that SVOP is a nucleotide-binding protein, although both its substrate specificity and binding site differ from that of SV2. Within the nucleotides tested, ATP, GTP and NAD show same level of inhibition on SVOP-FLAG labeling. Dose dependent studies indicated that SVOP demonstrates the highest affinity for NAD, in contrast to SV2, which binds both NAD and ATP with equal affinity. Mapping of the binding site revealed a single region spanning transmembrane domains 9-12, which contrasts to the two binding sites in the large cytoplasmic domains in SV2A. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SVOP is the third MF family member to be found to bind nucleotides. Given that the binding sites are unique in SVOP, SV2 and Glut1, this feature appears to have arisen separately.

  8. The effect of solvation on the radiation damage rate constants for adenine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    It is a well known fact, that water plays an important part in almost all biological systems and that inclusion of solvation effects might therefore be of utmost importance in studies of radiation damage to DNA. In the present investigation we have studied the effect of different solvation models...... in calculations of Gibbs free energies and reaction rates for the reaction between the OH radical and the DNA nucleobase adenine using Density Functional Theory at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with the Eckart tunneling correction. The solvent, water, has been included through either the implicit...

  9. Biofuel anode for cell reactions involving nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as a charge carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, B.; Gorton, L.; Johansson, G.

    1986-12-01

    Biofuel cell anodes with porous graphitic materials were modified by adsorption of a mediator (N,N-dimethyl-7-amino-1,2-benzophenoxazine, Meldola Blue) for oxidation of the dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Electrodes made from reticulated vitreous carbon were already heavily polarized at current densities less than 1 mA cm/sup -2/, mainly because of the low surface coverage with mediator. Graphite-felt electrodes adsorbed the mediator so well that current densities up to about 10 mA cm/sup -2/ could be supported. The cell resistances rather than the catalytic activity were then limiting the current.

  10. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  11. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  12. Do pyrimidine nucleotides regulate translatability of globin mRNA as purine nucleotides do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H N; Almendarez, E; Halim, M N

    1988-01-01

    1. When rabbit globin mRNA was incubated with rabbit reticulocyte lysate in the presence of various concentrations of nucleotides, globin synthesis was inhibited or stimulated dependent on dose. 2. Pyrimidine nucleotides inhibited protein synthesis at 0.3 mM, whereas 2 mM of purine nucleotides were required to cause similar inhibition. 3. Adenosine mono- and diphosphate inhibited globin synthesis at a concentration of only 1 mM; however, the sequence is AMP greater than ADP greater than ATP. 4. Translation arrest by these nucleotides was instantaneous. 5. These results suggest that these nucleotides may provide a structural component for maintaining the integrity, the conformation of mRNA or of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP).

  13. Rational Design of Selective Adenine-Based Scaffolds for Inactivation of Bacterial Histidine Kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Manibarsha; Wilke, Kaelyn E; Carlson, Erin E

    2017-10-12

    Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) are quintessential regulatory enzymes found ubiquitously in bacteria. Apart from their regulatory roles, they are also involved in the production of virulence factors and conferring resistance to various antibiotics in pathogenic microbes. We have previously reported compounds that inhibit multiple HKs by targeting the conserved catalytic and ATP-binding (CA) domain. Herein, we conduct a detailed structure-activity relationship assessment of adenine-based inhibitors using biochemical and docking methods. These studies have resulted in several observations. First, interaction of an inhibitor's amine group with the conserved active-site Asp is essential for activity and likely dictates its orientation in the binding pocket. Second, a N-NH-N triad in the inhibitor scaffold is highly preferred for binding to conserved Gly:Asp:Asn residues. Lastly, hydrophobic electron-withdrawing groups at several positions in the adenine core enhance potency. The selectivity of these inhibitors was tested against heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), which possesses a similar ATP-binding fold. We found that groups that target the ATP-lid portion of the catalytic domain, such as a six-membered ring, confer selectivity for HKs.

  14. Role of Hydrogen Bonding in the Formation of Adenine Chains on Cu(110 Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanxia Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the adsorption properties of DNA bases on metal surfaces is fundamental for the rational control of surface functionalization leading to the realisation of biocompatible devices for biosensing applications, such as monitoring of particular parameters within bio-organic environments and drug delivery. In this study, the effects of deposition rate and substrate temperature on the adsorption behavior of adenine on Cu(110 surfaces have been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and density functional theory (DFT modeling, with a focus on the characterization of the morphology of the adsorbed layers. STM results revealed the formation of one-dimensional linear chains and ladder-like chains parallel to the [110] direction, when dosing at a low deposition rate at room temperature, followed by annealing to 490 K. Two mirror related, well-ordered chiral domains oriented at ±55° with respect to the [110] direction are formed upon deposition on a substrate kept at 490 K. The molecular structures observed via STM are rationalized and qualitatively described on the basis of the DFT modeling. The observation of a variety of ad-layer structures influenced by deposition rate and substrate temperature indicates that dynamic processes and hydrogen bonding play an important role in the self-assembly of adenine on the Cu(110 surface.

  15. The chemistry of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) analogues containing C-nucleosides related to nicotinamide riboside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Watanabe, Kyoichi A; Lesiak-Watanabe, Krystyna; Goldstein, Barry M; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2002-04-01

    Oncolytic C-nucleosides, tiazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) and benzamide riboside (3-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzamide) are converted in cell into active metabolites thiazole-4-carboxamide- and benzamide adenine dinucleotide, TAD and BAD, respectively. TAD and BAD as NAD analogues were found to bind at the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (cofactor NAD) site of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an important target in cancer treatment. The synthesis and evaluation of anticancer activity of a number of C-nucleosides related to tiazofurin and nicotinamide riboside then followed and are reviewed herein. Interestingly, pyridine C-nucleosides (such as C-nicotinamide riboside) are not metabolized into the corresponding NAD analogues in cell. Their conversion by chemical methods is described. As dinucleotides these compounds show inhibition of IMPDH in low micromolar level. Also, the synthesis of BAD in metabolically stable bis(phosphonate) form is discussed indicating the usefulness of such preformed inhibitors in drug development. Among tiazofurin analogues, Franchetti and Grifantini found, that the replacement of the sulfur by oxygen (as in oxazafurin) but not the removal of nitrogen (tiophenfurin) of the thiazole ring resulted in inactive compounds. The anti cancer activity of their synthetic dinucleotide analogues indicate that inactive compounds are not only poorly metabolized in cell but also are weak inhibitors of IMPDH as dinucleotides.

  16. Thymine- and Adenine-Functionalized Polystyrene Form Self-Assembled Structures through Multiple Complementary Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shian Wu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the self-assembly of two homopolymers of the same molecular weight, but containing complementary nucleobases. After employing nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization to synthesize poly(vinylbenzyl chloride, we converted the polymer into poly(vinylbenzyl azide through a reaction with NaN3 and then performed click chemistry with propargyl thymine and propargyl adenine to yield the homopolymers, poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methylthymine (PVBT and poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methyladenine (PVBA, respectively. This PVBT/PVBA blend system exhibited a single glass transition temperature over the entire range of compositions, indicative of a miscible phase arising from the formation of multiple strong complementary hydrogen bonds between the thymine and adenine groups of PVBT and PVBA, respectively; Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the presence of these noncovalent interactions. In addition, dynamic rheology, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy provided evidence for the formation of supramolecular network structures in these binary PVBT/PVBA blend systems.

  17. Position-dependent effects of regioisomeric methylated adenine and guanine ribonucleosides on translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Changjun; Dai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yinsheng

    2017-09-06

    Reversible methylation of the N6 or N1 position of adenine in RNA has recently been shown to play significant roles in regulating the functions of RNA. RNA can also be alkylated upon exposure to endogenous and exogenous alkylating agents. Here we examined how regio-specific methylation at the hydrogen bonding edge of adenine and guanine in mRNA affects translation. When situated at the third codon position, the methylated nucleosides did not compromise the speed or accuracy of translation under most circumstances. When located at the first or second codon position, N1-methyladenosine (m1A) and m1G constituted robust blocks to both Escherichia coli and wheat germ extract translation systems, whereas N2-methylguanosine (m2G) moderately impeded translation. While m1A, m2G and N6-methyladenosine (m6A) did not perturb translational fidelity, O6-methylguanosine (m6G) at the first and second codon positions was strongly and moderately miscoding, respectively, and it was decoded as an adenosine in both systems. The effects of methylated ribonucleosides on translation could be attributed to the methylation-elicited alterations in base pairing properties of the nucleobases, and the mechanisms of ribosomal decoding contributed to the position-dependent effects. Together, our study afforded important new knowledge about the modulation of translation by methylation of purine nucleobases in mRNA. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Electron Tunneling Pathway and Role of Adenine in Repair of Damaged DNA by Photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyun; Tan, Chuang; Guo, Xunmin; Kao, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2012-06-01

    Through electron tunneling, photolyase, a photoenzyme, restores damaged DNA into normal bases. Here, we report our systematic characterization and analyses of three electron transfer processes in thymine dimer restoration by following the entire dynamical evolution during enzymatic repair with femtosecond resolution. We observed the complete dynamics of the reactants, all intermediates and final products, and determined their reaction time scales. Using (deoxy)uracil and thymine as dimer substrates, we unambiguously determined the electron tunneling pathways for the forward electron transfer to initiate repairing and for the final electron return to restore the active cofactor and complete the repair photocycle. Significantly, we found that the adenine moiety of the unusual bent cofactor is essential to mediating all electron transfer dynamics through a super-exchange mechanism, leading to a delicate balance of time scales. The active-site structural integrity, unique electron tunneling pathways and the critical role of adenine assure these elementary dynamics in synergy in this complex photorepair machinery to achieve the maximum repair efficiency close to unity. Z. Liu, C. Tan, X. Guo, Y.-T. Kao, J. Li, L. Wang, A. Sancar, and D. Zhong, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 14831 (2011) J. Li, Z. Liu, C. Tan, X. Guo, L. Wang, A. Sancar, and D. Zhong, Nature 466, 887 (2010)

  19. Extracellular nucleotide derivatives protect cardiomyctes against hypoxic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golan, O; Issan, Y; Isak, A

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Extracellular nucleotides have widespread effects and various cell responses. Whereas the effect of a purine nucleotide (ATP) and a pyrimidine nucleotide (UTP) on myocardial infarction has been examined, the role of different purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and nucleosides in cardiop...

  20. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectroscopy of adenine and uracil using shaped ultrafast laser pulses in the deep UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chien-hung; Sándor, Péter; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2012-03-22

    We compare two-dimensional (2D) ultrafast Fourier transform spectroscopy measurements in the deep UV (262 nm) for adenine and uracil in solution. Both molecules show excited-state absorption on short time scales and ground-state bleaching extending for over 1 ps. While the 2D spectrum for uracil shows changes in the center of gravity during the first few hundred femtoseconds, the center of gravity of the 2D spectrum for adenine does not show similar changes. We discuss our results in light of ab initio electronic structure calculations. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. High-NaCl diet impairs dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aso; DiBona, Gerald F; Grimberg, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 2 wk of high-NaCl diet on kidney function and dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation (RBFA) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an identical diet without...... arterial pressure variability (SAPV), and heart rate variability were assessed by spectral analytical techniques. Rats with ACRF showed marked reductions in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow (RBF), whereas mean arterial pressure and SAPV were significantly elevated. In addition, spontaneous...

  2. The effect of pi-stacking, H-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravaya, Ksenia B; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I

    2010-03-14

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Experimentally observed and computed adiabatic and vertical ionization energies (IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions strongly affect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largest changes in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) relative to the monomer occur in asymmetric H-bonded and symmetric pi-stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric H-bonded dimer the shift in IEs is much smaller (0.2 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric H-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. In the former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by the dipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. Relative to TT, the shifts in AA and AT are much smaller due to a less efficient overlap, smaller dipole of A and the large energy gap between ionized states of A and T monomers in the case of AT dimer. The ionization of the H-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) proton transfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  3. Retrieval and Representation of Nucleotide Sequence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umar et al.: Retrieval and Representation of Nucleotide Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cystathionine ............. 28. GenBank, information describing each sequence entry is given, including literature references, information about the function of the sequence, location of mRNA and coding regions, and position of ...

  4. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in peroxisome proliferator ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We also investigated the correlation of these two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with plasma resistin levels. The C1431T SNP was associated with higher levels of plasma resistin ( = 0.017). Furthermore, C1431T was associated with resistin in different tertiles. Prevalence of the 'Pro-C' haplotype decreased with ...

  5. Nucleotide excision repair and human syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractDNA damage is implicated in cancer and aging, and several DNA repair mechanisms exist that safeguard the genome from these deleterious consequences. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes a wide diversity of lesions, the main of which include UV-induced lesions, bulky chemical adducts

  6. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and single nucleotide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are providing in depth knowledge in plant biology, breeding and biotechnology. The emergence of many novel molecular marker techniques are changing and accelerating the process of producing mutations in plant molecular biology ...

  7. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in peroxisome proliferator ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    the metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes. We also investigated the correlation of these two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with plasma resistin levels. The C1431T SNP was associated with higher levels of plasma resistin (P = 0.017). Furthermore, C1431T was associated with resistin in different tertiles.

  8. On the existence of the H3 tautomer of adenine in aqueous solution. Rationalizations based on hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aidas, Kestutis; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Kongsted, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The (15)N NMR spectrum of adenine in aqueous solution has been modeled using high-level combined density functional theory/molecular mechanics techniques coupled to a dynamical averaging scheme. The explicit consideration of the three lowest-energy tautomers of adenine-H9, H7 and H3-allows...

  9. Solubilization of a guanine nucleotide-sensitive form of the P2Y-purinergic receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffs, R.A.; Cooper, C.L.; Harden, T.K. (Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1991-07-01

    P2Y-Purinergic receptors were solubilized from turkey erythrocyte plasma membranes with the nonionic detergent digitonin. Adenosine 5{prime}-O-(2-(35S)thiodiphosphate) ((35S)ADP {beta} S) labeled a single population of soluble high affinity sites (Kd = 12.9 nM; Bmax = 4.5 pmol/mg of protein) in an equilibrium binding assay; adenine nucleotide analogs competitively inhibited (35S)ADP {beta} S binding with a rank order of potency consistent with that for P2Y-purinergic receptors. Radioligand binding to solubilized P2Y-purinergic receptors was noncompetitively inhibited by guanine nucleotides with a rank order of potency that was in agreement with the potency order observed for guanine nucleotide-mediated inhibition of (35S)ADP {beta} S binding in purified turkey erythrocyte plasma membranes. The rate constant for dissociation of (35S)ADP beta S from solubilized receptors was increased 2.3-fold by guanosine 5{prime}-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP {gamma} S). Plasma membrane P2Y-purinergic receptors were labeled with (35S)ADP {beta} S or covalently labeled with the photoaffinity probe 3{prime}-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-32P)triphosphate (({alpha}-32P)BzATP) before solubilization and gel filtration chromatography on Superose 12. (35S)ADP {beta} S- or (alpha-32P)BzATP-labeled species eluted as a single peak of radioactivity of apparent Mr greater than or equal to 300,000. Incubation of the Mr greater than or equal to 300,000 protein species with GTP {gamma} S before rechromatography resulted in loss of labeling of proteins by (35S)ADP {beta} S and a shift in apparent size of the covalently ({alpha}-32P)BzATP-labeled species to a single peak of radioactivity of approximate Mr 70,000. These results suggest that a P2Y-purinergic receptor-guanine nucleotide regulatory protein complex is stable to membrane solubilization with digitonin, even in the absence of prebound agonist.

  10. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenov, Artur, E-mail: Artur.Nenov@unibo.it; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K. [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, IT-40126 Bologna (Italy); Rivalta, Ivan [Université de Lyon, CNRS, Institut de Chimie de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Cerullo, Giulio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, IT-20133 Milano (Italy); Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States); Garavelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.garavelli@unibo.it, E-mail: marco.garavelli@ens-lyon.fr [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, IT-40126 Bologna (Italy); Université de Lyon, CNRS, Institut de Chimie de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2015-06-07

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040–1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  11. DNA adenine methylation modulates pathogenicity of Klebsiella pneumoniae genotype K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chi-Tai; Yi, Wen-Ching; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2017-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae genotype K1 is a highly virulent pathogen that causes liver abscess and metastatic endophthalmitis/meningitis. Whether its pathogenicity is controlled by DNA adenine methylase (Dam), an epigenetic regulator of bacterial virulence gene expression, is yet unknown. We aimed to study the role of DNA adenine methylation in the pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae genotype K1. We identified the dam gene in the prototype tissue-invasive strain (NTUH-K2044) of K. pneumoniae genotype K1, using the strain's complete genome sequence in GenBank. We constructed a dam - mutant and compared it with the wild type, in terms of in vitro serum resistance and in vivo BALB/cByl mice inoculation. Loss of Dam activity in the mutant was verified by MboI restriction digestion of the genomic DNA and a 1000-fold increase in spontaneous mutation rate. The dam mutant lost at least 68% of serum resistance when compared with the wild type (survival ratio at 1 hour: 2.6 ± 0.4 vs. 8.2 ± 1.9; at 2 hours: 3.9 ± 1.6 vs. 17.4 ± 3.6; p values < 0.05). Likewise, virulence to mice decreased by 40-fold in an intraperitoneal injection model [lethal dose, 50% (LD 50 ): 2 × 10 3 colony-forming units (CFUs) vs. 5 × 10 1 CFUs] and by sixfold in a gastric ingestion model (LD 50 : 3 × 10 4 CFUs vs. 5 × 10 3 CFUs). Attenuation of the dam mutant was not attributable to its growth rate, which was similar to that of the wild type. Our results support the view that DNA adenine methylation plays an important role in modulating the pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae genotype K1. The incomplete attenuation indicates the existence of other regulatory factors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphism discrimination with and without an ethidium bromide intercalator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenati, Renzo A.; Connolly, Ashley R. [Flinders Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Flinders University, Sturt Road, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 (Australia); Ellis, Amanda V., E-mail: amanda.ellis@flinders.edu.au [Flinders Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Flinders University, Sturt Road, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 (Australia); Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2017-02-15

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is an important aspect in understanding genetic variations. Here, we discriminate SNPs using toe-hold mediated displacement reactions. The biological target is an 80 nucleotide long double-stranded–DNA from the mtDNA HV1 region, associated with maternal ancestry. This target has been specially designed with a pendant toehold and a cationic fluorophore, ATTO 647N, as a reporter, produced in a polymerase chain reaction. Rates of reaction for the toehold-polymerase chain reaction products (TPPs) with their corresponding complementary displacing sequences, labelled with a Black Hole Quencher 1, followed the order TPP–Cytosine > TPP–Thymine > TPP–Adenine ≥ TPP–Guanine. Non-complementary rates were the slowest with mismatches involving cytosine. These reactions, operating in a static/or contact mode, gave averaged readouts between SNPs within 15 min (with 80–90% quenching), compared to 25–30 min in previous studies involving fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Addition of an intercalating agent, ethidium bromide, retarded the rate of reaction in which cytosine was involved, presumably through stabilization of the base pairing, which resulted in markedly improved discrimination of cytosine containing SNPs. - Highlights: • Fluorophores and DNA intercalators effect the rate of toehold-mediated strand displacement. • Ethidium bromide had a destabilizing effect on mismatches that contained cytosine. • A cationic fluorophore and Black Hole Quencher 1 strand displacement system was 2–3 times faster than a FRET system. • This enabled SNP detection using toehold-mediated strand displacement in 15 min.

  13. Structurally related nucleotides as selective agonists and antagonists at P2Y1 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Moro, Stefano; Hoffmann, Carsten; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hak Sung; Ravi, R. Gnana; Harden, T. Kendall; Boyer, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The P2Y1 receptor responds to adenine nucleotides and is present in platelets, heart, smooth muscles prostate, ovary, and brain. A selective antagonist may be useful as an antithrombotic agent. We have analyzed the binding site of this G protein-coupled receptor using ligand design, site-directed mutagenesis, and homology modeling based on rhodopsin. We have designed and synthesized a series of deoxyadenosine 3′,5′-bisphosphate derivatives that act as antagonists, or, in some cases with small structural changes, as agonists or partial agonists. The 2-position accommodates Cl or thioethers, whereas the N6-position is limited to Me or Et. 2′-Substitution with OH or OMe increases agonist efficacy over 2′-H. Using molecular modeling of the binding site, the oxygen atoms of the ribose moiety were predicted to be non-essential, i.e. no specific H-bonds with the receptor protein appear in the model. We have, therefore, substituted this moiety with carbocylics, smaller and larger rings, conformationally constrained rings, and acyclics, with retention of affinity for the receptor. With simplified pharmacophores we are exploring the steric and electronic requirements of the receptor binding site, and the structural basis of receptor activation. PMID:11347970

  14. (Semi-)quantitative analysis of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence images of blood-perfused rat heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.C.C. Coremans (Joanna); C. Ince (Can); H.A. Bruining (Hajo); G.J. Puppels (Gerwin)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn vivo analysis of the metabolic state of tissue by means of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorimetry is disturbed by tissue movements and by hemodynamic and oximetric effects. These factors cause changes in the absorption of ultraviolet (UV)

  15. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the reaction between the •OH radical and adenine – a theoretical investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-01-01

    the computational method is validated by considering the hydrogen abstraction from the heterocyclic N9 nitrogen in adenine as a test system. Geometries for all molecules in the reaction are optimised with four different DFT exchange-correlation functionals (B3LYP, BHandHLYP, M06-2X and wB97X-D), in combination...

  16. Flavin adenine dinucleotide binding is the crucial step in alcohol oxidase assembly in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Melchior E.; Titorenko, Vladimir; Harder, Wim; Klei, Ida van der; Veenhuis, Marten

    We have studied the role of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the in vivo assembly of peroxisomal alcohol oxidase (AO) in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. In previous studies, using a riboflavin (Rf) autotrophic mutant, an unequivocal judgement could not be made, since Rf-limitation led to a

  17. Reduced Graphene Oxide/α-Cyclodextrin-Based Electrochemical Sensor: Characterization and Simultaneous Detection of Adenine, Guanine and Thymine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan ZOR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, the rising star of carbon nanomaterials, is a single layer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms patterned in a 2D honeycomb network. Thanks to its unique features, graphene has attracted enormous attention and it has arisen various applications in the fields of optical and electrochemical sensors. In the present work, reduced graphene oxide/alpha cyclodextrin (rGO/α-CD is proposed as a nanocomposite for individual and simultaneous detection of adenine, guanine and thymine. rGO/α-CD has been characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, AFM, HR-TEM and SEM techniques. Cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques were utilized for detection of adenine, guanine and thymine. The limit of detection (LOD values for adenine, guanine and thymine were calculated to be 145.5, 38.9 and 52.9 nmol L-1, respectively. The results show that the developed sensor can be utilized for the determination of adenine, guanine and thymine in human serum, indicating its promising application in the analysis of real samples.

  18. Ultraviolet hypersensitivity of Cockayne syndrome lymphoblastoid lines - the effects of exogenous. beta. -nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Fujio; Kukita, Atsushi

    1986-12-01

    Four Cockayne Syndrome (CS) lymphoblastoid lines were tested for the lethal effects of UV radiation (254 nm) with or without addition of exogenous ..beta..-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (..beta..-NAD/sup +/) to their culture medium. Two of them exhibited a small but significantly increased resistance to UV radiation when ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ was added to the culture. However, their UV sensitivity after ..beta..-NAD+ addition was still much greater than that of normal control lines. Normal control lymphoblastoid lines and those from complementation group A and group C of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) did not reveal any differences in post-UV sensitivity after the addition of exogenous ..beta..-NAD/sup +/. Thus the abnormal response to the lethal effects of UV radiation of CS lymphoblastoid lines could not be rectified by ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ addition. However, ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ does appear to play some partial role in reducing the high UV sensitivity of some CS lymphoblastoid lines.

  19. Structural study and investigation of NMR tensors in interaction of dopamine with Adenine and guanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjia Xu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of dopamine with adenine and guanine were studied at the Hartree-Fock level theory. The structural and vibrational properties of dopamine-4-N7GUA and dopamine-4-N3ADE were studied at level of HF/6-31G*. Interaction energies (ΔE were calculated to be -11.49 and -11.92 kcal/mol, respectively. Some of bond lengths, angels and tortions are compared. NBO studies were performed to the second-order and perturbative estimates of donor-acceptor interaction have been done. The procedures of gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO and continuous-set-of-gauge-transformation (CSGT were employed to calculate isotropic shielding, chemical shifts anisotropy and chemical shifts anisotropy asymmetry and effective anisotropy using 6-31G* basis set. These calculations yielded molecular geometries in good agreement with available experimental data.

  20. Animal models of pediatric chronic kidney disease. Is adenine intake an appropriate model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Claramunt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD has peculiar features. In particular, growth impairment is a major clinical manifestation of CKD that debuts in pediatric age because it presents in a large proportion of infants and children with CKD and has a profound impact on the self-esteem and social integration of the stunted patients. Several factors associated with CKD may lead to growth retardation by interfering with the normal physiology of growth plate, the organ where longitudinal growth rate takes place. The study of growth plate is hardly possible in humans and justifies the use of animal models. Young rats made uremic by 5/6 nephrectomy have been widely used as a model to investigate growth retardation in CKD. This article examines the characteristics of this model and analyzes the utilization of CKD induced by high adenine diet as an alternative research protocol.

  1. Aspects of Tryptophan and Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide in Immunity: A New Twist in an Old Tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Rodriguez Cetina Biefer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence underscores the interesting ability of tryptophan to regulate immune responses. However, the exact mechanisms of tryptophan’s immune regulation remain to be determined. Tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway is known to play an important role in tryptophan’s involvement in immune responses. Interestingly, quinolinic acid, which is a neurotoxic catabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is the major pathway for the de novo synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + . Recent studies have shown that NAD + , a natural coenzyme found in all living cells, regulates immune responses and creates homeostasis via a novel signaling pathway. More importantly, the immunoregulatory properties of NAD + are strongly related to the overexpression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1. This review provides recent knowledge of tryptophan and NAD + and their specific and intriguing roles in the immune system. Furthermore, it focuses on the mechanisms by which tryptophan regulates NAD + synthesis as well as innate and adaptive immune responses.

  2. Metal-adeninate vertices for the construction of an exceptionally porous metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jihyun; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Pohl, Ehmke; Yeh, Joanne I; Rosi, Nathaniel L

    2012-01-03

    Metal-organic frameworks comprising metal-carboxylate cluster vertices and long, branched organic linkers are the most porous materials known, and therefore have attracted tremendous attention for many applications, including gas storage, separations, catalysis and drug delivery. To increase metal-organic framework porosity, the size and complexity of linkers has increased. Here we present a promising alternative strategy for constructing mesoporous metal-organic frameworks that addresses the size of the vertex rather than the length of the organic linker. This approach uses large metal-biomolecule clusters, in particular zinc-adeninate building units, as vertices to construct bio-MOF-100, an exclusively mesoporous metal-organic framework. Bio-MOF-100 exhibits a high surface area (4,300 m(2) g(-1)), one of the lowest crystal densities (0.302 g cm(-3)) and the largest metal-organic framework pore volume reported to date (4.3 cm(3) g(-1)).

  3. Structural insight into inhibitors of flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent lysine demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Hideaki; Umehara, Takashi

    2017-05-04

    Until 2004, many researchers believed that protein methylation in eukaryotic cells was an irreversible reaction. However, the discovery of lysine-specific demethylase 1 in 2004 drastically changed this view and the concept of chromatin regulation. Since then, the enzymes responsible for lysine demethylation and their cellular substrates, biological significance, and selective regulation have become major research topics in epigenetics and chromatin biology. Many cell-permeable inhibitors for lysine demethylases have been developed, including both target-specific and nonspecific inhibitors. Structural understanding of how these inhibitors bind to lysine demethylases is crucial both for validation of the inhibitors as chemical probes and for the rational design of more potent, target-specific inhibitors. This review focuses on published small-molecule inhibitors targeted at the two flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent lysine demethylases, lysine-specific demethylases 1 and 2, and how the inhibitors interact with the tertiary structures of the enzymes.

  4. Synthesis and enzymatic incorporation of α-L-threofuranosyl adenine triphosphate (tATP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Chaput, John C

    2013-03-01

    Threose nucleic acid (TNA) is an artificial genetic polymer in which the natural ribose sugar found in RNA has been replaced with an unnatural threose sugar. TNA can be synthesized enzymatically using Therminator DNA polymerase to copy DNA templates into TNA. Here, we expand the substrate repertoire of Therminator DNA polymerase to include threofuranosyl adenine 3'-triphsophate (tATP). We chemically synthesized tATP by two different methods from the 2'-O-acetyl derivative. Enzyme-mediated polymerization reveals that tATP functions as an efficient substrate for Therminator DNA polymerase, indicating that tATP can replace the diaminopurine analogue (tDTP) in TNA transcription reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-healing metal-coordinated hydrogels using nucleotide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Zijie; Yuan, Qipeng; Liu, Juewen

    2015-10-21

    A supramolecular gel formed by coordination of Zn(2+) with adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is reported. The adenine base, the monophosphate, and Zn(2+) are all important for gel formation. Mechanically disrupted gels can re-form upon centrifugation; applications of this gel for guest-molecule entrapment are explored.

  6. Adenosine and its Related Nucleotides may Modulate Gastric Acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on lumen-perfused rat isolated stomachs showed that adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) inhibited histamine-induced gastric acid secretion. The inhibitions and the calcium levels of the serosal solution exhibited inverse relationship. Adenosine ...

  7. Nucleotide Manipulatives to Illustrate the Central Dogma†

    OpenAIRE

    Yung, Sonja B.; Primm, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma is a core concept that is critical for introductory biology and microbiology students to master. However, students often struggle to conceptualize the processes involved, and fail to move beyond simply memorizing the basic facts. To encourage critical thinking, we have designed a set of magnetic nucleotide manipulatives that allow students to model DNA structure, along with the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.

  8. Nucleotide Manipulatives to Illustrate the Central Dogma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja B. Yung

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma is a core concept that is critical for introductory biology and microbiology students to master. However, students often struggle to conceptualize the processes involved, and fail to move beyond simply memorizing the basic facts. To encourage critical thinking, we have designed a set of magnetic nucleotide manipulatives that allow students to model DNA structure, along with the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.

  9. Aggregation of rat neutrophils by nucleotide triphosphates.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford-Hutchinson, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) at concentrations of 3 x 10(-7)M and greater cause a rapid partially reversible aggregation of rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 2 Other nucleotide phosphates are much less active at producing aggregation responses; the agonist potencies being UTP greater than ATP greater than guanosine 5'-triphosphate, cytidine 5'-triphosphate, thymidine 5'-triphosphate; ATP greater than adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) greater than adenosine ...

  10. Visualization of cyclic nucleotide dynamics in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill eGorshkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP transduce many neuromodulatory signals from hormones and neurotransmitters into specific functional outputs. Their production, degradation and signaling are spatiotemporally regulated to achieve high specificity in signal transduction. The development of genetically encodable fluorescent biosensors has provided researchers with useful tools to study these versatile second messengers and their downstream effectors with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution in cultured cells and living animals. In this review, we introduce the general design of these fluorescent biosensors and describe several of them in more detail. Then we discuss a few examples of using cyclic nucleotide fluorescent biosensors to study regulation of neuronal function and finish with a discussion of advances in the field. Although there has been significant progress made in understanding how the specific signaling of cyclic nucleotide second messengers is achieved, the mechanistic details in complex cell types like neurons are only just beginning to surface. Current and future fluorescent protein reporters will be essential to elucidate the role of cyclic nucleotide signaling dynamics in the functions of individual neurons and their networks.

  11. Nucleotide composition bias and codon usage trends of gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The GC and AT skews estimate nucleotide composition bias at different positions of nucleotide triplets and the protein consideration caused by the nucleotide composition bias at codon positions 1 and 2 largely take part in synonymous codon usage patterns of the two mycoplasmas. The correlation between the codon ...

  12. A Sensitive Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Assay for Transient Enzyme Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1983-01-01

    A new assay for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase has been developed by using reverse-phase column chromatography for the separation of product and substrate of the enzymatic reaction. The polar 5'-nucleotides are not retarded by the column, while the more lipophilic cyclic nucleotides bind to the

  13. Probing Adenine Rings and Backbone Linkages Using Base Specific Isotope-Edited Raman Spectroscopy: Application to Group II Intron Ribozyme Domain V†

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Eldho, Nadukkudy V.; Dayie, T. Kwaku; Carey, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Raman difference spectroscopy is used to probe the properties of a 36-nt RNA molecule, “D5”, which lies at the heart of the catalytic apparatus in group II introns. For D5 that has all its adenine residues labeled with 13C and 15N, and utilizing Raman difference spectroscopy, we identify the conformational sensitive -C-O-P-O-C- stretching modes of the unlabeled bonds adjacent to adenine bases, as well as the adenine ring modes themselves. The phosphodiester modes can be assigned to individual...

  14. Efficacy of Adenine in the Treatment of Leukopenia and Neutropenia Associated with an Overdose of Antipsychotics or Discontinuation of Lithium Carbonate Administration: Three Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Takashi; Goto, Hidekazu; Sumiya, Kenji; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tanaka, Katsuya; Kohda, Yukinao

    2016-11-30

    Because adenine is effective for managing cases of radiation-induced and drug-induced leukopenia, it may be effective in cases of antipsychotic-induced leukopenia and neutropenia. Here, we report our experience with patients with leukopenia and neutropenia caused by an antipsychotic overdose or discontinuation of lithium carbonate, in whom adenine administration ameliorated the white blood cell and neutrophil counts. The progress of patients suggests that adenine is effective in cases of leukopenia and neutropenia associated with lithium carbonate discontinuation and an antipsychotic overdose.

  15. Gas-phase spectroscopy of protonated adenine, adenosine 5′-monophosphate and monohydrated ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S.O.; Støchkel, K.; Byskov, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    in combination with a tuneable pulsed laser system. Experiments also included the protonated adenosine 5′-monophosphate nucleotide (AMPH+). In the case of bare AdeH+ ions, one-photon absorption leads to four dominant fragment ions corresponding to ammonium and ions formed after loss of either NH3, HCN, or NH2CN...

  16. Detection of Guanine and Adenine Using an Aminated Reduced Graphene Oxide Functional Membrane-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new electrochemical sensor based on a Nafion, aminated reduced graphene oxide and chitosan functional membrane-modified glassy carbon electrode was proposed for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and electrochemical methods were utilized for the additional characterization of the membrane materials. The prepared electrode was utilized for the detection of guanine (G and adenine (A. The anodic peak currents to G and A were linear in the concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 120 μM and 0.2 to 110 μM, respectively. The detection limits were found to be 0.1 μM and 0.2 μM, respectively. Moreover, the modified electrode could also be used to determine G and A in calf thymus DNA.

  17. Electrochemical study in both classical cell and microreactors of flavin adenine dinucleotide as a redox mediator for NADH regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzedakis, Theodore, E-mail: tzedakis@chimie.ups-tlse.f [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR 5503, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse cedex 04 (France); Cheikhou, Kane [Ecole Superieure Polytechnique de Dakar BP: 16263 Dakar-Fann (Senegal); Jerome, Roche; Karine, Groenen Serrano; Olivier, Reynes [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR 5503, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse cedex 04 (France)

    2010-02-28

    The electrochemical reduction of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is studied in a classical electrochemical cell as well as in two types of microreactors: the first one is a one-channel reactor and the other one, a multichannel filter-press reactor. The ultimate goal is to use the reduced form of flavin (FADH{sub 2}), in the presence of formate dehydrogenase (FDH), in order to continuously regenerate the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) for chiral syntheses. Various voltammetric and adsorption measurements were carried out for a better understanding of the redox behavior of the FAD as well as its adsorption on gold. Diffusivity and kinetic electrochemical parameters of FAD were determined.

  18. Time-dependent density-functional-theory investigation of the collisions of protons and α particles with uracil and adenine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Cody; Hartig, Kara; Russakoff, Arthur; Kulpins, Ryan; Varga, Kálmán

    2017-05-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory was employed to study the effects of proton and α -particle radiation on uracil and adenine. This method has the advantage of treating nuclear motion and electronic motion simultaneously, allowing for the study of electronic excitation, charge transfer, ionization, and nuclear motion. Particle energies were surveyed in the range of 15-500 keV for protons and 100-2000 keV for α particles in conjunction with impact points both on and off carbon bonds in order to investigate the electron and nuclear dynamics of irradiated molecules and the form and quantity of transferred energy. The stopping power, energy transferred, and ionization were found, and the relationship between incident particle energy and electron density of the target molecule was characterized for proton and α -particle radiation incident on adenine and uracil.

  19. Ultrafast deactivation processes in the 2-aminopyridine dimer and the adenine-thymine base pair: Similarities and differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yue-Jie; Zhang, Feng; Cui, Gang-Long; Luo, Yi; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2010-08-01

    2-aminopyridine dimer has frequently been used as a model system for studying photochemistry of DNA base pairs. We examine here the relevance of 2-aminopyridine dimer for a Watson-Crick adenine-thymine base pair by studying UV-light induced photodynamics along two main hydrogen bridges after the excitation to the localized π1π∗ excited-state. The respective two-dimensional potential-energy surfaces have been determined by time-dependent density functional theory with Coulomb-attenuated hybrid exchange-correlation functional (CAM-B3LYP). Different mechanistic aspects of the deactivation pathway have been analyzed and compared in detail for both systems, while the related reaction rates have also be obtained from Monte Carlo kinetic simulations. The limitations of the 2-aminopyridine dimer as a model system for the adenine-thymine base pair are discussed.

  20. The GC-Rich Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Alga Coccomyxa Give Insight into the Evolution of Organelle DNA Nucleotide Landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David Roy; Burki, Fabien; Yamada, Takashi; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2011-05-13

    Most of the available mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences are biased towards adenine and thymine (AT) over guanine and cytosine (GC). Examples of GC-rich organelle DNAs are limited to a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green algae. Here, to gain insight in the evolution of organelle nucleotide landscape, we present the GC-rich mitochondrial and plastid DNAs from the trebouxiophyte green alga Coccomyxa sp. C-169. We compare these sequences with other GC-rich organelle DNAs and argue that the forces biasing them towards G and C are nonadaptive and linked to the metabolic and/or life history features of this species. The Coccomyxa organelle genomes are also used for phylogenetic analyses, which highlight the complexities in trying to resolve the interrelationships among the core chlorophyte green algae, but ultimately favour a sister relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae, with the Trebouxiophyceae branching at the base of the chlorophyte crown.

  1. [Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in centenarians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Juan; Gimeno-Mallench, Lucía; Inglés, Marta; Olaso, Gloria; Abdelaziz, Kheira Mohamed; Avellana, Juan Antonio; Belenguer, Ángel; Cruz, Raquel; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Borras, Consuelo; Viña, José

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is determined by genetic and external factors, such as nutritional, environmental, social, etc. Nevertheless, when living conditions are optimal, longevity is determined by genetic variations between individuals. In a same population, with relative genotypic homogeneity, subtle changes in the DNA sequence affecting a single nucleotide can be observed. These changes, called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are present in 1-5% of the population. A total of 92 subjects were recruited, including 28 centenarians and 64 controls, in order to find SNP that maybe implicated in the extreme longevity, as in the centenarians. Blood samples were collected to isolate and amplify the DNA in order to perform the analysis of SPN by Axiom™ Genotyping of Affymetrix technology. Statistical analyses were performed using the Plink program and libraries SNPassoc and skatMeta. Our results show 12 mutations with a p<.001, where 5 of these (DACH1, LOC91948, BTB16, NFIL3 y HDAC4) have regulatory functions of the expressions of others genes. Therefore, these results suggest that the genetic variation between centenarians and controls occurs in five genes that are involved in the regulation of gene expression to adapt to environmental changes better than controls. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  3. Alteration of the Intestinal Environment by Lubiprostone Is Associated with Amelioration of Adenine-Induced CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Eikan; Fukuda, Shinji; Shima, Hisato; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Fukuda, Noriko N; Suzuki, Takehiro; Suzuki, Chitose; Yuri, Akinori; Kikuchi, Koichi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ito, Sadayoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-08-01

    The accumulation of uremic toxins is involved in the progression of CKD. Various uremic toxins are derived from gut microbiota, and an imbalance of gut microbiota or dysbiosis is related to renal failure. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between the gut microbiota and renal failure are still obscure. Using an adenine-induced renal failure mouse model, we evaluated the effects of the ClC-2 chloride channel activator lubiprostone (commonly used for the treatment of constipation) on CKD. Oral administration of lubiprostone (500 µg/kg per day) changed the fecal and intestinal properties in mice with renal failure. Additionally, lubiprostone treatment reduced the elevated BUN and protected against tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, and inflammation. Gut microbiome analysis of 16S rRNA genes in the renal failure mice showed that lubiprostone treatment altered their microbial composition, especially the recovery of the levels of the Lactobacillaceae family and Prevotella genus, which were significantly reduced in the renal failure mice. Furthermore, capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry-based metabolome analysis showed that lubiprostone treatment decreased the plasma level of uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate and hippurate, which are derived from gut microbiota, and a more recently discovered uremic toxin, trans-aconitate. These results suggest that lubiprostone ameliorates the progression of CKD and the accumulation of uremic toxins by improving the gut microbiota and intestinal environment. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Protecting axonal degeneration by increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Shinjiro; Wang, Jing; Kaneko, Marie; Yiu, Glenn; Hurrell, Joanna M; Chitnis, Tanuja; Khoury, Samia J; He, Zhigang

    2006-09-20

    Axonal damage is a major morphological alteration in the CNS of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the underlying mechanism for the axonal damage associated with MS/EAE and its contribution to the clinical symptoms remain unclear. The expression of a fusion protein, named "Wallerian degeneration slow" (Wld(S)), can protect axons from degeneration, likely through a beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent mechanism. In this study, we find that, when induced with EAE, Wld(S) mice showed a modest attenuation of behavioral deficits and axon loss, suggesting that EAE-associated axon damage may occur by a mechanism similar to Wallerian degeneration. Furthermore, nicotinamide (NAm), an NAD biosynthesis precursor, profoundly prevents the degeneration of demyelinated axons and improves the behavioral deficits in EAE models. Finally, we demonstrate that delayed NAm treatment is also beneficial to EAE models, pointing to the therapeutic potential of NAm as a protective agent for EAE and perhaps MS patients.

  5. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Eliot F.; Venkatraman, Vishak; Grote, James G.; Steckl, Andrew J.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs are small molecules that are the basic building blocks of the larger DNA polymer. NBs readily thermally evaporate and integrate well into the vacuum deposited OLED fabrication. Adenine (A) and thymine (T) were deposited as electron-blocking/hole-transport layers (EBL/HTL) that resulted in increases in performance over the reference OLED containing the standard EBL material NPB. A-based OLEDs reached a peak current efficiency and luminance performance of 48 cd/A and 93,000 cd/m2, respectively, while T-based OLEDs had a maximum of 76 cd/A and 132,000 cd/m2. By comparison, the reference OLED yielded 37 cd/A and 113,000 cd/m2. The enhanced performance of T-based devices is attributed to a combination of energy levels and structured surface morphology that causes more efficient and controlled hole current transport to the emitting layer.

  6. Naturally Occurring β-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-Independent Avibacterium paragallinarum Isolate in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconi-Agapito, Francesca; Saravia, Luis E; Flores-Pérez, Aldo; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo

    2015-06-01

    The β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) requirement has been considered to be essential for the isolation of the causal agent of infectious coryza, Avibacterium paragallinarum. Nevertheless, NAD-independent reports from South Africa and Mexico dismissed this paradigm. It is now accepted that both NAD-dependent and NAD-independent agents are able to cause infectious coryza and thus belong to the species A. paragallinarum. Here, we report for the first time in Peru a NAD-independent isolate from broiler chickens with typical signs of infectious coryza that have received a trivalent inactivated vaccine against infectious coryza. The isolate was identified based on its morphology, biochemical and serologic tests, and PCR results. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis confirmed the isolate as A. paragallinarum. There have been no cases of NAD-independent A. paragallinarum isolates reported in South America. Increasing reports around the world highlight not only the need to reconsider the in vitro nutritional requirements of this species for its correct isolation but also the cross-protection conferred by commercial infectious coryza vaccines against NAD-independent isolates.

  7. Superoxide dismutase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate: quinone oxidoreductase polymorphisms and pancreatic cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice; Marsakova, Lenka; Vrana, David; Holcatova, Ivana; Ryska, Miroslav; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Slamova, Alena; Schejbalova, Miriam; Soucek, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma etiology and molecular pathogenesis is weakly understood. According to the assumption that genetic variation in carcinogen metabolism further modifies the risk of exposure-related cancers, an association of functional polymorphisms in oxidative stress-modifying genes superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 [Ala16Val, rs4880]), SOD3 (Arg231Gly, rs1799895), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1 [Pro187Ser, rs1800566], and NQO2 (Phe47Leu, rs1143684) with pancreatic cancer risk was studied. Polymorphisms were studied by allelic discrimination. In a hospital-based case-control study on 500 individuals (235 cases and 265 controls) of Czech white origin, SOD2, SOD3, NQO1, and NQO2 polymorphisms showed no significant association with pancreatic cancer risk. Major lifestyle factors such as smoking and alcohol, coffee, or tea consumption did not modify the effect of the studied polymorphisms. The first European study of the SOD2, SOD3, NQO1, and NQO2 roles in pancreatic cancer etiology did not find significant associations. Despite this observation, other populations with different lifestyle(s) may be at risk and should be further studied.

  8. Animal models of pediatric chronic kidney disease. Is adenine intake an appropriate model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramunt, Débora; Gil-Peña, Helena; Fuente, Rocío; Hernández-Frías, Olaya; Santos, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) has peculiar features. In particular, growth impairment is a major clinical manifestation of CKD that debuts in pediatric age because it presents in a large proportion of infants and children with CKD and has a profound impact on the self-esteem and social integration of the stunted patients. Several factors associated with CKD may lead to growth retardation by interfering with the normal physiology of growth plate, the organ where longitudinal growth rate takes place. The study of growth plate is hardly possible in humans and justifies the use of animal models. Young rats made uremic by 5/6 nephrectomy have been widely used as a model to investigate growth retardation in CKD. This article examines the characteristics of this model and analyzes the utilization of CKD induced by high adenine diet as an alternative research protocol. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnitude of malate-aspartate reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide shuttle activity in intact respiring tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1977-11-01

    Measurements of respiration, CO2 and lactate production, and changes in the levels of various key metabolites of the glycolytic sequence and tricarboxylic acid cycle were made on five lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, Krebs II carcinoma, AS-30D carcinoma, and L1210 cells) incubated aerobically in the presence of uniformly labeled D-[14C]glucose. From these data, as well as earlier evidence demonstrating that the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) shuttle in these cells requires a transaminase step and is thus identified as the malate-aspartate shuttle (W.V.V. Greenhouse and A.L. Lehninger, Cancer Res., 36: 1392-1396, 1976), metabolic flux diagrams were constructed for the five cell lines. These diagrams show the relative rates of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and the malate-aspartate shuttle in these tumors. Large amounts of cytosolic NADH were oxidized by the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the NADH shuttle, comprising anywhere from about 20 to 80% of the total flow of reducing equivalents to oxygen in these tumors. Calculations of the sources of energy for adenosine triphosphate synthesis indicated that on the average about one-third of the respiratory adenosine triphosphate is generated by electron flow originating from cytosolic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  10. Role of DNA and RNA N6-Adenine Methylation in Regulating Stem Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunshu; Zhou, Chenchen; Yuan, Quan

    2018-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications have been evidenced to participate in eukaryotic stem cell fate decision. Among the most studied, 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and its derivatives are wellestablished epigenetic codes that play important roles in stem cell pluripotency and differentiation. Based on improved detection techniques, recent studies have succeeded in defining N6-adenine methylation (m6A) in eukaryotic DNA and RNA. The abundant m6A methylation in RNA was shown to be involved in multiple cellular metabolisms while the presence and functional potential of DNA m6A methylation in different species advanced our knowledge in the m6A-mediated biological processes. m6A modification has been observed during embryogenesis and has been proposed to fine-tune stem cell regulation. The m6A methyltransferases and demethylases work together to control the dynamic state of m6A marks in genomic DNA and RNA to ensure proper cell fate transition and determination, which are vital to the development and survival of eukaryotes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Chinese herbal medicine Shenqi Detoxification Granule inhibits fibrosis in adenine induced chronic renal failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Min; Cai, Pingping; Ma, Hongbo; Meng, Hongyan; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Si, Guomin

    2014-01-01

    Progressive fibrosis accompanies all chronic renal disease, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF,) and platelet-derived growth factor-B, (PDGF-B,) play important roles in extra-cellular matrix abnormal accumulation, while endothelin-1 (ET-1) nitric oxide (NO,) are related to endothelial dysfunction, which mediates the progression of renal fibrosis. Shenqi Detoxification Granule (SDG), a traditional Chinese herbal formula, has been used for treatment of chronic renal failure in clinic for many years. In order to evaluate the efficacy, and explore the mechanism of SDG to inhibit the progression of renal fibrosis, study was carried out using the adenine-induced Wister rats as the CRF model, and losartan as postive control drug. Levels of serum creatinine [Scr], and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), albumin (ALB), 24hrs, urine protein (24hUP), triacylglycerol (TG), and cholesterol (CHO), together with ET-1, and NO were detected. Pathological changes of renal tissues were observed by HE, staining. In addition, CTGF and PDGF-B expression were analyzed by immuno-histo-chemistry. The results indicated that SDG can effectively reduce Scr, BUN, 24hUP, TG, and CHO levels, increase ALB levels, inhibit renal tissue damage in CRF rats, and the mechanism maybe reduce PDGF-B, CTGF expression and ET-1/NO. Shenqi Detoxification Granule is a beneficial treatment for chronic renal failure.

  12. High-NaCl Diet Aggravates Cardiac Injury in Rats with Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure and Increases Serum Troponin T Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kashioulis, Pavlos; Hammarsten, Ola; Marcussen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the effects of 2 weeks of high-NaCl diet on left ventricular (LV) morphology and serum levels of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats either received chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an iden...... to myocardial ischemia. This model may be suitable for studying pathophysiological mechanisms in chronic renicardiac syndromes....

  13. Classification of organisms using nucleotides frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Kremličková, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Tato bakalářská práce se zabývá klasifikací organismů na základě nukleotidové četnosti. Cílem práce je seznámit se s problematikou vyhodnocení příbuznosti organismů na základě podobnosti DNA sekvencí, navrhnout a realizovat v programovém prostředí Matlab algoritmus pro klasifikaci organismů na základě klasické fylogenetické metody, základních i pokročilých numerických metod a tyto metody mezi sebou porovnat. This thesis deals with the classification of organisms based on the nucleotide fre...

  14. Formation of amino acids and nucleotide bases in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörst, S M; Yelle, R V; Buch, A; Carrasco, N; Cernogora, G; Dutuit, O; Quirico, E; Sciamma-O'Brien, E; Smith, M A; Somogyi, A; Szopa, C; Thissen, R; Vuitton, V

    2012-09-01

    The discovery of large (>100 u) molecules in Titan's upper atmosphere has heightened astrobiological interest in this unique satellite. In particular, complex organic aerosols produced in atmospheres containing C, N, O, and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. In this work, aerosols produced in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment with enhanced CO (N(2)/CH(4)/CO gas mixtures of 96.2%/2.0%/1.8% and 93.2%/5.0%/1.8%) were found to contain 18 molecules with molecular formulae that correspond to biological amino acids and nucleotide bases. Very high-resolution mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled samples confirmed that C(4)H(5)N(3)O, C(4)H(4)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(5)N(5), and C(6)H(9)N(3)O(2) are produced by chemistry in the simulation chamber. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the non-isotopic samples confirmed the presence of cytosine (C(4)H(5)N(3)O), uracil (C(5)H(4)N(2)O(2)), thymine (C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2)), guanine (C(5)H(5)N(5)O), glycine (C(2)H(5)NO(2)), and alanine (C(3)H(7)NO(2)). Adenine (C(5)H(5)N(5)) was detected by GC-MS in isotopically labeled samples. The remaining prebiotic molecules were detected in unlabeled samples only and may have been affected by contamination in the chamber. These results demonstrate that prebiotic molecules can be formed by the high-energy chemistry similar to that which occurs in planetary upper atmospheres and therefore identifies a new source of prebiotic material, potentially increasing the range of planets where life could begin.

  15. Palindromic nucleotide analysis in human T cell receptor rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available Diversity of T cell receptor (TCR genes is primarily generated by nucleotide insertions upon rearrangement from their germ line-encoded V, D and J segments. Nucleotide insertions at V-D and D-J junctions are random, but some small subsets of these insertions are exceptional, in that one to three base pairs inversely repeat the sequence of the germline DNA. These short complementary palindromic sequences are called P nucleotides. We apply the ImmunoSeq deep-sequencing assay to the third complementarity determining region (CDR3 of the β chain of T cell receptors, and use the resulting data to study P nucleotides in the repertoire of naïve and memory CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells. We estimate P nucleotide distributions in a cross section of healthy adults and different T cell subtypes. We show that P nucleotide frequency in all T cell subtypes ranges from 1% to 2%, and that the distribution is highly biased with respect to the coding end of the gene segment. Classification of observed palindromic sequences into P nucleotides using a maximum conditional probability model shows that single base P nucleotides are very rare in VDJ recombination; P nucleotides are primarily two bases long. To explore the role of P nucleotides in thymic selection, we compare P nucleotides in productive and non-productive sequences of CD8(+ naïve T cells. The naïve CD8(+ T cell clones with P nucleotides are more highly expanded.

  16. Improving quality indices of Rosa ‘Yellow Finesse’ using methyl jasmonate and benzyl adenine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Askari-Khorasgani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth regulators (PGRs play a key role in regulating physiological and morphological development of plant species. Application of these PGRs can improve pre- and post-harvest quality and quantity of ornamental flowers and lessen the harmful effects of injury incurred at harvesting time. The objective of this study was to determine the appropriate spraying solution for improving pre- and postharvest quality indices of Rosa hybrida L. cv. ‘Yellow Finesse’. So, the effect of methyl jasmonate (MeJA at 0, 50, 100, or 150 mg*l-1 alone or in combination with benzyl adenine (BA at 0, 10, or 20 mg*l-1 was investigated. Plants were sprayed at a 15-day interval for two months and then harvested at a mature bud stage. The results showed that flower head diameter and leaf chlorophyll content were improved by applying 100 mg*l-1 MeJA + 20 mg*l-1 BA. The application of 100 mg*l-1 MeJA + 10 mg*l-1 BA or 10 mg*l-1 BA resulted in improving its petal carotenoid content. The plants treated with 150 mg*l-1 MeJA had the longest shelf life. The findings demonstrated that while 100 mg*l-1 MeJA + 20 mg*l-1 BA and 100 mg*l-1 MeJA + 10 mg*l-1 BA were the best preharvest spraying solutions due to the highest carotenoid content and largest flower head diameter. Particularly, 150 mg*l-1 MeJA was the best spraying solution for extending cut flower shelf life and had the potential to function as a postharvest treatment.

  17. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Protects against Spinal Cord Ischemia Reperfusion Injury-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of autophagy, neuroprotective mechanisms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+, and their relationship in spinal cord ischemic reperfusion injury (SCIR was assessed. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham, ischemia reperfusion (I/R, 10 mg/kg NAD+, and 75 mg/kg NAD+. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess autophagy and apoptosis. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB scores were used to assess neurological function. Expression levels of Beclin-1, Atg12-Atg5, LC3B-II, cleaved caspase 3, and Bax were upregulated in the I/R group and downregulated in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group; p-mTOR, p-AKT, p62, and Bcl-2 were downregulated in the I/R group and upregulated in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. Numbers of LC3B-positive, caspase 3-positive, Bax-positive, and TUNEL-positive cells were significantly increased in the I/R group and decreased in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. The mean integrated option density of Bax increased and that of Nissl decreased in the I/R group, and it decreased and increased, respectively, in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. BBB scores significantly increased in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group relative to the I/R group. No difference was observed between I/R and 10 mg/kg NAD+ groups for these indicators. Therefore, excessive and sustained autophagy aggravates SCIR; administration of NAD+ alleviates injury.

  18. Salt Specificity of a Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidase Prepared from a Halophilic Bacterium1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Dalton, B. P.

    1968-01-01

    Extracts prepared from a halophilic bacterium contained a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase active at high solute concentrations. The cation requirement was nonspecific, since KCl, RbCl, and CsCl replaced NaCl with little or no loss of activity, and NH4Cl was only partially effective. Only LiCl failed to replace NaCl. No specific chloride requirement was observed although not all anions replaced chloride. Bromide, nitrate, and iodide were essentially ineffective, whereas acetate, formate, citrate, and sulfate proved suitable. The presence of sulfate affected the ability of a cation to satisfy the solute requirement. Sulfate enhanced the rate of NADH2 oxidation when compared with the rate observed in the presence of chloride. Cations which were inactive as chlorides (LiCl and MgCl2 at high concentrations) satisfied the cation requirement when added as sulfate salts. Although magnesium satisfied the cation requirement, a concentration effect, as well as an anion effect, was observed. In the presence of MgCl2, little NADH2 oxidation was observed at concentrations greater than 1 m. At lower concentrations, the rate of oxidation increased, reaching a maximal value at 0.1 m and remaining constant up to a concentration of 0.05 m MgCl2. Magnesium acetate and MgSO4 also replaced NaCl, and the maximal rate of oxidation occurred at 0.05 m with respect to magnesium. There was no change in the rate of oxidation at high magnesium acetate concentrations, whereas the rate of NADH2 oxidation increased at higher concentrations of MgSO4. PMID:5636829

  19. Transcriptome and Functional Genomics Reveal the Participation of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase in Trypanosoma cruzi Resistance to Benznidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Huertas, Paola; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana María; González, Laura; Triana-Chávez, Omar

    2017-07-01

    Currently, the only available treatments for Trypanosoma cruzi are benznidazole (Bz) and nifurtimox (Nfx). The mechanisms of action and resistance to these drugs in this parasite are not complete known. In order to identify differentially expressed transcripts between sensitive and resistant parasites, a massive pyrosequencing of the T. cruzi transcriptome was carried out. Additionally, the 2D gel electrophoresis profile of sensitive and resistant parasites was analyzed and the data were supported with functional genomics. The results showed 133 differentially expressed genes in resistant parasites. The transcriptome analysis revealed the regulation of different genes with several functions and metabolic pathways, which could suggest that resistance in T. cruzi is a multigenic process. Additionally, using transcriptomics, one gene, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), was found to be down-regulated in the resistant parasites and its expression profile was confirmed by 2D electrophoresis analysis. The role of this gene in the resistance to Bz was confirmed overexpressing it in sensitive and resistant parasites. Interestingly, both parasites became more sensitive to Bz and H 2 O 2 . This is the first RNA-seq study to identify regulated genes in T. cruzi associated with Bz resistance and to show the role of APRT in T. cruzi resistance. Although T. cruzi regulation is mainly post-transcriptional, the transcriptome analysis, supported by 2D gel analysis and functional genomic, provides an overall idea of the expression profiles of genes under resistance conditions. These results contribute essential information to further the understanding of the mechanisms of action and resistance to Bz in T. cruzi. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1936-1945, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cyclic nucleotide specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linder Markus

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania represent a complex of important human pathogens that belong to the systematic order of the kinetoplastida. They are transmitted between their human and mammalian hosts by different bloodsucking sandfly vectors. In their hosts, the Leishmania undergo several differentiation steps, and their coordination and optimization crucially depend on numerous interactions between the parasites and the physiological environment presented by the fly and human hosts. Little is still known about the signalling networks involved in these functions. In an attempt to better understand the role of cyclic nucleotide signalling in Leishmania differentiation and host-parasite interaction, we here present an initial study on the cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major. Results This paper presents the identification of three class I cyclic-nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs from L. major, PDEs whose catalytic domains exhibit considerable sequence conservation with, among other, all eleven human PDE families. In contrast to other protozoa such as Dictyostelium, or fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida ssp or Neurospora, no genes for class II PDEs were found in the Leishmania genomes. LmjPDEA contains a class I catalytic domain at the C-terminus of the polypeptide, with no other discernible functional domains elsewhere. LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 are coded for by closely related, tandemly linked genes on chromosome 15. Both PDEs contain two GAF domains in their N-terminal region, and their almost identical catalytic domains are located at the C-terminus of the polypeptide. LmjPDEA, LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were further characterized by functional complementation in a PDE-deficient S. cerevisiae strain. All three enzymes conferred complementation, demonstrating that all three can hydrolyze cAMP. Recombinant LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were shown to be cAMP-specific, with Km values in the low micromolar range

  1. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Lans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER plays an essential role in many organisms across life domains to preserve and faithfully transmit DNA to the next generation. In humans, NER is essential to prevent DNA damage-induced mutation accumulation and cell death leading to cancer and aging. NER is a versatile DNA repair pathway that repairs many types of DNA damage which distort the DNA helix, such as those induced by solar UV light. A detailed molecular model of the NER pathway has emerged from in vitro and live cell experiments, particularly using model systems such as bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cell cultures. In recent years, the versatility of the nematode C. elegans to study DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms including NER has become increasingly clear. In particular, C. elegans seems to be a convenient tool to study NER during the UV response in vivo, to analyze this process in the context of a developing and multicellular organism, and to perform genetic screening. Here, we will discuss current knowledge gained from the use of C. elegans to study NER and the response to UV-induced DNA damage.

  2. Prebiotic nucleotide synthesis demonstration of a geologically plausible pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, A.W.; Veen, van der M.; Bisseling, T.; Chittenden, G.J.

    1975-01-01

    Mineral phosphate (apatite) is activated for the synthesis of nucleotides when dilute solutions containing nucleoside and ammonium oxalate are evaporated in its presence. A natural, igneous fluorapatite was found to be even more effective in nucleotide synthesis than the more soluble

  3. Structure and function of nucleotide sugar transporters: Current progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadley, B.; Maggioni, A.; Ashikov, A.M.; Day, C.J.; Haselhorst, T.; Tiralongo, J.

    2014-01-01

    The proteomes of eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea are highly diverse due, in part, to the complex post-translational modification of protein glycosylation. The diversity of glycosylation in eukaryotes is reliant on nucleotide sugar transporters to translocate specific nucleotide sugars that are

  4. Supplementary Material for: The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  5. In-silico single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) mining of Sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be considered the ultimate genetic markers as they represent the finest resolution of a DNA sequence (a single nucleotide), and are generally abundant in populations with a low mutation rate. SNPs are important tools in studying complex genetic traits and genome evolution.

  6. Condensing the information in DNA with double-headed nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mick; Sharma, Pawan K; Reslow-Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    A normal duplex holds as many Watson-Crick base pairs as the number of nucleotides in its constituent strands. Here we establish that single nucleotides can be designed to functionally imitate dinucleotides without compromising binding affinity. This effectively allows sequence information...

  7. Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of Caligula japonica in China. ... Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of Caligula japonica in China. Y Li, B Yang, H Wang, R Xia, L Wang, Z Zhang, L Qin, Y Liu ...

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and its application on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... wide trait analysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are the most common sequence variation and a significant amount of effort has been invested in re-sequencing alleles to discover .... logical markers and are usually visually characterized .... regard two-nucleotide changes and small indels up to a.

  9. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of the Reaction between the (•)OH Radical and Adenine: A Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhøj, Birgitte O; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2015-06-18

    The accessibility of all possible reaction paths for the reaction between the nucleobase adenine and the (•)OH radical is investigated through quantum chemical calculations of barrier heights and rate constants at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with Eckart tunneling corrections. First the computational method is validated by considering the hydrogen abstraction from the heterocyclic N9 nitrogen in adenine as a test system. Geometries for all molecules in the reaction are optimized with four different DFT exchange-correlation functionals (B3LYP, BHandHLYP, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D), in combination with Pople and Dunning basis sets, all of which have been employed in similar investigations in the literature. Improved energies are obtained through single point calculations with CCSD(T) and the same basis sets, and reaction rate constants are calculated for all methods both without tunneling corrections and with the Wigner, Bell, and Eckart corrections. In comparison to CCSD(T)//BHandHLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ reference results, the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) method combined with Eckart tunneling corrections provides a sensible compromise between accuracy and time. Using this method, all subreactions of the reaction between adenine and the (•)OH radical are investigated. The total rate constants for hydrogen abstraction and addition for adenine are predicted with this method to be 1.06 × 10(-12) and 1.10 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), respectively. Abstractions of H61 and H62 contribute the most, while only addition to the C8 carbon is found to be of any significance, in contrast to previous claims that addition is the dominant reaction pathway. The overall rate constant for the complete reaction is found to be 2.17 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), which agrees exceptionally well with experimental results.

  10. Silver-induced reconstruction of an adeninate-based metal–organic framework for encapsulation of luminescent adenine-stabilized silver clusters† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and additional structural, physicochemical and optical characterisation. See DOI: 10.1039/c6tc00260a Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Dries; Coutino-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Baekelant, Wouter; Bueken, Bart; Reinsch, Helge; Stassen, Ivo; Fenwick, Oliver; Richard, Fanny; Samorì, Paolo; Ameloot, Rob; Hofkens, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Bright luminescent silver-adenine species were successfully stabilized in the pores of the MOF-69A (zinc biphenyldicarboxylate) metal–organic framework, starting from the intrinsically blue luminescent bio-MOF-1 (zinc adeninate 4,4′-biphenyldicarboxylate). Bio-MOF-1 is transformed to the MOF-69A framework by selectively leaching structural adenine linkers from the original framework using silver nitrate solutions in aqueous ethanol. Simultaneously, bright blue-green luminescent silver-adenine clusters are formed inside the pores of the recrystallized MOF-69A matrix in high local concentrations. The structural transition and concurrent changes in optical properties were characterized using a range of structural, physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques (steady-state and time-resolved luminescence, quantum yield determination, fluorescence microscopy). The presented results open new avenues for exploring the use of MOFs containing luminescent silver clusters for solid-state lighting and sensor applications. PMID:28496980

  11. Analyzing Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase Activation in Aging and Vascular Amyloid Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Radbruch

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In aging individuals, both protective as well as regulatory immune functions are declining, resulting in an increased susceptibility to infections as well as to autoimmunity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase 2-deficiency in immune cell subsets has been shown to be associated with aging. Using intravital marker-free NAD(PH-fluorescence lifetime imaging, we have previously identified microglia/myeloid cells and astrocytes as main cellular sources of NADPH oxidase (NOX activity in the CNS during neuroinflammation, due to an overactivation of NOX. The overactivated NOX enzymes catalyze the massive production of the highly reactive O2−, which initiates in a chain reaction the overproduction of diverse reactive oxygen species (ROS. Age-dependent oxidative distress levels in the brain and their cellular sources are not known. Furthermore, it is unclear whether in age-dependent diseases oxidative distress is initiated by overproduction of ROS or by a decrease in antioxidant capacity, subsequently leading to neurodegeneration in the CNS. Here, we compare the activation level of NOX enzymes in the cerebral cortex of young and aged mice as well as in a model of vascular amyloid pathology. Despite the fact that a striking change in the morphology of microglia can be detected between young and aged individuals, we find comparable low-level NOX activation both in young and old mice. In contrast, aged mice with the human APPE693Q mutation, a model for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA, displayed increased focal NOX overactivation in the brain cortex, especially in tissue areas around the vessels. Despite activated morphology in microglia, NOX overactivation was detected only in a small fraction of these cells, in contrast to other pathologies with overt inflammation as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE or glioblastoma. Similar to these pathologies, the astrocytes majorly contribute to the NOX overactivation in the brain

  12. Reactivity of nitrogen atoms in adenine and (Ade)2Cu complexes towards ribose and 2-furanmethanol: Formation of adenosine and kinetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashalian, Ossanna; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2017-01-15

    To explore the interaction of nucleosides and nucleobases in the context of the Maillard reaction and to identify the selectivity of purine nitrogen atoms towards various electrophiles, model systems composed of adenine or adenosine, glycine, ribose and/or 2-furanmethanol (with and without copper) were studied in aqueous solutions heated at 110°C for 2h and subsequently analyzed by ESI/qTOF/MS/MS in addition to isotope labelling techniques. The results indicated that ribose selectively formed mono-ribosylated N(6) adenine, but in the presence of (Ade)2Cu complex the reaction mixture generated mono-, di- and tri-substituted sugar complexes and their hydrolysis products of mono-ribosylated N(6) and N(9) adenine adducts and di-ribosylated N(6,9) adenine. Furthermore, the reaction of 2-furanmethanol with adenine in the presence of ribose generated kinetin and its isomer, while its reaction with adenosine generated kinetin riboside, as confirmed by comparing the MS/MS profiles of these adducts to those of commercial standards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effects of Foliar Application of Benzyl Adenine, Ascorbic Acid and Thiamine on Some Morphological and Biochemical Characteristics of Petunia (Petunia hybrida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salehi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of growth and flowering of petunia as one of the most popular and cultivated bedding plants in Iran, is of significant importance. Thus, a CRD experiment with five replications was conducted at the Research Greenhouse of Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman, Iran.  From 48 days after sowing, when the seedlings had 5-6 true leaves, the seedlings were sprayed with  thiamine (0 and 100 mgL-1, ascorbic acid (0 and 100 mg L-1 and benzyl adenine (0 and 200 mg L-1 at 4 steps during  growth and development. The results indicated that the treatment of ascorbic acid with thiamine and benzyl adenine led to 2.5 and 3.5-fold increases in the number and length of lateral shoots compared to control treatment. The greatest fresh weight was obtained with ascorbic acid with thiamine and benzyl adenine treatment which led to a 2.5-fold increase in this trait, compared to the control. The highest dry weight was achieved in benzyl adenine treatment. The greatest vase-life and flower diameter were found with ascorbic acid (100 mg L-1, thiamine (100 mg L-1 and benzyl adenine (200 mg L-1 treatments in an extent that the flower longevity and diameter were increased by 83% and 72%, respectively, in comparison to control. Furthermore, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll, carotenoids and reduced sugars concentrations were significantly increased by the foliar-applied compounds compared to control.

  14. Adsorption of adenine and thymine on zeolites: FT-IR and EPR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry and SEM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baú, João Paulo T; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Souza Junior, Ivan G; de Souza, Cláudio M D; da Costa, Antonio C S; di Mauro, Eduardo; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Coronas, Joaquin; Casado, Clara; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2012-02-01

    The interactions of adenine and thymine with and adsorption on zeolites were studied using different techniques. There were two main findings. First, as shown by X-ray diffractometry, thymine increased the decomposition of the zeolites (Y, ZSM-5) while adenine prevented it. Second, zeolite Y adsorbed almost the same amount of adenine and thymine, thus both nucleic acid bases could be protected from hydrolysis and UV radiation and could be available for molecular evolution. The X-ray diffractometry and SEM showed that artificial seawater almost dissolved zeolite A. The adsorption of adenine on ZSM-5 zeolite was higher than that of thymine (Student-Newman-Keuls test-SNK pzeolite, when compared to other zeolites (SNK pzeolites was not statistically different (SNK p>0.05). The adsorption of adenine and thymine on zeolites did not depend on pore size or Si/Al ratio and it was not explained only by electrostatic forces; rather van der Waals interactions should also be considered.

  15. Nucleotide-time alignment for molecular recorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaddeus R Cybulski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a DNA polymerase to record intracellular calcium levels has been proposed as a novel neural recording technique, promising massive-scale, single-cell resolution monitoring of large portions of the brain. This technique relies on local storage of neural activity in strands of DNA, followed by offline analysis of that DNA. In simple implementations of this scheme, the time when each nucleotide was written cannot be determined directly by post-hoc DNA sequencing; the timing data must be estimated instead. Here, we use a Dynamic Time Warping-based algorithm to perform this estimation, exploiting correlations between neural activity and observed experimental variables to translate DNA-based signals to an estimate of neural activity over time. This algorithm improves the parallelizability of traditional Dynamic Time Warping, allowing several-fold increases in computation speed. The algorithm also provides a solution to several critical problems with the molecular recording paradigm: determining recording start times and coping with DNA polymerase pausing. The algorithm can generally locate DNA-based records to within <10% of a recording window, allowing for the estimation of unobserved incorporation times and latent neural tunings. We apply our technique to an in silico motor control neuroscience experiment, using the algorithm to estimate both timings of DNA-based data and the directional tuning of motor cortical cells during a center-out reaching task. We also use this algorithm to explore the impact of polymerase characteristics on system performance, determining the precision of a molecular recorder as a function of its kinetic and error-generating properties. We find useful ranges of properties for DNA polymerase-based recorders, providing guidance for future protein engineering attempts. This work demonstrates a useful general extension to dynamic alignment algorithms, as well as direct applications of that extension toward the development

  16. High-NaCl Diet Aggravates Cardiac Injury in Rats with Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure and Increases Serum Troponin T Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kashioulis, Pavlos; Hammarsten, Ola; Marcussen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the effects of 2 weeks of high-NaCl diet on left ventricular (LV) morphology and serum levels of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats either received chow containing adenine or were pair......-fed an identical diet without adenine [controls (C)]. Approximately 10 weeks after the beginning of the study, the rats were randomized to either remain on a normal NaCl diet (NNa; 0.6%) or to be switched to high-NaCl chow (HNa; 4%) for 2 weeks, after which acute experiments were performed. RESULTS: Rats with ACRF...

  17. Control of dinucleoside polyphosphates by the FHIT-homologous HNT2 gene, adenine biosynthesis and heat shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieganowski Pawel

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The FHIT gene is lost early in the development of many tumors. Fhit possesses intrinsic ApppA hydrolase activity though ApppA cleavage is not required for tumor suppression. Because a mutant form of Fhit that is functional in tumor suppression and defective in catalysis binds ApppA well, it was hypothesized that Fhit-substrate complexes are the active, signaling form of Fhit. Which substrates are most important for Fhit signaling remain unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that dinucleoside polyphosphate levels increase 500-fold to hundreds of micromolar in strains devoid of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of Fhit, Hnt2. Accumulation of dinucleoside polyphosphates is reversed by re-expression of Hnt2 and is active site-dependent. Dinucleoside polyphosphate levels depend on an intact adenine biosynthetic pathway and time in liquid culture, and are induced by heat shock to greater than 0.1 millimolar even in Hnt2+ cells. Conclusions The data indicate that Hnt2 hydrolyzes both ApppN and AppppN in vivo and that, in heat-shocked, adenine prototrophic yeast strains, dinucleoside polyphosphates accumulate to levels in which they may saturate Hnt2.

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo, Julia S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados - Unidad Merida, Carretera antigua a Progreso Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Patino, Rodrigo, E-mail: rtarkus@mda.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados - Unidad Merida, Carretera antigua a Progreso Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2011-04-20

    Research highlights: {yields} The reaction catalyzed by one enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway was studied. {yields} A spectrophotometric method is proposed for kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. {yields} The pH and the temperature influences are reported on physical chemical properties. {yields} Relative concentrations of substrates are also important in the catalytic process. - Abstract: The enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC 1.1.1.49) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides has a dual coenzyme specificity with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sub ox}) and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as electron acceptors. The G6PD coenzyme selection is determined by the metabolic cellular prevailing conditions. In this study a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis is presented for the reaction catalyzed by G6PD from L. mesenteroides with NAD{sub ox} as coenzyme in phosphate buffer. For this work, an in situ spectrophotometric technique was employed based on the detection of one product of the reaction. Substrate and coenzyme concentrations as well as temperature and pH effects were evaluated. The apparent equilibrium constant, the Michaelis constant, and the turnover number were determined as a function of each experimental condition. The standard transformed Gibbs energy of reaction was determined from equilibrium constants at different initial conditions. For the product 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone, a value of the standard Gibbs energy of formation is proposed, {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o} = -1784 {+-} 5 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  19. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Allison E; Rogovskyy, Artem S; Crowley, Michael A; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence.

  20. Effects of High Levels of DNA Adenine Methylation on Methyl-Directed Mismatch Repair in ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila, Patricia J.; Peterson, Janet; Herman, Gail; Modrich, Paul; Meselson, Matthew

    1983-01-01

    Two methods were used in an attempt to increase the efficiency and strand selectivity of methyl-directed mismatch repair of bacteriophage λ heteroduplexes in E. coli. Previous studies of such repair used λ DNA that was only partially methylated as the source of methylated chains. Also, transfection was carried out in methylating strains. Either of these factors might have been responsible for the incompleteness of the strand selectivity observed previously. In the first approach to increasing strand selectivity, heteroduplexes were transfected into a host deficient in methylation, but no changes in repair frequencies were observed. In the second approach, heteroduplexes were prepared using DNA that had been highly methylated in vitro with purified DNA adenine methylase as the source of methylated chains. In heteroduplexes having a repairable cI/+ mismatch, strand selectivity was indeed enhanced. In heteroduplexes with one chain highly methylated and the complementary chain unmethylated, the frequency of repair on the unmethylated chain increased to nearly 100%. Heteroduplexes with both chains highly methylated were not repaired at a detectable frequency. Thus, chains highly methylated by DNA adenine methylase were refractory to mismatch repair by this system, regardless of the methylation of the complementary chain. These results support the hypothesis that methyl-directed mismatch repair acts to correct errors of replication, thus lowering the mutation rate. PMID:6225697

  1. Targeted disruption of the mouse adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene and the production of APRT-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, S.J.; Chen, J.; Tischfield, J.A. [Indiana Univ., School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT: EC 2.4.2.7), a ubiquitously expressed purine salvage enzyme, catalyzes the synthesis of AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate from existing adenine and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Deficiency of this enzyme in humans results in the accumulation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine leading to crystalluria and nephrolithiasis. In order to facilitate our study of this rare, autosomal recessive disorder, we applied the advances in gene targeting technology and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell culture to the production of APRT-deficient mice. A positive-negative targeting strategy was used. The tageting vector contain 5.6 kb of the mouse APRT gene, a neomycin resistance gene in exon 3 as a positive selection marker, and a HSV thymidine kinase gene at the 3{prime} end of the homology as a negative selection marker. The vector was introduced into D3 ES cells by electroporation and the cells were selected for G418 and ganciclovir (GANC) resistance. G418-GANC resistant clones were screened by Southern blot. One of several correctly targeted clones was expanded and used for blastocyst microinjection to produce chimeric mice. Chimeric animals were bred and agouti progeny heterozygous for the targeted allele were obtained. Heterozygous animals have been bred to produce APRT-deficient animals. Matings are currently underway to determine the phenotype of APRT/HPRT-deficient animals.

  2. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Walsh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides.

  3. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Cellular Chromatin: Studies with Yeast from Nucleotide to Gene to Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Reed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we review our development of, and results with, high resolution studies on global genome nucleotide excision repair (GGNER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have focused on how GGNER relates to histone acetylation for its functioning and we have identified the histone acetyl tranferase Gcn5 and acetylation at lysines 9/14 of histone H3 as a major factor in enabling efficient repair. We consider results employing primarily MFA2 as a model gene, but also those with URA3 located at subtelomeric sequences. In the latter case we also see a role for acetylation at histone H4. We then go on to outline the development of a high resolution genome-wide approach that enables one to examine correlations between histone modifications and the nucleotide excision repair (NER of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers throughout entire genomes. This is an approach that will enable rapid advances in understanding the complexities of how compacted chromatin in chromosomes is processed to access DNA damage and then returned to its pre-damaged status to maintain epigenetic codes.

  4. Genotype-dependent variability in flow cytometric evaluation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase function in patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowells, S J; Fleisher, T A; Sekhsaria, S; Alling, D W; Maguire, T E; Malech, H L

    1996-01-01

    We studied phagocyte reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate function to evaluate production of reactive oxygen species in both X-linked and autosomal forms of chronic granulomatous disease. We found a consistent and significant difference between the activated granulocyte response of the X-linked (gp91-phagocyte oxidase) form of chronic granulomatous disease (n = 18) and that of the most common autosomal recessive (p47-phagocyte oxidase) form of the disease (n = 17). The data indicate that mutations in the p47-phagocyte oxidase component of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase component do not completely prevent oxidation despite severe defects in superoxide generation.

  5. Probing adenine rings and backbone linkages using base specific isotope-edited Raman spectroscopy: application to group II intron ribozyme domain V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Eldho, Nadukkudy V; Dayie, T Kwaku; Carey, Paul R

    2010-04-27

    Raman difference spectroscopy is used to probe the properties of a 36-nt RNA molecule, "D5", which lies at the heart of the catalytic apparatus in group II introns. For D5 that has all of its adenine residues labeled with (13)C and (15)N and utilizing Raman difference spectroscopy, we identify the conformationally sensitive -C-O-P-O-C- stretching modes of the unlabeled bonds adjacent to adenine bases, as well as the adenine ring modes themselves. The phosphodiester modes can be assigned to individual adenine residues based on earlier NMR data. The effect of Mg(2+) binding was explored by analyzing the Raman difference spectra for [D5 + Mg(2+)] minus [D5 no Mg(2+)], for D5 unlabeled, or D5 labeled with (13)C/(15)N-enriched adenine. In both sets of data we assign differential features to G ring modes perturbed by Mg(2+) binding at the N7 position. In the A-labeled spectra we attribute a Raman differential near 1450 cm(-1) and changes of intensity at 1296 cm(-1) to Mg binding at the N7 position of adenine bases. The A and G bases involved in Mg(2+) binding again can be identified using earlier NMR results. For the unlabeled D5, a change in the C-O-P-O-C stretch profile at 811 cm(-1) upon magnesium binding is due to a "tightening up" (in the sense of a more rigid molecule with less dynamic interchange among competing ribose conformers) of the D5 structure. For adenine-labeled D5, small changes in the adenine backbone bond signatures in the 810-830 cm(-1) region suggest that small conformational changes occur in the tetraloop and bulge regions upon binding of Mg(2+). The PO(2)(-) stretching vibration, near 1100 cm(-1), from the nonbridging phosphate groups, probes the effect of Mg(2+)-hydrate inner-sphere interactions that cause an upshift. In turn, the upshift is modulated by the presence of monovalent cations since in the presence of Na(+) and Li(+) the upshift is 23 +/- 2 cm(-1) while in the presence of K(+) and Cs(+) it is 13 +/- 3 cm(-1), a finding that correlates

  6. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  7. Free amino acids and 5'-nucleotides in Finnish forest mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Hanna; Rotola-Pukkila, Minna; Aisala, Heikki; Hopia, Anu; Laaksonen, Timo

    2018-05-01

    Edible mushrooms are valued because of their umami taste and good nutritional values. Free amino acids, 5'-nucleotides and nucleosides were analyzed from four Nordic forest mushroom species (Lactarius camphoratus, Boletus edulis, Cantharellus cibarius, Craterellus tubaeformis) using high precision liquid chromatography analysis. To our knowledge, these taste components were studied for the first time from Craterellus tubaeformis and Lactarius camphoratus. The focus was on the umami amino acids and 5'-nucleotides. The free amino acid and 5'-nucleotide/nucleoside contents of studied species differed from each other. In all studied samples, umami amino acids were among five major free amino acids. The highest concentration of umami amino acids was on L. camphoratus whereas B. edulis had the highest content of sweet amino acids and C. cibarius had the highest content of bitter amino acids. The content of umami enhancing 5'-nucleotides were low in all studied species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Association study of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrera, Noa; Arrojo, Manuel; Sanjuán, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies using several hundred thousand anonymous markers present limited statistical power. Alternatively, association studies restricted to common nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) have the advantage of strongly reducing the multiple testing problem, ...

  9. Enzymatic Incorporation of Modified Purine Nucleotides in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El Asrar, Rania; Margamuljana, Lia; Abramov, Mikhail; Bande, Omprakash; Agnello, Stefano; Jang, Miyeon; Herdewijn, Piet

    2017-12-14

    A series of nucleotide analogues, with a hypoxanthine base moiety (8-aminohypoxanthine, 1-methyl-8-aminohypoxanthine, and 8-oxohypoxanthine), together with 5-methylisocytosine were tested as potential pairing partners of N 8 -glycosylated nucleotides with an 8-azaguanine or 8-aza-9-deazaguanine base moiety by using DNA polymerases (incorporation studies). The best results were obtained with the 5-methylisocytosine nucleotide followed by the 1-methyl-8-aminohypoxanthine nucleotide. The experiments demonstrated that small differences in the structure (8-azaguanine versus 8-aza-9-deazaguanine) might lead to significant differences in recognition efficiency and selectivity, base pairing by Hoogsteen recognition at the polymerase level is possible, 8-aza-9-deazaguanine represents a self-complementary base pair, and a correlation exists between in vitro incorporation studies and in vivo recognition by natural bases in Escherichia coli, but this recognition is not absolute (exceptions were observed). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Microsporidia: Why Make Nucleotides if You Can Steal Them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dean

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are strict obligate intracellular parasites that infect a wide range of eukaryotes including humans and economically important fish and insects. Surviving and flourishing inside another eukaryotic cell is a very specialised lifestyle that requires evolutionary innovation. Genome sequence analyses show that microsporidia have lost most of the genes needed for making primary metabolites, such as amino acids and nucleotides, and also that they have only a limited capacity for making adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Since microsporidia cannot grow and replicate without the enormous amounts of energy and nucleotide building blocks needed for protein, DNA, and RNA biosynthesis, they must have evolved ways of stealing these substrates from the infected host cell. Providing they can do this, genome analyses suggest that microsporidia have the enzyme repertoire needed to use and regenerate the imported nucleotides efficiently. Recent functional studies suggest that a critical innovation for adapting to intracellular life was the acquisition by lateral gene transfer of nucleotide transport (NTT proteins that are now present in multiple copies in all microsporidian genomes. These proteins are expressed on the parasite surface and allow microsporidia to steal ATP and other purine nucleotides for energy and biosynthesis from their host. However, it remains unclear how other essential metabolites, such as pyrimidine nucleotides, are acquired. Transcriptomic and experimental studies suggest that microsporidia might manipulate host cell metabolism and cell biological processes to promote nucleotide synthesis and to maximise the potential for ATP and nucleotide import. In this review, we summarise recent genomic and functional data relating to how microsporidia exploit their hosts for energy and building blocks needed for growth and nucleic acid metabolism and we identify some remaining outstanding questions.

  11. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling studies of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the human mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurashima-Ito, Kaori [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Ikeya, Teppei [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), (Japan); Senbongi, Hiroshi [Mitochondrial Diseases Group, MRC Dunn Human NutritionUnit (United Kingdom); Tochio, Hidehito [International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Supramolecular Biology, Yokohama City University, Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Japan); Mikawa, Tsutomu [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Shibata, Takehiko [RIKEN, Shibata Distinguished Senior Scientist Laboratory (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan)], E-mail: ito-yutaka@center.tmu.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    Human ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 6 (ABCB6) is a mitochondrial ABC transporter, and presumably contributes to iron homeostasis. Aimed at understanding the structural basis for the conformational changes accompanying the substrate-transportation cycle, we have studied the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of ABCB6 (ABCB6-C) in both the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling. A non-linear sampling scheme was utilised for indirectly acquired {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N dimensions of all 3D triple-resonance NMR experiments, in order to overcome the instability and the low solubility of ABCB6-C. The backbone resonances for approximately 25% of non-proline residues, which are mostly distributed around the functionally important loops and in the Helical domain, were not observed for nucleotide-free form of ABCB6-C. From the pH, temperature and magnetic field strength dependencies of the resonance intensities, we concluded that this incompleteness in the assignments is mainly due to the exchange between multiple conformations at an intermediate rate on the NMR timescale. These localised conformational dynamics remained in ADP-bound ABCB6-C except for the loops responsible for adenine base and {alpha}/{beta}-phosphate binding. These results revealed that the localised dynamic cooperativity, which was recently proposed for a prokaryotic ABC MJ1267, also exists in a higher eukaryotic ABC, and is presumably shared by all members of the ABC family. Since the Helical domain is the putative interface to the transmembrane domain, this cooperativity may explain the coupled functions between domains in the substrate-transportation cycle.

  12. Nucleotide-sugar transporters: structure, function and roles in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handford M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycosylation of glycoconjugates and the biosynthesis of polysaccharides depend on nucleotide-sugars which are the substrates for glycosyltransferases. A large proportion of these enzymes are located within the lumen of the Golgi apparatus as well as the endoplasmic reticulum, while many of the nucleotide-sugars are synthesized in the cytosol. Thus, nucleotide-sugars are translocated from the cytosol to the lumen of the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum by multiple spanning domain proteins known as nucleotide-sugar transporters (NSTs. These proteins were first identified biochemically and some of them were cloned by complementation of mutants. Genome and expressed sequence tag sequencing allowed the identification of a number of sequences that may encode for NSTs in different organisms. The functional characterization of some of these genes has shown that some of them can be highly specific in their substrate specificity while others can utilize up to three different nucleotide-sugars containing the same nucleotide. Mutations in genes encoding for NSTs can lead to changes in development in Drosophila melanogaster or Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as alterations in the infectivity of Leishmania donovani. In humans, the mutation of a GDP-fucose transporter is responsible for an impaired immune response as well as retarded growth. These results suggest that, even though there appear to be a fair number of genes encoding for NSTs, they are not functionally redundant and seem to play specific roles in glycosylation.

  13. Effects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan on the adenine-induced chronic renal failure rats in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xuan; Han, Baoqin; Sui, Xianxian; Hu, Rui; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-02-01

    The effects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan (LMWC) on chronic renal failure (CRF) rats induced by adenine were investigated in vivo and in vitro. Chitosan were hydrolyzed using chitosanase at pH 6-7 and 37° for 24 h to obtain LMWC. In vitro, the effect of LMWC on the proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) showed that it had no cytotoxic effect and could promote cell growth. For the in vivo experiment, chronic renal failure rats induced by adenine were randomly divided into control group, Niaoduqing group, and high-, medium- and low-dose LMWC groups. For each group, we detected serum creatinine (SCR), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione oxidase (GSH-Px) activities of renal tissue, and obtained the ratio of kidney weight/body weight, pathological changes of kidney. The levels of serum SCR, BUN were higher in the adenine-induced rats than those in the control group, indicating that the rat chronic renal failure model worked successfully. The results after treatment showed that LMWC could reduce the SCR and BUN levels and enhance the activities/levels of T-SOD and GSH-PX in kidney compared to control group. Histopathological examination revealed that adenine-induced renal alterations were restored by LMWC at three tested dosages, especially at the low dosage of 100 mg kg-1 d-1.

  14. Ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitial injury in adenine-induced CKD rats by mediating Nrf2 and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gang; Liu, Xiuheng; Chen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to determine the effects of ozone therapy on restoring impaired Nrf2 activation to ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitial injury in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and chronic tubulointerstitial injury. Ozone therapy was administered by rectal insufflation. After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected and analyzed. Renal function and systemic electrolyte level were detected. Pathological changes in kidney were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson trichrome staining. Nrf2 activation was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. The levels of SOD, CAT, GSH, PCO, and MDA were detected in the kidney. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR analyses were performed to evaluate the activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) P65 pathway and inflammation infiltration in the tubulointerstitium of the rats. Ozone therapy improved severe renal insufficiency and tubulointerstitial morphology injury as well as restored Nrf2 activation and inhibited the NF-κB pathway in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Ozone therapy also up-regulated anti-oxidation enzymes (SOD, CAT, and GSH) and down-regulated oxidation products (PCO and MDA), as well as inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and ICAM-1) in the kidney. These findings indicated that ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitial injury in rats with adenine-induced CKD by mediating Nrf2 and NF-κB.

  15. Stacked base-pair structures of adenine nucleosides stabilized by the formation of hydrogen-bonding network involving the two sugar groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asami, Hiroya [Graduate School of Bio- and Nanosystem Sciences, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Yagi, Kiyoshi [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Ohba, Masashi [Yokohama College of Pharmacy, Yokohama 245-0066 (Japan); Urashima, Shu-hei [Graduate School of Bio- and Nanosystem Sciences, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Saigusa, Hiroyuki, E-mail: saigusa@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bio- and Nanosystem Sciences, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► A combination of laser desorption and supersonic jet-cooling is used to produce base pairs of adenine nucleosides. ► Stacked base-pair structure of N6,N6-dimethyladnosine is identified by IR vibrational spectroscopy. ► Anharmonic vibrational calculation is employed to analyze the vibrational mode coupling in the stacked base pair. - Abstract: We have employed a laser desorption technique combined with supersonic-jet cooling for producing base pairs of adenine nucleosides, adenosine (Ado) and N6,N6-dimethyladenosine (DMAdo) under low-temperature conditions. The resulting base pairs are then ionized through resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It is found that dimers of these adenine nucleosides are stable, especially in the case of DMAdo, with respect to those of the corresponding bases, i.e., adenine and N6,N6-dimethyladenine. Structural analysis of the DMAdo dimer is performed based on the IR–UV double resonance measurements and theoretical calculations. The result demonstrates that the dimer possesses a stacked structure being stabilized by the formation of hydrogen-bonding network involving the two sugar groups. The occurrence of the frequency shift and broadening is explained satisfactorily based on the anharmonic coupling of the OH stretching modes with specific bending modes and low-frequency modes of base and sugar moieties.

  16. Effect of aqueous extract and anthocyanins of calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa (Malvaceae) in rats with adenine-induced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Badreldin H; Cahliková, Lucie; Opletal, Lubomir; Karaca, Turan; Manoj, Priyadarsini; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al Suleimani, Yousuf M; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Chocholousova-Havlikova, Lucie; Locarek, Miroslav; Siatka, Tomas; Blunden, Gerald

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the possible beneficial effects of aqueous extracts of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. calyces and anthocyanins isolated therefrom in an adenine-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) model. Rats were orally given, for 28 consecutive days, either adenine alone or together with either aqueous extract of H. sabdariffa calyces (5 and 10%) or anthocyanins (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of anthocyanin concentrate). For comparative purposes, two groups of rats were given lisinopril (10 mg/kg). When either H. sabdariffa aqueous extract or the anthocyanins isolated from it was administered along with adenine, the adverse effects of adenine-induced CKD were significantly lessened, mostly in a dose-dependent manner. The positive effects were similar to those obtained by administration of lisinopril. The results obtained show that both H. sabdariffa and its anthocyanins could be considered as possible promising safe dietary agents that could be used to attenuate the progression of human CKD. This could have added significance as H. sabdariffa tea is widely consumed in many parts of Africa and Asia and is thus readily available. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-Binding to Nucleotide-Binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenyk, S.; Dixon, C.H.; Gittens, W.H.; Townsend, P.D.; Sharples, G.J.; Pålsson, L.O.; Takken, F.L.W.; Cann, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognise and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception.

  18. Simultaneous quantitation of nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in milk by a novel enzyme-coupled assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummarino, Simone; Mozzon, Massimo; Zamporlini, Federica; Amici, Adolfo; Mazzola, Francesca; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2017-04-15

    Nicotinamide riboside, the most recently discovered form of vitamin B3, and its phosphorylated form nicotinamide mononucleotide, have been shown to be potent supplements boosting intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) levels, thus preventing or ameliorating metabolic and mitochondrial diseases in mouse models. Here we report for the first time on the simultaneous quantitation of nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide and NAD in milk by means of a fluorometric, enzyme-coupled assay. Application of this assay to milk from different species revealed that the three vitamers were present in human and donkey milk, while being selectively distributed in the other milks. Human milk was the richest source of nicotinamide mononucleotide. Overall, the three vitamers accounted for a significant fraction of total vitamin B3 content. Pasteurization did not affect the bovine milk content of nicotinamide riboside, whereas UHT processing fully destroyed the vitamin. In human milk, NAD levels were significantly affected by the lactation time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The m6A methylation perturbs the Hoogsteen pairing-guided incorporation of an oxidized nucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoru; Song, Yanyan; Wang, Yafen; Li, Xin; Fu, Boshi; Liu, Yinong; Wang, Jiaqi; Wei, Lai; Tian, Tian; Zhou, Xiang

    2017-09-01

    Natural nucleic acid bases can form Watson-Crick (WC) or Hoogsteen (HG) base pairs. Importantly, 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA or 8-oxo-dG 5'-triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP) favors a syn conformation because of the steric repulsion between O8 and O4' of the deoxyribose ring. 8-oxo-dGTP can be incorporated into DNA opposite the templating adenine (A) using HG pairing as the dominant mechanism. Both RNA and DNA can be methylated at the N6 position of A to form N6-methyladenine (m6A). It has been found that certain viral infections may trigger an increase in the production of both 8-oxo-dGTP and m6A. The current study aims to systematically explore the effects of m6A methylation on HG base pairs and the consequent nucleotide incorporation. Our thermodynamic melting study shows that the m6A·8-oxo-dG is significantly less stable than the A·8-oxo-dG base pair in the paired region of a DNA duplex. Moreover, we have used pre-steady-state kinetics to examine the incorporation of 8-oxo-dGTP opposite m6A relative to A by a variety of reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes and DNA polymerase (DNA pol) enzymes such as the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RT and human DNA pol β. The results demonstrate that all of these enzymes incorporate 8-oxo-dGTP less efficiently opposite m6A relative to A. Considering the steric bulk of the purine-purine pair between 8-oxo-dG and A, m6A methylation may affect the HG pairing to a great extent. Hence, it will be unfavorable to incorporate 8-oxo-dGTP into the growing strand opposite m6A. Moreover, the impeded incorporation of 8-oxo-dGTP opposite m6A has been extended to determine m6A at pre-defined positions in human rRNA. Our study may provide new insights into the roles of m6A in reducing the mutagenic potential of cellular 8-oxo-dGTP.

  20. A Poly Adenine-Mediated Assembly Strategy for Designing Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering Substrates in Controllable Manners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Xiangxu; Wang, Houyu; Wang, Siyi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Bin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-07-07

    In this article, we introduce a Poly adenine (Poly A)-assisted fabrication method for rationally designing surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) substrates in controllable and reliable manners, enabling construction of core-satellite SERRS assemblies in both aqueous and solid phase (e.g., symmetric core (Au)-satellite (Au) nanoassemblies (Au-Au NPs), and asymmetric Ag-Au NPs-decorated silicon wafers (Ag-Au NPs@Si)). Of particular significance, assembly density is able to be controlled by varying the length of the Poly A block (e.g., 10, 30, and 50 consecutive adenines at the 5' end of DNA sequence, Poly A10/A30/A50), producing the asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies with adjustable surface density of Au NPs assembly on core NPs surface. Based on quantitative interrogation of the relationship between SERRS performance and assemble density, the Ag-Au NPs@Si featuring the strongest SERRS enhancement factor (EF ≈ 10(7)) and excellent reproducibility can be achieved under optimal conditions. We further employ the resultant Ag-Au NPs@Si as a high-performance SERRS sensing platform for the selective and sensitive detection of mercury ions (Hg(2+)) in a real system, with a low detection limit of 100 fM, which is ∼5 orders of magnitude lower than the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-defined limit (10 nM) in drinkable water. These results suggest the Poly A-mediated assembly method as new and powerful tools for designing high-performance SERRS substrates with controllable structures, facilitating improvement of sensitivity, reliability, and reproducibility of SERRS signals.

  1. Generation of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate and cyclic ADP-ribose by glucagon-like peptide-1 evokes Ca2+ signal that is essential for insulin secretion in mouse pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Ju; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Yim, Chang-Yeol; Takasawa, Shin; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Im, Mie-Jae; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)), resulting in insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. The molecular mechanism(s) of the GLP-1-mediated regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) was investigated. GLP-1-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) were measured in beta-cells isolated from Cd38(+/+) and Cd38(-/-) mice. Calcium-mobilizing second messengers were identified by measuring levels of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and cyclic ADP-ribose (ADPR), using a cyclic enzymatic assay. To locate NAADP- and cyclic ADPR-producing enzyme(s), cellular organelles were separated using the sucrose gradient method. A GLP-1-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase showed a cooperative Ca(2+) signal, i.e., an initial [Ca(2+)](i) rise mediated by the action of NAADP that was produced in acidic organelles and a subsequent long-lasting increase of [Ca(2+)](i) by the action of cyclic ADPR that was produced in plasma membranes and secretory granules. GLP-1 sequentially stimulated production of NAADP and cyclic ADPR in the organelles through protein kinase A and cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor II. Furthermore, the results showed that NAADP production from acidic organelles governed overall Ca(2+) signals, including insulin secretion by GLP-1, and that in addition to CD38, enzymes capable of synthesizing NAADP and/or cyclic ADPR were present in beta-cells. These observations were supported by the study with Cd38(-/-) beta-cells, demonstrating production of NAADP, cyclic ADPR, and Ca(2+) signal with normal insulin secretion stimulated by GLP-1. Our findings demonstrate that the GLP-1-mediated Ca(2+) signal for insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is a cooperative action of NAADP and cyclic ADPR spatiotemporally formed by multiple enzymes.

  2. Phosphate-Modified Nucleotides for Monitoring Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, Susanne; Marx, Andreas; Hacker, Stephan M

    2017-04-01

    Nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been proven to be interesting entities to study the activity of a variety of different protein classes. In this chapter, we present various types of modifications that were attached as reporter molecules to the phosphate chain of nucleotides and briefly describe the chemical reactions that are frequently used to synthesize them. Furthermore, we discuss a variety of applications of these molecules. Kinase activity, for instance, was studied by transfer of a phosphate modified with a reporter group to the target proteins. This allows not only studying the activity of kinases, but also identifying their target proteins. Moreover, kinases can also be directly labeled with a reporter at a conserved lysine using acyl-phosphate probes. Another important application for phosphate-modified nucleotides is the study of RNA and DNA polymerases. In this context, single-molecule sequencing is made possible using detection in zero-mode waveguides, nanopores or by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based mechanism between the polymerase and a fluorophore-labeled nucleotide. Additionally, fluorogenic nucleotides that utilize an intramolecular interaction between a fluorophore and the nucleobase or an intramolecular FRET effect have been successfully developed to study a variety of different enzymes. Finally, also some novel techniques applying electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based detection of nucleotide cleavage or the detection of the cleavage of fluorophosphates are discussed. Taken together, nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been applied to study the activity of a large diversity of proteins and are valuable tools to enhance the knowledge of biological systems.

  3. Evolution of Nucleotide Punctuation Marks: From Structural to Linear Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Houmami, Nawal; Seligmann, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    We present an evolutionary hypothesis assuming that signals marking nucleotide synthesis (DNA replication and RNA transcription) evolved from multi- to unidimensional structures, and were carried over from transcription to translation. This evolutionary scenario presumes that signals combining secondary and primary nucleotide structures are evolutionary transitions. Mitochondrial replication initiation fits this scenario. Some observations reported in the literature corroborate that several signals for nucleotide synthesis function in translation, and vice versa. (a) Polymerase-induced frameshift mutations occur preferentially at translational termination signals (nucleotide deletion is interpreted as termination of nucleotide polymerization, paralleling the role of stop codons in translation). (b) Stem-loop hairpin presence/absence modulates codon-amino acid assignments, showing that translational signals sometimes combine primary and secondary nucleotide structures (here codon and stem-loop). (c) Homopolymer nucleotide triplets (AAA, CCC, GGG, TTT) cause transcriptional and ribosomal frameshifts. Here we find in recently described human mitochondrial RNAs that systematically lack mono-, dinucleotides after each trinucleotide (delRNAs) that delRNA triplets include 2x more homopolymers than mitogenome regions not covered by delRNA. Further analyses of delRNAs show that the natural circular code X (a little-known group of 20 translational signals enabling ribosomal frame retrieval consisting of 20 codons {AAC, AAT, ACC, ATC, ATT, CAG, CTC, CTG, GAA, GAC, GAG, GAT, GCC, GGC, GGT, GTA, GTC, GTT, TAC, TTC} universally overrepresented in coding versus other frames of gene sequences), regulates frameshift in transcription and translation. This dual transcription and translation role confirms for X the hypothesis that translational signals were carried over from transcriptional signals. PMID:28396681

  4. One pathway can incorporate either adenine or dimethylbenzimidazole as an alpha-axial ligand of B12 cofactors in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter J; Lango, Jozsef; Carkeet, Colleen; Britten, Audrey; Kräutler, Bernhard; Hammock, Bruce D; Roth, John R

    2008-02-01

    Corrinoid (vitamin B12-like) cofactors contain various alpha-axial ligands, including 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) or adenine. The bacterium Salmonella enterica produces the corrin ring only under anaerobic conditions, but it can form "complete" corrinoids aerobically by importing an "incomplete" corrinoid, such as cobinamide (Cbi), and adding appropriate alpha- and beta-axial ligands. Under aerobic conditions, S. enterica performs the corrinoid-dependent degradation of ethanolamine if given vitamin B12, but it can make B12 from exogenous Cbi only if DMB is also provided. Mutants isolated for their ability to degrade ethanolamine without added DMB converted Cbi to pseudo-B12 cofactors (having adenine as an alpha-axial ligand). The mutations cause an increase in the level of free adenine and install adenine (instead of DMB) as an alpha-ligand. When DMB is provided to these mutants, synthesis of pseudo-B12 cofactors ceases and B12 cofactors are produced, suggesting that DMB regulates production or incorporation of free adenine as an alpha-ligand. Wild-type cells make pseudo-B12 cofactors during aerobic growth on propanediol plus Cbi and can use pseudo-vitamin B12 for all of their corrinoid-dependent enzymes. Synthesis of coenzyme pseudo-B12 cofactors requires the same enzymes (CobT, CobU, CobS, and CobC) that install DMB in the formation of coenzyme B12. Models are described for the mechanism and control of alpha-axial ligand installation.

  5. AANT: the Amino Acid-Nucleotide Interaction Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael M; Khrapov, Maksim A; Cox, J Colin; Yao, Jianchao; Tong, Lingnan; Ellington, Andrew D

    2004-01-01

    We have created an Amino Acid-Nucleotide Interaction Database (AANT; http://aant.icmb.utexas. edu/) that categorizes all amino acid-nucleotide interactions from experimentally determined protein-nucleic acid structures, and provides users with a graphic interface for visualizing these interactions in aggregate. AANT accomplishes this by extracting individual amino acid-nucleotide interactions from structures in the Protein Data Bank, combining and superimposing these interactions into multiple structure files (e.g. 20 amino acids x 5 nucleotides) and grouping structurally similar interactions into more readily identifiable clusters. Using the Chime web browser plug-in, users can view 3D representations of the superimpositions and clusters. The unique collection and representation of data on amino acid-nucleotide interactions facilitates understanding the specificity of protein-nucleic acid interactions at a more fundamental level, and allows comparison of otherwise extremely disparate sets of structures. Moreover, by modularly representing the fundamental interactions that govern binding specificity it may prove possible to better engineer nucleic acid binding proteins.

  6. Insertions/deletions-associated nucleotide polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although high levels of within-species variation are commonly observed, a general mechanism for the origin of such variation is still lacking. Insertions and deletions (indels are a widespread feature of genomes and we hypothesize that there might be an association between indels and patterns of nucleotide polymorphism. Here, we investigate flanking sequences around 18 indels (>100bp among a large number of accessions of the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We found two distinct haplotypes, i.e. a nucleotide dimorphism, present around each of these indels and dimorphic haplotypes always corresponded to the indel-present/-absent patterns. In addition, the peaks of nucleotide diversity between the two divergent alleles were closely associated with these indels. Thus, there exists a close association between indels and dimorphisms. Further analysis suggests that indel-associated substitutions could be an important component of genetic variation shaping nucleotide polymorphism in Arabidopsis. Finally, we suggest a mechanism by which indels might generate these highly divergent haplotypes. This study provides evidence that nucleotide dimorphisms, which are frequently regarded as evidence of frequency-dependent selection, could be explained simply by structural variation in the genome.

  7. The regulation of nucleotide metabolism of immune cells: papaverine induced nucleotide breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, H; Sass, S; Tsien, W H

    1980-06-01

    During a period of prelabeling of mouse thymus cells with any nucleoside at 4 degrees C, nucleoside phosphates accumulated, but no nucleic acid synthesis occurred. Elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C then led to incorporation into the respective nucleic acid reaching a maximum in 5--15 min. Papaverine inhibited this incorporation (IC50:50 muM) and caused an efflux of label into the medium as a nonphosphorylated product. The responses of the different nucleotide phosphate pools showed more dependency on the base then the sugar moeity. The effect of papaverine could not be altered or mimicked by deprivation of oxygen, glucose, or calcium. Mouse spleen cells responded like thymocytes to papaverine, but rat GH3 pituitary cell DNA syntesis was only transiently inhibited with no concomitant efflux of 3H into the medium. As expected, thymus cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), determined by the luciferin-luciferase reaction, decreased in the presence of papaverine; suprisingly, extracellular ATP fell as well. The results suggest that decreases in cellular ATP of mouse thymus cells leads to reductions of all nucleoside phosphates and the efflux of the resultant nucleosides. Papaverine may effect a decrease in the ATP levels by activating a phosphohydrolase rather than, or in addition to, the previously suggested inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport.

  8. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of butterbur mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Komatsu, Ken; Maejima, Kensaku; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Okano, Yukari; Shiraishi, Takuya; Takahashi, Shuichiro; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Namba, Shigetou

    2009-01-01

    Butterbur mosaic virus (ButMV), a member of the genus Carlavirus, was isolated from Japanese butterbur. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of ButMV. The genome of ButMV consists of 8,662 nucleotides in length and is predicted to contain six ORFs. The ButMV replicase and CP genes share 46.4-54.9 and 43.2-62.1% nucleotide and 38.6-46.6 and 31.3-65.0% amino acid sequence identities, respectively, with those of other carlaviruses. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we suggested that ButMV replicase and CP is most closely related to coleus vein necrosis virus and carnation latent virus, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that ButMV was a distinct species of the genus Carlavirus.

  9. Effect of nucleotides on broiler performance and carcass yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VC Pelícia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the effect of nucleotides on the performance and carcass yield of broilers fed diets with no antibiotic growth promoters (AGP, anticoccidials, or animal feedstuffs. In the trial, 600 Ross 308 male broilers were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design into six treatments with four replicates of 25 birds each. Treatments consisted of a control diet (CD, CD + AGP, CD + 0.04%, CD + 0.05%, CD + 0.06%, and CD + 0.07% nucleotides. The experimental diets did not contain anticoccidials, and birds were vaccinated against coccidiosis at three days of age. No significant differences were detected among broilers submitted to the different treatments in none of the studied parameters. Under the conditions of this experiment, diets supplemented with nucleotides did not influence broiler performance or carcass yield at 42 days of age, and were not different from the feeds not containing any additive or with AGP.

  10. Palladium-Catalyzed Modification of Unprotected Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin H. Shaughnessy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  11. Compositions and methods for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-11-22

    Described herein are nucleic acid based probes and methods for discriminating and detecting single nucleotide variants in nucleic acid molecules (e.g., DNA). The methods include use of a pair of probes can be used to detect and identify polymorphisms, for example single nucleotide polymorphism in DNA. The pair of probes emit a different fluorescent wavelength of light depending on the association and alignment of the probes when hybridized to a target nucleic acid molecule. Each pair of probes is capable of discriminating at least two different nucleic acid molecules that differ by at least a single nucleotide difference. The methods can probes can be used, for example, for detection of DNA polymorphisms that are indicative of a particular disease or condition.

  12. Recombinant synthesis, purification, and nucleotide binding characteristics of the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis gene product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J; Huang, Z; Rado, T A; Peng, S; Jilling, T; Muccio, D D; Sorscher, E J

    1992-04-05

    The majority of mutations which lead to clinical cystic fibrosis are located within the two predicted nucleotide binding domains of the cystic fibrosis gene product. We have used a prokaryotic expression system to synthesize and purify the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD-1, amino acids 426-588) with and without the most common mutation associated with the disease (the deletion of phenylalanine at position 508, delta F508). Both wild type and delta F508 NBD-1 bind ATP-agarose in a quantitatively comparable manner; this binding was inhibited by excess Na2ATP, trinitrophenol-ATP, or 8-azido-ATP. Irreversible NBD-1 labeling by an ATP analog was demonstrated using [32P]8-azido-ATP. This covalent labeling was inhibited by preincubation with Na2ATP, with half-maximal inhibition for Na2ATP occurring at approximately 5 mM for both the wild type and delta F508 nucleotide binding domain. These experiments are among the first to confirm the expectation that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator NBD-1 binds nucleotide. Since, under the conditions used in our study, NBD-1 without phenylalanine 508 displays very similar nucleotide binding characteristics to the wild type protein, our results support previous structural models which predict that the delta F508 mutation should not cause an alteration in ATP binding.

  13. Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms of NADPH oxidase p22phox gene and ischemic stroke in Shanghai Han population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei XU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective This paper aims to investigate the distribution of genotypes and alleles of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase p22phox -930A/G, 242C/T and -675A/T, so as to evaluate the association between three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and risk of atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in permanent resident population of Han nationality living in Shanghai area. Methods The genotypes and allele frequencies of NADPH oxidase p22phox subunit -930A/G, 242C/T and -675A/T were detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in 205 patients with ischemic stroke and 136 healthy controls. Results In patients with ischemic stroke, the results of PCR-RFLP in variant genetic loci were different. For -930A/G, one band appeared at 268 bp of genotype AA; 2 bands appeared at 197 and 71 bp of genotype GG; 3 bands appeared at 268, 197 and 71 bp of genotype AG. For 242C/T, one band appeared at 348 bp of genotype CC; 2 bands appeared at 188 and 160 bp of genotype TT; 3 bands appeared at 348, 188 and 160 bp of genotype CT. For -675A/T, 2 bands appeared at 158 and 54 bp of genotype TT; 3 bands appeared at 212, 158 and 54 bp of genotype AT. The genotypes and allele frequency of all three SNPs of NADPH oxidase p22phox gene had no significant difference between ischemic stroke patients and healthy controls (P > 0.05. Conclusions The genetic polymorphism of NADPH oxidase p22phox gene -930A/G, 242C/T and -675A/T might have no association with ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.09.011

  14. The electrochemical reduction of the purines guanine and adenine at platinum electrodes in several room temperature ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin, E-mail: boldrinv@iq.unesp.br [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo State, Araraquara, R. Prof. Francisco Degni, CP 355, 14801-970, SP (Brazil); Rogers, Emma I. [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Hardacre, Christopher, E-mail: c.hardacre@qub.ac.uk [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering/QUILL, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Compton, Richard G., E-mail: richard.compton@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-05

    The reduction of guanine was studied by microelectrode voltammetry in the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-hexyltriethylammonium bis (trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][N(Tf){sub 2}], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorosphosphate [C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C{sub 4}mpyrr][N(Tf){sub 2}], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C{sub 4}mim][N(Tf){sub 2}], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium dicyanamide [C{sub 4}mpyrr][N(NC){sub 2}] and tris(P-hexyl)-tetradecylphosphonium trifluorotris(pentafluoroethyl)phosphate [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP] on a platinum microelectrode. In [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][NTf{sub 2}] and [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP], but not in the other ionic liquids studied, guanine reduction involves a one-electron, diffusion-controlled process at very negative potential to produce an unstable radical anion, which is thought to undergo a dimerization reaction, probably after proton abstraction from the cation of the ionic liquid. The rate of this subsequent reaction depends on the nature of the ionic liquid, and it is faster in the ionic liquid [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP], in which the formation of the resulting dimer can be voltammetrically monitored at less negative potentials than required for the reduction of the parent molecule. Adenine showed similar behaviour to guanine but the pyrimidines thymine and cytosine did not; thymine was not reduced at potentials less negative than required for solvent (RTIL) decomposition while only a poorly defined wave was seen for cytosine. The possibility for proton abstraction from the cation in [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][NTf{sub 2}] and [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP] is noted and this is thought to aid the electrochemical dimerization process. The resulting rapid reaction is thought to shift the reduction potentials for guanine and adenine to lower values than observed in RTILs where the scope for proton abstraction is not present. Such shifts are

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection on a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dufva, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We present a magnetoresistive sensor platform for hybridization assays and demonstrate its applicability on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The sensor relies on anisotropic magnetoresistance in a new geometry with a local negative reference and uses the magnetic field from the se...... for external electromagnets and thus allows for miniaturization of the sensor platform....

  16. [Tabular excel editor for analysis of aligned nucleotide sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkin, V V

    2010-01-01

    Excel platform was used for transition of results of multiple aligned nucleotide sequences obtained using the BLAST network service to the form appropriate for visual analysis and editing. Two macros operators for MS Excel 2007 were constructed. The array of aligned sequences transformed into Excel table and processed using macros operators is more appropriate for analysis than initial html data.

  17. The nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes from soybean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, O; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Jensen, E O

    1982-01-01

    We present the complete nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes isolated from soybean DNA. Both genes contain three intervening sequences in identical positions. Comparison of the coding sequences with known amino-acid sequences of soybean leghemoglobins suggest that the two genes corresp...

  18. Exact correspondence between walk in nucleotide and protein sequence spaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry N Ivankov

    Full Text Available In the course of evolution, genes traverse the nucleotide sequence space, which translates to a trajectory of changes in the protein sequence in protein sequence space. The correspondence between regions of the nucleotide and protein sequence spaces is understood in general but not in detail. One of the unexplored questions is how many sequences a protein can reach with a certain number of nucleotide substitutions in its gene sequence. Here I propose an algorithm to calculate the volume of protein sequence space accessible to a given protein sequence as a function of the number of nucleotide substitutions made in the protein-coding sequence. The algorithm utilizes the power of the dynamic programming approach, and makes all calculations within a couple of seconds on a desktop computer. I apply the algorithm to green fluorescence protein, and get the number of sequences four times higher than estimated before. However, taking into account the astronomically huge size of the protein sequence space, the previous estimate can be considered as acceptable as an order of magnitude estimation. The proposed algorithm has practical applications in the study of evolutionary trajectories in sequence space.

  19. Nucleotide and Amino acid changes map to Functional Domains on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    equine/Ibadan/4/91 (H3N8) haemagglutinin (HA) gene in ELISA plates is reported. There was no nucleotide change compared with the sequence we earlier obtained for this virus by cycle sequencing which indicates that the present method is ...

  20. Nucleotide excision repair I: from E.coli to yeast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractGenetic information is constantly deteriorating, mainly as a consequence of the action of numerous genotoxic agents. In order to cope with this fundamental problem, all living organisms have acquired a complex network of DNA repair systems to safeguard their genetic integrity. Nucleotide

  1. Regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms at the beginning of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There are two regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (rSNPs) at the beginning of the second intron of the mouse - gene that are strongly associated with lung cancer susceptibility. We performed functional analysis of three SNPs (rs12228277: T>A, rs12226937: G>A, and rs61761074: T>G) located in the same ...

  2. Quenching of nucleotide-derived radicals by bisbenzimidazole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The pulse radiolysis technique has been employed to investigate the reaction of DNA-minor-groove ligand bisbenzimidazole Hoechst 33258 with pyrimidine and purine nucleotide-derived radicals. Formation of an N-centred. Hoechst-33258 radical is observed. Bimolecular rate constants and the yields of.

  3. Nucleotide insertion initiated by van derWaals interaction during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Interacting biomolecules; peptide-bond formation; generalized van der Waals interaction; ionization energy theory. Abstract. We present here an unambiguous theoretical analyses and to show that the exclusive biochemical reaction involved in a single nucleotide insertion into the DNA primer can be efficiently ...

  4. Nucleotide variation at the dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) gene in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied nucleotide sequence variation at the gene coding for dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) in seven populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Strength and pattern of linkage disequilibrium are somewhat distinct in the extensively sampled Spanish and Raleigh populations. In the Spanish population, a few sites are in ...

  5. The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database: major new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesser, Guenter; Baker, Wendy; van den Broek, Alexandra; Garcia-Pastor, Maria; Kanz, Carola; Kulikova, Tamara; Leinonen, Rasko; Lin, Quan; Lombard, Vincent; Lopez, Rodrigo; Mancuso, Renato; Nardone, Francesco; Stoehr, Peter; Tuli, Mary Ann; Tzouvara, Katerina; Vaughan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/) incorporates, organizes and distributes nucleotide sequences from all available public sources. The database is located and maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK. In an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA), data are exchanged amongst the collaborating databases on a daily basis to achieve optimal synchronization. Webin is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, while automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via FTP, Email and World Wide Web interfaces. EBI's Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many other specialized molecular biology databases. For sequence similarity searching, a variety of tools (e.g. Fasta, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the latest data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. All resources can be accessed via the EBI home page at http://www.ebi.ac.uk.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and its application on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nucleotide diversity across a genome is the source of most phenotypic variation. Such DNA polymorphism is the basis for the development of molecular markers, an indispensable tool in genetic mapping studies. In general, the high resolution fine mapping of genes is often limited by lack of sufficient number of ...

  7. Nucleotide variation at the methionine synthase locus in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nucleotide variation at the methionine synthase (MetE) locus within and among populations of an endangered forest tree Fokienia hodginsii in Vietnam was investigated in the present study. A total of 12 populations were sampled across Vietnam. The length of the sequenced locus varied from 1567 to 1559 bp. A total of 42 ...

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 5'-flanking region of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prolactin (PRL), a polypeptide hormone synthesized and secreted by the animal's anterior pituitary gland, plays an important role in the regulation of mammalian lactation and avian reproduction. Considering the significant association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 5'-flanking region of PRL and ...

  9. Prospects for inferring pairwise relationships with single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery C. Glaubitz; O. Eugene, Jr. Rhodes; J. Andrew DeWoody

    2003-01-01

    An extraordinarily large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are now available in humans as well as in other model organisms. Technological advancements may soon make it feasible to assay hundreds of SNPs in virtually any organism of interest. One potential application of SNPs is the determination of pairwise genetic relationships in populations without...

  10. Nucleotide excision repair: ERCC1 and TFIIH complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Vuuren (Hanneke)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractDNA is the carrier of genetic information in living organisms. The information stored in the nucleotide sequence of DNA is transmitted to the offspring by generating identical copies of the parental DNA molecules. Damage in DNA can cause loss of genetic information. Nevertheless, the DNA

  11. Relationship between single-nucleotide polymorphisms in un ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to unravel the link between human leukocyte antigen-G un- translated region (HLA-G 3-UTR) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and preeclampsia by examining polymorphisms in HLA-G 3-UTR in preeclampsia patients and their newborns, as well as those of women with normal ...

  12. Detection of new single nucleotide polymorphisms by means of real ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    technique in molecular genetics which allows quantifica- tion of polymorphic DNA regions and genotyping of sin- ... RESEARCH NOTE. Keywords. Single nucleotide polymorphism; real time PCR; DNA melting curve analysis. .... tion is located in an open reading frame, it is unlikely that it influences a splicing event.

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in ghrelin gene and the resulting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone releasing peptide which also affects feed intake in chickens. Ghrelin is encoded by chicken ghrelin gene (cGHRL) found in chromosome 7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been reported in cGHRL in Chinese native chickens, but such studies have not been carried out in chickens ...

  14. Review Single nucleotide polymorphism in genome-wide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genome-wide patterns of variation across individuals provide most powerful source of data for uncovering the history of migration, expansion, and adaptation of the human population. The arrival of new technologies that type more than millions of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a single experiment has ...

  15. Effects of Dietary Nucleotides on Growth Rate and Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dietary nucleotides on growth and disease resistance of crustaceans were evaluated using axenic Artemia culture tests. Higher Artemia growth in xenic culture (15.6 ± 2.9 mm) than in axenic culture (9.2 ± 1.9 mm) reaffirmed the need to eliminate microbial populations known to influence growth and disease ...

  16. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B; O'Brien, Thomas J; Stevenson, David M; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using (13)C-labeled sugars and [(15)N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. Copyright © 2015, Pisithkul et al.

  17. Probing Adenine Rings and Backbone Linkages Using Base Specific Isotope-Edited Raman Spectroscopy: Application to Group II Intron Ribozyme Domain V†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Eldho, Nadukkudy V.

    2010-01-01

    Raman difference spectroscopy is used to probe the properties of a 36-nt RNA molecule, “D5”, which lies at the heart of the catalytic apparatus in group II introns. For D5 that has all its adenine residues labeled with 13C and 15N, and utilizing Raman difference spectroscopy, we identify the conformational sensitive -C-O-P-O-C- stretching modes of the unlabeled bonds adjacent to adenine bases, as well as the adenine ring modes themselves. The phosphodiester modes can be assigned to individual adenine residues based on earlier NMR data. The effect of Mg2+ binding was explored by analyzing the Raman difference spectra for [D5 + Mg2+] minus [D5 no Mg2+], for D5 unlabeled, or D5 labeled with 13C/15N-enriched adenine. In both sets of data we assign differential features to G ring modes perturbed by Mg2+ binding at the N7 position. In the A labeled spectra we attribute a Raman differential near 1450 cm−1 and changes of intensity at 1296 cm−1 to Mg binding at the N7 position of adenine bases. The A and G bases involved in Mg2+ binding again can be identified using earlier NMR results. For the unlabeled D5, a change in the C-O-P-O-C stretch profile at 811 cm−1 upon magnesium binding is due to a “tightening up” (in the sense of a more rigid molecule with less dynamic interchange among competing ribose conformers) of the D5 structure. For adenine labeled D5, small changes in the adenine backbone bond signatures in the 810 – 830 cm−1 region suggest small conformational changes occur in the tetraloop and bulge regions upon binding of Mg2+. The PO2− stretching vibration, near 1100 cm−1, from the non-bridging phosphate groups, probes the effect of Mg2+-hydrate inner-sphere interactions that cause an up-shift. In turn, the up-shift is modulated by the presence of monovalent cations since in the presence of Na+ and Li+ the up-shift is (23±2 cm−1) while in the presence of K+ and Cs+ it is (13±3 cm−1), a finding that correlates with the differences in

  18. Adenine derivatives as phosphate-activating groups for the regioselective formation of 3',5'-linked oligoadenylates on montmorillonite: possible phosphate-activating groups for the prebiotic synthesis of RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabahar, K. J.; Ferris, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    Methyladenine and adenine N-phosphoryl derivatives of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-AMP) and uridine 5'-monophosphate (5'-UMP) are synthesized, and their structures are elucidated. The oligomerization reactions of the adenine derivatives of 5'-phosphoramidates of adenosine on montmorillonite are investigated. 1-Methyladenine and 3-methyladenine derivatives on montmorillonite yielded oligoadenylates as long as undecamer, and the 2-methyladenine and adenine derivatives on montmorillonite yielded oligomers up to hexamers and pentamers, respectively. The 1-methyladenine derivative yielded linear, cyclic, and A5'ppA-derived oligonucleotides with a regioselectivity for the 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages averaging 84%. The effect of pKa and amine structure of phosphate-activating groups on the montmorillonite-catalyzed oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoramidate of adenosine are discussed. The binding and reaction of methyladenine and adenine N-phosphoryl derivatives of adenosine are described.

  19. Ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitial injury in adenine-induced CKD rats by mediating Nrf2 and NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study aims to determine the effects of ozone therapy on restoring impaired Nrf2 activation to ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitial injury in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Materials and Methods: Sprague–Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and chronic tubulointerstitial injury. Ozone therapy was administered by rectal insufflation. After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected and analyzed. Renal function and systemic electrolyte level were detected. Pathological changes in kidney were assessed by hematoxylin–eosin staining and Masson trichrome staining. Nrf2 activation was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. The levels of SOD, CAT, GSH, PCO, and MDA were detected in the kidney. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR analyses were performed to evaluate the activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB P65 pathway and inflammation infiltration in the tubulointerstitium of the rats. Results: Ozone therapy improved severe renal insufficiency and tubulointerstitial morphology injury as well as restored Nrf2 activation and inhibited the NF-κB pathway in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Ozone therapy also up-regulated anti-oxidation enzymes (SOD, CAT, and GSH and down-regulated oxidation products (PCO and MDA, as well as inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 in the kidney. Conclusion:These findings indicated that ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitial injury in rats with adenine-induced CKD by mediating Nrf2 and NF-κB.

  20. A click chemistry approach to pleuromutilin derivatives. Part 3: extended footprinting analysis and excellent MRSA inhibition for a derivative with an adenine phenyl side chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, Ida; Hansen, Lykke H; Nielsen, Poul; Vester, Birte

    2014-02-15

    Five promising pleuromutilin derivatives from our former studies, all containing adenine on various linkers, were supplemented with two new compounds. The binding to Escherichia coli ribosomes was verified by extensive chemical footprinting analysis. The ability to inhibit bacterial growth was investigated on two Staphylococcus aureus strains and compared to the pleuromutilin drugs tiamulin and valnemulin. Three of the compounds show an effect similar to tiamulin and one compound shows an excellent effect similar to valnemulin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Continuing Exposure to Low-Dose Nonylphenol Aggravates Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Dysfunction and Role of Rosuvastatin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Chia-Hung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonylphenol (NP, an environmental organic compound, has been demonstrated to enhance reactive-oxygen species (ROS synthesis. Chronic exposure to low-dose adenine (AD has been reported to induce chronic kidney disease (CKD. Methods In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic exposure to NP will aggravate AD-induced CKD through increasing generations of inflammation, ROS, and apoptosis that could be attenuated by rosuvastatin. Fifty male Wistar rats were equally divided into group 1 (control, group 2 (AD in fodder at a concentration of 0.25%, group 3 (NP: 2 mg/kg/day, group 4 (combined AD & NP, and group 5 (AD-NP + rosuvastatin: 20 mg/kg/day. Treatment was continued for 24 weeks for all animals before being sacrificed. Results By the end of 24 weeks, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine levels were increased in group 4 than in groups 1–3, but significantly reduced in group 5 as compared with group 4 (all p  Conclusion NP worsened AD-induced CKD that could be reversed by rosuvastatin therapy.

  2. Nuclease SP: A novel enzyme from spinach that incises damaged duplex DNA preferentially at sites of adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doetsch, P.W.; McCray, W.H. Jr.; Lee, K.; Bettler, D.R.; Valenzuela, M.R.L. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1988-07-25

    A novel endonuclease has been isolated from extracts of spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea). The enzyme has been purified by a series of column chromatography steps and has a molecular size of approximately 43,000 daltons. The spinach endonuclease cleaved double stranded DNA damaged by ultraviolet light or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) primarily at sites of adenine when end-labelled DNA fragments of defined sequence were employed as substrates. The nature of the structural distortion contained in damaged, duplex DNA appears to be an important determinant for endonuclease cleavage. DNA helical distortions produced by UV light-induced pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts, but not cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are recognized by the enzyme. The DNA cleavage products generated by the enzyme contain 3{prime}-hydroxyl and 5{prime}-phosphoryl termini. Single stranded DNA and RNA are hydrolyzed by the spinach endonuclease. This enzyme, which we call nuclease SP, is similar in several respects to other single-strand-specific nucleases such as N. crassa and mung bean nucleases and may function in DNA repair and/or recombination events in spinach cells. Nuclease SP should be a useful tool for the analysis of photoproducts occurring in duplex DNA.

  3. Adsorptive removal of indole and quinoline from model fuel using adenine-grafted metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Mithun; Song, Ji Yoon; Jeong, Ah Rim; Min, Kil Sik; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2017-10-28

    A highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-101, was modified for the first time with the nucleobase adenine (Ade) by grafting onto the MOF. The Ade-grafted MOF, Ade-MIL-101, was further protonated to obtain P-Ade-MIL-101, and these MOFs were utilized to remove nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs) (such as indole (IND) and quinoline (QUI)) from a model fuel by adsorption. These functionalized MOFs exhibited remarkable adsorption performance for NCCs compared with that shown by commercial activated carbon (AC) and pristine MIL-101, even though the porosities of the functionalized-MOFs were lower than that of pristine MIL-101. P-Ade-MIL-101 has 12.0 and 10.8 times capacity to that of AC for IND and QUI adsorption, respectively; its adsorption performance was competitive with that of other reported adsorbents. The remarkable adsorption of IND and QUI by Ade-MIL-101 was attributed to H-bonding. H-bonding combined with cation-π interactions was proposed as the mechanism for the removal of IND by P-Ade-MIL-101, whereas acid-base interactions were thought to be responsible for QUI adsorption by P-Ade-MIL-101. Moreover, P-Ade-MIL-101 can be regenerated without any severe degradation and used for successive adsorptions. Therefore, P-Ade-MIL-101 was recommended as an effective adsorbent for fuel purification by adsorptive removal of NCCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Purification and characterization of the enzymes involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide degradation by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Thanaa Hamed; El-Ghonemy, Dina Helmy

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate a new pathway for the degradation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829 extracts. Enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of NAD, i.e. alkaline phosphatase, aminohydrolase and glycohydrolase were determined. Alkaline phosphatase was found to catalyse the sequential hydrolysis of two phosphate moieties of NAD molecule to nicotinamide riboside plus adenosine. Adenosine was then deaminated by aminohydrolase to inosine and ammonia. While glycohydrolase catalyzed the hydrolysis of the nicotinamide-ribosidic bond of NAD+ to produce nicotinamide and ADP-ribose in equimolar amounts, enzyme purification through a 3-step purification procedure revealed the existence of two peaks of alkaline phosphatases, and one peak contained deaminase and glycohydrolase activities. NAD deaminase was purified to homogeneity as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an apparent molecular mass of 91 kDa. Characterization and determination of some of NAD aminohydrolase kinetic properties were conducted due to its biological role in the regulation of cellular NAD level. The results also revealed that NAD did not exert its feedback control on nicotinamide amidase produced by P. brevicompactum.

  5. Photosensitized oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by diethoxyphosphorus(V)tetraphenylporphyrin and its fluorinated derivative: Possibility of chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Murata, Atsushi

    2018-01-01

    Water-soluble porphyrins, diethoxyphosphorus(V)tetraphenylporphyrin (EtP(V)TPP) and its fluorinated analogue (FEtP(V)TPP), decreased the typical absorption around 340 nm of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) under visible light irradiation, indicating oxidative decomposition. A singlet oxygen quencher, sodium azide, and a triplet quencher, potassium iodide, slightly inhibited photosensitized NADH oxidation. However, these inhibitory effects were very small. Furthermore, the fluorescence lifetime of these P(V)porphyrins was decreased by NADH, suggesting the contribution of electron transfer to the singlet excited (S1) state of P(V)porphyrin. The redox potential measurement supports the electron transfer-mediated oxidation of NADH. The quantum yields of NADH photodecomposition by P(V)porphyrins could be estimated from the kinetic data and the effect of these quenchers on NADH oxidation. The obtained values suggest that the electron accepting by the S1 states of P(V)porphyrins triggers a chain reaction of NADH oxidation. This photosensitized reaction may play an important role in the photocytotoxicity of P(V)porphyrins. The axial ligand fluorination of P(V)porphyrins improved electron accepting ability. However, fluorination slightly suppressed static interaction with NADH, resulting in decreased oxidation quantum yield.

  6. Photosensitized oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by diethoxyphosphorus(V)tetraphenylporphyrin and its fluorinated derivative: Possibility of chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Murata, Atsushi

    2018-01-05

    Water-soluble porphyrins, diethoxyphosphorus(V)tetraphenylporphyrin (EtP(V)TPP) and its fluorinated analogue (FEtP(V)TPP), decreased the typical absorption around 340nm of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) under visible light irradiation, indicating oxidative decomposition. A singlet oxygen quencher, sodium azide, and a triplet quencher, potassium iodide, slightly inhibited photosensitized NADH oxidation. However, these inhibitory effects were very small. Furthermore, the fluorescence lifetime of these P(V)porphyrins was decreased by NADH, suggesting the contribution of electron transfer to the singlet excited (S1) state of P(V)porphyrin. The redox potential measurement supports the electron transfer-mediated oxidation of NADH. The quantum yields of NADH photodecomposition by P(V)porphyrins could be estimated from the kinetic data and the effect of these quenchers on NADH oxidation. The obtained values suggest that the electron accepting by the S1 states of P(V)porphyrins triggers a chain reaction of NADH oxidation. This photosensitized reaction may play an important role in the photocytotoxicity of P(V)porphyrins. The axial ligand fluorination of P(V)porphyrins improved electron accepting ability. However, fluorination slightly suppressed static interaction with NADH, resulting in decreased oxidation quantum yield. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Blue light induced reactive oxygen species from flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide on lethality of HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Yeh; Chang, Chih-Jui; Chen, Liang-Yü

    2017-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a safe and non-invasive treatment for cancers and microbial infections. Various photosensitizers and light sources have been developed for clinical cancer therapies. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the cofactor of enzymes and are used as photosensitizers in this study. Targeting hypoxia and light-triggering reactive oxygen species (ROS) are experimental strategies for poisoning tumor cells in vitro. HeLa cells are committed to apoptosis when treated with FMN or FAD and exposed to visible blue light (the maximum emitted wavelength of blue light is 462nm). Under blue light irradiation at 3.744J/cm2 (=0.52mW/cm2 irradiated for 2h), the minimal lethal dose is 3.125μM and the median lethal doses (LD50) for FMN and FAD are 6.5μM and 7.2μM, respectively. Individual exposure to visible blue light irradiation or riboflavin photosensitizers does not produce cytotoxicity and no side effects are observed in this study. The western blotting results also show that an intrinsic apoptosis pathway is activated by the ROS during photolysis of riboflavin analogues. Blue light triggers the cytotoxicity of riboflavins on HeLa cells in vitro. Based on these results, this is a feasible and efficient of PDT with an intrinsic photosensitizer for cancer research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Alteration of DNA adenine methylase (Dam) activity in Pasteurella multocida causes increased spontaneous mutation frequency and attenuation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Paulsen, Daniel B; Scruggs, Daniel W; Banes, Michelle M; Reeks, Brenda Y; Lawrence, Mark L

    2003-08-01

    Pasteurella multocida is one of the primary bacterial pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. Relatively few virulence factors of P. multocida have been characterized, and there is a need for improved vaccines for prevention of BRD. In other Gram-negative species, DNA adenine methylase (Dam) regulates the expression of virulence genes, and appropriate expression of Dam is required for virulence. In this study, the authors cloned and sequenced the P. multocida A1 dam gene and demonstrated that it is able to restore Dam function in an Escherichia coli dam mutant. When P. multocida dam was placed under the control of a constitutively expressed promoter on a plasmid, it caused an increased spontaneous mutation rate in P. multocida. In addition, the plasmid-mediated alteration of Dam production in P. multocida caused it to be highly attenuated in mice. These findings indicate that appropriate expression of Dam is required for virulence of P. multocida, which is believed to be the first report that Dam is required for virulence of a species in the Pasteurellaceae. Therefore, Dam may function as a virulence gene regulator in the Pasteurellaceae, similar to previously reported findings from other Gram-negative species.

  9. Mechanistic Analysis of Fluorescence Quenching of Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide by Oxamate in Lactate Dehydrogenase Ternary Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huo-Lei; Callender, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Fluorescence of Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH) is extensively employed in studies of oxidoreductases. A substantial amount of static and kinetic work has focused on the binding of pyruvate or substrate mimic oxamate to the binary complex of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-NADH where substantial fluorescence quenching is typically observed. However, the quenching mechanism is not well understood limiting structural interpretation. Based on time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) computations with cam-B3LYP functional in conjunction with the analysis of previous experimental results, we propose that bound oxamate acts as an electron acceptor in the quenching of fluorescence of NADH in the ternary complex, where a charge transfer (CT) state characterized by excitation from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the nicotinamide moiety of NADH to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of oxamate exists close to the locally excited (LE) state involving only the nicotinamide moiety. Efficient quenching in the encounter complex like in pig heart LDH requires that oxamate forms a salt bridge with Arg-171 and hydrogen bonds with His-195, Thr-246 and Asn-140. Further structural rearrangement and loop closure, which also brings about another hydrogen bond between oxamate and Arg-109, will increase the rate of fluorescence quenching as well. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  10. Changes in the intracellular concentrations of the adenosine phosphates and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides ofSaccharomyces cerevisiae during batch fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, J C; Pareja, M; Ortega, J M

    1995-03-01

    Significant changes in the intracellular concentrations of adenosine phosphates and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides were observed during fermentation of grape must by three different strains ofSaccharomyces cerevisiae: S. cerevisiae var.cerevisiae, a typical fermentative yeast strain and two flor-veil-forming strains,S. cerevisiae var.bayanus andS. cerevisiae var.capensis. The intracellular concentration of ATP was always higher inS. cerevisiae var.cerevisiae than in the flor-veil-forming strains. NAD(+) and NADP(+) concentrations decreased at faster rates in the flor-veil-forming yeasts than in the other yeast but NADH concentration was the same in all yeasts for the first 10 days of fermentation. NADPH concentration was always lower inS. cerevisiae var.cerevisiae than in the other yeasts and this yeast also showed higher rates of growth and fermentation during the early stages of the fermentation and the presence of non-viable cells at the end of fermentation. In contrast, the flor-veil-forming strains maintained growth and fermentation capabilities for a relatively long time and viable cells were present throughout the entire fermentation process (31 days).

  11. Theoretical investigation of the coupling between hydrogen-atom transfer and stacking interaction in adenine-thymine dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2013-04-15

    Three different dimers of the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair are studied to point out the changes of important properties (structure, atomic charge, energy and so on) induced by coupling between the movement of the atoms in the hydrogen bonds and the stacking interaction. The comparison of these results with those for the A-T monomer system explains the role of the stacking interaction in the hydrogen-atom transfer in this biologically important base pair. The results support the idea that this coupling depends on the exact dimer considered and is different for the N-N and N-O hydrogen bonds. In particular, the correlation between the hydrogen transfer and the stacking interaction is more relevant for the N-N bridge than for the N-O one. Also, the two different mechanisms of two-hydrogen transfer (step by step and concerted) can be modified by the stacking interaction between the base pairs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Interaction between thymine dimer and flavin-adenine dinucleotide: a DFT and direct ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2008-06-19

    The interaction between the fully reduced flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FADH (-)) and thymine dimer (T) 2 has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The charges of FADH (-) and (T) 2 were calculated to be -0.9 and -0.1, respectively, at the ground state. By photoirradiation, an electron transfer occurred from FADH (-) to (T) 2 at the first excited state. Next, the reaction dynamics of electron capture of (T) 2 have been investigated by means of the direct ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) method (HF/3-21G(d) and B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels) in order to elucidate the mechanism of the repair process of thymine dimer caused by the photoenzyme. The thymine dimer has two C-C single bonds between thymine rings (C 5-C 5' and C 6-C 6' bonds) at the neutral state, which is expressed by (T) 2. After the electron capture of (T) 2, the C 5-C 5' bond was gradually elongated and then it was preferentially broken. The time scale of the C-C bond breaking and formation of the intermediate with a single bond (T) 2 (-) was estimated to be 100-150 fs. The present calculations confirmed that the repair reaction of thymine dimer takes place efficiently via an electron-transfer process from the FADH (-) enzyme.

  13. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  14. Xuezhikang, extract of red yeast rice, inhibited tissue factor and hypercoagulable state through suppressing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Yang, Yabing; Liu, Meilin

    2011-09-01

    Xuezhikang, extract of red yeast rice, is a traditional Chinese medicine with multiple cardioprotective effect. It contains a family of naturally occurring statins, such as lovastatin. Tissue factor (TF) is overexpressed in macrophages of lipid core plaques, which display high procoagulant activity and seem to be a potentially target for anti-atherothrombosis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the effect and possible molecular mechanisms of xuezhikang on inhibiting TF expression and hypercoagulable state and the differences compared with lovastatin. Our results showed that xuezhikang significantly suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced TF expression in macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. Xuezhikang reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity by decreasing membrane translocation of p47 through inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor (diphenyleneiodonium) also inhibited the oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced TF expression, similar to the effects of xuezhikang. Furthermore, consistent with the severity of aortic atherosclerosis, xuezhikang (300 mg·kg·d) significantly reduced blood coagulation activation and TF expression in high-cholesterol diet-induced atherosclerotic rats. In addition, xuezhikang was more potent than lovastatin on inhibiting the expression of TF and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activation. These observations provide evidences that inhibition of xuezhikang on hypercoagulation and TF expression may partly account for its cardioprotective benefits.

  15. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity and capacity of some natural N6-substituted adenine derivatives (cytokinins) by fluorimetric and spectrophotometric assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzolari, Andrea; Marinello, Cristina; Carini, Marina; Santaniello, Enzo; Biondi, Pier Antonio

    2016-04-15

    Four natural N(6)-substituted adenine derivatives (cytokinins) were evaluated for the first time in vitro for they antioxidant capacity by using fluorimetric and spectrophotometric assays, i.e., the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), trolox equivalence antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and the 2-deoxyribose degradation (2-DRA) assays. The results from the TEAC assay show that only N(6)-(4-hydroxybenzyl)adenine (p-topolin) shows an electron transfer capacity due to the presence of a phenolic moiety in the N(6)-position. The results from the ORAC test show that the antioxidant activity of N(6)-furfuryladenine (kinetin, K) is the highest up to a concentration of 1 μM, whereas at concentrations higher than 1 μM p-topolin is the most efficient antioxidant. Analysis of the kinetic data suggests that, compared to the other cytokinins, more sites of the molecular structure of p-topolin are available for the quenching of peroxyl radicals. The hydroxyl radical scavenger ability, as measured by the 2-DRA assay, showed that all tested cytokinins react in this test and that N(6)-(Δ(2)-isopentenyl)adenine is slightly more potent, probably because of the allylic methylene group present in the N(6)-isopentenyl moiety. Our data suggest that a part of the biological activity of the evaluated cytokinins is likely to be related to an intrinsic antioxidant capacity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A new two-dimensional extended adenine and thiophenecarboxylate mixed-ligand zinc(II) complex: synthesis, structure, thermostability and luminescent properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Feng, Yong Lan; Fu, Wei Wei

    2015-12-01

    The design and preparation of crystalline polymeric materials has attracted increasing attention due to their diverse applications as functional materials in gas storage, separation, catalysis, sensing and photoluminescence. The judicious selection of organic linkers is critical for varying the coordination behaviour of the metal ions and determining the overall characteristics of the networks. A new adenine-based Zn(II) coordination polymer, [Zn(C6H2O4S)(C5H5N5)]n or [Zn(tdc)(9H-ade)] (H2tdc is thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid and ade is adenine), has been prepared hydrothermally and the crystal structure exhibits in its packing two-dimensional (4,4) grid sheets parallel to the ab plane, featuring two distinct square cavities delimited by the two types of ligands and the Zn(II) ions with the dimensions 6.6 × 6.6 and 10.2 × 10.2 Å (based on the Zn...Zn distance). The title complex shows enhanced photoluminescence at 378 nm compared to the free ligands, suggesting that the coordination of H2tdc or adenine to the metal centre effectively increases the rigidity of the ligands and reduces the energy loss by radiative decay of intraligand excited states.

  17. Adenine and benzimidazole-based mimics of REP-3123 as antibacterial agents against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed G. Eissa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing research efforts to develop new antibacterial agents acting on novel molecular targets, a series of twenty-two adenine and benzimidazole-based mimics of the lead compound REP-3123 was designed to target methionyl-tRNA synthetase of Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis based on a homology model. Structures of the target compounds were elucidated by means of 1H and 13C NMR spectral data and their purity was confirmed by HRMS or microanalyses. The target compounds were tested for their in vitro antibacterial activity against those two challenging organisms by the microdilution method in brain heart infusion broth. Unfortunately, six of the target compounds were not biologically tested due to inadequate solubility in DMSO under the assay conditions. Only the fluoro-substituted adenine-based sulfamide (18 showed activity against C. difficile with an MIC of 85.33 μg/mL. The adenine-based thiourea (32 and diamine (36 were the most promising antibacterial agents against B. anthracis with an MIC of 92.16 μg/mL. The rest of the tested compounds either showed inferior activity (MIC = 102.4 μg/mL or were totally inactive. Although the compounds were not very active, the biological data are employed as a basis for our currently underway investigation for structure optimization.

  18. {sup 19}F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sochor, F. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany); Silvers, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory (United States); Müller, D.; Richter, C.; Fürtig, B., E-mail: fuertig@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de; Schwalbe, H., E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus {sup 19}F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5′-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the {sup 19}F isotope. The thermal stability of the {sup 19}F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson–Crick base paired uridine signals and the {sup 19}F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of {sup 19}F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides.

  19. Identification of cyclic nucleotide gated channels using regular expressions

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2013-09-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are nonselective cation channels found in plants, animals, and some bacteria. They have a six-transmembrane/one- pore structure, a cytosolic cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, and a cytosolic calmodulin-binding domain. Despite their functional similarities, the plant CNGC family members appear to have different conserved amino acid motifs within corresponding functional domains than animal and bacterial CNGCs do. Here we describe the development and application of methods employing plant CNGC-specific sequence motifs as diagnostic tools to identify novel candidate channels in different plants. These methods are used to evaluate the validity of annotations of putative orthologs of CNGCs from plant genomes. The methods detail how to employ regular expressions of conserved amino acids in functional domains of annotated CNGCs and together with Web tools such as PHI-BLAST and ScanProsite to identify novel candidate CNGCs in species including Physcomitrella patens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  20. Genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism in domesticated rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caicedo, Ana L; Williamson, Scott H; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2007-01-01

    Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments......, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models...... explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection...

  1. Conservation and Divergence in Nucleotide Excision Repair Lesion Recognition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Nicolas; Gross, Jonas; Roth, Heide M.; Buechner, Claudia N.; Kisker, Caroline; Tessmer, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair is an important and highly conserved DNA repair mechanism with an exceptionally large range of chemically and structurally unrelated targets. Lesion verification is believed to be achieved by the helicases UvrB and XPD in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic processes, respectively. Using single molecule atomic force microscopy analyses, we demonstrate that UvrB and XPD are able to load onto DNA and pursue lesion verification in the absence of the initial lesion detection proteins. Interestingly, our studies show different lesion recognition strategies for the two functionally homologous helicases, as apparent from their distinct DNA strand preferences, which can be rationalized from the different structural features and interactions with other nucleotide excision repair protein factors of the two enzymes. PMID:27405761

  2. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontob...

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the yeast SUC2 gene for invertase.

    OpenAIRE

    Taussig, R; Carlson, M.

    1983-01-01

    The yeast SUC2 gene is a structural gene for both the secreted and intracellular forms of invertase. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the coding region and the 5' and 3' flanking regions. The coding regions for the signal peptide-containing precursor to secreted invertase and for the intracellular invertase begin at different initiation codons within the SUC2 gene but share the same reading frame. The amino acid sequences predicted for the two forms of invertase from the nucleoti...

  4. Mitochondria as determinant of nucleotide pools and chromosomal stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial function plays an important role in multiple human diseases and mutations in the mitochondrial genome have been detected in nearly every type of cancer investigated to date. However, the mechanism underlying the interrelation is unknown. We used human cell lines depleted of mitochon...... mitochondrial activity. Our results suggest that mitochondria are central players in maintaining genomic stability and in controlling essential nuclear processes such as upholding a balanced supply of nucleotides....

  5. Nucleotide Sequence of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus Anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-02

    interactions with eucaryotic cells , p. 189-198. In P. Greengard and G. A. Robinson (ed.), Advances in cyclic nucleotide and protein phosphorylation...biological activity of * PA produced by the recombinants were tested by a Western blot * procedure and the CFO cell elongation assay, respectively (14... cell elongation assay (20; data not shown). To determine the location ard direction of transcription of the PA gene, the 4.2-kb ins’nrt was excised

  6. Nucleotide sequence composition and method for detection of neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, A.; Yang, H.L.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes a composition of matter that is specific for {ital Neisseria gonorrhoeae}. It comprises: at least one nucleotide sequence for which the ratio of the amount of the sequence which hybridizes to chromosomal DNA of {ital Neisseria gonorrhoeae} to the amount of the sequence which hybridizes to chromosomal DNA of {ital Neisseria meningitidis} is greater than about five. The ratio being obtained by a method described.

  7. Nucleotide sequencing and identification of some wild mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudip Kumar; Mandal, Aninda; Datta, Animesh K; Gupta, Sudha; Paul, Rita; Saha, Aditi; Sengupta, Sonali; Dubey, Priyanka Kumari

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA-ITS (Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers) fragment of the genomic DNA of 8 wild edible mushrooms (collected from Eastern Chota Nagpur Plateau of West Bengal, India) was amplified using ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacers 1) and ITS2 primers and subjected to nucleotide sequence determination for identification of mushrooms as mentioned. The sequences were aligned using ClustalW software program. The aligned sequences revealed identity (homology percentage from GenBank data base) of Amanita hemibapha [CN (Chota Nagpur) 1, % identity 99 (JX844716.1)], Amanita sp. [CN 2, % identity 98 (JX844763.1)], Astraeus hygrometricus [CN 3, % identity 87 (FJ536664.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 4, % identity 90 (JF746992.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 5, % identity 99 (GU001667.1)], T. microcarpus [CN 6, % identity 82 (EF421077.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 7, % identity 76 (JF746993.1)], and Volvariella volvacea [CN 8, % identity 100 (JN086680.1)]. Although out of 8 mushrooms 4 could be identified up to species level, the nucleotide sequences of the rest may be relevant to further characterization. A phylogenetic tree is constructed using Neighbor-Joining method showing interrelationship between/among the mushrooms. The determined nucleotide sequences of the mushrooms may provide additional information enriching GenBank database aiding to molecular taxonomy and facilitating its domestication and characterization for human benefits.

  8. Genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism in domesticated rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Caicedo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models to explain contemporary patterns of polymorphisms in rice, including a (i selectively neutral population bottleneck model, (ii bottleneck plus migration model, (iii multiple selective sweeps model, and (iv bottleneck plus selective sweeps model. We find that a simple bottleneck model, which has been the dominant demographic model for domesticated species, cannot explain the derived nucleotide polymorphism site frequency spectrum in rice. Instead, a bottleneck model that incorporates selective sweeps, or a more complex demographic model that includes subdivision and gene flow, are more plausible explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection results only in a local signature of variation.

  9. [Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases: role in the heart and therapeutic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedioune, Ibrahim; Bobin, Pierre; Karam, Sarah; Lindner, Marta; Mika, Delphine; Lechêne, Patrick; Leroy, Jérôme; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) degrade the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), thereby regulating multiple aspects of cardiac function. This highly diverse class of enzymes encoded by 21 genes encompasses 11 families that are not only responsible for the termination of cyclic nucleotide signalling, but are also involved in the generation of dynamic microdomains of cAMP and cGMP, controlling specific cell functions in response to various neurohormonal stimuli. In the myocardium, the PDE3 and PDE4 families predominate, degrading cAMP and thereby regulating cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. PDE3 inhibitors are positive inotropes and vasodilators in humans, but their use is limited to acute heart failure and intermittent claudication. PDE5 inhibitors, which are used with success to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension, do not seem efficient in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. There is experimental evidence however that these PDE, as well as other PDE families including PDE1, PDE2 and PDE9, may play important roles in cardiac diseases, such as hypertrophy and heart failure (HF). After a brief presentation of the cyclic nucleotide pathways in cardiac myocytes and the major characteristics of the PDE superfamily, this review will focus on the potential use of PDE inhibitors in HF, and the recent research developments that could lead to a better exploitation of the therapeutic potential of these enzymes in the future. © Société de Biologie, 2016.

  10. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Linkage Disequilibrium in Sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkman, Judith M.; Berry, Simon T.; Leon, Alberto J.; Slabaugh, Mary B.; Tang, Shunxue; Gao, Wenxiang; Shintani, David K.; Burke, John M.; Knapp, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic diversity in modern sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars (elite oilseed inbred lines) has been shaped by domestication and breeding bottlenecks and wild and exotic allele introgression−the former narrowing and the latter broadening genetic diversity. To assess single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies, nucleotide diversity, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) in modern cultivars, alleles were resequenced from 81 genic loci distributed throughout the sunflower genome. DNA polymorphisms were abundant; 1078 SNPs (1/45.7 bp) and 178 insertions-deletions (INDELs) (1/277.0 bp) were identified in 49.4 kbp of DNA/genotype. SNPs were twofold more frequent in noncoding (1/32.1 bp) than coding (1/62.8 bp) sequences. Nucleotide diversity was only slightly lower in inbred lines (θ = 0.0094) than wild populations (θ = 0.0128). Mean haplotype diversity was 0.74. When extraploted across the genome (∼3500 Mbp), sunflower was predicted to harbor at least 76.4 million common SNPs among modern cultivar alleles. LD decayed more slowly in inbred lines than wild populations (mean LD declined to 0.32 by 5.5 kbp in the former, the maximum physical distance surveyed), a difference attributed to domestication and breeding bottlenecks. SNP frequencies and LD decay are sufficient in modern sunflower cultivars for very high-density genetic mapping and high-resolution association mapping. PMID:17660563

  11. Broadening the scope of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed sugar nucleotide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Richard W; Peltier-Pain, Pauline; Singh, Shanteri; Zhou, Maoquan; Thorson, Jon S

    2013-05-07

    We described the integration of the general reversibility of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions, artificial glycosyl donors, and a high throughput colorimetric screen to enable the engineering of glycosyltransferases for combinatorial sugar nucleotide synthesis. The best engineered catalyst from this study, the OleD Loki variant, contained the mutations P67T/I112P/T113M/S132F/A242I compared with the OleD wild-type sequence. Evaluated against the parental sequence OleD TDP16 variant used for screening, the OleD Loki variant displayed maximum improvements in k(cat)/K(m) of >400-fold and >15-fold for formation of NDP-glucoses and UDP-sugars, respectively. This OleD Loki variant also demonstrated efficient turnover with five variant NDP acceptors and six variant 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl glycoside donors to produce 30 distinct NDP-sugars. This study highlights a convenient strategy to rapidly optimize glycosyltransferase catalysts for the synthesis of complex sugar nucleotides and the practical synthesis of a unique set of sugar nucleotides.

  12. Nucleotide Sequencing and Identification of Some Wild Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Kumar Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rDNA-ITS (Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers fragment of the genomic DNA of 8 wild edible mushrooms (collected from Eastern Chota Nagpur Plateau of West Bengal, India was amplified using ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 and ITS2 primers and subjected to nucleotide sequence determination for identification of mushrooms as mentioned. The sequences were aligned using ClustalW software program. The aligned sequences revealed identity (homology percentage from GenBank data base of Amanita hemibapha [CN (Chota Nagpur 1, % identity 99 (JX844716.1], Amanita sp. [CN 2, % identity 98 (JX844763.1], Astraeus hygrometricus [CN 3, % identity 87 (FJ536664.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 4, % identity 90 (JF746992.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 5, % identity 99 (GU001667.1], T. microcarpus [CN 6, % identity 82 (EF421077.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 7, % identity 76 (JF746993.1], and Volvariella volvacea [CN 8, % identity 100 (JN086680.1]. Although out of 8 mushrooms 4 could be identified up to species level, the nucleotide sequences of the rest may be relevant to further characterization. A phylogenetic tree is constructed using Neighbor-Joining method showing interrelationship between/among the mushrooms. The determined nucleotide sequences of the mushrooms may provide additional information enriching GenBank database aiding to molecular taxonomy and facilitating its domestication and characterization for human benefits.

  13. Auxotrophic Actinobacillus pleurpneumoniae grows in multispecies biofilms without the need for nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loera-Muro, Abraham; Jacques, Mario; Avelar-González, Francisco J; Labrie, Josée; Tremblay, Yannick D N; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma L

    2016-06-27

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiologic agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, which causes important worldwide economic losses in the swine industry. Several respiratory tract infections are associated with biofilm formation, and A. pleuropneumoniae has the ability to form biofilms in vitro. Biofilms are structured communities of bacterial cells enclosed in a self-produced polymer matrix that are attached to an abiotic or biotic surface. Virtually all bacteria can grow as a biofilm, and multi-species biofilms are the most common form of microbial growth in nature. The goal of this study was to determine the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form multi-species biofilms with other bacteria frequently founded in pig farms, in the absence of pyridine compounds (nicotinamide mononucleotide [NMN], nicotinamide riboside [NR] or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NAD]) that are essential for the growth of A. pleuropneumoniae. For the biofilm assay, strain 719, a field isolate of A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1, was mixed with swine isolates of Streptococcus suis, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli, and deposited in 96-well microtiter plates. Based on the CFU results, A. pleuropneumoniae was able to grow with every species tested in the absence of pyridine compounds in the culture media. Interestingly, A. pleuropneumoniae was also able to form strong biofilms when mixed with S. suis, B. bronchiseptica or S. aureus. In the presence of E. coli, A. pleuropneumoniae only formed a weak biofilm. The live and dead populations, and the matrix composition of multi-species biofilms were also characterized using fluorescent markers and enzyme treatments. The results indicated that poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine remains the primary component responsible for the biofilm structure. In conclusion, A. pleuropneumoniae apparently is able to satisfy the requirement of pyridine compounds through of other swine pathogens by

  14. Eliciting the mitochondrial unfolded protein response by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide repletion reverses fatty liver disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariani, Karim; Menzies, Keir J; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wegner, Casey J; Wang, Xu; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Moullan, Norman; Zhang, Hongbo; Perino, Alessia; Lemos, Vera; Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Young-Ki; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Pham, Tho X; Yang, Yue; Ku, Chai Siah; Koo, Sung I; Fomitchova, Anna; Cantó, Carlos; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A; Lee, Ji-Young; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-04-01

    With no approved pharmacological treatment, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease in Western countries and its worldwide prevalence continues to increase along with the growing obesity epidemic. Here, we show that a high-fat high-sucrose (HFHS) diet, eliciting chronic hepatosteatosis resembling human fatty liver, lowers hepatic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) ) levels driving reductions in hepatic mitochondrial content, function, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, in conjunction with robust increases in hepatic weight, lipid content, and peroxidation in C57BL/6J mice. To assess the effect of NAD(+) repletion on the development of steatosis in mice, nicotinamide riboside, a precursor of NAD(+) biosynthesis, was added to the HFHS diet, either as a preventive strategy or as a therapeutic intervention. We demonstrate that NR prevents and reverts NAFLD by inducing a sirtuin (SIRT)1- and SIRT3-dependent mitochondrial unfolded protein response, triggering an adaptive mitohormetic pathway to increase hepatic β-oxidation and mitochondrial complex content and activity. The cell-autonomous beneficial component of NR treatment was revealed in liver-specific Sirt1 knockout mice (Sirt1(hep-/-) ), whereas apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (Apoe(-/-) ) challenged with a high-fat high-cholesterol diet affirmed the use of NR in other independent models of NAFLD. Our data warrant the future evaluation of NAD(+) boosting strategies to manage the development or progression of NAFLD. © 2015 The Authors. Hepatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. n-Nucleotide circular codes in graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmel, Elena; Michel, Christian J; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-13

    The circular code theory proposes that genes are constituted of two trinucleotide codes: the classical genetic code with 61 trinucleotides for coding the 20 amino acids (except the three stop codons {TAA,TAG,TGA}) and a circular code based on 20 trinucleotides for retrieving, maintaining and synchronizing the reading frame. It relies on two main results: the identification of a maximal C(3) self-complementary trinucleotide circular code X in genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses (Michel 2015 J. Theor. Biol. 380, 156-177. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.04.009); Arquès & Michel 1996 J. Theor. Biol. 182, 45-58. (doi:10.1006/jtbi.1996.0142)) and the finding of X circular code motifs in tRNAs and rRNAs, in particular in the ribosome decoding centre (Michel 2012 Comput. Biol. Chem. 37, 24-37. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2011.10.002); El Soufi & Michel 2014 Comput. Biol. Chem. 52, 9-17. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2014.08.001)). The univerally conserved nucleotides A1492 and A1493 and the conserved nucleotide G530 are included in X circular code motifs. Recently, dinucleotide circular codes were also investigated (Michel & Pirillo 2013 ISRN Biomath. 2013, 538631. (doi:10.1155/2013/538631); Fimmel et al. 2015 J. Theor. Biol. 386, 159-165. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.08.034)). As the genetic motifs of different lengths are ubiquitous in genes and genomes, we introduce a new approach based on graph theory to study in full generality n-nucleotide circular codes X, i.e. of length 2 (dinucleotide), 3 (trinucleotide), 4 (tetranucleotide), etc. Indeed, we prove that an n-nucleotide code X is circular if and only if the corresponding graph [Formula: see text] is acyclic. Moreover, the maximal length of a path in [Formula: see text] corresponds to the window of nucleotides in a sequence for detecting the correct reading frame. Finally, the graph theory of tournaments is applied to the study of dinucleotide circular codes. It has full equivalence between the combinatorics

  16. Plasma Membrane Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Calcium Channels Control Land Plant Thermal Sensing and Acquired Thermotolerance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrija Finka; America Farinia Henriquez Cuendet; Frans J.M. Maathuis; Younousse Saidi; Pierre Goloubinoff

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we found that the cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel (CNGC) CNGCb gene from Physcomitrella patens and its Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog CNGC2, encode a component of cyclic nucleotide gated Ca²...

  17. Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella and methods for the detection of Brucella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCready, Paula M [Tracy, CA; Radnedge, Lyndsay [San Mateo, CA; Andersen, Gary L [Berkeley, CA; Ott, Linda L [Livermore, CA; Slezak, Thomas R [Livermore, CA; Kuczmarski, Thomas A [Livermore, CA

    2009-02-24

    Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium were identified. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  18. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-01

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  19. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in heart and vessels: A therapeutic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Pierre; Belacel-Ouari, Milia; Bedioune, Ibrahim; Zhang, Liang; Leroy, Jérôme; Leblais, Véronique; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) degrade the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), thereby regulating multiple aspects of cardiac and vascular muscle functions. This highly diverse class of enzymes encoded by 21 genes encompasses 11 families that are not only responsible for the termination of cyclic nucleotide signalling, but are also involved in the generation of dynamic microdomains of cAMP and cGMP, controlling specific cell functions in response to various neurohormonal stimuli. In the myocardium and vascular smooth muscle, the PDE3 and PDE4 families predominate, degrading cAMP and thereby regulating cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and smooth muscle contractile tone. PDE3 inhibitors are positive inotropes and vasodilators in humans, but their use is limited to acute heart failure and intermittent claudication. PDE5 is particularly important for the degradation of cGMP in vascular smooth muscle, and PDE5 inhibitors are used to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. There is experimental evidence that these PDEs, as well as other PDE families, including PDE1, PDE2 and PDE9, may play important roles in cardiac diseases, such as hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as several vascular diseases. After a brief presentation of the cyclic nucleotide pathways in cardiac and vascular cells, and the major characteristics of the PDE superfamily, this review will focus on the current use of PDE inhibitors in cardiovascular diseases, and the recent research developments that could lead to better exploitation of the therapeutic potential of these enzymes in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Patterns of nucleotides that flank substitutions in human orthologous genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhuoran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence context is an important aspect of base mutagenesis, and three-base periodicity is an intrinsic property of coding sequences. However, how three-base periodicity is influenced in the vicinity of substitutions is still unclear. The effect of context on mutagenesis should be revealed in the usage of nucleotides that flank substitutions. Relative entropy (also known as Kullback-Leibler divergence is useful for finding unusual patterns in biological sequences. Results Using relative entropy, we visualized the periodic patterns in the context of substitutions in human orthologous genes. Neighbouring patterns differed both among substitution categories and within a category that occurred at three codon positions. Transition tended to occur in periodic sequences relative to transversion. Periodic signals were stronger in a set of flanking sequences of substitutions that occurred at the third-codon positions than in those that occurred at the first- or second-codon positions. To determine how the three-base periodicity was affected near the substitution sites, we fitted a sine model to the values of the relative entropy. A sine of period equal to 3 is a good approximation for the three-base periodicity at sites not in close vicinity to some substitutions. These periods were interrupted near the substitution site and then reappeared away from substitutions. A comparative analysis between the native and codon-shuffled datasets suggested that the codon usage frequency was not the sole origin of the three-base periodicity, implying that the native order of codons also played an important role in this periodicity. Synonymous codon shuffling revealed that synonymous codon usage bias was one of the factors responsible for the observed three-base periodicity. Conclusions Our results offer an efficient way to illustrate unusual periodic patterns in the context of substitutions and provide further insight into the origin of three

  1. ATCG nucleotide fluctuation of Deinococcus radiodurans radiation genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Todd; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, C.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D. H.; Cheung, T. D.

    2007-09-01

    The radiation resistance-repair genes in Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) and E-coli were analyzed in terms of the A, T, C, G nucleotide fluctuations. The studied genes were Rec-A, Rec-Q, and the unique DR PprA gene. In an ATCG sequence, each base was assigned a number equal to its atomic number. The resulting numerical sequence was the basis of the statistical analysis. Fractal analysis using the Higuchi method gave a fractal dimension increase of the Deinococcus radiodurans genes as compared to E-coli, which is comparable to the enhancement observed in the human HAR1 region (HAR1F gene) over that of the chimpanzee. Near neighbor fluctuation was also studied via the Black-Scholes model where the increment sequence was treated as a random walk series. The Deinococcus radiodurans radiation gene standard deviations were consistently higher than that of the E-coli deviations, and agree with the fractal analysis results. The sequence stacking interaction was studied using the published nucleotide-pair melting free energy values and Deinococcus radiodurans radiation genes were shown to possess larger negative free energies. The high sensitivity of the fractal dimension as a biomarker was tested with correlation analysis of the gamma ray dose versus fractal dimension, and the R square values were found to be above 0.9 (N=5). When compared with other nucleotide sequences such as the rRNA sequences, HAR1 and its chimpanzee counterpart, the higher fluctuation (correlated randomness) and larger negative free energy of a DR radiation gene suggested that a radiation resistance-repair sequence exhibited higher complexity. As the HAR1 nucleotide sequence complexity and its transcription activity of co-expressing cortex protein reelin supported a positive selection event in humans, a similar inference of positive selection of coding genes could be drawn for Deinococcus radiodurans when compared to E-coli. The origin of such a positive selection would be consistent with that of a

  2. Degradation of Adenine on the Martian Surface in the Presence of Perchlorates and Ionizing Radiation: A Reflectron Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometric Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góbi, Sándor; Bergantini, Alexandre; Kaiser, Ralf I., E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to unravel the radiolytic decomposition of adenine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) under conditions relevant to the Martian surface. Being the fundamental building block of (deoxy)ribonucleic acids, the possibility of survival of this biomolecule on the Martian surface is of primary importance to the astrobiology community. Here, neat adenine and adenine–magnesium perchlorate mixtures were prepared and irradiated with energetic electrons that simulate the secondary electrons originating from the interaction of the galactic cosmic rays with the Martian surface. Perchlorates were added to the samples since they are abundant—and therefore relevant oxidizers on the surface of Mars—and they have been previously shown to facilitate the radiolysis of organics such as glycine. The degradation of the samples were monitored in situ via Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy and the electron ionization quadruple mass spectrometric method; temperature-programmed desorption profiles were then collected by means of the state-of-the-art single photon photoionization reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-ReTOF-MS), allowing for the detection of the species subliming from the sample. The results showed that perchlorates do increase the destruction rate of adenine by opening alternative reaction channels, including the concurrent radiolysis/oxidation of the sample. This new pathway provides a plethora of different radiolysis products that were identified for the first time. These are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), isocyanic acid (HNCO), isocyanate (OCN{sup −}), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen monoxide (NO); an oxidation product containing carbonyl groups (R{sub 1}R{sub 2}–C=O) with a constrained five-membered cyclic structure could also be observed. Cyanamide (H{sub 2}N–C≡N) was detected in both irradiated samples as well.

  3. New Dihydro OO′Bis(Salicylidene) 2,2′ Aminobenzothiazolyl Borate Complexes: Kinetic and Voltammetric Studies of Dimethyltin Copper Complex with Guanine, Adenine, and Calf Thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Farukh; Mohani, Bhawana; Parveen, Shamima

    2006-01-01

    The newly synthesized ligand, dihydro OO′bis(salicylidene) 2,2′ aminobenzothiazolyl borate (2), was derived from the reaction of Schiff base of 2-aminobenzothiazole and salicylaldehyde with KBH4. CuII (3) and ZnII (4) complexes of (2) were synthesized and further metallated with dimethyltindichloride to yield heterobimetallic complexes (5) and (6). All complexes have been thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, and IR, NMR, EPR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy and conductance measurements. The spectroscopic data support square planar environment around the CuII atom, while the SnIV atom acquires pentacoordinate geometry. The interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA was studied by spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and kinetic methods. The absorption spectra of complex (5) exhibit a remarkable “hyperchromic effect” in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA. Indicative of strong binding of the complex to calf thymus DNA preferentially binds through N7 position of guanine base, while the adenine shows binding to a lesser extent. The kinetic data were obtained from the rate constants, kobs, values under pseudo-first-order conditions. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to study the interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA. The CV of complex (5) in the absence and in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA altered drastically, with a positive shift in formal peak potential Epa and Epc values and a significant increase in peak current. The positive shift in formal potentials with increase in peak current favours strong interaction of complex (5) with calf thymus DNA. The net shift in E 1/2 has been used to estimate the ratio of equilibrium constants for the binding of Cu(II) and Cu(I) complexes to calf thymus DNA. PMID:17497007

  4. New Dihydro OO'Bis(Salicylidene) 2,2' Aminobenzothiazolyl Borate Complexes: Kinetic and Voltammetric Studies of Dimethyltin Copper Complex with Guanine, Adenine, and Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Farukh; Mohani, Bhawana; Parveen, Shamima

    2006-01-01

    The newly synthesized ligand, dihydro OO'bis(salicylidene) 2,2' aminobenzothiazolyl borate (2), was derived from the reaction of Schiff base of 2-aminobenzothiazole and salicylaldehyde with KBH(4). Cu(II) (3) and Zn(II) (4) complexes of (2) were synthesized and further metallated with dimethyltindichloride to yield heterobimetallic complexes (5) and (6). All complexes have been thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, and IR, NMR, EPR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy and conductance measurements. The spectroscopic data support square planar environment around the Cu(II) atom, while the Sn(IV) atom acquires pentacoordinate geometry. The interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA was studied by spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and kinetic methods. The absorption spectra of complex (5) exhibit a remarkable "hyperchromic effect" in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA. Indicative of strong binding of the complex to calf thymus DNA preferentially binds through N(7) position of guanine base, while the adenine shows binding to a lesser extent. The kinetic data were obtained from the rate constants, k(obs), values under pseudo-first-order conditions. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to study the interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA. The CV of complex (5) in the absence and in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA altered drastically, with a positive shift in formal peak potential E(pa) and E(pc) values and a significant increase in peak current. The positive shift in formal potentials with increase in peak current favours strong interaction of complex (5) with calf thymus DNA. The net shift in E(1/2) has been used to estimate the ratio of equilibrium constants for the binding of Cu(II) and Cu(I) complexes to calf thymus DNA.

  5. A possible prebiotic synthesis of purine, adenine, cytosine, and 4(3H)-pyrimidinone from formamide: implications for the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladino, R; Crestini, C; Costanzo, G; Negri, R; Di Mauro, E

    2001-05-01

    The synthesis of prebiotic molecules is a major problem in chemical evolution as well as in any origin-of-life theory. We report here a plausible new prebiotic synthesis of naturally occurring purine and pyrimidine derivatives from formamide under catalytic conditions. In the presence of CaCO(3) and different inorganic oxides, namely silica, alumine, kaolin, and zeolite (Y type), neat formamide undergoes the formation of purine, adenine, cytosine, and 4(3H)-pyrimidinone, from acceptable to good yields. The role of catalysts showed to be not limited to the improvement of the yield but it is also relevant in providing a high selectivity in the products distribution.

  6. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  7. Multi-nucleotide de novo Mutations in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Besenbacher

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutation of the DNA molecule is one of the most fundamental processes in biology. In this study, we use 283 parent-offspring trios to estimate the rate of mutation for both single nucleotide variants (SNVs and short length variants (indels in humans and examine the mutation process. We found 17812 SNVs, corresponding to a mutation rate of 1.29 × 10-8 per position per generation (PPPG and 1282 indels corresponding to a rate of 9.29 × 10-10 PPPG. We estimate that around 3% of human de novo SNVs are part of a multi-nucleotide mutation (MNM, with 558 (3.1% of mutations positioned less than 20kb from another mutation in the same individual (median distance of 525bp. The rate of de novo mutations is greater in late replicating regions (p = 8.29 × 10-19 and nearer recombination events (p = 0.0038 than elsewhere in the genome.

  8. Structure and function of nucleotide sugar transporters: Current progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hadley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The proteomes of eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea are highly diverse due, in part, to the complex post-translational modification of protein glycosylation. The diversity of glycosylation in eukaryotes is reliant on nucleotide sugar transporters to translocate specific nucleotide sugars that are synthesised in the cytosol and nucleus, into the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus where glycosylation reactions occur. Thirty years of research utilising multidisciplinary approaches has contributed to our current understanding of NST function and structure. In this review, the structure and function, with reference to various disease states, of several NSTs including the UDP-galactose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine, GDP-fucose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine/UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose and CMP-sialic acid transporters will be described. Little is known regarding the exact structure of NSTs due to difficulties associated with crystallising membrane proteins. To date, no three-dimensional structure of any NST has been elucidated. What is known is based on computer predictions, mutagenesis experiments, epitope-tagging studies, in-vitro assays and phylogenetic analysis. In this regard the best-characterised NST to date is the CMP-sialic acid transporter (CST. Therefore in this review we will provide the current state-of-play with respect to the structure–function relationship of the (CST. In particular we have summarised work performed by a number groups detailing the affect of various mutations on CST transport activity, efficiency, and substrate specificity.

  9. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis of Protamine Genes in Infertile Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamad Salamian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs are considered as one of the underlyingcauses of male infertility. Proper sperm chromatin packaging which involves replacement ofhistones with protamines has profound effect on male fertility. Over 20 SNPs have been reportedfor the protamine 1 and 2.Materials and Methods: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of two previouslyreported SNPs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP approach in 35, 96 and 177 normal, oligozoospermic and azoospermic individuals. TheseSNPs are: 1. A base pair substitution (G at position 197 instead of T in protamine type 1 Openreading frame (ORF including untranslated region, which causes an Arg residue change to Serresidue in a highly conserved region. 2. cytidine nucleotide change to thymidine in position of 248of protamine type 2 ORF which caused a nonsense point mutation.Results: The two mentioned SNPs were not present in the studied population, thus concluding thatthese SNPs can not serves as molecular markers for male infertility diagnosis.Conclusion: The results of our study reveal that in a selected Iranian population, the SNP G197Tand C248T are completely absent and are not associated with male infertility and therefore theseSNPs may not represent a molecular marker for genetic diagnosis of male infertility.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of European archaeological M. leprae DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Watson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy was common in Europe eight to twelve centuries ago but molecular confirmation of this has been lacking. We have extracted M. leprae ancient DNA (aDNA from medieval bones and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP typed the DNA, this provides insight into the pattern of leprosy transmission in Europe and may assist in the understanding of M. leprae evolution. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Skeletons have been exhumed from 3 European countries (the United Kingdom, Denmark and Croatia and are dated around the medieval period (476 to 1350 A.D.. we tested for the presence of 3 previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 10 aDNA extractions. M. leprae aDNA was extracted from 6 of the 10 bone samples. SNP analysis of these 6 extractions were compared to previously analysed European SNP data using the same PCR assays and were found to be the same. Testing for the presence of SNPs in M. leprae DNA extracted from ancient bone samples is a novel approach to analysing European M. leprae DNA and the findings concur with the previously published data that European M. leprae strains fall in to one group (SNP group 3. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the suggestion that the M. leprae genome is extremely stable and show that archaeological M. leprae DNA can be analysed to gain detailed information about the genotypic make-up of European leprosy, which may assist in the understanding of leprosy transmission worldwide.

  11. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  12. Detecting Single-Nucleotide Substitutions Induced by Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Chan, Amanda H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-08-01

    The detection of genome editing is critical in evaluating genome-editing tools or conditions, but it is not an easy task to detect genome-editing events-especially single-nucleotide substitutions-without a surrogate marker. Here we introduce a procedure that significantly contributes to the advancement of genome-editing technologies. It uses droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) and allele-specific hydrolysis probes to detect single-nucleotide substitutions generated by genome editing (via homology-directed repair, or HDR). HDR events that introduce substitutions using donor DNA are generally infrequent, even with genome-editing tools, and the outcome is only one base pair difference in 3 billion base pairs of the human genome. This task is particularly difficult in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, in which editing events can be very rare. Therefore, the technological advances described here have implications for therapeutic genome editing and experimental approaches to disease modeling with iPS cells. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Thoroughbred Horse Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Expression Database: HSDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Ho Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetics is important for breeding and selection of horses but there is a lack of well-established horse-related browsers or databases. In order to better understand horses, more variants and other integrated information are needed. Thus, we construct a horse genomic variants database including expression and other information. Horse Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Expression Database (HSDB (http://snugenome2.snu.ac.kr/HSDB provides the number of unexplored genomic variants still remaining to be identified in the horse genome including rare variants by using population genome sequences of eighteen horses and RNA-seq of four horses. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were confirmed by comparing them with SNP chip data and variants of RNA-seq, which showed a concordance level of 99.02% and 96.6%, respectively. Moreover, the database provides the genomic variants with their corresponding transcriptional profiles from the same individuals to help understand the functional aspects of these variants. The database will contribute to genetic improvement and breeding strategies of Thoroughbreds.

  14. Post-synthetic modification of mesoporous zinc-adeninate framework with tris(2,2′-biprydine) ruthenium(II) complex and its electrochemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun; Shin, Ik Soo [Dept. of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Hye Jae; An, Ji Hyun [Dept. of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Herein we report a redox-active metal-organic framework (MOF) via post-synthetic cation exchange with tris(2,2′-biprydine) ruthenium(II) complex (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}). A porous anionic zinc-adeninate framework (bMOF-100) is spacious enough to easily entrap 2.43 of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} cations within the mesopore. The encapsulation supported the framework structure preventing any distortion from a rapid solvent evaporation under SEM observation. Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}@bMOF-100 was then immobilized on the surface of glassy carbon electrode, and its electrocatalytic and electrochemiluminescent (ECL) properties were investigated in aqueous and organic solution. Especially, Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}@bMOF-100 showed the excellent electrochemical properties of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, but gradual decomposition of the MOF structure was observed under electrochemical measurements because of the sluggish oxidation of adeninate ligand.

  15. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation

    KAUST Repository

    Rose, Nicholas D.

    2015-12-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP+, respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  16. Excess-electron injection and transfer in terthiophene-modified DNA: terthiophene as a photosensitizing electron donor for thymine, cytosine, and adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man Jae; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro

    2012-02-13

    Excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has attracted wide attention owing to its close relation to DNA repair and nanowires. To clarify the dynamics of EET in DNA, a photosensitizing electron donor that can donate an excess electron to a variety of DNA sequences has to be developed. Herein, a terthiophene (3T) derivative was used as the photosensitizing electron donor. From the dyad systems in which 3T was connected to a single nucleobase, it was revealed that (1) 3T* donates an excess electron efficiently to thymine, cytosine, and adenine, despite adenine being a well-known hole conductor. The free-energy dependence of the electron-transfer rate was explained on the basis of the Marcus theory. From the DNA hairpins, it became clear that (1) 3T* can donate an excess electron not only to the adjacent nucleobase but also to the neighbor one nucleobase further along and so on. From the charge-injection rate, the possibilities of smaller β value and/or charge delocalization were discussed. In addition, EET through consecutive cytosine nucleobases was suggested. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Mechanisms of the Formation of Adenine, Guanine, and Their Analogues in UV-Irradiated Mixed NH3:H2O Molecular Ices Containing Purine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Stein, Tamar; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the formation mechanisms of the nucleobases adenine and guanine and the nucleobase analogues hypoxanthine, xanthine, isoguanine, and 2,6-diaminopurine in a UV-irradiated mixed 10:1 H2O:NH3 ice seeded with precursor purine by using ab initio and density functional theory computations. Our quantum chemical investigations suggest that a multistep reaction mechanism involving purine cation, hydroxyl and amino radicals, together with water and ammonia, explains the experimentally obtained products in an independent study. The relative abundances of these products appear to largely follow from relative thermodynamic stabilities. The key role of the purine cation is likely to be the reason why purine is not functionalized in pure ammonia ice, where cations are promptly neutralized by free electrons from NH3 ionization. Amine group addition to purine is slightly favored over hydroxyl group attachment based on energetics, but hydroxyl is much more abundant due to higher abundance of H2O. The amino group is preferentially attached to the 6 position, giving 6-aminopurine, that is, adenine, while the hydroxyl group is preferentially attached to the 2 position, leading to 2-hydroxypurine. A second substitution by hydroxyl or amino group occurs at either the 6 or the 2 position depending on the first substitution. Given that H2O is far more abundant than NH3 in the experimentally studied ices (as well as based on interstellar abundances), xanthine and isoguanine are expected to be the most abundant bi-substituted photoproducts.

  18. Cyclic nucleotides and production of prostanoids in human varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcova, S; Gloviczki, P; Rud, K S; Miller, V M

    1999-11-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the production of prostacyclin and thromboxane and the activation of cyclic nucleotides in human varicose and nonvaricose veins and to determine whether these second messenger pathways were differentially activated by the venotropic extract of Ruscus aculeatus. The experiments were designed to characterize the activity of cyclic nucleotides and the production of prostaglandins in human varicose and nonvaricose veins. Segments of the greater saphenous veins and the adjacent tributaries were obtained from patients who underwent vein stripping and excision of primary varicose veins. The saphenous veins from the patients who underwent peripheral arterial bypass grafting were used as controls. The segments of veins were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution in the presence of venotropic extract of Ruscus aculeatus (10(-3) g/mL) or in water-miscible organic solvent (dimethyl sulfoxide, 10(-3) g/mL), for 1, 5, and 10 minutes at 37 degrees C. The nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, 10(-4) g/mL) was used to block cyclic nucleotide degradation in some samples. Tissue and media samples were collected. Tissue concentrations of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP and cGMP, respectively) and media concentrations of 6-ketoprostaglandin-F(1)(alpha) (the stable metabolite of prostacyclin) and thromboxane B(2) (the stable metabolite of thromboxane A(2)) were measured by means of radioimmunoassay. Cyclooxygenase 2 was measured with Western blot analysis. The varicose veins showed greater levels of cAMP but not of cGMP at all time points as compared with the control veins. Prostanoid production was not significantly altered in the varicose veins. Stimulation with Ruscus aculeatus increased the cAMP concentration in the varicose veins but did not affect the cGMP levels. The ratio between 6-ketoprostaglandin-F(1)(alpha) and thromboxane B(2) was two-fold greater in

  19. Potato Virus Y HCPro Suppression of Antiviral Silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants Correlates with Its Ability To Bind In Vivo to 21- and 22-Nucleotide Small RNAs of Viral Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Francisco J; Donaire, Livia; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Chung, Bong-Nam; Tenllado, Francisco; Canto, Tomás

    2017-06-15

    We have investigated short and small RNAs (sRNAs) that were bound to a biologically active hexahistidine-tagged Potato virus Y (PVY) HCPro suppressor of silencing, expressed from a heterologous virus vector in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and purified under nondenaturing conditions. We found that RNAs in purified preparations were differentially enriched in 21-nucleotide (nt) and, to a much lesser extent, 22-nt sRNAs of viral sequences (viral sRNAs [vsRNAs]) compared to those found in a control plant protein background bound to nickel resin in the absence of HCPro or in a purified HCPro alanine substitution mutant (HCPro mutB) control that lacked suppressor-of-silencing activity. In both controls, sRNAs were composed almost entirely of molecules of plant sequence, indicating that the resin-bound protein background had no affinity for vsRNAs and also that HCPro mutB failed to bind to vsRNAs. Therefore, PVY HCPro suppressor activity correlated with its ability to bind to 21- and 22-nt vsRNAs. HCPro constituted at least 54% of the total protein content in purified preparations, and we were able to calculate its contribution to the 21- and the 22-nt pools of sRNAs present in the purified samples and its binding strength relative to the background. We also found that in the 21-nt vsRNAs of the HCPro preparation, 5'-terminal adenines were overrepresented relative to the controls, but this was not observed in vsRNAs of other sizes or of plant sequences.IMPORTANCE It was previously shown that HCPro can bind to long RNAs and small RNAs (sRNAs) in vitro and, in the case of Turnip mosaic virus HCPro, also in vivo in arabidopsis AGO2-deficient plants. Our data show that PVY HCPro binds in vivo to sRNAs during infection in wild-type Nicotiana benthamiana plants when expressed from a heterologous virus vector. Using a suppression-of-silencing-deficient HCPro mutant that can accumulate in this host when expressed from a virus vector, we also show that sRNA binding correlates

  20. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-11-02

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  1. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  2. Environmental heat stress, hyperammonemia and nucleotide metabolism during intermittent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Peter; Drust, Barry

    2006-01-01

    exercise with heat stress, the core and muscle temperatures peaked at 39.5±0.2 and 40.2±0.2°C to be ~ 1°C higher (P...Abstract  This study investigated the influence of environmental heat stress on ammonia (NH3) accumulation in relation to nucleotide metabolism and fatigue during intermittent exercise. Eight males performed 40 min of intermittent exercise (15 s at 306±22 W alternating with 15 s of unloaded cycling......) followed by five 15 s all-out sprints. Control trials were conducted in a 20°C environment while heat stress trials were performed at an ambient temperature of 40°C. Muscle biopsies and venous blood samples were obtained at rest, after 40 min of exercise and following the maximal sprints. Following...

  3. Single-nucleotide polymorphism identification and genotyping in Camelina sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravinder; Bollina, Venkatesh; Higgins, Erin E; Clarke, Wayne E; Eynck, Christina; Sidebottom, Christine; Gugel, Richard; Snowdon, Rod; Parkin, Isobel A P

    Camelina sativa, a largely relict crop, has recently returned to interest due to its potential as an industrial oilseed. Molecular markers are key tools that will allow C. sativa to benefit from modern breeding approaches. Two complementary methodologies, capture of 3' cDNA tags and genomic reduced-representation libraries, both of which exploited second generation sequencing platforms, were used to develop a low density (768) Illumina GoldenGate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The array allowed 533 SNP loci to be genetically mapped in a recombinant inbred population of C. sativa. Alignment of the SNP loci to the C. sativa genome identified the underlying sequenced regions that would delimit potential candidate genes in any mapping project. In addition, the SNP array was used to assess genetic variation among a collection of 175 accessions of C. sativa, identifying two sub-populations, yet low overall gene diversity. The SNP loci will provide useful tools for future crop improvement of C. sativa.

  4. Identification of repeats in DNA sequences using nucleotide distribution uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchuan

    2017-01-07

    Repetitive elements are important in genomic structures, functions and regulations, yet effective methods in precisely identifying repetitive elements in DNA sequences are not fully accessible, and the relationship between repetitive elements and periodicities of genomes is not clearly understood. We present an ab initio method to quantitatively detect repetitive elements and infer the consensus repeat pattern in repetitive elements. The method uses the measure of the distribution uniformity of nucleotides at periodic positions in DNA sequences or genomes. It can identify periodicities, consensus repeat patterns, copy numbers and perfect levels of repetitive elements. The results of using the method on different DNA sequences and genomes demonstrate efficacy and accuracy in identifying repeat patterns and periodicities. The complexity of the method is linear with respect to the lengths of the analyzed sequences. The Python programs in this study are freely available to the public upon request or at https://github.com/cyinbox/DNADU. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromatin Dynamics during Nucleotide Excision Repair: Histones on the Move

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie E. Polo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been a long-standing question how DNA damage repair proceeds in a nuclear environment where DNA is packaged into chromatin. Several decades of analysis combining in vitro and in vivo studies in various model organisms ranging from yeast to human have markedly increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chromatin disorganization upon damage detection and re-assembly after repair. Here, we review the methods that have been developed over the years to delineate chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage by focusing on the well-characterized Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER pathway. We also highlight how these methods have provided key mechanistic insight into histone dynamics coupled to repair in mammals, raising new issues about the maintenance of chromatin integrity. In particular, we discuss how NER factors and central players in chromatin dynamics such as histone modifiers, nucleosome remodeling factors, and histone chaperones function to mobilize histones during repair.

  6. Telomerase-inhibitory effects of sugar-modified nucleotide analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinmei, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hazuki; Amano, Rie; Suzuki, Kaori; Saneyoshi, Mineo; Yamaguchi, Toyofumi

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is an endogenous reverse transcriptase that uses its internal RNA moiety as a template for the synthesis of telomere repeats, thus maintaining telomere length. To study the susceptibility of telomerase to sugar-modified nucleotide analogs, inhibition by arabinofuranosylguanine 5'-triphosphate (araGTP), 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (AZdGTP), 2',3'-dideoxy-2'-fluoroarabino-furanosylguanine 5'-triphosphate (FaraGTP), and their thymine counterparts was investigated. Among these compounds, all dGTP analogs showed potent inhibitory activity against human telomerase. Conversely, dTTP analogs showed moderate or weak inhibition. Partially purified telomerase from cherry salmon testis utilized ddGTP and AZdGTP as substrates into the 3'-terminus of DNA.

  7. Molecular karyotype single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of early fetal demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Liu, Yan; He, Nan-nan; Hu, Lin-li; Zhang, Yi-le; Wang, Yang; Dong, Fang-li; Guo, Yi-hong; Su, Ying-chun; Sun, Ying-pu

    2013-08-01

    We explored the application of single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP array) in molecular karyotype analysis for early spontaneous abortion detection in assisted reproductive technology (ART). SNP array was performed in 81 cases. Of the 81 cases, 16 experienced natural conception (NC) and 65 were pregnant by ART. Of the 65 cases, 4 underwent artificial insemination (AI), 32 fresh in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET), 9 fresh intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and 20 thawed embryo transfer. In the 81 cases examined 69.1% displayed an abnormal molecular karyotype. In the subjects greater than 35 years of age, the abnormal molecular karyotype rate was 87.5% higher compared to 61.4% in younger individuals (P abnormal molecular karyotype rate or type between ART (64.6%) and NC (87.5%). Compared with traditional cytogenetic diagnosis, the SNP array can identify a greater number of abnormal karyotypes.

  8. Pinched flow fractionation devices for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A.V.; Poulsen, L.; Birgens, H.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a new and flexible micro fluidic based method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs). The method relies on size separation of selectively hybridized polystyrene microspheres in a micro fluidic pinched flow fractionation (PFF) device. The micro fluidic PFF devices...... and 5.6 mu m were functionalized with biotin-labeled oligonucleotides for the detection of a mutant (Mt) or wild-type (Wt) DNA sequence in the HBB gene, respectively. Hybridization to functionalized beads was performed with fluorescent targets comprising synthetic DNA oligonucleotides or amplified RNA......, synthesized using human DNA samples from individuals with point mutations in the HBB gene. Following a stringent wash, the beads were separated in a PFF device and the fluorescent signal from the beads was analyzed. Patients being wildtypes, heterozygotes or mutated respectively for the investigated mutation...

  9. Glucose inhibits cardiac muscle maturation through nucleotide biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Haruko; Minami, Itsunari; Braas, Daniel; Pappoe, Herman; Wu, Xiuju; Sagadevan, Addelynn; Vergnes, Laurent; Fu, Kai; Morselli, Marco; Dunham, Christopher; Ding, Xueqin; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K; Pellegrini, Matteo; Clark, Peter M; Reue, Karen; Lusis, Aldons J; Ribalet, Bernard; Kurdistani, Siavash K; Christofk, Heather; Nakatsuji, Norio

    2017-01-01

    The heart switches its energy substrate from glucose to fatty acids at birth, and maternal hyperglycemia is associated with congenital heart disease. However, little is known about how blood glucose impacts heart formation. Using a chemically defined human pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocyte differentiation system, we found that high glucose inhibits the maturation of cardiomyocytes at genetic, structural, metabolic, electrophysiological, and biomechanical levels by promoting nucleotide biosynthesis through the pentose phosphate pathway. Blood glucose level in embryos is stable in utero during normal pregnancy, but glucose uptake by fetal cardiac tissue is drastically reduced in late gestational stages. In a murine model of diabetic pregnancy, fetal hearts showed cardiomyopathy with increased mitotic activity and decreased maturity. These data suggest that high glucose suppresses cardiac maturation, providing a possible mechanistic basis for congenital heart disease in diabetic pregnancy. PMID:29231167

  10. Rates of nucleotide substitution in sexual and anciently asexual rotifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, David B. Mark; Meselson, Matthew S.

    2001-01-01

    The class Bdelloidea of the phylum Rotifera is the largest well studied eukaryotic taxon in which males and meiosis are unknown, and the only one for which these indications of ancient asexuality are supported by cytological and molecular genetic evidence. We estimated the rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions in the hsp82 heat shock gene in bdelloids and in facultatively sexual rotifers of the class Monogononta, employing distance based and maximum likelihood methods. Relative-rate tests, using acanthocephalan rotifers as an outgroup, showed slightly higher rates of nonsynonymous substitution and slightly lower rates of synonymous substitution in bdelloids as compared with monogononts. The opposite trend, however, was seen in intraclass pairwise comparisons. If, as it seems, bdelloids have evolved asexually, an equality of bdelloid and monogonont substitution rates would suggest that the maintenance of sexual reproduction in monogononts is not attributable to an effect of sexual reproduction in limiting the load of deleterious nucleotide substitutions. PMID:11381112

  11. Chromatin Dynamics during Nucleotide Excision Repair: Histones on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E.

    2012-01-01

    It has been a long-standing question how DNA damage repair proceeds in a nuclear environment where DNA is packaged into chromatin. Several decades of analysis combining in vitro and in vivo studies in various model organisms ranging from yeast to human have markedly increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chromatin disorganization upon damage detection and re-assembly after repair. Here, we review the methods that have been developed over the years to delineate chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage by focusing on the well-characterized Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) pathway. We also highlight how these methods have provided key mechanistic insight into histone dynamics coupled to repair in mammals, raising new issues about the maintenance of chromatin integrity. In particular, we discuss how NER factors and central players in chromatin dynamics such as histone modifiers, nucleosome remodeling factors, and histone chaperones function to mobilize histones during repair. PMID:23109890

  12. A model for the evolution of nucleotide polymerase directionality.

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    Joshua Ballanco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In all known living organisms, every enzyme that synthesizes nucleic acid polymers does so by adding nucleotide 5′-triphosphates to the 3′-hydroxyl group of the growing chain. This results in the well known 5'→3' directionality of all DNA and RNA Polymerases. The lack of any alternative mechanism, e.g. addition in a 3'→5' direction, may indicate a very early founder effect in the evolution of life, or it may be the result of a selective pressure against such an alternative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an attempt to determine whether the lack of an alternative polymerase directionality is the result of a founder effect or evolutionary selection, we have constructed a basic model of early polymerase evolution. This model is informed by the essential chemical properties of the nucleotide polymerization reaction. With this model, we are able to simulate the growth of organisms with polymerases that synthesize either 5'→3' or 3'→5' in isolation or in competition with each other. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have found that a competition between organisms with 5'→3' polymerases and 3'→5' polymerases only results in a evolutionarily stable strategy under certain conditions. Furthermore, we have found that mutations lead to a much clearer delineation between conditions that lead to a stable coexistence of these populations and conditions which ultimately lead to success for the 5'→3' form. In addition to presenting a plausible explanation for the uniqueness of enzymatic polymerization reactions, we hope these results also provide an example of how whole organism evolution can be understood based on molecular details.

  13. ENGINES: exploring single nucleotide variation in entire human genomes

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    Salas Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation ultra-sequencing technologies are starting to produce extensive quantities of data from entire human genome or exome sequences, and therefore new software is needed to present and analyse this vast amount of information. The 1000 Genomes project has recently released raw data for 629 complete genomes representing several human populations through their Phase I interim analysis and, although there are certain public tools available that allow exploration of these genomes, to date there is no tool that permits comprehensive population analysis of the variation catalogued by such data. Description We have developed a genetic variant site explorer able to retrieve data for Single Nucleotide Variation (SNVs, population by population, from entire genomes without compromising future scalability and agility. ENGINES (ENtire Genome INterface for Exploring SNVs uses data from the 1000 Genomes Phase I to demonstrate its capacity to handle large amounts of genetic variation (>7.3 billion genotypes and 28 million SNVs, as well as deriving summary statistics of interest for medical and population genetics applications. The whole dataset is pre-processed and summarized into a data mart accessible through a web interface. The query system allows the combination and comparison of each available population sample, while searching by rs-number list, chromosome region, or genes of interest. Frequency and FST filters are available to further refine queries, while results can be visually compared with other large-scale Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP repositories such as HapMap or Perlegen. Conclusions ENGINES is capable of accessing large-scale variation data repositories in a fast and comprehensive manner. It allows quick browsing of whole genome variation, while providing statistical information for each variant site such as allele frequency, heterozygosity or FST values for genetic differentiation. Access to the data mart

  14. G-BLASTN: accelerating nucleotide alignment by graphics processors.

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    Zhao, Kaiyong; Chu, Xiaowen

    2014-05-15

    Since 1990, the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) has become one of the most popular and fundamental bioinformatics tools for sequence similarity searching, receiving extensive attention from the research community. The two pioneering papers on BLAST have received over 96 000 citations. Given the huge population of BLAST users and the increasing size of sequence databases, an urgent topic of study is how to improve the speed. Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely used as low-cost, high-performance computing platforms. The existing GPU-BLAST is a promising software tool that uses a GPU to accelerate protein sequence alignment. Unfortunately, there is still no GPU-accelerated software tool for BLAST-based nucleotide sequence alignment. We developed G-BLASTN, a GPU-accelerated nucleotide alignment tool based on the widely used NCBI-BLAST. G-BLASTN can produce exactly the same results as NCBI-BLAST, and it has very similar user commands. Compared with the sequential NCBI-BLAST, G-BLASTN can achieve an overall speedup of 14.80X under 'megablast' mode. More impressively, it achieves an overall speedup of 7.15X over the multithreaded NCBI-BLAST running on 4 CPU cores. When running under 'blastn' mode, the overall speedups are 4.32X (against 1-core) and 1.56X (against 4-core). G-BLASTN also supports a pipeline mode that further improves the overall performance by up to 44% when handling a batch of queries as a whole. Currently G-BLASTN is best optimized for databases with long sequences. We plan to optimize its performance on short database sequences in our future work. http://www.comp.hkbu.edu.hk/∼chxw/software/G-BLASTN.html chxw@comp.hkbu.edu.hk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. High pressure {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy on guanine nucleotides

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    Spoerner, Michael; Karl, Matthias; Lopes, Pedro; Hoering, Marcus; Loeffel, Karoline; Nuehs, Andrea; Adelsberger, Joseph; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert, E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@ur.de [University of Regensburg, Centre of Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry and Biomedicine, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    The {sup 31}P NMR pressure response of guanine nucleotides bound to proteins has been studied in the past for characterizing the pressure perturbation of conformational equilibria. The pressure response of the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shifts of the phosphate groups of GMP, GDP, and GTP as well as the commonly used GTP analogs GppNHp, GppCH{sub 2}p and GTPγS was measured in the absence and presence of Mg{sup 2+}-ions within a pressure range up to 200 MPa. The pressure dependence of chemical shifts is clearly non-linear. For all nucleotides a negative first order pressure coefficient B{sub 1} was determined indicating an upfield shift of the resonances with pressure. With exception of the α-phosphate group of Mg{sup 2+}·GMP and Mg{sup 2+}·GppNHp the second order pressure coefficients are positive. To describe the data of Mg{sup 2+}·GppCH{sub 2}p and GTPγS a Taylor expansion of 3rd order is required. For distinguishing pH effects from pressure effects a complete pH titration set is presented for GMP, as well as GDP and GTP in absence and presence of Mg{sup 2+} ions using indirect referencing to DSS under identical experimental conditions. By a comparison between high pressure {sup 31}P NMR data on free Mg{sup 2+}-GDP and Mg{sup 2+}-GDP in complex with the proto-oncogene Ras we demonstrate that pressure induced changes in chemical shift are clearly different between both forms.

  16. Characterization of a nucleotide kinase encoded by bacteriophage T7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Q; Tabor, Stanley; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W; Richardson, Charles C

    2012-08-24

    Gene 1.7 protein is the only known nucleotide kinase encoded by bacteriophage T7. The enzyme phosphorylates dTMP and dGMP to dTDP and dGDP, respectively, in the presence of a phosphate donor. The phosphate donors are dTTP, dGTP, and ribo-GTP as well as the thymidine and guanosine triphosphate analogs ddTTP, ddGTP, and dITP. The nucleotide kinase is found in solution as a 256-kDa complex consisting of ~12 monomers of the gene 1.7 protein. The two molecular weight forms co-purify as a complex, but each form has nearly identical kinase activity. Although gene 1.7 protein does not require a metal ion for its kinase activity, the presence of Mg(2+) in the reaction mixture results in either inhibition or stimulation of the rate of kinase reactions depending on the substrates used. Both the dTMP and dGMP kinase reactions are reversible. Neither dTDP nor dGDP is a phosphate acceptor of nucleoside triphosphate donors. Gene 1.7 protein exhibits two different equilibrium patterns toward deoxyguanosine and thymidine substrates. The K(m) of 4.4 × 10(-4) M obtained with dTTP for dTMP kinase is ~3-fold higher than that obtained with dGTP for dGMP kinase (1.3 × 10(-4) M), indicating that a higher concentration of dTTP is required to saturate the enzyme. Inhibition studies indicate a competitive relationship between dGDP and both dGTP, dGMP, whereas dTDP appears to have a mixed type of inhibition of dTMP kinase. Studies suggest two functions of dTTP, as a phosphate donor and a positive effector of the dTMP kinase reaction.

  17. Characterization of a Nucleotide Kinase Encoded by Bacteriophage T7*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Q.; Tabor, Stanley; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J.; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    Gene 1.7 protein is the only known nucleotide kinase encoded by bacteriophage T7. The enzyme phosphorylates dTMP and dGMP to dTDP and dGDP, respectively, in the presence of a phosphate donor. The phosphate donors are dTTP, dGTP, and ribo-GTP as well as the thymidine and guanosine triphosphate analogs ddTTP, ddGTP, and dITP. The nucleotide kinase is found in solution as a 256-kDa complex consisting of ∼12 monomers of the gene 1.7 protein. The two molecular weight forms co-purify as a complex, but each form has nearly identical kinase activity. Although gene 1.7 protein does not require a metal ion for its kinase activity, the presence of Mg2+ in the reaction mixture results in either inhibition or stimulation of the rate of kinase reactions depending on the substrates used. Both the dTMP and dGMP kinase reactions are reversible. Neither dTDP nor dGDP is a phosphate acceptor of nucleoside triphosphate donors. Gene 1.7 protein exhibits two different equilibrium patterns toward deoxyguanosine and thymidine substrates. The Km of 4.4 × 10−4 m obtained with dTTP for dTMP kinase is ∼3-fold higher than that obtained with dGTP for dGMP kinase (1.3 × 10−4 m), indicating that a higher concentration of dTTP is required to saturate the enzyme. Inhibition studies indicate a competitive relationship between dGDP and both dGTP, dGMP, whereas dTDP appears to have a mixed type of inhibition of dTMP kinase. Studies suggest two functions of dTTP, as a phosphate donor and a positive effector of the dTMP kinase reaction. PMID:22761426

  18. Time- and anion-dependent stimulation on triphosphopyridine nucleotide followed by antioxidant responses in Vibrio fischeri after exposure to 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, ZhenYang; Mo, LingYun; Zhang, Jing; Liu, ShuShen

    2016-11-01

    A toxicity database of over 157 ionic liquids (ILs) was established on Vibrio fischeri (VF). The database contained mainly monotonic concentration-response relationship, and its application in risk assessment was challenged by potential non-monotonic hormetic effects of ILs. In the present study, the hormetic effects of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium salts ([emim]X, X = BF4, Cl and Br) were confirmed on VF, and biochemical explanations were explored in a time-dependent manner. On luminescence, [emim]BF4 showed inhibitory effects compared with the control, and the median effective concentration (EC50) increased from 3.15E-02 to 8.88E-02 mol/L from 0.25 to 24 h. Notably, [emim]BF4 also showed stimulatory effects at 18 h when the maximum stimulation (Emin) was 51.8% higher than the control, and at 24 h when the Emin increased to 120% higher than the control. Compared with [emim]BF4, [emim]Cl had higher EC50 values which increased over time, while it had less maximum stimulation which also increased over time. In results of [emim]Br, there were only inhibitory effects. At the biochemical level, the stimulatory effects of [emim]BF4 and [emim]Cl on triphosphopyridine nucleotide (NADPH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) were earlier than those on luminescence. Moreover, NAD(P)H showed stimulation in [emim]Br which did not have hormetic effects on luminescence. Meanwhile, the effects of [emim]X on flavin mononucleotide, adenosine-triphosphate, reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidases showed consistent time-dependent changes with those on luminescence. The results indicated different roles between NAD(P)H and other biochemical indices, e.g., the antioxidant responses, in the stimulation of [emim]X on luminescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A functional single nucleotide polymorphism at the promoter region of cyclin A2 is associated with increased risk of colon, liver, and lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk-Hwan; Park, Seong-Eun; Kim, Minseung; Ji, Yong Ick; Kang, Mi Yeon; Jung, Eun Hyun; Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Kim, Sung; Shim, Young Mog; Park, Joobae

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this was to identify functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins that are associated with risk of human cancer. First, 45 SNPs in CDKs and cyclins were analyzed in 106 lung cancers and 108 controls for a pilot study. One SNP (reference SNP [rs] 769236, +1 guanine to adenine [G→A]) at the promoter region of cyclin A2 (CCNA2) also was analyzed in 1989 cancers (300 breast cancers, 450 colorectal cancers, 450 gastric cancers, 367 hepatocellular carcinomas, and 422 lung cancers) and in 1096 controls. Genotyping was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Transcriptional activity of the SNP according to the cell cycle was analyzed by using a luciferase reporter assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis in NIH3T3 cells. In the pilot study, the SNP (rs769236) was associated significantly with the risk of lung cancer. In the expanded study, multivariate logistic regression indicated that the AA homozygous variant of the SNP was associated significantly with the development of lung cancer (P hepatocellular carcinoma (P = .02) but not with breast cancer or gastric cancer. The luciferase activity of a 300-base pair construct that contained the A allele was 1.5-fold greater than the activity of a construct with the G allele in NIH3T3 cells. The high luciferase activity of constructs that contained the A allele did not change with cell cycle progression. The current results suggested that an SNP (rs769236) at the promoter of CCNA2 may be associated significantly with increased risk of colon, liver, and lung cancers. Cancer 2011 © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  20. Dietary Nucleotides Supplementation and Liver Injury in Alcohol-Treated Rats: A Metabolomics Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaxia; Bao, Lei; Wang, Nan; Xu, Meihong; Mao, Ruixue; Li, Yong

    2016-03-31

    Previous studies suggested that nucleotides were beneficial for liver function, lipid metabolism and so on. The present study aimed to investigate the metabolic response of dietary nucleotides supplementation in alcohol-induced liver injury rats. Five groups of male Wistar rats were used: normal control group (basal diet, equivalent distilled water), alcohol control group (basal diet, 50% alcohol (v/v)), dextrose control group (basal diet, isocaloric amount of dextrose), and 0.04% and 0.16% nucleotides groups (basal diet supplemented with 0.4 g and 1.6 g nucleotides kg(-1) respectively, 50% alcohol (v/v)). The liver injury was measured through traditional liver enzymes, expression of oxidative stress markers and histopathological examination. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-time-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was applied to identify liver metabolite profiles. Nucleotides supplementation prevented the progression of hepatocyte steatosis. The levels of total proteins, globulin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol triglyceride, as well as the oxidative stress markers altered by alcohol, were improved by nucleotides supplementation. Elevated levels of liver bile acids (glycocholic acid, chenodeoxyglycocholic acid, and taurodeoxycholic acid), as well as lipids (stearic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, phosphatidylcholine, and lysophosphatidylethanolamine) in alcohol-treated rats were reversed by nucleotides supplementation. In addition, supplementation with nucleotides could increase the levels of amino acids, including valyl-Leucine, L-leucine, alanyl-leucine and L-phenylalanine. These data indicate potential biomarkers and confirm the benefit of dietary nucleotides on alcoholic liver injury.

  1. SNEP: Simultaneous detection of nucleotide and expression polymorphisms using Affymetrix GeneChip

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    Takada Toyoyuki

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are useful tools for studying biodiversity, because they can be used to investigate both nucleotide and expression polymorphisms. However, when different strains (or species produce different signal intensities after mRNA hybridization, it is not easy to determine whether the signal intensities were affected by nucleotide or expression polymorphisms. To overcome this difficulty, nucleotide and expression polymorphisms are currently examined separately. Results We have developed SNEP, a new method that allows simultaneous detection of both nucleotide and expression polymorphisms. SNEP involves a robust statistical procedure based on the idea that a nucleotide polymorphism observed at the probe level can be regarded as an outlier, because the nucleotide polymorphism can reduce the hybridization signal intensity. To investigate the performance of SNEP, we used three species: barley, rice and mice. In addition to the publicly available barley data, we obtained new rice and mouse data from the strains with available genome sequences. The sensitivity and false positive rate of nucleotide polymorphism detection were estimated based on the sequence information. The robustness of expression polymorphism detection against nucleotide polymorphisms was also investigated. Conclusion SNEP performed well regardless of the genome size and showed a better performance for nucleotide polymorphism detection, when compared with other previously proposed methods. The R-software 'SNEP' is available at http://www.ism.ac.jp/~fujisawa/SNEP/.

  2. DNA methylation is associated with an increased level of conservation at nondegenerate nucleotides in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Trees-Juen; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2014-02-01

    DNA methylation at CpG dinucleotides can significantly increase the rate of cytosine-to-thymine mutations and the level of sequence divergence. Although the correlations between DNA methylation and genomic sequence evolution have been widely studied, an unaddressed yet fundamental question is how DNA methylation is associated with the conservation of individual nucleotides in different sequence contexts. Here, we demonstrate that in mammalian exons, the correlations between DNA methylation and the conservation of individual nucleotides are dependent on the type of exonic sequence (coding or untranslated), the degeneracy of coding nucleotides, background selection pressure, and the relative position (first or nonfirst exon in the transcript) where the nucleotides are located. For untranslated and nonzero-fold degenerate nucleotides, methylated sites are less conserved than unmethylated sites regardless of background selection pressure and the relative position of the exon. For zero-fold degenerate (or nondegenerate) nucleotides, however, the reverse trend is observed in nonfirst coding exons and first coding exons that are under stringent background selection pressure. Furthermore, cytosine-to-thymine mutations at methylated zero-fold degenerate nucleotides are predicted to be more detrimental than those that occur at unmethylated nucleotides. As zero-fold and nonzero-fold degenerate nucleotides are very close to each other, our results suggest that the "functional resolution" of DNA methylation may be finer than previously recognized. In addition, the positive correlation between CpG methylation and the level of conservation at zero-fold degenerate nucleotides implies that CpG methylation may serve as an "indicator" of functional importance of these nucleotides.

  3. Relative Stability of the La and Lb Excited States in Adenine and Guanine: Direct Evidence from TD-DFT Calculations of MCD Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Fabrizio; Improta, Roberto; Fahleson, Tobias; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-06-05

    The relative position of La and Lb ππ* electronic states in purine nucleobases is a much debated topic, since it can strongly affect our understanding of their photoexcited dynamics. To assess this point, we calculated the absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of adenine, guanine, and their nucleosides in gas-phase and aqueous solution, exploiting recent developments in MCD computational technology within time-dependent density functional theory. MCD spectroscopy allows us to resolve the intense S0→ La transition from the weak S0→ Lb transition. The spectra obtained in water solution, by using B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP functionals and describing solvent effect by cluster models and by the polarizable continuum model (PCM), are in very good agreement with the experimental counterparts, thus providing direct and unambiguous evidence that the energy ordering predicted by TD-DFT, La < Lb, is the correct one.

  4. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

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    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  5. Base Sequence Context Effects on Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuqin; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity of the genome when damaged by bulky DNA lesions, since inefficient repair can cause mutations and human diseases notably cancer. The structural properties of DNA lesions that determine their relative susceptibilities to NER are therefore of great interest. As a model system, we have investigated the major mutagenic lesion derived from the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N2-dG in six different sequence contexts that differ in how the lesion is positioned in relation to nearby guanine amino groups. We have obtained molecular structural data by NMR and MD simulations, bending properties from gel electrophoresis studies, and NER data obtained from human HeLa cell extracts for our six investigated sequence contexts. This model system suggests that disturbed Watson-Crick base pairing is a better recognition signal than a flexible bend, and that these can act in concert to provide an enhanced signal. Steric hinderance between the minor groove-aligned lesion and nearby guanine amino groups determines the exact nature of the disturbances. Both nearest neighbor and more distant neighbor sequence contexts have an impact. Regardless of the exact distortions, we hypothesize that they provide a local thermodynamic destabilization signal for repair. PMID:20871811

  6. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-27

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X3, an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp.

  7. Environmental heat stress, hyperammonemia and nucleotide metabolism during intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Peter; Drust, Barry; Nielsen, Bodil; Nybo, Lars

    2006-05-01

    This study investigated the influence of environmental heat stress on ammonia (NH3) accumulation in relation to nucleotide metabolism and fatigue during intermittent exercise. Eight males performed 40 min of intermittent exercise (15 s at 306+/-22 W alternating with 15 s of unloaded cycling) followed by five 15 s all-out sprints. Control trials were conducted in a 20 degrees C environment while heat stress trials were performed at an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C. Muscle biopsies and venous blood samples were obtained at rest, after 40 min of exercise and following the maximal sprints. Following exercise with heat stress, the core and muscle temperatures peaked at 39.5+/-0.2 and 40.2+/-0.2 degrees C to be approximately 1 degrees C higher (Pheat stress trial (PNH3 increased from 31+/-2 microM at rest to 93+/-6 at 40 min and 151+/-15 microM after the maximal sprints to be 34% higher than control (Pheat stress compared to control, while muscle glycogen, CP, ATP and IMP levels were similar across trials. In conclusion, altered levels of "classical peripheral fatiguing agents" does apparently not explain the reduced capacity for performing repeated sprints following intermittent exercise in the heat, whereas the augmented systemic NH3 response may be a factor influencing fatigue during exercise with superimposed heat stress.

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with abnormal coronary microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Satoshi; Cilluffo, Rebecca; Best, Patricia J M; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Aoki, Tatsuo; Cunningham, Julie M; de Andrade, Mariza; Choi, Byoung-Joo; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2014-06-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation. Although microvascular pathology is associated with cardiovascular events, genetic phenotypes causing microvascular disease remain largely unknown. This study identifies sex-specific SNPs associated with coronary microvascular dysfunction. Six hundred and forty-three patients without significant obstructive coronary heart disease were enrolled, referred for cardiac catheterization, and underwent invasive coronary microcirculatory assessment. Patient data were collected from 1529 autosomal SNPs and seven X chromosome SNPs, which were selected to represent the variability from 76 candidate genes with published associations with coronary vasoreactivity, angiogenesis, inflammation, vascular calcification, atherosclerosis risk factors, female hormones, blood coagulation, or coronary heart disease. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was assessed by an intracoronary injection of adenosine. Patients were categorized according to a CFR above or below 2.5 and were stratified by sex.After adjusting for age, sex, and BMI, this study shows that SNPs within VEGFA and CDKN2B-AS1 are associated with abnormal CFR (Pcoronary microvascular dysfunction. Furthermore, sex-specific allelic variants within MYH15, VEGFA, and NT5E are associated with an increased risk of coronary microvascular dysfunction in men.

  9. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Identification, Characterization, and Linkage Mapping in Quinoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Maughan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quinoa ( Willd. is an important seed crop throughout the Andean region of South America. It is important as a regional food security crop for millions of impoverished rural inhabitants of the Andean Altiplano (high plains. Efforts to improve the crop have led to an increased focus on genetic research. We report the identification of 14,178 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs using a genomic reduction protocol as well as the development of 511 functional SNP assays. The SNP assays are based on KASPar genotyping chemistry and were detected using the Fluidigm dynamic array platform. A diversity screen of 113 quinoa accessions showed that the minor allele frequency (MAF of the SNPs ranged from 0.02 to 0.50, with an average MAF of 0.28. Structure analysis of the quinoa diversity panel uncovered the two major subgroups corresponding to the Andean and coastal quinoa ecotypes. Linkage mapping of the SNPs in two recombinant inbred line populations produced an integrated linkage map consisting of 29 linkage groups with 20 large linkage groups, spanning 1404 cM with a marker density of 3.1 cM per SNP marker. The SNPs identified here represent important genomic tools needed in emerging plant breeding programs for advanced genetic analysis of agronomic traits in quinoa.

  10. Implication of Posttranslational Histone Modifications in Nucleotide Excision Repair

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    Shisheng Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Histones are highly alkaline proteins that package and order the DNA into chromatin in eukaryotic cells. Nucleotide excision repair (NER is a conserved multistep reaction that removes a wide range of generally bulky and/or helix-distorting DNA lesions. Although the core biochemical mechanism of NER is relatively well known, how cells detect and repair lesions in diverse chromatin environments is still under intensive research. As with all DNA-related processes, the NER machinery must deal with the presence of organized chromatin and the physical obstacles it presents. A huge catalogue of posttranslational histone modifications has been documented. Although a comprehensive understanding of most of these modifications is still lacking, they are believed to be important regulatory elements for many biological processes, including DNA replication and repair, transcription and cell cycle control. Some of these modifications, including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 or the histone H2A variant H2AX, have been found to be implicated in different stages of the NER process. This review will summarize our recent understanding in this area.

  11. Fluorogenic Labeling of 5-Formylpyrimidine Nucleotides in DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Biswajit; Seikowski, Jan; Höbartner, Claudia

    2016-01-26

    5-Formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-formyluracil (5fU) are natural nucleobase modifications that are generated by oxidative modification of 5-methylcytosine and thymine (or 5-methyluracil). Herein, we describe chemoselective labeling of 5-formylpyrimidine nucleotides in DNA and RNA by fluorogenic aldol-type condensation reactions with 2,3,3-trimethylindole derivatives. Mild and specific reaction conditions were developed for 5fU and 5fC to produce hemicyanine-like chromophores with distinct photophysical properties. Residue-specific detection was established by fluorescence readout as well as primer-extension assays. The reactions were optimized on DNA oligonucleotides and were equally suitable for the modification of 5fU- and 5fC-modified RNA. This direct labeling approach of 5-formylpyrimidines is expected to help in elucidating the occurrence, enzymatic transformations, and functional roles of these epigenetic/epitranscriptomic nucleobase modifications in DNA and RNA. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of myostatin gene in Chinese domestic horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Liu, Dong-Hua; Cao, Chun-Na; Wang, Shao-Qiang; Dang, Rui-Hua; Lan, Xian-Yong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Wu-Jun; Lei, Chu-Zhao

    2014-03-15

    The myostatin gene (MSTN) is a genetic determinant of skeletal muscle growth. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in MSTN are of importance due to their strong associations with horse racing performances. In this study, we screened the SNPs in MSTN gene in 514 horses from 15 Chinese horse breeds. Six SNPs (g.26T>C, g.156T>C, g.587A>G, g.598C>T, g.1485C>T, g.2115A>G) in MSTN gene were detected by sequencing and genotyped using PCR-RFLP method. The g.587A>G and g.598C>T residing in the 5'UTR region were novel SNPs identified by this study. The g.2115A>G which have previously been associated with racing performances were present in Chinese horse breeds, providing valuable genetic information for evaluating the potential racing performances in Chinese domestic breeds. The six SNPs together defined thirteen haplotypes, demonstrating abundant haplotype diversities in Chinese horses. Most of the haplotypes were shared among different breeds with no haplotype restricted to a specific region or a single horse breed. AMOVA analysis indicated that most of the genetic variance was attributable to differences among individuals without any significant contribution by the four geographical groups. This study will provide fundamental and instrumental genetic information for evaluating the potential racing performances of Chinese horse breeds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Patients with Moyamoya Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, progressive, cerebrovascular occlusive disorder that displays various clinical features and results in cerebral infarct or hemorrhagic stroke. Specific genes associated with the disease have not yet been identified, making identification of at-risk patients difficult before clinical manifestation. Familial MMD is not uncommon, with as many as 15% of MMD patients having a family history of the disease, suggesting a genetic etiology. Studies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MMD have mostly focused on mechanical stress on vessels, endothelium, and the relationship to atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss SNPs studies targeting the genetic etiology of MMD. Genetic analyses in familial MMD and genome-wide association studies represent promising strategies for elucidating the pathophysiology of this condition. This review also discusses future research directions, not only to offer new insights into the origin of MMD, but also to enhance our understanding of the genetic aspects of MMD. There have been several SNP studies of MMD. Current SNP studies suggest a genetic contribution to MMD, but further reliable and replicable data are needed. A large cohort or family-based design would be important. Modern SNP studies of MMD depend on novel genetic, experimental, and database methods that will hopefully hasten the arrival of a consensus conclusion. PMID:26180609

  14. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the nuclear lamina proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, R A; Yuen, J; Cao, H

    2001-01-01

    Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) has been shown to be due to mutations in the LMNA gene encoding nuclear lamins A and C, indicating that defective structure of the nuclear envelope can produce this unique phenotype. Some patients with inherited partial lipodystrophy have normal LMNA coding, promoter, and 3'-untranslated region sequences. This suggests that the FPLD phenotype is genetically heterogeneous. Among the candidate genes to consider for the non-LMNA-associated forms of FPLD are other components of the inner nuclear membrane, such as lamin B1 and B2 and the lamin B receptor. We developed amplification primers for the coding regions of LMNB1, LMNB2, and LBR, which encode lamin B1, lamin B2, and the lamin B receptor, respectively. We found no putative disease mutations in any of these proteins in subjects with non-LMNA FPLD, but, through the screening of diseased and normal subjects, we identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); specifically, five SNPs in LMNB1 and four SNPs in LBR. The LMNB2 gene was monomorphic in screening experiments. We conclude that mutations in other constituent proteins of the nuclear envelope are not present in subjects with non-LMNA-associated FPLD. However, the identification of amplification primers and SNPs provides tools to investigate these proteins for their association with other phenotypes.

  15. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair by nuclear lamin b1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Butin-Israeli

    Full Text Available The nuclear lamins play important roles in the structural organization and function of the metazoan cell nucleus. Recent studies on B-type lamins identified a requirement for lamin B1 (LB1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in normal diploid cells. In order to further investigate the function of LB1 in proliferation, we disrupted its normal expression in U-2 OS human osteosarcoma and other tumor cell lines. Silencing LB1 expression induced G1 cell cycle arrest without significant apoptosis. The arrested cells are unable to mount a timely and effective response to DNA damage induced by UV irradiation. Several proteins involved in the detection and repair of UV damage by the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway are down-regulated in LB1 silenced cells including DDB1, CSB and PCNA. We propose that LB1 regulates the DNA damage response to UV irradiation by modulating the expression of specific genes and activating persistent DNA damage signaling. Our findings are relevant to understanding the relationship between the loss of LB1 expression, DNA damage signaling, and replicative senescence.

  16. 9-(2′-Deoxy-2′-Fluoro-β-d-Arabinofuranosyl) Adenine Is a Potent Antitrypanosomal Adenosine Analogue That Circumvents Transport-Related Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbarian, Farahnaz; Vodnala, Munender; Alzahrani, Khalid J. H.; Ebiloma, Godwin U.; de Koning, Harry P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current chemotherapy against African sleeping sickness, a disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is limited by toxicity, inefficacy, and drug resistance. Nucleoside analogues have been successfully used to cure T. brucei-infected mice, but they have the limitation of mainly being taken up by the P2 nucleoside transporter, which, when mutated, is a common cause of multidrug resistance in T. brucei. We report here that adenine arabinoside (Ara-A) and the newly tested drug 9-(2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-β-d-arabinofuranosyl) adenine (FANA-A) are instead taken up by the P1 nucleoside transporter, which is not associated with drug resistance. Like Ara-A, FANA-A was found to be resistant to cleavage by methylthioadenosine phosphorylase, an enzyme that protects T. brucei against the antitrypanosomal effects of deoxyadenosine. Another important factor behind the selectivity of nucleoside analogues is how well they are phosphorylated within the cell. We found that the T. brucei adenosine kinase had a higher catalytic efficiency with FANA-A than the mammalian enzyme, and T. brucei cells treated with FANA-A accumulated high levels of FANA-A triphosphate, which even surpassed the level of ATP and led to cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA synthesis, and the accumulation of DNA breaks. FANA-A inhibited nucleic acid biosynthesis and parasite proliferation with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) in the low nanomolar range, whereas mammalian cell proliferation was inhibited in the micromolar range. Both Ara-A and FANA-A, in combination with deoxycoformycin, cured T. brucei-infected mice, but FANA-A did so at a dose 100 times lower than that of Ara-A. PMID:28373184

  17. Study of bacteriophage T4-encoded Dam DNA (adenine-N6)-methyltransferase binding with substrates by rapid laser UV cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimov, Alexey A; Sclavi, Bianca; Zinoviev, Victor V; Malygin, Ernst G; Hattman, Stanley; Buckle, Malcolm

    2007-09-07

    DNA methyltransferases of the Dam family (including bacteriophage T4-encoded Dam DNA (adenine-N(6))-methyltransferase (T4Dam)) catalyze methyl group transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet), producing S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy) and methylated adenine residues in palindromic GATC sequences. In this study, we describe the application of direct (i.e. no exogenous cross-linking reagents) laser UV cross-linking as a universal non-perturbing approach for studying the characteristics of T4Dam binding with substrates in the equilibrium and transient modes of interaction. UV irradiation of the enzyme.substrate complexes using an Nd(3+):yttrium aluminum garnet laser at 266 nm resulted in up to 3 and >15% yields of direct T4Dam cross-linking to DNA and AdoMet, respectively. Consequently, we were able to measure equilibrium constants and dissociation rates for enzyme.substrate complexes. In particular, we demonstrate that both reaction substrates, specific DNA and AdoMet (or product AdoHcy), stabilized the ternary complex. The improved substrate affinity for the enzyme in the ternary complex significantly reduced dissociation rates (up to 2 orders of magnitude). Several of the parameters obtained (such as dissociation rate constants for the binary T4Dam.AdoMet complex and for enzyme complexes with a nonfluorescent hemimethylated DNA duplex) were previously inaccessible by other means. However, where possible, the results of laser UV cross-linking were compared with those of fluorescence analysis. Our study suggests that rapid laser UV cross-linking efficiently complements standard DNA methyltransferase-related tools and is a method of choice to probe enzyme-substrate interactions in cases in which data cannot be acquired by other means.

  18. Specificity of the ModA11, ModA12 and ModD1 epigenetic regulator N(6)-adenine DNA methyltransferases of Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, Kate L; Jen, Freda E-C; Tan, Aimee; Scott, Adeana L; Kumar, Ritesh; Power, Peter M; Chen, Li-Tzu; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Wang, Andrew H-J; Hill, Dorothea M C; Luyten, Yvette A; Morgan, Richard D; Roberts, Richard J; Maiden, Martin C J; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A; Korlach, Jonas; Rao, Desirazu N; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-04-30

    Phase variation (random ON/OFF switching) of gene expression is a common feature of host-adapted pathogenic bacteria. Phase variably expressed N(6)-adenine DNA methyltransferases (Mod) alter global methylation patterns resulting in changes in gene expression. These systems constitute phase variable regulons called phasevarions. Neisseria meningitidis phasevarions regulate genes including virulence factors and vaccine candidates, and alter phenotypes including antibiotic resistance. The target site recognized by these Type III N(6)-adenine DNA methyltransferases is not known. Single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis was used to identify the recognition site for three key N. meningitidis methyltransferases: ModA11 (exemplified by M.NmeMC58I) (5'-CGY M6A: G-3'), ModA12 (exemplified by M.Nme77I, M.Nme18I and M.Nme579II) (5'-AC M6A: CC-3') and ModD1 (exemplified by M.Nme579I) (5'-CC M6A: GC-3'). Restriction inhibition assays and mutagenesis confirmed the SMRT methylome analysis. The ModA11 site is complex and atypical and is dependent on the type of pyrimidine at the central position, in combination with the bases flanking the core recognition sequence 5'-CGY M6A: G-3'. The observed efficiency of methylation in the modA11 strain (MC58) genome ranged from 4.6% at 5'-GCGC M6A: GG-3' sites, to 100% at 5'-ACGT M6A: GG-3' sites. Analysis of the distribution of modified sites in the respective genomes shows many cases of association with intergenic regions of genes with altered expression due to phasevarion switching. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Rev1 and Polzeta influence toxicity and mutagenicity of Me-lex, a sequence selective N3-adenine methylating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Paola; Ciribilli, Yari; Russo, Debora; Bisio, Alessandra; Perfumo, Chiara; Andreotti, Virginia; Menichini, Paola; Inga, Alberto; Huang, Xiaofen; Gold, Barry; Fronza, Gilberto

    2008-03-01

    The relative toxicity and mutagenicity of Me-lex, which selectively generates 3-methyladenine (3-MeA), is dependent on the nature of the DNA repair background. Base excision repair (BER)-defective S. cerevisiae strains mag1 and apn1apn2 were both significantly more sensitive to Me-lex toxicity, but only the latter is significantly more prone to Me-lex-induced mutagenesis. To examine the contribution of translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases in the bypass of Me-lex-induced lesions, the REV3 and REV1 genes were independently deleted in the parental yeast strain and in different DNA repair-deficient derivatives: the nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient rad14, and the BER-deficient mag1 or apn1apn2 strains. The strains contained an integrated ADE2 reporter gene under control of the transcription factor p53. A centromeric yeast expression vector containing the wild-type p53 cDNA was treated in vitro with increasing concentrations of Me-lex and transformed into the different yeast strains. The toxicity of Me-lex-induced lesions was evaluated based on the plasmid transformation efficiency compared to the untreated vector, while Me-lex mutagenicity was assessed using the p53 reporter assay. In the present study, we demonstrate that disruption of Polzeta (through deletion of its catalytic subunit coded by REV3) or Rev1 (by REV1 deletion) increased Me-lex lethality and decreased Me-lex mutagenicity in both the NER-defective (rad14) and BER-defective (mag1; apn1apn2) strains. Therefore, Polzeta and Rev1 contribute to resistance of the lethal effects of Me-lex-induced lesions (3-MeA and derived AP sites) by bypassing lesions and fixing some mutations.

  20. Nucleotide variation in genes invloved in wood formation in two pine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Pot; Lisa McMillan; Craig Echt; Gregoire Le Provost; Pauline Garnier-Gere; Sheree Cato; Christophe Plomion

    2005-01-01

    Nucleotide diversity in eight genes related to wood formation was investigated in two pine species, Pinus pinaster and P. radiata. The nucleotide diversity patterns observed and their properties were compared between the two species according to the specific characteristics of the samples analysed. A lower diversity was observed in P. radiata...

  1. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are nucleotide substitution mutations that tend to be at high densities within eukaryotic genomes. The development of assays that detect allelic variation at SNP loci is attractive for genome mapping, population genetics, and phylogeographic applications. A p...

  2. Regulation of Salmonella typhimurium pyr Gene Expression: Effect of Changing Both Purine and Pyrimidine Nucleotide Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes is repressed by the pyrimidine nucleotide end-products of the pathway. However, purine nucleotides also play a role. In this study, I have measured expression of the pyr genes (pyrA-E) in Salmonella typhimurium strains harbouring mutations...... of each pyr gene is discussed in relation to present knowledge on gene structure and regulatory mechanism....

  3. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a novel allexivirus from alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new species of the family Alphaflexiviridae provisionally named Alfalfa virus S (AVS) was diagnosed in alfalfa samples originating from Sudan. A complete nucleotide sequence of the viral genome consisting of 8,349 nucleotides excluding the 3’ poly(A) tail was determined by Illumina NGS technology ...

  4. Complete nucleotide sequence of a monopartite Begomovirus and associated satellites infecting Carica papaya in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, M S; Yoshida, S; Khatri-Chhetri, G B; Briddon, R W; Natsuaki, K T

    2013-06-01

    Carica papaya (papaya) is a fruit crop that is cultivated mostly in kitchen gardens throughout Nepal. Leaf samples of C. papaya plants with leaf curling, vein darkening, vein thickening, and a reduction in leaf size were collected from a garden in Darai village, Rampur, Nepal in 2010. Full-length clones of a monopartite Begomovirus, a betasatellite and an alphasatellite were isolated. The complete nucleotide sequence of the Begomovirus showed the arrangement of genes typical of Old World begomoviruses with the highest nucleotide sequence identity (>99 %) to an isolate of Ageratum yellow vein virus (AYVV), confirming it as an isolate of AYVV. The complete nucleotide sequence of betasatellite showed greater than 89 % nucleotide sequence identity to an isolate of Tomato leaf curl Java betasatellite originating from Indonesian. The sequence of the alphasatellite displayed 92 % nucleotide sequence identity to Sida yellow vein China alphasatellite. This is the first identification of these components in Nepal and the first time they have been identified in papaya.

  5. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahrig, Ryan R; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles B; Zirbel, Craig L

    2013-07-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to 'RNA 3D Align' (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/.

  6. Association of prediabetes-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms with microalbuminuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wook Choi

    Full Text Available Increased glycemic exposure, even below the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus, is crucial in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular complications represented by microalbuminuria. Nonetheless, there is limited evidence regarding which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are associated with prediabetes and whether genetic predisposition to prediabetes is related to microalbuminuria, especially in the general population. Our objective was to answer these questions. We conducted a genomewide association study (GWAS separately on two population-based cohorts, Ansung and Ansan, in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES. The initial GWAS was carried out on the Ansung cohort, followed by a replication study on the Ansan cohort. A total of 5682 native Korean participants without a significant medical illness were classified into either control group (n = 3153 or prediabetic group (n = 2529. In the GWAS, we identified two susceptibility loci associated with prediabetes, one at 17p15.3-p15.1 in the GCK gene and another at 7p15.1 in YKT6. When variations in GCK and YKT6 were used as a model of prediabetes, this genetically determined prediabetes increased microalbuminuria. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose concentration in plasma and SNP rs2908289 in GCK were associated with microalbuminuria, and adjustment for age, gender, smoking history, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and serum triglyceride levels did not attenuate this association. Our results suggest that prediabetes and the associated SNPs may predispose to microalbuminuria before the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Further studies are needed to explore the details of the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this genetic association.

  7. Sequencing genes in silico using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high throughput sequencing technology has enabled the 1000 Genomes Project Pilot 3 to generate complete sequence data for more than 906 genes and 8,140 exons representing 697 subjects. The 1000 Genomes database provides a critical opportunity for further interpreting disease associations with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs discovered from genetic association studies. Currently, direct sequencing of candidate genes or regions on a large number of subjects remains both cost- and time-prohibitive. Results To accelerate the translation from discovery to functional studies, we propose an in silico gene sequencing method (ISS, which predicts phased sequences of intragenic regions, using SNPs. The key underlying idea of our method is to infer diploid sequences (a pair of phased sequences/alleles at every functional locus utilizing the deep sequencing data from the 1000 Genomes Project and SNP data from the HapMap Project, and to build prediction models using flanking SNPs. Using this method, we have developed a database of prediction models for 611 known genes. Sequence prediction accuracy for these genes is 96.26% on average (ranges 79%-100%. This database of prediction models can be enhanced and scaled up to include new genes as the 1000 Genomes Project sequences additional genes on additional individuals. Applying our predictive model for the KCNJ11 gene to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC Type 2 diabetes cohort, we demonstrate how the prediction of phased sequences inferred from GWAS SNP genotype data can be used to facilitate interpretation and identify a probable functional mechanism such as protein changes. Conclusions Prior to the general availability of routine sequencing of all subjects, the ISS method proposed here provides a time- and cost-effective approach to broadening the characterization of disease associated SNPs and regions, and facilitating the prioritization of candidate

  8. Nucleotide substitutions revealing specific functions of Polycomb group genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajusz, Izabella; Sipos, László; Pirity, Melinda K

    2015-04-01

    POLYCOMB group (PCG) proteins belong to the family of epigenetic regulators of genes playing important roles in differentiation and development. Mutants of PcG genes were isolated first in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, resulting in spectacular segmental transformations due to the ectopic expression of homeotic genes. Homologs of Drosophila PcG genes were also identified in plants and in vertebrates and subsequent experiments revealed the general role of PCG proteins in the maintenance of the repressed state of chromatin through cell divisions. The past decades of gene targeting experiments have allowed us to make significant strides towards understanding how the network of PCG proteins influences multiple aspects of cellular fate determination during development. Being involved in the transmission of specific expression profiles of different cell lineages, PCG proteins were found to control wide spectra of unrelated epigenetic processes in vertebrates, such as stem cell plasticity and renewal, genomic imprinting and inactivation of X-chromosome. PCG proteins also affect regulation of metabolic genes being important for switching programs between pluripotency and differentiation. Insight into the precise roles of PCG proteins in normal physiological processes has emerged from studies employing cell culture-based systems and genetically modified animals. Here we summarize the findings obtained from PcG mutant fruit flies and mice generated to date with a focus on PRC1 and PRC2 members altered by nucleotide substitutions resulting in specific alleles. We also include a compilation of lessons learned from these models about the in vivo functions of this complex protein family. With multiple knockout lines, sophisticated approaches to study the consequences of peculiar missense point mutations, and insights from complementary gain-of-function systems in hand, we are now in a unique position to significantly advance our understanding of the molecular basis of

  9. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates in Plants and Plant Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marondedze, Claudius; Wong, Aloysius; Thomas, Ludivine; Irving, Helen; Gehring, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs) and the enzymes that can generate them are of increasing interest in the plant sciences. Arguably, the major recent advance came with the release of the complete Arabidopsis thaliana genome that has enabled the systematic search for adenylate (ACs) or guanylate cyclases (GCs) and did eventually lead to the discovery of a number of GCs in higher plants. Many of these proteins have complex domain architectures with AC or GC centers moonlighting within cytosolic kinase domains. Recent reports indicated the presence of not just the canonical cNMPs (i.e., cAMP and cGMP), but also the noncanonical cCMP, cUMP, cIMP, and cdTMP in plant tissues, and this raises several questions. Firstly, what are the functions of these cNMPs, and, secondly, which enzymes can convert the substrate triphosphates into the respective noncanonical cNMPs? The first question is addressed here by comparing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) response of cAMP and cGMP to that elicited by the noncanonical cCMP or cIMP. The results show that particularly cIMP can induce significant ROS production. To answer, at least in part, the second question, we have evaluated homology models of experimentally confirmed plant GCs probing the substrate specificity by molecular docking simulations to determine if they can conceivably catalytically convert substrates other than ATP or GTP. In summary, molecular modeling and substrate docking simulations can contribute to the evaluation of cyclases for noncanonical cyclic mononucleotides and thereby further our understanding of the molecular mechanism that underlie cNMP-dependent signaling in planta.

  10. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation. PMID:24129575

  11. Dietary Nucleotides Supplementation and Liver Injury in Alcohol-Treated Rats: A Metabolomics Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaxia Cai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies suggested that nucleotides were beneficial for liver function, lipid metabolism and so on. The present study aimed to investigate the metabolic response of dietary nucleotides supplementation in alcohol-induced liver injury rats. Methods: Five groups of male Wistar rats were used: normal control group (basal diet, equivalent distilled water, alcohol control group (basal diet, 50% alcohol (v/v, dextrose control group (basal diet, isocaloric amount of dextrose, and 0.04% and 0.16% nucleotides groups (basal diet supplemented with 0.4 g and 1.6 g nucleotides kg−1 respectively, 50% alcohol (v/v. The liver injury was measured through traditional liver enzymes, expression of oxidative stress markers and histopathological examination. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-time-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS was applied to identify liver metabolite profiles. Results: Nucleotides supplementation prevented the progression of hepatocyte steatosis. The levels of total proteins, globulin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol triglyceride, as well as the oxidative stress markers altered by alcohol, were improved by nucleotides supplementation. Elevated levels of liver bile acids (glycocholic acid, chenodeoxyglycocholic acid, and taurodeoxycholic acid, as well as lipids (stearic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, phosphatidylcholine, and lysophosphatidylethanolamine in alcohol-treated rats were reversed by nucleotides supplementation. In addition, supplementation with nucleotides could increase the levels of amino acids, including valyl-Leucine, l-leucine, alanyl-leucine and l-phenylalanine. Conclusion: These data indicate potential biomarkers and confirm the benefit of dietary nucleotides on alcoholic liver injury.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in elite north american potato germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Jong Walter S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current breeding approaches in potato rely almost entirely on phenotypic evaluations; molecular markers, with the exception of a few linked to disease resistance traits, are not widely used. Large-scale sequence datasets generated primarily through Sanger Expressed Sequence Tag projects are available from a limited number of potato cultivars and access to next generation sequencing technologies permits rapid generation of sequence data for additional cultivars. When coupled with the advent of high throughput genotyping methods, an opportunity now exists for potato breeders to incorporate considerably more genotypic data into their decision-making. Results To identify a large number of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in elite potato germplasm, we sequenced normalized cDNA prepared from three commercial potato cultivars: 'Atlantic', 'Premier Russet' and 'Snowden'. For each cultivar, we generated 2 Gb of sequence which was assembled into a representative transcriptome of ~28-29 Mb for each cultivar. Using the Maq SNP filter that filters read depth, density, and quality, 575,340 SNPs were identified within these three cultivars. In parallel, 2,358 SNPs were identified within existing Sanger sequences for three additional cultivars, 'Bintje', 'Kennebec', and 'Shepody'. Using a stringent set of filters in conjunction with the potato reference genome, we identified 69,011 high confidence SNPs from these six cultivars for use in genotyping with the Infinium platform. Ninety-six of these SNPs were used with a BeadXpress assay to assess allelic diversity in a germplasm panel of 248 lines; 82 of the SNPs proved sufficiently informative for subsequent analyses. Within diverse North American germplasm, the chip processing market class was most distinct, clearly separated from all other market classes. The round white and russet market classes both include fresh market and processing cultivars. Nevertheless, the russet and round

  13. Toward optimal set of single nucleotide polymorphism investigation before IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A V; Dedul, A G; Fedotov, Y N; Komlichenko, E V

    2016-10-01

    At present, the patient preparation for IVF needs to undergo a series of planned tests, including the genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles of some genes. In former USSR countries, such investigation was not included in overwhelming majority of health insurance programs and paid by patient. In common, there are prerequisites to the study of more than 50 polymorphisms. An important faced task is to determine the optimal panel for SNP genotyping in terms of price/number of SNP. During 2009-2015 in the University Hospital of St. Petersburg State University, blood samples were analyzed from 550 women with different reproductive system disorders preparing for IVF and 46 healthy women in control group. In total, 28 SNP were analyzed in the genes of thrombophilia factors, folic acid cycle, detoxification system, and the renin-angiotensin system. The method used was real-time PCR. A significant increase in the frequency of pathological alleles of some polymorphisms in patients with habitual failure of IVF was shown, compared with the control group. As a result, two options defined panels for optimal typing SNP before IVF were composed. Standard panel includes 8 SNP, 5 in thromborhilic factors, and 3 in folic acid cycle genes. They are 20210 G > A of FII gene, R506Q G > A of FV gene (mutation Leiden), -675 5G > 4G of PAI-I gene, L33P T > C of ITGB3 gene, -455 G > A of FGB gene, 667 C > T of MTHFR gene, 2756 A > G of MTR gene, and 66 A > G of MTRR gene. Extended panel of 15 SNP also includes 807 C > T of ITGA2 gene, T154M C > T of GP1BA gene, second polymorphism 1298 A > C in MTHFR gene, polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin gene AGT M235T T > C and -1166 A > C of AGTR1 gene, polymorphisms I105V A > G and A114V C > T of detoxification system gene GSTP. The results of SNP genotyping can be adjusted for treatment tactics and IVF, and also medical support getting pregnant. The success rate of

  14. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  15. Effects of six anaesthetic agents on UDP-glucuronic acid and other nucleotides in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensson, P I; Eriksson, G

    1985-08-01

    Anaesthesia affects the liver nucleotide pool. It was the aim of the present study to examine how anaesthesia for 60 min with pentobarbital, ketamin + diazepam, halothane, enflurane and isoflurane may influence the nucleotide pool in the rat liver, studied with isotachophoresis. It was found that none of the agents gave both safe and reproducible anaesthesia without affecting the nucleotide pools or affecting the experiments in some other way. Halothane and isoflurane were the two best alternatives with respect to both efficiency and safety. Isoflurane may be preferable since it gives a higher energy charge.

  16. A novel genome signature based on inter-nucleotide distances profiles for visualization of metagenomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xian-Hua; Yu, Zu-Guo; Ma, Yuan-Lin; Han, Guo-Sheng; Anh, Vo

    2017-09-01

    There has been a growing interest in visualization of metagenomic data. The present study focuses on the visualization of metagenomic data using inter-nucleotide distances profile. We first convert the fragment sequences into inter-nucleotide distances profiles. Then we analyze these profiles by principal component analysis. Finally the principal components are used to obtain the 2-D scattered plot according to their source of species. We name our method as inter-nucleotide distances profiles (INP) method. Our method is evaluated on three benchmark data sets used in previous published papers. Our results demonstrate that the INP method is good, alternative and efficient for visualization of metagenomic data.

  17. Severe MgADP inhibition of Bacillus subtilis F1-ATPase is not due to the absence of nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic nucleotide binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Ishikawa

    Full Text Available F1-ATPase from Bacillus subtilis (BF1 is severely suppressed by the MgADP inhibition. Here, we have tested if this is due to the loss of nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic site that is required for the activation. Measurements with a tryptophan mutant of BF1 indicated that the noncatalytic sites could bind ATP normally. Furthermore, the mutant BF1 that cannot bind ATP to the noncatalytic sites showed much lower ATPase activity. It was concluded that the cause of strong MgADP inhibition of BF1 is not the weak nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic sites but the other steps required for the activation.

  18. Structural studies on MtRecA-nucleotide complexes: insights into DNA and nucleotide binding and the structural signature of NTP recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S; Ganesh, N; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Muniyappa, K; Vijayan, M

    2003-02-15

    RecA protein plays a crucial role in homologous recombination and repair of DNA. Central to all activities of RecA is its binding to Mg(+2)-ATP. The active form of the protein is a helical nucleoprotein filament containing the nucleotide cofactor and single-stranded DNA. The stability and structure of the helical nucleoprotein filament formed by RecA are modulated by nucleotide cofactors. Here we report crystal structures of a MtRecA-ADP complex, complexes with ATPgammaS in the presence and absence of magnesium as well as a complex with dATP and Mg+2. Comparison with the recently solved crystal structures of the apo form as well as a complex with ADP-AlF4 confirms an expansion of the P-loop region in MtRecA, compared to its homologue in Escherichia coli, correlating with the reduced affinity of MtRecA for ATP. The ligand bound structures reveal subtle variations in nucleotide conformations among different nucleotides that serve in maintaining the network of interactions crucial for nucleotide binding. The nucleotide binding site itself, however, remains relatively unchanged. The analysis also reveals that ATPgammaS rather than ADP-AlF4 is structurally a better mimic of ATP. From among the complexed structures, a definition for the two DNA-binding loops L1 and L2 has clearly emerged for the first time and provides a basis to understand DNA binding by RecA. The structural information obtained from these complexes correlates well with the extensive biochemical data on mutants available in the literature, contributing to an understanding of the role of individual residues in the nucleotide binding pocket, at the molecular level. Modeling studies on the mutants again point to the relative rigidity of the nucleotide binding site. Comparison with other NTP binding proteins reveals many commonalties in modes of binding by diverse members in the structural family, contributing to our understanding of the structural signature of NTP recognition. Copyright 2003 Wiley

  19. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Copies of ST.25 may be obtained from the World Intellectual Property Organization; 34 chemin des... PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or... representation of nucleotides. (1) A nucleotide sequence shall be listed using the lower-case letter for...

  20. T-786C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of endothelial nitric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T-786C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and serum level of vascular endothelial relaxant factor (VERF) in non-diabetic patients with coronary artery disease.

  1. SPT4 increases UV-induced mutagenesis in yeast through impaired nucleotide excision repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Yu, Sung-Lim; Kim, Ho-Yeol; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Sung-Keun

    2013-01-01

    .... As unrepaired DNA lesions inhibit transcription, UV-induced damage to transcribed DNA is repaired preferentially versus non-transcribed DNA through transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCR...

  2. Nucleotide receptors as targets in the pharmacological enhancement of dermal wound healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gendaszewska-Darmach, Edyta; Kucharska, Marta

    2011-01-01

    With a growing interest of the involvement of extracellular nucleotides in both normal physiology and pathology, it has become evident that P2 receptor agonists and antagonists may have therapeutic potential...

  3. WEB-server for search of a periodicity in amino acid and nucleotide sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Frenkel, F.; Skryabin, K. G.; Korotkov, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    A new web server (http://victoria.biengi.ac.ru/splinter/login.php) was designed and developed to search for periodicity in nucleotide and amino acid sequences. The web server operation is based upon a new mathematical method of searching for multiple alignments, which is founded on the position weight matrices optimization, as well as on implementation of the two-dimensional dynamic programming. This approach allows the construction of multiple alignments of the indistinctly similar amino acid and nucleotide sequences that accumulated more than 1.5 substitutions per a single amino acid or a nucleotide without performing the sequences paired comparisons. The article examines the principles of the web server operation and two examples of studying amino acid and nucleotide sequences, as well as information that could be obtained using the web server.

  4. The interaction of the Eco R1 restriction enzyme E.coli with nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, Donald F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1979-11-01

    The Eco R1 restriction enzyme can be shown to be inhibited by nucleotides which correspond to any part of its known site of phosphodiesterase activity. A series of di-, tetra-, and hexa-nucleotide fragments were synthesized and their effect on the activity of the enzyme upon superhelical Co1 E1 DNA studied. The inhibition caused by the individual mononucleotides were also studied. In general all the nucleotide fragments showed some form of interaction with the enzyme system. Tetranucleotides were stronger inhibitors than dinucleotides, which in turn were stronger inhibitors than the mononucleotides. Within each category of inhibitors, those containing the phosphodiester bond which is acted upon by the enzyme were the strongest inhibitors. Only those fragments which were consistent with the enzymes site of activity showed competitive inhibition kinetics. Nucleotides which do not fit within the site of phosphodiesterase activity show non-competitive inhibition kinetics.

  5. Efficient reverse transcription using locked nucleic acid nucleotides towards the evolution of nuclease resistant RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Edwards, Stacey L

    2012-01-01

    We found that SuperScript® III Reverse Transcriptase is an efficient enzyme for the recognition of LNA nucleotides, making it a prime candidate to be used in de novo selection of LNA containing RNA aptamers.......We found that SuperScript® III Reverse Transcriptase is an efficient enzyme for the recognition of LNA nucleotides, making it a prime candidate to be used in de novo selection of LNA containing RNA aptamers....

  6. Critical role of DNA intercalation in enzyme-catalyzed nucleotide flipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Jenna M; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2014-11-10

    Nucleotide flipping is a common feature of DNA-modifying enzymes that allows access to target sites within duplex DNA. Structural studies have identified many intercalating amino acid side chains in a wide variety of enzymes, but the functional contribution of these intercalating residues is poorly understood. We used site-directed mutagenesis and transient kinetic approaches to dissect the energetic contribution of intercalation for human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase, an enzyme that initiates repair of alkylation damage. When AAG flips out a damaged nucleotide, the void in the duplex is filled by a conserved tyrosine (Y162). We find that tyrosine intercalation confers 140-fold stabilization of the extrahelical specific recognition complex, and that Y162 functions as a plug to slow the rate of unflipping by 6000-fold relative to the Y162A mutant. Surprisingly, mutation to the smaller alanine side chain increases the rate of nucleotide flipping by 50-fold relative to the wild-type enzyme. This provides evidence against the popular model that DNA intercalation accelerates nucleotide flipping. In the case of AAG, DNA intercalation contributes to the specific binding of a damaged nucleotide, but this enhanced specificity comes at the cost of reduced speed of nucleotide flipping. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in 11 expressed resistance candidate genes in Lolium perenne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asp Torben

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association analysis is an alternative way for QTL mapping in ryegrass. So far, knowledge on nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in ryegrass is lacking, which is essential for the efficiency of association analyses. Results 11 expressed disease resistance candidate (R genes including 6 nucleotide binding site and leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR like genes and 5 non-NBS-LRR genes were analyzed for nucleotide diversity. For each of the genes about 1 kb genomic fragments were isolated from 20 heterozygous genotypes in ryegrass. The number of haplotypes per gene ranged from 9 to 27. On average, one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP was present per 33 bp between two randomly sampled sequences for the 11 genes. NBS-LRR like gene fragments showed a high degree of nucleotide diversity, with one SNP every 22 bp between two randomly sampled sequences. NBS-LRR like gene fragments showed very high non-synonymous mutation rates, leading to altered amino acid sequences. Particularly LRR regions showed very high diversity with on average one SNP every 10 bp between two sequences. In contrast, non-NBS LRR resistance candidate genes showed a lower degree of nucleotide diversity, with one SNP every 112 bp. 78% of haplotypes occurred at low frequency ( Conclusion Substantial LD decay was found within a distance of 500 bp for most resistance candidate genes in this study. Hence, LD based association analysis is feasible and promising for QTL fine mapping of resistance traits in ryegrass.

  8. Extracellular modulation of the silkmoth sex pheromone receptor activity by cyclic nucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Odorants and pheromones are essential to insects as chemical cues for finding food or an appropriate mating partner. These volatile compounds bind to olfactory receptors (Ors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons. Each insect Or functions as a ligand-gated ion channel and is a heteromeric complex that comprises one type of canonical Or and a highly conserved Orco subunit. Because there are many Or types, insect Ors can recognize with high specificity a myriad of chemical cues. Cyclic nucleotides can modulate the activity of insect Or-Orco complexes; however, the mechanism of action of these nucleotides is under debate. Here, we show that cyclic nucleotides, including cAMP and cGMP, interact with the silkmoth sex pheromone receptor complex, BmOr-1-BmOrco, from the outside of the cell and that these nucleotides act as antagonists at low concentrations and weak agonists at high concentrations. These cyclic nucleotides do not compete with the sex pheromone, bombykol, for binding to the BmOr-1 subunit. ATP and GTP also weakly inhibited BmOr-1-BmOrco activity, but D-ribose had no effect; these findings indicated that the purine moiety was crucial for the inhibition. Only the bombykol receptors have been so far shown to be subject to modulation by nucleotide-related compounds, indicating that this responsiveness to these compounds is not common for all insect Or-Orco complexes.

  9. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Vercesi, Anibal; Bababunmi, Enitan A.

    1978-01-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca2+ and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca2+ is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as β-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca2+. Successive cycles of Ca2+ release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca2+-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca2+, mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport. Images PMID:25436

  10. Tissue-specific regulation of sirtuin and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways identified in C57Bl/6 mice in response to high-fat feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Janice E; Farquharson, Andrew J; Horgan, Graham W; Williams, Lynda M

    2016-11-01

    The sirtuin (SIRT)/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) system is implicated in development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diet-induced obesity, a major risk factor for T2D. Mechanistic links have not yet been defined. SIRT/NAD system gene expression and NAD/NADH levels were measured in liver, white adipose tissue (WAT) and skeletal muscle from mice fed either a low-fat diet or high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 days up to 16 weeks. An in-house custom-designed multiplex gene expression assay assessed all 7 mouse SIRTs (SIRT1-7) and 16 enzymes involved in conversion of tryptophan, niacin, nicotinamide riboside and metabolic precursors to NAD. Significantly altered transcription was correlated with body weight, fat mass, plasma lipids and hormones. Regulation of the SIRT/NAD system was associated with early (SIRT4, SIRT7, NAPRT1 and NMNAT2) and late phases (NMNAT3, NMRK2, ABCA1 and CD38) of glucose intolerance. TDO2 and NNMT were identified as markers of HFD consumption. Altered regulation of the SIRT/NAD system in response to HFD was prominent in liver compared with WAT or muscle. Multiple components of the SIRTs and NAD biosynthetic enzymes network respond to consumption of dietary fat. Novel molecular targets identified above could direct strategies for dietary/therapeutic interventions to limit metabolic dysfunction and development of T2D. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Graphite-Based Nanocomposite Electrochemical Sensor for Multiplex Detection of Adenine, Guanine, Thymine, and Cytosine: A Biomedical Prospect for Studying DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Khan Loon; Khor, Sook Mei

    2017-09-19

    Guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), and cytosine (C) are the four basic constituents of DNA. Studies on DNA composition have focused especially on DNA damage and genotoxicity. However, the development of a rapid, simple, and multiplex method for the simultaneous measurement of the four DNA bases remains a challenge. In this study, we describe a graphite-based nanocomposite electrode (Au-rGO/MWCNT/graphite) that uses a simple electro-co-deposition approach. We successfully applied the developed sensor for multiplex detection of G, A, T, and C, using square-wave voltammetry. The sensor was tested using real animal and plant DNA samples in which the hydrolysis of T and C could be achieved with 8 mol L-1 of acid. The electrochemical sensor exhibited excellent sensitivity (G = 178.8 nA/μg mL-1, A = 92.9 nA/μg mL-1, T = 1.4 nA/μg mL-1, and C = 15.1 9 nA/μg mL-1), low limit of detection (G, A = 0.5 μg mL-1; T, C = 1.0 μg mL-1), and high selectivity in the presence of common interfering factors from biological matrixes. The reliability of the established method was assessed by method validation and comparison with the ultraperformance liquid chromatography technique, and a correlation of 103.7% was achieved.

  12. Determination of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate concentration using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection: ratio of the reduced form as a biomarker of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Funakoshi, Masayo; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2009-11-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) is the principal source of reducing power in numerous processes of physiological importance. We examined the influence of oxidative stress on the relative amounts of NADPH in human red blood cells (RBCs). To determine the homeostasis of the NADPH existing in the reduced form following oxidation, we developed an improved method for measurement of NADPH in human RBCs using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present method with fluorescent detection is reproducible and selective than enzymatic cycling method and HPLC methods with spectrometric detection. The calibration curve is linear over the range of 0.1-5.0 muM with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. The within-run precision of the assays for total NADPH (NADPH+NADP(+)) and NADPH concentrations in human RBC were 2.4% and 8.6%, respectively (n=5). After the RBC suspension was exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), which is scavenged by glutathione peroxidase (GPX) along with NADPH consumption, a significant decrease in the NADPH ratio [(NADPH/(NADPH+NADP(+))] was observed after a transient decrease and rapid recovery of the reduced form of glutathione. The marked decrease in the NADPH ratio induced by t-BHP exposure was observed in the absence of glucose. However, the NADPH ratio was not decreased by t-BHP exposure after pre-treatment with a glutathione reductase inhibitor. This method may be useful for the measurement of small amounts of NADPH from various biological sources.

  13. Protective effect of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury via reducing oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lei; Wang, Zhenfei; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Liang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    As previous studies demonstrate that oxidative stress and apoptosis play crucial roles in ischemic pathogenesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) treatment attenuates oxidative stress-induced cell death among primary neurons and astrocytes as well as significantly reduce cerebral ischemic injury in rats. We used a spinal cord ischemia injury (SCII) model in rats to verify our hypothesis that NAD+ could ameliorate oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. Adult male rats were subjected to transient spinal cord ischemia for 60min, and different doses of NAD+ were administered intraperitoneally immediately after the start of reperfusion. Neurological function was determined by Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) scores. The oxidative stress level was assessed by superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. The degree of apoptosis was analyzed by deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining and protein levels of cleaved caspase-3 and AIF (apoptosis inducing factor). The results showed that NAD+ at 50 or 100mg/kg significantly decreased the oxidative stress level and neuronal apoptosis in the spinal cord of ischemia-reperfusion rats compared with saline, as accompanied with the decreased oxidative stress, NAD+ administration significantly restrained the neuronal apoptosis after ischemia injury while improved the neurological and motor function. These findings suggested that NAD+ might protect against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion via reducing oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nitrogen Substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon As Capable Interstellar Infrared Spectrum Source Considering Astronomical Chemical Evolution Step To Biological Organic Purine And Adenine

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Norio

    2016-01-01

    In order to find out capable chemical evolution step from astronomically created organic in interstellar space to biological organic on the earth, infrared spectrum of nitrogen substituted carbon pentagon-hexagon coupled polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon was analyzed by the density functional theory. Ionization was modeled from neutral to tri-cation. Among one nitrogen and two nitrogen substituted NPAH, we could find good examples showing similar IR behavior with astronomically well observed one as like C8H6N1, C7H5N2, and C7H5N2. We can imagine that such ionized NPAH may be created in interstellar space by attacks of high energy nitrogen and photon. Whereas, in case of three and four nitrogen substituted cases as like C6H4N3 and C5H3N4, there were no candidate showing similar behavior with observed one. Also, IR of typical biological organic with four and five nitrogen substituted one as like purine and adenine resulted no good similarity with observed one. By such theoretical comparison, one capable story of ...

  15. Discovery of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Binding Proteins in the Escherichia coli Proteome Using a Combined Energetic- and Structural-Bioinformatics-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingfei; Shin, Woong-Hee; Zhu, Xiaolei; Park, Sung Hoon; Park, Chiwook; Tao, W Andy; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-02-03

    Protein-ligand interaction plays a critical role in regulating the biochemical functions of proteins. Discovering protein targets for ligands is vital to new drug development. Here, we present a strategy that combines experimental and computational approaches to identify ligand-binding proteins in a proteomic scale. For the experimental part, we coupled pulse proteolysis with filter-assisted sample preparation (FASP) and quantitative mass spectrometry. Under denaturing conditions, ligand binding affected protein stability, which resulted in altered protein abundance after pulse proteolysis. For the computational part, we used the software Patch-Surfer2.0. We applied the integrated approach to identify nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding proteins in the Escherichia coli proteome, which has over 4200 proteins. Pulse proteolysis and Patch-Surfer2.0 identified 78 and 36 potential NAD-binding proteins, respectively, including 12 proteins that were consistently detected by the two approaches. Interestingly, the 12 proteins included 8 that are not previously known as NAD binders. Further validation of these eight proteins showed that their binding affinities to NAD computed by AutoDock Vina are higher than their cognate ligands and also that their protein ratios in the pulse proteolysis are consistent with known NAD-binding proteins. These results strongly suggest that these eight proteins are indeed newly identified NAD binders.

  16. The role of iron chelators and oxygen in the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase-dependent chromium(VI) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikalsen, A; Capellmann, M; Alexander, J

    1995-03-01

    Chromium(VI) reduction was studied in a system composed of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (NADPH-P450 reductase) and different iron chelators and iron sources. In an aerobic phosphate buffer containing iron(II), chromium(VI) was not reduced by the Fe2+ probably because of spontaneous autoxidation of Fe2+, but freshly made Fe2+, added directly to a CrVI-containing buffer, reduced CrVI. Under anaerobic conditions, iron(II) reduced chromium(VI) stoichiometrically. A systemic containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-Fe3+, NADPH-P450 reductase and NADPH effectively reduced chromium(VI) anaerobically. Under aerobic conditions this reaction was inhibited by about 45%. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-Fe3+, which is a poor acceptor of electrons from NADPH-P450 reductase, reduced chromium(VI) only marginally, Mannitol slightly increased the aerobic CrVI reduction. Addition of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which both regenerate some O2, led to inhibition of CrVI reduction. Ferritin, NADPH-P450 reductase and the iron chelators, EDTA and citrate, reduced CrVI, indicating mobilization of Fe2+ from ferritin. Low levels of EDTA (55 mumol l-1) and citrate (100 mumol l-1) in contrast to high levels (5 mmol l-1) did not increase CrVI reduction in microsomes. Using 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethane sulfonic acid buffer instead of phosphate buffer, the CrVI-reducing activity was increased.

  17. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-01-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Images PMID:6432847

  18. On the intermolecular vibrational modes of the guanine⋯cytosine, adenine⋯thymine and formamide⋯formamide H-bonded dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florián, Jan; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Johnson, Benny G.

    1995-04-01

    Harmonic force fields, frequencies, and IR and Raman intensities of the intermolecular vibrational modes in the cyclic formamide dimer and the guanine-cytosine and adenine-thymine DNA base pairs were calculated using several ab initio methods, including Hartree-Fock, MP2 and gradient-corrected density functional theory (DFT), with various basis sets. A polar environment was modeled using the polarizable continuum model (SCRF). The effect of electron correlation upon calculated Raman intensities was investigated using DFT. The normal coordinate analysis was carried out in internal coordinates observing C 2h symmetry of the formamide dimer. These coordinates were also generalized for the DNA base pairs, allowing force constants, frequencies and intensities of the characteristic intermolecular vibrational modes to be compared among the H-bonded complexes studied. In addition, coordinates defined in this way are directly related to standard DNA interbase structural parameters as pseudodyad, tilt and propeller twist angles. Extensive coupling of the intramolecular wagging vibrations of the amino groups participating in H-bonding with the tilt and propeller twist vibrations was obtained for the lowest frequency normal modes.

  19. Effects of dietary nucleotides supplementation on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) performance and acute stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi-Kohyani, Ahmad; Keyvanshokooh, Saeed; Nematollahi, Amin; Mahmoudi, Nemat; Pasha-Zanoosi, Hossein

    2012-04-01

    This experiment was conducted to examine the effect of dietary nucleotides (NT) on fish performance and acute stress response on fingerling rainbow trout (23 g ± 0.01, mean weight ± SEM). Five experimental diets according to different levels of supplemented nucleotides (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2%) were assayed on experimental fish for 8 weeks. Growth, hematological parameters (hematocrit, hemoglobin, erythrocyte, lymphocyte, and neutrophil count), serum proteins (globulin, albumin), and plasma enzymatic activity (alkaline phosphatase, ALP; aspartate transaminase, AST; lactate dehydrogenase, LDH; alanine transaminase, ALT) were assayed. At the end of feeding trial, fish fed the control and 0.2% diets were subjected to handling and crowding stress. Modulatory effects of nucleotides on acute stress response (cortisol and glucose) and plasma electrolytes (Na(+), Cl(-), K(+), and Ca(2+)) were studied. The percentage of body weight gain (WG) and feed efficiency (FE) of fish were better when the fish were fed 0.15-0.2% diets. Fish fed the nucleotide-supplemented diets tended to have lower levels of serum enzymes including ALP, AST, LDH, and ALT. Plasma cortisol levels of fish fed on 0.2% diet under handling and crowding stress were significantly lower than fish fed the control diet at all post-stress time intervals. In our study, fish fed nucleotide-supplemented diet had significantly lower concentrations of glucose compared to those fed the basal diet. The concentrations of sodium, chloride, calcium, and potassium of fish fed the control diet were significantly lower than in fish fed nucleotide-supplemented diet. Dietary nucleotides administration seems to promote growth and to enhance resistance against handling and crowding stress in fingerling rainbow trout.

  20. Performance and intestinal health of weanling pigs fed with dietary nucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla de Andrade

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported benefits to growth performance, intestinal histology and reduced diarrhea for pigs supplemented with nucleotide additive as a replacement to antimicrobial growth promoters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nucleotide levels on performance, occurrence of diarrhea, relative weight of organs, intestinal histology, and intestinal microbiota of weanling pigs. One hundred and sixty 21-d weaned pigs (6.43 ± 0.71 kg BW were used in a randomized complete block design experiment with five treatments, eight replications per treatment and four animals per pen (experimental unit. The treatments were basal diet with 120 ppm of chloro-hydroxyquinoline (antimicrobial, and basal diet with 0 (control, 100, 150, or 200 ppm of nucleotides. The average daily gain (ADG, average daily feed intake (ADFI, gain to feed ratio (G:F, and occurrence of diarrhea were calculated from day 1 to 14, day 14 to 34, and day 1 to 34 of the experiment. A day after the end of the experiment, one animal from each pen was slaughtered to evaluate the relative weight of organs, intestinal histology, and intestinal microbiota. From day 1-14 and day 14-34 of the experiment, performance was not affected by the treatments. For the total experimental period (day 1-34, increasing the dietary concentrations of nucleotides linearly improved the final body weight and average daily gain. Salmonella spp. was detected only in the control treatment, without affecting the other microorganisms. Pigs fed with antibiotic had a lower occurrence of diarrhea from day 1-14 compared to pigs fed with nucleotide treatments. Although increasing the occurrence of diarrhea in the first 14 days, dietary nucleotides added up to 200 ppm, improve the final body weight and average daily gain at 34 days post weaning. Nucleotides and antimicrobial not shown beneficial effects on organ weights, and intestinal histology of nursery pig, however, are able to decrease the

  1. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

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    Arehart Eric

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize that specific nucleotide combinations in the flanking regions of SNP fragments are associated with mutation. Results We modeled the relationship between DNA sequence and observed polymorphisms using the novel multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR approach. MDR was originally developed to detect synergistic interactions between multiple SNPs that are predictive of disease susceptibility. We initially assembled data from the Broad Institute as a pilot test for the hypothesis that flanking region patterns associate with mutagenesis (n = 2194. We then confirmed and expanded our inquiry with human SNPs within coding regions and their flanking sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database (n = 29967 and a control set of sequences (coding region not associated with SNP sites randomly selected from the NCBI database (n = 29967. We discovered seven flanking region pattern associations in the Broad dataset which reached a minimum significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Significant models (p Conclusion The present study represents the first use of this computational methodology for modeling nonlinear patterns in molecular genetics. MDR was able to identify distinct nucleotide patterning around sites of mutations dependent upon the observed nucleotide change. We discovered one flanking region set that included five nucleotides clustered around a specific type of SNP site. Based on the strongly associated patterns identified in

  2. Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation by strongly agonistic nucleotidic phosphoantigens.

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    Moulin, Morgane; Alguacil, Javier; Gu, Siyi; Mehtougui, Asmaa; Adams, Erin J; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Champagne, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells can sense through their TCR tumor cells producing the weak endogenous phosphorylated antigen isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), or bacterially infected cells producing the strong agonist hydroxyl dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (HDMAPP). The recognition of the phosphoantigen is dependent on its binding to the intracellular B30.2 domain of butyrophilin BTN3A1. Most studies have focused on pyrophosphate phosphoantigens. As triphosphate nucleotide derivatives are naturally co-produced with IPP and HDMAPP, we analyzed their specific properties using synthetic nucleotides derived from HDMAPP. The adenylated, thymidylated and uridylated triphosphate derivatives were found to activate directly Vγ9Vδ2 cell lines as efficiently as HDMAPP in the absence of accessory cells. These antigens were inherently resistant to terminal phosphatases, but apyrase, when added during a direct stimulation of Vγ9Vδ2 cells, abrogated their stimulating activity, indicating that their activity required transformation into strong pyrophosphate agonists by a nucleotide pyrophosphatase activity which is present in serum. Tumor cells can be sensitized with nucleotide phosphoantigens in the presence of apyrase to become stimulatory, showing that this can occur before their hydrolysis into pyrophosphates. Whereas tumors sensitized with HDMAPP rapidly lost their stimulatory activity, sensitization with nucleotide derivatives, in particular with the thymidine derivative, induced long-lasting stimulating ability. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, binding of some nucleotide derivatives to BTN3A1 intracellular domain was found to occur with an affinity similar to that of IPP, but much lower than that of HDMAPP. Thus, nucleotide phosphoantigens are precursors of pyrophosphate antigens which can deliver strong agonists intracellularly resulting in prolonged and strengthened activity.

  3. Cobalt(III) complexes of monodentate N9-bound adeninate (ade-), [Co(ade-kappaN9)Cl(en)2]+ (en = 1,2-diaminoethane): syntheses, crystal structures, and protonation behaviors of the geometrical isomers.

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    Suzuki, Takayoshi; Hirai, Yoko; Monjushiro, Hideaki; Kaizaki, Sumio

    2004-10-04

    In acidic aqueous solution, a cobalt(III) complex containing monodentate N(9)-bound adeninate (ade(-)), cis-[Co(ade-kappaN(9))Cl(en)(2)]Cl (cis-[1]Cl), underwent protonation to the adeninate moiety without geometrical isomerization or decomposition of the Co(III) coordination sphere, and complexes of cis-[CoCl(Hade)(en)(2)]Cl(2) (cis-[2]Cl(2)) and cis-[Co(H(2)ade)Cl(en)(2)]Cl(3) (cis-[3]Cl(3)) could be isolated. The pK(a) values of the Hade and H(2)ade(+) complexes are 6.03(1) and 2.53(12), respectively, at 20 degrees C in 0.1 M aqueous NaCl. The single-crystal X-ray analyses of cis-[2]Cl(2).0.5H(2)O and cis-[3]Cl(2)(BF(4)).H(2)O revealed that protonation took place first at the adeninate N(7) and then at the N(1) atoms to form adenine tautomer (7H-Hade-kappaN(9)) and cationic adeninium (1H,7H-H(2)ade(+)-kappaN(9)) complexes, respectively. On the other hand, addition of NaOH to an aqueous solution of cis-[1]Cl afforded a mixture of geometrical isomers of the hydroxo-adeninato complex, cis- and trans-[Co(ade-kappaN(9))(OH)(en)(2)](+). The trans-isomer of chloro-adeninato complex trans-[Co(ade-kappaN(9))Cl(en)(2)]BF(4) (trans-[1]BF(4)) was synthesized by a reaction of cis-[2](BF(4))(2) and sodium methoxide in methanol. This isomer in acidic aqueous solution was also stable toward isomerization, affording the corresponding adenine tautomer and adeninium complexes (pK(a) = 5.21(1) and 2.48(9), respectively, at 20 degrees C in 0.1 M aqueous NaCl). The protonated product of trans-[Co(7H-Hade-kappaN(9))Cl(en)(2)](BF(4))(2).H(2)O (trans-[2](BF(4))(2).H(2)O) could also be characterized by X-ray analysis. Furthermore, the hydrogen-bonding interactions of the adeninate/adenine tautomer complexes cis-[1]BF(4), cis-[2](BF(4))(2), and trans-[2](BF(4))(2) with 1-cyclohexyluracil in acetonitrile-d(3) were investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of trans-[Co(ade)(H(2)O)(en)(2)]HPO(4).3H(2)O, which was obtained by a reaction of trans-[Co(ade)(OH)(en)(2)]BF(4

  4. Globalizing Genomics: The Origins of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

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    Stevens, Hallam

    2017-10-06

    Genomics is increasingly considered a global enterprise - the fact that biological information can flow rapidly around the planet is taken to be important to what genomics is and what it can achieve. However, the large-scale international circulation of nucleotide sequence information did not begin with the Human Genome Project. Efforts to formalize and institutionalize the circulation of sequence information emerged concurrently with the development of centralized facilities for collecting that information. That is, the very first databases build for collecting and sharing DNA sequence information were, from their outset, international collaborative enterprises. This paper describes the origins of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration between GenBank in the United States, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Databank, and the DNA Database of Japan. The technical and social groundwork for the international exchange of nucleotide sequences created the conditions of possibility for imagining nucleotide sequences (and subsequently genomes) as a "global" objects. The "transnationalism" of nucleotide sequence was critical to their ontology - what DNA sequences came to be during the Human Genome Project was deeply influenced by international exchange.

  5. Reversal of Proximal Renal Tubular Dysfunction after Nucleotide Analogue Withdrawal in Chronic Hepatitis B

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    Abhasnee Sobhonslidsuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Proximal renal tubular dysfunction (PRTD is an infrequent complication after nucleotide analogue therapy. We evaluated the outcomes of PRTD and nephrotoxicity after nucleotide analogue withdrawal in chronic hepatitis B (CHB. Methods. A longitudinal follow-up study was performed in patients with PRTD after nucleotide analogue discontinuation. Serum and urine were collected at baseline and every 3 months for one year. The fractional excretion of phosphate (PO4, uric acid (UA, and potassium and tubular maximal reabsorption rate of PO4 to glomerular filtration rate (TmPO4/GFR were calculated. Renal losses were defined based on the criteria of substance losses. Subclinical PRTD and overt PRTD were diagnosed when 2 and ≥3 criteria were identified. Results. Eight subclinical and eight overt PRTD patients were enrolled. After nucleotide analogue withdrawal, there were overall improvements in GFR, serum PO4, and UA. Renal loss of PO4, UA, protein, and β2-microglobulin reduced over time. At one year, complete reversal of PRTD was seen in 13 patients (81.2%. Improvements in PRTD were seen in all but one patient. Conclusion. One year after nucleotide analogue withdrawal, PRTD was resolved in most patients. Changes in TmPO4/GFR, urinary protein, and β2-microglobulin indicate that urinary biomarkers may represent an early sign of PRTD recovery.

  6. Nucleotide precursors prevent folic acid-resistant neural tube defects in the mouse.

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    Leung, Kit-Yi; De Castro, Sandra C P; Savery, Dawn; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2013-09-01

    Closure of the neural tube during embryogenesis is a crucial step in development of the central nervous system. Failure of this process results in neural tube defects, including spina bifida and anencephaly, which are among the most common birth defects worldwide. Maternal use of folic acid supplements reduces risk of neural tube defects but a proportion of cases are not preventable. Folic acid is thought to act through folate one-carbon metabolism, which transfers one-carbon units for methylation reactions and nucleotide biosynthesis. Hence suboptimal performance of the intervening reactions could limit the efficacy of folic acid. We hypothesized that direct supplementation with nucleotides, downstream of folate metabolism, has the potential to support neural tube closure. Therefore, in a mouse model that exhibits folic acid-resistant neural tube defects, we tested the effect of specific combinations of pyrimidine and purine nucleotide precursors and observed a significant protective effect. Labelling in whole embryo culture showed that nucleotides are taken up by the neurulating embryo and incorporated into genomic DNA. Furthermore, the mitotic index was elevated in neural folds and hindgut of treated embryos, consistent with a proposed mechanism of neural tube defect prevention through stimulation of cellular proliferation. These findings may provide an impetus for future investigations of supplemental nucleotides as a means to prevent a greater proportion of human neural tube defects than can be achieved by folic acid alone.

  7. Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and unexpected consanguinity: considerations for clinicians when returning results to families.

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    Delgado, Fernanda; Tabor, Holly K; Chow, Penny M; Conta, Jessie H; Feldman, Kenneth W; Tsuchiya, Karen D; Beck, Anita E

    2015-05-01

    The broad use of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays has increased identification of unexpected consanguinity. Therefore, guidelines to address reporting of consanguinity have been published for clinical laboratories. Because no such guidelines for clinicians exist, we describe a case and present recommendations for clinicians to disclose unexpected consanguinity to families. In a boy with multiple endocrine abnormalities and structural birth defects, single-nucleotide polymorphism array analysis revealed ~23% autosomal homozygosity suggestive of a first-degree parental relationship. We assembled an interdisciplinary health-care team, planned the most appropriate way to discuss results of the single-nucleotide polymorphism array with the adult mother, including the possibility of multiple autosomal recessive disorders in her child, and finally met with her as a team. From these discussions, we developed four major considerations for clinicians returning results of unexpected consanguinity, all guided by the child's best interests: (i) ethical and legal obligations for reporting possible abuse, (ii) preservation of the clinical relationship, (iii) attention to justice and psychosocial challenges, and (iv) utilization of the single-nucleotide polymorphism array results to guide further testing. As single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays become a common clinical diagnostic tool, clinicians can use this framework to return results of unexpected consanguinity to families in a supportive and productive manner.

  8. Investigating cyclic nucleotide and cyclic dinucleotide binding to HCN channels by surface plasmon resonance.

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    Sebastien Hayoz

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN channels control cardiac and neuronal rhythmicity. HCN channels contain cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD in their C-terminal region linked to the pore-forming transmembrane segment with a C-linker. The C-linker couples the conformational changes caused by the direct binding of cyclic nucleotides to the HCN pore opening. Recently, cyclic dinucleotides were shown to antagonize the effect of cyclic nucleotides in HCN4 but not in HCN2 channels. Based on the structural analysis and mutational studies it has been proposed that cyclic dinucleotides affect HCN4 channels by binding to the C-linker pocket (CLP. Here, we first show that surface plasmon resonance (SPR can be used to accurately measure cyclic nucleotide binding affinity to the C-linker/CNBD of HCN2 and HCN4 channels. We then used SPR to investigate cyclic dinucleotide binding in HCN channels. To our surprise, we detected no binding of cyclic dinucleotides to the isolated monomeric C-linker/CNBDs of HCN4 channels with SPR. The binding of cyclic dinucleotides was further examined with isothermal calorimetry (ITC, which indicated no binding of cyclic dinucleotides to both monomeric and tetrameric C-linker/CNBDs of HCN4 channels. Taken together, our results suggest that interaction of the C-linker/CNBD with other parts of the channel is necessary for cyclic-dinucleotide binding in HCN4 channels.

  9. Analysis of plant nucleotide sugars by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Jun; Herter, Thomas; Baidoo, Edward E K; Lao, Jeemeng; Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E; Michelle Smith-Moritz, A; Adams, Paul D; Keasling, Jay D; Usadel, Björn; Petzold, Christopher J; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the intricate metabolic processes involved in plant cell wall biosynthesis is limited by difficulties in performing sensitive quantification of many involved compounds. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography is a useful technique for the analysis of hydrophilic metabolites from complex biological extracts and forms the basis of this method to quantify plant cell wall precursors. A zwitterionic silica-based stationary phase has been used to separate hydrophilic nucleotide sugars involved in cell wall biosynthesis from milligram amounts of leaf tissue. A tandem mass spectrometry operating in selected reaction monitoring mode was used to quantify nucleotide sugars. This method was highly repeatable and quantified 12 nucleotide sugars at low femtomole quantities, with linear responses up to four orders of magnitude to several 100pmol. The method was also successfully applied to the analysis of purified leaf extracts from two model plant species with variations in their cell wall sugar compositions and indicated significant differences in the levels of 6 out of 12 nucleotide sugars. The plant nucleotide sugar extraction procedure was demonstrated to have good recovery rates with minimal matrix effects. The approach results in a significant improvement in sensitivity when applied to plant samples over currently employed techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sublingual Nucleotides Prolong Run Time to Exhaustion in Young Physically Active Men

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    Sergej M. Ostojic

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although dietary nucleotides have been determined to be required for normal immune function, there is limited direct interventional evidence confirming performance-enhancing effects of sublingual nucleotides in humans. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of sublingual nucleotides (50 mg/day administered for 14 days in thirty young healthy physically active males, on endurance performance and immune responses. Fasting white blood cell count, natural killer cells (NKC number, NKC cytotoxic activity, and serum immunoglobulin (IgA, IgM, IgG, and time to exhaustion, peak rate of perceived exertion, peak heart rate, and peak running speed during the exercise test were measured at baseline (day 0 and post-intervention (day 14. Time to exhaustion, as well as serum immunoglobulin A and NKC cytotoxic activity, were significantly higher at day 14 (p < 0.05 in participants supplemented with nucleotides compared with those who consumed placebo. No significant differences in other parameters were observed between groups at post-intervention. No volunteers withdrew before the end of the study nor reported any vexatious side effects of supplementation. The results of the present study suggest that sublingual nucleotides may provide pertinent benefit as both an ergogenic and immunostimulatory additive in active males.

  11. Discovery of nucleotide polymorphisms in the Musa gene pool by Ecotilling.

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    Till, Bradley J; Jankowicz-Cieslak, Joanna; Sági, László; Huynh, Owen A; Utsushi, Hiroe; Swennen, Rony; Terauchi, Ryohei; Mba, Chikelu

    2010-11-01

    Musa (banana and plantain) is an important genus for the global export market and in local markets where it provides staple food for approximately 400 million people. Hybridization and polyploidization of several (sub)species, combined with vegetative propagation and human selection have produced a complex genetic history. We describe the application of the Ecotilling method for the discovery and characterization of nucleotide polymorphisms in diploid and polyploid accessions of Musa. We discovered over 800 novel alleles in 80 accessions. Sequencing and band evaluation shows Ecotilling to be a robust and accurate platform for the discovery of polymorphisms in homologous and homeologous gene targets. In the process of validating the method, we identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms that may be deleterious for the function of a gene putatively important for phototropism. Evaluation of heterozygous polymorphism and haplotype blocks revealed a high level of nucleotide diversity in Musa accessions. We further applied a strategy for the simultaneous discovery of heterozygous and homozygous polymorphisms in diploid accessions to rapidly evaluate nucleotide diversity in accessions of the same genome type. This strategy can be used to develop hypotheses for inheritance patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms within and between genome types. We conclude that Ecotilling is suitable for diversity studies in Musa, that it can be considered for functional genomics studies and as tool in selecting germplasm for traditional and mutation breeding approaches.

  12. A new supervised over-sampling algorithm with application to protein-nucleotide binding residue prediction.

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    Jun Hu

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleotide interactions are ubiquitous in a wide variety of biological processes. Accurately identifying interaction residues solely from protein sequences is useful for both protein function annotation and drug design, especially in the post-genomic era, as large volumes of protein data have not been functionally annotated. Protein-nucleotide binding residue prediction is a typical imbalanced learning problem, where binding residues are extremely fewer in number than non-binding residues. Alleviating the severity of class imbalance has been demonstrated to be a promising means of improving the prediction performance of a machine-learning-based predictor for class imbalance problems. However, little attention has been paid to the negative impact of class imbalance on protein-nucleotide binding residue prediction. In this study, we propose a new supervised over-sampling algorithm that synthesizes additional minority class samples to address class imbalance. The experimental results from protein-nucleotide interaction datasets demonstrate that the proposed supervised over-sampling algorithm can relieve the severity of class imbalance and help to improve prediction performance. Based on the proposed over-sampling algorithm, a predictor, called TargetSOS, is implemented for protein-nucleotide binding residue prediction. Cross-validation tests and independent validation tests demonstrate the effectiveness of TargetSOS. The web-server and datasets used in this study are freely available at http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetSOS/.

  13. MeCP2 recognizes cytosine methylated tri-nucleotide and di-nucleotide sequences to tune transcription in the mammalian brain.

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    Sabine Lagger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CG binding protein MeCP2 cause several neurological disorders including Rett syndrome. The di-nucleotide methyl-CG (mCG is the classical MeCP2 DNA recognition sequence, but additional methylated sequence targets have been reported. Here we show by in vitro and in vivo analyses that MeCP2 binding to non-CG methylated sites in brain is largely confined to the tri-nucleotide sequence mCAC. MeCP2 binding to chromosomal DNA in mouse brain is proportional to mCAC + mCG density and unexpectedly defines large genomic domains within which transcription is sensitive to MeCP2 occupancy. Our results suggest that MeCP2 integrates patterns of mCAC and mCG in the brain to restrain transcription of genes critical for neuronal function.

  14. The distribution of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, cranial and spinal nerves of frog, Microhyla ornata.

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    Jadhao, Arun G; Biswas, Saikat P; Bhoyar, Rahul C; Pinelli, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) enzymatic activity has been reported in few amphibian species. In this study, we report its unusual localization in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, cranial nerves, spinal nerves, and ganglions of the frog, Microhyla ornata. In the rhombencephalon, at the level of facial and vagus nerves, the NADPH-d labeling was noted in the nucleus of the abducent and facial nerves, dorsal nucleus of the vestibulocochlear nerve, the nucleus of hypoglossus nerve, dorsal and lateral column nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the dorsal field of spinal grey, the lateral and medial motor fields of spinal grey and radix ventralis and dorsalis (2-10). Many ependymal cells around the lining of the fourth ventricle, both facial and vagus nerves and dorsal root ganglion, were intensely labeled with NADPH-d. Most strikingly the NADPH-d activity was seen in small and large sized motoneurons in both medial and lateral motor neuron columns on the right and left sides of the brain. This is the largest stained group observed from the caudal rhombencephalon up to the level of radix dorsalis 10 in the spinal cord. The neurons were either oval or elongated in shape with long processes and showed significant variation in the nuclear and cellular diameter. A massive NADPH-d activity in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, and spinal nerves implied an important role of this enzyme in the neuronal signaling as well as in the modulation of motor functions in the peripheral nervous systems of the amphibians. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Protective immunity conferred by a DNA adenine methylase deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine when delivered in-water to sheep challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, V L; Heithoff, D M; Mahan, M J; Walker, K H; Hornitzky, M A; Gabor, L; Thomson, P C; Thompson, A; House, J K

    2011-04-27

    Stimulation of acquired immunity to Salmonella in livestock is not feasible in neonates (which can be infected within 24h of birth) and is challenging in feedlots, which typically source animals from diverse locations and vendors. Induction of innate immune mechanisms through mass vaccination of animals upon arrival to feedlots is an alternative approach. Transport, environmental conditions, changes in social grouping, and further handling during feedlot assembly are significant stressors. These factors, as well as concurrent exposure to a diversity of pathogens, contribute to the risk of disease. We have shown that oral immunization of calves with a modified live Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strain, which lacks the DNA adenine methylase gene (S. Typhimurium dam), attenuates the severity of clinical disease, reduces fecal shedding, and promotes clearance of salmonellae following virulent homologous and heterologous challenge. This study examines the safety and efficacy of a S. Typhimurium dam vaccine in sheep via oral delivery in drinking water (ad libitum), as a means to effectively vaccinate large groups of animals. Adult merino sheep were vaccinated in drinking water -28 days, -7 days and 24h pre and 24h post-virulent Salmonella Typhimurium challenge which was administered via the oral route. Significant attenuation of clinical disease (temperature, appetite, and attitude) and reduction in mortality and virulent Salmonella Typhimurium fecal shedding and tissue colonization was observed in animals that received the vaccine 28 and 7 days pre-challenge. Further, vaccination did not pose a risk to stock previously infected with virulent salmonellae as mortalities and clinical disease in sheep vaccinated prior to or following virulent challenge did not differ significantly from the non-vaccinated controls. The capacity of S. Typhimurium dam vaccines delivered in drinking water to protect livestock from virulent Salmonella challenge offers an

  16. Spectroscopy and speciation studies on the interactions of aluminum (III) with ciprofloxacin and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoling; Li, Li; Xu, Chongzheng; Wei, Haiyan; Wang, Xianlong; Yang, Xiaodi

    2012-08-03

    In this study, both experimental and theoretical approaches, including absorption spectra, fluorescence emission spectra, 1H- and 31P-NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), pH-potentiometry and theoretical approaches using the BEST & SPE computer programs were applied to study the competitive complexation between ciprofloxacin (CIP) and b-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) with aluminum (III) in aqueous solutions. Rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA) was used to analyze the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the ligands, the binary complexes and the ternary complexes. It is found, at the mM total concentration level and pH = 7.0, the bidentate mononuclear species [Al(CIP)]2+ and [Al(NADP)] predominate in the aqueous solutions of the Al(III)-CIP and Al(III)-NADP systems, and the two complexes have similar conditional stability constants. However, the pH-potentiometry results show at the mM total concentration level and pH = 7.0, the ternary species [Al(CIP)(HNADP)] predominates in the ternary complex system. Comparing predicted NMR spectra with the experimental NMR results, it can be concluded that for the ternary complex, CIP binds to aluminum ion between the 3-carboxylic and 4-carbonyl groups, while the binding site of oxidized coenzyme II is through the oxygen of phosphate, which is linked to adenosine ribose, instead of pyrophosphate. The results also suggested CIP has the potential to be a probe molecular for the detection of NADP and the Al(III)-NADP complexes under physiological condition.

  17. Chinese Herbal Formulas Si-Wu-Tang and Er-Miao-San Synergistically Ameliorated Hyperuricemia and Renal Impairment in Rats Induced by Adenine and Potassium Oxonate

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    Yongping Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. Here, we examined the combined protective effects of Chinese herbal formula Si-Wu-Tang and Er-Miao-San on hyperuricemia and renal impairment in rats. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into normal rats, hyperuricemic rats, and hyperuricemic rats orally administrated with benzbromarone (4.5 mg·kg-1·d-1, Si-Wu-Tang (3.78 g·kg-1·d-1 and Si-Wu-Tang plus Er-Miao-San (6.48 g·kg-1·d-1 for 4 weeks. Hyperuricemic rats were orally gavaged with adenine (0.1 g·kg-1·d-1 and potassium oxonate (1.5 g·kg-1·d-1 daily for 4 weeks. Serum uric acid, creatinine, total cholesterol (TCH, triglyceride and blood urea nitrogen (BUN concentrations, as well as urinary uric acid and microalbuminuria were measured weekly. Serum xanthine oxidase (XOD activity and renal histopathology were also evaluated. The renal expression of organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1 and organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3 was detected by western blot. Results: Si-Wu-Tang plus Er-Miao-San lowered serum uric acid, creatinine, triglyceride and BUN levels to a greater degree than did Si-Wu-Tang alone. Si-Wu-Tang plus Er-Miao-San ameliorated microalbuminuria and renal histopathology, as well as decreased serum TCH concentration and XOD activity in hyperuricemic rats. Combination of Si-Wu-Tang and Er-Miao-San also led to a greater increase in OAT1 and OAT3 expression than did Siwutang alone. Conclusion: Si-Wu-Tang and Er-Miao-San synergistically ameliorated hyperuricemia and renal impairment in rats through upregulation of OAT1 and OAT3.

  18. Spectroscopy and Speciation Studies on the Interactions of Aluminum (III with Ciprofloxacin and β-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate in Aqueous Solutions

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    Xiaodi Yang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, both experimental and theoretical approaches, including absorption spectra, fluorescence emission spectra, 1H- and 31P-NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, pH-potentiometry and theoretical approaches using the BEST & SPE computer programs were applied to study the competitive complexation between ciprofloxacin (CIP and b-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP with aluminum (III in aqueous solutions. Rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA was used to analyze the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the ligands, the binary complexes and the ternary complexes. It is found, at the mM total concentration level and pH = 7.0, the bidentate mononuclear species [Al(CIP]2+ and [Al(NADP] predominate in the aqueous solutions of the Al(III-CIP and Al(III-NADP systems, and the two complexes have similar conditional stability constants. However, the pH-potentiometry results show at the mM total concentration level and pH = 7.0, the ternary species [Al(CIP(HNADP] predominates in the ternary complex system. Comparing predicted NMR spectra with the experimental NMR results, it can be concluded that for the ternary complex, CIP binds to aluminum ion between the 3-carboxylic and 4-carbonyl groups, while the binding site of oxidized coenzyme II is through the oxygen of phosphate, which is linked to adenosine ribose, instead of pyrophosphate. The results also suggested CIP has the potential to be a probe molecular for the detection of NADP and the Al(III-NADP complexes under physiological condition.

  19. Effect of telmisartan on the expression of adiponectin receptors and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase in the heart and aorta in type 2 diabetic rats

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    Guo Zhixin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic cardiovascular disease is associated with decreased adiponectin and increased oxidative stress. This study investigated the effect of telmisartan on the expression of adiponectin receptor 2 (adipoR2 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase subunits in the heart and the expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1 in aorta in type 2 diabetic rats. Methods Type 2 diabetes was induced by high-fat and high-sugar diet and intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ. Heart function, adipoR2, p22phox, NOX4, glucose transporter 4(GLUT4, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1(MCP-1 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGFin the heart, and adipoR1, MCP-1 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB in aorta were analyzed in controls and diabetic rats treated with or without telmisartan (5mg/kg/d by gavage for 12 weeks. Results Heart function, plasma and myocardial adiponectin levels, the expression of myocardial adipoR2 and GLUT4 were significantly decreased in diabetic rats (P Conclusions Our results suggest that telmisartan upregulates the expression of myocardial adiponectin, its receptor 2 and GLUT4. Simultaneously, it downregulates the expression of myocardial p22phox, NOX4, MCP-1, and CTGF, contributing so to the improvement of heart function in diabetic rats. Telmisartan also induces a protective role on the vascular system by upregulating the expression of adipoR1 and downregulating the expression of MCP-1 and NF-κB in the abdominal aorta in diabetic rats.

  20. Simultaneous determination of adenine guanine and thymine at multi-walled carbon nanotubes incorporated with poly(new fuchsin) composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Ching; Yogeswaran, Umasankar [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, No.1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, S.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, No.1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: smchen78@ms15.hinet.net

    2009-03-16

    A composite film (MWCNTs-PNF) which contains multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) along with the incorporation of poly(new fuchsin) (PNF) has been synthesized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE), gold (Au) and indium tin oxide (ITO) by potentiostatic methods. The presence of MWCNTs in the composite film enhances surface coverage concentration ({gamma}) of PNF to {approx}176.5%, and increases the electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) to {approx}346%. The composite film also exhibits promising enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards the mixture of biochemical compounds such as adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and thymine (THY). The surface morphology of the composite film deposited on ITO has been studied using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. These two techniques reveal that the PNF incorporated on MWCNTs. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance study reveals the enhancement in the functional properties of MWCNTs and PNF. The electrocatalytic responses of analytes at MWCNTs and MWCNTs-PNF films were measured using both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). From electrocatalysis studies, well separated voltammetric peaks have been obtained at the composite film for AD, GU and THY, with the peak separation of 320.3 and 132.7 mV between GU-AD and AD-THY respectively. The sensitivity of the composite film towards AD, GU and THY in DPV technique is 218.18, 12.62 and 78.22 mA M{sup -1} cm{sup -2} respectively, which are higher than MWCNTs film. Further, electroanalytical studies of AD, GU and THY present in single-strand deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) have been carried out using semi-derivative CV and DPV.

  1. A novel flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) containing d-lactate dehydrogenase from the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeota Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7: purification, characterization and expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2008-07-01

    Dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase activity was found in the crude extract of a continental thermoacidophilic crenarchaeota, Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7, and was purified 375-fold through four sequential chromatography steps. With a molecular mass of about 93 kDa, this enzyme was a homodimer comprised of identical subunits with molecular masses of about 48 kDa. The enzyme retained its full activity after incubation at 80 degrees C for 10 min and after incubation at pHs ranging from 6.5 to 10.0 for 30 min at 50 degrees C. The preferred substrate for this enzyme was D-lactate, with 2,6-dichloroindophenol serving as the electron acceptor. Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the enzyme's prosthetic group was determined to be flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was MLEGIEYSQGEEREDFVGFKIKPKI. Using that sequence and previously reported genome information, the gene encoding the enzyme (ST0649) was identified. It was subsequently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and found to encode a polypeptide of 440 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 49,715. The amino acid sequence of this dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase showed higher homology (39% identity) with that of a glycolate oxidase subunit homologue from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, but less similarity (32% identity) to D-lactate dehydrogenase from A. fulgidus. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase from S. tokodaii is a novel type of FAD containing D-lactate dehydrogenase.

  2. Nuclear-localized cyclic nucleotide-gated channels mediate symbiotic calcium oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Myriam; Sun, Jongho; Vaz Martins, Teresa; Radhakrishnan, Guru V; Findlay, Kim; Soumpourou, Eleni; Thouin, Julien; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Sanders, Dale; Morris, Richard J; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2016-05-27

    Nuclear-associated Ca(2+) oscillations mediate plant responses to beneficial microbial partners--namely, nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that colonize roots of legumes and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize roots of the majority of plant species. A potassium-permeable channel is known to be required for symbiotic Ca(2+) oscillations, but the calcium channels themselves have been unknown until now. We show that three cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in Medicago truncatula are required for nuclear Ca(2+) oscillations and subsequent symbiotic responses. These cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are located at the nuclear envelope and are permeable to Ca(2+) We demonstrate that the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels form a complex with the postassium-permeable channel, which modulates nuclear Ca(2+) release. These channels, like their counterparts in animal cells, might regulate multiple nuclear Ca(2+) responses to developmental and environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. A curated dataset of complete Enterobacteriaceae plasmids compiled from the NCBI nucleotide database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Orlek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of plasmid sequences are now publicly available in the NCBI nucleotide database, but they are not reliably annotated to distinguish complete plasmids from plasmid fragments, such as gene or contig sequences; therefore, retrieving complete plasmids for downstream analyses is challenging. Here we present a curated dataset of complete bacterial plasmids from the clinically relevant Enterobacteriaceae family. The dataset was compiled from the NCBI nucleotide database using curation steps designed to exclude incomplete plasmid sequences, and chromosomal sequences misannotated as plasmids. Over 2000 complete plasmid sequences are included in the curated plasmid dataset. Protein sequences produced from translating each complete plasmid nucleotide sequence in all 6 frames are also provided. Further analysis and discussion of the dataset is presented in an accompanying research article: “Ordering the mob: insights into replicon and MOB typing…” (Orlek et al., 2017 [1]. The curated plasmid sequences are publicly available in the Figshare repository.

  4. Common and Potentially Prebiotic Origin for Precursors of Nucleotide Synthesis and Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Giurgiu, Constantin; Tam, Chun Pong; Li, Li; Hongo, Yayoi; Aono, Masashi; Szostak, Jack W

    2017-07-05

    We have recently shown that 2-aminoimidazole is a superior nucleotide activating group for nonenzymatic RNA copying. Here we describe a prebiotic synthesis of 2-aminoimidazole that shares a common mechanistic pathway with that of 2-aminooxazole, a previously described key intermediate in prebiotic nucleotide synthesis. In the presence of glycolaldehyde, cyanamide, phosphate and ammonium ion, both 2-aminoimidazole and 2-aminooxazole are produced, with higher concentrations of ammonium ion and acidic pH favoring the former. Given a 1:1 mixture of 2-aminoimidazole and 2-aminooxazole, glyceraldehyde preferentially reacts and cyclizes with the latter, forming a mixture of pentose aminooxazolines, and leaving free 2-aminoimidazole available for nucleotide activation. The common synthetic origin of 2-aminoimidazole and 2-aminooxazole and their distinct reactivities are suggestive of a reaction network that could lead to both the synthesis of RNA monomers and to their subsequent chemical activation.

  5. Use of Specific Chemical Reagents for Detection of Modified Nucleotides in RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Behm-Ansmant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring cellular RNAs contain an impressive number of chemically distinct modified residues which appear posttranscriptionally, as a result of specific action of the corresponding RNA modification enzymes. Over 100 different chemical modifications have been identified and characterized up to now. Identification of the chemical nature and exact position of these modifications is typically based on 2D-TLC analysis of nucleotide digests, on HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry, or on the use of primer extension by reverse transcriptase. However, many modified nucleotides are silent in reverse transcription, since the presence of additional chemical groups frequently does not change base-pairing properties. In this paper, we give a summary of various chemical approaches exploiting the specific reactivity of modified nucleotides in RNA for their detection.

  6. Heated oligonucleotide ligation assay (HOLA): an affordable single nucleotide polymorphism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W C; Gorrochotegui-Escalante, N; Duteau, N M

    2006-03-01

    Most single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection requires expensive equipment and reagents. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is an inexpensive SNP assay that detects ligation between a biotinylated "allele-specific detector" and a 3' fluorescein-labeled "reporter" oligonucleotide. No ligation occurs unless the 3' detector nucleotide is complementary to the SNP nucleotide. The original OLA used chemical denaturation and neutralization. Heated OLA (HOLA) instead uses a thermal stable ligase and cycles of denaturing and hybridization for ligation and SNP detection. The cost per genotype is approximately US$1.25 with two-allele SNPs or approximately US$1.75 with three-allele SNPs. We illustrate the development of HOLA for SNP detection in the Early Trypsin and Abundant Trypsin loci in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) and at the a-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae s.s.

  7. Design of small molecules that compete with nucleotide binding to an engineered oncogenic KRAS allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Larraufie, Mare-Helene; Musavi, Leila; Akkiraju, Hemanth; Brown, Lewis M; Stockwell, Brent R

    2018-01-09

    RAS mutations are found in 30% of all human cancers, with KRAS the most frequently mutated among the three RAS isoforms (KRAS, NRAS, HRAS). However, directly targeting oncogenic KRAS with small molecules in the nucleotide-binding site has been difficult due to the high affinity of KRAS for GDP and GTP. We designed an engineered allele of KRAS, and a covalent inhibitor that competes for GTP and GDP. This ligand-receptor combination demonstrates that the high affinity of GTP/GDP for RAS proteins can be overcome with a covalent inhibitor and a suitably engineered binding site. The covalent inhibitor irreversibly modifies the protein at the engineered nucleotide binding site and is able to compete with GDP and GTP. This provides a new tool for studying KRAS function and suggests strategies for targeting the nucleotide-binding site of oncogenic RAS proteins.

  8. A curated dataset of complete Enterobacteriaceae plasmids compiled from the NCBI nucleotide database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlek, Alex; Phan, Hang; Sheppard, Anna E; Doumith, Michel; Ellington, Matthew; Peto, Tim; Crook, Derrick; Walker, A Sarah; Woodford, Neil; Anjum, Muna F; Stoesser, Nicole

    2017-06-01

    Thousands of plasmid sequences are now publicly available in the NCBI nucleotide database, but they are not reliably annotated to distinguish complete plasmids from plasmid fragments, such as gene or contig sequences; therefore, retrieving complete plasmids for downstream analyses is challenging. Here we present a curated dataset of complete bacterial plasmids from the clinically relevant Enterobacteriaceae family. The dataset was compiled from the NCBI nucleotide database using curation steps designed to exclude incomplete plasmid sequences, and chromosomal sequences misannotated as plasmids. Over 2000 complete plasmid sequences are included in the curated plasmid dataset. Protein sequences produced from translating each complete plasmid nucleotide sequence in all 6 frames are also provided. Further analysis and discussion of the dataset is presented in an accompanying research article: "Ordering the mob: insights into replicon and MOB typing…" (Orlek et al., 2017) [1]. The curated plasmid sequences are publicly available in the Figshare repository.

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host.

  11. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Hesketh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP, cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection.

  12. Moloney murine sarcoma virus MuSVts110 DNA: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, L; Chiocca, S M; Gilbreth, M A; Ainsworth, J R; Bishop, L A; Murphy, E C

    1992-09-01

    We have cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MuSV) MuSVts110 DNA by assembly of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified segments of integrated viral DNA from infected NRK cells (6m2 cells) and determined its complete sequence. Previously, by direct sequencing of MuSVts110 RNA transcribed in 6m2 cells, we established that the thermosensitive RNA splicing phenotype uniquely characteristic of MuSVts110 results from a deletion of 1,487 nucleotides of progenitor MuSV-124 sequences. As anticipated, the sequence obtained in this study contained precisely this same deletion. In addition, several other unexpected sequence differences were found between MuSVts110 and MuSV-124. For example, in the noncoding region upstream of the gag gene, MuSVts110 DNA contained a 52-nucleotide tract typical of murine leukemia virus rather than MuSV-124, suggesting that MuSVts110 originated as a MuSV-helper murine leukemia virus recombinant during reverse transcription rather than from a straightforward deletion within MuSV-124. In addition, both MuSVts110 long terminal repeats contained head-to-tail duplications of eight nucleotides in the U3 region. Finally, seven single-nucleotide substitutions were found scattered throughout MuSVts110 DNA. Three of the nucleotide substitutions were in the gag gene, resulting in one coding change in p15 and one in p30. All of the remaining nucleotide changes were found in the noncoding region between the 5' long terminal repeat and the gag gene. In NIH 3T3 cells transfected with the cloned MuSVts110 DNA, the pattern of viral RNA expression conformed with that observed in cells infected with authentic MuSVts110 virus in that viral RNA splicing was 30 to 40% efficient at growth temperatures between 28 and 33 degrees C but reduced to trace levels above 37 degrees C.

  13. The loss of a hydrogen bond: Thermodynamic contributions of a non-standard nucleotide

    OpenAIRE

    Jolley, Elizabeth A.; Znosko, Brent M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-standard nucleotides are ubiquitous in RNA. Thermodynamic studies with RNA duplexes containing non-standard nucleotides, whether incorporated naturally or chemically, can provide insight into the stability of Watson?Crick pairs and the role of specific functional groups in stabilizing a Watson?Crick pair. For example, an A-U, inosine?U and pseudouridine?A pair each form two hydrogen bonds. However, an RNA duplex containing a central I?U pair or central ??A pair is 2.4 kcal/mol le...

  14. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone structural gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, W G; Rougeon, F

    1979-01-01

    An almost complete cDNA copy of human growth hormone has been cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence confirms the known protein sequence and predicts the sequence of a precursor region of 26 amino acids. We have compared the nucleotide sequence to that for the homolgous proteins, rat growth hormone and human chorionic somatomammotropin (Seeburg et al. and Shine et al., Nature 270, 486 (1977)). There appears to be evolutionary conservation of mRNA sequence features not related to protein structure. Images PMID:386281

  15. NUCLEOTIDE COMPARISON OF GDF9 GENE IN INDIAN YAK AND GADDI GOAT: HIGH ALTITUDE LIVESTOCK ANIMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshya Veer Singh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to characterize exon 1 and exon 2 sequence of one of fecundity genes: GDF9 (Growth differentiation factor 9, in high altitude livestock animal (Yak and Gaddi goat. Six nucleotide differences were identified between sheep (AF078545 and goats (EF446168 in exon 1 and exon 2. Sequencing revealed nine novel single nucleotide mutations in exon 1 and exon 2 of Indian yak that compared with Bos taurus (GQ922451. These results preliminarily showed that the GDF9 gene might be a major gene that influences prolificacy of Gaddi goats and Indian yak.

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence and affinities of the genomic RNA of Narcissus common latent virus (genus Carlavirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H-Y; Chen, J; Adams, M J; Chen, J-P

    2006-08-01

    The complete sequence of an isolate of Narcissus common latent virus (NCLV) from Zhangzhou city, Fujian, China was determined from amplified fragments of purified viral RNA. Excluding the poly(A) tail, the genomic RNA of NCLV was 8539 nucleotides (nt) long and had the typical organization for a member of the genus Carlavirus. The most closely related species were Potato virus M, Hop latent virus and Aconitum latent virus, which had 58-59% nt identity to NCLV in their entire genomes. These relationships were confirmed by a phylogenetic analysis using a composite nucleotide alignment of all the open reading frames.

  17. Association of Toll-like receptor 2 Arg753Gln and Toll-like receptor 1 Ile602Ser single-nucleotide polymorphisms with leptospirosis in an Argentine population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cédola, Maia; Chiani, Yosena; Pretre, Gabriela; Alberdi, Lucrecia; Vanasco, Bibiana; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2015-06-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), a member of the Toll-like receptor family, plays an important role in the recognition of and subsequent immune response activation against leptospirosis in humans. The genetic polymorphism in TLR2 of an arginine to glutamine substitution at residue 753 (Arg753Gln) has been associated with a negative influence on TLR2 function, which may, in turn, determine the innate host response to Leptospira spp. This bacterium signals through TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers in human cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the Arg753Gln single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the TLR2 gene, and the isoleucine to serine transversion at position 602 (Ile602Ser) of the TLR1 gene (previously associated with Lyme disease), in leptospirosis patients compared to healthy controls, carrying out a retrospective case/control study. The TLR2 polymorphism adenine (A) allele was observed in 7.3% of leptospirosis patients but was not found in the control group, whereas the guanine (G) allele of the TLR1 polymorphism was found in 63.6% of patients and 41.6% of controls. Susceptibility to leptospirosis disease was increased 10.57-fold for carriers of the TLR2 G/A genotype (P=0.0493) and 3.85-fold for carriers of the TLR1 G/G genotype (P=0.0428). Furthermore, the risk of developing hepatic insufficiency and jaundice was increased 18.86- and 27.60-fold for TLR2 G/A carriers, respectively. Similarly, the risk of developing jaundice was increased 12.67-fold for TLR1 G allele carriers (G/G and T/G genotypes). In conclusion, the present data suggest that the TLR2 Arg753Gln and TLR1 Ile602Ser SNPs influence the risk of developing leptospirosis and its severity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Glutamine, Glutamic Acid and Nucleotides on the Turnover of Carbon (δC) in Organs of Weaned Piglets

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Borges Amorim; Dirlei Antonio Berto; Mayra Anton Dib Saleh; Filipe Garcia Telles; Juliana Célia Denadai; Maria Márcia Pereira Sartori; Fabiana Golin Luiggi; Luan Sousa Santos; Carlos Ducatti

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and physiological alterations occur in the digestive system of weanling piglets, compromising the performance in subsequent phases. This experiment aimed at verifying the influence of glutamine, glutamate and nucleotides on the carbon turnover in the pancreas and liver of piglets weaned at 21 days of age. Four diets were evaluated: glutamine, glutamic acid or nucleotides-free diet (CD); containing 1% glutamine (GD); containing 1% glutamic acid (GAD) and containing 1% nucleotides...

  19. Correlation between a single nucleotide polymorphism (G/T at nt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation between a single nucleotide polymorphism (G/T at nt –88) in the Mx1 gene promoter and the response to interferon therapy for hepatitis C virus in ... We found that Mx1 nt-88 SNP is not significantly correlated to achieving sustained virological response (SVR) after pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin ...

  20. Infectious mononucleosis-linked HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Naghmeh; Broer, Linda; Hoppenbrouwers, Ilse A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2010-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a presumed autoimmune disease associated with genetic and environmental risk factors such as infectious mononucleosis. Recent research has shown infectious mononucleosis to be associated with a specific HLA class I polymorphism. Our aim was to test if the infectious mononucleosis-linked HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6457110) is also associated with multiple sclerosis. Genotyping of the HLA-A single nucleotide polymorphism rs6457110 using TaqMan was performed in 591 multiple sclerosis cases and 600 controls. The association of multiple sclerosis with the HLA-A single nucleotide polymorphism was tested using logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and HLA-DRB1*1501. HLA-A minor allele (A) is associated with multiple sclerosis (OR = 0.68; p = 4.08 × 10( -5)). After stratification for HLA-DRB1*1501 risk allele (T) carrier we showed a significant OR of 0.70 (p = 0.003) for HLA-A. HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism rs6457110 is associated with infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis, independent of the major class II allele, supporting the hypothesis that shared genetics may contribute to the association between infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis.